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Sample records for receptor-associated periodic fever

  1. Autoinflammatory Diseases with Periodic Fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sag, Erdal; Bilginer, Yelda; Ozen, Seza

    2017-07-01

    One purpose of this review was to raise awareness for the new autoinflammatory syndromes. These diseases are increasingly recognized and are in the differential diagnosis of many disease states. We also aimed to review the latest recommendations for the diagnosis, management, and treatment of these patients. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic fever syndrome (TRAPS), and hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome/mevalonate kinase deficiency (HIDS/MVKD) are the more common autoinflammatory diseases that are characterized by periodic fevers and attacks of inflammation. Recently much collaborative work has been done to understand the characteristics of these patients and to develop recommendations to guide the physicians in the care of these patients. These recent recommendations will be summarized for all four diseases. FMF is the most common periodic fever disease. We need to further understand the pathogenesis and the role of single mutations in the disease. Recently, the management and treatment of the disease have been nicely reviewed. CAPS is another interesting disease associated with severe complications. Anti-interleukin-1 (anti-IL-1) treatment provides cure for these patients. TRAPS is characterized by the longest delay in diagnosis; thus, both pediatricians and internists should be aware of the characteristic features and the follow-up of these patients. HIDS/MVKD is another autoinflammatory diseases characterized with fever attacks. The spectrum of disease manifestation is rather large in this disease, and we need further research on biomarkers for the optimal management of these patients.

  2. Hereditary periodic fever syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDermott, MF; Frenkel, J

    Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are defined by recurrent attacks of generalised inflammation for which no infectious or auto-immune cause can be identified. For most of these disorders, the molecular basis has recently been elucidated. This has opened the prospect of novel therapeutic

  3. A new mutation causing autosomal dominant periodic fever syndrome in a Danish family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyhreter, Heike; Schwartz, Marianne; Kristensen, Tim D

    2003-01-01

    We describe four members in a family of 8 individuals over 3 generations with the autosomal dominant inherited periodic fever syndrome tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS). The patients had recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, arthritis, and rash. We examined...

  4. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

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    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  5. Recurrent abdominal pain as the presentation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) in an Asian girl: a case report and review of the literature.

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    Chen, Yun-Ju; Yu, Hsin-Hui; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lau, Yu-Lung; Lee, Wen-I; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is characterized by periodic fever, cutaneous rash, conjunctivitis, lymphadenopathy, abdominal pain, myalgia, and arthralgia. It is a rare autosomal dominant disease and strongly associated with heterozygous mutations in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor super family 1A (TNFRSF1A) gene. It is believed to be more common in Western countries than in Asian countries. Here, we present the case of a 14-year-old girl with periodic fever and abdominal pain with elevation of inflammatory markers for 2 years. After extensive work-up of infectious etiology with negative results, the diagnosis of TRAPS was made although no gene mutations were identified in the TNFRSF1A gene, MVK gene, and NALP3/CIAS1 gene. She had partial clinical response to corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. However, the treatment response to TNF-α inhibitor etanercept was dramatic. She has remained symptom free under regular weekly to biweekly etanercept treatment for 2 years. We also reviewed the related literature and summarized the data of 10 Asian cases of TRAPS. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. AA amyloidosis complicating the hereditary periodic fever syndromes.

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    Lane, Thirusha; Loeffler, Jutta M; Rowczenio, Dorota M; Gilbertson, Janet A; Bybee, Alison; Russell, Tonia L; Gillmore, Julian D; Wechalekar, Ashutosh D; Hawkins, Philip N; Lachmann, Helen J

    2013-04-01

    AA amyloidosis is a life-threatening complication of the hereditary periodic fever syndromes (HPFS), which are otherwise often compatible with normal life expectancy. This study was undertaken to determine the characteristics, presentation, natural history, and response to treatment in 46 patients who had been referred for evaluation at the UK National Amyloidosis Centre. Disease activity was monitored by serial measurement of serum amyloid A. Renal function was assessed by measurement of serum creatinine and albumin levels, the estimated glomerular filtration rate, and proteinuria from 24-hour urine collections. The amyloid load was measured by serum amyloid P scintigraphy. Twenty-four patients had familial Mediterranean fever, 12 patients had tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome, 6 patients had cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes, and 4 patients had mevalonate kinase deficiency. The median age at onset of HPFS was 5 years; median age at presentation with AA amyloidosis was 38 years. Diagnosis of an HPFS had not been considered prior to presentation with AA amyloidosis in 23 patients (50%). Eleven patients (24%) had end-stage renal failure (ESRF) at presentation; of these, 3 had received transplants prior to referral. A further 13 patients developed ESRF over the followup period, with 10 undergoing renal transplantation. The median time to progression to ESRF from onset of AA amyloidosis was 3.3 years (interquartile range [IQR] 2-8), with a median time to transplant of 4 years (IQR 3-6). Eleven patients (24%) died. The median survival in the entire cohort was 19 years from diagnosis of AA amyloidosis. Of the 37 patients who were treated successfully, or in whom at least partial suppression of the underlying HPFS was achieved, 17 (46%) showed amyloid regression, 14 (38%) showed a stable amyloid load, and 2 (5%) showed increased amyloid deposition over the followup period. AA amyloidosis remains a challenging and serious late complication

  7. Evidence-based provisional clinical classification criteria for autoinflammatory periodic fevers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Federici, Silvia; Sormani, Maria Pia; Ozen, Seza; Lachmann, Helen J; Amaryan, Gayane; Woo, Patricia; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Dewarrat, Natacha; Cantarini, Luca; Insalaco, Antonella; Uziel, Yosef; Rigante, Donato; Quartier, Pierre; Demirkaya, Erkan; Herlin, Troels; Meini, Antonella; Fabio, Giovanna; Kallinich, Tilmann; Martino, Silvana; Butbul, Aviel Yonatan; Olivieri, Alma; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Neven, Benedicte; Simon, Anna; Ozdogan, Huri; Touitou, Isabelle; Frenkel, Joost; Hofer, Michael; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Gattorno, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop and validate a set of clinical criteria for the classification of patients affected by periodic fevers. Patients with inherited periodic fevers (familial Mediterranean fever (FMF); mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD); tumour necrosis factor

  8. PFAPA (Periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis, pharingitis, cervical adenitis) or Marshall’s syndrome in children

    OpenAIRE

    N N Kuzmina; G R Movsisyan

    2005-01-01

    PFAPA (periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis, pharingitis, cervical adenitis) or Marshall’s syndrome is one of the rare periodic fever conditions appearing in children. Its cause is unknown. This syndrome may continue for several years. During interictal period the child is quite well, grows and develops normally. The disease should be differentiated from Behcet’s disease, cyclic neutropenia, familial Mediterranean fever, familial Ireland fever, hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome, systemic juven...

  9. Current Diagnosis and Treatment Models of Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Lymphadenitis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşenur Paç Kısaarslan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical lymphadenitis (PFAPA syndrome is the most frequent cause of periodic fever in childhood. The pathogenesis of PFAPA is still unknown. Differantial diagnosis must be made with cyclic neutropenia and other autoinflammatory diseases. Because PFAPA is self limiting and benign, there is no certain treatment model. Treatment options must be specific to the patient, with a strong family and doctor relationship.

  10. PFAPA (Periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis, pharingitis, cervical adenitis or Marshall’s syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N N Kuzmina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PFAPA (periodic fever, aphtous stomatitis, pharingitis, cervical adenitis or Marshall’s syndrome is one of the rare periodic fever conditions appearing in children. Its cause is unknown. This syndrome may continue for several years. During interictal period the child is quite well, grows and develops normally. The disease should be differentiated from Behcet’s disease, cyclic neutropenia, familial Mediterranean fever, familial Ireland fever, hyperimmunoglobulinemia D syndrome, systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, chronic tonsillitis, some infectious diseases. Many drugs are used for the treatment of PFAPA syndrome: antibiotics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, chloroquin, antiviral drugs, glucocorticoids, cimetidin. Tonsillectomy is used quite often. Analysis of the literature data shows that best results may be achieved with tonsillectomy (sometimes in combination with ade- notomy. PFAPA in a child of 2 years age diagnosed for the first time in Russian pediatric rheumatology is described.

  11. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also cause fevers. Some examples are: Arthritis or connective tissue illnesses such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus Ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease Vasculitis or periarteritis nodosa The first symptom of a cancer may be a fever. This is particularly true ...

  12. Fever

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    Tamas Bartfai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of body temperature remains one of the most common ways to assess health. An increase in temperature above what is considered to be a normal value is inevitably regarded as a sure sign of disease and referred to with one simple word: fever. In this review, we summarize how research on fever allowed the identification of the exogenous and endogenous molecules and pathways mediating the fever response. We also show how temperature elevation is common to different pathologies and how the molecular components of the fever-generation pathway represent drug targets for antipyretics, such as acetylsalicylic acid, the first “blockbuster drug”. We also show how fever research provided new insights into temperature and energy homeostasis, and into treatment of infection and inflammation.

  13. Periodic fever: From Still's disease to Muckle-Wells syndrome.

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    Solís Marquínez, Marta Nataya; García Fernández, Edilia; Morís de la Tassa, Joaquín

    2017-06-02

    Muckle-Wells syndrome is a systemic autoinflammatory disease included in the group of hereditary periodic febrile syndromes. We report the case of a patient with this rare disease to call the attention to the singularity of this condition, its low incidence, its atypical presentation and the subsequent delay in the diagnosis, which is reached when late and devastating consequences have taken place. In this case, the first-line therapy, anti-interleukin 1 (IL-1), failed to control the disease. Nevertheless, the IL-6 inhibitor, tocilizumab, proved effective, achieving the total remission of nephrotic syndrome associated with AA secondary amyloidosis, changing the bleak prognosis of this disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome: Current Literature Review with a Case Report

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    Mahmut Demirtaş

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis syndrome (PFAPA is a frequently seen, important medical condition, which must be kept in mind in periodic fever etiology. Although its etiology is not clearly understood, autoimmune etiology is suspected due to response to steroids. There is no specific test for the diagnosis of disease. Diagnosis is based on symptoms and physical examination. Although medical treatment is the first choice for the management of the disease, tonsillectomy take over in treatment options for termination of attacks and permanent results. We have presented a patient that was performed tonsillectomy in our clinic for frequent attacks despite recurrent medical therapy with diagnosis of PFAPA with review of current literature.

  15. Performance of Different Diagnostic Criteria for Familial Mediterranean Fever in Children with Periodic Fevers : Results from a Multicenter International Registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirkaya, Erkan; Saglam, Celal; Turker, Turker; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Woo, Pat; Doglio, Matteo; Amaryan, Gayane; Frenkel, Joost; Uziel, Yosef; Insalaco, Antonella; Cantarini, Luca; Hofer, Michael; Boiu, Sorina; Duzova, Ali; Modesto, Consuelo; Bryant, Annette; Rigante, Donato; Papadopoulou-Alataki, Efimia; Guillaume-Czitrom, Severine; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmine; Neven, Bénédicte; Lachmann, Helen; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Gattorno, Marco; Ozen, Seza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our aims were to validate the pediatric diagnostic criteria in a large international registry and to compare them with the performance of previous criteria for the diagnosis of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). METHODS: Pediatric patients with FMF from the Eurofever registry were used

  16. [MVK gene abnormality and new approach to treatment of hyper IgD syndrome and periodic fever syndrome].

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    Naruto, Takuya

    2007-04-01

    Hyper IgD and periodic fever syndrome (HIDS; OMIM 260920) is one of the hereditary autoinflammatory syndromes characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation.. HIDS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent fever attacks in early childhood. HIDS caused by mevalonate kinase (MK) mutations, also that is the gene of mevalonic aciduria (OMIM 251170). During febrile episodes, urinary mevalonate concentrations were found to be significantly elevated in patients. Diagnosis of HIDS was retrieving gene or measurement of the enzyme activity in peripheral blood lymphocyte in general. This of HIDS is an activity decline of MK, and a complete deficiency of MK becomes a mevalonic aciduria with a nervous symptom. The relation between the fever and inflammation of mevalonate or isoprenoid products are uncertain. The therapy attempt with statins, which is inhibited the next enzyme after HMG-CoA reductase, or inhibit the proinflammatory cytokines.

  17. Guidelines for the management and treatment of periodic fever syndromes: Cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (cryopyrinopathies - CAPS).

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    Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Len, Claudio Arnaldo; da Silva, Clovis Artur Almeida; de Magalhães, Cristina Medeiros Ribeiro; Sacchetti, Silvana B; Ferriani, Virgínia Paes Leme; Piotto, Daniela Gerent Petry; Cavalcanti, André de Souza; de Moraes, Ana Júlia Pantoja; Sztajnbok, Flavio Roberto; de Oliveira, Sheila Knupp Feitosa; Campos, Lucia Maria Arruda; Bandeira, Marcia; Santos, Flávia Patricia Sena Teixeira; Magalhães, Claudia Saad

    2016-01-01

    To establish guidelines based on cientific evidences for the management of cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes. The Guideline was prepared from 4 clinical questions that were structured through PICO (Patient, Intervention or indicator, Comparison and Outcome), to search in key primary scientific information databases. After defining the potential studies to support the recommendations, these were graduated considering their strength of evidence and grade of recommendation. 1215 articles were retrieved and evaluated by title and abstract; from these, 42 articles were selected to support the recommendations. 1. The diagnosis of CAPS is based on clinical history and clinical manifestations, and later confirmed by genetic study. CAPS may manifest itself in three phenotypes: FCAS (mild form), MWS (intermediate form) and CINCA (severe form). Neurological, ophthalmic, otorhinolaryngological and radiological assessments may be highly valuable in distinguishing between syndromes; 2. The genetic diagnosis with NLRP3 gene analysis must be conducted in suspected cases of CAPS, i.e., individuals presenting before 20 years of age, recurrent episodes of inflammation expressed by a mild fever and urticaria; 3. Laboratory abnormalities include leukocytosis and elevated serum levels of inflammatory proteins; and 4. Targeted therapies directed against interleukin-1 lead to rapid remission of symptoms in most patients. However, there are important limitations on the long-term safety. None of the three anti-IL-1β inhibitors prevents progression of bone lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Lack of isoprenoid products raises ex vivo interleukin-1beta secretion in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, Joost; Rijkers, Ger T.; Mandey, Saskia H. L.; Buurman, Sandra W. M.; Houten, Sander M.; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Waterham, Hans R.; Kuis, Wietse

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the increased interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) secretion in hyperimmunoglobulinemia D and periodic fever syndrome is due to the accumulation of mevalonate kinase (MK), the substrate of the deficient enzyme, or the lack of its products, the isoprenoid compounds. METHODS:

  19. Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (pfapa) syndrome in children.

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    Semianchuk, Vira B

    Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome refers to a group of primary immunodeficiencies, namely autoinflammatory diseases. Most pediatricians and otolaryngologists do not suspect PFAPA syndrome when treating recurrent pharyngitis (according to Ukrainian classification - tonsillitis) and stomatitis. Therefore, patients with a given syndrome receive unnecessary treatment (antibiotic therapy or antiviral drugs) and the diagnosis is made late. The aim of the research was to provide pediatricians, family physicians and otolaryngologists with information on the importance of early diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome. The analysis of the prevalence and diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome in Ukraine and worldwide has been made as well as a late diagnosis of PFAPA syndrome in a child living in Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine has been described (case report). The Сase report 7-year-old boy, who grows and develops normally. The symptoms of pharyngitis including high body temperature (>40 º С), sore throat and white spots on the tonsils appeared for the first time at the age of two years. The boy received antibacterial drugs about 10 times a year. During a four-year period of recurrent episodes of the disease antimicrobial susceptibility testing to determine susceptibility of the oropharyngeal flora to the antibiotics were continuously performed, different blood tests for herpes viruses, Epstein-Barr virus infection and cytomegalovirus in particular were made using the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in addition to long-term treatment. An example of late diagnosing PFAPA syndrome (four years after the onset of first symptoms) resulting in regular examinations, medical manoeuvres, outpatient and inpatient treatment, use of antibiotic therapy including intravenous injections on a monthly basis has been studied.

  20. [Periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and adenitis: PFAPA syndrome in Argentina].

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    Rocco, R

    2011-03-01

    PFAPA syndrome is a benign, non-hereditary condition, of unknown etiology and pathogenesis. There are few reports of it in South America. The purpose of this article is to communicate the experience in a large pediatric hospital in Argentina. A total of 18 patients were diagnosed with PFAPA between 2002 and 2009 at the Medium Risk Clinic, Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan Pediatrics Hospital, Buenos Aires City. The modified criteria reported by Thomas et al were used for diagnosis. The follow up continued with evaluations during new febrile episodes, clinic check ups and telephone calls. The mean age at onset of symptoms was 2.5 years (range: 0.4-7.5) and the mean lag time from onset of symptoms and diagnosis was 3.2 years (range: 0.4-10.9). Fever episodes lasted for a mean of 4.5 days (range: 2-8), with a mean interval of 23 days (range: 15-30) between the beginning of the attacks. Febrile episodes were treated with methyl prednisone at a dose of 1mg/kg or betamethasone at a dose of 0.15mg/kg in a single dose. With a mean follow up of 2.6 years (range: 0.5-5.9) 13 patients remain with febrile episodes at a mean interval of 4.6 months (range: 1-12). Five patients did not have febrile crisis for more than a year during the study period and they are considered cured; in this group the disease lasted a mean of 4.7 years (1-9.7). PFAPA syndrome is a sporadic, difficult to diagnose, condition. Both methyl-prednisone and betamethasone have shown to be effective in controlling the symptoms during the febrile crisis. The definitive remission of the syndrome may occur in the first years of onset, although in most patients the febrile episodes continue with an increase of free intervals and attenuated symptoms, and full recovery in prepuberty or adolescence with no sequelae. Copyright © 2009 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel unstable duplication upstream of HAS2 predisposes to a breed-defining skin phenotype and a periodic fever syndrome in Chinese Shar-Pei dogs.

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    Mia Olsson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary periodic fever syndromes are characterized by recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation with no known pathogenic or autoimmune cause. In humans, several genes have been implicated in this group of diseases, but the majority of cases remain unexplained. A similar periodic fever syndrome is relatively frequent in the Chinese Shar-Pei breed of dogs. In the western world, Shar-Pei have been strongly selected for a distinctive thick and heavily folded skin. In this study, a mutation affecting both these traits was identified. Using genome-wide SNP analysis of Shar-Pei and other breeds, the strongest signal of a breed-specific selective sweep was located on chromosome 13. The same region also harbored the strongest genome-wide association (GWA signal for susceptibility to the periodic fever syndrome (p(raw = 2.3 × 10⁻⁶, p(genome = 0.01. Dense targeted resequencing revealed two partially overlapping duplications, 14.3 Kb and 16.1 Kb in size, unique to Shar-Pei and upstream of the Hyaluronic Acid Synthase 2 (HAS2 gene. HAS2 encodes the rate-limiting enzyme synthesizing hyaluronan (HA, a major component of the skin. HA is up-regulated and accumulates in the thickened skin of Shar-Pei. A high copy number of the 16.1 Kb duplication was associated with an increased expression of HAS2 as well as the periodic fever syndrome (p < 0.0001. When fragmented, HA can act as a trigger of the innate immune system and stimulate sterile fever and inflammation. The strong selection for the skin phenotype therefore appears to enrich for a pleiotropic mutation predisposing these dogs to a periodic fever syndrome. The identification of HA as a major risk factor for this canine disease raises the potential of this glycosaminoglycan as a risk factor for human periodic fevers and as an important driver of chronic inflammation.

  2. Choroidal Thickness Changes in the Acute Attack Period in Patients with Familial Mediterranean Fever.

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    Gundogan, Fatih C; Akay, Fahrettin; Uzun, Salih; Ozge, Gokhan; Toyran, Sami; Genç, Halil

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate choroidal thickness changes during acute attacks of familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Fifty patients with FMF and 50 healthy controls were included. Choroidal thickness of each participant was measured at the foveola and horizontal nasal and temporal quadrants at 500-µm intervals to 1,500 µm from the foveola using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. White blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and serum levels of fibrinogen and C-reactive protein (CRP) were evaluated. The clinical findings (peritonitis, arthritis and pleuritis) were noted. Choroidal thickness was significantly thicker at all measurement points in FMF patients compared to healthy controls during an acute attack (p 0.05). Increased choroidal thickness in the acute phase of FMF is possibly related to the inflammatory edematous changes in the choroid. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Comparison of serum oxidant and antioxidant parameters in familial Mediterranean fever patients (FMF) with attack free period.

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    Şahin, Ali; Erten, Şükran; Altunoğlu, Alpaslan; Işıkoğlu, Semra; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Ergin, Merve; Atalay, Hacı Veli; Erel, Özcan

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autoinflammatory, autosomal recessive, inherited disease characterized by recurrent self-limiting attacks of serosal surfaces. The imbalance of oxidants/antioxidants may play a role in such attacks. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the relationship between serum paraoxonase (PON1) activity, PON1 phenotype, and other parameters in patients with FMF and healthy controls. A total of 120 FMF patients with an attack-free period (AFP) and 65 healthy subjects were included in this study. The serum PON1 activity, stimulated paraoxonase (SPON) activity, PON1 phenotype (representing Q192R polymorphism; QQ, QR, RR), arylesterase activity, total oxidant status (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), oxidative stress index (OSI), advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP), total thiols (TTL), and ischemia-modified albumin (IMA) and cystatin-c (CYS-C) levels were measured. For the QQ phenotype, the median TTL and AOPP levels of the control group were 264.50 (57.75) mol/L and 21.26 (21.17) mmol/L, respectively, whereas the median TTL, AOPP levels of the patients were 309.00 (47.00) mol/L and 12.98 (6.96) mmol/L, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the patients and controls with the QQ phenotype in terms of TTL and AOPP (pantioxidant parameters were similar among the patients during AFP and the controls.

  4. Identification of potential vectors of and detection of antibodies against Rift Valley fever virus in livestock during interepizootic periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostal, Melinda K; Evans, Alina L; Sang, Rosemary; Gikundi, Solomon; Wakhule, Lilian; Munyua, Peninah; Macharia, Joseph; Feikin, Daniel R; Breiman, Robert F; Njenga, M Kariuki

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) antibodies in livestock and presence of competent mosquito vectors of RVFV during an interepizootic period (IEP) in Kenya. 208 sheep and 84 goats ranging in age from 4 months to 15 years, from 2 breeding herds. Blood specimens were collected from the sheep and goats during the 1999-2006 IEP in Rift Valley Province, and serum was harvested. Serum specimens were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies against RVFV by use of an ELISA. In addition, 7,134 mosquitoes were trapped in Naivasha, Nairobi, and Northeastern Province, and speciation was performed. No animals were seropositive for IgM against RVFV. Of the animals born after the 1997-1998 epizootic, 18% (34/188) of sheep were seropositive for IgG against RVFV, compared with 3% (2/75) of goats. Seventy percent (8,144/11,678) of the mosquitoes collected were of the Culex subgenera; 18% (2,102/11,678) were Aedes spp. Detection of IgG in the sera of sheep and goats born after the 1997-1998 epizootic and before the 2006 epizootic indicated that virus activity existed during the IEP. Detection of Aedes mosquitoes, which are competent vectors of RVFV, suggested that a cryptic vector-to-vertebrate cycle may exist during IEPs.

  5. Estimation of the Basic Reproductive Ratio for Dengue Fever at the Take-Off Period of Dengue Infection.

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    Jafaruddin; Indratno, Sapto W; Nuraini, Nuning; Supriatna, Asep K; Soewono, Edy

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the basic reproductive ratio ℛ 0 of dengue fever has continued to be an ever-increasing challenge among epidemiologists. In this paper we propose two different constructions to estimate ℛ 0 which is derived from a dynamical system of host-vector dengue transmission model. The construction is based on the original assumption that in the early states of an epidemic the infected human compartment increases exponentially at the same rate as the infected mosquito compartment (previous work). In the first proposed construction, we modify previous works by assuming that the rates of infection for mosquito and human compartments might be different. In the second construction, we add an improvement by including more realistic conditions in which the dynamics of an infected human compartments are intervened by the dynamics of an infected mosquito compartment, and vice versa. We apply our construction to the real dengue epidemic data from SB Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, during the period of outbreak Nov. 25, 2008-Dec. 2012. We also propose two scenarios to determine the take-off rate of infection at the beginning of a dengue epidemic for construction of the estimates of ℛ 0: scenario I from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to time (daily) and scenario II from equation of new cases of dengue with respect to cumulative number of new cases of dengue. The results show that our first construction of ℛ 0 accommodates the take-off rate differences between mosquitoes and humans. Our second construction of the ℛ 0 estimation takes into account the presence of infective mosquitoes in the early growth rate of infective humans and vice versa. We conclude that the second approach is more realistic, compared with our first approach and the previous work.

  6. Yellow Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Vaccine Information Testing for Vaccine Adverse Events Yellow fever Vaccine Continuing Education Course Yellow Fever Home Prevention Vaccine Vaccine Recommendations Reactions to Yellow Fever Vacine Yellow Fever Vaccine, Pregnancy, & ... Transmission Symptoms, Diagnosis, & Treatment Maps Africa ...

  7. Stochastic spatio-temporal modelling of African swine fever spread in the European Union during the high risk period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigsch, Annette; Costard, Solenne; Jones, Bryony A; Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Wieland, Barbara

    2013-03-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a notifiable viral pig disease with high mortality and serious socio-economic consequences. Since ASF emerged in Georgia in 2007 the disease has spread to several neighbouring countries and cases have been detected in areas bordering the European Union (EU). It is uncertain how fast the virus would be able to spread within the unrestricted European trading area if it were introduced into the EU. This project therefore aimed to develop a model for the spread of ASF within and between the 27 Member States (MS) of the EU during the high risk period (HRP) and to identify MS during that period would most likely contribute to ASF spread ("super-spreaders") or MS that would most likely receive cases from other MS ("super-receivers"). A stochastic spatio-temporal state-transition model using simulated individual farm records was developed to assess silent ASF virus spread during different predefined HRPs of 10-60 days duration. Infection was seeded into farms of different pig production types in each of the 27 MS. Direct pig-to-pig transmission and indirect transmission routes (pig transport lorries and professional contacts) were considered the main pathways during the early stages of an epidemic. The model was parameterised using data collated from EUROSTAT, TRACES, a questionnaire sent to MS, and the scientific literature. Model outputs showed that virus circulation was generally limited to 1-2 infected premises per outbreak (95% IQR: 1-4; maximum: 10) with large breeder farms as index case resulting in most infected premises. Seven MS caused between-MS spread due to intra-Community trade during the first 10 days after seeding infection. For a HRP of 60 days from virus introduction, movements of infected pigs will originate at least once from 16 MS, with 6 MS spreading ASF in more than 10% of iterations. Two thirds of all intra-Community spread was linked to six trade links only. Denmark, the Netherlands, Lithuania and Latvia were identified

  8. Vitamin D levels and effects of vitamin D replacement in children with periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagi, Stefano; Bertini, Federico; Rigante, Donato; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-06-01

    The periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) syndrome is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by regularly recurrent fever episodes due to seemingly unprovoked inflammation. To assess serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations in children with PFAPA syndrome and evaluate longitudinally the effect of wintertime vitamin D supplementation on the disease course. We have evaluated 25 Italian patients (19 males, 6 females, aged 2.4-5.3 years), fulfilling the Euro-Fever PFAPA criteria. For each patient, we recorded demographic and anthropometric data, clinical manifestations, serum calcium, phosphate, and 25(OH)D. After 400 IU vitamin D supplementation during wintertime, clinical and auxological characteristics, calcium, phosphate, and 25(OH)D levels were re-evaluated. Data were compared with a sex- and age-matched control group. PFAPA patients showed reduced 25(OH)D levels than controls (pchildren with PFAPA syndrome, and hypovitaminosis D might be a significant risk factor for PFAPA flares. However, vitamin D supplementation seems to significantly reduce the typical PFAPA episodes and their duration, supporting the role of vitamin D as an immune-regulatory factor in this syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Nóbrega Litvoc

    Full Text Available Summary The yellow fever (YF virus is a Flavivirus, transmitted by Haemagogus, Sabethes or Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The disease is endemic in forest areas in Africa and Latin America leading to epizootics in monkeys that constitute the reservoir of the disease. There are two forms of YF: sylvatic, transmitted accidentally when approaching the forests, and urban, which can be perpetuated by Aedes aegypti. In Brazil, the last case of urban YF occurred in 1942. Since then, there has been an expansion of transmission areas from the North and Midwest regions to the South and Southeast. In 2017, the country faced an important outbreak of the disease mainly in the states of Minas Gerais, Espírito Santo and Rio de Janeiro. In 2018, its reach extended from Minas Gerais toward São Paulo. Yellow fever has an incubation period of 3 to 6 days and sudden onset of symptoms with high fever, myalgia, headache, nausea/vomiting and increased transaminases. The disease ranges from asymptomatic to severe forms. The most serious forms occur in around 15% of those infected, with high lethality rates. These forms lead to renal, hepatic and neurological impairment, and bleeding episodes. Treatment of mild and moderate forms is symptomatic, while severe and malignant forms depend on intensive care. Prevention is achieved by administering the vaccine, which is an effective (immunogenicity at 90-98% and safe (0.4 severe events per 100,000 doses measure. In 2018, the first transplants in the world due to YF were performed. There is also an attempt to evaluate the use of active drugs against the virus in order to reduce disease severity.

  10. Dengue fever

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms and research has been limited to studies ... severity and problems with vaccination (4). History of ... Americas in 1970s reduced the spread of dengue fever. After this .... Reiter P. Yellow fever and dengue: a threat to Europe? 9.

  11. Yellow fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to thrive. Blood tests can confirm the diagnosis. Treatment There is no specific treatment for yellow fever. ... SJ, Endy TP, Rothman AL, Barrett AD. Flaviviruses (dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, West Nile encephalitis, St. ...

  12. Typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Typhoid fever is an infection that causes diarrhea and a rash . It is most commonly caused due to ... in their stools for years, spreading the disease. Typhoid fever is common in developing countries. Most cases in ...

  13. Reduced Number of CD8+ Cells in Tonsillar Germinal Centres in Children with the Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis and Cervical Adenitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Førsvoll, J; Janssen, E A M; Møller, I; Wathne, N; Skaland, I; Klos, J; Kristoffersen, E K; Øymar, K

    2015-07-01

    The syndrome of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis and cervical adenitis (PFAPA) is an autoinflammatory disorder of unknown aetiology. Tonsillectomy may cause a prompt resolution of the syndrome. The aim was to study the histologic and immunological aspects of the palatine tonsils in PFAPA, to help understand the pathophysiology of the syndrome. Tonsils from children with PFAPA (n = 11) and children with tonsillar hypertrophy (n = 16) were evaluated histologically after haematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of different cell types was identified immunohistochemically by cluster of differentiation (CD) markers: CD3 (T cells), CD4 (T helper cells), CD8 (cytotoxic T cells), CD15 (neutrophils), CD20 (B cells), CD45 (all leucocytes), CD57 (NK cells) and CD163 (monocytes and macrophages). Tonsils from children with PFAPA showed reactive lymphoid hyperplasia dominated by well-developed germinal centres with many tingible body macrophages. The histologic findings were unspecific, and a similar morphologic appearance was also found in the tonsils from controls. The number of CD8+ cells in germinal centres differed between children with PFAPA [median 9 cells (quartiles: 5, 15)] and controls [18 cells (12, 33) (P = 0.001)] and between children with PFAPA with (median 14 cells; 9, 16) and without (4 cells; 3, 8) aphthous stomatitis (P = 0.015). For the other cell types, no differences in germinal centres were found between children with PFAPA and controls. In conclusion, a lower number of CD8+ cells were found in germinal centres of tonsils in children with PFAPA compared to controls, which may be a feature linked to the aetiology of the syndrome. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rat bite fever without fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stehle, P; Dubuis, O; So, A; Dudler, J

    2003-09-01

    Rat bite fever is a rarely reported acute febrile bacterial illness caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis or Spirillum minus following a rat bite. It is classically characterised by abrupt onset of fever with rigors, myalgias, headache, and the appearance of a generalised maculopapular petechial skin rash. Polyarthritis complicates the course of the disease in up to 50% of infected patients, and numerous hurdles can make the diagnosis particularly difficult in the absence of fever or rash, as in the present case. A high degree of awareness is necessary to make the correct diagnosis in such cases. Diagnosis has important prognostic implications as the disease is potentially lethal, but easily treatable.

  15. [Rheumatic fever in the 5-year period of 1994-1999 at 2 hospitals in San Luis Potosi and Mexico D.F].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto López, M E; Cordera González de Cosío, F; Estrada, L; Guel, L; Abud Mendoza, C; Reyes, P A

    2001-01-01

    To assess the incidence of acute Rheumatic Fever (ARF). A retrospective, descriptive, observational study on the first attack and recurrence was performed in a general hospital and a reference center. By Jones criteria: 67 cases, 39 women and 28 men; 58% first attack, 42% recurrence. Higher incidence during spring-winter. The most common major criteria were: carditis, polyarthritis. The most common minor criteria were: fever, arthralgias and acute phase reaction markers. No differences between hospitals were noted. Evidence of contact with streptococcus was found. Mitral, aortic and tricuspid valves were commonly affected. Incidence in the age group > 5 < 20 was 7/1000. Incidence of ARF has decreased, but has not been eradicated. It occurs in developing countries, where it remains an issue of public health. Failures in clinical suspicion, prophylaxis, and adherence to treatment influence this situation. Education for health, early diagnosis, and primary and secondary prophylaxis should be reinforced.

  16. Dengue fever (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengue fever, or West Nile fever, is a mild viral illness transmitted by mosquitoes which causes fever, ... second exposure to the virus can result in Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a life-threatening illness.

  17. Typhoid fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wain, John; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Mikoleit, Matthew L.

    2015-01-01

    Control of typhoid fever relies on clinical information, diagnosis, and an understanding for the epidemiology of the disease. Despite the breadth of work done so far, much is not known about the biology of this human-adapted bacterial pathogen and the complexity of the disease in endemic areas...... with shifting trends in enteric fever. This knowledge is crucial, both to control the disease and to manage cases. Additionally, salmonella serovars that cause human infection can change over time and location. In areas of Asia, multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S Typhi) has been the main...... cause of enteric fever, but now S Typhi is being displaced by infections with drug-resistant S enterica serovar Paratyphi A. New conjugate vaccines are imminent and new treatments have been promised, but the engagement of local medical and public health institutions in endemic areas is needed to allow...

  18. Valley Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valley fever. These fungi are commonly found in soil in specific regions. The fungi's spores can be stirred into the air by ... species have a complex life cycle. In the soil, they grow as a mold with long filaments that break off into airborne ...

  19. Scarlet Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-06-09

    Katherine Fleming-Dutra, pediatrician, discusses scarlet fever, its cause, how to treat it, and how to prevent its spread.  Created: 6/9/2011 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 6/9/2011.

  20. Tri-phasic fever in dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D, Pradeepa H; Rao, Sathish B; B, Ganaraj; Bhat, Gopalakrishna; M, Chakrapani

    2018-04-01

    Dengue fever is an acute febrile illness with a duration of 2-12 days. Our observational study observed the 24-h continuous tympanic temperature pattern of 15 patients with dengue fever and compared this with 26 others with fever due to a non-dengue aetiology. A tri-phasic fever pattern was seen among two-thirds of dengue fever patients, but in only one with an inflammatory disease. One-third of dengue fever patients exhibited a single peak temperature. Continuous temperature monitoring and temperature pattern analysis in clinical settings can aid in the early differentiation of dengue fever from non-dengue aetiology.

  1. Jungle fever

    OpenAIRE

    Waeckerlé, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    This project developed from the premise that the global economy and media have transformed the world and its inhabitants into tourist attractions – so it sets out to reclaim not tourism, but everyday life. Jungle Fever explores the poetics and politics of the everyday, using the body and mind as tools: it offers a 42-page user guide in three languages, with a map and three accompanying posters, proposing destinations, activities and excursions for 8-hour and 24-hour journeys. The instructions...

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spotted fever on the foot Rocky Mountain spotted fever, petechial rash Antibodies Deer and dog tick References McElligott SC, Kihiczak GG, Schwartz RA. Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other rickettsial infections. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann ...

  3. Clinical Features and Genetic Background of the Periodic Fever Syndrome with Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis: A Single Center Longitudinal Study of 81 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daša Perko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory disorder in childhood with unknown etiology. The aim of our study was clinical evaluation of PFAPA patients from a single tertiary care center and to determine whether variations of AIM2, MEFV, NLRP3, and MVK genes are involved in PFAPA pathogenesis. Clinical and laboratory data of consecutive patients with PFAPA syndrome followed up at the University Children’s Hospital, Ljubljana, were collected from 2008 to 2014. All four genes were PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Eighty-one patients fulfilled criteria for PFAPA syndrome, 50 (63% boys and 31 (37% girls, with mean age at disease onset of 2.1 ± 1.5 years. Adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthae were present in 94%, 98%, and 56%, respectively. Family history of recurrent fevers in childhood was positive in 78%. Nineteen variants were found in 17/62 (27% patients, 4 different variants in NLRP3 gene in 13 patients, and 6 different variants in MEFV gene in 5 patients, and 2 patients had 2 different variants. No variants of clinical significance were found in MVK and AIM2 genes. Our data suggest that PFAPA could be the result of multiple low-penetrant variants in different genes in combination with epigenetic and environmental factors leading to uniform clinical picture.

  4. Comparative study of adverse events after yellow fever vaccination between elderly and non-elderly travellers: questionnaire survey in Japan over a 1-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Ryutaro; Ujiie, Mugen; Hori, Narumi; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio

    2016-03-01

    A live attenuated yellow fever (YF) vaccination is required of all travellers visiting countries where YF virus is endemic. Although the risk of serious adverse events (AEs) after YF vaccination is known to be greater in elderly people than in younger people, information about other AEs among elderly travellers is lacking. A prospective observational questionnaire study was conducted to investigate the occurrence of AEs after YF vaccination in travellers who attended a designated YF vaccination centre in Tokyo, Japan, from 1 November 2011 to 31 October 2012. A questionnaire enquiring about any AEs experienced in the 2 weeks following YF vaccination was distributed to all vaccinees enrolled in this study, and responses were collected subsequently by mail or phone. For child vaccinees, their parents were allowed to respond in their stead. Of the 1298 vaccinees who received the YF vaccine, 1044 (80.4%) were enrolled in the present study and 666 (63.8%) responded to the questionnaire. Of these 666 respondents, 370 (55.6%) reported AEs, of which 258 (38.7%) were systemic and 230 (34.5%) were local. No severe AEs associated with YF vaccination were reported. Elderly vaccinees (aged ≥60 years) reported fewer total AEs than those aged yellow vaccination reported among elderly vaccinees than among non-elderly vaccinees. These results could provide supplementary information for judging the adaptation of vaccination in elderly travellers. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Allergies and Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Allergies and Hay Fever Allergies and Hay Fever Patient ... life more enjoyable. Why does the body develop allergies? Allergy symptoms appear when the immune system reacts ...

  6. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with facebook share with twitter share with linkedin Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Credit: CDC A male cayenne tick, Amblyomma cajennense, ... and New Mexico. Why Is the Study of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever a Priority for NIAID? Tickborne diseases are becoming ...

  7. Q fever in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Anders; Svendsen, Claus Bo; Christensen, Jens Jorgen

    2010-01-01

    We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection.......We report a patient with Q fever endocarditis in a settlement in eastern Greenland (Isortoq, Ammassalik area). Likely animal sources include sled dogs and seals. Q fever may be underdiagnosed in Arctic areas but may also represent an emerging infection....

  8. Fever in Infants and Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or higher that is unresponsive to fever-reducing medicine?YesNoDoes your child have a low-grade fever (up to 101°) ... fever, give your child a nonaspirin fever-reducing medicine. Call your child’s doctor after 24 hours if the fever continues ...

  9. Psychosis in dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Suprakash Chaudhury; Biswajit Jagtap; Deepak Kumar Ghosh

    2017-01-01

    An 18-year-old male student developed abnormal behavior while undergoing treatment for dengue fever. He was ill-kempt, irritable and had auditory and visual hallucinations and vague persecutory delusions in clear sensorium with impaired insight. The psychotic episode had a temporal correlation with dengue fever. Psychiatric comorbidities of dengue fever including mania, anxiety, depression, and catatonia are mentioned in literature but the literature on the psychosis following dengue is spars...

  10. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Hercules Sakkas; Petros Bozidis; Ashley Franks; Chrissanthy Papadopoulou

    2018-01-01

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and s...

  11. ETIOLOGY OF OROYA FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hideyo

    1926-01-01

    The experiments reported here were carried on in the main with passage strains of Bartonella bacilliformis, and the results indicate that the virulence of the organism has been considerably enhanced by passage through susceptible animals. While the animals of the earlier experimental series showed no anemia, some of the present group manifested a definite reduction in the number of red cells and in hemoglobin, and in one instance (M. rhesus 25) anemia was of the extreme type so often associated with Oroya fever in man. The anemic condition appeared to be secondary in character, however, nucleated red cells being few in number. In this animal also Bartonella bacilliformis was readily demonstrated in the erythrocytes by means of stained smears, though the number of cells invaded by the parasites was by no means so great as in the human infection. In most instances of experimental Bartonella infection so far induced the demonstration of the parasites by ordinary routine examination of stained film preparations is possible only when the titer of the blood exceeds 1:1,000. Prolonged search of many slides has not been attempted, however. The number of microorganisms in the blood, as shown by culture tests of ascending dilutions, was in most instances highest (1:100,000 to 1:10,000,000) during the early period of the infection coincident usually with the period of highest fever, falling to a titer of 1:10 during the last half of the disease. In one of the fatally infected monkeys, however, the titer increased from 1:10 on the 4th day to 1:1,000,000 on the 24th day. The titer of the blood was equally great in Monkeys 5 and 6, although the former was inoculated locally, the other intravenously and intraperitoneally. The largest proportion of infected red cells was found in Monkey 25, while the blood titer, as shown by culture test, was highest in Monkey 7. The febrile reaction varied in the animals of this series from a severe continuous fever of 104–105°F., lasting 2 to

  12. Validation of the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) for hereditary recurrent fever syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piram, Maryam; Koné-Paut, Isabelle; Lachmann, Helen J; Frenkel, Joost; Ozen, Seza; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Stojanov, Silvia; Simon, Anna; Finetti, Martina; Sormani, Maria Pia; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To validate the Auto-Inflammatory Diseases Activity Index (AIDAI) in the four major hereditary recurrent fever syndromes (HRFs): familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) and cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Methods In 2010, an international collaboration established the content of a disease activity tool for HRFs. Patients completed a 1-month prospective diary with 12 yes/no items before a clinical appointment during which their physician assessed their disease activity by a questionnaire. Eight international experts in auto-inflammatory diseases evaluated the patient's disease activity by a blinded web evaluation and a nominal group technique consensus conference, with their consensus judgement considered the gold standard. Sensitivity/specificity/accuracy measures and the ability of the score to discriminate active from inactive patients via the best cut-off score were calculated by a receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results Consensus was achieved for 98/106 (92%) cases (39 FMF, 35 CAPS, 14 TRAPS and 10 MKD), with 26 patients declared as having inactive disease and 72 as having active disease. The median total AIDAI score was 14 (range=0–175). An AIDAI cut-off score ≥9 discriminated active from inactive patients, with sensitivity/specificity/accuracy of 89%/92%/90%, respectively, and an area under the curve of 98% (95% CI 96% to 100%). Conclusions The AIDAI score is a valid and simple tool for assessing disease activity in FMF/MKD/TRAPS/CAPS. This tool is easy to use in clinical practice and has the potential to be used as the standard efficacy measure in future clinical trials. PMID:24026675

  13. The 2007-2010 Q fever epidemic in The Netherlands: characteristics of notified acute Q fever patients and the association with dairy goat farming.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.; Hoek, W. van der; Wijers, N.; Schimmer, B.; Rietveld, A.; Wijkmans, C.J.; Vellema, P.; Schneeberger, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands with emphasis on the epidemiological characteristics of acute Q fever patients and the association with veterinary factors. Data from 3264 notifications for acute Q fever in the period from 2007 through 2009 were analysed. The patients most

  14. Hemorrhagic Fevers - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dialect) (繁體中文) Expand Section Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - English PDF Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) -- Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know - 繁體中文 (Chinese, Traditional ( ...

  15. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  16. Rat bite fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaastra, W.; Boot, R.G.A.; Ho, H.; Lipman, L.J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Rat bite fever (RBF) is a bacterial zoonosis for which two causal bacterial species have been identified: Streptobacillis moniliformis and Spirillum minus. Haverhill fever (HF) is a form of S. moniliformis infection believed to develop after ingestion of contaminated food or water. Here the

  17. Fever with Rashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Letha

    2018-07-01

    Fever with rashes is one of the commonest clinical problems a general practitioner or pediatrician has to face in day-to-day clinical practice. It can be a mild viral illness or a life-threatening illness like meningococcemia or Dengue hemorrhagic fever or it can be one with a lifelong consequence like Kawasaki disease. It is very important to arrive at a clinical diagnosis as early as possible with the minimum investigational facilities. The common causes associated with fever and rashes are infections, viral followed by other infections. There can be so many non-infectious causes also for fever and rashes like auto immune diseases, drug allergies etc. The type of rashes, their appearance in relation to the fever and pattern of spread to different parts of body and the disappearance, all will help in making a diagnosis. Often the diagnosis is clinical. In certain situations laboratory work up becomes essential.

  18. Oropouche Fever: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hercules Sakkas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV, an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis. Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV’s emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  19. Oropouche Fever: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Hercules; Bozidis, Petros; Franks, Ashley; Papadopoulou, Chrissanthy

    2018-04-04

    Oropouche fever is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Oropouche virus (OROV), an arthropod transmitted Orthobunyavirus circulating in South and Central America. During the last 60 years, more than 30 epidemics and over half a million clinical cases attributed to OROV infection have been reported in Brazil, Peru, Panama, Trinidad and Tobago. OROV fever is considered the second most frequent arboviral febrile disease in Brazil after dengue fever. OROV is transmitted through both urban and sylvatic transmission cycles, with the primary vector in the urban cycle being the anthropophilic biting midge Culicoides paraensis . Currently, there is no evidence of direct human-to-human OROV transmission. OROV fever is usually either undiagnosed due to its mild, self-limited manifestations or misdiagnosed because its clinical characteristics are similar to dengue, chikungunya, Zika and yellow fever, including malaria as well. At present, there is no specific antiviral treatment, and in the absence of a vaccine for effective prophylaxis of human populations in endemic areas, the disease prevention relies solely on vector control strategies and personal protection measures. OROV fever is considered to have the potential to spread across the American continent and under favorable climatic conditions may expand its geographic distribution to other continents. In view of OROV's emergence, increased interest for formerly neglected tropical diseases and within the One Health concept, the existing knowledge and gaps of knowledge on OROV fever are reviewed.

  20. Yellow fever: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, T P

    2001-08-01

    Yellow fever, the original viral haemorrhagic fever, was one of the most feared lethal diseases before the development of an effective vaccine. Today the disease still affects as many as 200,000 persons annually in tropical regions of Africa and South America, and poses a significant hazard to unvaccinated travellers to these areas. Yellow fever is transmitted in a cycle involving monkeys and mosquitoes, but human beings can also serve as the viraemic host for mosquito infection. Recent increases in the density and distribution of the urban mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti, as well as the rise in air travel increase the risk of introduction and spread of yellow fever to North and Central America, the Caribbean and Asia. Here I review the clinical features of the disease, its pathogenesis and pathophysiology. The disease mechanisms are poorly understood and have not been the subject of modern clinical research. Since there is no specific treatment, and management of patients with the disease is extremely problematic, the emphasis is on preventative vaccination. As a zoonosis, yellow fever cannot be eradicated, but reduction of the human disease burden is achievable through routine childhood vaccination in endemic countries, with a low cost for the benefits obtained. The biological characteristics, safety, and efficacy of live attenuated, yellow fever 17D vaccine are reviewed. New applications of yellow fever 17D virus as a vector for foreign genes hold considerable promise as a means of developing new vaccines against other viruses, and possibly against cancers.

  1. Lithotrites and postoperative fever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, David I; Lipkin, Michael E; Wang, Agnes J

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the risks of fever from different lithotrites after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PNL database is a prospective, multi-institutional, international PNL registry. Of 5,803 total...... with fever [Odds Ratio (OR) 1.17, p = 0.413], while diabetes (OR 1.32, p = 0.048), positive urine culture (OR 2.08, p PNL...... fever was not significantly different among the various lithotrites used in the CROES PNL study....

  2. STUDIES ON TUBERCULIN FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Charles H.; Atkins, Elisha

    1959-01-01

    Evidence has been presented that the fever elicited by intravenous administration of old tuberculin (O.T.) in BCG-infected rabbits is a specific property of this hypersensitivity system and is probably not due to contamination of tuberculin with bacterial endotoxins. Daily injections of O.T. in sensitized animals resulted in a rapid tolerance to its pyrogenic effect. Tuberculin tolerance can be differentiated from that occurring with endotoxins and was invariably associated with the development of a negative skin test. The mechanism of this tolerance would thus appear to be desensitization. A circulating pyrogen found during tuberculin fever was indistinguishable in its biologic effects from endogenous pyrogens obtained in several other types of experimental fever. This material produced fevers in normal recipients and therefore may be clearly differentiated from O.T. itself which was pyrogenic only to sensitized animals. Since the titer of serum pyrogen was directly proportional to the degree of fever induced by injection of O.T. in the donor animals, a causal relation is suggested. On the basis of these findings, it is postulated that tuberculin fever is due to a circulating endogenous pyrogen released by a specific action of O.T. on sensitized cells of the host. PMID:13641561

  3. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emadi Koochak H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF was first described in the Crimea in 1944 and then in 1956 in congo. CCHF is a viral hemorrhagic fever of the Nairovirus group that belongs to Bunyaviridae family virus. It is transmitted to human by tick bite. The most efficient and common tick that is the vectors of CCHF is a member of the Hyalomma genus which infected many mammals such as livestock, this tick is the main reservoire of virus in nature. Humans also become infected with CCHF virus by direct contact with blood or other infected tissues from livestock or human patients (nosocomial infection. Disease has been found in saharic Africa, Eastern Europe, Pakistan, India and Middle East (specially Iran and Iraq. This disease recently spread in Iran so in 1999 to 2001 at least 222 suspected case(81 definite case reported that led to the death of 15 of 81 cases. It is estimated that 30 percent of the country's cattle are contaminated with this virus."nIn humans, after a short incubation period it appears suddenly with fever, chills, myalgia and GI symptoms followed by severe bleeding and DIC that led to death .If the patient improved, has a long {2-4 weeks convalescence period. Disease diagnosed by clinical manifestations, serologic tests, viral culture and PCR and its specific treatment is oral ribavirin for 10 days, for prevention of disease personal protective measures from tick bite, spraying poison of mews to reduce of ticks crowd, isolation of patients and dis-infection of contaminated personal equipments that who suffering from CCHF is recommended.

  4. Yellow Fever Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... How can I prevent yellow fever? Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine can prevent yellow fever. Yellow fever vaccine ... such as those containing DEET. 3 Yellow fever vaccine Yellow fever vaccine is a live, weakened virus. It is ...

  5. A case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, Barry S

    2007-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a serious, generalized infection that is spread to humans through the bite of infected ticks. It can be lethal but it is curable. The disease gets its name from the Rocky Mountain region where it was first identified in 1896. The fever is caused by the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii and is maintained in nature in a complex life cycle involving ticks and mammals. Humans are considered to be accidental hosts and are not involved in the natural transmission cycle of this pathogen. The author examined a 47-year-old woman during a periodic recall appointment. The patient had no dental problems other than the need for routine prophylaxis but mentioned a recent problem with swelling of her extremities with an accompanying rash and general malaise and soreness in her neck region. Tests were conducted and a diagnosis of Rocky Mountain spotted fever was made.

  6. Yellow fever: epidemiology and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Elizabeth D

    2007-03-15

    Yellow fever continues to occur in regions of Africa and South America, despite the availability of effective vaccines. Recently, some cases of severe neurologic disease and multiorgan system disease have been described in individuals who received yellow fever vaccine. These events have focused attention on the need to define criteria for judicious use of yellow fever vaccine and to describe the spectrum of adverse events that may be associated with yellow fever vaccine. Describing host factors that would increase risk of these events and identifying potential treatment modalities for yellow fever and yellow fever vaccine-associated adverse events are subjects of intense investigation.

  7. Congo crimean hemorrhagic fever in balochistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, A.B.; Shaikh, M.; Khan, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To observe the pattern and mortality of Congo-Crimean Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) in Balochistan. Two hundred and twenty-six febrile patients with bleeding of sudden onset, with initial signs and symptoms including headache, high fever, back pain, joint pain, stomach pain, vomiting, red eyes, flushed face, red throat and petechiae on the palate of both sexes were screened for CCHF over a period of 10 years. Clinical criteria for initial diagnosis directed the subsequent diagnostic work-up. The ages of these patients ranged from 7 years to 74 years. Sixty-three percent of these patients were positive for CCHF. Males were 68% of the total patients. Over the years, CCHF showed a gradual increase ranging from 43% to 80%. Total mortality was 15%, all being secondary cases. Death was not observed in primary CCHF cases. In this study, suspicion of viral hemorrhagic fever was raised in 62% cases at the time of admission and the patients were immediately isolated, noninvasive procedures were instigated and barrier nursing was implemented. None of the family and hospital staff members who had close contact with the patient became ill, while those who were not suspected initially (38%) infected the health care workers and the family members. Although CCHF is rare, this study stresses the need for proper health facilities in Pakistan and to include VHF (viral hemorrhagic fevers) in the differential diagnosis of unexplained fever with hemorrhagic tendencies of sudden onset. (author)

  8. Travelers' Health: Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... days should raise suspicion of typhoid or paratyphoid fever. Typhoid fever is a nationally notifiable disease. TREATMENT Specific ... typhoid-fever Table 3-21. Vaccines to prevent typhoid fever VACCINA- TION AGE (y) DOSE, MODE OF ADMINISTRA- ...

  9. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Kucuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean Fever is an autosomal recessive inherited disease with a course of autoinflammation, which is characterized by the episodes of fever and serositis. It affects the populations from Mediterranean basin. Genetic mutation of the disease is on MEFV gene located on short arm of Chromosome 16. The disease is diagnosed based on clinical evaluation. Amyloidosis is the most important complication. The only agent that decreases the development of amyloidosis and the frequency and severity of the episodes is colchicine, which has been used for about 40 years. In this review, we aimed to discuss especially the most recent advances about Familial Mediterranean Fever which is commonly seen in our population.

  10. Rift Valley Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Amy

    2017-06-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a severe veterinary disease of livestock that also causes moderate to severe illness in people. The life cycle of RVF is complex and involves mosquitoes, livestock, people, and the environment. RVF virus is transmitted from either mosquitoes or farm animals to humans, but is generally not transmitted from person to person. People can develop different diseases after infection, including febrile illness, ocular disease, hemorrhagic fever, or encephalitis. There is a significant risk for emergence of RVF into new locations, which would affect human health and livestock industries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Seasonal Allergies (Hay Fever) KidsHealth / For Parents / Seasonal Allergies (Hay ... español Alergia estacional (fiebre del heno) About Seasonal Allergies "Achoo!" It's your son's third sneezing fit of ...

  12. Breathing Valley Fever

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-04

    Dr. Duc Vugia, chief of the Infectious Diseases Branch in the California Department of Public Health, discusses Valley Fever.  Created: 2/4/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/5/2014.

  13. Spotted fever rickettsiosis in Coronel Fabriciano, Minas Gerais State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Márcio Antônio Moreira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We report cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Coronel Fabriciano Municipality of Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The cases occurred in May and June of 2000. During this period there were two deaths among children from an area named Pedreira in a periurban area of this municipality. In a boy who died with clinical manifestations of Brazilian spotted fever, a necropsy revealed the presence of a spotted fever group Rickettsia. The serological results confirm the difficulty in the differential diagnosis of patients with symptoms of rickettsial diseases.

  14. Q fever in infancy: a review of 18 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardus, J H; Dumas, A M; Huisman, J; Schaap, G J

    1985-01-01

    Infection with Coxiella burnetti (Q fever) was diagnosed in 18 children younger than 3 years of age in The Netherlands during a 16-month period. The diagnosis was confirmed serologically by means of a complement-fixation test and immunofluorescence for IgM determination. A summary of the clinical, hematologic, serologic and epidemiologic features is given. Four children had relapsing episodes of fever during several months. The problem of childhood infection with C. burnetii, particularly in relation to the possibility of intrauterine infection or infection during birth and in the neonatal period, is discussed. In at least one child of this series, an infection by means of breast feeding was considered likely. Q fever is possibly underdiagnosed in children; it should be considered in children with fever of unknown origin.

  15. Approach to postoperative fever in pediatric cardiac patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Ajay K; Singh, Vishal K; Varma, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Fever in the postoperative period in children undergoing surgery for congenital heart disease is fairly common and tends to cause anxiety to both the surgeon and the patient. Such fever is associated with the metabolic response to trauma, systemic response to the cardiopulmonary bypass, hypothermia, presence of drainage tubes, drugs, blood transfusion as well as infections. Establishing the diagnosis requires proper assessment of the patient with focused history, targeted physical examination and judicious use of investigations with the knowledge of the common causes

  16. Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Heinz; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2012-01-01

    Ebola viruses are the causative agents of a severe form of viral haemorrhagic fever in man, designated Ebola haemorrhagic fever, and are endemic in regions of central Africa. The exception is the species Reston Ebola virus, which has not been associated with human disease and is found in the Philippines. Ebola virus constitutes an important local public health threat in Africa, with a worldwide effect through imported infections and through the fear of misuse for biological terrorism. Ebola virus is thought to also have a detrimental effect on the great ape population in Africa. Case-fatality rates of the African species in man are as high as 90%, with no prophylaxis or treatment available. Ebola virus infections are characterised by immune suppression and a systemic inflammatory response that causes impairment of the vascular, coagulation, and immune systems, leading to multiorgan failure and shock, and thus, in some ways, resembling septic shock. PMID:21084112

  17. Treatment of dengue fever

    OpenAIRE

    Rajapakse, Senaka; Rodrigo,Chaturaka; Rajapakse,Anoja Chamarie

    2012-01-01

    Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decad...

  18. Fever and rash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlossberg, D

    1996-03-01

    The combination of fever and rash comprises an extensive differential diagnosis. Many of the causes of this presentation are life-threatening. In this article, rashes are categorized as petechial, maculopapular, vesicular, erythematous, and urticarial. Each type of rash is then divided into infectious etiologies, both treatable and nontreatable, and noninfectious etiologies. It is usually possible to arrive at a workable differential diagnosis when clinical, historical, and epidemiologic factors are considered.

  19. Fever of unknown origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Matsui, Akira; Tanaka, Fumiko; Okuno, Yoshishige; Mitsumori, Michihide; Torizuka, Tatsurou; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Shimbo, Shin-ichirou

    1990-01-01

    Gallium-67 scintigraphy is a commonly performed imaging modality in deteting pyrogenic lesions in cases of long-standing inexplainable fever. To re-evaluate the significance of gallium imaging in such cases, a retrospective review was made of 56 scans performed in febrile patients in whom sufficient clinical and laboratory findings were obtained. Gallium scans were true positive in 30 patients, false positive in 3, true negative in 19, and false negative in 4. In the group of true positive, local inflammatory lesions were detected in 23 patients with a final diagnosis of lung tuberculosis, urinary tract infection, and inflammatory joint disease. Abnormal gallium accumulation, as shown in the other 7 patients, provided clues to the diagnosis of generalized disorders, such as hematological malignancies (n=3), systemic autoimmune diseases (n=3), and severe infectious mononucleosis (n=one). In the group of false positive, gallium imaging revealed intestinal excretion of gallium in 2 patients and physiological pulmonary hilar accumulation in one. In the true negative group of 19 patients, fever of unknown origin was resolved spontaneously in 12 patients, and with antibiotics and corticosteroids in 2 and 5 patients, respectively. Four patients having false negative scans were finally diagnosed as having urinary tract infection (n=2), bacterial meningitis (n=one), and polyarteritis (n=one). Gallium imaging would remain the technique of choice in searching for origin of unknown fever. It may also be useful for early diagnosis of systemic disease, as well as focal inflammation. (N.K.)

  20. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  1. Getting a Handle on Neuropharmacology by Targeting Receptor-Associated Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Michael P; Matta, Jose A; Gu, Shenyan; Seierstad, Mark; Bredt, David S

    2017-12-06

    Targeted therapy for neuropsychiatric disorders requires selective modulation of dysfunctional neuronal pathways. Receptors relevant to CNS disorders typically have associated proteins discretely expressed in specific neuronal pathways; these accessory proteins provide a new dimension for drug discovery. Recent studies show that targeting a TARP auxiliary subunit of AMPA receptors selectively modulates neuronal excitability in specific forebrain pathways relevant to epilepsy. Other medicinally important ion channels, gated by glutamate, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and acetylcholine, also have associated proteins, which may be druggable. This emerging pharmacology of receptor-associated proteins provides a new approach for improving drug efficacy while mitigating side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (Korean Hemorrhagic Fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-07-23

    fever , chills, nausea, headache and muscle ache in July 1985. One day after admission he developed petechial haemorrhage over his body and limbs and in...ftOA179 565 NENORNAGIC FEVER WI TH RENAL SYNDOMNE (KOREAN HEMORRHAIC FEVER )(U) KOREN UNIV SEOUL COLL OF MEDICINE N N LEE 23 JUL " DAD7-94-G-4616...34,, , " S , S S .S =. 5 5 . S S S * B M Lfl IC) uIeuCc FVM WITH RENAL SYNDR~OME (KOREAN EMORRHAGIC FEVER ) ANNUAL AND FINAL REPORT S HO WANG LIZB N.D. 5

  3. Rheumatic fever associated with antiphospholipid syndrome: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Felipe; de Carvalho, Jozélio

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical associations between rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome and the impact of coexistence of these two diseases in an individual. Systematic review in electronics databases, regarding the period from 1983 to 2012. The keywords: "Rheumatic Fever," "Antiphospholipid Syndrome," and "Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome" are used. were identified 11 cases described in the literature about the association of rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinical presentation of rheumatic fever was characterized by the predominance of carditis (11/11) and chorea (7/11). Regarding the manifestations of APS, the stroke was observed in 7/11 (63.6%), with one of them having probable embolic origin. The present study brings the information that the association between APS and RF is quite rare, however, is of great clinical importance. Doctors who deal with the RF should include in their differential diagnosis the APS, especially in the presence of stroke in patients with RF and whose echocardiogram does not show intracavitary thrombi.

  4. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers. 2014.

  5. Treatment of hay fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, S F

    1989-01-01

    The range of treatments for hay fever available to the general practitioner has changed considerably in recent years. New antihistamines have addressed the problem of sedation and moved towards one daily dose; nasally applied corticosteroids avoid the need for systemic steroid therapy and its potential adverse effect; and regulatory decisions have set a trend away from immunotherapy in general practice. However, knowledge about the mechanism of action of immunotherapy is increasing and new developments with improved safety profiles include allergen polymers, allergoids, oral immunotherapy and nasal immunotherapy. Choice of treatment depends, as always, on the individual circumstances of the patient and his or her disease. PMID:2556545

  6. Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Need yellow fever vaccine? Plan ahead. Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... none were from the United States). What is yellow fever? Yellow fever is caused by a virus that ...

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Marylin; Orejuela, Leonora; Fuya, Patricia; Carrillo, Pilar; Hernandez, Jorge; Parra, Edgar; Keng, Colette; Small, Melissa; Olano, Juan P; Bouyer, Donald; Castaneda, Elizabeth; Walker, David; Valbuena, Gustavo

    2007-07-01

    We investigated 2 fatal cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever that occurred in 2003 and 2004 near the same locality in Colombia where the disease was first reported in the 1930s. A retrospective serosurvey of febrile patients showed that > 21% of the serum samples had antibodies aaainst spotted fever group rickettsiae.

  8. Q Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q Fever in the United States Hospitalization Rates Geography Seasonal trends People at Risk Q fever was first recognized as a human disease in Australia in 1935 and in the United States in the early 1940s. The “Q” stands for “query” and was applied at a time when the cause was unknown. ...

  9. Febre amarela Yellow fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernando da Costa Vasconcelos

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A febre amarela é doenca infecciosa não-contagiosa causada por um arbovírus mantido em ciclos silvestres em que macacos atuam como hospedeiros amplificadores e mosquitos dos gêneros Aedes na África, e Haemagogus e Sabethes na América, são os transmissores. Cerca de 90% dos casos da doença apresentam-se com formas clínicas benignas que evoluem para a cura, enquanto 10% desenvolvem quadros dramáticos com mortalidade em torno de 50%. O problema mostra-se mais grave em África onde ainda há casos urbanos. Nas Américas, no período de 1970-2001, descreveram-se 4.543 casos. Os países que mais diagnosticaram a doença foram o Peru (51,5%, a Bolívia (20,1% e o Brasil (18,7%. Os métodos diagnósticos utilizados incluem a sorologia (IgM, isolamento viral, imunohistoquímica e RT-PCR. A zoonose não pode ser erradicada, mas, a doença humana é prevenível mediante a vacinação com a amostra 17D do vírus amarílico. A OMS recomenda nova vacinação a cada 10 anos. Neste artigo são revistos os principais conceitos da doença e os casos de mortes associados à vacina.Yellow fever is an infectious and non-contagious disease caused by an arbovirus, the yellow fever virus. The agent is maintained in jungle cycles among primates as vertebrate hosts and mosquitoes, especially Aedes in Africa, and Haemagogus and Sabethes in America. Approximately 90% of the infections are mild or asymptomatic, while 10% course to a severe clinical picture with 50% case-fatality rate. Yellow fever is largely distributed in Africa where urban epidemics are still reported. In South America, between 1970-2001, 4,543 cases were reported, mostly from Peru (51.5%, Bolivia (20.1% and Brazil (18.7%. The disease is diagnosed by serology (detection of IgM, virus isolation, immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Yellow fever is a zoonosis and cannot be eradicated, but it is preventable in man by using the 17D vaccine. A single dose is enough to protect an individual for at least

  10. Autism, fever, epigenetics and the locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehler, Mark F; Purpura, Dominick P

    2009-03-01

    Some children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit improved behaviors and enhanced communication during febrile episodes. We hypothesize that febrigenesis and the behavioral-state changes associated with fever in autism depend upon selective normalization of key components of a functionally impaired locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) system. We posit that autistic behaviors result from developmental dysregulation of LC-NA system specification and neural network deployment and modulation linked to the core behavioral features of autism. Fever transiently restores the modulatory functions of the LC-NA system and ameliorates autistic behaviors. Fever-induced reversibility of autism suggests preserved functional integrity of widespread neural networks subserving the LC-NA system and specifically the subsystems involved in mediating the cognitive and behavioral repertoires compromised in ASD. Alterations of complex gene-environmental interactions and associated epigenetic mechanisms during seminal developmental critical periods are viewed as instrumental in LC-NA dysregulation as emphasized by the timing and severity of prenatal maternal stressors on autism prevalence. Our hypothesis has implications for a rational approach to further interrogate the interdisciplinary etiology of ASD and for designing novel biological detection systems and therapeutic agents that target the LC-NA system's diverse network of pre- and postsynaptic receptors, intracellular signaling pathways and dynamic epigenetic remodeling processes involved in their regulation and functional plasticity.

  11. Hay fever & homeopathy: a case series evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vinita

    2016-05-01

    Seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) is common and can considerably reduce the quality of life of sufferers. Despite the wide everyday application and promising results with homeopathy, scientific evidence of its effectiveness for most ailments is scarce. The assessment of the clinical effectiveness of homeopathic remedies in the alleviation of hay fever symptoms in a typical clinical setting. We performed a clinical observational study of eight patients in the treatment of hay fever symptoms over a two-year period (2012 and 2013) using Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP) self-evaluation questionnaires at baseline and again after two weeks and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The individualized prescription - either a single remedy or multiple remedies - was based on the totality of each patient's symptoms. The average MYMOP scores for the eyes, nose, activity and wellbeing had improved significantly after two and four weeks of homeopathic treatment. The overall average MYMOP profile score at baseline was 3.83 (standard deviation, SD, 0.78). After 14 and 28 days of treatment the average score had fallen to 1.14 (SD, 0.36; PHomeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Familial Mediterranean Fever: Review of Literature and Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shama Khan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever, an autosomal recessive disorder, is a member of the periodic fever syndromes, and considered to be the most common cause of recurrent febrile episodes in children. It is important to understand the disorder as familial Mediterranean fever falls on a spectrum of various presentations; the recurrent episodes of familial Mediterranean fever may be so severe that the quality of life may be affected in such patients. Therefore, physicians should not delay the evaluation in such cases and promptly initiate treatment to not only improve quality of life but to also avoid complications, such as amyloidosis. This study reports two different cases of familial Mediterranean fever, with varying clinical presentations, and established diagnosis via genetic testing as well as cessation of symptoms with a trial of therapy. Furthermore, this study discusses the various manifestations of familial Mediterranean fever, laboratory findings, and current therapies available for management.

  13. Phylogeny of Yellow Fever Virus, Uganda, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Holly R; Kayiwa, John; Mossel, Eric C; Lutwama, Julius; Staples, J Erin; Lambert, Amy J

    2018-08-17

    In April 2016, a yellow fever outbreak was detected in Uganda. Removal of contaminating ribosomal RNA in a clinical sample improved the sensitivity of next-generation sequencing. Molecular analyses determined the Uganda yellow fever outbreak was distinct from the concurrent yellow fever outbreak in Angola, improving our understanding of yellow fever epidemiology.

  14. Discriminating fever behavior in house flies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Anderson

    Full Text Available Fever has generally been shown to benefit infected hosts. However, fever temperatures also carry costs. While endotherms are able to limit fever costs physiologically, the means by which behavioral thermoregulators constrain these costs are less understood. Here we investigated the behavioral fever response of house flies (Musca domestica L. challenged with different doses of the fungal entomopathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Infected flies invoked a behavioral fever selecting the hottest temperature early in the day and then moving to cooler temperatures as the day progressed. In addition, flies infected with a higher dose of fungus exhibited more intense fever responses. These variable patterns of fever are consistent with the observation that higher fever temperatures had greater impact on fungal growth. The results demonstrate the capacity of insects to modulate the degree and duration of the fever response depending on the severity of the pathogen challenge and in so doing, balance the costs and benefits of fever.

  15. EpiReview: Typhoid fever, NSW, 2005-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaratnam, Praveena; Tobin, Sean; Seale, Holly; Musto, Jennie

    2013-11-01

    To examine trends in the incidence of typhoid fever in NSW to inform the development of prevention strategies. Typhoid fever case notification data for the period 2005-2011 were extracted from the NSW Notifiable Conditions Information Management System. Population incidence rates were calculated and analysed by demographic variables. There were 250 case notifications of typhoid fever in NSW from 2005 to 2011, of which 240 are likely to have been acquired overseas. Case notifications remained relatively stable over the review period with the highest rates in Western Sydney Local Health District (10.9 per 100,000 population). Two-thirds (66.4%) of all case notifications are likely to have been acquired in South Asia, and about half of overseas-acquired case notifications were most likely to have been associated with travel to visit friends and relatives. Hospitalisation was required for 79.6% of cases where hospitalisation status was known. Prior typhoid vaccination was reported in 7% of cases in 2010 and 2011 where vaccination status was known. While typhoid fever rates remain low in NSW, case notifications of this preventable infection continue to be reported, particularly in travellers visiting friends and relatives in South Asia. Further research to better understand barriers to the use of preventive measures may be useful in targeting typhoid fever prevention messages in high-risk groups, particularly South Asian communities in NSW.

  16. PROLACTIN-INDUCED TYROSINE PHOSPHORYLATION, ACTIVATION AND RECEPTOR ASSOCIATION OF FOCAL ADHESION KINASE (FAK) IN MAMMARY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prolactin-Induced Tyrosine Phosphorylation, Activation and ReceptorAssociation of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) in Mammary Epithelial Cells. Suzanne E. Fenton1 and Lewis G. Sheffield2. 1U.S. Environmental ProtectionAgency, MD-72, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711, and

  17. Treatment of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajapakse S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Senaka Rajapakse,1,2 Chaturaka Rodrigo,1 Anoja Rajapakse31Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka; 2Lincoln County Hospital, United Lincolnshire NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK; 3Kings Mill Hospital, Sherwood Forest NHS Foundation Trust, Mansfield, UKAbstract: The endemic area for dengue fever extends over 60 countries, and approximately 2.5 billion people are at risk of infection. The incidence of dengue has multiplied many times over the last five decades at an alarming rate. In the endemic areas, waves of infection occur in epidemics, with thousands of individuals affected, creating a huge burden on the limited resources of a country's health care system. While the illness passes off as a simple febrile episode in many, a few have a severe illness marked by hypovolemic shock and bleeding. Iatrogenic fluid overload in the management may further complicate the picture. In this severe form dengue can be fatal. Tackling the burden of dengue is impeded by several issues, including a lack of understanding about the exact pathophysiology of the infection, inability to successfully control the vector population, lack of specific therapy against the virus, and the technical difficulties in developing a vaccine. This review provides an overview on the epidemiology, natural history, management strategies, and future directions for research on dengue, including the potential for development of a vaccine.Keywords: dengue, treatment, fluid resuscitation

  18. Role of spatial inhomogenity in GPCR dimerisation predicted by receptor association-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sneha A.; Pawar, Aiswarya B.; Dighe, Anish; Athale, Chaitanya A.; Sengupta, Durba

    2017-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) association is an emerging paradigm with far reaching implications in the regulation of signalling pathways and therapeutic interventions. Recent super resolution microscopy studies have revealed that receptor dimer steady state exhibits sub-second dynamics. In particular the GPCRs, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 (M1MR) and formyl peptide receptor (FPR), have been demonstrated to exhibit a fast association/dissociation kinetics, independent of ligand binding. In this work, we have developed a spatial kinetic Monte Carlo model to investigate receptor homo-dimerisation at a single receptor resolution. Experimentally measured association/dissociation kinetic parameters and diffusion coefficients were used as inputs to the model. To test the effect of membrane spatial heterogeneity on the simulated steady state, simulations were compared to experimental statistics of dimerisation. In the simplest case the receptors are assumed to be diffusing in a spatially homogeneous environment, while spatial heterogeneity is modelled to result from crowding, membrane micro-domains and cytoskeletal compartmentalisation or ‘corrals’. We show that a simple association-diffusion model is sufficient to reproduce M1MR association statistics, but fails to reproduce FPR statistics despite comparable kinetic constants. A parameter sensitivity analysis is required to reproduce the association statistics of FPR. The model reveals the complex interplay between cytoskeletal components and their influence on receptor association kinetics within the features of the membrane landscape. These results constitute an important step towards understanding the factors modulating GPCR organisation.

  19. Molecular and functional characterization of pigeon (Columba livia) tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Kang, Xilong; Xiong, Dan; Zhu, Shanshan; Zheng, Huijuan; Xu, Ying; Guo, Yaxin; Pan, Zhiming; Jiao, Xinan

    2017-04-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3) plays a key antiviral role by promoting type I interferon production. We cloned the pigeon TRAF3 gene (PiTRAF3) according to its predicted mRNA sequence to investigate its function. The 1704-bp full-length open reading frame encodes a 567-amino acid protein. One Ring finger, two TRAF-type Zinc fingers, one Coiled coil, and one MATH domain were inferred. RT-PCR showed that PiTRAF3 was expressed in all tissues, with relatively weak expression in the heart and liver. In HEK293T cells, over-expression of wild-type, △Ring, △Zinc finger, and △Coiled coil PiTRAF3, but not a △MATH form, significantly increased IFN-β promoter activity. Zinc finger and Coiled coil domains were essential for NF-κB activation. In chicken HD11 cells, PiTRAF3 increased IFN-β promoter activity and four domains were all contributing. R848 stimulation of pigeon peripheral blood mononuclear cells and splenocytes significantly increased expression of PiTRAF3 and the inflammatory cytokine genes CCL5, IL-8, and IL-10. These data demonstrate TRAF3's innate immune function and improve understanding of its involvement in poultry antiviral defense. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modulation of BCR Signaling by the Induced Dimerization of Receptor-Associated SYK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Westbroek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Clustering of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR by polyvalent antigens is transmitted through the SYK tyrosine kinase to the activation of multiple intracellular pathways that determine the physiological consequences of receptor engagement. To explore factors that modulate the quantity and quality of signals sent by the crosslinked BCR, we developed a novel chemical mediator of dimerization to induce clustering of receptor-associated SYK. To accomplish this, we fused SYK with E. coli dihydrofolate reductase (eDHFR, which binds the small molecule trimethoprim (TMP with high affinity and selectivity and synthesized a dimer of TMP with a flexible linker. The TMP dimer is able to induce the aggregation of eDHFR-linked SYK in live cells. The induced dimerization of SYK bound to the BCR differentially regulates the activation of downstream transcription factors, promoting the activation of Nuclear Factor of Activated T cells (NFAT without affecting the activation of NFκB. The dimerization of SYK enhances the duration but not the amplitude of calcium mobilization by enhancing the extent and duration of its interaction with the crosslinked BCR at the plasma membrane.

  1. Typhoid fever vaccination strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Kashmira A; Bentsi-Enchill, Adwoa; Marks, Florian; Fox, Kimberley

    2015-06-19

    Typhoid vaccination is an important component of typhoid fever prevention and control, and is recommended for public health programmatic use in both endemic and outbreak settings. We reviewed experiences with various vaccination strategies using the currently available typhoid vaccines (injectable Vi polysaccharide vaccine [ViPS], oral Ty21a vaccine, and injectable typhoid conjugate vaccine [TCV]). We assessed the rationale, acceptability, effectiveness, impact and implementation lessons of these strategies to inform effective typhoid vaccination strategies for the future. Vaccination strategies were categorized by vaccine disease control strategy (preemptive use for endemic disease or to prevent an outbreak, and reactive use for outbreak control) and vaccine delivery strategy (community-based routine, community-based campaign and school-based). Almost all public health typhoid vaccination programs used ViPS vaccine and have been in countries of Asia, with one example in the Pacific and one experience using the Ty21a vaccine in South America. All vaccination strategies were found to be acceptable, feasible and effective in the settings evaluated; evidence of impact, where available, was strongest in endemic settings and in the short- to medium-term. Vaccination was cost-effective in high-incidence but not low-incidence settings. Experience in disaster and outbreak settings remains limited. TCVs have recently become available and none are WHO-prequalified yet; no program experience with TCVs was found in published literature. Despite the demonstrated success of several typhoid vaccination strategies, typhoid vaccines remain underused. Implementation lessons should be applied to design optimal vaccination strategies using TCVs which have several anticipated advantages, such as potential for use in infant immunization programs and longer duration of protection, over the ViPS and Ty21a vaccines for typhoid prevention and control. Copyright © 2015. Published by

  2. Trends and risk factors for human Q fever in Australia, 1991-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan-Gardner, T S; Massey, P D; Hutchinson, P; Knope, K; Fearnley, E

    2017-03-01

    Australian abattoir workers, farmers, veterinarians and people handling animal birthing products or slaughtering animals continue to be at high risk of Q fever despite an effective vaccine being available. National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System data were analysed for the period 1991-2014, along with enhanced risk factor data from notified cases in the states of New South Wales and Queensland, to examine changes in the epidemiology of Q fever in Australia. The national Q fever notification rate reduced by 20% [incident rate ratio (IRR) 0·82] following the end of the National Q fever Management Program in 2006, and has increased since 2009 (IRR 1·01-1·34). Highest rates were in males aged 40-59 years (5·9/100 000) and 87% of Q fever cases occurred in New South Wales and Queensland. The age of Q fever cases and proportion of females increased over the study period. Based on the enhanced risk factor data, the most frequently listed occupation for Q fever cases involved contact with livestock, followed by 'no known risk' occupations. More complete and comparable enhanced risk factor data, at the State/Territory and national levels, would aid in further understanding of the epidemiology of Q fever.

  3. Frequency of splenomegaly in dengue fever in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javaid, A.; Asghar, M.; Butt, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue Fever is caused by arthropod born viruses.According to World Health Organization approximately 50-100 million infections of dengue fever occur yearly. Objective of this study was to determine the frequency of splenomegaly in dengue fever in children. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted at the Department of Paediatrics, Allied Hospital, Faisalabad, during a period from June 2012 to May 2013 by including 93 Children, aged 4-14 years presenting with fever of less than 14 days with thrombocytopenia and positive IgM or IgM and IgG dengue antibodies by ELISA. Patients were thoroughly evaluated by detailed history and clinical examination. Ultrasonography of the patients was performed to confirm the splenomegaly. The data was analysed to determine the frequency and percentage of disease. Results: Out of 93 children, 51 (54.8%) were male and 42 (45.2%) were female. The most common clinical presentation was noted is chills and rigors in 80 (86.02%). Unusual clinical features were encephalopathy in 37 (39.78%) followed by bleeding manifestations and upper respiratory tract infection (upper RTI). Splenomegaly was seen in 45 (48.4%) children. Conclusion: Dengue fever is increasingly presenting with atypical presentation like splenomegaly, encephalopathy, bleeding manifestations and upper RTI. (author)

  4. 17DD yellow fever vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Reinaldo M.; Maia, Maria de Lourdes S.; Farias, Roberto Henrique G.; Camacho, Luiz Antonio B.; Freire, Marcos S.; Galler, Ricardo; Yamamura, Anna Maya Yoshida; Almeida, Luiz Fernando C.; Lima, Sheila Maria B.; Nogueira, Rita Maria R.; Sá, Gloria Regina S.; Hokama, Darcy A.; de Carvalho, Ricardo; Freire, Ricardo Aguiar V.; Filho, Edson Pereira; Leal, Maria da Luz Fernandes; Homma, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To verify if the Bio-Manguinhos 17DD yellow fever vaccine (17DD-YFV) used in lower doses is as immunogenic and safe as the current formulation. Results: Doses from 27,476 IU to 587 IU induced similar seroconversion rates and neutralizing antibodies geometric mean titers (GMTs). Immunity of those who seroconverted to YF was maintained for 10 mo. Reactogenicity was low for all groups. Methods: Young and healthy adult males (n = 900) were recruited and randomized into 6 groups, to receive de-escalating doses of 17DD-YFV, from 27,476 IU to 31 IU. Blood samples were collected before vaccination (for neutralization tests to yellow fever, serology for dengue and clinical chemistry), 3 to 7 d after vaccination (for viremia and clinical chemistry) and 30 d after vaccination (for new yellow fever serology and clinical chemistry). Adverse events diaries were filled out by volunteers during 10 d after vaccination. Volunteers were retested for yellow fever and dengue antibodies 10 mo later. Seropositivity for dengue was found in 87.6% of volunteers before vaccination, but this had no significant influence on conclusions. Conclusion: In young healthy adults Bio-Manguinhos/Fiocruz yellow fever vaccine can be used in much lower doses than usual. International Register ISRCTN 38082350. PMID:23364472

  5. Periodic Fever, Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, Adenitis Syndrome (PFAPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American College of Rheumatology Committee on Communications and Marketing. This information is provided for general education only. Individuals should consult a qualified health care provider for professional medical advice, diagnosis and treatment of a medical ...

  6. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in hereditary periodic fever syndromes and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, S. M.; Frenkel, J.; Waterham, H. R.

    2003-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase (MK) is an essential enzyme in the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway which produces numerous biomolecules (isoprenoids) involved in a variety of cellular processes. The indispensability of MK and isoprenoid biosynthesis for human health is demonstrated by the identification of its

  7. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan; Yang, Li; Li, Yu; Jiang, Tie-Jian

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis

  8. Familial Mediterranean Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people of Mediterranean origin — including Sephardic Jews, Arabs, Greeks, Italians, Armenians and Turks. But it may affect ... attacks, you'll likely feel normal. Symptom-free periods may be as short as a few days ...

  9. Administration of time-expired yellow fever vaccine: public health response and results of a serological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K W; Nguyen-Van-Tam, J S; Howells, J

    1999-06-01

    The discovery that a local travel clinic had administered 101 doses of time-expired yellow fever vaccine over a six month period prompted an immediate investigation in order to advise vaccinees about to travel to areas where yellow fever is endemic. No data were available to provide adequate reassurance about the potential efficacy of time-expired vaccine, so a rapid serological investigation was conducted, which provided evidence that the yellow fever vaccine had remained potent beyond its expiry date.

  10. Managing Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minniear, Timothy D; Buckingham, Steven C

    2009-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is caused by the tick-borne bacterium Rickettsia rickettsii. Symptoms range from moderate illness to severe illness, including cardiovascular compromise, coma and death. The disease is prevalent in most of the USA, especially during warmer months. The trademark presentation is fever and rash with a history of tick bite, although tick exposure is unappreciated in over a third of cases. Other signature symptoms include headache and abdominal pain. The antibiotic therapy of choice for R. rickettsii infection is doxycycline. Preventive measures for Rocky Mountain spotted fever and other tick-borne diseases include: wearing long-sleeved, light colored clothing; checking for tick attachment and removing attached ticks promptly; applying topical insect repellent; and treating clothing with permethrin.

  11. [Emerging diseases. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuljić-Kapulica, Nada

    2004-01-01

    Recognized for many years in central Asia and Eastern Europe, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a severe zoonotic disease which affects people coming into contact with livestock or ticks. The range of the CCHF virus is now known to extend form central Asia to India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and to most of Saharan and sub-Saharan Africa. CCHF virus is a member of the Bunyavirus family, and is classified as a Nairovirus. After an incubation period of approximately 3 to 6 days the abrupt onset of acute febrile illness occurs. The first symptoms are similar to severe influenza and include fever, headache, severe back and abdominal pain. The hemorrhagic fever manifestations occur after several days of illnesses and include petechial rash, ecchymoses, hematemmesis, and melenna. Cases typically present with some form of hepatitis. The mortality rate is 10-50% in different outbreaks with deaths typically occurring during the second week of illness. The genus Hyalomma of ixodid ticks is the most important vector of the CCHF virus. Vertebrates including birds and small animals provide excellent amplifier hosts of both the virus and the tick. The virus can be transmitted to humans by direct contact with infected animals and from person to person. Early diagnosis is possible in special laboratories using antigen detection by imunofluorescence or ELISA tests or molecular methods as PCR and antibody detection. Tick control measures need to be emphasized and utilized to prevent CCHF. This includes spraying camp sites, clothing and danger areas with acaricides or repellent. Strict isolation of patients with CCHF and a focus on barrier nursing would help to prevent nosocomial spread. Presently the vaccine is a dangerous mouse brain-derived version. Future development of a vaccine would help to prevent human infection.

  12. Dengue fever: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2010-07-01

    Dengue fever is a common tropical infection. This acute febrile illness can be a deadly infection in cases of severe manifestation, causing dengue hemorrhagic shock. In this brief article, I will summarize and discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. For diagnosis of dengue, most tropical doctors make use of presumptive diagnosis; however, the definite diagnosis should be based on immunodiagnosis or viral study. Focusing on treatment, symptomatic and supportive treatment is the main therapeutic approach. The role of antiviral drugs in the treatment of dengue fever has been limited, but is currently widely studied.

  13. Modeled Forecasts of Dengue Fever in San Juan, PR Using NASA Satellite Enhanced Weather Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Cory; Quattrochi, Dale; Zavodsky, Bradley; Case, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus is transmitted between humans and mosquitoes of the genus Aedes and causes approximately 96 million cases of disease (dengue fever) each year (Bhatet al. 2013). Symptoms of dengue fever include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting, and eye, muscle and joint pain (CDC). More sever manifestations such as abdominal pain, bleeding from nose and gums, vomiting of blood, and clammy skin occur in rare cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (CDC). Dengue fever occurs throughout tropical and sub-tropical regions worldwide, however, the geographical range and size of epidemics is increasing. Weather and climate are drivers of dengue virus transmission dynamics (Morin et al. 2013) by affecting mosquito proliferation and the virus extrinsic incubation period (i.e. required time for the virus to replicate and disseminate within the mosquito before it can retransmit the virus).

  14. Overview of Classical Swine Fever (Hog Cholera, Classical Swine fever)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical swine fever is a contagious often fatal disease of pigs clinically characterized by high body temperature, lethargy, yellowish diarrhea, vomits and purple skin discoloration of ears, lower abdomen and legs. It was first described in the early 19th century in the USA. Later, a condition i...

  15. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review

    OpenAIRE

    Heilman, James M; Wolff, Jacob De; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treat...

  16. Defining travel-associated cases of enteric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Joanne; Lighton, Lorraine; Jones, Jane

    2014-01-01

    There is no internationally recognized case-definition for travel-associated enteric fever in non-endemic countries. This study describes the patterns of case reporting between 2007 and 2011 as travel-associated or not from the surveillance data in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (EWNI), before and after a change in the time component of the case-definition in January 2011. It examines in particular the role of a time frame based on the reported typical incubation period in defining a case of travel-associated enteric fever. The results showed no significant differences in the distribution of cases of enteric fever in regards to the interval between the onset and UK arrival in 2011 compared to 2007-2010 (p=0.98 for typhoid and paratyphoid A); the distribution for paratyphoid B was also similar in both time periods. During 2007-2010, 93% (1730/1853) of all of the cases were classified as travel-associated compared to 94% (448/477) in 2011. This difference was not statistically significant. Changing the time component of the definition of travel-associated enteric fever did not make a significant difference to the proportion of travel-associated cases reported by investigators. Our analysis suggests that time might be subordinate to other considerations when investigators classify a case as travel-associated. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, K Y; Park, H Y; Kim, J D; Rhee, H S [Presbyterian Medical Center, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-12-15

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  18. Diarrhea associated with typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, S. K.; Speelman, P.; Butler, T.; Nath, S.; Rahman, H.; Stoll, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of diarrhea occurring with typhoid fever, we selected 42 patients with diarrhea and blood cultures positive for Salmonella typhi or Salmonella paratyphi A, but without diarrheal copathogens, for measurement of stool output and examination of fecal composition. The mean

  19. Radiological observation in typhoid fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, K. Y.; Park, H. Y.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic findings in plain abdominal films, chest PA and liver scanning are considered to be ancillary diagnostic methods for uncomplicated typhoid fever and a valuable method for detection of complication such as intestinal perforation. 189 cases of clinically proven typhoid fever from Mar. 1973 to Feb. 1979 in this Hospital were reviewed and radiographic findings were analyzed carefully. The results are as follows: 1. Most (73.6%) cases were between 20 and 40 years of age. 2. Three of the most common radiographic findings were as follows: 1) Localized paralytic ileus in RLQ or diffuse paralytic ileus (96.3%). 2) Hepatomegaly (56.5%). 3) Splenomegaly (49.7%). 3. In cases of typhoid fever with intestinal perforation there were additional significant findings such as free air under diaphragm (85%), free fluid in peritoneal cavity (90%) and air fluid levels in RLQ (80%). 4. The most frequent chest x-ray finding was elevation of diaphragm (11.1%). 5. 8 cases of complicated typhoid fever which eventually came to operation were diagnosed only by radiographic method.

  20. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Regulates Fever Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Sanchez-Alavez

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenase inhibitors such as ibuprofen have been used for decades to control fever through reducing the levels of the pyrogenic lipid transmitter prostaglandin E2 (PGE2. Historically, phospholipases have been considered to be the primary generator of the arachidonic acid (AA precursor pool for generating PGE2 and other eicosanoids. However, recent studies have demonstrated that monoacyglycerol lipase (MAGL, through hydrolysis of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol, provides a major source of AA for PGE2 synthesis in the mammalian brain under basal and neuroinflammatory states. We show here that either genetic or pharmacological ablation of MAGL leads to significantly reduced fever responses in both centrally or peripherally-administered lipopolysaccharide or interleukin-1β-induced fever models in mice. We also show that a cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist does not attenuate these anti-pyrogenic effects of MAGL inhibitors. Thus, much like traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, MAGL inhibitors can control fever, but appear to do so through restricted control over prostaglandin production in the nervous system.

  1. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... A. C. EVANS, D. J. MARTIN, B. D. GINSBURG. Summary. Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time ...

  2. Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estripeaut, Dora; Aramburú, María Gabriela; Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Thompson, Herbert A; Dasch, Gregory A; Paddock, Christopher D; Zaki, Sherif; Eremeeva, Marina E

    2007-11-01

    We describe a fatal pediatric case of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama, the first, to our knowledge, since the 1950s. Diagnosis was established by immunohistochemistry, PCR, and isolation of Rickettsia rickettsii from postmortem tissues. Molecular typing demonstrated strong relatedness of the isolate to strains of R. rickettsii from Central and South America.

  3. Maternal fever during labor--what does it mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgay, C A; Smith, M A; Blok, B

    1994-01-01

    Several studies have shown maternal fever to be associated with chorioamnionitis and neonatal sepsis if at least two of the following five criteria are also present: maternal tachycardia, purulent or foul-smelling amniotic fluid, fetal tachycardia, uterine tenderness, or maternal leukocytosis. Less is known about the risk of neonatal sepsis when the presence of maternal fever in labor is the only criterion. A retrospective medical record review searching for women who had a fever greater than 100.4 degrees F while in the active phase of labor during a 1-year period at the University of Michigan was undertaken to investigate the relation between isolated maternal fever in labor and neonatal sepsis. Eighty-two cases of maternal fever were found. Forty-six women met the clinical criteria for chorioamnionitis, and 6 of the 7 neonates with sepsis diagnosed were born to these mothers. There were no significant differences found in admission or intrapartum factors between women who did and did not meet clinical criteria for chorioamnionitis, and there was no association between these factors and neonatal sepsis. Epidural anesthesia was administered to 91 percent of these women and might be associated with maternal fever during labor. Using maternal clinical criteria for chorioamnionitis and a neonatal band cell-total neutrophil ratio of 0.2 or greater instead of the current system to determine the need for newborn antibiotic administration would improve the positive predictive value (12.5 percent versus 9.3 percent) and specificity (34.6 percent versus 16 percent) without compromising sensitivity (100 percent). All septic and probably septic newborns would be treated, and neonatal antibiotic administration would be reduced by 17 percent. The addition of the maternal clinical criteria for chorioamnionitis to the criteria already used for diagnosing and treating neonatal sepsis could prove useful in decisions regarding the selective administration of intrapartum antibiotics

  4. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a...

  5. Geographic patterns and environmental factors associated with human yellow fever presence in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Patricia Najera; Aldighieri, Sylvain; Machado, Gustavo; Leonel, Deise Galan; Vilca, Luz Maria; Uriona, Sonia; Schneider, Maria Cristina

    2017-09-01

    In the Americas, yellow fever virus transmission is a latent threat due to the proximity between urban and wild environments. Although yellow fever has nearly vanished from North and Central America, there are still 13 countries in the Americas considered endemic by the World Health Organization. Human cases usually occur as a result of the exposure to sylvatic yellow fever in tropical forested environments; but urban outbreaks reported during the last decade demonstrate that the risk in this environment still exists. The objective of this study was to identify spatial patterns and the relationship between key geographic and environmental factors with the distribution of yellow fever human cases in the Americas. An ecological study was carried out to analyze yellow fever human cases reported to the Pan American Health Organization from 2000 to 2014, aggregated by second administrative level subdivisions (counties). Presence of yellow fever by county was used as the outcome variable and eight geo-environmental factors were used as independent variables. Spatial analysis was performed to identify and examine natural settings per county. Subsequently, a multivariable logistic regression model was built. During the study period, 1,164 cases were reported in eight out of the 13 endemic countries. Nearly 83.8% of these cases were concentrated in three countries: Peru (37.4%), Brazil (28.1%) and Colombia (18.4%); and distributed in 57 states/provinces, specifically in 286 counties (3.4% of total counties). Yellow fever presence was significantly associated with altitude, rain, diversity of non-human primate hosts and temperature. A positive spatial autocorrelation revealed a clustered geographic pattern in 138/286 yellow fever positive counties (48.3%). A clustered geographic pattern of yellow fever was identified mostly along the Andes eastern foothills. This risk map could support health policies in endemic countries. Geo-environmental factors associated with presence

  6. Population Explosions of Tiger Moth Lead to Lepidopterism Mimicking Infectious Fever Outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallara Janardhanan Wills

    Full Text Available Lepidopterism is a disease caused by the urticating scales and toxic fluids of adult moths, butterflies or its caterpillars. The resulting cutaneous eruptions and systemic problems progress to clinical complications sometimes leading to death. High incidence of fever epidemics were associated with massive outbreaks of tiger moth Asota caricae adult populations during monsoon in Kerala, India. A significant number of monsoon related fever characteristic to lepidopterism was erroneously treated as infectious fevers due to lookalike symptoms. To diagnose tiger moth lepidopterism, we conducted immunoblots for tiger moth specific IgE in fever patients' sera. We selected a cohort of patients (n = 155 with hallmark symptoms of infectious fevers but were tested negative to infectious fevers. In these cases, the total IgE was elevated and was detected positive (78.6% for tiger moth specific IgE allergens. Chemical characterization of caterpillar and adult moth fluids was performed by HPLC and GC-MS analysis and structural identification of moth scales was performed by SEM analysis. The body fluids and chitinous scales were found to be highly toxic and inflammatory in nature. To replicate the disease in experimental model, wistar rats were exposed to live tiger moths in a dose dependant manner and observed similar clinico-pathological complications reported during the fever epidemics. Further, to link larval abundance and fever epidemics we conducted cointegration test for the period 2009 to 2012 and physical presence of the tiger moths were found to be cointegrated with fever epidemics. In conclusion, our experiments demonstrate that inhalation of aerosols containing tiger moth fluids, scales and hairs cause systemic reactions that can be fatal to human. All these evidences points to the possible involvement of tiger moth disease as a major cause to the massive and fatal fever epidemics observed in Kerala.

  7. Typhoid fever cases in the U.S. military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrell, Tia; Selig, Daniel J; Riddle, Mark S; Porter, Chad K

    2015-10-14

    Salmonella enterica, serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), a causative agent of enteric fever (typhoid fever), predominately affects populations in developing regions with poor access to clean food and water. In addition, travelers to these regions are at risk of exposure. We report the epidemiological characteristics of S. Typhi cases among active duty United States military personnel from 1998 to 2011 using data obtained from the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Cases were identified based on International Classification for Disease Ninth Edition - Clinical Modification codes. We identified a total of 205 cases S. Typhi for an incidence of 1.09 per 100,000 person-years. Cases were on average 31.7 years old, predominately married (n = 129, 62.9 %), Caucasian (n = 142, 69.3 %), male (n = 176, 85.9 %), and had a high school education (n = 101, 49.3 %). Of the identified cases, 122 had received a Typhoid vaccination within 4 years of diagnosis. This study provides an overview of enteric fever in the United States military. The incidence was similar to the general U.S. population except for increased incidence from 1998 to 2000, perhaps attributable to operational deployments in that period. Given that vaccination is an effective primary prevention measure against typhoid fever, active monitoring of pre-deployment vaccine history is warranted.

  8. Rheumatic Fever Associated with Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the clinical associations between rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome and the impact of coexistence of these two diseases in an individual. Methods. Systematic review in electronics databases, regarding the period from 1983 to 2012. The keywords: “Rheumatic Fever,” “Antiphospholipid Syndrome,” and “Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome” are used. Results. were identified 11 cases described in the literature about the association of rheumatic fever and antiphospholipid syndrome. Clinical presentation of rheumatic fever was characterized by the predominance of carditis (11/11 and chorea (7/11. Regarding the manifestations of APS, the stroke was observed in 7/11 (63.6%, with one of them having probable embolic origin. Conclusion. The present study brings the information that the association between APS and RF is quite rare, however, is of great clinical importance. Doctors who deal with the RF should include in their differential diagnosis the APS, especially in the presence of stroke in patients with RF and whose echocardiogram does not show intracavitary thrombi.

  9. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Iran and neighboring countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chinikar, S; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Hewson, R

    2010-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic viral disease that is asymptomatic in infected livestock, but a serious threat to humans. Human infections begin with nonspecific febrile symptoms, but progress to a serious hemorrhagic syndrome with a case fatality rate of 2-50%. Although the ...... in Iran and neighboring countries and provide evidence of over 5000 confirmed cases of CCHF in a single period/season....

  10. Possible sexual transmission of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Yurievna Pshenichnaya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Three cases of family transmission of laboratory-confirmed Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF among spouses are reported. These spouses had sexual contact at the end of the incubation period or during the early stage of the mild form of CCHF, without any hemorrhagic symptoms in the first infected spouse. This report demonstrates that sexual contact may represent a real risk of CCHF transmission, even if the patient only experiences mild symptoms.

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever acquired in Florida, 1973-83.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, J J; Janowski, H T

    1985-01-01

    From 1973 to 1983, 49 Florida residents were reported with confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), 25 of whom were considered to have had Florida-acquired disease. Although there was no history of tick exposure for six of these 25 persons, all had contact with dogs or outdoor activities during the incubation period. The tick vectors of RMSF are widely distributed throughout Florida. We conclude that RMSF, although rare in Florida, can be acquired in the state. PMID:4061716

  12. [Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki; Moriikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro

    2004-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is an acute infectious disease caused by CCHF virus (CCHFV), a member of the family Bunyaviridae, genus Nairovirus. The case fatality rate of CCHF ranges from 10-40%. Because CCHF is not present in Japan, many Japanese virologists and clinicians are not very familiar with this disease. However, there remains the possibility of an introduction of CCHFV or other hemorrhagic fever viruses into Japan from surrounding endemic areas. Development of diagnostic laboratory capacity for viral hemorrhagic fevers is necessary even in countries without these diseases. At the National Institute of Infectious Diseases, Tokyo, Japan, laboratory-based systems such as recombinant protein-based antibody detection, antigen-capture and pathological examination have been developed. In this review article, epidemiologic and clinical data on CCHF in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, compiled through field investigations and diagnostic testing utilizing the aforementioned laboratory systems, are presented. CCHFV infections are closely associated with the environmental conditions, life styles, religion, occupation, and human economic activities. Based on these data, preventive measures for CCHFV infections are also discussed.

  13. Typhoid fever: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza Palma, Natalia Carolina; Farías Molina, Solange; Calzadilla Riveras, Jeannette; Hermoso, Amalia

    2016-06-21

    Typhoid fever remains a major health problem worldwide, in contrast to Chile, where this disease is an isolated finding. Clinical presentation is varied, mainly presenting with fever, malaise, abdominal discomfort, and nonspecific symptoms often confused with other causes of febrile syndrome. We report a six-year-old, male patient presenting with fever of two weeks associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, malaise, hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes. Differential diagnoses were considered and a Widal reaction and two blood cultures were requested; both came back positive, confirming the diagnosis of typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi. Prior to diagnosis confirmation, empirical treatment was initiated with ceftriaxone and metronidazole, with partial response; then drug therapy was adjusted according to ciprofloxacin susceptibility testing with a favorable clinical response. We discuss diagnostic methods and treatment of enteric fever with special emphasis on typhoid fever.

  14. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paddock, Christopher D; Fernandez, Susana; Echenique, Gustavo A; Sumner, John W; Reeves, Will K; Zaki, Sherif R; Remondegui, Carlos E

    2008-04-01

    We describe the first molecular confirmation of Rickettsia rickettsii, the cause of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), from a tick vector, Amblyomma cajennense, and from a cluster of fatal spotted fever cases in Argentina. Questing A. cajennense ticks were collected at or near sites of presumed or confirmed cases of spotted fever rickettsiosis in Jujuy Province and evaluated by polymerase chain reaction assays for spotted fever group rickettsiae. DNA of R. rickettsii was amplified from a pool of A. cajennense ticks and from tissues of one of four patients who died during 2003-2004 after illnesses characterized by high fever, severe headache, myalgias, and petechial rash. The diagnosis of spotted fever rickettsiosis was confirmed in the other patients by indirect immunofluorescence antibody and immunohistochemical staining techniques. These findings show the existence of RMSF in Argentina and emphasize the need for clinicians throughout the Americas to consider RMSF in patients with febrile rash illnesses.

  15. NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Salmonellosis (excluding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever) to Shigellosis - 2018. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable...

  16. Perinatal Yellow Fever: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Lilian Martins Oliveira; Romanelli, Roberta Maia Castro; de Carvalho, Andréa Lucchesi; Teixeira, Daniela Caldas; de Carvalho, Luis Fernando Andrade; Cury, Verônica Ferreira; Filho, Marcelo Pereira Lima; Perígolo, Graciele; Heringer, Tiago Pires

    2018-04-09

    An outbreak of yellow fever in Brazil made it possible to assess different presentations of disease such as perinatal transmission. A pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with yellow fever symptoms. She was submitted to cesarean section and died due to fulminant hepatitis. On the 6th day the newborn developed liver failure and died 13 days later. Yellow fever PCR was positive for both.

  17. Rat bite fever in a pet lover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, B B; Paller, A S; Katz, B Z

    1998-02-01

    Rat-bite fever is an uncommon bacterial illness resulting from infection with Streptobacillus moniliformis that is often transmitted by the bite of a rat. The cutaneous findings in rat-bite fever are nonspecific but have been described as maculopapular or petechial. We describe a 9-year-old girl with acrally distributed hemorrhagic pustules, fever, and arthralgias. Diagnosis was delayed because of difficulty in identifying the pathologic organism. She was successfully treated with 10 days of ceftriaxone.

  18. Q fever in Spain: Description of a new series, and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alende-Castro, Vanesa; Macía-Rodríguez, Cristina; Novo-Veleiro, Ignacio; García-Fernández, Xana; Treviño-Castellano, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Fernández, Sergio; González-Quintela, Arturo

    2018-03-01

    Forms of presentation of Q fever vary widely across Spain, with differences between the north and south. In the absence of reported case series from Galicia (north-west Spain), this study sought to describe a Q-fever case series in this region for the first time, and conduct a systematic review to analyse all available data on the disease in Spain. Patients with positive serum antibodies to Coxiella burnetii from a single institution over a 5-year period (January 2011-December 2015) were included. Patients with phase II titres above 1/128 (or documented seroconversion) and compatible clinical criterial were considered as having Q fever. Patients with clinical suspicion of chronic Q-fever and IgG antibodies to phase I-antigen of over 1/1024, or persistently high levels six months after treatment were considered to be cases of probable chronic Q-fever. Systematic review: We conducted a search of the Pubmed/Medline database using the terms: Q Fever OR Coxiella burnetii AND Spain. Our search yielded a total of 318 studies: 244 were excluded because they failed to match the main criteria, and 41 were discarded due to methodological problems, incomplete information or duplication. Finally, 33 studies were included. A total of 155 patients, all of them from Galicia, with positive serological determination were located during the study period; 116 (75%) were deemed to be serologically positive patients without Q fever and the remaining 39 (25%) were diagnosed with Q fever. A potential exposure risk was found in 2 patients (5%). The most frequent form of presentation was pneumonia (87%), followed by isolated fever (5%), diarrhoea (5%) and endocarditis (3%). The main symptoms were headache (100%), cough (77%) and fever (69%). A trend to a paucisymptomatic illness was observed in women. Hospital admission was required in 37 cases, and 6 patients died while in hospital. Only 2 patients developed chronic Q-fever. Systematic review: Most cases were sporadic, mainly presented

  19. Vaccines for preventing typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Rachael; Paul, Mical; Richardson, Marty; Neuberger, Ami

    2018-05-31

    Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever continue to be important causes of illness and death, particularly among children and adolescents in south-central and southeast Asia. Two typhoid vaccines are widely available, Ty21a (oral) and Vi polysaccharide (parenteral). Newer typhoid conjugate vaccines are at varying stages of development and use. The World Health Organization has recently recommended a Vi tetanus toxoid (Vi-TT) conjugate vaccine, Typbar-TCV, as the preferred vaccine for all ages. To assess the effects of vaccines for preventing typhoid fever. In February 2018, we searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and mRCT. We also searched the reference lists of all included trials. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing typhoid fever vaccines with other typhoid fever vaccines or with an inactive agent (placebo or vaccine for a different disease) in adults and children. Human challenge studies were not eligible. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria and extracted data, and assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We computed vaccine efficacy per year of follow-up and cumulative three-year efficacy, stratifying for vaccine type and dose. The outcome addressed was typhoid fever, defined as isolation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi in blood. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) and efficacy (1 - RR as a percentage) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In total, 18 RCTs contributed to the quantitative analysis in this review: 13 evaluated efficacy (Ty21a: 5 trials; Vi polysaccharide: 6 trials; Vi-rEPA: 1 trial; Vi-TT: 1 trial), and 9 reported on adverse events. All trials but one took place in typhoid-endemic countries. There was no information on vaccination in adults aged over 55 years of age, pregnant women, or travellers. Only one trial included data on children under two years of age.Ty21a vaccine (oral vaccine, three doses

  20. Comparisons of predictors for typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deen Jacqueline L

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Exposure of the individual to contaminated food or water correlates closely with the risk for enteric fever. Since public health interventions such as water improvement or vaccination campaigns are implemented for groups of individuals we were interested whether risk factors not only for the individual but for households, neighbourhoods and larger areas can be recognised? Methods: We conducted a large enteric fever surveillance study and analyzed factors which correlate with enteric fever on an individual level and factors associated with high and low risk areas with enteric fever incidence. Individual level data were linked to a population based geographic information systems. Individual and household level variables were fitted in Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE with the logit link function to take into account the likelihood that household factors correlated within household members. Results: Over a 12-month period 80 typhoid fever cases and 47 paratyphoid fever cases were detected among 56,946 residents in two bustees (slums of Kolkata, India. The incidence of paratyphoid fever was lower (0.8/1000/year, and the mean age of paratyphoid patients was older (17.1 years than for typhoid fever (incidence 1.4/1000/year, mean age 14.7 years. Residents in areas with a high risk for typhoid fever had lower literacy rates and economic status, bigger household size, and resided closer to waterbodies and study treatment centers than residents in low risk areas. Conclusion: There was a close correlation between the characteristics detected based on individual cases and characteristics associated with high incidence areas. Because the comparison of risk factors of populations living in high versus low risk areas is statistically very powerful this methodology holds promise to detect risk factors associated with diseases using geographic information systems.

  1. Intrathecal antibody production in two cases of yellow fever vaccine associated neurotropic disease in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Marczeski, Fanny Clara; Martinez, Valeria Paula; Nemirovsky, Corina; Padula, Paula Julieta

    2011-12-01

    During the period 2007-2008 several epizootics of Yellow fever with dead of monkeys occurred in southeastern Brasil, Paraguay, and northeastern Argentina. In 2008 after a Yellow fever outbreak an exhaustive prevention campaign took place in Argentina using 17D live attenuated Yellow fever vaccine. This vaccine is considered one of the safest live virus vaccines, although serious adverse reactions may occur after vaccination, and vaccine-associated neurotropic disease are reported rarely. The aim of this study was to confirm two serious adverse events associated to Yellow fever vaccine in Argentina, and to describe the analysis performed to assess the origin of specific IgM against Yellow fever virus (YFV) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Both cases coincided with the Yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic disease case definition, being clinical diagnosis longitudinal myelitis (case 1) and meningoencephalitis (case 2). Specific YFV antibodies were detected in CSF and serum samples in both cases by IgM antibody-capture ELISA. No other cause of neurological disease was identified. In order to obtain a conclusive diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) infection the IgM antibody index (AI(IgM) ) was calculated. High AI(IgM) values were found in both cases indicating intrathecal production of antibodies and, therefore, CNS post-vaccinal YFV infection could be definitively associated to YFV vaccination. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escott S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Escott, Ahmad B Tarabishy, Frederick H DavidorfHavener Eye Institute, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: The paper describes the first reported case of multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous hepatitis-A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccinations. A 33-year-old male developed sudden onset of flashing lights and floaters in his right eye 3 weeks following hepatitis A, typhoid, and yellow fever vaccinations. Fundus examination and angiography confirmed the presence of multiple peripheral chorioretinal lesions. These lesions demonstrated characteristic morphologic changes over a period of 8 weeks which were consistent with a diagnosis of self-resolving multifocal choroiditis. Vaccine-induced intraocular inflammation has been described infrequently. We demonstrate the first case of self-resolving multifocal choroiditis following simultaneous administration of hepatitis A, yellow fever, and typhoid immunizations.Keywords: multifocal choroiditis, vaccination, hepatitis A, typhoid, yellow fever

  3. Dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawichien, Terapong

    2012-05-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is endemic in tropical and subtropical zones and the prevalence is increasing across South-east Asia, Africa, the Western Pacific and the Americas. In recent years, the spread of unplanned urbanisation, with associated substandard housing, overcrowding and deterioration in water, sewage and waste management systems, has created ideal conditions for increased transmission of the dengue virus in tropical urban centres. While dengue infection has traditionally been considered a paediatric disease, the age distribution of dengue has been rising and more cases have been observed in adolescents and adults. Furthermore, the development of tourism in the tropics has led to an increase in the number of tourists who become infected, most of whom are adults. Symptoms and risk factors for dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and severe dengue differ between children and adults, with co-morbidities and incidence in more elderly patients associated with greater risk of mortality. Treatment options for DF and DHF in adults, as for children, centre round fluid replacement (either orally or intravenously, depending on severity) and antipyretics. Further data are needed on the optimal treatment of adult patients.

  4. THROMBOCYTOPENIA IN DENGUE HAEMORRHAGIC FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Putu Sutirta-Yasa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and geographical distribution of dengue has gradually increased during the past decade. Today, dengue is considered one of the most important arthropod-borne viral diseasases in humans in term of morbidity and mortality. Dengue infection   a potential life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF / dengue shock syndrome(DSS, characterized by thrombocytopenia and increased vascular permiability. Thrombocytopenia causes bleeding, but in   DHF patients with thrombocytopenia do not always develop bleeding manifestation. The pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia are not cleared. Multiple factors  may be involved in the machanisms leading to thrombocytopenia in DHF/DSS patients.

  5. Fever-Induced Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Manohar MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is increasingly recognized as a cause of sudden cardiac death. Many of these patients do not get diagnosed due its dynamic and often hidden nature. We have come a long way in understanding the disease process, and its electrophysiology appears to be intimately linked with sodium channel mutations or disorders. The cardiac rhythm in these patients can deteriorate into fatal ventricular arrhythmias. This makes it important for the clinician to be aware of the conditions in which arrhythmogenicity of Brugada syndrome is revealed or even potentiated. We present such an instance where our patient’s Brugada syndrome was unmasked by fever.

  6. Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your children to do the same, especially before eating, after using the toilet, after spending time in a crowd or around someone who's sick, after petting animals, and during travel on public transportation. Show your ...

  7. A model of dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boutayeb A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a disease which is now endemic in more than 100 countries of Africa, America, Asia and the Western Pacific. It is transmitted to the man by mosquitoes (Aedes and exists in two forms: Dengue Fever and Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever. The disease can be contracted by one of the four different viruses. Moreover, immunity is acquired only to the serotype contracted and a contact with a second serotype becomes more dangerous. Methods The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations. Results Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters. Conclusion The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.

  8. Orbital cellulitis in course of typhoid fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowacka, K.; Szreter, M.; Mikolajewicz, J.

    1993-01-01

    In 18 months girl with exophthalmus of the left eye and extensive swelling of the soft tissues in both orbits during continued fever was observed. Typhoid fever with a non-typical course and ophthalmic complications were diagnosed on the basis of serological tests. Complete cure after treatment with augmenting was obtained. (author)

  9. Antimicrobial resistance problems in typhoid fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragih, R. H.; Purba, G. C. F.

    2018-03-01

    Typhoid fever (enteric fever) remains a burden in developing countries and a major health problem in Southern and Southeastern Asia. Salmonella typhi (S. typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, is a gram-negative, motile, rod-shaped, facultative anaerobe and solely a human pathogen with no animal reservoir. Infection of S. typhi can cause fever, abdominal pain and many worsenonspecific symptoms, including gastrointestinal symptoms suchas nausea, vomiting, constipation, and diarrhea. Chloramphenicol, ampicillin,and cotrimoxazole were the first-recommended antibiotics in treating typhoid fever. In the last two decades though, these three traditional drugs started to show resistance and developed multidrug resistance (MDR) S. typhi strains. In many parts of the world, the changing modes ofpresentation and the development of MDR have made typhoid fever increasingly difficult to treat.The use of first-line antimicrobials had been recommended to be fluoroquinolone as a replacement. However, this wassoonfollowedbyreportsof isolates ofS. typhi showing resistancetofluoroquinolones as well. These antimicrobial resistance problems in typhoid fever have been an alarming situation ever since and need to be taken seriously or else typhoid fever will no longer be taken care completely by administering antibiotics.

  10. [Familial Mediterranean fever: not to be missed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, J.; Bemelman, F.J.; Potter van Loon, B.J.; Simon, A.

    2013-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is common among Turkish and Moroccan migrants. We describe three patients with FMF. A 3-year-old girl with recurrent fever and abdominal pain who was diagnosed early with FMF and treated effectively with colchicine. An adolescent girl who required interleukin

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charles R

    2013-04-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is typically undifferentiated from many other infections in the first few days of illness. Treatment should not be delayed pending confirmation of infection when Rocky Mountain spotted fever is suspected. Doxycycline is the drug of choice even for infants and children less than 8 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Statistics and Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search the CDC Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF) Transmission Signs and Symptoms Diagnosis and Testing ...

  13. Clinical characteristics of Q fever and etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in a tropical region of southern Taiwan: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsu Lai

    Full Text Available The clinical characteristics of Q fever are poorly identified in the tropics. Fever with pneumonia or hepatitis are the dominant presentations of acute Q fever, which exhibits geographic variability. In southern Taiwan, which is located in a tropical region, the role of Q fever in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has never been investigated.During the study period, May 2012 to April 2013, 166 cases of adult CAP and 15 cases of acute Q fever were prospectively investigated. Cultures of clinical specimens, urine antigen tests for Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila, and paired serologic assessments for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Q fever (Coxiella burnetii were used for identifying pathogens associated with CAP. From April 2004 to April 2013 (the pre-study period, 122 cases of acute Q fever were also included retrospectively for analysis. The geographic distribution of Q fever and CAP cases was similar. Q fever cases were identified in warmer seasons and younger ages than CAP. Based on multivariate analysis, male gender, chills, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzymes were independent characteristics associated with Q fever. In patients with Q fever, 95% and 13.5% of cases presented with hepatitis and pneumonia, respectively. Twelve (7.2% cases of CAP were seropositive for C. burnetii antibodies, but none of them had acute Q fever. Among CAP cases, 22.9% had a CURB-65 score ≧2, and 45.8% had identifiable pathogens. Haemophilus parainfluenzae (14.5%, S. pneumoniae (6.6%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (4.8%, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (3.0% were the most common pathogens identified by cultures or urine antigen tests. Moreover, M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, and co-infection with 2 pathogens accounted for 9.0%, 7.8%, and 1.8%, respectively.In southern Taiwan, Q fever is an endemic disease with hepatitis as the major presentation and is not a common etiology of CAP.

  14. Decreased expression of thyroid receptor-associated protein 220 in temporal lobe tissue of patients with refractory epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinmei; Wang Xuefeng; Xi Zhiqin; Gong Yun; Liu Fengying; Sun Jijun; Wu Yuan; Luan Guoming; Wang Yuping; Li Yunlin; Zhang Jianguo; Lu Yong; Li Hongwei

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: TRAP220 (thyroid hormone receptor-associated protein) functions as a coactivator for nuclear receptors and stimulates transcription by recruiting the TRAP mediator complex to hormone responsive promoter regions. Thus, TRAP220 enhances the function of thyroid/steroid hormone receptors such as thyroid hormone and oestrogen receptors. This study investigated the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein level in epileptic brains comparing with human control. Methods: We examined the expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels in temporal lobes from patients with chronic pharmacoresistant epilepsy who have undergone surgery. Results: Expression of TRAP220 mRNA and protein was shown to be decreased significantly in the temporal cortex of the patients with epilepsy. Conclusions: Our work showed that a decrease in TRAP220 mRNA and protein levels may be involved in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and may be associated with impairment of the brain caused by frequent seizures

  15. Molecular characterization of a novel human hybrid-type receptor that binds the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Linda; Madsen, P; Moestrup, S K

    1996-01-01

    the corresponding cDNA. The gene, designated SORL1, maps to chromosome 11q 23/24 and encodes a 2214-residue type 1 receptor containing a furin cleavage site immediately preceding the N terminus determined in the purified protein. The receptor, designated sorLA-1, has a short cytoplasmic tail containing a tyrosine...... density lipoprotein receptor gene family receptors, and 3) six tandemly arranged fibronectin type III repeats also found in certain neural adhesion proteins. sorLA-1 may therefore be classified as a hybrid receptor. Northern blotting revealed specific mRNA transcripts in brain, spinal cord, and testis......The 39-40-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) binds to the members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family and functions as a specialized endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi chaperone. Using RAP affinity chromatography, we have purified a novel approximately 250-kDa brain protein and isolated...

  16. Educational Fever and South Korean Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Kyu Lee

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the influence of educational fever on the development of the Republic of Korea education and economy in the context of the cultural history of this country. In order to examine this study, the author explains the concept of educational fever and discusses the relation between Confucianism and education zeal. Educational fever and human capitalization in South Korean higher education are analyzed from a comparative viewpoint. The study evaluates the effects and problems of education fever this country’s current higher education, and it concludes that Koreans’ educational fever has been a core factor by which to achieve the development of the national economy as well as the rapid expansion of higher education.

  17. Dengue fever: a Wikipedia clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, James M; De Wolff, Jacob; Beards, Graham M; Basden, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is a mosquito-borne infectious tropical disease caused by the dengue virus. Symptoms include fever, headache, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash that is similar to measles. In a small proportion of cases, the disease develops into life-threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever, which results in bleeding, thrombocytopenia, and leakage of blood plasma, or into dengue shock syndrome, in which dangerously low blood pressure occurs. Treatment of acute dengue fever is supportive, with either oral or intravenous rehydration for mild or moderate disease and use of intravenous fluids and blood transfusion for more severe cases. Along with attempts to eliminate the mosquito vector, work is ongoing to develop a vaccine and medications targeted directly at the virus.

  18. PATHOGENETIC MECHANISMS IN EXPERIMENTAL IMMUNE FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Richard K.; Wolff, Sheldon M.

    1968-01-01

    When rabbits sensitized to human serum albumin (HSA) are challenged intravenously with specific antigen, fever develops and two transferable pyrogens can be demonstrated in the circulation. The first appears prior to the development of fever and has properties consistent with soluble antigen-antibody complexes. These have been shown to be pyrogenic when prepared in vitro and to produce a state of febrile tolerance when repeatedly administered. The second pyrogen, demonstrable during fever in donor rabbits, appears to be similar to endogenous pyrogen described in other experimental fevers. It is postulated that the formation of antigen-antibody complexes constitutes an important initial phase of the febrile reaction in this type of immune fever. PMID:4873023

  19. Molecular detection of Coxiella burnetii from the formalin-fixed tissues of Q fever patients with acute hepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Rock Jang

    Full Text Available Serologic diagnosis is one of the most widely used diagnostic methods for Q fever, but the window period in antibody response of 2 to 3 weeks after symptom onset results in significant diagnostic delay. We investigated the diagnostic utility of Q fever PCR from formalin-fixed liver tissues in Q fever patients with acute hepatitis.We reviewed the clinical and laboratory data in patients with Q fever hepatitis who underwent liver biopsy during a 17-year period, and whose biopsied tissues were available. We also selected patients who revealed granuloma in liver biopsy and with no Q fever diagnosis within the last 3 years as control. Acute Q fever hepatitis was diagnosed if two or more of the following clinical, serologic, or histopathologic criteria were met: (1 an infectious hepatitis-like clinical feature such as fever (≥ 38°C with elevated hepatic transaminase levels; (2 exhibition of a phase II immunoglobulin G (IgG antibodies titer by IFA of ≥ 1:128 in single determination, or a four-fold or greater rise between two separate samples obtained two or more weeks apart; (3 histologic finding of biopsy tissue showing characteristic fibrin ring granuloma.A total of 11 patients with acute Q fever hepatitis were selected and analyzed. Of the 11 patients, 3 (27% had exposure to zoonotic risk factors and 7 (63% met the serologic criteria. Granulomas with either circumferential or radiating fibrin deposition were observed in 10 cases on liver biopsy and in 1 case on bone marrow biopsy. 8 (73% revealed positive Coxiella burnetii PCR from their formalin-fixed liver tissues. In contrast, none of 10 patients with alternative diagnosis who had hepatic granuloma revealed positive C. burnetii PCR from their formalin-fixed liver tissues.Q fever PCR from formalin-fixed liver tissues appears to be a useful adjunct for diagnosing Q fever hepatitis.

  20. Dengue fever in patients admitted in tertiary care hospitals in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munir, M. A.; Saqib, M. A. N.; Qureshi, H.; Alam, S. E.; Arif, A.; Khan, Z. U.; Saeed, Q.; Iqbal, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the gaps in the diagnosis and management of dengue fever cases. Methods: The retrospective descriptive analytical study was done with a case record analysis of patients with dengue fever admitted from January to December 2010 at five tertiary care hospitals in different Pakistani cities. Using a questionnaire, information was gathered on demography, haematological profile, management, use of blood and platelet transfusions and the outcome. For comparison, data of serologically-confirmed dengue patients from a private laboratory in Islamabad was collected to see the age, gender and month-wise distribution of cases tested over the same period. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Out of the 841 confirmed dengue cases, 514 (79%) were males and 139 (21%) females. The overall mean age was 31.3+-14.0 years. Dengue fever was seen in 653 (78%) and dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) in 188 (22%) patients. Most cases were between 20 and 49 years of age. A gradual increase in dengue fever and dengue haemorrhagic fever was seen from August, with a peak in October/November. Tourniquet test was done only in 20 (2.3%) cases, out of which 11 (55%) were positive and 9 (45%) were negative. Serial haematocrit was not done in any case. Total deaths were 5 (0.6%). Conclusions: Most cases were seen in October/November with the majority being in the 20-39 age group. Tourniquet test and serial haematocrit were infrequently used. No standard national guidelines were employed. (author)

  1. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2 -dependent fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-08-01

    The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2 -dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg(-1) ), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60-360 mg·kg(-1) ), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120-360 mg·kg(-1) ) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg(-1) ), Tsv (150 μg·kg(-1) ) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2 -independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Pediatric myth: fever and petechiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhammer, Martin D; Colletti, James E

    2008-09-01

    A child presenting with petechiae and fever is assumed to have meningococcemia or another form of bacterial sepsis and therefore to require antibiotics, blood cultures, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and hospital admission. A review of the literature challenges this statement and suggests that a child presenting with purpura (or petechiae), an ill appearance and delayed capillary refill time or hypotension should be admitted and treated for meningococcal disease without delay. Conversely, a child with a petechial rash, which is confined to the distribution of the superior vena cava, is unlikely to have meningococcal disease. Outpatient therapy in this context is appropriate. In other children, a reasonable approach would be to draw blood for culture and C-reactive protein (CRP) while administering antibiotics. If the CRP is normal, these children could be discharged to follow-up in 1 day, whereas children with CRP values greater than 6 mg/L would be admitted.

  3. Narcolepsy following yellow fever vaccination: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ewald Rosch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare, but important differential diagnosis for daytime sleepiness and atonic paroxysms in an adolescent. A recent increase in incidence in the paediatric age-group probably linked to the use of the Pandremix influenza vaccine in 2009, has increased awareness that different environmental factors can ‘trigger’ narcolepsy with cataplexy in a genetically susceptible population.Here we describe the case of a 13 year-old boy with narcolepsy following yellow-fever vaccination. He carries the HLA DQB1*0602 haplotype strongly associated with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Polysomnography showed rapid sleep onset with rapid eye movement (REM latency of 47 minutes, significant sleep fragmentation and a mean sleep latency of 1.6 minutes with sleep onset REM in 4 out of 4 nap periods. Together with the clinical history, these findings are diagnostic of narcolepsy type 1. The envelope protein E of the yellow fever vaccine strain 17D has significant amino acid sequence overlap with both hypocretin and the hypocretin receptor 2 receptors in protein regions that are predicted to act as epitopes for antibody production. These findings raise the question whether the yellow fever vaccine strain may, through a potential molecular mimicry mechanism, be another infectious trigger for this neuro-immunological disorder.

  4. Association of Mean Platelet Volume with Severity, Serology & Treatment Outcome in Dengue Fever: Prognostic Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kritika; Yadav, Ajay

    2015-11-01

    Dengue is the most rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease in the world. Dengue fever (DF) with its severe manifestations such as dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) has emerged as a major public health problem of international concern. Thrombocytopenia and bleeding are common complications of dengue fever, hence besides platelet counts, there is a need to assess the role of mean platelet volume. Studying association of mean platelet volume (MPV) with severity, serology & treatment outcome to assess its prognostic utility, which can be of great help in limiting morbidity & mortality associated with dengue fever. The present study was conducted in Central Pathology Lab of SMS Medical College & Hospital, Jaipur, Rajasthan from the period of March 2013 till October 2013. Blood samples were collected from 200 patients with NS 1 Antigen positivity experiencing febrile illness, clinically consistent with dengue infection. Evaluation of platelet counts, MPV, IgM and IgG antibodies was done in all these cases. Categorical data were presented as numbers (percent) and were compared among groups using Chi-square test. Groups compared for demographic data were presented as mean and standard deviation and were compared using student t-test, ANOVA and Post-Hoc Test, Tukey Test using SPSS, version 20 for Windows. A total of 200 Dengue fever cases were studied. Out of which, 68% cases were of DF, 23% DHF & 9% DSS i.e. classical dengue fever was most common presentation. Maximum (44%) cases were in age group of 15-24 years. Fever was the presenting complaint in all cases (100%). 98% cases of dengue had thrombocytopenia. MPV showed no significant correlation with severity, serology & treatment outcome, thus excluding its role in dengue cases. Mean platelet volume is not important as prognostic parameter in dengue fever.

  5. Hemodynamics in Korean Hemorrhagic Fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ji Young; Lee, Jung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1974-01-01

    The author in an attempt to evaluate hemodynamic changes in the clinical stages of Korean hemorrhagic fever measured plasma volume, cardiac output and effective renal plasma flow utilizing radioisoto as during various phases of the disease. Cardiac output was measured by radiocardiography with external monitoring method using RIHSA. Effective renal plasma flow was obtained from blood clearance curve drawn by external monitoring after radiohippuran injection according to the method described by Razzak et al. The study was carried out in thirty-eight cases of Korean hemorrhagic fever and the following conclusions were obtained. 1) Plasma volume was increased in the patients during the oliguric and hypertensive-diuretic phases, while it was normal in the patients during the normotensive-diuretic phase. 2) Cardiac index was increased in the patients during the oliguric phase and was slightly increased in the patients at the hypertensive diuretic phase. It was normal in the other phases. 3) Total peripheral resistance was increased in the hypertensive patients during diuretic phase, while it was normal in the rest of phases. 4) Effective renal plasma flow was significantly reduced in the patients during the oliguric and diuretic phases as well as at one month after the oliguric onset. There was no significant difference between the oliguric and the early diuretic phases. Renal plasma flow in the group of patients at one month after the oliguric onset was about 45% of the normal, however, it returned to normal level at six months after the onset. 5) Clinical syndrome of relative hypervolemia was observed in some patients during the oliguric phase or hypertensive diuretic phase. Characteristic hemodynamic findings were high cardiac output and normal to relatively increased peripheral resistance these cases. Relatively increased circulating blood volumes due to decreased effective vascular space was suggested for the mechanism of relative hypervolemia. 6) Cardiac

  6. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Illyas, M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107 (2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107 (37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107 (63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-105 degreeC (mean 101 degree C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1 (0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count 40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection, the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by molecular studies or dengue specific IgM. (author)

  7. [Coexistence of acute appendicitis and dengue fever: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuna-Ramos, Juan Fidel; Silva-Gracia, Carlos; Maya-Vacio, Gerardo Joel; Romero-Utrilla, Alejandra; Ríos-Burgueño, Efrén Rafael; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador

    2017-12-01

    Dengue is the most important human viral disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It can be asymptomatic or it can present in any of its 3clinical forms: Dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. However, some atypical manifestations have been reported in surgical emergencies caused by acute appendicitis in patients with dengue fever. We report the case of an 18-year-old Mexican male who presented to the emergency department of the General Hospital of Culiacan, Sinaloa, with symptoms of dengue fever, accompanied by crampy abdominal pain with positive Rovsing and Dunphy signs. Dengue infection was confirmed by a positive NS1 antigen test performed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An abdominal ultrasound revealed an appendicular process; as the abdominal pain in the right side kept increasing, an open appendectomy was performed. Abundant inflammatory liquid was observed during the surgery, and the pathology laboratory reported an oedematous appendix with fibrinopurulent plaques, which agreed with acute ulcerative appendicitis. The patient was discharged fully recovered without complications during the follow-up period. Acute abdominal pain can be caused in some cases by dengue infection. This can be confusing, which can lead to unnecessary surgical interventions, creating additional morbidities and costs for the patient. This unusual and coincident acute appendicitis with dengue highlights the importance of performing careful clinical studies for appropriate decision making, especially in dengue endemic regions during an outbreak of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Prospective cohort study of fever incidence and risk in elderly persons living at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokobayashi, Kenichi; Matsushima, Masato; Watanabe, Takamasa; Fujinuma, Yasuki; Tazuma, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence of fever among elderly persons under home medical management, diagnosis at fever onset and outcomes from a practical standpoint. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 5 clinics in residential areas of Tokyo that process an average of 50–200 outpatients/day. Participants Patients (n=419) aged ≥65 years who received home medical management from the five clinics between 1 October 2009 and 30 September 2010. Main outcome measures Fever (≥37.5°C or ≥1.5°C above usual body temperature), diagnosis at onset and outcomes (cure at home, hospitalisation and death). Results The incidence of fever was 2.5/1000 patient-days (95% CI 2.2 to 2.8). Fever occurred at least once (229 fever events) among one-third of the participants during the study period. Fever was more likely to arise in the wheelchair users or bedridden than in ambulatory individuals (HR 1.9 (95% CI 1.3 to 2.8; p<0.01); in patients with moderate-to-severe rather than those with none-to-mild cognitive impairment (HR, 1.7 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.6, p=0.01); and in those whose care-need levels were ≥3 rather than ≤2 (HR, 4.5 (95% CI 2.9 to 7.0; p<0.01). The causes of fever were pneumonia/bronchitis (n=103), skin and soft tissue infection (n=26), urinary tract infection (n=22) and the common cold (n=13). Fever was cured in 67% and 23% of patients at home and in hospital, respectively, and 5% of patients each died at home and in hospital. Antimicrobial agents treated 153 (67%) events in the home medical care setting. Conclusions Fever was more likely to occur in those requiring higher care levels and the main cause of fever was pneumonia/bronchitis. Healthcare providers should consider the conditions of elderly residents with lower objective functional status. PMID:25009132

  9. Appendicular perforation in dengue fever: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Desai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections have become one of major emerging infectious diseases in the tropics. Acute abdomen occurring in dengue viral infection is not uncommon. The spectrums of acute surgical emergencies which raise suspicion of an abdominal catastrophe in patients presenting with dengue fever include acute pancreatitis, acute acalculous cholecystitis, non-specific peritonitis and very rarely acute appendicitis. The presence of low white cell count and platelet count can raise suspicion of a diagnosis of dengue in a patient presenting with acute abdominal pain, during a dengue epidemic. We herein report three patients with dengue fever who had appendicular perforation during the course of their viral fever.

  10. Epidural Labor Analgesia and Maternal Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Emily E; Arendt, Katherine W

    2017-06-01

    Women receiving an epidural for labor analgesia are at increased risk for intrapartum fever. This relationship has been supported by observational, before and after, and randomized controlled trials. The etiology is not well understood but is likely a result of noninfectious inflammation as studies have found women with fever have higher levels of inflammatory markers. Maternal pyrexia may change obstetric management and women are more likely to receive antibiotics or undergo cesarean delivery. Maternal pyrexia is associated with adverse neonatal outcomes. With these consequences, understanding and preventing maternal fever is imperative.

  11. Clinical Features Of Malaria And Typhoid Fever | Mba | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Features to distinguish Malaria from Typhoid fever. These can be discerned from a good and detailed clinical history, in addition to a thorough physical examination. The following would help. The paroxysms of malaria fever as against the step ladder pattern fever of typhoid fever. The prominence of headaches in typhoid ...

  12. DMPD: The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ncellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. Ringwood L, Li L. Cytokine. 2008 Apr;42(1):1-7. Epub ...ases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. PubmedID 182...49132 Title The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling

  13. Very late-onset group B Streptococcus meningitis, sepsis, and systemic shigellosis due to interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jens C; Ghandil, Pegah; Chrabieh, Maya; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Picard, Capucine; Puel, Anne; Creech, C Buddy

    2009-11-01

    We describe a child with very late-onset group B Streptococcus sepsis and meningitis, systemic shigellosis, and chronic osteomyelitis. Peripheral blood cells obtained from the patient and her brother did not respond to stimulation with either interleukin-1beta or lipopolysaccharide. Sequencing of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 gene revealed 2 novel mutations.

  14. Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever: Systematic review to estimate global morbidity and mortality for 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey C. Buckle

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain important causes of morbidity worldwide. Accurate disease burden estimates are needed to guide policy decisions and prevention and control strategies.

  15. Fever prevalence and management among three rural communities in the North West Zone, Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, R M; Alegana, V A; Amran, J; Noor, A M; Snow, R W

    2010-06-01

    Between March and August 2008 we undertook 2 cross-sectional surveys among 1375 residents of 3 randomly selected villages in the district of Gebiley in the North-West Zone, Somalia. We investigated for the presence of malaria infection and the period prevalence of self-reported fever 14 days prior to both surveys. All blood samples examined were negative for both species of Plasmodium. The period prevalence of 14-day fevers was 4.8% in March and 0.6% in August; the majority of fevers (84.4%) were associated with other symptoms including cough, running nose and sore throat; 48/64 cases had resolved by the day of interview (mean duration 5.4 days). Only 18 (37.5%) fever cases were managed at a formal health care facility: 7 within 24 hours and 10 within 24-72 hours of onset. None of the fevers were investigated for malaria; they were treated with antibiotics, antipyretics and vitamins.

  16. Demographic and clinico-epidemiological features of dengue fever in Faisalabad, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz Ahmed Raza

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study was carried out to explore the epidemiological and clinical features of dengue fever in Faisalabad, Pakistan during 2011 and 2012. During the study period, anti-dengue IgM positive cases were reported in the post-monsoon period during the months of August-December. Certain hotspots for the dengue infection were identified in the city that coincide with the clusters of densely populated urban regions of the city. Out of total 299 IgM positive patients (male 218 and female 81; there were 239 dengue fever (DF and 60 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients. There was decrease in the median age of dengue patients from 31 years in 2011 to 21.5 years in 2012 (p<0.001. Abdominal pain was seen in 35% DHF patients followed by nausea in 28.3%, epistaxis in 25% and rash in 20% patients (p<0.05. Patients reported to be suffering from high-grade fever for an average of 8.83 days in DHF as compared to 5.82 days in DF before being hospitalized. Co-morbidities were found to be risk factor for the development of DHF in dengue patients. Clinical and laboratory features of dengue cases studied could be used for the early identification of patients at risk of severe dengue fever.

  17. Studies to Control Endemic Typhoid Fever in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-30

    Bol. Inst. Bacteriol. Chile 1976; 18:33-37. 30. Escaff, M, Urbina, A, Mary, J. Contaminacion de repollos regados con aguas servidas. Agricultura...Tecnica 1979; 39:59-62. - 31. Lobos, H, Greive, R, Quijada, M, Brandt, H. Pesquisa del genero Vibrio en aguas servidas. Bol. Inst. Bact. Chile 1974; 16:40...REPORT #2 0") STUDIES TO CONTROL ENDEMIC TYPHOID N FEVER IN CHILE 0) ANNUAL REPORT U’ Contract Period 1/1/82-12/31/82 • I REPORT PREPARED BY: L

  18. A Case of Familial Mediterranean Fever Having Intermittent Leukopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyitler, Ilke; Kavukcu, Salih

    2018-03-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a genetically inherited autoinflammatory disorder characterized by inflammatory attacks and may result in amyloidosis as a severe complication. Elevation of acute phase reactants, including leukocytosis, is seen during attack periods. Here we describe a 13-year-old female patient with a very rare clinical presentation of FMF, who would experience FMF attacks when she did not regularly take her colchicine. During these attacks she had leukopenia and neutropenia instead of leukocytosis. The leukocyte count returned to normal when she continued the medication and avoided attacks. Ethnicity and clinical signs are important in leukopenic patientsand should be investigated for FMF to avoid unnecessary procedures and complications.

  19. FastStats: Allergies/Hay Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Allergies and Hay Fever Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... 12 months: 7.5% Number with reported respiratory allergies in the past 12 months: 7.6 million ...

  20. THE MEANING OF FEVER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Polyakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fever is a normal physiological response to illness in young children and it is often associated with a self-limiting viral infection. Fever is not a diagnosis, but a symptom of illness. A diagnosis of the underlying illness is essential to institute appropriate treatment. Although it is a normal response, that facilitates and accelerates recovery, some people, including many doctors, believe that fever should be treated to reduce temperature without determining the underlying illness causing the fever. Antipyretics should be used to make the child more comfortable and not used routinely with the sole aim of reducing the temperature. This article aims to acquaint primary healthcare workers and general practitioners with last guidelines to assist the measurement of body temperature, deciding on when to refer and the appropriate use of antipyretic medication in children, efficacy and safety of paracetamol and ibuprofen in oral and rectal forms. 

  1. Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome (HFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care includes careful management of the patient’s fluid (hydration) and electrolyte (e.g., sodium, potassium, chloride) levels, ... TG, Peters CJ. Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers. Seminars in Pediatric Infectious Diseases 1997;8(Suppl 1):64-73 . ...

  2. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  3. Dengue Fever in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Dr. Amesh Adalja, an associate at the Center for Biosecurity and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School, of Medicine, discusses dengue fever outbreaks in the United States.

  4. Nutritional management in Ebola haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamon Chaiyasit

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ebola haemorrhagic fever is a viral infection causing a major health problem worldwide. In this short article, the authors briefly review and discuss on the nutritional management (energy, protein, fat and micronutrient in management of Ebola infection.

  5. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.

  6. STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Elisha; Wood, W. Barry

    1955-01-01

    Further studies have been made of a pyrogenic substance which appears in the circulation of rabbits during the course of experimental fever induced by injection of typhoid vaccine. With the use of a passive transfer method and pyrogen-tolerant recipients, the biological properties of this substance have been differentiated from those of the uncleared vaccine in the circulation. The newly identified factor resembles leucocytic pyrogen in the rapidity with which it produces fever and in its failure to exhibit cross-tolerance with bacterial pyrogen. This striking similarity of properties suggests that the circulating factor is of endogenous origin and may arise from cell injury. A close correlation between its presence in the circulation and the existence of fever has been demonstrated. The possible relationship of these findings to the pathogenesis of fever is evident. PMID:13271667

  7. STUDIES ON SOUTH AMERICAN YELLOW FEVER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nelson C.; Shannon, Raymond C.

    1929-01-01

    Yellow fever virus from M. rhesus has been inoculated into a South American monkey (Cebus macrocephalus) by blood injection and by bites of infected mosquitoes. The Cebus does not develop the clinical or pathological signs of yellow fever. Nevertheless, the virus persists in the Cebus for a time as shown by the typical symptoms and lesions which develop when the susceptible M. rhesus is inoculated from a Cebus by direct transfer of blood or by mosquito (A. aegypti) transmission. PMID:19869607

  8. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Horta Veloso

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  9. Acute atrial fibrillation during dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veloso Henrique Horta

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Cardiac rhythm disorders, such as atrioventricular blocks and ventricular ectopic beats, appear during infection and are attributed to viral myocarditis. However, supraventricular arrhythmias have not been reported. We present a case of acute atrial fibrillation, with a rapid ventricular rate, successfully treated with intravenous amiodarone, in a 62-year-old man with dengue hemorrhagic fever, who had no structural heart disease.

  10. CLINICAL AND LABORATORY PROFILE OF DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Fazal

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Dengue is a major health problem in many parts of India and Gulbarga (North Karnataka was previously not a known endemic area f or dengue. Infection with dengue virus can cause a spectrum of three clinical syndromes , classic dengue fever (DF , dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. The present study was undertaken to determine the disease profile of dengue virus infection in hospitalized patients. METHODS AND MATERIAL: One hundred patients admitted in Basaveshwar Teaching and General hospital with fever more than 38.5 degree Celsius and IgM dengue positive were selected. They were followed from the onset of fever to twelve days or till they are recovered according to WHO discharge criteria whichever is earlier. They underwent relevant investigations to identify specific organ dysfunction and categorize them into the spectrum of Dengue fever in accordance to W HO criteria . RESULTS: Out of 100 cases in this study 70 cases belongs to DF , 23 cases to DHF and 7 cases to DSS based on WHO criteria. All the cases had fever (100%. Other common symptoms noted were myalgia (61% , joint pain (54% , headache (66% , vomitin g (55% , pain abdomen (48% , rash (41% , hepatomegaly (20% , bleeding (21% and shock (8%. Hess test was positive in 24% patients. Low platelet count of less than 100 , 000/cu mm according to WHO criteria was present in 73% patients. Deranged liver functio n test and renal parameters were seen in 26 and 8 patients respectively . Mortality documented was 7 patients due to delayed presentation. The average duration of hospital stay was 4.65 days. CONCLUSION: Dengue fever was a more common manifestation than DHF or DSS. During aepidemic , dengue should be strongly considered on the differential diagnosis of any patient with fever. The treatment of dengue is mainly fluid management and supportive. Early recognition and management of alarm symptoms is the key to bet ter outcome

  11. Cardiac manifestations of Familial Mediterranean fever

    OpenAIRE

    Alsarah, Ahmad; Alsara, Osama; Laird-Fick, Heather S.

    2017-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is autoinflammatory disorder characterized by sporadic attacks of fever, peritonitis, pleuritis, and arthritis. It is mainly seen in patients from Mediterranean origins, but it is now reported more frequently in Europe and North America due to immigration. To analyze the data on the cardiovascular manifestations in FMF patients, we searched PubMed using the terms “Familial Mediterranean Fever” or “FMF” in combination with other key words including “cardiovas...

  12. Lansoprazole Upregulates Polyubiquitination of the TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6 and Facilitates Runx2-mediated Osteoblastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Kenichi; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Ohkawara, Bisei; Okuno, Tatsuya; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2015-12-01

    The transcription factor, runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), plays a pivotal role in the differentiation of the mesenchymal stem cells to the osteochondroblast lineages. We found by the drug repositioning strategy that a proton pump inhibitor, lansoprazole, enhances nuclear accumulation of Runx2 and induces osteoblastogenesis of human mesenchymal stromal cells. Systemic administration of lansoprazole to a rat femoral fracture model increased osteoblastogenesis. Dissection of signaling pathways revealed that lansoprazole activates a noncanonical bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) activated kinase-1 (TAK1)-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. We found by in cellulo ubiquitination studies that lansoprazole enhances polyubiquitination of the TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and by in vitro ubiquitination studies that the enhanced polyubiquitination of TRAF6 is attributed to the blocking of a deubiquitination enzyme, cylindromatosis (CYLD). Structural modeling and site-directed mutagenesis of CYLD demonstrated that lansoprazole tightly fits in a pocket of CYLD where the C-terminal tail of ubiquitin lies. Lansoprazole is a potential therapeutic agent for enhancing osteoblastic differentiation.

  13. Expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 and its clinical significance in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Yang, Guosheng; Qiu, Xiaofu; Luo, Youhua; Liu, Baichuan; Wang, Bingwei

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression and clinical significance of TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1) in kidney cancer. TRAP1 expression was detected in kidney cancer and normal kidney tissues by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Then, the correlation of TRAP1 expression with clinicopathological characters and patients' prognosis was evaluated in kidney cancer. IHC results revealed that the high-expression rates of TRAP1 in kidney cancer tissues and normal kidney tissues were 51.3% (41/80), 23.3% (7/30), and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.01). Also, TRAP1 mRNA level in kidney cancer was found to be significantly greater compared with those in normal kidney by qRT-PCR. In addition, TRAP1 expression in kidney cancer significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (Pkidney cancer and correlates with patients prognosis, which may be served as a potential marker for the diagnosis and treatment of kidney cancer.

  14. CHRONOVAC VOYAGEUR: A study of the immune response to yellow fever vaccine among infants previously immunized against measles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goujon, Catherine; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Tondeur, Laura; Poirier, Béatrice; Seffer, Valérie; Desprès, Philippe; Consigny, Paul-Henri; Vray, Muriel

    2017-10-27

    For administration of multiple live attenuated vaccines, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends either simultaneous immunization or period of at least 28days between vaccines, due to a possible reduction in the immune response to either vaccine. The main objective of this study was to compare the immune response to measles (alone or combined with mumps and rubella) and yellow fever vaccines among infants aged 6-24months living in a yellow fever non-endemic country who had receivedmeasles and yellow fever vaccines before travelling to a yellow fever endemic area. A retrospective, multicenter case-control study was carried out in 7 travel clinics in the Paris area from February 1st 2011 to march 31, 2015. Cases were defined as infants immunized with the yellow fever vaccine and with the measles vaccine, either alone or in combination with mumps and rubella vaccine, with a period of 1-27days between each immunization. For each case, two controls were matched based on sex and age: a first control group (control 1) was defined as infants having received the measles vaccine and the yellow fever vaccine simultaneously; a second control group (control 2) was defined as infants who had a period of more than 27days between receiving the measles vaccine and yellow fever vaccine. The primary endpoint of the study was the percentage of infants with protective immunity against yellow fever, measured by the titer of neutralizing antibodies in a venous blood sample. One hundred and thirty-one infants were included in the study (62 cases, 50 infants in control 1 and 19 infants in control 2). Of these, 127 (96%) were shown to have a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies. All 4 infants without a protective titer of yellow fever antibodies were part of control group 1. The measles vaccine, alone or combined with mumps and rubella vaccines, appears to have no influence on humoral immune response to the yellow fever vaccine when administered between 1 and 27

  15. Mechanism of fever induction in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegert, R; Philipp-Dormston, W K; Radsak, K; Menzel, H

    1976-01-01

    Three exogenous pyrogens (Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, synthetic double-stranded ribonucleic acid. Newcastle disease virus) were compared with respect to their mechanisms of fever induction in rabbits. All inducers stimulated the production of an endogenous pyrogen demonstrated in the blood as well as prostaglandins of the E group, and of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the cerebrospinal fluid. The concentrations of these compounds were elevated approximately twofold as compared to the controls. Independently of the mode of induction, the fever reaction could be prevented by pretreatment with 5 mg of cycloheximide per kg, although the three fever mediators were induced as in febrile animals. Consequently, at least one additional fever mediator that is sensitive to a 30 to 50% inhibition of protein synthesis by cycloheximide has to be postulated. The comparable reactions of the rabbits after administration of different pyrogens argues for a similar fever mechanism. In contrast to fever induction there was no stimulation of endogenous pyrogen, prostaglandins of the E group, and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in hyperthermia as a consequence of exposure of the animals to exogenous overheating. Furthermore, hyperthermia could not be prevented by cycloheximide. PMID:185148

  16. Fever and abdominal tumoral masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin C. Dima

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available 49 year-old man presented to our clinic for pain in the right hypochondrium, diarrhea, and fever. The clinical examination highlights a tumoral formation in the right side of the abdomen, with firm consistency, poorly defined margins, and present mobility in the deep structures. On biological exams, leukocytosis with neutrophilia, inflammatory syndrome, and hypoalbuminaemia were identified. The first computed tomography exam described parietal thickening of the ascending colon, with infiltrative aspect, and multiple local adenopathies, lomboaortic and interaortocave. Moreover, four nodular liver tumors, with hypodense image in native examination, were identified. The lab tests for infectious diseases were all inconclusives: three hemocultures, three stool samples, and three coproparasitological exams were all negatives. Interdisciplinary examinations, internal medicine and infectious diseases, sustained the diagnosis of colonic neoplasm with peritumoral abscess and liver pseudo-tumoral masses. The colonoscopy did not revealed any bowel lesions relevant for neoplasia. This result as well as the bio-clinical context imposed abstention from surgical intervention. Wide spectrum antibiotics and symptomatic treatment were initiated. But, ten days after hospitalization, the second computed tomography exam showed reduction of the ascending colon wall thickness associated with significant increases of the liver tumors is so revealed. The investigations for other possible etiologies were so continued.

  17. Bovine petechial fever (Ondiri disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G

    1993-02-01

    Bovine petechial fever is a Rickettsial disease of cattle, which has been diagnosed, only in Kenya, East Africa. Other countries in the region share some of the biotopes in which the disease occurs, and may well have the infection. The disease is characterised by widespread petechial and ecchymotic haemorrhages on the mucosal surfaces, and throughout the serosal and subserosal surfaces of the body organs and cavities. It may be fatal in up to 50% of untreated cases. The causal organism may be demonstrated most readily in the cytoplasm of polymorphonuclear granulocytes of the peripheral blood, as well as other leucocytes, and has been classified as Cytoecetes ondirii, a member of the tribe Ehrlichiae. Circumstantial and other evidence suggests that the disease is transmitted by an arthropod vector, which has yet to be identified. The blood of a naturally infected wild ruminant, the bushbuck, Tragelaphus scriptus has been shown to remain infective for at least 2 years, and other species such as the African buffalo, Syncercus caffer for at least 5 weeks. These and possibly other species, may serve as the amplifying and reservoir hosts.

  18. Problem Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ovary syndrome. Read our information on PCOS for teens , and see your doctor if you think you may have PCOS. Major weight loss. Girls who have anorexia will often stop having periods. When to see ...

  19. Incidence and risk factors of milk fever among cross-bred dairy cows ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted on 206 cross-bred dairy cows in different dairy herds in Khartoum State, Sudan, during the period from March 2003 to June 2004 to determine the prevalence and incidence rate of milk fever (MF) based on clinical and laboratory diagnosis, and to recognize the risk factors associated with the ...

  20. Urinary tract infections and post-operative fever in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Jorge; Smith, Arthur; Geavlete, Petrisor; Shah, Hemendra; Kural, Ali Riza; de Sio, Marco; Amón Sesmero, José H; Hoznek, András; de la Rosette, Jean

    2013-10-01

    To review the incidence of UTIs, post-operative fever, and risk factors for post-operative fever in PCNL patients. Between 2007 and 2009, consecutive PCNL patients were enrolled from 96 centers participating in the PCNL Global Study. Only data from patients with pre-operative urine samples and who received antibiotic prophylaxis were included. Pre-operative bladder urine culture and post-operative fever (>38.5°C) were assessed. Relationship between various patient and operative factors and occurrence of post-operative fever was assessed using logistic regression analyses. Eight hundred and sixty-five (16.2%) patients had a positive urine culture; Escherichia coli was the most common micro-organism found in urine of the 350 patients (6.5%). Of the patients with negative pre-operative urine cultures, 8.8% developed a fever post-PCNL, in contrast to 18.2% of patients with positive urine cultures. Fever developed more often among the patients whose urine cultures consisted of Gram-negative micro-organisms (19.4-23.8%) versus those with Gram-positive micro-organisms (9.7-14.5%). Multivariate analysis indicated that a positive urine culture (odds ratio [OR] = 2.12, CI [1.69-2.65]), staghorn calculus (OR = 1.59, CI [1.28-1.96]), pre-operative nephrostomy (OR = 1.61, CI [1.19-2.17]), lower patient age (OR for each year of 0.99, CI [0.99-1.00]), and diabetes (OR = 1.38, CI [1.05-1.81]) all increased the risk of post-operative fever. Limitations include the use of fever as a predictor of systemic infection. Approximately 10% of PCNL-treated patients developed fever in the post-operative period despite receiving antibiotic prophylaxis. Risk of post-operative fever increased in the presence of a positive urine bacterial culture, diabetes, staghorn calculi, and a pre-operative nephrostomy.

  1. [Surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F F; Zhao, S L; Chen, Q; Chang, Z R; Zhang, J; Zheng, Y M; Luo, L; Ran, L; Liao, Q H

    2017-06-10

    Objective: Through analyzing the surveillance data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in 2015 to understand the related epidemiological features and most possible clustering areas of high incidence. Methods: Individual data was collected from the passive surveillance program and analyzed by descriptive statistic method. Characteristics on seasonal, regional and distribution of the diseases were described. Spatial-temporal clustering characteristics were estimated, under the retrospective space-time method. Results: A total of 8 850 typhoid fever cases were reported from the surveillance system, with incidence rate as 0.65/100 000. The number of paratyphoid fever cases was 2 794, with incidence rate as 0.21/100 000. Both cases of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever occurred all year round, with high epidemic season from May to October. Most cases involved farmers (39.68 % ), children (15.89 % ) and students (12.01 % ). Children under 5 years showed the highest incidence rate. Retrospective space-time analysis for provinces with high incidence rates would include Yunnan, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hunan and Guangdong, indicating the first and second class clusters were mainly distributed near the bordering adjacent districts and counties among the provinces. Conclusion: In 2015, the prevalence rates of typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever were low, however with regional high prevalence areas. Cross regional transmission existed among provinces with high incidence rates which might be responsible for the clusters to appear in these areas.

  2. Predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyles, David; Sinha, Madhumita; Rosenberg, David I; Foster, Kevin N; Tran, Melissa; Drachman, David

    2014-01-01

    To determine predictors of serious bacterial infections in pediatric burn patients with fever (core temp ≥38.5°C), the authors conducted a retrospective review of medical records of pediatric (0-18 years) patients admitted to the Arizona Burn Center between 2008 and 2011 with greater than 5% TBSA and inpatient hospitalization for ≥72 hours. The study group comprised patients with a febrile episode during their inpatient stay. Serious bacterial infection (the primary outcome variable) was defined as: bacteremia, urinary tract infection, meningitis (blood, urine, or cerebrospinal fluid culture positive for a pathogen respectively), pneumonia, line, and wound infection. A generalized estimating equation analysis was done to predict the presence or absence of serious bacterial infection. Of 1082 pediatric burn patients hospitalized during the study period, 353 met the study eligibility criteria. A total of 108 patients (30.6%) had at least one fever episode (fever group). No difference in demographic characteristics was noted between the fever and no-fever groups; significant differences were observed for: third-degree TBSA, second-degree TBSA, total operating room visits, length of stay, Injury Severity Score, and death. A total of 47.2% of the patients had one or more episodes of fever with serious bacterial infection. In a generalized estimating equation predictive model, presence of a central line, second-, and third-degree TBSA were predictive of serious bacterial infection in burn patients with fever. In this study, individual clinical variables such as tachypnea and tachycardia were not predictive of serious bacterial infections, but the presence of a central line, and larger TBSA were significant predictors of serious bacterial infections. Younger age (P =.08) and ventilator support (P =.057) also approached significance as predictors of serious bacterial infections.

  3. Changes of Pituitary Hormones after Injection of Naloxone in the Hypotensive Phase of Korean Hemorrhagic Fever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Cho, Bo Youn; Lee, Hong Gyu; Lee, Jung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Tae [Hallym Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-09-15

    The opiate antagonist, naloxone, was injected for the reversal of hypotension due to Korean hemorrhagic fever, and the authors observed changes in pituitary hormones. In the hypotensive phase of the Korean hemorrhagic fever, the beta-endorphin was high, and normalized gradually in the diuretic and convalescent period. The naloxone raised the pulse rate and the blood pressure within 30 minutes without change in the central venous pressure. Around 30 minuted after the injection of the naloxone, the beta-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol rose. The prolactin fell down 60 minutes after the naloxone injection.

  4. CAREGIVERS' KNOWLEDGE AND HOME MANAGEMENT OF FEVER IN CHILDREN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koech, P J; Onyango, F E; Jowi, C

    2014-05-01

    Fever is one of the most common complaints presented to the Paediatric Emergency Unit (PEU). It is a sign that there is an underlying pathologic process, the most common being infection. Many childhood illnesses are accompanied by fever, many of which are treated at home prior to presentation to hospital. Most febrile episodes are benign. Caregivers are the primary contacts to children with fever. Adequate caregivers' knowledge and proper management of fever at home leads to better management of febrile illnesses and reduces complications. To determine the caregivers' knowledge and practices regarding fever in children. A cross-sectional study. Peadiatric Emergency Unit at Kenyatta National Hospital (KNH) SUBJECTS: Two hundred and fifty caregivers of children under 12 years presenting with fever in August to October 2011 to the PEU. Three quarters of the caregivers' defined fever correctly. Their knowledge on the normal body was at 47.6%. Infection was cited as the leading cause of fever (95.2%). Brain damage (77.6%) and dehydration (65.6%) were viewed as the most common complication. Fever was treated at home by 97.2% of caregivers, most of them used medication. Fever was defined correctly by 75.2% of the study participants and a majority of them used touch to detect fever. Fever was managed at home with medications. Public Health Education should be implemented in order to enlighten caregivers on fever and advocate for the use of a clinical thermometer to monitor fever at home.

  5. Context dependency and generality of fever in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahlschmidt, Z. R.; Adamo, S. A.

    2013-07-01

    Fever can reduce mortality in infected animals. Yet, despite its fitness-enhancing qualities, fever often varies among animals. We used several approaches to examine this variation in insects. Texas field crickets ( Gryllus texensis) exhibited a modest fever (1 °C increase in preferred body temperature, T pref) after injection of prostaglandin, which putatively mediates fever in both vertebrates and invertebrates, but they did not exhibit fever during chronic exposure to heat-killed bacteria. Further, chronic food limitation and mating status did not affect T pref or the expression of behavioural fever, suggesting limited context dependency of fever in G. texensis. Our meta-analysis of behavioural fever studies indicated that behavioural fever occurs in many insects, but it is not ubiquitous. Thus, both empirical and meta-analytical results suggest that the fever response in insects `is widespread, although certainly not inevitable' (Moore 2002). We highlight the need for future work focusing on standardizing an experimental protocol to measure behavioural fever, understanding the specific mechanism(s) underlying fever in insects, and examining whether ecological or physiological costs often outweigh the benefits of fever and can explain the sporadic nature of fever in insects.

  6. Impact of yellow fever on the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomori, O

    1999-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) has remained a disease of public health importance since it was first described in the fifteenth century. At different periods in human history, YF has caused untold hardship and indescribable misery among populations in the Americas, Europe, and Africa. It brought economic disaster in its wake, constituting a stumbling block to development. Yellow fever is an arboviral infection with three epidemiological transmission cycles between monkeys, mosquitoes, and humans. It is an acute infectious disease characterized by sudden onset, with two phases of development separated by a short period of remission. The clinical spectrum of YF varies from a very mild, nonspecific, febrile illness to a fulminating, sometimes fatal disease with pathognomonic features. In severe cases, jaundice and bleeding diathesis with hepatorenal involvement are common. The fatality rate of severe YF is 50% or higher. Despite landmark achievements in the understanding of the epidemiology of YF and the availability of a safe, efficacious vaccine, YF remains a major public health problem in both Africa and South America, where annually the disease affects an estimated 200,000 persons, causing an estimated 30,000 deaths. Since the 1980s epidemics of YF in Africa have affected predominantly children under the age of 15 years. The failure to control YF arises from a misapplication of public health strategies and insufficient political commitment by governments in YF endemic areas, especially in Africa, to control the disease.

  7. [Evaluation on the effects of prevention and control programs regarding typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guanghai; Zou, Zhiting; Wang, Dan; Huang, Yanping; Nie, Wei; Liu, Huihui; Tang, Guangpeng

    2014-05-01

    This study was to evaluate the effects of prevention and control regarding programs on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever, in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012, to provide evidence for the improvement of related programs. Data on typhoid fever and paratyphoid including information on epidemics, individual, cases, measures for prevention and control programs taken and relative government documents were collected and analyzed in Guizhou province, from 2007 to 2012. Information related to the average annual incidence, nature of outbreaks, time span before confirmed diagnosis was made, unit which carried the case report, proportion of laboratory confirmed diagnosed cases and case-management were compared between 2007-2009 and 2010-2012 descriptively while chi-square test with Excel and EpiInfo software were used for data analysis. In the period of 2007-2009, a total of 5 978 typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever cases were reported in Guizhou province with the average yearly incidence as 5.29/100 000. In the period of 2010-2012, 2 765 cases were reported with the average yearly incidence as 2.57/100 000. When compared to the former, data from the latter period showed that the average yearly incidence had declined 51.31% in all the prefectures. There were still some outbreaks appeared but the total number of cases involved reduced 87.50%. The time span before the confirmation of diagnosis became shorter but the difference was not statistically significant (χ² = 0.08, P = 0.99). Number of cases reported by hospitals at county or above had 11.51% of increase while those cases reported at the township hospitals or below decreased for 61.47% . The proportion of laboratory diagnosed cases increased 23.63%. Rates of timeliness on cards being filled in, input and audited showed increase of 8.44%, 6.76% and 2.40% respectively. Successful measures for prevention and control on typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever had been remarkably taken in Guizhou province, but the potential

  8. Acute infectious purpura fulminans due to probable spotted fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Kundavaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpura fulminans (PF is associated with several infections, most notably with meningococcus, staphylococcus, and streptococcus infections. However, there are few reports of association of this entity with spotted fever from India. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with fever, headache, and myalgia. On the seventh day of fever he developed nonblanching purple hemorrhagic purpura on the trunk and most prominently on the extremities consistent with purpura fulminans. Immunofluorescent assay confirmed the diagnosis of spotted fever. PF though common with rocky mountain spotted fever (RMSF is rarely seen in association with Indian tick typhus, the usual cause of spotted fever in India.

  9. Can internet search queries be used for dengue fever surveillance in China?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pi; Wang, Li; Zhang, Yanhong; Luo, Ganfeng; Zhang, Yanting; Deng, Changyu; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Qingying

    2017-10-01

    China experienced an unprecedented outbreak of dengue fever in 2014, and the number of cases reached the highest level over the past 25 years. Traditional sentinel surveillance systems of dengue fever in China have an obvious drawback that the average delay from receipt to dissemination of dengue case data is roughly 1-2 weeks. In order to exploit internet search queries to timely monitor dengue fever, we analyzed data of dengue incidence and Baidu search query from 31 provinces in mainland China during the period of January 2011 to December 2014. We found that there was a strong correlation between changes in people's online health-seeking behavior and dengue fever incidence. Our study represents the first attempt demonstrating a strong temporal and spatial correlation between internet search trends and dengue epidemics nationwide in China. The findings will help the government to strengthen the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for dengue fever. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Dengue and the risk of urban yellow fever reintroduction in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massad Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To propose a mathematical method for the estimation of the Basic Reproduction Number, R0, of urban yellow fever in a dengue-infested area. METHODS: The method is based on the assumption that, as the same vector (Aedes aegypti causes both infections, all the quantities related to the mosquito, estimated from the initial phase of dengue epidemic, could be applied to yellow fever dynamics. It is demonstrated that R0 for yellow fever is, on average, 43% lower than that for dengue. This difference is due to the longer dengue viremia and its shorter extrinsic incubation period. RESULTS: In this study the analysis was expanded to the epidemiological situation of dengue in São Paulo in the year 2001. The total number of dengue cases increased from 3,582 in 2000 to 51,348 in 2001. It was then calculated R0 for yellow fever for every city which have shown R0 of dengue greater than 1. It was also estimated the total number of unprotected people living in highly risky areas for urban yellow fever. CONCLUSIONS: Currently there is a great number of non-vaccinated people living in Aedes aegypti infested area in the state of São Paulo.

  11. Fish can show emotional fever: stress-induced hyperthermia in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Sonia; Huntingford, Felicity A; Boltaña, Sebastian; Vargas, Reynaldo; Knowles, Toby G; Mackenzie, Simon

    2015-11-22

    Whether fishes are sentient beings remains an unresolved and controversial question. Among characteristics thought to reflect a low level of sentience in fishes is an inability to show stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH), a transient rise in body temperature shown in response to a variety of stressors. This is a real fever response, so is often referred to as 'emotional fever'. It has been suggested that the capacity for emotional fever evolved only in amniotes (mammals, birds and reptiles), in association with the evolution of consciousness in these groups. According to this view, lack of emotional fever in fishes reflects a lack of consciousness. We report here on a study in which six zebrafish groups with access to a temperature gradient were either left as undisturbed controls or subjected to a short period of confinement. The results were striking: compared to controls, stressed zebrafish spent significantly more time at higher temperatures, achieving an estimated rise in body temperature of about 2-4°C. Thus, zebrafish clearly have the capacity to show emotional fever. While the link between emotion and consciousness is still debated, this finding removes a key argument for lack of consciousness in fishes. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Dengue fever outbreak: a clinical management experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shahid; Ali, Nadir; Ashraf, Shahzad; Ilyas, Mohammad; Tariq, Waheed-Uz-Zaman; Chotani, Rashid A

    2008-01-01

    To determine the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever and compare the clinical and haematological characteristics of Dengue-probable and Dengue-proven cases. An observational study. The Combined Military Hospital, Malir Cantt., Karachi, from August 2005 to December 2006. All patients with age above 14 years, who were either hospitalized or treated in medical outdoor clinic due to acute febrile illness, were evaluated for clinical features of Dengue Fever (DF), Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). Patients showing typical clinical features and haematological findings suggestive of Dengue fever (As per WHO criteria) were evaluated in detail for comparison of probable and confirmed cases of Dengue fever. All other cases of acute febrile illness, not showing clinical features or haematological abnormalities of Dengue fever, were excluded. The clinical and laboratory features were recorded on SPSS 11.0 programme and graded where required, for descriptive and statistical analysis. Out of 5200 patients with febrile illness, 107(2%) presented with typical features of DF, 40/107(37%) were Dengue-proven while 67/107(63%) were Dengue-probable. Out of Dengue-proven cases, 38 were of DF and 2 were of DHF. Day 1 temperature ranged from 99-1050C (mean 1010C). Chills and rigors were noticed in 86 (80%), myalgia in 67%, headache in 54%, pharyngitis in 35%, rash in 28%, and bleeding manifestations in 2% cases. Hepatomegaly in 1(0.5%), lymphadenopathy in 1(0.5%) and splenomegaly in 12 (11.2%) cases. Leucopoenia (count40 U/L in 57% cases. Frequency of clinically suspected dengue virus infection was 107 (2%), while confirmed dengue fever cases were 40 (0.8%) out of 5200 fever cases. Fever with chills and rigors, body aches, headache, myalgia, rash, haemorrhagic manifestations, platelet count, total leukocyte count, and ALT, are parameters to screen the cases of suspected dengue virus infection; the diagnosis cannot be confirmed unless supported by

  13. Early fever after trauma: Does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, Holly E; Rowell, Susan; Morris, Cynthia; Lin, Amber L; Schreiber, Martin A

    2018-01-01

    Fever is strongly associated with poor outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that early fever is a direct result of brain injury and thus would be more common in TBI than in patients without brain injury and associated with inflammation. We prospectively enrolled patients with major trauma with and without TBI from a busy Level I trauma center intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were assigned to one of four groups based on their presenting Head Abbreviated Injury Severity Scale scores: multiple injuries: head Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score greater than 2, one other region greater than 2; isolated head: head AIS score greater than 2, all other regions less than 3; isolated body: one region greater than 2, excluding head/face; minor injury: no region with AIS greater than 2. Early fever was defined as at least one recorded temperature greater than 38.3°C in the first 48 hours after admission. Outcome measures included neurologic deterioration, length of stay in the ICU, hospital mortality, discharge Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended, and plasma levels of seven key cytokines at admission and 24 hours (exploratory). Two hundred sixty-eight patients were enrolled, including subjects with multiple injuries (n = 59), isolated head (n = 97), isolated body (n = 100), and minor trauma (n = 12). The incidence of fever was similar in all groups irrespective of injury (11-24%). In all groups, there was a significant association between the presence of early fever and death in the hospital (6-18% vs. 0-3%), as well as longer median ICU stays (3-7 days vs. 2-3 days). Fever was significantly associated with elevated IL-6 at admission (50.7 pg/dL vs. 16.9 pg/dL, p = 0.0067) and at 24 hours (83.1 pg/dL vs. 17.1 pg/dL, p = 0.0025) in the isolated head injury group. Contrary to our hypothesis, early fever was not more common in patients with brain injury, though fever was associated with longer ICU stays and death in all groups. Additionally, fever was

  14. Interaction between the SLC19A1 gene and maternal first trimester fever on offspring neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Lijun; Zhu, Huiping; Ye, Rongwei; Wu, Jilei; Liu, Jianmeng; Ren, Aiguo; Li, Zhiwen; Zheng, Xiaoying

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have indicated that the reduced folate carrier gene (SLC19A1) is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the interaction between the SLC19A1 gene variant and maternal fever exposure and NTD risk remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the risk for NTDs was influenced by the interactions between the SLC19A1 (rs1051266) variant and maternal first trimester fever. We investigated the potential interaction between maternal first trimester fever and maternal or offspring SLC19A1 polymorphism through a population-based case-control study. One hundred and four nuclear families with NTDs and 100 control families with nonmal newborns were included in the study. SLC19A1 polymorphism was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism. Mothers who had the GG/GA genotype and first trimester fever had an elevated risk of NTDs (adjusted odds ratio, 11.73; 95% confidence interval, 3.02-45.58) as compared to absence of maternal first trimester fever and AA genotype after adjusting for maternal education, paternal education, and age, and had a significant interactive coefficient (γ = 3.17) between maternal GG/GA genotype and first trimester fever. However, there was no interaction between offspring's GG/GA genotype and maternal first trimester fever (the interactive coefficient γ = 0.97) after adjusting for confounding factors. Our findings suggested that the risk of NTDs was potentially influenced by a gene-environment interaction between maternal SLC19A1 rs1051266 GG/GA genotype and first trimester fever. Maternal GG/GA genotype may strengthen the effect of maternal fever exposure on NTD risk in this Chinese population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Q fever: a new ocular manifestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaondo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available P Udaondo1,3, S Garcia-Delpech1,2, D Salom1,2, M Garcia-Pous1, M Diaz-Llopis1,21Department of Ophthalmology, Nuevo Hospital Universitario y Politecnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain; 2Faculty of Medicine, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain; 3Universidad Cardenal Herrera CEU, Valencia, SpainAbstract: Q Fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii. Ocular manifestations are rare in this infection. We describe the case of a man complaining of an intense retro-orbital headache, fever, arthralgia, and bilateral loss of vision, who showed an anterior uveitis accompanied by exudative bilateral inferior retinal detachment and optic disk edema. At the beginning, a Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada (VKH syndrome was suspected, but the patient was diagnosed with Q fever and treatment with doxycycline was initiated, with complete resolution after 2 weeks. We wondered if Q fever could unleash VKH syndrome or simulate a VKH syndrome by a similar immunological process.Keywords: Q fever, Vogt–Koyanagi–Harada syndrome, panuveitis, exudative retinal detachment

  16. Spatiotemporal analysis of indigenous and imported dengue fever cases in Guangdong province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhongjie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever has been a major public health concern in China since it re-emerged in Guangdong province in 1978. This study aimed to explore spatiotemporal characteristics of dengue fever cases for both indigenous and imported cases during recent years in Guangdong province, so as to identify high-risk areas of the province and thereby help plan resource allocation for dengue interventions. Methods Notifiable cases of dengue fever were collected from all 123 counties of Guangdong province from 2005 to 2010. Descriptive temporal and spatial analysis were conducted, including plotting of seasonal distribution of cases, and creating choropleth maps of cumulative incidence by county. The space-time scan statistic was used to determine space-time clusters of dengue fever cases at the county level, and a geographical information system was used to visualize the location of the clusters. Analysis were stratified by imported and indigenous origin. Results 1658 dengue fever cases were recorded in Guangdong province during the study period, including 94 imported cases and 1564 indigenous cases. Both imported and indigenous cases occurred more frequently in autumn. The areas affected by the indigenous and imported cases presented a geographically expanding trend over the study period. The results showed that the most likely cluster of imported cases (relative risk = 7.52, p  Conclusions This study demonstrated that the geographic range of imported and indigenous dengue fever cases has expanded over recent years, and cases were significantly clustered in two heavily urbanised areas of Guangdong province. This provides the foundation for further investigation of risk factors and interventions in these high-risk areas.

  17. [Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Sá DelFiol, Fernando; Junqueira, Fábio Miranda; da Rocha, Maria Carolina Pereira; de Toledo, Maria Inês; Filho, Silvio Barberato

    2010-06-01

    Although the number of confirmed cases of spotted fever has been declining in Brazil since 2005, the mortality rate (20% to 30%) is still high in comparison to other countries. This high mortality rate is closely related to the difficulty in making the diagnosis and starting the correct treatment. Only two groups of antibiotics have proven clinical effectiveness against spotted fever: chloramphenicol and tetracyclines. Until recently, the use of tetracyclines was restricted to adults because of the associated bone and tooth changes in children. Recently, however, the American Academy of Pediatrics and various researchers have recommended the use of doxycycline in children. In more severe cases, chloramphenicol injections are often preferred in Brazil because of the lack of experience with injectable tetracycline. Since early diagnosis and the adequate drug treatment are key to a good prognosis, health care professionals must be better prepared to recognize and treat spotted fever.

  18. Hemophagocytic syndrome in classic dengue fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayantan Ray

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24-year-old previously healthy girl presented with persistent fever, headache, and jaundice. Rapid-test anti-dengue virus IgM antibody was positive but anti-dengue IgG was nonreactive, which is suggestive of primary dengue infection. There was clinical deterioration during empiric antibiotic and symptomatic therapy. Bone marrow examination demonstrated the presence of hemophagocytosis. Diagnosis of dengue fever with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome was made according to the diagnostic criteria of the HLH 2004 protocol of the Histiocyte Society. The patient recovered with corticosteroid therapy. A review of literature revealed only a handful of case reports that showed the evidence that this syndrome is caused by dengue virus. Our patient is an interesting case of hemophagocytic syndrome associated with classic dengue fever and contributes an additional case to the existing literature on this topic. This case highlights the need for increased awareness even in infections not typically associated with hemophagocytic syndrome.

  19. Immunological features underlying viral hemorrhagic fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F

    2015-10-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of (social) media on the political figure fever model: Jokowi-fever model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Benny; Samat, Nor Azah

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, political figures begin to utilize social media as one of alternative to engage in communication with their supporters. Publics referred to Jokowi, one of the candidates in Indonesia presidential election in 2014, as the first politician in Indonesia to truly understand the power of social media. Social media is very important in shaping public opinion. In this paper, effect of social media on the Jokowi-fever model in a closed population will be discussed. Supporter population is divided into three class sub-population, i.e susceptible supporters, Jokowi infected supporters, and recovered supporters. For case no positive media, there are two equilibrium points; the Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio less than one and the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if basic reproductive ratio greater than one. For case no negative media, there is only the Jokowi-fever endemic equilibrium point in which it locally stable if the condition is satisfied. Generally, for case positive media proportion is positive, there is no Jokowi-fever free equilibrium point. The numerical result shows that social media gives significantly effect on Jokowi-fever model, a sharp increase or a sharp decrease in the number of Jokowi infected supporters. It is also shown that the boredom rate is one of the sensitive parameters in the Jokowi-fever model; it affects the number of Jokowi infected supporters.

  1. The 2007–2010 Q fever epidemic in The Netherlands: characteristics of notified acute Q fever patients and the association with dairy goat farming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Frederika; van der Hoek, Wim; Wijers, Nancy; Schimmer, Barbara; Rietveld, Ariene; Wijkmans, Clementine J; Vellema, Piet; Schneeberger, Peter M

    2012-02-01

    We describe the Q fever epidemic in the Netherlands with emphasis on the epidemiological characteristics of acute Q fever patients and the association with veterinary factors. Data from 3264 notifications for acute Q fever in the period from 2007 through 2009 were analysed. The patients most affected were men, smokers and persons aged 40–60 years. Pneumonia was the most common clinical presentation (62% in 2007 and 2008). Only 3.2% of the patients were working in the agriculture sector and 0.5% in the meat-processing industry including abattoirs. Dairy goat farms with Coxiella burnetii-induced abortion waves were mainly located in the same area where human cases occurred. Airborne transmission of contaminated dust particles from commercial dairy goat farms in densely populated areas has probably caused this epidemic. In 2010, there was a sharp decline in the number of notified cases following the implementation of control measures on dairy goat and sheep farms such as vaccination, hygiene measures and culling of pregnant animals on infected farms. In combination with a rise in the human population with antibodies against C. burnetii, these have most likely ended the outbreak. Development of chronic Q fever in infected patients remains an important problem for years to come.

  2. Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever presenting as Acute Abdomen

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Araimi, Hanaa; Al-Jabri, Amal; Mehmoud, Arshad; Al-Abri, Seif

    2011-01-01

    We describe a case of a 38 year-old Sri Lankan female who was referred to the surgeon on call with a picture of acute abdomen. She presented with a three-day history of fever, headache, abdominal pain and diarrhoea; however, the physical examination was not consistent with acute abdomen. Her platelet count was 22 ×109/L. A diagnosis of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) was made and dengue serology was positive. Dengue epidemics have been associated with a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms an...

  3. [The fourth horseman: The yellow fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejos-Parás, Alfonso; Cabrera-Gaytán, David Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Dengue virus three, Chikunguya and Zika have entered the national territory through the south of the country. Cases and outbreaks of yellow fever have now been identified in the Americas where it threatens to expand. Although Mexico has a robust epidemiological surveillance system for vector-borne diseases, our country must be alert in case of its possible introduction into the national territory. This paper presents theoretical assumptions based on factual data on the behavior of yellow fever in the Americas, as well as reflections on the epidemiological surveillance of vector-borne diseases.

  4. [Q fever. Description of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Irún, Á; González Santamaría, A R; Munguía Rozadilla, F; Herrero González, J L

    2013-01-01

    Q fever is a zoonosis of global distribution with an incidence of 3 cases per 100,000 inhabitants/year. A variety of animals can be the coxiella reservoir which always must be taken into account when faced with a fever process in a compatible context. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to improve the prognosis, and prevent the development of chronic infection or other potential complications associated with the coxelliosis. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  5. Transmission Dinamics Model Of Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debora; Rendy; Rahmi

    2018-01-01

    Dengue fever is an endemic disease that is transmitted through the Aedes aegypti mosquito vector. The disease is present in more than 100 countries in America, Africa, and Asia, especially tropical countries. Differential equations can be used to represent the spread of dengue virus occurring in time intervals and model in the form of mathematical models. The mathematical model in this study tries to represent the spread of dengue fever based on the data obtained and the assumptions used. The mathematical model used is a mathematical model consisting of Susceptible (S), Infected (I), Viruses (V) subpopulations. The SIV mathematical model is then analyzed to see the solution behaviour of the system.

  6. Hyperglycemic crisis precipitated by Lassa fever in a patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hyperglycemic crisis precipitated by Lassa fever in a patient with previously undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus. ... Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice ... To report a rare case of HC unmasked by Lassa fever in a patient previously not ...

  7. Comparison of sampling techniques for Rift Valley Fever virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    time for trapping potential vectors for Rift Valley Fever virus. ..... Krockel, U., Rose, A., Eiras, A.E. & Geier, M. (2006) New tools for surveillance of adult yellow fever ... baited trapping systems for sampling outdoor mosquito populations in ...

  8. Long-Term Serological Follow-Up of Acute Q-Fever Patients after a Large Epidemic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia C H Wielders

    Full Text Available Serological follow-up of acute Q-fever patients is important for detection of chronic infection but there is no consensus on its frequency and duration. The 2007-2009 Q-fever epidemic in the Netherlands allowed for long-term follow-up of a large cohort of acute Q-fever patients. The aim of this study was to validate the current follow-up strategy targeted to identify patients with chronic Q-fever.A cohort of adult acute Q-fever patients, diagnosed between 2007 and 2009, for whom a twelve-month follow-up sample was available, was invited to complete a questionnaire and provide a blood sample, four years after the acute episode. Antibody profiles, determined by immunofluorescence assay in serum, were investigated with a special focus on high titres of IgG antibodies against phase I of Coxiella burnetii, as these are considered indicative for possible chronic Q-fever.Of the invited 1,907 patients fulfilling inclusion criteria, 1,289 (67.6% were included in the analysis. At any time during the four-year follow-up period, 58 (4.5% patients were classified as possible, probable, or proven chronic Q-fever according to the Dutch Q-fever Consensus Group criteria (which uses IgG phase I ≥1:1,024 to as serologic criterion for chronic Q-fever. Fifty-two (89.7% of these were identified within the first year after the acute episode. Of the six patients that were detected for the first time at four-year follow-up, five had an IgG phase I titre of 1:512 at twelve months.A twelve-month follow-up check after acute Q-fever is recommended as it adequately detects chronic Q-fever in patients without known risk factors. Additional serological and clinical follow-up is recommended for patients with IgG phase I ≥1:512, as they showed the highest risk to progress to chronic Q-fever.

  9. 78 FR 8960 - Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... microscopic parasites (Babesia) that cause bovine babesiosis. We are amending the list by clarifying that... cattle from areas of the United States that are quarantined because of ticks that are vectors for bovine... this section to indicate that the terms southern fever, cattle fever, Texas fever, bovine piroplasmosis...

  10. Education Fever and Happiness in Korean Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses relevance between education fever and happiness from the viewpoint of Korean higher education. To review this study systematically, three research questions are addressed. First, what is education fever from the viewpoint of the Korean people? Second, what are relations between education fever and happiness? Last, can…

  11. Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study sought to estimate the direct medical cost of Lassa fever treatment on patients in South-South Nigeria. All the 73 confirmed Lassa fever cases admitted in the isolation ward of the Institute Of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) Irrua, in Edo State, Nigeria, ...

  12. Dengue fever as a cause of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Noely; Bergara, Gabriel Heiser; Moura, Nathalie Bianchini Vieira; Cardoso, Débora Morais; Hirose, Maki; Ferronato, Angela Espósito; Pastorino, Antônio Carlos; Lo, Denise Swei; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries in Southeast Asia, the Americas, the western Pacific, Africa and the eastern Mediterranean regions. The virus is transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease is the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans and is a global and national public health concern in several countries. A seasonal pattern of dengue disease is consistently observed. The highest incidences usually correspond to the period of highest rainfall and humidity, providing suitable conditions for Aedes aegypti breeding and survival. In Brazil for instance it is from January to June. Dengue may cause marked changes in bone marrow that result in hypocellularity and, consequently, thrombocytopenia and leucopenia, along with an increase in hematocrit, which is secondary to capillary leakage. However, those abnormalities are usually self-limited, and do not warrant further investigations, such as a marrow biopsy or a myelogram. The occurrence of persistent reactive hemophagocytosis is uncommon and usually leads to serious adverse outcomes. The authors report the case of an 8-year old girl complaining of high-grade fever, malaise, headache, abdominal pain and a cutaneous rash. Laboratory examination revealed atypical lymphocytosis on peripheral blood count, hyperbilirrunemia, abnormal liver enzymes and clotting tests. Serology was positive for dengue. Because of the persistence of fever and laboratory examinations were consistent with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) a bone marrow aspiration was performed, which confirmed the presence of hemophagocytosis. Hence we report a rare presentation of dengue accompanied by self-limited HLH that hopefully evolve to favorable outcome.

  13. Retrospective Study of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tull, Rechelle; Ahn, Christine; Daniel, Alyssa; Yosipovitch, Gil; Strowd, Lindsay C

    2017-03-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), a lethal tick-borne illness, is prevalent in the south central United States. Children younger than 10 years old have the greatest risk of fatal outcome from RMSF. The objective of the current study was to review pediatric cases of RMSF seen in the dermatology consult service and to evaluate dermatology's role in the diagnosis and management of this disease. A retrospective review was performed of inpatient dermatology consultations at a tertiary care center in North Carolina from 2001 to 2011. Data collected included patient demographic characteristics, symptoms, pre- and postconsultation diagnoses, diagnostic procedures, length of hospital stay, and outcome. A total of 3,912 consultations were conducted in the dermatology service over 10 years. Six patients with RMSF, ranging in age from 22 months to 10 years (mean 5.1 years), were evaluated during April, May, and June. All preconsultation diagnoses included RMSF in the differential diagnosis. All patients underwent skin biopsies, and a culture was obtained in one case. Fifty percent of patients died within 4 days of hospitalization. Variables associated with mortality from RMSF are delayed diagnosis and initiation of antirickettsial therapy. Physicians should consider RMSF in children presenting with fever and rash during the summer months. Dermatology consultation is useful in evaluating patients with suspicious clinical features of RMSF with skin findings. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Lassa fever or lassa hemorrhagic fever risk to humans from rodent-borne zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Bahnasawy, Mamdouh M; Megahed, Laila Abdel-Mawla; Abdalla Saleh, Hala Ahmed; Morsy, Tosson A

    2015-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) typically manifest as rapidly progressing acute febrile syndromes with profound hemorrhagic manifestations and very high fatality rates. Lassa fever, an acute hemorrhagic fever characterized by fever, muscle aches, sore throat, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and chest and abdominal pain. Rodents are important reservoirs of rodent-borne zoonosis worldwide. Transmission rodents to humans occur by aerosol spread, either from the genus Mastomys rodents' excreta (multimammate rat) or through the close contact with infected patients (nosocomial infection). Other rodents of the genera Rattus, Mus, Lemniscomys, and Praomys are incriminated rodents hosts. Now one may ask do the rodents' ectoparasites play a role in Lassa virus zoonotic transmission. This paper summarized the update knowledge on LHV; hopping it might be useful to the clinicians, nursing staff, laboratories' personals as well as those concerned zoonoses from rodents and rodent control.

  15. Host-pathogen interactions in typhoid fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, H.K.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focuses on host-pathogen interactions in Salmonella Typhi and Burkholderia pseudomallei infections and explores the interplay between these bacteria and the innate immune system. Typhoid fever is one of the most common causes of bacterial infection in low-income countries. With adequate

  16. Cases of typhoid fever in Copenhagen region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrett, Freja Cecille; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2013-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a systemic illness which in high-income countries mainly affects travellers. The incidence is particularly high on the Indian subcontinent. Travellers who visit friends and relatives (VFR) have been shown to have a different risk profile than others. We wished to identify main...

  17. Dengue Fever in the United States

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-09

    Dr. Amesh Adalja, an associate at the Center for Biosecurity and clinical assistant professor at the University of Pittsburgh School, of Medicine, discusses dengue fever outbreaks in the United States.  Created: 4/9/2012 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  18. Fever and sickness behavior: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, L M; Kent, S; Pittman, Q J; Roth, J

    2015-11-01

    Fever has been recognized as an important symptom of disease since ancient times. For many years, fever was treated as a putative life-threatening phenomenon. More recently, it has been recognized as an important part of the body's defense mechanisms; indeed at times it has even been used as a therapeutic agent. The knowledge of the functional role of the central nervous system in the genesis of fever has greatly improved over the last decade. It is clear that the febrile process, which develops in the sick individual, is just one of many brain-controlled sickness symptoms. Not only will the sick individual appear "feverish" but they may also display a range of behavioral changes, such as anorexia, fatigue, loss of interest in usual daily activities, social withdrawal, listlessness or malaise, hyperalgesia, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction, collectively termed "sickness behavior". In this review we consider the issue of whether fever and sickness behaviors are friend or foe during: a critical illness, the common cold or influenza, in pregnancy and in the newborn. Deciding whether these sickness responses are beneficial or harmful will very much shape our approach to the use of antipyretics during illness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enzootic transmission of yellow fever virus, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Albert J; Lemey, Philippe; Bergren, Nicholas A; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Morón, Dulce; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of yellow fever virus (YFV) strains isolated from Venezuela strongly supports YFV maintenance in situ in Venezuela, with evidence of regionally independent evolution within the country. However, there is considerable YFV movement from Brazil to Venezuela and between Trinidad and Venezuela.

  20. Facing dengue fever - our first experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvjetković Dejan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne disease caused by dengue virus, endemic in tropical and subtropical regions, where it is mostly imported from. The most common clinical form is classic dengue fever. We presented the first dengue case microbiologically confirmed in Serbia. Case report. A 34-year-old male got classic dengue fever after arrival from Cuba. The disease occurred suddenly with fever, myalgias, skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, abnormal aminotransferase and creatine kinase levels. The diagnosis was confirmed with virological diagnostic methods. Significant leukopenia and thrombocytopenia as well as elevation of serum creatine kinase activity were recorded from the very beginning of hospitalization, but were gradually normalized. The whole duration of hospitalization was accompanied by laboratory signs of liver lesion. The disease had favourable outcome. At hospital discharge, the patient was afebrile, asymptomatic, with discrete erythematous rash on torso and arms, normal hemathological values and creatine kinase level and moderately elevated alanine-aminotransferase level. Conclusion. Considering global climate changes and growing international traffic, our health care service needs to be ready for possible massive outbreaks of dengue and other tropical infectious diseases in forthcoming years.

  1. Dengue fever | Tavodova | South Sudan Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Dengue fever. Milada Tavodova. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  2. African Swine Fever Virus, Siberia, Russia, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasov, Denis; Titov, Ilya; Tsybanov, Sodnom; Gogin, Andrey; Malogolovkin, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is arguably the most dangerous and emerging swine disease worldwide. ASF is a serious problem for the swine industry. The first case of ASF in Russia was reported in 2007. We report an outbreak of ASF in Siberia, Russia, in 2017.

  3. Rift Valley Fever, Mayotte, 2007–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giry, Claude; Gabrie, Philippe; Tarantola, Arnaud; Pettinelli, François; Collet, Louis; D’Ortenzio, Eric; Renault, Philippe; Pierre, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    After the 2006–2007 epidemic wave of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in East Africa and its circulation in the Comoros, laboratory case-finding of RVF was conducted in Mayotte from September 2007 through May 2008. Ten recent human RVF cases were detected, which confirms the indigenous transmission of RFV virus in Mayotte. PMID:19331733

  4. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-28

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.  Created: 10/28/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2010.

  5. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan, 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast describes the emergence of the first human cases of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Sudan in 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Stuart Nichol discusses how the disease was found in Sudan and how it spread in a hospital there.

  6. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruna, Marcelo B; Kamakura, Orson; Moraes-Filho, Jonas; Horta, Mauricio C; Pacheco, Richard C

    2009-03-01

    Clinical illness caused by Rickettsia rickettsii in dogs has been reported solely in the United States. We report 2 natural clinical cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever in dogs in Brazil. Each case was confirmed by seroconversion and molecular analysis and resolved after doxycycline therapy.

  7. Chemotherapy of experimental bovine petechial fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snodgrass, D R

    1976-01-01

    A dithiosemicarbazone was compared with two tetracycline formulations in the treatment of bovine petechial fever (BPF) in experimentally infected sheep, and was then used to treat the disease in experimental cattle. The dithiosemicarbazone was found to be more efficacious than either of the other two drugs in treating ovine BPF, and also to be effective against BPF in cattle.

  8. Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease: Collaboration Patterns and Research Core Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Alejandro; González, Gregorio; Manuel Ramos, Jose

    2016-09-01

    Rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease (RHD) are important health problems in developing countries. The study aim was to provide a review and content analysis of the scientific literature on rheumatic fever and RHD over a 70-year period. Medline was employed via the online PubMed service of the US National Library of Medicine, to search for all documents containing the MeSH terms 'rheumatic fever' or 'rheumatic heart disease' between January 1945 and December 2013. A total of 18,552 references was retrieved. Between 1945 and 1970 the number of annual publications containing the search terms increased, but decreased between 1971 and 2013. Between 1990 and 2013, national collaboration (co-authorship) was greatly increased, from 8.7% to 41.7% of the total reports. International collaboration also increased, from 2.5% to 14.8% (p = 0.001). The United States was the main collaborating country, sharing ties mainly with India, South Africa and Brazil. A content analysis led to the identification of three prominent core research topics, chief among which were heart diseases (rheumatic fever diseases, mitral valve diseases and endocarditis). Other areas of note included streptococcal infections and rheumatic diseases (which, in addition to rheumatic fever, also highlighted arthritis and juvenile arthritis). Publications on rheumatic fever and RHD had a major impact during the 1960s, but research groups interest has since declined overall, in line with a decreasing interest in these diseases in developed countries. In contrast, national and international collaboration has increased, a phenomenon that should be encouraged for research into these and other diseases that affect developing countries.

  9. A Q fever cluster among workers at an abattoir in south-western Sydney, Australia, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Lord

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In September 2015, the Public Health Unit of the South Western Sydney Local Health District was notified of two possible Q fever cases. Case investigation identified that both cases were employed at an abattoir, and both cases advised that co-workers had experienced similar symptoms. Public Health Unit staff also recalled interviewing in late 2014 at least one other Q fever case who worked at the same abattoir. This prompted an outbreak investigation. Methods: The investigation incorporated active case finding, microbiological analysis, field investigation and a risk factor survey. Included cases were laboratory definitive or suspected cases occurring from October 2014 to October 2015, residing or working in south-western Sydney. A suspected case had clinically compatible illness, high-risk exposure and was epidemiologically linked to another confirmed case. A confirmed case included laboratory detection of C. burnetii. Results: Eight cases met the case definition with seven confirmed (including a deceased case and one suspected. The eight cases were all males who had been employed at an abattoir in south-western Sydney during their incubation period; symptom onset dates ranged from November 2014 to September 2015. Field investigation identified multiple potential risk factors at the abattoir, and the majority (75% of employees were not vaccinated against Q fever despite this high-risk setting. Conclusion: This cluster of Q fever in a single abattoir confirms the significance of this zoonotic disease as an occupational hazard among persons working in high-risk environments. Implementation of Q fever vaccination programmes should eliminate Q fever in high-risk occupational settings.

  10. Emergence of Lassa Fever Disease in Northern Togo: Report of Two Cases in Oti District in 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akouda Akessiwe Patassi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lassa fever belongs to the group of potentially fatal hemorrhagic fevers, never reported in Togo. The aim of this paper is to report the first two cases of Lassa fever infection in Togo. Case Presentation. The two first Lassa fever cases occurred in two expatriate’s health professionals working in Togo for more than two years. The symptoms appeared among two health professionals of a clinic located in Oti district in the north of the country. The absence of clinical improvement after antimalarial treatment and the worsening of clinical symptoms led to the medical evacuation. The delayed diagnosis of the first case led to a fatal outcome. The second case recovered under ribavirin treatment. Conclusion. The emergence of this hemorrhagic fever confirms the existence of Lassa fever virus in Togo. After a period of intensive Ebola virus transmission from 2013 to 2015, this is an additional call for the establishment and enhancement of infection prevention and control measures in the health care setting in West Africa.

  11. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report

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    Maria Paula Gomes Mourão

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  12. Dengue hemorrhagic fever and acute hepatitis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Maria Paula Gomes; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius Guimarães de; Bastos, Michele de Souza; Albuquerque, Bernardino Cláudio de; Alecrim, Wilson Duarte

    2004-12-01

    Dengue fever is the world's most important viral hemorrhagic fever disease, the most geographically wide-spread of the arthropod-born viruses, and it causes a wide clinical spectrum of disease. We report a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute hepatitis. The initial picture of classical dengue fever was followed by painful liver enlargement, vomiting, hematemesis, epistaxis and diarrhea. Severe liver injury was detected by laboratory investigation, according to a syndromic surveillance protocol, expressed in a self-limiting pattern and the patient had a complete recovery. The serological tests for hepatitis and yellow fever viruses were negative. MAC-ELISA for dengue was positive.

  13. Dengue fever with rectus sheath hematoma: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever, also known as breakbone fever, is an infectious tropical disease caused by the Dengue virus. It is associated with a number of complications, which are well documented. However, Dengue fever associated with rectus sheath hematoma (RSH is a very rare complication. Only one case report has been published prior supporting the association of Dengue fever with RSH. We report a case of Dengue fever who presented with RSH and was successfully treated conservatively. RSH is also an uncommon cause of acute abdominal pain. It is accumulation of blood in the sheath of the rectus abdominis, secondary to rupture of an epigastric vessel or muscle tear.

  14. Q Fever: An Old but Still a Poorly Understood Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Honarmand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Q fever is a bacterial infection affecting mainly the lungs, liver, and heart. It is found around the world and is caused by the bacteria Coxiella burnetii. The bacteria affects sheep, goats, cattle, dogs, cats, birds, rodents, and ticks. Infected animals shed this bacteria in birth products, feces, milk, and urine. Humans usually get Q fever by breathing in contaminated droplets released by infected animals and drinking raw milk. People at highest risk for this infection are farmers, laboratory workers, sheep and dairy workers, and veterinarians. Chronic Q fever develops in people who have been infected for more than 6 months. It usually takes about 20 days after exposure to the bacteria for symptoms to occur. Most cases are mild, yet some severe cases have been reported. Symptoms of acute Q fever may include: chest pain with breathing, cough, fever, headache, jaundice, muscle pains, and shortness of breath. Symptoms of chronic Q fever may include chills, fatigue, night sweats, prolonged fever, and shortness of breath. Q fever is diagnosed with a blood antibody test. The main treatment for the disease is with antibiotics. For acute Q fever, doxycycline is recommended. For chronic Q fever, a combination of doxycycline and hydroxychloroquine is often used long term. Complications are cirrhosis, hepatitis, encephalitis, endocarditis, pericarditis, myocarditis, interstitial pulmonary fibrosis, meningitis, and pneumonia. People at risk should always: carefully dispose of animal products that may be infected, disinfect any contaminated areas, and thoroughly wash their hands. Pasteurizing milk can also help prevent Q fever.

  15. [Control discourses and power relations of yellow fever: Philadelphia in 1793].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seohyung

    2014-12-01

    1793 Yellow fever in Philadelphia was the most severe epidemics in the late 18th century in the United States. More than 10% of the population in the city died and many people fled to other cities. The cause of yellow fever in the United States had close relationship with slaves and sugar in Philadelphia. Sugarcane plantation had needed many labors to produce sugar and lots of Africans had to move to America as slaves. In this process, Aëdes aegypti, the vector of yellow fever had migrated to America and the circumstances of ships or cities provided appropriate conditions for its breeding. In this period, the cause of yellow fever could not be established exactly, so suggestions of doctors became entangled in political and intellectual discourses in American society. There was a critical conflict between Jeffersonian Republicanism and Federalism about the origin and treatment of yellow fever. Benjamin Rush, a Jeffersonian Republican, suggested urban sanitation reform and bloodletting. He believed the infectious disease happened because of unsanitary city condition, so he thought the United States could be a healthy nation by improvement of the public health and sanitation. He would like to cope with national crisis and develop American society on the basis of republicanism. While Rush suggested the improvement of public health and sanitation, the city government of Philadelphia suggested isolation of yellow fever patients and quarantine. City government isolated the patients from healthy people and it reconstructed space of hospital. Also, it built orphanages to take care of children who lost their parents during the epidemic and implemented power to control people put in the state of exception. Of course, city government tried to protect the city and nation by quarantine of every ship to Philadelphia. Control policies of yellow fever in 1793 showed different conflicts and interactions. Through the yellow fever, Jeffersonian Republicanism and Federalism had

  16. Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in Mauritania and Related Environmental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Caminade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Four large outbreaks of Rift Valley Fever (RVF occurred in Mauritania in 1998, 2003, 2010 and 2012 which caused lots of animal and several human deaths. We investigated rainfall and vegetation conditions that might have impacted on RVF transmission over the affected regions. Our results corroborate that RVF transmission generally occurs during the months of September and October in Mauritania, similarly to Senegal. The four outbreaks were preceded by a rainless period lasting at least a week followed by heavy precipitation that took place during the second half of the rainy season. First human infections were generally reported three to five weeks later. By bridging the gap between meteorological forecasting centers and veterinary services, an early warning system might be developed in Senegal and Mauritania to warn decision makers and health services about the upcoming RVF risk.

  17. Environmentally-driven ensemble forecasts of dengue fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamana, T. K.; Shaman, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    Dengue fever is a mosquito-borne viral disease prevalent in the tropics and subtropics, with an estimated 2.5 billion people at risk of transmission. In many areas where dengue is found, disease transmission is seasonal but prone to high inter-annual variability with occasional severe epidemics. Predicting and preparing for periods of higher than average transmission remains a significant public health challenge. Recently, we developed a framework for forecasting dengue incidence using an dynamical model of disease transmission coupled with observational data of dengue cases using data-assimilation methods. Here, we investigate the use of environmental data to drive the disease transmission model. We produce retrospective forecasts of the timing and severity of dengue outbreaks, and quantify forecast predictive accuracy.

  18. Mechanisms of fever production and lysis: lessons from experimental LPS fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Blatteis, Clark M

    2014-10-01

    Fever is a cardinal symptom of infectious or inflammatory insults, but it can also arise from noninfectious causes. The fever-inducing agent that has been used most frequently in experimental studies designed to characterize the physiological, immunological and neuroendocrine processes and to identify the neuronal circuits that underlie the manifestation of the febrile response is lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Our knowledge of the mechanisms of fever production and lysis is largely based on this model. Fever is usually initiated in the periphery of the challenged host by the immediate activation of the innate immune system by LPS, specifically of the complement (C) cascade and Toll-like receptors. The first results in the immediate generation of the C component C5a and the subsequent rapid production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The second, occurring after some delay, induces the further production of PGE2 by induction of its synthesizing enzymes and transcription and translation of proinflammatory cytokines. The Kupffer cells (Kc) of the liver seem to be essential for these initial processes. The subsequent transfer of the pyrogenic message from the periphery to the brain is achieved by neuronal and humoral mechanisms. These pathways subserve the genesis of early (neuronal signals) and late (humoral signals) phases of the characteristically biphasic febrile response to LPS. During the course of fever, counterinflammatory factors, "endogenous antipyretics," are elaborated peripherally and centrally to limit fever in strength and duration. The multiple interacting pro- and antipyretic signals and their mechanistic effects that underlie endotoxic fever are the subjects of this review.

  19. The role of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Saeed Nadhim

    2014-01-01

    To study the usefulness of abdominal ultrasound in the diagnosis of typhoid fever and to determine the common ultrasound findings early in the course of the disease. Abdominal ultrasound examination was performed within the first week of initiation of symptoms in 350 cases with clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever. Subsequent ultrasound follow-up examination was done 15 days later (beginning of the third week). All the patients proved to have positive Widal test and Sallmonella culture. The study was performed in Erbil-Iraq from the period January 1993 to October 2010. The following ultrasound findings were reported: hepatomegaly (31.4%), prominent intrahepatic bile ducts (64.85%), splenomegaly (100%), mesenteric lymphadenopathy (42.85%), bowel wall thickening (35.71%), acalculous cholecystitis (16.28%), perforations (1.14%), and ascites in (3.4%). The current study showed that the findings are typical enough to justify initiation of treatment for typhoid fever when serology is equivocal and culture is negative, and is fairly safe to say that normal ultrasound examination early in the course of febrile illness rules out typhoid fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Molecular and Spatial Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Rural Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Thanh, Duy; Thompson, Corinne N; Rabaa, Maia A; Sona, Soeng; Sopheary, Sun; Kumar, Varun; Moore, Catrin; Tran Vu Thieu, Nga; Wijedoru, Lalith; Holt, Kathryn E; Wong, Vanessa; Pickard, Derek; Thwaites, Guy E; Day, Nicholas; Dougan, Gordon; Turner, Paul; Parry, Christopher M; Baker, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Typhoid fever, caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, is an endemic cause of febrile disease in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to better understand the epidemiology of pediatric typhoid fever in Cambodia. We accessed routine blood culture data from Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC) in Siem Reap province between 2007 and 2014, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on the isolated bacteria to characterize the S. Typhi population. The resulting phylogenetic information was combined with conventional epidemiological approaches to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of S. Typhi and population-level risk factors for reported disease. During the study period, there were 262 cases of typhoid within a 100 km radius of AHC, with a median patient age of 8.2 years (IQR: 5.1-11.5 years). The majority of infections occurred during the rainy season, and commune incidences as high as 11.36/1,000 in children aged typhoid fever in rural communes in Cambodia. Our data provide a platform for additional population-based typhoid fever studies in this location, and suggest that this would be a suitable setting in which to introduce a school-based vaccination programme with Vi conjugate vaccines.

  1. Longitudinal study of Thai people media exposure, knowledge, and behavior on dengue fever prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonchutima, Smith; Kachentawa, Kirati; Limpavithayakul, Manasanun; Prachansri, Anan

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever is transmitted through a bite by a dengue -infected Aedes aegypti mosquito. It was first reported in the mid -20th century in Thailand, and since then its epidemiology has been of great concern and has spread all across the country. The alarming incidence of dengue posed a serious threat to human health in all major cities of Thailand. This study was aimed at identifying the level of awareness of dengue fever in Thai population knowledge for prevention and control, and most importantly contribution of media in educating masses for dengue control measures. It is longitudinal in nature and was conducted in 25 provinces of Thailand during 2013-2015. Approximately 7772 respondents participated in this study, with the selection of provinces based on considerations like population, prevalence and demography. A pre-tested structured questionnaire was used to collect information relevant to study participants' demographic profile, pre-existing knowledge about dengue fever and its reinforcement through media, and population attitudes toward prevention and control. Over the period of three years, a positive trend was revealed relevant to the contribution of media in educating and reminding the Thai population of dengue, without any uniformity or powerful campaigns. Based on the results drawn from this study, we conclude that despite the measures undertaken to prevent dengue fever, there is insufficient media exposure. An interdisciplinary approach involving the community participation, media, and government is needed to overcome dengue threat in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Q fever in the Greek Island of Crete: epidemiologic, clinical, and therapeutic data from 98 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tselentis, Y; Gikas, A; Kofteridis, D; Kyriakakis, E; Lydataki, N; Bouros, D; Tsaparas, N

    1995-05-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken in Crete, Greece, to investigate the epidemiologic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of Q fever. Over a period of 5 years (1989-1993), 1,298 patients were examined and 98 cases were identified. Individuals who were aged 20-29 years and 30-39 years appeared to have an increased risk of infection. Contact with animals was found to be a major risk factor for acquisition of Q fever. The predominant clinical manifestations of the infection were fever (91.7% of patients) and respiratory disease (88.5%), whereas hepatitis was the dominant feature in only a minority (7.1%) of patients. Chest radiographs frequently revealed pulmonary interstitial changes (36.4% of patients) and alveolar changes (34.4%). Abnormal echocardiographic findings were also observed. There was no difference in the duration of fever whether the patient received therapy with tetracycline or erythromycin, a finding that may be explained by the delay in initiating tetracycline therapy.

  3. [Epidemiologic surveillance of dengue fever in the French army from 1996 to 1999].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meynard, J B; Ollivier-Gay, L; Deparis, X; Durand, J P; Michel, R; Pages, F; Matton, T; Boutin, J P; Tolou, H; Merouze, F; Baudon, D

    2001-01-01

    Dengue fever is a widespread disease that can occur outside tropical areas. Several thousand French military personnel are exposed to this infectious risk each year and exposure is expected to rise with the creation of a professional army and the increasing number of foreign missions. As a result, dengue fever has become a major priority for the Armed Services Health Corps (ASHC). A system of epidemiological surveillance based on the active participation of all military physicians has been designed by the ASHC to collect and analyze all data relevant to cases of dengue fever involving French military personnel stationed overseas or at home. The purpose of this study is to present data compiled for the period from 1996 to 1999. Analysis of these data demonstrated that the incidence of dengue fever peaked in 1997 due to epidemic outbreaks occurring in French Polynesia and Martinique. In response to these outbreaks control measures were adapted especially in regard to vector control. This study shows that the system of surveillance implemented by the ASHC is an effective but still perfectible tool.

  4. Comparison between DOT EIA IgM and Widal Test as early diagnosis of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Z; Hossain, M A; Musa, A K; Shamsuzzaman, A K; Mahmud, M C; Ahsan, M M; Sumona, A A; Ahmed, S; Jahan, N A; Alam, M; Begum, A

    2009-01-01

    A recently developed DOT enzyme immunoassay known as "Typhidot" for detecting IgM antibody against 50 KDa OMP antigen of Salmonella typhi, was evaluated on 100 clinically suspected typhoid fever cases and 40 age-sex matched controls, in the Department of Microbiology, Mymensingh Medical College during, the period from June 2006 to July 2007. Blood culture, Widal test, and DOT EIA for IgM test were performed in all patients. Among 100 clinically suspected typhoid fever cases, 35 were subsequently confirmed on the basis of positive blood culture for S. typhi and/or significant rising titre of Widal test. The DOT EIA IgM test could produce results within 1 hour. The result of the DOT EIA IgM test showed a good diagnostic value for typhoid fever. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the test was found as 91.42%, 90.00%, 88.88% and 92.30% respectively. On the other hand corresponding values for Widal test were of 42.85%, 85.00%, 71.42% and 62.96% respectively. Thus, The DOT EIA IgM seems to be a practical alternative to Widal test for early diagnosis of typhoid fever.

  5. MEDICAL PRACTICE IN CHILDREN PRESENTING FEVER WITH PETECHIAL RASH TO AN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrascu-Biris, Ioana; Chirita-Emandi, Adela; Lambert, Imelda; Marginean, Otilia; Sharif, Farhana

    2016-01-01

    The association of fever and petechiae in children is one of the most alarming findings for a paediatrician. To quickly distinguish between benign and life-threatening conditions is challenging in many cases. We aimed to evaluate the clinical practice of children presenting with fever and petechiae as initial symptoms. 41 patients (age 3 months-11 years) presenting with fever and petechiae were identified in an Emergency Paediatric Assessment Unit over a period of 9 months. General data, symptoms and signs were assessed for each patient. The work-up consisted in: complete blood count, inflammatory tests, coagulation tests, Monospot test, nasopharyngeal rapid tests, blood culture, and cerebrospinal fluid culture where appropriate. Most children were 6 mg/l was poorly correlated with serious illness. The following variables were strongly associated with serious illness: ill appearance, shivering, lethargy, back rigidity, ESR>50 mm/h and prolonged capillary refill time. 59% (24/41) of children were treated with antibiotics, however, at discharge 42%(10/24) of them, did not have a work-up suggestive for a bacterial illness. Screening for low prevalence but high morbidity conditions, as the meningococcal disease, with an extensive work-up is time and resource consuming and may lead to unmotivated antibiotic use. Larger studies are needed to change the emergency practice for management of fever and rash.

  6. The unrecognized burden of typhoid fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaro, Stephen K; Iroh Tam, Pui-Ying; Mintz, Eric Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Typhoid fever (TF), caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is the most common cause of enteric fever, responsible for an estimated 129,000 deaths and more than 11 million cases annually. Although several reviews have provided global and regional TF disease burden estimates, major gaps in our understanding of TF epidemiology remain. Areas covered: We provide an overview of the gaps in current estimates of TF disease burden and offer suggestions for addressing them, so that affected communities can receive the full potential of disease prevention offered by vaccination and water, sanitation, and hygiene interventions. Expert commentary: Current disease burden estimates for TF do not capture cases from certain host populations, nor those with atypical presentations of TF, which may lead to substantial underestimation of TF cases and deaths. These knowledge gaps pose major obstacles to the informed use of current and new generation typhoid vaccines.

  7. Chikungunya fever: current status in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nava-Frías, Margarita; Searcy-Pavía, Ricardo Efrén; Juárez-Contreras, Carina Aurora; Valencia-Bautista, Anayeli

    Chikungunya fever is a tropical vector-borne disease that has been spreading rapidly around the world during the last 10 years, and which has been usually misdiagnosed as dengue. Nowadays, this disease is increasing in Mexico, mainly in the southern and central zones of the country, being significantly more common in women, children and young adults (28% in<20 years of age). The classical presentation includes fever, arthralgia, polyarthritis, back-pain, and skin rashes. Although symptoms and treatment are similar to those for dengue, there are key clinical features to differentiate these two diseases. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Dengue fever in pregnancy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phupong Vorapong

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue, a mosquito-borne flavivirus infection, is endemic in Southeast Asia. Currently, the incidence has been increasing among adults. Case presentation A 26-year-old Thai woman, G1P0 31 weeks pregnancy, presented with epigastric pain for 1 day. She also had a high-grade fever for 4 days. The physical examination, complete blood counts as well as serology confirmed dengue fever. The patient was under conservative treatment despite severe thrombocytopenia. She was well at the 3rd day of discharge and 1-week follow-up. The pregnancy continued until term without any complication and she delivered vaginally a healthy female baby. Conclusions More cases of dengue infection in pregnancy can be found due to the increasing incidence during adulthood. It should be suspected when a pregnant woman presents with symptoms and signs like in a non-pregnant. Conservative treatment should be conducted unless there are any complications.

  9. Infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Raabe Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website.

  10. Severe Dengue Fever Outbreak in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Wang, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ko; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever (DF) is a vector-borne disease caused by dengue viruses (DENVs). Epidemic dengue occurs intermittently in Taiwan. In 2014, Taiwan experienced its largest DF outbreak. There were 15,732 DF cases reported. There were a total of 136 dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) cases, of which 20 resulted in death. Most DF cases were reported in southern Taiwan. A total of 15,043 (96%) cases were from Kaohsiung, a modern city in southern Taiwan. This report reviews DF epidemics in Taiwan during 2005-2014. The correlation between DF and DHF along with temperature and precipitation were conjointly examined. We conclude that most dengue epidemics in Taiwan resulted from imported DF cases. Results indicate three main factors that may have been associated with this DF outbreak in Kaohsiung: an underground pipeline explosion combined with subsequent rainfall and higher temperature. These factors may have enhanced mosquito breeding activity, facilitating DENV transmission. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  11. Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a clinician's dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Edwin J; Olson, Gary S; Weiner, Scott J; Paddock, Christopher D

    2003-04-14

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is still the most lethal tick-vectored illness in the United States. We examine the dilemmas facing the clinician who is evaluating the patient with possible Rocky Mountain spotted fever, with particular attention to the following 8 pitfalls in diagnosis and treatment: (1) waiting for a petechial rash to develop before diagnosis; (2) misdiagnosing as gastroenteritis; (3) discounting a diagnosis when there is no history of a tick bite; (4) using an inappropriate geographic exclusion; (5) using an inappropriate seasonal exclusion; (6) failing to treat on clinical suspicion; (7) failing to elicit an appropriate history; and (8) failing to treat with doxycycline. Early diagnosis and proper treatment save lives.

  12. Epidural Analgesia and Fever at Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of labor fever under epidural analgesia (EA and to evaluate its impact on the courses of puerperium and early neonatality. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the data of a prospective study of the course of labor, puerperium, and early neonatality in 397 women in whom labors occurred at the Republican Peritoneal Center in 2006. A study group included 324 parturients in whom labor pain was relieved by EA. A comparison group comprised 55 parturients in whom no analgesics were used at labor. Results. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in the incidence of labor fever and complicated puerperium and in that of neonatal pyoseptic diseases. Key words: labor hyperthermia, epidural analgesia, labor pain relief.

  13. Aortic valve replacement during acute rheumatic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Chi, S; Gonzalez-Lavin, L

    1978-07-01

    Emergency aortic valve replacement was performed during an attack of acute rheumatic fever in a 12-year-old black boy. He had an uneventful recovery and has remained asymptomatic 27 months after operation. In the light of this experience and that of others, one might conclude that the decision to operate on these patients should be based on the severity of the haemodynamic derangement rather than on the state of activity in the rheumatic process.

  14. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Sudan, 2008

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-15

    This podcast describes the emergence of the first human cases of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in Sudan in 2008. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Stuart Nichol discusses how the disease was found in Sudan and how it spread in a hospital there.  Created: 4/15/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infections (proposed).   Date Released: 4/15/2010.

  15. Review of current typhoid fever vaccines, cross-protection against paratyphoid fever, and the European guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Jane N; Hatz, Christoph; Kantele, Anu

    2017-10-01

    Typhoid and paratyphoid fever remain a global health problem, which - in non-endemic countries - are mainly seen in travelers, particularly in VFRs (visiting friends and relatives), with occasional local outbreaks occurring. A rise in anti-microbial resistance emphasizes the role of preventive measures, especially vaccinations against typhoid and paratyphoid fever for travelers visiting endemic countries. Areas covered: This state-of-the-art review recapitulates the epidemiology and mechanisms of disease of typhoid and paratyphoid fever, depicts the perspective of non-endemic countries and travelers (VFRs), and collectively presents current European recommendations for typhoid fever vaccination. We provide a brief overview of available (and developmental) vaccines in Europe, present current data on cross-protection to S. Paratyphi, and aim to provide a background for typhoid vaccine decision-making in travelers. Expert commentary: European recommendations are not harmonized. Experts must assess vaccination of travelers based on current country-specific recommendations. Travel health practitioners should be aware of the issues surrounding vaccination of travelers and be motivated to increase awareness of typhoid and paratyphoid fever risks.

  16. Changes in leukocyte populations of cows with milk fever or displaced abomasum after calving

    OpenAIRE

    Ohtsuka, Hiromichi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Kudo, Katsunori; Tomioka, Michiko; Koiwa, Masateru; Kimura, Kayoko

    2013-01-01

    Most of the metabolic diseases of dairy cows occur within the first 2 wk after calving, and cows with a metabolic disease are prone to infectious diseases. Although metabolic diseases are generally recognized as a risk factor for infectious diseases owing to the associated decrease in immune function, the difference in immune status between cows with milk fever (MF) or displaced abomasum (DA) during the lactation period has not been clarified. Therefore, the peripheral blood leukocyte populat...

  17. Advanced Vaccine Candidates for Lassa Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor S. Lukashevich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lassa virus (LASV is the most prominent human pathogen of the Arenaviridae. The virus is transmitted to humans by a rodent reservoir, Mastomys natalensis, and is capable of causing lethal Lassa Fever (LF. LASV has the highest human impact of any of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (with the exception of Dengue Fever with an estimated several hundred thousand infections annually, resulting in thousands of deaths in Western Africa. The sizeable disease burden, numerous imported cases of LF in non-endemic countries, and the possibility that LASV can be used as an agent of biological warfare make a strong case for vaccine development. Presently there is no licensed vaccine against LF or approved treatment. Recently, several promising vaccine candidates have been developed which can potentially target different groups at risk. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the LASV pathogenesis and immune mechanisms involved in protection. The current status of pre-clinical development of the advanced vaccine candidates that have been tested in non-human primates will be discussed. Major scientific, manufacturing, and regulatory challenges will also be considered.

  18. The Example of Eastern Africa: the dynamic of Rift Valley fever and tools for monitoring virus activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rift Valley fever is a mosquito-borne viral zoonosis that primarily affects animals but also has the capacity to infect humans. Outbreaks of this disease in eastern Africa are closely associated with periods of heavy rainfall and forecasting models and early warning systems have been developed to en...

  19. Hypocholesterolemia as a predictor of disease severity in dengue fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodhi, S.; Tahira, Q.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the difference between total cholesterol (TC) of dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) patients and also between DHF patients with favourable (DHF I and II) and adverse (DHF III and IV) outcome. Methodology: This comparative cross - sectional study was conducted in the Department of Medicine, Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from August to November 2012. The study comprised of 100 febrile patients with positive dengue serology. TC was measured on the admission day. The patients were observed during admission period for clinical outcome i.e. DF and DHF. DHF patients were graded as I - IV and grouped as favourable (I and II) and adverse (III and IV) out- come. Results: Out of 100 patients included in the study, 64 were males and 36 were females with mean age 33.03 ± 14.5 years and mean TC 3.02 ± 0.88 mmollL. The 63 DF and 37 DHF patients had mean ages of 30.21 ± 12.7 and 37.84 ± 16.2lyears respectively (p-value 0.017) and mean TC 3.43 +- 0.79 and 2.34 ± 0.56 mmollL respectively (p-value 0.000). M:F for DF and DHF was 2:1 and 1.47:1 respectively (p-value 0.001). Among 37 DHF patients, there were 16 DHF I, 8 DHF II, 10 DHF III and 3 DHF IV patients. For DHF I - IV, mean TC was 2.77 ± 0.45, 2.16 ± 0.33, 2.05 ± 0.35 and 1.49 ± 0.35 mmollL respectively. DHF patients with favourable and adverse out.come had mean TC 2.55 ± 0.5 and 1.92 ± 0.42 mmolll respectively (p = value 0.000). Conclusion: Low serum TC strongly correlated with disease severity in dengue fever patients. (author)

  20. Management of symptomatic thrombocytopenia associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, T.; Saleem, I.U.; Mehmood, K.; Tanvir, I.; Saadia, A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Immune - mediated destruction of platelets is thought to be the mechanism of thrombocytopenia seen after the viraemic phase of dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF). Immuno - suppressants such as steroids, immune globulin and Anti D immune globulin are effective in the treatment of this type of immune thrombocytopenic purpura. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of oral Prednisolone in the rate of resolution of thrombocytopenia and monitoring of complications in patients recovering from Dengue haemorrhagic fever. Method: A controlled study was carried out on diagnosed cases Dengue haemorrhagic patients presenting with sever thrombocytopenia and symptoms like confluent ecchymosis, epistaxis and purpuric rashes. In study was conducted in Ittefaq hospital (trust) Lahore, during the period of October to December 2008. Treatment group received steroids in two forms i.e. first line therapy prednisolone (1 mg / kg) orally or as second line therapy of initial I/V high dose (prednisolone) in pulse doses i.e. 40 mg / bd for four days and later oral prednisolone as in first line therapy with omeprazole 20 mg / bd in addition to standard treatment. Control group received standard supportive care only. Results: A total of 341 suspected patients were admitted in hospital. Serological diagnosis was confirmed in 166 patients. CBC revealed platelet count . 100 x 109 / l in 106 patients. A group of symptomatic febrile patients have platelet count < 20 x 109 / l was selected for therapeutic intervention. first line therapy (oral prednisolone was stated in 43 patients. In Fourteen patients second line therapy (high dose dexamethasone pulse) therapy was instituted. Seven of them attained complete response whereas two patients achieved partial response. Four patients were shifted to Anti D therapy. Three deaths occurred during our study. Rest of all the patients improved and were discharged in due course of time. Conclusion: This small scale preliminary study shows promising

  1. Epidemiologic characteristics and military implications of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulić, Rosanda; Ropac, Darko

    2002-10-01

    To analyze epidemiologic characteristics of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Croatia, including military implications of the disease and measures for its prevention. We analyzed data from obligatory infectious disease reports and notification of deaths due to infectious diseases, data on the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome epidemics in Croatia, and data collected by survey of the population, serological findings, and studies of wild rodents serving as reservoirs of the infection. During the 1987-2001 period, 235 cases of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome were recorded in Croatia, with 147 (62.6%) of them among Croatian Army soldiers. Mortality rate was up to 15.4% (mean 2.2%) (5/235). The highest number of cases was recorded in months of June and July, ie, during the warm season characterized by increased activity of both the animals acting as infection reservoirs and humans as hosts. The known natural foci of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome have been Plitvice and Slunj areas, Velika and Mala Kapela mountains, Zagreb area (Velika Gorica and Jastrebarsko), west Slavonia, Novska area, and Dinara Mountain. The disease has not been recorded in the littoral area and Adriatic islands. The identified causative agents include Dobrava and Puumala viruses of the genus Hantavirus, whereas rodents Clethrionomys glareolus, Apodemus flavicollis, Apodemus agrarius, and Apodemus sylvaticus serve as the main reservoirs of the infection. Typical biotopes of the infection in Croatia are deciduous woods. The measures of prevention in Croatia include pest control, disinfection, hygienic waste disposal, preventing rodent access to food and water, proper choice of camping sites, and health education. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome occurs predominantly in soldiers, in a sporadic or epidemic form. Because of the course of disease and potentially lethal outcome, the disease has a considerable impact on the field task performance and combat readiness of

  2. Lassa fever in post-conflict sierra leone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey G Shaffer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lassa fever (LF, an often-fatal hemorrhagic disease caused by Lassa virus (LASV, is a major public health threat in West Africa. When the violent civil conflict in Sierra Leone (1991 to 2002 ended, an international consortium assisted in restoration of the LF program at Kenema Government Hospital (KGH in an area with the world's highest incidence of the disease.Clinical and laboratory records of patients presenting to the KGH Lassa Ward in the post-conflict period were organized electronically. Recombinant antigen-based LF immunoassays were used to assess LASV antigenemia and LASV-specific antibodies in patients who met criteria for suspected LF. KGH has been reestablished as a center for LF treatment and research, with over 500 suspected cases now presenting yearly. Higher case fatality rates (CFRs in LF patients were observed compared to studies conducted prior to the civil conflict. Different criteria for defining LF stages and differences in sensitivity of assays likely account for these differences. The highest incidence of LF in Sierra Leone was observed during the dry season. LF cases were observed in ten of Sierra Leone's thirteen districts, with numerous cases from outside the traditional endemic zone. Deaths in patients presenting with LASV antigenemia were skewed towards individuals less than 29 years of age. Women self-reporting as pregnant were significantly overrepresented among LASV antigenemic patients. The CFR of ribavirin-treated patients presenting early in acute infection was lower than in untreated subjects.Lassa fever remains a major public health threat in Sierra Leone. Outreach activities should expand because LF may be more widespread in Sierra Leone than previously recognized. Enhanced case finding to ensure rapid diagnosis and treatment is imperative to reduce mortality. Even with ribavirin treatment, there was a high rate of fatalities underscoring the need to develop more effective and/or supplemental treatments for

  3. Chikungunya fever: A re-emerging viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhabra M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya (CHIK fever is a re-emerging viral disease characterized by abrupt onset of fever with severe arthralgia followed by constitutional symptoms and rash lasting for 1-7 days. The disease is almost self-limiting and rarely fatal. Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a RNA virus belonging to family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus. Molecular characterization has demonstrated two distinct lineages of strains which cause epidemics in Africa and Asia. These geographical genotypes exhibit differences in the transmission cycles. In contrast to Africa where sylvatic cycle is maintained between monkeys and wild mosquitoes, in Asia the cycle continues between humans and the Aedes aegypti mosquito. CHIKV is known to cause epidemics after a period of quiescence. The first recorded epidemic occurred in Tanzania in 1952-1953. In Asia, CHIK activity was documented since its isolation in Bangkok, Thailand in 1958. Virus transmission continued till 1964. After hiatus, the virus activity re-appeared in the mid-1970s and declined by 1976. In India, well-documented outbreaks occurred in 1963 and 1964 in Kolkata and southern India, respectively. Thereafter, a small outbreak of CHIK was reported from Sholapur district, Maharashtra in 1973. CHIKV emerged in the islands of South West Indian Ocean viz. French island of La Reunion, Mayotee, Mauritius and Seychelles which are reporting the outbreak since February, 2005. After quiescence of about three decades, CHIKV re-emerged in India in the states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Tamil Nadu since December, 2005. Cases have also been reported from Rajasthan, Gujarat and Kerala. The outbreak is still continuing. National Institute of Communicable Diseases has conducted epidemiological, entomological and laboratory investigations for confirmation of the outbreak. These have been discussed in detail along with the major challenges that the country faced during the current outbreak.

  4. The significance of peripartum fever in women undergoing vaginal deliveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensal, Adi; Weintraub, Adi Y; Levy, Amalia; Holcberg, Gershon; Sheiner, Eyal

    2008-10-01

    We investigated whether patients undergoing vaginal delivery who developed peripartum fever (PPF) had increased rates of other gestational complications. A retrospective study was undertaken comparing pregnancy complications of patients who developed PPF with those who did not. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to control for confounders. To avoid ascertainment bias, the year of birth was included in the model. Women who underwent cesarean delivery and those with multiple pregnancies were excluded from the study. During the study period, there were 169,738 singleton vaginal deliveries, and 0.4% of the women suffered from PPF. Hypertensive disorders, induction of labor, dystocia of labor in the second stage, suspected fetal distress, meconium-stained amniotic fluid, postpartum hemorrhage, manual lysis of a retained placenta, and revision of the uterine cavity and cervix were found to be independently associated with PPF by multivariable analysis. Year of birth was found to be a risk factor for fever. Apgar scores lower than 7 at 1 but not 5 minutes were significantly higher in the PPF group. Perinatal mortality rates were significantly higher among women with PPF (6.7% versus 1.3%, odds ratio [OR] = 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.9 to 7.3; P < 0.001). Using another multivariable analysis, with perinatal mortality as the outcome variable, PPF was found as an independent risk factor for perinatal mortality (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.9 to 4.6; P < 0.001). PPF in women undergoing vaginal deliveries is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and specifically is an independent risk factor for perinatal mortality.

  5. Open study of short course Fleroxacin for Typhoid and Paratyphoid Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H.H. Nelwan

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical and bacteriological effect of short course fleroxacin in uncomplicated typhoid and paratyphoid fever patients. Four hundred mg of fleroxacin was given oraly once daily for a period of 3 to 5 days. The diagnosis of typhoid and paratyphoid fever was established by clinical picture as well as blood culture or Widal serology test. Thirty patients in whom the clinical picture was confirmed as a typhoid or paratyphoid infection were eligible for this investigation. They consisted of 15 males and 15 females ranging in age from 18-38 years average 27.5 years of whom 18 were diagnosed by blood culture consisting of 16 S.typhi positive cases and two S.paratyphi A, while 12 other cases were positively confirmed by serial Widal agglutination serology. These cases suffered from fever between 3-14 days with a minimum recorded body temperature elevation of 38.5 degrees Celsius. Clinical response with defervescence of fever was obtained in the positive blood culture group within 3 days (8 patients including 2 cases positive for S.paratyphi A and within two additional days (5 days in the remaining 10 cases. In the twelve cases with a positive serology for typhoid fever a clinical response was obtained for defervescence within 3 days (6 cases with 4 of these cases were on 3 days of fleroxacin and 2 cases on 5 days of fleroxacin. In the remaining 6 serologic positive cases fever resolved after 4-6 days with an average of 5 days with one on 3 days of fleroxacin and the rest (5 cases on 5 days of fleroxacin. All positive blood culture cases reverted to negative after the fleroxacin course. No relapse or carrier state was recorded in this serie. It may be concluded that a 3 to 5 days closely monitored course of fleroxacin has excellent clinical as well as bacteriological efficacy in noncomplicated typhoid and paratyphoid fever. (Med J Indones 2002; 11: 41-7Keywords: fluoroquinolones, enteric infections, short

  6. Vaccine Platforms to Control Arenaviral Hemorrhagic Fevers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Ricardo; Bredenbeek, Peter; Jiang, Xiaohong; Tretyakova, Irina; Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-20

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne emerging human pathogens. Diseases caused by these viruses, e.g., Lassa fever (LF) in West Africa and South American hemorrhagic fevers (HFs), are serious public health problems in endemic areas. We have employed replication-competent and replication-deficient strategies to design vaccine candidates potentially targeting different groups "at risk". Our leader LF vaccine candidate, the live reassortant vaccine ML29, is safe and efficacious in all tested animal models including non-human primates. In this study we showed that treatment of fatally infected animals with ML29 two days after Lassa virus (LASV) challenge protected 80% of the treated animals. In endemic areas, where most of the target population is poor and many live far from health care facilities, a single-dose vaccination with ML29 would be ideal solution. Once there is an outbreak, a fast-acting vaccine or post-exposure prophylaxis would be best. The 2(nd) vaccine technology is based on Yellow Fever (YF) 17D vaccine. We designed YF17D-based recombinant viruses expressing LASV glycoproteins (GP) and showed protective efficacy of these recombinants. In the current study we developed a novel technology to clone LASV nucleocapsid within YF17D C gene. Low immunogenicity and stability of foreign inserts must be addressed to design successful LASV/YFV bivalent vaccines to control LF and YF in overlapping endemic areas of West Africa. The 3(rd) platform is based on the new generation of alphavirus replicon virus-like-particle vectors (VLPV). Using this technology we designed VLPV expressing LASV GP with enhanced immunogenicity and bivalent VLPV expressing cross-reactive GP of Junin virus (JUNV) and Machupo virus (MACV), causative agents of Argentinian and Bolivian HF, respectively. A prime-boost regimen required for VLPV immunization might be practical for medical providers, military, lab personnel, and visitors in endemic areas.

  7. Fever of unknown origin in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, K M; Henderson, S T; Streit, J G

    1989-06-01

    Fever is a prominent sign of an acute-phase response induced by microbial invasion, tissue injury, immunologic reactions, or inflammatory processes. This generalized host response is produced by a multiplicity of localized or systemic diseases and characterized by acute, subacute, or chronic changes in metabolic, endocrinologic, neurologic, and immunologic functions. The fundamental event is an initiation of the acute-phase response by the production of a mediated molecule called IL-1. This polypeptide is produced primarily from phagocytic cells such as blood monocytes, phagocytic lining cells of the liver and spleen, and other tissue macrophages. IL-1 produces a local reaction but also enters the circulation, acting as a hormone to mediate distant organ system responses to infection, immunologic reaction, and inflammatory processes. Fever is the result when IL-1 initiates the synthesis of prostaglandins, notably prostaglandin E2 in the thermoregulatory center located in the anterior hypothalamus. The thermostatic set point is then raised and mechanisms to conserve heat (vasoconstriction) and to produce heat (shivering) are initiated. The result is a sudden rise in body temperature. The same basic mechanisms are involved in FUO. Many of the biologic and biochemical changes that are seen in FUO are also evidence of an acute-phase response. The elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate is partly due to increased synthesis of hepatic proteins, including compliment components, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen, and C-reactive protein. IL-1 acts directly on the bone marrow to increase absolute numbers and immaturity of circulating neutrophils. Anemia is produced by many mechanisms, including the reduction of circulating serum iron. Although fever production in the elderly maybe delayed or of less intensity, it is still a marker of significant disease.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  8. Seroprevalence of yellow fever virus in selected health facilities in Western Kenya from 2010 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwallah, Allan ole; Inoue, Shingo; Thairu-Muigai, Anne Wangari; Kuttoh, Nancy; Morita, Kouichi; Mwau, Matilu

    2015-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF), which is caused by a mosquito-borne virus, is an important viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in equatorial Africa and South America. Yellow fever virus (YFV) is the prototype of the family Flaviviridae and genus Flavivirus. The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of YFV in selected health facilities in Western Kenya during the period 2010-2012. A total of 469 serum samples from febrile patients were tested for YFV antibodies using in-house IgM-capture ELISA, in-house indirect IgG ELISA, and 50% focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT50). The present study did not identify any IgM ELISA-positive cases, indicating absence of recent YFV infection in the area. Twenty-eight samples (6%) tested positive for YFV IgG, because of either YFV vaccination or past exposure to various flaviviruses including YFV. Five cases were confirmed by FRNT50; of these, 4 were either vaccination or natural infection during the YF outbreak in 1992-1993 or another period and 1 case was confirmed as a West Nile virus infection. Domestication and routine performance of arboviral differential diagnosis will help to address the phenomenon of pyrexia of unknown origin, contribute to arboviral research in developing countries, and enhance regular surveillance.

  9. Fever, jaundice and acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Sam M; Pathak, Neha; Toms, Graham C; Gelding, Susan V; Sivaprakasam, Venkat

    2015-02-01

    Leptospirosis is an uncommon infectious disease that has protean clinical manifestations ranging from an innocuous 'flu-like' illness to potentially life-threatening multi-organ failure. Here we describe a case of Weil's disease that presented on the acute medical take with fever, jaundice and acute renal failure. We highlight the importance of careful history taking at the time of admission and how understanding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of leptospirosis enables a definitive diagnosis to be reached. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  10. The Yellow Fever Vaccine: A History

    OpenAIRE

    Frierson, J. Gordon

    2010-01-01

    After failed attempts at producing bacteria-based vaccines, the discovery of a viral agent causing yellow fever and its isolation in monkeys opened new avenues of research. Subsequent advances were the attenuation of the virus in mice and later in tissue culture; the creation of the seed lot system to avoid spontaneous mutations; the ability to produce the vaccine on a large scale in eggs; and the removal of dangerous contaminants. An important person in the story is Max Theiler, who was Prof...

  11. Milk fever control principles: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilsing-Hansen, T; Jørgensen, R J; Østergaard, S

    2002-01-01

    (between 0 and 0.20) (daily calcium intake below versus above 20 g/d). The main problem in implementing the low-Ca principle is difficulties in formulating rations sufficiently low in calcium when using commonly available feeds. The use of large doses of vitamin D metabolites and analogues for milk fever...... prevention is controversial. Due to toxicity problems and an almost total lack of recent studies on the subject this principle is not described in detail. A few management related issues were discussed briefly, and the following conclusions were made: It is important to supply the periparturient cow...

  12. What's new in Rocky Mountain spotted fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luke F; Sexton, Daniel J

    2008-09-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) remains an important illness despite an effective therapy because it is difficult to diagnose and is capable of producing a fatal outcome. The pathogenesis of RMSF remains, in large part, an enigma. However, recent research has helped shed light on this mystery. Importantly, the diagnosis of RMSF must be considered in all febrile patients who have known or possible exposure to ticks, especially if they live in or have traveled to endemic regions during warmer months. Decisions about giving empiric therapy to such patients are difficult and require skill and careful judgement.

  13. STUDY OF ULTRASOUND FINDING IN DENGUE FEVER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Bajaj

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Dengue fever (DF is a viral haemorrhagic fever causing severe morbidity and mortality in affected patients. The aim of the study is to describe the role of ultrasonography (USG in the assessment of patients with Dengue fever, and its complications and to prove ultrasound is useful in the diagnosis during an epidemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS It is a prospective study was conducted in 2016 comprising of 178 patients who were serologically positive for dengue, radiological investigations were conducted in all cases. RESULTS Out of 178 patients Males (N=117 are more effected subjects in the study. female: Male ratio is 1:2. Hepatomegaly 74.1% which is most common findings in study, 113 (63.4% had GB wall thickening 98 had ascites (55%, 32 had pleural effusion (17.9%. most commonly seen in the age group of 20-39 years. Hepatomegaly was the most common finding noted in 67 patients (37.6%, followed by GB wall thickening in 65 patients (36.1%. Hepatomegaly was more common in 0-19 is 56 patients with 31.4% years age group Ascites in >40 years age group (16.8%. Hepatomegaly was seen in most of the patients whose platelet count was <40,000. (94.7%. GB wall thickening (88.5% common findings seen in patients whose platelet count was <40,000. In patients with platelet count of 40,000-80,000, Ascites is most common finding (87.5%, followed by Splenomegaly (60.7%. In patients whose platelet count was 80,000-150,000, Ascites (50% was more common than Splenomegaly (45.8%. In three patients with platelet count more than 150,000, no sonological abnormality was detected. CONCLUSIONS Ultrasound findings of hepatic changes, GB wall oedema, splenomegaly, ascites and pleural effusion in patients presenting with signs and symptoms of Dengue fever during an epidemic are diagnostic. Contributing in the differential diagnosis with other causes of febrile disease.

  14. Acute cholecystitis in a child with scarlet fever: A rare association

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical features are exudative pharyngitis, fever and bright red exanthema. Otitis media, pneumonia, septicaemia, osteomyelitis, rheumatic fever and acute glomerulonephritis are the common complications associated with scarlet fever. However, hepatitis and vasculitis are other rare complications described in the literature.

  15. Hemorrhagic Fever Caused by a Novel Bunyavirus in China: Pathogenesis and Correlates of Fatal Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yong-Zhen; He, Yong-Wen; Dai, Yong-An; Xiong, Yanwen; Zheng, Han; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Li, Juan; Sun, Qiangzheng; Luo, Xue-Lian; Cheng, Yu-Li; Qin, Xin-Cheng; Tian, Jun-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Yu, Bin; Jin, Dong; Guo, Wen-Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Wen; Peng, Jin-Song; Zhang, Guo-Bin; Zhang, Shaomin; Chen, Xiao-Min; Wang, Yan; Li, Ming-Hui; Li, Zhenjun; Lu, Shan; Ye, Changyun; de Jong, Menno D.; Xu, Jianguo

    2012-01-01

    Background. Hemorrhagic fever-like illness caused by a novel Bunyavirus, Huaiyangshan virus (HYSV, also known as Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia virus [SFTSV] and Fever, Thrombocytopenia and Leukopenia Syndrome [FTLS]), has recently been described in China. Methods. Patients with

  16. Fever treatment in the absence of malaria transmission in an urban informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yazoume; Madise, Nyovani; Ndugwa, Robert; Ochola, Sam; Snow, Robert W

    2009-07-15

    In sub-Saharan Africa, knowledge of malaria transmission across rapidly proliferating urban centres and recommendations for its prevention or management remain poorly defined. This paper presents the results of an investigation into infection prevalence and treatment of recent febrile events among a slum population in Nairobi, Kenya. In July 2008, a community-based malaria parasite prevalence survey was conducted in Korogocho slum, which forms part of the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance system. Interviewers visited 1,069 participants at home and collected data on reported fevers experienced over the preceding 14 days and details on the treatment of these episodes. Each participant was tested for malaria parasite presence with Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) and microscopy. Descriptive analyses were performed to assess the period prevalence of reported fever episodes and treatment behaviour. Of the 1,069 participants visited, 983 (92%) consented to be tested. Three were positive for Plasmodium falciparum using RDT; however, all were confirmed negative on microscopy. Microscopic examination of all 953 readable slides showed zero prevalence. Overall, from the 1,004 participants who have data on fever, 170 fever episodes were reported giving a relatively high period prevalence (16.9%, 95% CI:13.9%-20.5%) and higher among children below five years (20.1%, 95%CI:13.8%-27.8%). Of the fever episodes with treatment information 54.3% (95%CI:46.3%-62.2%) were treated as malaria using mainly sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine or amodiaquine, including those managed at a formal health facility. Only four episodes were managed using the nationally recommended first-line treatment, artemether-lumefantrine. The study could not demonstrate any evidence of malaria in Korogocho, a slum in the centre of Nairobi. Fever was a common complaint and often treated as malaria with anti-malarial drugs. Strategies, including testing for malaria parasites to reduce the inappropriate

  17. Fever treatment in the absence of malaria transmission in an urban informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ochola Sam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, knowledge of malaria transmission across rapidly proliferating urban centres and recommendations for its prevention or management remain poorly defined. This paper presents the results of an investigation into infection prevalence and treatment of recent febrile events among a slum population in Nairobi, Kenya. Methods In July 2008, a community-based malaria parasite prevalence survey was conducted in Korogocho slum, which forms part of the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance system. Interviewers visited 1,069 participants at home and collected data on reported fevers experienced over the preceding 14 days and details on the treatment of these episodes. Each participant was tested for malaria parasite presence with Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT and microscopy. Descriptive analyses were performed to assess the period prevalence of reported fever episodes and treatment behaviour. Results Of the 1,069 participants visited, 983 (92% consented to be tested. Three were positive for Plasmodium falciparum using RDT; however, all were confirmed negative on microscopy. Microscopic examination of all 953 readable slides showed zero prevalence. Overall, from the 1,004 participants who have data on fever, 170 fever episodes were reported giving a relatively high period prevalence (16.9%, 95% CI:13.9%–20.5% and higher among children below five years (20.1%, 95%CI:13.8%–27.8%. Of the fever episodes with treatment information 54.3% (95%CI:46.3%–62.2% were treated as malaria using mainly sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine or amodiaquine, including those managed at a formal health facility. Only four episodes were managed using the nationally recommended first-line treatment, artemether-lumefantrine. Conclusion The study could not demonstrate any evidence of malaria in Korogocho, a slum in the centre of Nairobi. Fever was a common complaint and often treated as malaria with anti-malarial drugs. Strategies

  18. Typhoid Fever in South Africa in an Endemic HIV Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keddy, Karen H; Sooka, Arvinda; Smith, Anthony M; Musekiwa, Alfred; Tau, Nomsa P; Klugman, Keith P; Angulo, Frederick J

    2016-01-01

    Typhoid fever remains an important disease in Africa, associated with outbreaks and the emerging multidrug resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) haplotype, H58. This study describes the incidence of, and factors associated with mortality due to, typhoid fever in South Africa, where HIV prevalence is high. Nationwide active laboratory-based surveillance for culture-confirmed typhoid fever was undertaken from 2003-2013. At selected institutions, additional clinical data from patients were collected including age, sex, HIV status, disease severity and outcome. HIV prevalence among typhoid fever patients was compared to national HIV seroprevalence estimates. The national reference laboratory tested Salmonella Typhi isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility and haplotype. Unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression analyses were conducted determining factors associated with typhoid fever mortality. We identified 855 typhoid fever cases: annual incidence ranged from 0.11 to 0.39 per 100,000 population. Additional clinical data were available for 369 (46.8%) cases presenting to the selected sites. Among typhoid fever patients with known HIV status, 19.3% (29/150) were HIV-infected. In adult females, HIV prevalence in typhoid fever patients was 43.2% (19/44) versus 15.7% national HIV seroprevalence (P Typhoid fever incidence in South Africa was largely unchanged from 2003-2013. Typhoid fever mortality was associated disease severity. HIV infection may be a contributing factor. Interventions mandate improved health care access, including to HIV management programmes as well as patient education. Further studies are necessary to clarify relationships between HIV infection and typhoid fever in adults.

  19. Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern; a Review Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Saeed; Baratloo, Alireza; Rouhipour, Alaleh; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Yousefifard, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) was first reported in 1976 with two concurrent outbreaks of acute viral hemorrhagic fever centered in Yambuku (near the Ebola river), Democratic Republic of Congo, and in Nzara, Sudan. The current outbreak of the Ebola virus was started by reporting the first case in March 2014 in the forest regions of southeastern Guinea. Due to infection rates raising over 13,000% within a 6-month period, Ebola is now considered as a global public health emergency and on August 8(th), 2014 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the epidemic to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. With more than 5000 involved cases and nearly 3000 deaths, this event has turned into the largest and most dangerous Ebola virus outbreak in the world. Based on the above-mentioned, the present article aimed to review the virologic characteristics, transmission, clinical manifestation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Ebola virus disease.

  20. Viscerotropic and neurotropic disease following vaccination with the 17D yellow fever vaccine, ARILVAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchener, Scott

    2004-06-02

    Yellow fever vaccine associated viscerotropic (YFV-AVD) and neurotropic (YFV-AND) diseases have been recently identified in various countries. Previously post-vaccination multiple organ system failure was recognised as a rare serious adverse event of yellow fever vaccination and 21 cases of post-vaccinal (YFV) encephalitis had been recorded. Incidence data is not available. On investigation of vaccine surveillance reports from Europe following distribution of more than 3 million doses of ARILVAX trade mark, four cases each of YFV-AVD and YFV-AND were found (each 1.3 cases per million doses distributed) for the period 1991 to 2003. The incidence for each is higher after 1996 (2.5 cases per million doses distributed). The incidence of these adverse events appears to be very low with ARILVAX trade mark. Similar incidence data is required from other countries for comparison.

  1. Surveillance of Rift Valley Fever in Iran between 2001 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh CHINIKAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an acute zoonotic viral disease that mostly affects ruminants with an occasional spillover as human infection. Following the outbreak of RVF in Saudi Arabia in 2000, surveillance of both animal and human population in Iran increased until 2011. During this period 1206 ovine, 405 caprine, 325 bovine and 28 camel samples were tested for RVFV in nine provinces in Iran. None of these samples tested IgG positive. Moreover, amongst 37 clinically suspected human cases of patients with RVF symptoms, none of these samples tested positive for RVFV. Despite the fact that no positive cases in human or animal populations were identified in Iran, surveillance and monitoring of viral haemorrhagic fevers including RVFV will continue.

  2. Surveillance of Rift Valley Fever in Iran between 2001 and 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadegh CHINIKAR

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an acute zoonotic viral disease that mostly affects ruminants with an occasional spillover as human infection. Following the outbreak of RVF in Saudi Arabia in 2000, surveillance of both animal and human population in Iran increased until 2011. During this period 1206 ovine, 405 caprine, 325 bovine and 28 camel samples were tested for RVFV in nine provinces in Iran. None of these samples tested IgG positive. Moreover, amongst 37 clinically suspected human cases of patients with RVF symptoms, none of these samples tested positive for RVFV. Despite the fact that no positive cases in human or animal populations were identified in Iran, surveillance and monitoring of viral haemorrhagic fevers including RVFV will continue.

  3. Fever and Multiple Eschars After an African Safari: Report of Three Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albízuri Prado, Fátima; Sánchez, Alba; Feito, Marta; Mayor, Ander; Rodriguez, Ana; de Lucas, Raúl

    2017-07-01

    African tick-bite fever (ATBF), a tickborne disease endemic in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa and the West Indies caused by Rickettsia africae, has been recognized as an emerging health problem in recent years. ATBF has been reported as the second most commonly documented etiology of fever, after malaria, in travelers who return ill from sub-Saharan Africa. Most cases reported in the literature occurred in middle-aged adults, so the incidence of ATBF in children is unclear. We report a cluster of three cases of ATBF that occurred in children ages 7 to 16 years after returning from a game-hunting safari in South Africa. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Extracellular collagenases and the endocytic receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein/Endo180, cooperate in fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2007-01-01

    in these events. A recently discovered turnover route with importance for tumor growth involves intracellular collagen degradation and is governed by the collagen receptor, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (uPARAP or Endo180). The interplay between this mechanism and extracellular...... collagenolysis is not known. In this report, we demonstrate the existence of a new, composite collagen breakdown pathway. Thus, fibroblast-mediated collagen degradation proceeds preferentially as a sequential mechanism in which extracellular collagenolysis is followed by uPARAP/Endo180-mediated endocytosis......The collagens of the extracellular matrix are the most abundant structural proteins in the mammalian body. In tissue remodeling and in the invasive growth of malignant tumors, collagens constitute an important barrier, and consequently, the turnover of collagen is a rate-limiting process...

  5. Structural and functional characterization of a novel molluskan ortholog of TRAF and TNF receptor-associated protein from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Sukkyoung; Kim, Hyowon; Zoysa, Mahanama De; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Jehee

    2014-09-01

    Immune signaling cascades have an indispensable role in the host defense of almost all the organisms. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling is considered as a prominent signaling pathway in vertebrate as well as invertebrate species. Within the signaling cascade, TNF receptor-associated factor (TRAF) and TNF receptor-associated protein (TTRAP) has been shown to have a crucial role in the modulation of immune signaling in animals. Here, we attempted to characterize a novel molluskan ortholog of TTRAP (AbTTRAP) from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) and analyzed its expression levels under pathogenic stress. The complete coding sequence of AbTTRAP consisted of 1071 nucleotides, coding for a 357 amino acid peptide, with a predicted molecular mass of 40 kDa. According to our in-silico analysis, AbTTRAP resembled the typical TTRAP domain architecture, including a 5'-tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase domain. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis revealed its common ancestral invertebrate origin, where AbTTRAP was clustered with molluskan counterparts. Quantitative real time PCR showed universally distributed expression of AbTTRAP in selected tissues of abalone, from which more prominent expression was detected in hemocytes. Upon stimulation with two pathogen-derived mitogens, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), transcript levels of AbTTRAP in hemocytes and gill tissues were differentially modulated with time. In addition, the recombinant protein of AbTTRAP exhibited prominent endonuclease activity against abalone genomic DNA, which was enhanced by the presence of Mg(2+) in the medium. Collectively, these results reinforce the existence of the TNF signaling cascade in mollusks like disk abalone, further implicating the putative regulatory behavior of TTRAP in invertebrate host pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Yellow fever disease: density equalizing mapping and gender analysis of international research output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Matthias; Groneberg, David A; Klingelhoefer, Doris; Gerber, Alexander

    2013-11-18

    A number of scientific papers on yellow fever have been published but no broad scientometric analysis on the published research of yellow fever has been reported.The aim of the article based study was to provide an in-depth evaluation of the yellow fever field using large-scale data analysis and employment of bibliometric indicators of production and quantity. Data were retrieved from the Web of Science database (WoS) and analyzed as part of the NewQis platform. Then data were extracted from each file, transferred to databases and visualized as diagrams. Partially by means of density-equalizing mapping makes the findings clear and emphasizes the output of the analysis. In the study period from 1900 to 2012 a total of 5,053 yellow fever-associated items were published by 79 countries. The United States (USA) having the highest publication rate at 42% (n = 751) followed by far from Brazil (n = 203), France (n = 149) and the United Kingdom (n = 113). The most productive journals are the "Public Health Reports", the "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene" and the "Journal of Virology". The gender analysis showed an overall steady increase of female authorship from 1950 to 2011. Brazil is the only country of the five most productive countries with a higher proportion of female scientists. The present data shows an increase in research productivity over the entire study period, in particular an increase of female scientists. Brazil shows a majority of female authors, a fact that is confirmed by other studies.

  7. The Molecular and Spatial Epidemiology of Typhoid Fever in Rural Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duy Pham Thanh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever, caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, is an endemic cause of febrile disease in Cambodia. The aim of this study was to better understand the epidemiology of pediatric typhoid fever in Cambodia. We accessed routine blood culture data from Angkor Hospital for Children (AHC in Siem Reap province between 2007 and 2014, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS on the isolated bacteria to characterize the S. Typhi population. The resulting phylogenetic information was combined with conventional epidemiological approaches to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of S. Typhi and population-level risk factors for reported disease. During the study period, there were 262 cases of typhoid within a 100 km radius of AHC, with a median patient age of 8.2 years (IQR: 5.1-11.5 years. The majority of infections occurred during the rainy season, and commune incidences as high as 11.36/1,000 in children aged <15 years were observed over the study period. A population-based risk factor analysis found that access to water within households and increasing distance from Tonle Sap Lake were protective. Spatial mapping and WGS provided additional resolution for these findings, and confirmed that proximity to the lake was associated with discrete spatiotemporal disease clusters. We confirmed the dominance of MDR H58 S. Typhi in this population, and found substantial evidence of diversification (at least seven sublineages within this single lineage. We conclude that there is a substantial burden of pediatric typhoid fever in rural communes in Cambodia. Our data provide a platform for additional population-based typhoid fever studies in this location, and suggest that this would be a suitable setting in which to introduce a school-based vaccination programme with Vi conjugate vaccines.

  8. Yellow Fever in Africa: Estimating the Burden of Disease and Impact of Mass Vaccination from Outbreak and Serological Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Tini; Van Kerkhove, Maria D.; Yactayo, Sergio; Ronveaux, Olivier; Lewis, Rosamund F.; Staples, J. Erin; Perea, William; Ferguson, Neil M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas of Africa and South America. While eradication is not feasible due to the wildlife reservoir, large scale vaccination activities in Africa during the 1940s to 1960s reduced yellow fever incidence for several decades. However, after a period of low vaccination coverage, yellow fever has resurged in the continent. Since 2006 there has been substantial funding for large preventive mass vaccination campaigns in the most affected countries in Africa to curb the rising burden of disease and control future outbreaks. Contemporary estimates of the yellow fever disease burden are lacking, and the present study aimed to update the previous estimates on the basis of more recent yellow fever occurrence data and improved estimation methods. Methods and Findings Generalised linear regression models were fitted to a dataset of the locations of yellow fever outbreaks within the last 25 years to estimate the probability of outbreak reports across the endemic zone. Environmental variables and indicators for the surveillance quality in the affected countries were used as covariates. By comparing probabilities of outbreak reports estimated in the regression with the force of infection estimated for a limited set of locations for which serological surveys were available, the detection probability per case and the force of infection were estimated across the endemic zone. The yellow fever burden in Africa was estimated for the year 2013 as 130,000 (95% CI 51,000–380,000) cases with fever and jaundice or haemorrhage including 78,000 (95% CI 19,000–180,000) deaths, taking into account the current level of vaccination coverage. The impact of the recent mass vaccination campaigns was assessed by evaluating the difference between the estimates obtained for the current vaccination coverage and for a hypothetical scenario excluding these vaccination campaigns. Vaccination campaigns

  9. Yellow Fever in Africa: estimating the burden of disease and impact of mass vaccination from outbreak and serological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garske, Tini; Van Kerkhove, Maria D; Yactayo, Sergio; Ronveaux, Olivier; Lewis, Rosamund F; Staples, J Erin; Perea, William; Ferguson, Neil M

    2014-05-01

    Yellow fever is a vector-borne disease affecting humans and non-human primates in tropical areas of Africa and South America. While eradication is not feasible due to the wildlife reservoir, large scale vaccination activities in Africa during the 1940s to 1960s reduced yellow fever incidence for several decades. However, after a period of low vaccination coverage, yellow fever has resurged in the continent. Since 2006 there has been substantial funding for large preventive mass vaccination campaigns in the most affected countries in Africa to curb the rising burden of disease and control future outbreaks. Contemporary estimates of the yellow fever disease burden are lacking, and the present study aimed to update the previous estimates on the basis of more recent yellow fever occurrence data and improved estimation methods. Generalised linear regression models were fitted to a dataset of the locations of yellow fever outbreaks within the last 25 years to estimate the probability of outbreak reports across the endemic zone. Environmental variables and indicators for the surveillance quality in the affected countries were used as covariates. By comparing probabilities of outbreak reports estimated in the regression with the force of infection estimated for a limited set of locations for which serological surveys were available, the detection probability per case and the force of infection were estimated across the endemic zone. The yellow fever burden in Africa was estimated for the year 2013 as 130,000 (95% CI 51,000-380,000) cases with fever and jaundice or haemorrhage including 78,000 (95% CI 19,000-180,000) deaths, taking into account the current level of vaccination coverage. The impact of the recent mass vaccination campaigns was assessed by evaluating the difference between the estimates obtained for the current vaccination coverage and for a hypothetical scenario excluding these vaccination campaigns. Vaccination campaigns were estimated to have reduced the

  10. Typhoid fever in Fiji: a reversible plague?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Corinne N; Kama, Mike; Acharya, Shrish; Bera, Una; Clemens, John; Crump, John A; Dawainavesi, Aggie; Dougan, Gordon; Edmunds, W John; Fox, Kimberley; Jenkins, Kylie; Khan, M Imran; Koroivueta, Josefa; Levine, Myron M; Martin, Laura B; Nilles, Eric; Pitzer, Virginia E; Singh, Shalini; Raiwalu, Ratu Vereniki; Baker, Stephen; Mulholland, Kim

    2014-10-01

    The country of Fiji, with a population of approximately 870 000 people, faces a growing burden of several communicable diseases including the bacterial infection typhoid fever. Surveillance data suggest that typhoid has become increasingly common in rural areas of Fiji and is more frequent amongst young adults. Transmission of the organisms that cause typhoid is facilitated by faecal contamination of food or water and may be influenced by local behavioural practices in Fiji. The Fijian Ministry of Health, with support from Australian Aid, hosted a meeting in August 2012 to develop comprehensive control and prevention strategies for typhoid fever in Fiji. International and local specialists were invited to share relevant data and discuss typhoid control options. The resultant recommendations focused on generating a clearer sense of the epidemiology of typhoid in Fiji and exploring the contribution of potential transmission pathways. Additionally, the panel suggested steps such as ensuring that recommended ciprofloxacin doses are appropriate to reduce the potential for relapse and reinfection in clinical cases, encouraging proper hand hygiene of food and drink handlers, working with water and sanitation agencies to review current sanitation practices and considering a vaccination policy targeting epidemiologically relevant populations. © 2014 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Longitudinal myelitis associated with yellow fever vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, M; Riccio, P; Patrucco, L; Rojas, J I; Cristiano, E

    2009-07-01

    Severe adverse reaction to yellow fever (YF) vaccine includes the yellow fever vaccine-associated neurotropic disease. This terminology includes postvaccinal encephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and Guillain-Barré syndrome. The objective of this communication is to report a patient who received a YF vaccine in Argentina and subsequently developed longitudinal myelitis with a symptom that had previously gone unreported in the literature. A 56-year-old man began with progressive paraparesia, urinary retention, and constipation 48 h previous to admission. The patient received YF vaccine 45 days prior to the onset of the symptoms. There was no history of other immunization or relevant condition. MR of the spine showed longitudinal intramedullary hyperintense signal (D5-12) without gadolinium enhancement. A high concentration of YFV-specific IgM vaccine antibody was found in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Serological tests for other flavivirus were negative. A diagnosis of longitudinal myelitis without encephalitis associated with YF vaccine was performed and symptoms improved 5 days later. This is the first report dealing with longitudinal myelitis as a serious adverse event associated with YF vaccination in which confirmation of the presence of antibodies in CSF was found. To date, it is also the first report with serological confirmation in Argentina and in South America. We consider that the present investigation will raise awareness in the region in the reporting of adverse events related to YF vaccine and improve our knowledge of adverse reactions to the vaccine.

  12. Dengue Fever: Causes, Complications, and Vaccine Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyati Khetarpal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a highly endemic infectious disease of the tropical countries and is rapidly becoming a global burden. It is caused by any of the 4 serotypes of dengue virus and is transmitted within humans through female Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue disease varies from mild fever to severe conditions of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome. Globalization, increased air travel, and unplanned urbanization have led to increase in the rate of infection and helped dengue to expand its geographic and demographic distribution. Dengue vaccine development has been a challenging task due to the existence of four antigenically distinct dengue virus serotypes, each capable of eliciting cross-reactive and disease-enhancing antibody response against the remaining three serotypes. Recently, Sanofi Pasteur’s chimeric live-attenuated dengue vaccine candidate has been approved in Mexico, Brazil, and Philippines for usage in adults between 9 and 45 years of age. The impact of its limited application to the public health system needs to be evaluated. Simultaneously, the restricted application of this vaccine candidate warrants continued efforts in developing a dengue vaccine candidate which is additionally efficacious for infants and naïve individuals. In this context, alternative strategies of developing a designed vaccine candidate which does not allow production of enhancing antibodies should be explored, as it may expand the umbrella of efficacy to include infants and naïve individuals.

  13. The thermal stability of yellow fever vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ishak

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of yellow fever vaccine thermostability both in lyophilized form and after reconstitution were analyzed. Two commercial yellow fever vaccines were assayed for their thermal stability. Vaccines were exposed to test temperatures in the range of 8 (graus C to 45 (graus C. Residual infectivity was measured by a plaque assay using Vero cells. The titre values were used in an accelerated degradation test that follows the Arrhenius equation and the minimum immunizing dose was assumed to be 10 (ao cubo particles forming unit (pfu/dose. Some of the most relevant results include that (i regular culture medium show the same degradation pattern of a reconstituted 17D-204 vaccine; (ii reconstituted YF-17D-204 showed a predictable half life of more than six days if kept at 0 (graus C; (iii there are differences in thermostability between different products that are probably due to both presence of stabilizers in the preparation and the modernization in the vaccine production; (iv it is important to establish a proper correlation between the mouse infectivity test and the plaque assay since the last appears to be more simple, economical, and practical for small laboratories to assess the potency of the vaccine, and (v the accelerated degradation test appears to be the best procedure to quantify the thermostability of biological products.

  14. Risk factors for typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Jakarta, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollaard, A.M.; Ali, S.; Asten, H.A.G.H. van; Widjaja, S.; Visser, L.G.; Surjadi, C.; Dissel, J.T. van

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The proportion of paratyphoid fever cases to typhoid fever cases may change due to urbanization and increased dependency on food purchased from street vendors. For containment of paratyphoid a different strategy may be needed than for typhoid, because risk factors for disease may not

  15. Limitations of typhoid fever diagnostics and the need for prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Henk L.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of: Siba V, Horwood PF, Vanuga K et al. Evaluation of serological diagnostic tests for typhoid fever in Papua New Guinea using a composite reference standard. Clin. Vaccine Immunol. 19(11), 1833-1837 (2012). The study under review evaluated serological tests for typhoid fever against PCR

  16. Typhoid fever in a South African in-patient population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Mohammad Enayet Hossain

    2004-01-01

    In conclusion, the data presented herein show that no single clinical or paraclinical parameter is reliable in arriving at a correct clinical diagnosis of typhoid fever and that bacteriologic confirmation is necessary for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Patients ’ age and sex influence the clinical

  17. Typhoid fever : aspects of environment, host and pathogen interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Soegianto

    2006-01-01

    In a surveillance study in Jakarta, Indonesia, 88 typhoid and 26 paratyphoid fever patients were identified by blood culture. Risk factors for transmission of typhoid fever were mainly intra-household factors (poor hand-washing hygiene, recent household contacts), whereas paratyphoid was mainly

  18. Typhoid Fever Complicated by Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis and Rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non, Lemuel R; Patel, Rupa; Esmaeeli, Amir; Despotovic, Vladimir

    2015-11-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) and rhabdomyolysis are rare complications of typhoid fever from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Herein, we describe the clinical features in a 21-year-old female from India who presented to the intensive care unit with fever, severe pancytopenia, and rhabdomyolysis. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  19. Public health importance of lassa fever epidemiology, clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The public health importance of Lassa fever can not be over emphasized if one considers the high infectivity and mortality rates associated with the disease. This study dealt extensively on the epidemiology, clinical features and current management of Lassa fever through literature review. The aim of this study is to sensitise ...

  20. Traveling Abroad: Latest Yellow Fever Vaccine Update | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earlier this month, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released its list of clinics that are administering the yellow fever vaccine Stamaril, which has been made available to address the total depletion of the United States’ primary yellow fever vaccine, YF-VAX. These clinics will provide the vaccine to individuals preparing for international travel,

  1. Rationalizing the approach to children with fever in neutropenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammann, Roland A.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Phillips, Bob

    Purpose of review Fever in neutropenia is the most frequent potentially life-threatening complication of chemotherapy in children and adolescents with cancer. This review summarizes recent studies that refine our knowledge of how to manage pediatric fever in neutropenia, and their implications for

  2. Fatal Yellow Fever in Travelers to Brazil, 2018.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Davidson H; Angelo, Kristina; Caumes, Eric; van Genderen, Perry J J; Florescu, Simin A; Popescu, Corneliu P; Perret, Cecilia; McBride, Angela; Checkley, Anna; Ryan, Jenny; Cetron, Martin; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2018-03-23

    Yellow fever virus is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes yellow fever, an acute infectious disease that occurs in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. Most patients with yellow fever are asymptomatic, but among the 15% who develop severe illness, the case fatality rate is 20%-60%. Effective live-attenuated virus vaccines are available that protect against yellow fever (1). An outbreak of yellow fever began in Brazil in December 2016; since July 2017, cases in both humans and nonhuman primates have been reported from the states of São Paulo, Minas Gerais, and Rio de Janeiro, including cases occurring near large urban centers in these states (2). On January 16, 2018, the World Health Organization updated yellow fever vaccination recommendations for Brazil to include all persons traveling to or living in Espírito Santo, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro states, and certain cities in Bahia state, in addition to areas where vaccination had been recommended before the recent outbreak (3). Since January 2018, 10 travel-related cases of yellow fever, including four deaths, have been reported in international travelers returning from Brazil. None of the 10 travelers had received yellow fever vaccination.

  3. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorp, E. van; Setiati, T.E.; Mairuhu, A.T.; Suharti, C.; Cate, H.H.; Dolmans, W.M.V.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Hack, C.E.; Brandjes, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  4. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, Eric C. M.; Setiati, Tatty E.; Mairuhu, Albert T. A.; Suharti, Catharina; Cate Ht, Hugo ten; Dolmans, Wil M. V.; van der Meer, Jos W. M.; Hack, C. Erik; Brandjes, Dees P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was

  5. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and coexisting hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Hong

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is an acute viral disease with fever, hemorrhage and renal failure caused by hantavirus infection. Hantavirus induces HFRS or hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS. HPS progression to a life-threatening pulmonary disease is found primarily in the USA and very rarely in South Korea. Here, we report a case of HFRS and coexisting HPS.

  6. Fever. The Variety of Causes and Complexity of Decision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Delyagin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the principles of thermometry in children, interpretation of the measurement results, as well as the biological mechanisms of fever and the principles of its treatment. It is shown that the drug of choice in the symptomatic treatment of fever in children is ibuprofen (Nurofen for children.

  7. Caregivers' Knowledge and Home Management of Fever in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Fever is one of the most common complaints presented to the Paediatric Emergency Unit (PEU). It is a sign that there is an underlying pathologic process, the most common being infection. Many childhood illnesses are accompanied by fever, many of which are treated at home prior to presentation to hospital.

  8. Rift Valley fever potential mosquito vectors and their infection status ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a mosquito-borne viral zoonotic disease. Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) has been isolated from more than 40 species of mosquitoes from eight genera. This study was conducted to determine the abundance of potential mosquito vectors and their RVFV infection status in Ngorongoro ...

  9. Marburg haemorrhagic fever: recent advances | AdegborO | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the exception of a vaccine for yellow fever and ribavirin, which is used for treatment of some arenaviral infections, no specific chemotherapy for viral hemorrhagic fever exists. Only supportive treatment is possible The filoviruses, Marburg virus (MARV) and Ebola virus (EBOV), have been associated with hemorrhagic ...

  10. Parental beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever in Turkish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parental beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever in Turkish primary care. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... problem in pediatric age and is one of the most common reasons parents seek medical attention. ... Parents with a child with fever aged between 0 and 14 years were interviewed.

  11. Molecular characterization of African swine fever virus in apparently ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African swine fever (ASF) is a highly lethal and economically significant disease of domestic pigs in Uganda where outbreaks regularly occur. There is neither a vaccine nor treatment available for ASF control. Twenty two African swine fever virus (ASFV) genotypes (I - XXII) have been identified based on partial sequencing ...

  12. Marburg hemorrhagic fever associated with multiple genetic lineages of virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bausch, D G; Nichol, S T; Muyembe-Tamfum, J J

    2006-01-01

    Background An outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever was first observed in a gold-mining village in northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo in October 1998. Methods We investigated the outbreak of Marburg hemorrhagic fever most intensively in May and October 1999. Sporadic cases and short ch...

  13. Spontaneous muscle hematomas in a patient with Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jency Maria Koshy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and Dengue shock syndrome manifest in various forms, ranging from petechial skin hemorrhage to life threatening cerebral, pulmonary, gastrointestinal and genitourinary hemorrhages. However it is very rare to have muscle hematomas in DHF. We report a rare case of spontaneous Iliopsoas hematoma complicating Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  14. [Alarm symptoms of meningitis in children with fever].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.F. Geurts (Dorien); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractA 15-year-old girl presented with fever and pain in her legs. A viral infection was suspected, but within 24 hours she became confused and developed meningeal signs, based on which she was diagnosed as having meningitis. Within a few hours a 6-month-old boy developed fever, a grey

  15. Dengue as a cause of acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, H.L.; de Vries, P.J.; Nga, T.T.T.; Giao, P.T.; Hung, L.Q.; Binh, T.Q.; Nam, N.V.; Nagelkerke, N.; Kager, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Dengue is a common cause of fever in the tropics but its contribution to the total burden of febrile illnesses that is presented to primary health facilities in endemic regions such as Vietnam, is largely unknown. We aimed to report the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever in Binh

  16. Dengue fever associated with acute scrotal oedema: two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, M.; Naqvi, S.Z.G.

    2011-01-01

    Scrotal oedema associated with dengue fever is a rare and self limiting condition resolving in a few days without any complication or sequelae. This is a report of two cases of dengue fever associated with acute scrotal and penile oedema. (author)

  17. Dengue as a cause of acute undifferentiated fever in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phuong, Hoang Lan; de Vries, Peter J.; Nga, Tran T. T.; Giao, Phan T.; Hung, Le Q.; Binh, Tran Q.; Nam, Nguyen V.; Nagelkerke, Nico; Kager, Piet A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dengue is a common cause of fever in the tropics but its contribution to the total burden of febrile illnesses that is presented to primary health facilities in endemic regions such as Vietnam, is largely unknown. We aimed to report the frequency of dengue as a cause of fever in Binh

  18. Close Relationship of Ruminant Pestiviruses and Classical Swine Fever Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postel, Alexander; Schmeiser, Stefanie; Oguzoglu, Tuba Cigdem; Indenbirken, Daniela; Alawi, Malik; Fischer, Nicole; Grundhoff, Adam

    2015-01-01

    To determine why serum from small ruminants infected with ruminant pestiviruses reacted positively to classical swine fever virus (CSFV)–specific diagnostic tests, we analyzed 2 pestiviruses from Turkey. They differed genetically and antigenically from known Pestivirus species and were closely related to CSFV. Cross-reactions would interfere with classical swine fever diagnosis in pigs. PMID:25811683

  19. Burden of typhoid fever in Sulaimania, Iraqi Kurdistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jonathan; Saeed, Rebeen; Mykhan, Hawar; Kanan, Shwan; Farhad, Dlawer; Ali, Kocher Omer; Abdulwahab, Runak Hama Kareem; Palardy, John; Neill, Marguerite A

    2014-10-01

    Typhoid fever imposes a high disease burden worldwide, but resource limitations mean that the burden of typhoid fever in many countries is poorly understood. The authors conducted a prospective surveillance study at the adult and pediatric teaching hospitals in Sulaimania, Iraqi Kurdistan. All patients presenting with an undifferentiated febrile illness consistent with typhoid were eligible for enrollment. Enrolled patients had blood cultures and Brucella serologies performed. Incidence was calculated with reference to census data. Both typhoid fever and brucellosis were common, and the incidence of typhoid fever was 21 cases/100 000 patient-years. Classic disease symptoms were uncommonly observed. Cost-effective surveillance projects to calculate disease burden of typhoid fever are practical and replicable. Typhoid has successfully adapted to the healthcare environment in Sulaimania. Additional work in the region should focus on antibiotic resistance and other enteric pathogens such as Brucella spp. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. What a rheumatologist needs to know about yellow fever vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Cristina Vanderley; Mota, Licia Maria Henrique da; Santos-Neto, Leopoldo Luiz Dos; Tauil, Pedro Luiz

    2013-04-01

    Patients with rheumatic diseases are more susceptible to infection, due to the underlying disease itself or to its treatment. The rheumatologist should prevent infections in those patients, vaccination being one preventive measure to be adopted. Yellow fever is one of such infectious diseases that can be avoided.The yellow fever vaccine is safe and effective for the general population, but, being an attenuated live virus vaccine, it should be avoided whenever possible in rheumatic patients on immunosuppressive drugs. Considering that yellow fever is endemic in a large area of Brazil, and that vaccination against that disease is indicated for those living in such area or travelling there, rheumatologists need to know that disease, as well as the indications for the yellow fever vaccine and contraindications to it. Our paper was aimed at highlighting the major aspects rheumatologists need to know about the yellow fever vaccine to decide about its indication or contraindication in specific situations. 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Yellow Fever Outbreaks in Unvaccinated Populations, Brazil, 2008–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Alessandro Pecego Martins; Costa, Zouraide Guerra Antunes; Ramos, Daniel Garkauskas; Andrade, Maria Auxiliadora; Jayme, Valéria de Sá; de Almeida, Marco Antônio Barreto; Vettorello, Kátia Campomar; Mascheretti, Melissa; Flannery, Brendan

    2014-01-01

    Due to the risk of severe vaccine-associated adverse events, yellow fever vaccination in Brazil is only recommended in areas considered at risk for disease. From September 2008 through June 2009, two outbreaks of yellow fever in previously unvaccinated populations resulted in 21 confirmed cases with 9 deaths (case-fatality, 43%) in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul and 28 cases with 11 deaths (39%) in Sao Paulo state. Epizootic deaths of non-human primates were reported before and during the outbreak. Over 5.5 million doses of yellow fever vaccine were administered in the two most affected states. Vaccine-associated adverse events were associated with six deaths due to acute viscerotropic disease (0.8 deaths per million doses administered) and 45 cases of acute neurotropic disease (5.6 per million doses administered). Yellow fever vaccine recommendations were revised to include areas in Brazil previously not considered at risk for yellow fever. PMID:24625634

  2. Viscerotropic disease following yellow fever vaccination in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittembury, Alvaro; Ramirez, Gladys; Hernández, Herminio; Ropero, Alba Maria; Waterman, Steve; Ticona, María; Brinton, Margo; Uchuya, Jorge; Gershman, Mark; Toledo, Washington; Staples, Erin; Campos, Clarense; Martínez, Mario; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Cabezas, Cesar; Lanciotti, Robert; Zaki, Sherif; Montgomery, Joel M; Monath, Thomas; Hayes, Edward

    2009-10-09

    Five suspected cases of yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) clustered in space and time following a vaccination campaign in Ica, Peru in 2007. All five people received the same lot of 17DD live attenuated yellow fever vaccine before their illness; four of the five died of confirmed YEL-AVD. The surviving case was classified as probable YEL-AVD. Intensive investigation yielded no abnormalities of the implicated vaccine lot and no common risk factors. This is the first described space-time cluster of yellow fever viscerotropic disease involving more than two cases. Mass yellow fever vaccination should be avoided in areas that present extremely low risk of yellow fever.

  3. Outcome of Pediatric Gastroenterology Outpatients With Fever and Central Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Thomas; Blatt, Julie; Skinner, Asheley Cockrell; Jhaveri, Ravi; Jobson, Meghan; Freeman, Katherine

    2016-11-01

    Although management algorithms for fever and central venous catheters (CVCs) have been implemented for pediatric oncology (PO) patients, management of pediatric outpatients with noncancer diagnoses and CVCs lacks clear protocols. The aim of the study was to assess outcomes for pediatric outpatients with gastrointestinal disorders presenting with fever and CVC. Using a microbiology database and emergency department records, we created a database of pediatric gastroenterology (PGI) and PO outpatients with fever and a CVC who presented to our emergency department or clinics from January 2010 through December 2012. We excluded patients who had severe neutropenia (absolute neutrophil count, gastroenterology outpatients with fever and a CVC have a high prevalence of bloodstream infection. Algorithms for management need to be subspecialty specific. Pediatric gastroenterology patients presenting to emergency departments or clinics with fever and CVC require admission for monitoring and management.

  4. Poor food hygiene and housing as risk factors for typhoid fever in Semarang, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasem, M H; Dolmans, W M; Keuter, M M; Djokomoeljanto, R R

    2001-06-01

    To identify risk factors for typhoid fever in Semarang city and its surroundings, 75 culture-proven typhoid fever patients discharged 2 weeks earlier from hospital and 75 controls were studied. Control subjects were neighbours of cases with no history of typhoid fever, not family members, randomly selected and matched for gender and age. Both cases and controls were interviewed at home by the same trained interviewer using a standardized questionnaire. A structured observation of their living environment inside and outside the house was performed during the visit and home drinking water samples were tested bacteriologically. Univariate analysis showed the following risk factors for typhoid fever: never or rarely washing hands before eating (OR = 3.28; 95% CI = 1.41-7.65); eating outdoors at least once a week (OR = 3.00; 95% CI = 1.09-8.25); eating outdoors at a street food stall or mobile food vendor (OR = 3.86; 95% CI = 1.30-11.48); consuming ice cubes in beverage in the 2-week period before getting ill (OR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.09-8.25) and buying ice cubes from a street vendor (OR = 5.82; 95% CI = 1.69-20.12). Water quality and living environment of cases were worse than that of controls, e.g. cases less often used clean water for taking a bath (OR = 6.50; 95% CI = 1.47-28.80), for brushing teeth (OR = 4.33; 95% CI = 1.25-15.20) and for drinking (OR = 3.67; 95% CI = 1.02-13.14). Cases tended to live in houses without water supply from the municipal network (OR=11.00; 95% CI = 1.42-85.2), with open sewers (OR = 2.80; 95% CI = 1.0-7.77) and without tiles in the kitchen (OR = 2.67; 95% CI = 1.04-6.81). Multivariate analysis showed that living in a house without water supply from the municipal network (OR = 29.18; 95% CI = 2.12-400.8) and with open sewers (OR = 7.19; 95% CI = 1.33-38.82) was associated with typhoid fever. Never or rarely washing hands before eating (OR = 3.97; 95% CI = 1.22-12.93) and being unemployed or having a part-time job (OR = 31.3; 95% CI = 3

  5. Role Of Adhesion Molecules Vcam-1 And Ve-Cadherin In Endothelium Dysfunction Development At Hemorrhagic Fever With Renal Syndrome

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    А.А. Baygildina

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to determine the changes in concentration of both sVCAM-1 and VE-cadherin in blood serum of patients suffered from hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. 87 patients aged 15-65 were examined. Concentrations of both sVCAM-1 and VE- cadherin in blood serum by means of "Bender MedSystems" (Austria ELISA test were determined. It was shown that in both medium severe and severe forms of HFRS statistically the significant rise of sVCAM-1 concentration in blood with high indices in oliguric period took place. Complicated form was characterized by high indices of sVCAM-1 level in fever period, extremely decreasing in concentration in oliguric period and tendency to normalizing in clinical convalescence period. VE-cadherin level in blood was predominantly lower than control in all the observed groups with the exception of fever period in group with medium severe disease form. Negative correlation of normal intensity between adhesion molecules levels in blood was revealed. In conclusion it is necessary to point out that high VCAM-1 expression by endotheliocytes evidences the development of an adhesion form of endothelial dysfunction, low VE-cadherin production in a base for development of angiogenic form of endothelial dysfunction and changes in expression of these adhesion molecules that have adaptive metabolic response to macroorganism of HFRS pathogenic action

  6. Analysis of Impact of Geographical Environment and Socio-economic Factors on the Spatial Distribution of Kaohsiung Dengue Fever Epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Yin; Wen, Tzai-Hung; Yu, Hwa-Lung

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan is located in subtropical and tropical regions with high temperature and high humidity in the summer. This kind of climatic condition is the hotbed for the propagation and spread of the dengue vector mosquito. Kaohsiung City has been the worst dengue fever epidemic city in Taiwan. During the study period, from January 1998 to December 2011, Taiwan CDC recorded 7071 locally dengue epidemic cases in Kaohsiung City, and the number of imported case is 118. Our research uses Quantile Regression, a spatial infection disease distribution, to analyze the correlation between dengue epidemic and geographic environmental factors and human society factors in Kaohsiung. According to our experiment statistics, agriculture and natural forest have a positive relation to dengue fever(5.5~34.39 and 3.91~15.52). The epidemic will rise when the ratio for agriculture and natural forest increases. Residential ratio has a negative relation for quantile 0.1 to 0.4(-0.005~-0.78), and a positive relation for quantile 0.5 to0.9(0.01~18.0) . The mean income is also a significant factor in social economy field, and it has a negative relation to dengue fever(-0.01~-0.04). Conclusion from our research is that the main factor affecting the degree of dengue fever in predilection area is the residential proportion and the ratio of agriculture and natural forest plays an important role affecting the degree of dengue fever in non predilection area. Moreover, the serious epidemic area located by regression model is the same as the actual condition in Kaohsiung. This model can be used to predict the serious epidemic area of dengue fever and provide some references for the Health Agencies

  7. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of Four Genes Encoding Ethylene Receptors Associated with Pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) Flowering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-He; Wu, Qing-Song; Huang, Xia; Liu, Sheng-Hui; Zhang, Hong-Na; Zhang, Zhi; Sun, Guang-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous ethylene, or ethephon, has been widely used to induce pineapple flowering, but the molecular mechanism behind ethephon induction is still unclear. In this study, we cloned four genes encoding ethylene receptors (designated AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b). The 5' flanking sequences of these four genes were also cloned by self-formed adaptor PCR and SiteFinding-PCR, and a group of putative cis-acting elements was identified. Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b belonged to the plant ERS1s and ETR2/EIN4-like groups. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that AcETR2a and AcETR2b (subfamily 2) were more sensitive to ethylene treatment compared with AcERS1a and AcERS1b (subfamily 1). The relative expression of AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b was significantly increased during the earlier period of pineapple inflorescence formation, especially at 1-9 days after ethylene treatment (DAET), whereas AcERS1a expression changed less than these three genes. In situ hybridization results showed that bract primordia (BP) and flower primordia (FP) appeared at 9 and 21 DAET, respectively, and flowers were formed at 37 DAET. AcERS1a, AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b were mainly expressed in the shoot apex at 1-4 DAET; thereafter, with the appearance of BP and FP, higher expression of these genes was found in these new structures. Finally, at 37 DAET, the expression of these genes was mainly focused in the flower but was also low in other structures. These findings indicate that these four ethylene receptor genes, especially AcERS1b, AcETR2a, and AcETR2b, play important roles during pineapple flowering induced by exogenous ethephon.

  8. Rift Valley fever: Real or perceived threat for Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Dautu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever (RVF in Zambia was first reported in 1974 during an epizootic of cattle and sheep that occurred in parts of Central, Southern and Copperbelt Provinces. In 1990, the disease was documented in nine districts of the provinces of Zambia. In the last two decades, there have been no reports of RVF. This long period without reported clinical disease raises questions as to whether RVF is a current or just a perceived threat. To address this question, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE disease occurrence data on RVF for the period 2005−2010 in the Southern Africa Development Community (SADC was analysed. From the analysis, it was evident that most countries that share a common border with Zambia had reported at least one occurrence of the disease during the period under review. Due to the absence of natural physical barriers between Zambia and most of her neighbours, informal livestock trade and movements is a ubiquitous reality. Analysis of the rainfall patterns also showed that Zambia received rains sufficient to support a mosquito population large enough for high risk of RVF transmission. The evidence of disease occurrence in nearby countries coupled with animal movement, and environmental risk suggests that RVF is a serious threat to Zambia. In conclusion, the current occurrence of RVF in Zambia is unclear, but there are sufficient indications that the magnitude of the circulating infection is such that capacity building in disease surveillance and courses on recognition of the disease for field staff is recommended. Given the zoonotic potential of RVF, these measures are also a prerequisite for accurate assessment of the disease burden in humans.

  9. [Familial Mediterranean fever - first experiences in Slovakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallos, Tomáš; Gálová, Lucia Lukáčiková; Macejková, Eva; Sedlačko, Jozef; Toplak, Nataša; Debeljak, Maruša; Sargsyan, Hasmik; Ilenčíková, Denisa; Kovács, László

    2014-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most prevalent genetically determined autoinflammatory disease. FMF significantly decreases the quality of life and limits life expectancy due to the development of amyloidosis in affected individuals. Prevalence of FMF is highest in the south-eastern Mediterraneans. In other parts of the world, its occurance is often restricted to high-risk ethnic groups. In Central Europe, experience with FMF is scarse to none, as in the case of Slovakia, where no cases have been reported, so far. Herein we report the first five patients (3 adults and 2 children, 4 native Slovaks) in whom the diagnosis of FMF could be confirmed in Slovakia. Our experience demonstrates that FMF does occur in low-risk populations in Central Europe. Due to low prevalence and lack of experience, FMF diagnosis may be significantly delayed (4.5-30 years) and undiagnosed cases are to be expected in our population.

  10. Viral haemorrhagic fever and vascular alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, P; Wolf, K; Falzarano, D; Feldmann, H; Seebach, J; Schnittler, H

    2008-02-01

    Pathogenesis of viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) is closely associated with alterations of the vascular system. Among the virus families causing VHF, filoviruses (Marburg and Ebola) are the most fatal, and will be focused on here. After entering the body, Ebola primarily targets monocytes/macrophages and dendritic cells. Infected dendritic cells are largely impaired in their activation potency, likely contributing to the immune suppression that occurs during filovirus infection. Monocytes/macrophages, however, immediately activate after viral contact and release reasonable amounts of cytokines that target the vascular system, particularly the endothelial cells. Some underlying molecular mechanisms such as alteration of the vascular endothelial cadherin/catenin complex, tyrosine phosphorylation, expression of cell adhesion molecules, tissue factor and the effect of soluble viral proteins released from infected cells to the blood stream will be discussed.

  11. [Fever and petechial exanthema in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soult Rubio, J A; Navarro González, J; Olano Claret, P

    1992-11-01

    In an attempt to determine clinical and analytical predictive parameters of a possible grave disease, we have carried out a retrospective study of 172 children admitted to our hospital with fever and petechiae as initial symptoms. The ages ranged between 1 month and 10 years. Even though we have not found a clinical symptom or analysis sufficiently sensitive as to predict all grave diseases, the general clinical state of the child associated with either a high or low white cell count and an abnormal coagulation study should be alert signals for a serious infectious disease. On the contrary, if the clinical and analytical parameters are within normal limits the risk of a grave disease is low. We emphasize the high incidence of meningococcal disease (26%).

  12. Resistance Patterns of Typhoid Fever in Children: A Longitudinal Community-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vala, Snehal; Shah, Urvesh; Ahmad, Syed Amir; Scolnik, Dennis; Glatstein, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella typhi and S. paratyphi are important causes of bacteremia in children, especially those from the developing world. There is a lack of standardized treatment protocols for such patients in the literature, and there are also reports of therapeutic failure related to resistance to commonly used antibiotics. We analyzed the epidemiological, clinical, and antimicrobiological sensitivity patterns of disease in patients diagnosed with blood culture-positive typhoid fever over a 6-month period in a tertiary-care pediatric hospital in western India. Data were retrospectively analyzed for all patients with Salmonella isolates on blood culture between January 1 and June 30, 2011 at the Synergy Neonatal and Pediatric Hospital. Susceptibility of isolates to antimicrobials and minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined. Demographic data, symptoms and signs, basic laboratory results, treatment courses, and clinical outcomes were collected from clinical charts. All of the 61 isolates of S. typhi were sensitive to cefepime (fourth-generation cephalosporin), 96% to third-generation cephalosporins, and 95% to quinolones. There was intermediate sensitivity to ampicillin (92%) and chloramphenicol (80%). Notably, azithromycin resistance was observed in 63% of isolates. All patients ultimately made full recoveries. There is an urgent need for large scale, community-based clinical trials to evaluate the effectiveness of different antibiotics in enteric fever. Our antimicrobial susceptibility data suggest that quinolones and third-generation cephalosporins should be used as first-line antimicrobials in enteric fever. Although fourth-generation cephalosporins are useful, we feel their use should be restricted to complicated or resistant cases.

  13. Cases of typhoid fever in Copenhagen region: a retrospective study of presentation and relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Freja Cecille; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2013-08-11

    Typhoid fever is a systemic illness which in high-income countries mainly affects travellers. The incidence is particularly high on the Indian subcontinent. Travellers who visit friends and relatives (VFR) have been shown to have a different risk profile than others. We wished to identify main characteristics for travellers infected with S. Typhi considering both clinical and laboratory findings in order to provide for faster and better diagnostics in the future. The outcome of treatment, especially concerning relapse, was evaluated as well. Retrospectively collected data from 19 adult cases of typhoid fever over a 5-year period at the Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre Denmark. The patients were young adults, presenting with symptoms within a month after travelling. 84% were returned from travelling in the Indian subcontinent. 17 out of 19 patients were VFR-travellers. The main symptoms were fever (100%), gastrointestinal symptoms (84%), headache (58%) and dry cough (26%). Laboratory findings showed elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in all cases and elevated alanine transaminase (ALAT) in 47% of cases. In primary cases 4 isolates were fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin, the remaining were intermediate susceptible. Relapse occurred in 37% of the cases and only in cases where the patient was infected by a strain with intermediate susceptibility. Better pre-travel counselling should be given to VFR-travellers. The main symptoms and laboratory findings confirm previous findings. The relapse rate was unexpected high and could be correlated to ciprofloxacin-resistance.

  14. Seroepizootology of Q fever in Bulgaria during the last five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinov, S P; Pandarov, S; Popov, G V

    1989-12-01

    The work presents results of investigations on Q fever seroepizootology in Bulgaria during the last five years. These data are compared with the preceding period from 1950 to 1983. The basic method for investigation is Complement fixation test. Also used are immunofluorescence, agglutination reaction, cultivation and direct Electron microscopy. In general 15,814 samples were tested. Q fever positivity was foundin 10.08% of cattle, 20.44% of sheep, 10.17% of goats, 59.25% of dogs, 26.66% of magpies, 11.11% of wood-pigeons, 7.40% of mouflons, 7.14% of foxes and 5.82% of hens. These data confirm the results of our preceding investigations for the wide dissemination of C. burnetti among domestic animals. Positive data for the significant spread of C. burnetti among the wild animals and birds also exists. The disease manifests itself clinically in abortions in sheep and cattle and mastitis in sheep. The inapparent form, however, is much more frequent. The infected dogs represent a special interest. The control measures are based on the wide use of tetracyclines. The presented data testify to the continuing importance of the problem of Q fever in Bulgaria.

  15. [Report of Relapse Typhoid Fever Cases from Kolkata, India: Recrudescence or Reinfection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samajpati, Sriparna; Das, Surojit; Ray, Ujjwayini; Dutta, Shanta

    2018-05-24

    Three relapse cases were reported out of 107 hospital-attending typhoid cases within a period of 2 years (2014-2016) from Apollo Gleneagles Hospital, Kolkata, India. During the first episode of typhoid fever, 2 of the 3 cases were treated with ceftriaxone (CRO) for 7 days, and 1 was treated for 14 days. Six Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi) isolates, obtained from the 3 patients during both typhoid episodes, were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) mutation and molecular subtyping by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and H58 haplotyping. Pairs of the S. Typhi strains isolated from two of the patients during the 1st and 2nd episodes were similar with respect to the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles, QRDR mutations, and molecular subtypes; whereas, the S. Typhi strain pair isolated from the 3rd patient were different in their AMR profiles, QRDR mutations, and MLVA profiles. From these observations, it may be concluded that in spite of treating typhoid cases with CRO for 7-14 days, relapse of typhoid fever might occur. The article also showed the advantage of MLVA typing over PFGE, MLST, and CRISPR typing for the discrimination of strains isolated from the same patient in case of relapse of typhoid fever.

  16. Surgical treatment of peritonitis due to typhoid fever in a Hospital in Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulfo Gallego Mariño

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Typhoid fever is a cause of peritonitis by perforation of the intestinal loops and provokes the death of many people; therefore it constitutes a health problem in Mozambique.Objective: To describe the patients operated on, with the diagnosis of peritonitis resulting from typhoid fever, at the surgery department of the Provincial Hospital in Quelimane, Zambezia Province, Mozambique, from November 1, 2011 to April 30, 2012.Methods: A descriptive study of the patients operated on with the diagnosis of peritonitis resulting from typhoid fever, at the hospital and period herein mentioned, was performed. The study population consisted of 96 patients who were operated on. The variables that were measured were: age, sex, onset of symptoms, total perforations, performed surgical treatment and complications.Results: Male patients of the 25 to 50 age group prevailed; most of them visited the service after 72 hours of the onset of symptoms; in 66 patients only one perforation was found and the surgical procedure mostly used was the suture of the perforation and the washout of the abdominal cavity.Conclusions: Most of the patients visited the service 72 hours after the onset of symptoms; they underwent surgery; and wound infection was the most frequent complication.

  17. One Health approach to controlling a Q fever outbreak on an Australian goat farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, K A; Vincent, G; Wilks, C R; Franklin, L; Sutton, B; Stenos, J; Cowan, R; Lim, K; Athan, E; Harris, O; Macfarlane-Berry, L; Segal, Y; Firestone, S M

    2016-04-01

    A recent outbreak of Q fever was linked to an intensive goat and sheep dairy farm in Victoria, Australia, 2012-2014. Seventeen employees and one family member were confirmed with Q fever over a 28-month period, including two culture-positive cases. The outbreak investigation and management involved a One Health approach with representation from human, animal, environmental and public health. Seroprevalence in non-pregnant milking goats was 15% [95% confidence interval (CI) 7-27]; active infection was confirmed by positive quantitative PCR on several animal specimens. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii DNA obtained from goat and human specimens was identical by two typing methods. A number of farming practices probably contributed to the outbreak, with similar precipitating factors to the Netherlands outbreak, 2007-2012. Compared to workers in a high-efficiency particulate arrestance (HEPA) filtered factory, administrative staff in an unfiltered adjoining office and those regularly handling goats and kids had 5·49 (95% CI 1·29-23·4) and 5·65 (95% CI 1·09-29·3) times the risk of infection, respectively; suggesting factory workers were protected from windborne spread of organisms. Reduction in the incidence of human cases was achieved through an intensive human vaccination programme plus environmental and biosecurity interventions. Subsequent non-occupational acquisition of Q fever in the spouse of an employee, indicates that infection remains endemic in the goat herd, and remains a challenge to manage without source control.

  18. Vitamin D serostatus and dengue fever progression to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamor, E; Villar, L A; Lozano, A; Herrera, V M; Herrán, O F

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D could modulate pathways leading to dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). We examined the associations of serum total 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] and vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) concentrations in patients with uncomplicated dengue fever (DF) with risk of progression to DHF/DSS. In a case-control study nested in a cohort of DF patients who were followed during the acute episode in Bucaramanga, Colombia, we compared 25(OH)D and VDBP at onset of fever between 110 cases who progressed to DHF/DSS and 235 DF controls who did not progress. 25(OH)D concentrations were also compared between the acute sample and a sample collected >1 year post-convalescence in a subgroup. Compared with 25(OH)D ⩾75 nmol/l, adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) for progression were 0·44 (0·22-0·88) and 0·13 (0·02-1·05) for 50 to 75 nmol/l (vitamin D insufficiency) and <50 nmol/l (vitamin D deficiency), respectively (P, trend = 0·003). Mean 25(OH)D concentrations were much lower post-convalescence compared with the acute episode, regardless of case status. Compared with controls, mean VDBP was non-significantly lower in cases. We conclude that low serum 25(OH)D concentrations in DF patients predict decreased odds of progression to DHF/DSS.

  19. Fever without source: evaluation of a guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Beatriz Marcondes; Cardoso, Débora Morais; de Paulis, Milena; Escobar, Ana Maria de Ulhôa; Gilio, Alfredo Elias

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the applicability of a standardized guideline for children up to 36 months of age with fever without source (FWS). Prospective cohort study involving children with FWS treated at the emergency department of Hospital Universitário, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil, from June 2006 to May 2007. The guideline classifies the risk of serious bacterial infection (SBI) according to the presence or absence of toxemia, age, and temperature. Laboratory screening was based on risk assessment: complete blood count, blood culture, urinalysis, urine culture, and, if necessary, chest radiography, cerebrospinal fluid, and coproculture. We studied 251 children and, of these, 215 were followed up until the final diagnosis. Toxemia was found in 20 children, and 195 were well-appearing (30 up to 3 months old and 165 from 3 to 36 months old). Among those children from 3 to 36 months without toxemia, 95 had axillary temperature > 39 degrees C. In 107 (49.8%) children, there was spontaneous resolution of fever; in 88 (40.9%), benign self-limited disease was identified; and in 20 (9.3%), there was SBI. Among the cases of SBI, we identified 16 urinary tract infections, three cases of pneumonia and one occult bacteremia. Of the 215 children, 129 (60%) received no antibiotics, and 86 received antibiotics at some point (45 empirically). Empirical antibiotic treatment was maintained for an average of 72 hours. The guideline was shown to be appropriate to follow up these children using simple laboratory tests that can be carried out at most health facilities. The most frequent SBI in this sample was urinary tract infection.

  20. Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers: A threat to Zambia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katendi Changula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Filoviral haemorrhagic fevers (FVHF are caused by agents belonging to Filoviridae family, Ebola and Marburg viruses. They are amongst the most lethal pathogens known to infect humans. Incidence of FVHF outbreaks are increasing, with affected number of patients on the rise. Whilst there has been no report yet of FVHF in Zambia, its proximity to Angola and Democratic Republic of Congo, which have recorded major outbreaks, as well as the open borders, increased trade and annual migration of bats between these countries, puts Zambia at present and increased risk. Previous studies have indicated bats as potential reservoir hosts for filoviruses. An increasing population with an increasing demand for resources has forced incursion into previously uninhabited land, potentially bringing them into contact with unknown pathogens, reservoir hosts and/or amplifying hosts. The recent discovery of a novel arenavirus, Lujo, highlights the potential that every region, including Zambia, has for being the epicentre or primary focus for emerging and re-emerging infections. It is therefore imperative that surveillance for potential emerging infections, such as viral haemorrhagic fevers be instituted. In order to accomplish this surveillance, rapid detection, identification and monitoring of agents in patients and potential reservoirs is needed. International co-operation is the strategy of choice for the surveillance and fight against emerging infections. Due to the extensive area in which filoviral infections can occur, a regional approach to surveillance activities is required, with regional referral centres. There is a need to adopt shared policies for the prevention and control of infectious diseases. There is also need for optimisation of currently available tests and development of new diagnostic tests, in order to have robust, highly sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that can be used even where there are inadequate laboratories and diagnostic services.

  1. Environmental Transmission of Typhoid Fever in an Urban Slum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akullian, Adam; Ng'eno, Eric; Matheson, Alastair I; Cosmas, Leonard; Macharia, Daniel; Fields, Barry; Bigogo, Godfrey; Mugoh, Maina; John-Stewart, Grace; Walson, Judd L; Wakefield, Jonathan; Montgomery, Joel M

    2015-12-01

    Enteric fever due to Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) occurs in urban areas with poor sanitation. While direct fecal-oral transmission is thought to be the predominant mode of transmission, recent evidence suggests that indirect environmental transmission may also contribute to disease spread. Data from a population-based infectious disease surveillance system (28,000 individuals followed biweekly) were used to map the spatial pattern of typhoid fever in Kibera, an urban informal settlement in Nairobi Kenya, between 2010-2011. Spatial modeling was used to test whether variations in topography and accumulation of surface water explain the geographic patterns of risk. Among children less than ten years of age, risk of typhoid fever was geographically heterogeneous across the study area (p = 0.016) and was positively associated with lower elevation, OR = 1.87, 95% CI (1.36-2.57), p typhoid fever did not vary geographically or with elevation among individuals more than ten years of age [corrected]. Our results provide evidence of indirect, environmental transmission of typhoid fever among children, a group with high exposure to fecal pathogens in the environment. Spatially targeting sanitation interventions may decrease enteric fever transmission.

  2. Yellow fever cases in Asia: primed for an epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Sean; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Lim, Poh Lian

    2016-07-01

    There is currently an emerging outbreak of yellow fever in Angola. Cases in infected travellers have been reported in a number of other African countries, as well as in China, representing the first ever documented cases of yellow fever in Asia. There is a large Chinese workforce in Angola, many of whom may be unvaccinated, increasing the risk of ongoing importation of yellow fever into Asia via busy commercial airline routes. Large parts of the region are hyperendemic for the related Flavivirus dengue and are widely infested by Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of urban yellow fever transmission. The combination of sustained introduction of viraemic travellers, an ecology conducive to local transmission, and an unimmunized population raises the possibility of a yellow fever epidemic in Asia. This represents a major global health threat, particularly in the context of a depleted emergency vaccine stockpile and untested surveillance systems in the region. In this review, the potential for a yellow fever outbreak in Asia is discussed with reference to the ecological and historical forces that have shaped global yellow fever epidemiology. The limitations of surveillance and vector control in the region are highlighted, and priorities for outbreak preparedness and response are suggested. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental Transmission of Typhoid Fever in an Urban Slum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Akullian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteric fever due to Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever occurs in urban areas with poor sanitation. While direct fecal-oral transmission is thought to be the predominant mode of transmission, recent evidence suggests that indirect environmental transmission may also contribute to disease spread.Data from a population-based infectious disease surveillance system (28,000 individuals followed biweekly were used to map the spatial pattern of typhoid fever in Kibera, an urban informal settlement in Nairobi Kenya, between 2010-2011. Spatial modeling was used to test whether variations in topography and accumulation of surface water explain the geographic patterns of risk.Among children less than ten years of age, risk of typhoid fever was geographically heterogeneous across the study area (p = 0.016 and was positively associated with lower elevation, OR = 1.87, 95% CI (1.36-2.57, p <0.001. In contrast, the risk of typhoid fever did not vary geographically or with elevation among individuals more than ten years of age [corrected].Our results provide evidence of indirect, environmental transmission of typhoid fever among children, a group with high exposure to fecal pathogens in the environment. Spatially targeting sanitation interventions may decrease enteric fever transmission.

  4. Paediatric fever management: continuing education for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Anne M; Edwards, Helen E; Courtney, Mary D; Wilson, Jenny E; Monaghan, Sarah J

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the influence of level of practice, additional paediatric education and length of paediatric and current experience on nurses' knowledge of and beliefs about fever and fever management. Fifty-one nurses from medical wards in an Australian metropolitan paediatric hospital completed a self-report descriptive survey. Knowledge of fever management was mediocre (Mean 12.4, SD 2.18 on 20 items). Nurses practicing at a higher level and those with between one and four years paediatric or current experience were more knowledgeable than novices or more experienced nurses. Negative beliefs that would impact nursing practice were identified. Interestingly, beliefs about fever, antipyretic use in fever management and febrile seizures were similar; they were not influenced by nurses' knowledge, experience, education or level of practice. Paediatric nurses are not expert fever managers. Knowledge deficits and negative attitudes influence their practice irrespective of additional paediatric education, paediatric or current experience or level of practice. Continuing education is therefore needed for all paediatric nurses to ensure the latest clear evidence available in the literature for best practice in fever management is applied.

  5. Yellow fever cases in Asia: primed for an epidemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Wasserman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is currently an emerging outbreak of yellow fever in Angola. Cases in infected travellers have been reported in a number of other African countries, as well as in China, representing the first ever documented cases of yellow fever in Asia. There is a large Chinese workforce in Angola, many of whom may be unvaccinated, increasing the risk of ongoing importation of yellow fever into Asia via busy commercial airline routes. Large parts of the region are hyperendemic for the related Flavivirus dengue and are widely infested by Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of urban yellow fever transmission. The combination of sustained introduction of viraemic travellers, an ecology conducive to local transmission, and an unimmunized population raises the possibility of a yellow fever epidemic in Asia. This represents a major global health threat, particularly in the context of a depleted emergency vaccine stockpile and untested surveillance systems in the region. In this review, the potential for a yellow fever outbreak in Asia is discussed with reference to the ecological and historical forces that have shaped global yellow fever epidemiology. The limitations of surveillance and vector control in the region are highlighted, and priorities for outbreak preparedness and response are suggested.

  6. A super-spreading ewe infects hundreds with Q fever at a farmers' market in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner-Wiening Christiane

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In May 2003 the Soest County Health Department was informed of an unusually large number of patients hospitalized with atypical pneumonia. Methods In exploratory interviews patients mentioned having visited a farmers' market where a sheep had lambed. Serologic testing confirmed the diagnosis of Q fever. We asked local health departments in Germany to identiy notified Q fever patients who had visited the farmers market. To investigate risk factors for infection we conducted a case control study (cases were Q fever patients, controls were randomly selected Soest citizens and a cohort study among vendors at the market. The sheep exhibited at the market, the herd from which it originated as well as sheep from herds held in the vicinity of Soest were tested for Coxiella burnetii (C. burnetii. Results A total of 299 reported Q fever cases was linked to this outbreak. The mean incubation period was 21 days, with an interquartile range of 16–24 days. The case control study identified close proximity to and stopping for at least a few seconds at the sheep's pen as significant risk factors. Vendors within approximately 6 meters of the sheep's pen were at increased risk for disease compared to those located farther away. Wind played no significant role. The clinical attack rate of adults and children was estimated as 20% and 3%, respectively, 25% of cases were hospitalized. The ewe that had lambed as well as 25% of its herd tested positive for C. burnetii antibodies. Conclusion Due to its size and point source nature this outbreak permitted assessment of fundamental, but seldom studied epidemiological parameters. As a consequence of this outbreak, it was recommended that pregnant sheep not be displayed in public during the 3rd trimester and to test animals in petting zoos regularly for C. burnetii.

  7. An epidemiologic and entomologic investigation of a cluster of Rocky Mountain spotted fever cases in Delaware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotz, L; Callejas, L; McKechnie, D; Wolfe, D; Gaw, E; Hathcock, L; Childs, J

    1998-06-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) continues to be the most common fatal tick-borne illness in the United States. In August of 1996, four children attending a summer camp in Delaware were diagnosed with RMSF. This report summarizes the results of the epidemiologic and entomologic investigation conducted by the Delaware Division of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention regarding this cluster of RMSF cases. Epidemiologic and clinical aspects of RMSF, as well as previously reported clusters of the disease, are also reviewed. A questionnaire regarding symptoms and activities was administered via telephone to 163 (73 percent) of the 223 attendees. A suspected case was defined as an illness in a person attending the camp between August 11 and 17 that occurred during the two-week period following the session, characterized by either 1) fever with one or more symptoms (i.e., headache, rash, myalgia, or fatigue) or 2) no fever with two or more symptoms. Cases of RMSF were confirmed by serologic evaluation. Seven of 13 patients with suspected RMSF submitted sera for testing. Four patients had confirmed RMSF; three were males, and the median age was 12.5 years compared with 12 years for all attendees. All confirmed patients reported fever, headache, fatigue, and rash. An increased risk of becoming ill was associated with overnight camping at site A (Odds Ratio (OR) undefined, p = 0.02), visiting or overnight camping at site B (OR undefined, p = 0.003 and 0.002), and leaving the trails when hiking (OR undefined, p = 0.02). These data suggest that development of RMSF was associated with visiting or camping at specific sites and behavior likely to increase contact with ticks. Camp supervisors were advised to educate campers regarding tick bite prevention measures, reduce underbrush around campsites, and encourage campers to remain on the trails. Health care providers should remain aware of the increased risk for RMSF during the spring, summer, and

  8. A multi-country study of the economic burden of dengue fever: Vietnam, Thailand, and Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Seok; Mogasale, Vittal; Lim, Jacqueline K; Carabali, Mabel; Lee, Kang-Sung; Sirivichayakul, Chukiat; Dang, Duc Anh; Palencia-Florez, Diana Cristina; Nguyen, Thi Hien Anh; Riewpaiboon, Arthorn; Chanthavanich, Pornthep; Villar, Luis; Maskery, Brian A; Farlow, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health concern in many parts of the tropics and subtropics. The first dengue vaccine has already been licensed in six countries. Given the growing interests in the effective use of the vaccine, it is critical to understand the economic burden of dengue fever to guide decision-makers in setting health policy priorities. A standardized cost-of-illness study was conducted in three dengue endemic countries: Vietnam, Thailand, and Colombia. In order to capture all costs during the entire period of illness, patients were tested with rapid diagnostic tests on the first day of their clinical visits, and multiple interviews were scheduled until the patients recovered from the current illness. Various cost items were collected such as direct medical and non-medical costs, indirect costs, and non-out-of-pocket costs. In addition, socio-economic factors affecting disease severity were also identified by adopting a logit model. We found that total cost per episode ranges from $141 to $385 for inpatient and from $40 to $158 outpatient, with Colombia having the highest and Thailand having the lowest. The percentage of the private economic burden of dengue fever was highest in the low-income group and lowest in the high-income group. The logit analyses showed that early treatment, higher education, and better knowledge of dengue disease would reduce the probability of developing more severe illness. The cost of dengue fever is substantial in the three dengue endemic countries. Our study findings can be used to consider accelerated introduction of vaccines into the public and private sector programs and prioritize alternative health interventions among competing health problems. In addition, a community would be better off by propagating the socio-economic factors identified in this study, which may prevent its members from developing severe illness in the long run.

  9. Protective and immunological behavior of chimeric yellow fever dengue vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Scott B; Russell, Philip K

    2016-03-29

    Clinical observations from the third year of the Sanofi Pasteur chimeric yellow fever dengue tetravalent vaccine (CYD) trials document both protection and vaccination-enhanced dengue disease among vaccine recipients. Children who were 5 years-old or younger when vaccinated experienced a DENV disease resulting in hospitalization at 5 times the rate of controls. On closer inspection, hospitalized cases among vaccinated seropositives, those at highest risk to hospitalized disease accompanying a dengue virus (DENV) infection, were greatly reduced by vaccination. But, seronegative individuals of all ages after being vaccinated were only modestly protected from mild to moderate disease throughout the entire observation period despite developing neutralizing antibodies at high rates. Applying a simple epidemiological model to the data, vaccinated seronegative individuals of all ages were at increased risk of developing hospitalized disease during a subsequent wild type DENV infection. The etiology of disease in placebo and vaccinated children resulting in hospitalization during a DENV infection, while clinically similar are of different origin. The implications of the observed mixture of DENV protection and enhanced disease in CYD vaccinees are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rocky mountain spotted fever hospitalizations among American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demma, Linda J; Holman, Robert C; Mikosz, Christina A; Curns, Aaron T; Swerdlow, David L; Paisano, Edna L; Cheek, James E

    2006-09-01

    To describe the epidemiology of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), we conducted a retrospective analysis of hospitalization records with an RMSF diagnosis using Indian Health Service (IHS) hospital discharge data for calendar years 1980-2003. A total of 261 RMSF hospitalizations were reported among AIs, for an average annual hospitalization rate of 1.21 per 100,000 persons; two deaths were reported (0.8%). Most hospitalizations (88.5%) occurred in the Southern Plains region, where the rate was 4.23 per 100,000 persons. Children 1-4 years of age had the highest age-specific hospitalization rate of 2.50 per 100,000 persons. The overall annual RMSF hospitalization rate declined during the study period. Understanding the epidemiology of RMSF among AI/ANs and educating IHS/tribal physicians on the diagnosis of tick-borne diseases remain important for the prompt treatment of RMSF and the reduction of the disease occurrence among AI/ANs, particularly in high-risk areas.

  11. Relating coccidioidomycosis (valley fever) incidence to soil moisture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, E J; Bell, J E; Benedict, K; Shriber, J; McCotter, O; Cosh, M H

    2017-04-17

    Coccidioidomycosis (also called Valley fever) is caused by a soilborne fungus, Coccidioides spp. , in arid regions of the southwestern United States. Though some who develop infections from this fungus remain asymptomatic, others develop respiratory disease as a consequence. Less commonly, severe illness and death can occur when the infection spreads to other regions of the body. Previous analyses have attempted to connect the incidence of coccidioidomycosis to broadly available climatic measurements, such as precipitation or temperature. However, with the limited availability of long-term, in situ soil moisture data sets, it has not been feasible to perform a direct analysis of the relationships between soil moisture levels and coccidioidomycosis incidence on a larger temporal and spatial scale. Utilizing in situ soil moisture gauges throughout the southwest from the U.S. Climate Reference Network and a model with which to extend those estimates, this work connects periods of higher and lower soil moisture in Arizona and California between 2002 and 2014 to the reported incidence of coccidioidomycosis. The results indicate that in both states, coccidioidomycosis incidence is related to soil moisture levels from previous summers and falls. Stated differently, a higher number of coccidioidomycosis cases are likely to be reported if previous bands of months have been atypically wet or dry, depending on the location.

  12. Celiac Disease Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Cooney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a common autoimmune enteropathy that occurs, in affected individuals, with exposure to gluten in the diet and improves with removal of dietary gluten. Although CD is readily considered in patients with classical presentations of the disease, atypical manifestations may be the only presenting symptoms. We present a case of CD in a 16-year-old female presenting as fever of unknown origin, which has not been reported previously. The postulated mechanism for fever in CD and the importance of clinicians having a low threshold for considering CD in the differential diagnosis of fever of unknown origin and other enigmatic clinical presentations is discussed.

  13. The death of Alexander the Great: malaria or typhoid fever?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Burke A

    2004-03-01

    Alexander the Great had a profound effect on world history. His conquests covered the entire known world at the time, and he was responsible for the spread of Greek culture throughout the ancient world. In Babylon in 323 BC, Alexander died when he was nearly 33 years old. Possible explanations for his death have included alcoholic liver disease and strychnine poisoning, but little data support either condition as the cause of his death. Alexander most likely died from malaria or typhoid fever, which were rampant in ancient Babylon. The description of his final illness from the royal diaries is consistent with typhoid fever or malaria but is most characteristic of typhoid fever.

  14. Fundus Findings in Dengue Fever: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Şahan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is a flavivirus infection transmitted through infected mosquitoes, and is endemic in Southeast Asia, Central and South America, the Pacific, Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean region. A 41-year-old male patient had visual impairment after travelling to Thailand, which is one of the endemic areas. Cotton wool spots were observed on fundus examination. Fundus fluorescein angiography showed minimal vascular leakage from areas near the cotton wool spots and dot hemorrhages in the macula. Dengue fever should be considered in patients with visual complaints who traveled to endemic areas of dengue fever. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 223-225

  15. 42 CFR 71.3 - Designation of yellow fever vaccination centers; Validation stamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... safe, potent, and pure yellow fever vaccine. Medical facilities of Federal agencies are authorized to obtain yellow fever vaccine without being designated as a yellow fever vaccination center by the Director..., storage, and administration of yellow fever vaccine. If a designated center fails to comply with such...

  16. Lassa fever – full recovery without ribavarin treatment: a case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Her close contacts showed no evidence of Lassa virus infection. Conclusion: This report adds to the literature on the natural history of Lassa fever; and that individuals may survive Lassa fever with conservative management of symptoms of the disease and its complications. Keywords: Lassa fever; viral hemorrhagic fever, ...

  17. New assay of protective activity of Rocky Mountain spotted fever vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anacker, R L; Smith, R F; Mann, R E; Hamilton, M A

    1976-01-01

    Areas under the fever curves of guinea pigs inoculated with Rocky Mountain spotted fever vaccine over a restricted dose range and infected with a standardized dose of Rickettsia rickettsii varied linearly with log10 dose of vaccine. A calculator was programmed to plot fever curves and calculate the vaccine dose that reduced the fever of infected animals by 50%. PMID:823177

  18. Evolution of periodicity in periodical cicadas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiromu; Kakishima, Satoshi; Uehara, Takashi; Morita, Satoru; Koyama, Takuya; Sota, Teiji; Cooley, John R; Yoshimura, Jin

    2015-09-14

    Periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in the USA are famous for their unique prime-numbered life cycles of 13 and 17 years and their nearly perfectly synchronized mass emergences. Because almost all known species of cicada are non-periodical, periodicity is assumed to be a derived state. A leading hypothesis for the evolution of periodicity in Magicicada implicates the decline in average temperature during glacial periods. During the evolution of periodicity, the determinant of maturation in ancestral cicadas is hypothesized to have switched from size dependence to time (period) dependence. The selection for the prime-numbered cycles should have taken place only after the fixation of periodicity. Here, we build an individual-based model of cicadas under conditions of climatic cooling to explore the fixation of periodicity. In our model, under cold environments, extremely long juvenile stages lead to extremely low adult densities, limiting mating opportunities and favouring the evolution of synchronized emergence. Our results indicate that these changes, which were triggered by glacial cooling, could have led to the fixation of periodicity in the non-periodical ancestors.

  19. Studies on the pathogenesis of fever. VIII. Further observations on the role of endogenous pyrogen in endotoxin fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GILLMAN, S M; BORNSTEIN, D L; WOOD, W B

    1961-11-01

    Rabbits made granulocytopenic with nitrogen mustard have been shown to generate serum endogenous pyrogen when given a fever-producing dose of bacterial endotoxin. This finding is in accord with the hypothesis that endogenous pyrogen plays a central role in the pathogenesis of endotoxin fever. The fact that leucopenic animals produce less serum-endogenous pyrogen than normal animals given the same dose of endotoxin has also been confirmed and suggests that polymorphonuclear leucocytes constitute a major source of the endogenous pyrogen which is demonstrable in the circulation during endotoxin fever.

  20. On the mathematical analysis of Ebola hemorrhagic fever: deathly infection disease in West African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon; Goufo, Emile Franc Doungmo

    2014-01-01

    For a given West African country, we constructed a model describing the spread of the deathly disease called Ebola hemorrhagic fever. The model was first constructed using the classical derivative and then converted to the generalized version using the beta-derivative. We studied in detail the endemic equilibrium points and provided the Eigen values associated using the Jacobian method. We furthered our investigation by solving the model numerically using an iteration method. The simulations were done in terms of time and beta. The study showed that, for small portion of infected individuals, the whole country could die out in a very short period of time in case there is not good prevention.

  1. Dengue fever and Aedes aegypti risk in the Galápagos Islands, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Lippi, Catherine; Ibarra, Anna; Waggoner, Egan; León, Renato; Ortega, Fernando; B, Marilyn; Borbor-Cordova, Mercy; Ryan, Sadie; Nightingale, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Dengue fever is an emerging infectious disease in the Galápagos Islands of Ecuador, with the first cases reported in 2002 and periodic outbreaks since then. Here we report the results of a pilot study conducted in two cities in 2014: Puerto Ayora (PA) on Santa Cruz Island, and Puerto Baquerizo Moreno (PB) on Santa Cristobal Island. The aims of this study were to assess the social-ecological risk factors associated with dengue and mosquito presence at the household level. Methods...

  2. Congenital cerebral palsy and prenatal exposure to self-reported maternal infections, fever, or smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Streja, Elani; Miller, Jessica; Bech, Bodil H

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to investigate the association between maternal self-reported infections, fever, and smoking in the prenatal period and the subsequent risk for congenital cerebral palsy (CP). STUDY DESIGN: We included the 81,066 mothers of singletons born between 1996...... and midgestation. We identified 139 CP cases including 121 cases of spastic CP (sCP) as confirmed by the Danish National Cerebral Palsy Register. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Self-reported vaginal...

  3. Gallbladder perforation complicating typhoid fever: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gali, B M; Ali, N; Agbese, G O; Duna, V D; Dawha, S D; Ismai, G I; Mohammed, M

    2011-01-01

    Gallbladder perforation (GBP) is rare and as a complication of typhoid fever is extremely rare. We present two consecutive patients with GBP diagnosed incidentally at laparotomy. Information on the management of two patients with gallbladder perforation seen at Federal Medical Centre Azare in June and October 2008 was extracted from their case records. The two patients were both males aged 13 years and 16 years. They both presented with high fever of more than 2 weeks duration; and abdominal pain and distension. Both patients had features of generalised peritonitis. Pre-operative diagnoses of typhoid enteric perforation were made based on a positive Widal test. Intra-operative findings however, were that of bile peritonitis and gallbladder perforation. Both had cholecystectomy. Culture of the bile aspirate yielded Salmonella typhi. Gallbladder perforation secondary to typhoid fever should be considered as a differential diagnosis in patients with suspected typhoid enteric perforation in typhoid fever endemic region.

  4. Is it time for a new yellow fever vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Edward B

    2010-11-29

    An inexpensive live attenuated vaccine (the 17D vaccine) against yellow fever has been effectively used to prevent yellow fever for more than 70 years. Interest in developing new inactivated vaccines has been spurred by recognition of rare but serious, sometimes fatal adverse events following live virus vaccination. A safer inactivated yellow fever vaccine could be useful for vaccinating people at higher risk of adverse events from the live vaccine, but could also have broader global health utility by lowering the risk-benefit threshold for assuring high levels of yellow fever vaccine coverage. If ongoing trials demonstrate favorable immunogenicity and safety compared to the current vaccine, the practical global health utility of an inactivated vaccine is likely to be determined mostly by cost. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Yellow fever vectors' surveillance in three satellite communities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outbreaks of yellow fever have continued to occur in various parts of Nigeria. ... easily render themselves to vector and environmental management strategies. ... vectors, while locally adapted CDC (Centre for Disease Control) ovitraps were ...

  6. NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Cryptosporidiosis to Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or...

  7. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Fast Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  8. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): History and Disease Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  9. Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever): Signs and Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Legionella (Legionnaires' Disease and Pontiac Fever) Note: Javascript is ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Legionella Home About the Disease Causes, How it Spreads, & ...

  10. Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient Page Prevention of Acute Rheumatic Fever and Rheumatic Heart Disease Mariana Mirabel , Kumar Narayanan , Xavier Jouven , Eloi Marijon ... regurgitant ) valves. Over time, there is progressive damage (rheumatic heart disease, RHD) that may lead to heart failure, stroke, ...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  12. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  13. Fever in pregnancy and the risk of congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sass, L.; Urhoj, S. K.; Kjærgaard, J.

    2017-01-01

    fetal malformations or death. Fever during pregnancy, especially during embryogenesis, has also been associated with congenital malformations in human offspring. The purpose of this large cohort study of clinically recognized pregnancies was to investigate whether fever during first trimester...... was associated with an increased risk of congenital malformations in the offspring. Methods: The Danish National Birth Cohort is a population-based cohort of 100,418 pregnant women and their offspring recruited in 1996 to 2002. Information on fever during pregnancy was collected prospectively by means of two....... Congenital malformations within the first three and a half years of life were categorized according to EUROCAT's classification criteria. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations between fever in first trimester and overall congenital malformations and congenital malformations...

  14. Parental beliefs and practices regarding childhood fever in Turkish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-12

    Mar 12, 2016 ... Parents with a child with fever aged between 0 and 14 years were interviewed. The participants ... common reasons parents seek medical attention for their children by ..... received inaccurate doses of antipyretics.[22] In our ...

  15. Why sulfonamides are contraindicated in Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Vicky; Hsu, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are not effective for the treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Patients suspected of having RMSF based on history and physical exam should be treated with doxycycline and not a sulfonamide to avoid increased morbidity and mortality.

  16. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals...

  17. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the...

  18. Why sulfonamides are contraindicated in Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Vicky; Hsu, Sylvia

    2014-02-18

    Sulfonamide antibiotics are not effective for the treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF). Patients suspected of having RMSF based on history and physical exam should be treated with doxycycline and not a sulfonamide to avoid increased morbidity and mortality.

  19. NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Spotted Fever Rickettsiosis to Syphilis - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during...

  20. Ongoing Cerebral Vasculitis During Treatment of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lisa R; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Yeshokumar, Anusha K; Johnston, Michael V

    2015-11-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever is a tickborne infection that produces a systemic small-vessel vasculitis; its prognosis is excellent if appropriate treatment is initiated early. Because the advent of effective antirickettsial therapies predates the widespread use of brain magnetic resonance imaging, there are limited data on the effect of untreated Rocky Mountain spotted fever infection on neuroimaging studies. We describe a 7-year-old girl with delayed treatment of Rocky Mountain spotted fever who suffered severe neurological impairment. Serial brain magnetic resonance images revealed a progressive "starry sky appearance," which is proposed to result from the same small vessel vasculitis that causes the characteristic skin rash of this infection. Neurological injury can continue to occur despite specific antirickettsial therapy in Rocky Mountain spotted fever. This child's clinical features raise questions about the optimal management of this infection, particularly the utility of immune modulating therapies in cases of delayed treatment and neurological involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. diagnosis of malaria and typhoid fevers using basic tools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    userpc

    retrospective analysis was conducted on the positivity rate for malaria parasite and typhoid fever among .... the size of the data, using a statistical software .... The frequency of the request for Malaria .... parameters vary with the change in the.

  2. Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, and Its Transmission Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryu Candra

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever is an infectious disease resulting spectrum of clinical manifestations that vary from the lightest, dengue fever, hemorrhagic fever and dengue fever are accompanied by shock or dengue shock syndrome. Its caused by dengue virus, transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The case is spread in the tropics, especially in Southeast Asia, Central America, America and the Caribbean, many causes of death in children 90% of them attacking children under 15 years old. Until now pathogenesis is unclear. There are two theories or hypotheses immuno-patogenesis DHF and DSS is still controversial which secondary infections (secondary heterologus infection and antibody-dependent enhancement. Risk factors for dengue transmission are rapid urban population growth, mobilization of the population because of improved transportation facilities and disrupted or weakened so that population control. Another risk factor is poverty which result in people not has the ability to provide a decent home and healthy, drinking water supply and proper waste disposal.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors for brucellosis in prolonged fever ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ifiable risk factors for the infection in humans in post conflict Northern Uganda. Methods: The study ... human brucellosis control. Keywords: Brucellosis, human, fever, prevalence, Uganda, zoonosis. ..... lution and taxonomy. Vet Microbiol. 2002 ...

  4. Rat-bite fever presenting with rash and septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanechorn Na Ayuthaya, Rajyani; Niumpradit, Nucha

    2005-11-01

    Rat-bite fever is an uncommon disease known for its endemicity to occur worldwide. Although most patients tend to develop mild symptoms with improvement from conventional antibiotics, it can progress with severe complications with a mortality rate as high as 13% without proper treatment. The authors report a complicated case of rat bite-fever involving a 61-year old woman who presented with fever petechial rash, and septic arthritis following a rat bite. Initially, multiple antibiotics were administered but were not effective. As a consequence, invasive procedures such as arthrotomy and joint debridement were done and prolonged antibiotic was administered until clinical resolution. Since many cases do not have a history of rat bite and may present with fever, rashes, and arthritis it is essential to distinguish it from other diseases. Here, the authors will provide details on the etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management to aid prompt detection and treatment of the disease.

  5. Kawasaki disease following Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Aswine K

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Kawasaki disease is an idiopathic acute systemic vasculitis of childhood. Although it simulates the clinical features of many infectious diseases, an infectious etiology has not been established. This is the first reported case of Kawasaki disease following Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Case presentation We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with fever and petechial rash. Serology confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever. While being treated with intravenous doxycycline, she developed swelling of her hands and feet. She had the clinical features of Kawasaki disease which resolved after therapy with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG and aspirin. Conclusion This case report suggests that Kawasaki disease can occur concurrently or immediately after a rickettsial illness such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, hypothesizing an antigen-driven immune response to a rickettsial antigen.

  6. Kawasaki disease following Rocky Mountain spotted fever: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Aswine K; Kairys, Steven W

    2009-07-06

    Kawasaki disease is an idiopathic acute systemic vasculitis of childhood. Although it simulates the clinical features of many infectious diseases, an infectious etiology has not been established. This is the first reported case of Kawasaki disease following Rocky Mountain spotted fever. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl who presented with fever and petechial rash. Serology confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever. While being treated with intravenous doxycycline, she developed swelling of her hands and feet. She had the clinical features of Kawasaki disease which resolved after therapy with intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) and aspirin. This case report suggests that Kawasaki disease can occur concurrently or immediately after a rickettsial illness such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever, hypothesizing an antigen-driven immune response to a rickettsial antigen.

  7. Etiologies of Acute Undifferentiated Fever and Clinical Prediction of Scrub Typhus in a Non-Tropical Endemic Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ho-Chul; Chon, Sung-Bin; Oh, Won Sup; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Ho-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Scrub typhus usually presents as acute undifferentiated fever. This cross-sectional study included adult patients presenting with acute undifferentiated fever defined as any febrile illness for ≤ 14 days without evidence of localized infection. Scrub typhus cases were defined by an antibody titer of a ≥ fourfold increase in paired sera, a ≥ 1:160 in a single serum using indirect immunofluorescence assay, or a positive result of the immunochromatographic test. Multiple regression analysis identified predictors associated with scrub typhus to develop a prediction rule. Of 250 cases with known etiology of acute undifferentiated fever, influenza (28.0%), hepatitis A (25.2%), and scrub typhus (16.4%) were major causes. A prediction rule for identifying suspected cases of scrub typhus consisted of age ≥ 65 years (two points), recent fieldwork/outdoor activities (one point), onset of illness during an outbreak period (two points), myalgia (one point), and eschar (two points). The c statistic was 0.977 (95% confidence interval = 0.960–0.994). At a cutoff value ≥ 4, the sensitivity and specificity were 92.7% (79.0–98.1%) and 90.9% (86.0–94.3%), respectively. Scrub typhus, the third leading cause of acute undifferentiated fever in our region, can be identified early using the prediction rule. PMID:25448236

  8. Thrombosis and antiphospholipid antibody syndrome during acute Q fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Million, Matthieu; Bardin, Nathalie; Bessis, Simon; Nouiakh, Nadia; Douliery, Charlaine; Edouard, Sophie; Angelakis, Emmanouil; Bosseray, Annick; Epaulard, Olivier; Branger, Stéphanie; Chaudier, Bernard; Blanc-Laserre, Karine; Ferreira-Maldent, Nicole; Demonchy, Elisa; Roblot, France; Reynes, Jacques; Djossou, Felix; Protopopescu, Camelia; Carrieri, Patrizia; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Mege, Jean-Louis; Raoult, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Q fever is a neglected and potentially fatal disease. During acute Q fever, antiphospholipid antibodies are very prevalent and have been associated with fever, thrombocytopenia, acquired heart valve disease, and progression to chronic endocarditis. However, thrombosis, the main clinical criterion of the 2006 updated classification of the antiphospholipid syndrome, has not been assessed in this context. To test whether thrombosis is associated with antiphospholipid antibodies and whether the criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome can be met in patients with acute Q fever, we conducted a cross-sectional study at the French National Referral Center for Q fever. Patients included were diagnosed with acute Q fever in our Center between January 2007 and December 2015. Each patient's history and clinical characteristics were recorded with a standardized questionnaire. Predictive factors associated with thrombosis were assessed using a rare events logistic regression model. IgG anticardiolipin antibodies (IgG aCL) assessed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were tested on the Q fever diagnostic serum. A dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and thrombosis was tested using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of the 664 patients identified for inclusion in the study, 313 (47.1%) had positive IgG aCL and 13 (1.9%) were diagnosed with thrombosis. Three patients fulfilled the antiphospholipid syndrome criteria. After multiple adjustments, only positive IgG aCL (relative risk, 14.46 [1.85–113.14], P = .011) were independently associated with thrombosis. ROC analysis identified a dose-dependent relationship between IgG aCL levels and occurrence of thrombosis (area under curve, 0.83, 95%CI [0.73–0.93], P antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, and acquired valvular heart disease. Antiphospholipid antibodies should be systematically assessed in acute Q fever patients. Hydroxychloroquine

  9. Shortage of vaccines during a yellow fever outbreak in Guinea.

    OpenAIRE

    Nathan, N; Barry, M; Van Herp, M; Zeller, H

    2001-01-01

    A yellow fever epidemic erupted in Guinea in September, 2000. From Sept 4, 2000, to Jan 7, 2001, 688 instances of the disease and 225 deaths were reported. The diagnosis was laboratory confirmed by IgM detection in more than 40 patients. A mass vaccination campaign was limited by insufficient international stocks. After the epidemic in Guinea, the International Coordinating Group on Vaccine Provision for Epidemic Meningitis Control decided that 2 million doses of 17D yellow fever vaccine, bei...

  10. An Atypical Local Vesicular Reaction to the Yellow Fever Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Wauters, Robert H.; Hernandez, Camellia L.; Petersen, Maureen M.

    2017-01-01

    Yellow fever vaccine is a live attenuated viral inoculation indicated for patients traveling to endemic areas. The vaccine is generally well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Typical side effects include malaise, pain at the injection site, and, albeit rarely, immediate hypersensitivity reactions. We present a case of a rare adverse reaction to yellow fever vaccine in which a patient developed vesicular lesions resulting in bullae and circumferential hyperpigmentation.

  11. An Atypical Local Vesicular Reaction to the Yellow Fever Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauters, Robert H; Hernandez, Camellia L; Petersen, Maureen M

    2017-09-19

    Yellow fever vaccine is a live attenuated viral inoculation indicated for patients traveling to endemic areas. The vaccine is generally well tolerated with minimal adverse effects. Typical side effects include malaise, pain at the injection site, and, albeit rarely, immediate hypersensitivity reactions. We present a case of a rare adverse reaction to yellow fever vaccine in which a patient developed vesicular lesions resulting in bullae and circumferential hyperpigmentation.

  12. Present status of yellow fever: Memorandum from a PAHO Meeting

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    An international seminar on the treatment and laboratory diagnosis of yellow fever, sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and held in 1984, differed from previous meetings on yellow fever because of its emphasis on the care and management of patients and because the participants included specialists from several branches of medicine, such as hepatology, haematology, cardiology, infectious diseases, pathology and nephrology. The meeting reviewed the current status of yellow ...

  13. Recurrent fevers and failure to thrive in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David R; Chan, Sarah; Chang, Johanna; Broderick, Lori; Hoffman, Hal M

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 2-year old boy with consanguineous parents who recently emigrated from India and presented with oral ulcers and lymphadenopathy. He also had a history of recurrent fevers, polyarticular arthritis, chronic diarrhea, failure to thrive, and developmental delay. Infectious workup revealed herpes simplex virus 1 viremia and radiological evaluation revealed osteopenia and erosions involving multiple joints. We describe the immunologic and genetic evaluation of this patient and discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to an infant with recurrent fevers.

  14. A Study of Renogram in Korean Hemorrhagic Fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Tae Kyu; Lee, Jung Sang; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1974-01-01

    The patterns of renogram in patients with Korean hemorrhagic fever were evaluated with clinical course and renal hemodynamic changes in various clinical stages. The renal plasma flow was measured by hippuran blood clearance using 131 I-ortho-iodohippurate and hippuran renogram was analysed means of quantitative and qualitative methods in 26 patients of Korean hemorrhagic fever. The results obtained with this study were as follows;1) During the oliguric phase of Korean hemorrhagic fever, the renogram showed non-functioning (flat) or obstructive pattern. The group of patients with non-functioning pattern of renogram had more severe impairment of renal function and grave prognosis than the group with obstructive pattern of renogram. 2) During the diuretic phase, the renogram showed obstructive or dysfunction ar normal pattern, which was related with the recovery of renal function. Obstruction pattern of renogram was observed till the 2nd week of diuretic phase. Normal pattern of renogram began to appear by the 2nd week of diuretic phase. 3) During the convalescent phase of Korean hemorrhagic fever, 40% of patients showed dysfunction pattern of renogram, and the recovery of abnormal renogram in Korean hemorrhagic fever was more delayed than the recovery of clinical features and laboratory findings. 4) The renogram showed normal pattern 6 months after onset of Korean hemorrhagic fever in all cases. 5) There was significant correlationship between the pattern of renogram and the decrease of renal plasma flow in the patients with Korean hemorrhagic fever. The decrease of renal plasma flow was marked in the patients with non-functioning pattern of renogram and was least in the patients with dysfunction pattern of renogram. All above results suggested that the renogram reflects the effective renal plasma flow and degree of renal impairment, and the renogram may be one of the important indexes which could give us a more precise prognosis in Korean hemorrhagic fever.

  15. Fatigue following Acute Q-Fever: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsing, Corine E.; Bleijenberg, Gijs; Langendam, Miranda; Timen, Aura; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term fatigue with detrimental effects on daily functioning often occurs following acute Q-fever. Following the 2007–2010 Q-fever outbreak in the Netherlands with over 4000 notified cases, the emphasis on long-term consequences of Q-fever increased. The aim of this study was to provide an overview of all relevant available literature, and to identify knowledge gaps regarding the definition, diagnosis, background, description, aetiology, prevention, therapy, and prognosis, of fatigue following acute Q-fever. Design A systematic review was conducted through searching Pubmed, Embase, and PsycInfo for relevant literature up to 26th May 2015. References of included articles were hand searched for additional documents, and included articles were quality assessed. Results Fifty-seven articles were included and four documents classified as grey literature. The quality of most studies was low. The studies suggest that although most patients recover from fatigue within 6–12 months after acute Q-fever, approximately 20% remain chronically fatigued. Several names are used indicating fatigue following acute Q-fever, of which Q-fever fatigue syndrome (QFS) is most customary. Although QFS is described to occur frequently in many countries, a uniform definition is lacking. The studies report major health and work-related consequences, and is frequently accompanied by nonspecific complaints. There is no consensus with regard to aetiology, prevention, treatment, and prognosis. Conclusions Long-term fatigue following acute Q-fever, generally referred to as QFS, has major health-related consequences. However, information on aetiology, prevention, treatment, and prognosis of QFS is underrepresented in the international literature. In order to facilitate comparison of findings, and as platform for future studies, a uniform definition and diagnostic work-up and uniform measurement tools for QFS are proposed. PMID:27223465

  16. Prolonged fever in peritoneal tuberculosis: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zein, U.; Irwandi, S.; Habib, H.; Lim, H.; Pasha, M.; Janis, I.; Saragih, R. H.; Ginting, Y.; Effendy-Y S, R.

    2018-03-01

    Peritoneal tuberculosis may lead to delayed diagnosis because of the nonspecific features such as fever, abdominal distension, abdominal tenderness, ascites, and weight loss. Here, wereported a case of prolonged fever and abdominal pain which was due to peritoneal tuberculosis. Initial examinations including acomplete blood test and serologic tests did not lead to the diagnosis. A final diagnosis was made by abdominal CT-scan and laparoscopy combined with histopathological studies. Antituberculous medications provided a good clinical response in this patient.

  17. Endogenous opioids: role in prostaglandin-dependent and -independent fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Daniel; Machado, Renes R; Fernandes, Luíz C; Souza, Glória E P; Zampronio, Aleksander R

    2008-02-01

    This study evaluated the participation of mu-opioid-receptor activation in body temperature (T(b)) during normal and febrile conditions (including activation of heat conservation mechanisms) and in different pathways of LPS-induced fever. The intracerebroventricular treatment of male Wistar rats with the selective opioid mu-receptor-antagonist cyclic d-Phe-Cys-Try-d-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP; 0.1-1.0 microg) reduced fever induced by LPS (5.0 microg/kg) but did not change T(b) at ambient temperatures of either 20 degrees C or 28 degrees C. The subcutaneous, intracerebroventricular, and intrahypothalamic injection of morphine (1.0-10.0 mg/kg, 3.0-30.0 microg, and 1-100 ng, respectively) produced a dose-dependent increase in T(b). Intracerebroventricular morphine also produced a peripheral vasoconstriction. Both effects were abolished by CTAP. CTAP (1.0 microg icv) reduced the fever induced by intracerebroventricular administration of TNF-alpha (250 ng), IL-6 (300 ng), CRF (2.5 microg), endothelin-1 (1.0 pmol), and macrophage inflammatory protein (500 pg) and the first phase of the fever induced by PGF(2alpha) (500.0 ng) but not the fever induced by IL-1beta (3.12 ng) or PGE(2) (125.0 ng) or the second phase of the fever induced by PGF(2alpha). Morphine-induced fever was not modified by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin (2.0 mg/kg). In addition, morphine injection did not induce the expression of COX-2 in the hypothalamus, and CTAP did not modify PGE(2) levels in cerebrospinal fluid or COX-2 expression in the hypothalamus after LPS injection. In conclusion, our results suggest that LPS and endogenous pyrogens (except IL-1beta and prostaglandins) recruit the opioid system to cause a mu-receptor-mediated fever.

  18. Secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premaratna, R; Dissanayake, D; Silva, F H D S; Dassanayake, M; de Silva, H J

    2015-03-01

    Although dengue management guidelines do not advice on use of antibiotics in dengue shock syndrome, unrecognised bactraemia is likely to contribute to morbidity and mortality. To assess the occurance of secondary bacteraemia in adult patients with prolonged dengue fever. A prospective study was conducted recruiting patients with confirmed acute dengue infection who had prolonged fever (>5 days). Two sets of blood cultures were taken in such patients prior to institution of antibiotic therapy. Demographic, clinical, haematological and biochemical parameters were recorded. Development of ascites and pleural effusions were detected using ultrasonography. Fourty patients (52.5% males) with a mean age of 29.8 years (SD 13.6) were studied. The average duration of fever was 7.9 days (SD 1.8). Ten patients (25%) had bacterial isolates in their blood cultures; Staphylococcus aureus (n=2), coliforms (n=3), pseudomonas (n=1) and 4 had mixed growths. The culture positive group had severe body aches at admission and higher fever, third space fluid accumulation, a significant drop in platelets and a higher CRP. A quarter of dengue patients with prolonged fever had a bacterial isolate. Culture positive patients appeared more ill with body aches and had higher degrees of fever during the latter part of the illness. Increased vascular permeability may predispose to bacterial seepage into blood. Although white cell count is not helpful in detecting bacteraemia, low platelet count and elevation of CRP seem to be helpful.

  19. Seroprevalence of Q fever in Goats in the Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaeldin A Salih

    Full Text Available Aim: The survey was carried out to detect anti- C. burnetii antibodies in goat's sera samples in eight States in the Sudan during September 2010 – July 2011. Materials and Methods: In a preliminary study, four hundred and sixty caprine sera samples collected from eight States in the Sudan were screened for anti- Coxiella burnetii (the causative agent of Q fever antibodies using a commercial indirect ELISA (iELISA kit. Results: The results showed an overall prevalence rate 24.22% of Q fever antibodies. The prevalence rate of antibodies ranged from 6.7% in Kassala to 40% in South Darfur. The prevalence rates were highest in South Darfur (40% and South Kordofan (34.7%, moderate in El Gazira (29.7%, Khartoum (29.1%, the Northern (24% and the River Nile (20.2% States. It was lowest in the White Nile (7.5% and Kassala (6.7% States. Conclusion: It could be concluded that Q fever is prevalent in goats in the Sudan. Therefore, further epizootiological investigations on Q fever in other farm animals and man at the country level is important to monitor and determine the magnitude of Q fever infection in order to estimate its economic impact on animal industry and its public health hazard in the Sudan. In addition, the impact of Q fever among shepherds should be studied. [Vet. World 2012; 5(7.000: 394-397

  20. [Analysis of parental knowledge and care in childhood fever].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Conesa, Maria-Cristina; Sánchez Pina, Inés; Ridao Manonellas, Saida; Tormo Esparza, Antoni; García Hernando, Verónica; López Fernández, Marta

    2017-10-01

    To describe the parental knowledge and care of fever in children under 2years. Relate this data with socio-demographic with characteristics. Cross-sectional and correlation multicenter study. Five teams of Primary Care in Barcelona. Parents of children under 2years attended to administer a vaccine included in the pediatric systematic calendar. A total of 311 subjects participated. The main variables are 9 items of knowledge and 8 of care or management of fever obtained with the adaptation of the questionnaire by Chiappini et al. (2012). 69.8% had a correct care/management of fever. 3.9% matched all items of knowledge. The knowledge score is lower in people with no education (p=0.03); higher in Europe and South America and lowest in Asia and Africa (P<.001). 100% of patients that had chronic problems answered correctly all items of fever care (P=.03). It is important to note that the correlation between the scores of knowledge and management is positive (rho=0.15, P=.008). A correct care of fever is observed despite the low knowledge. A good strategy to promote a correct care of febrile child is to do sanitary education with update information and adapted it to parents, focusing on the differences between ethnic groups because they seem to have inaccurate beliefs about fever. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Lung Lesions During Fever of Unknown Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Renata; Zielonka, Tadeusz M; Hadzik-Blaszczyk, Malgorzata; Wardyn, Kazimierz A; Zycinska, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) remains one of the most difficult diagnostic challenges. The causes of FUO can be various diseases located in different organs. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and nature of pulmonary lesions during FUO. One hundred and sixty one patients with FUO participated in this prospective study. We performed a detailed comprehensive history, physical examination, and a wide spectrum of tests. The most common causes of FUO were infections (39%), autoimmune conditions (28%), and neoplasms (17%). Lung lesions were found in 30% of patients. In this group 35% were infections, 30% autoimmune diseases, and 4% cancer. Among patients with respiratory infections, there were cases of tuberculosis, atypical pneumonia, lung abscess, and bronchiectases. Autoimmune pulmonary lesions were observed during vasculitis and systemic lupus. The causes of FUO in the group of patients with lung lesions were also pulmonary embolism, sarcoidosis, and pulmonary fibrosis. Chest CT played an important role in the diagnosis of the causes of FUO with pulmonary manifestations. Pulmonary lesions are a common cause of FUO. Most FUO with pulmonary lesions are recognized during infections and autoimmune diseases. An important part of diagnosing FUO is a detailed evaluation of the respiratory system.

  2. Acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Beaton, Andrea; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Guilherme, Luiza; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Mayosi, Bongani M.; Sable, Craig; Steer, Andrew; Wilson, Nigel; Wyber, Rosemary; Zühlke, Liesl

    2018-01-01

    Acute rheumatic fever (ARF) is the result of an autoimmune response to pharyngitis caused by infection with group A Streptococcus. The long-term damage to cardiac valves caused by ARF, which can result from a single severe episode or from multiple recurrent episodes of the illness, is known as rheumatic heart disease (RHD) and is a notable cause of morbidity and mortality in resource-poor settings around the world. Although our understanding of disease pathogenesis has advanced in recent years, this has not led to dramatic improvements in diagnostic approaches, which are still reliant on clinical features using the Jones Criteria, or treatment practices. Indeed, penicillin has been the mainstay of treatment for decades and there is no other treatment that has been proven to alter the likelihood or the severity of RHD after an episode of ARF. Recent advances — including the use of echocardiographic diagnosis in those with ARF and in screening for early detection of RHD, progress in developing group A streptococcal vaccines and an increased focus on the lived experience of those with RHD and the need to improve quality of life — give cause for optimism that progress will be made in coming years against this neglected disease that affects populations around the world, but is a particular issue for those living in poverty. PMID:27188830

  3. A Patient with Microcytic Anemia and Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha Bhatia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 62-year-old man with a history of mechanical aortic valve insertion and ascending aorta replacement in 1997 presented to his family doctor in August 2004 with a two-week history of melena after recently returning from a six-month vacation in Mexico. The patient had no other abdominal complaints. He took warfarin but did not take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, acetylsalicylic acid or alcohol. The patient had no history of liver or peptic ulcer disease. He had lost 7 kg over the past month, but did not complain of fever or night sweats. On physical examination, vital signs were normal, the second heart sound was mechanical, and there were no abnormal findings. Laboratory investigations showed a borderline microcytic anemia (hemoglobin 76 g/L; mean corpuscular volume 79 fL; mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration 323 g/L, a therapeutic international normalized ratio (2.6 and an elevated creatinine level (112 µmol/L. His stool was positive for occult blood, although the ferritin level was high (623 µg/L. Other routine blood work was normal. The patient was admitted to hospital for investigation of the anemia.

  4. Thinking about the cold fusion fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitsunezaki, Akio

    1989-01-01

    The excitement since March 23 on cold fusion seems to be unprecedented evidence that the people of the world are waiting for fusion power with much enthusiasm. Cold fusion is really a surprise because it does not need high temperature and because it seems to be easy to enlarge the test tube into a useful power source if the claim by Professors Pons and Fleischmann at the University of Utah are true. The second announcement of cold fusion came from the Brigham Young University, also in the state of Utah, by Professor Jones, but his report was totally different from that given by Pons and Fleischmann. From the beginning of the 'fever', physicists have been very skeptical about cold fusion. Most of the critics and criticisms are targeted on Pons and Fleischmann rather than Jones, because not only was their paper poor but also their statements have not been scientific. They insisted that the heat came from fusion reaction, but without any scientific proof. They had not carried out the basic control experiment by running the same test with ordinary water instead of heavy water. A meeting on cold fusion was held at JAERI on May 15. At the end of the meeting, the some 260 attendants knew that cold fusion was not conceivable with the current scientific knowledge. (N.K.)

  5. Classical Swine Fever-An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Sandra; Staubach, Christoph; Henke, Julia; Carlson, Jolene; Beer, Martin

    2017-04-21

    Classical swine fever (CSF) remains one of the most important transboundary viral diseases of swine worldwide. The causative agent is CSF virus, a small, enveloped RNA virus of the genus Pestivirus. Based on partial sequences, three genotypes can be distinguished that do not, however, directly correlate with virulence. Depending on both virus and host factors, a wide range of clinical syndromes can be observed and thus, laboratory confirmation is mandatory. To this means, both direct and indirect methods are utilized with an increasing degree of commercialization. Both infections in domestic pigs and wild boar are of great relevance; and wild boars are a reservoir host transmitting the virus sporadically also to pig farms. Control strategies for epidemic outbreaks in free countries are mainly based on classical intervention measures; i.e., quarantine and strict culling of affected herds. In these countries, vaccination is only an emergency option. However, live vaccines are used for controlling the disease in endemically infected regions in Asia, Eastern Europe, the Americas, and some African countries. Here, we will provide a concise, updated review on virus properties, clinical signs and pathology, epidemiology, pathogenesis and immune responses, diagnosis and vaccination possibilities.

  6. Dynamic behavior of sylvatic yellow fever in Brazil (1954-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Portela Câmara

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Sylvatic yellow fever (SYF is enzootic in Brazil, causing periodic outbreaks in humans living near forest borders or in rural areas. In this study, the cycling patterns of this arbovirosis were analyzed. METHODS: Spectral Fourier analysis was used to capture the periodicity patterns of SYF in time series. RESULTS: SYF outbreaks have not increased in frequency, only in the number of cases. There are two dominant cycles in SYF outbreaks, a seven year cycle for the central-western region and a 14 year cycle for the northern region. Most of the variance was concentrated in the central-western region and dominated the entire endemic region. CONCLUSIONS: The seven year cycle is predominant in the endemic region of the disease due the greater contribution of variance in the central-western region; however, it was possible identify a 14 cycle that governs SYF outbreaks in the northern region. No periodicities were identified for the remaining geographical regions.

  7. Risk factors for the development of severe typhoid fever in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Christopher M; Thompson, Corinne; Vinh, Ha; Chinh, Nguyen Tran; Phuong, Le Thi; Ho, Vo Anh; Hien, Tran Tinh; Wain, John; Farrar, Jeremy J; Baker, Stephen

    2014-02-10

    Typhoid fever is a systemic infection caused by the bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. Age, sex, prolonged duration of illness, and infection with an antimicrobial resistant organism have been proposed risk factors for the development of severe disease or fatality in typhoid fever. We analysed clinical data from 581 patients consecutively admitted with culture confirmed typhoid fever to two hospitals in Vietnam during two periods in 1993-1995 and 1997-1999. These periods spanned a change in the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes of the infecting organisms i.e. fully susceptible to standard antimicrobials, resistance to chloramphenicol, ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (multidrug resistant, MDR), and intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (nalidixic acid resistant). Age, sex, duration of illness prior to admission, hospital location and the presence of MDR or intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility in the infecting organism were examined by logistic regression analysis to identify factors independently associated with severe typhoid at the time of hospital admission. The prevalence of severe typhoid was 15.5% (90/581) and included: gastrointestinal bleeding (43; 7.4%); hepatitis (29; 5.0%); encephalopathy (16; 2.8%); myocarditis (12; 2.1%); intestinal perforation (6; 1.0%); haemodynamic shock (5; 0.9%), and death (3; 0.5%). Severe disease was more common with increasing age, in those with a longer duration of illness and in patients infected with an organism exhibiting intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. Notably an MDR phenotype was not associated with severe disease. Severe disease was independently associated with infection with an organism with an intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (AOR 1.90; 95% CI 1.18-3.07; p = 0.009) and male sex (AOR 1.61 (1.00-2.57; p = 0.035). In this group of patients hospitalised with typhoid fever infection with an organism with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was

  8. Continuous fever-range heat stress induces thermotolerance in odontoblast-lineage cells.

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    Morotomi, Takahiko; Kitamura, Chiaki; Okinaga, Toshinori; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Sakagami, Ryuji; Anan, Hisashi

    2014-07-01

    Heat shock during restorative procedures can trigger damage to the pulpodentin complex. While severe heat shock has toxic effects, fever-range heat stress exerts beneficial effects on several cells and tissues. In this study, we examined whether continuous fever-range heat stress (CFHS) has beneficial effects on thermotolerance in the rat clonal dental pulp cell line with odontoblastic properties, KN-3. KN-3 cells were cultured at 41°C for various periods, and the expression level of several proteins was assessed by Western blot analysis. After pre-heat-treatment at 41°C for various periods, KN-3 cells were exposed to lethal severe heat shock (LSHS) at 49°C for 10min, and cell viability was examined using the MTS assay. Additionally, the expression level of odontoblast differentiation makers in surviving cells was examined by Western blot analysis. CFHS increased the expression levels of several heat shock proteins (HSPs) in KN-3 cells, and induced transient cell cycle arrest. KN-3 cells, not pre-heated or exposed to CFHS for 1 or 3h, died after exposure to LSHS. In contrast, KN-3 cells exposed to CFHS for 12h were transiently lower on day 1, but increased on day 3 after LSHS. The surviving cells expressed odontoblast differentiation markers, dentine sialoprotein and dentine matrix protein-1. These results suggest that CFHS for 12h improves tolerance to LSHS by inducing HSPs expression and cell cycle arrest in KN-3 cells. The appropriate pretreatment with continuous fever-range heat stress can provide protection against lethal heat shock in KN-3 cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Negative Regulation of Interferon-β Production by Alternative Splicing of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 3 in Ducks

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    Xiaoqin Wei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3, an intracellular signal transducer, is identified as an important component of Toll-like receptors and RIG-I-like receptors induced type I interferon (IFN signaling pathways. Previous studies have clarified TRAF3 function in mammals, but little is known about the role of TRAF3 in ducks. Here, we cloned and characterized the full-length duck TRAF3 (duTRAF3 gene and an alternatively spliced isoform of duTRAF3 (duTRAF3-S lacking the fragment encoding amino acids 217–319, from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs. We found that duTRAF3 and duTRAF3-S played different roles in regulating IFN-β production in DEFs. duTRAF3 through its TRAF domain interacted with duMAVS or duTRIF, leading to the production of IFN-β. However, duTRAF3-S, containing the TRAF domain, was unable to bind duMAVS or duTRIF due to the intramolecular binding between the N- and C-terminal of duTRAF3-S that blocked the function of its TRAF domain. Further analysis identified that duTRAF3-S competed with duTRAF3 itself for binding to duTRAF3, perturbing duTRAF3 self-association, which impaired the assembly of duTRAF3-duMAVS/duTRIF complex, ultimately resulted in a reduced production of IFN-β. These findings suggest that duTRAF3 is an important regulator of duck innate immune signaling and reveal a novel mechanism for the negative regulation of IFN-β production via changing the formation of the homo-oligomerization of wild molecules, implying a novel regulatory role of truncated proteins.

  10. Deletion of interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (Irak1) improves glucose tolerance primarily by increasing insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Jian; Kim, Soohyun Park; Zhang, Dongming; Sun, Helen; Cao, Qi; Lu, Xin; Ying, Zhekang; Li, Liwu; Henry, Robert R; Ciaraldi, Theodore P; Taylor, Simeon I; Quon, Michael J

    2017-07-21

    Chronic inflammation may contribute to insulin resistance via molecular cross-talk between pathways for pro-inflammatory and insulin signaling. Interleukin 1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1) mediates pro-inflammatory signaling via IL-1 receptor/Toll-like receptors, which may contribute to insulin resistance, but this hypothesis is untested. Here, we used male Irak1 null (k/o) mice to investigate the metabolic role of IRAK-1. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and k/o mice had comparable body weights on low-fat and high-fat diets (LFD and HFD, respectively). After 12 weeks on LFD (but not HFD), k/o mice ( versus WT) had substantially improved glucose tolerance (assessed by the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT)). As assessed with the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp technique, insulin sensitivity was 30% higher in the Irak1 k/o mice on chow diet, but the Irak1 deletion did not affect IPGTT outcomes in mice on HFD, suggesting that the deletion did not overcome the impact of obesity on glucose tolerance. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose-disposal rates were higher in the k/o mice, but we detected no significant difference in hepatic glucose production rates (± insulin infusion). Positron emission/computed tomography scans indicated higher insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle, but not liver, in Irak1 k/o mice in vivo Moreover, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt was higher in muscle, but not in liver, from Irak1 k/o mice ex vivo In conclusion, Irak1 deletion improved muscle insulin sensitivity, with the effect being most apparent in LFD mice. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. HIV-1 Nef induces proinflammatory state in macrophages through its acidic cluster domain: involvement of TNF alpha receptor associated factor 2.

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    Giorgio Mangino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 Nef is a virulence factor that plays multiple roles during HIV replication. Recently, it has been described that Nef intersects the CD40 signalling in macrophages, leading to modification in the pattern of secreted factors that appear able to recruit, activate and render T lymphocytes susceptible to HIV infection. The engagement of CD40 by CD40L induces the activation of different signalling cascades that require the recruitment of specific tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factors (i.e. TRAFs. We hypothesized that TRAFs might be involved in the rapid activation of NF-κB, MAPKs and IRF-3 that were previously described in Nef-treated macrophages to induce the synthesis and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and IFNβ to activate STAT1, -2 and -3. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Searching for possible TRAF binding sites on Nef, we found a TRAF2 consensus binding site in the AQEEEE sequence encompassing the conserved four-glutamate acidic cluster. Here we show that all the signalling effects we observed in Nef treated macrophages depend on the integrity of the acidic cluster. In addition, Nef was able to interact in vitro with TRAF2, but not TRAF6, and this interaction involved the acidic cluster. Finally silencing experiments in THP-1 monocytic cells indicate that both TRAF2 and, surprisingly, TRAF6 are required for the Nef-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. CONCLUSIONS: Results reported here revealed TRAF2 as a new possible cellular interactor of Nef and highlighted that in monocytes/macrophages this viral protein is able to manipulate both the TRAF/NF-κB and TRAF/IRF-3 signalling axes, thereby inducing the synthesis of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines as well as IFNβ.

  12. Angiotensin-2-mediated Ca2+ signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium: role of angiotensin-receptor-associated-protein and TRPV2 channel.

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    Rene Barro-Soria

    Full Text Available Angiotensin II (AngII receptor (ATR is involved in pathologic local events such as neovascularisation and inflammation including in the brain and retina. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE expresses ATR in its AT1R form, angiotensin-receptor-associated protein (Atrap, and transient-receptor-potential channel-V2 (TRPV2. AT1R and Atrap co-localize to the basolateral membrane of the RPE, as shown by immunostaining. Stimulation of porcine RPE (pRPE cells by AngII results in biphasic increases in intracellular free Ca(2+inhibited by losartan. Xestospongin C (xest C and U-73122, blockers of IP3R and PLC respectively, reduced AngII-evoked Ca(2+response. RPE cells from Atrap(-/- mice showed smaller AngII-evoked Ca(2+peak (by 22% and loss of sustained Ca(2+elevation compared to wild-type. The TRPV channel activator cannabidiol (CBD at 15 µM stimulates intracellular Ca(2+-rise suggesting that porcine RPE cells express TRPV2 channels. Further evidence supporting the functional expression of TRPV2 channels comes from experiments in which 100 µM SKF96365 (a TRPV channel inhibitor reduced the cannabidiol-induced Ca(2+-rise. Application of SKF96365 or reduction of TRPV2 expression by siRNA reduced the sustained phase of AngII-mediated Ca(2+transients by 53%. Thus systemic AngII, an effector of the local renin-angiotensin system stimulates biphasic Ca(2+transients in the RPE by releasing Ca(2+from cytosolic IP3-dependent stores and activating ATR/Atrap and TRPV2 channels to generate a sustained Ca(2+elevation.

  13. Regulatory role of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 in breast cancer by activating the protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3β signaling pathway.

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    Shen, Hongyu; Li, Liangpeng; Yang, Sujin; Wang, Dandan; Zhou, Siying; Chen, Xiu; Tang, Jinhai

    2017-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is an endogenous adaptor of innate and adaptive immune responses, and serves a crucial role in tumor necrosis factor receptor and toll‑like/interleukin‑1 receptor signaling. Although studies have demonstrated that TRAF6 has oncogenic activity, its potential contributions to breast cancer in human remains largely uninvestigated. The present study examined the expression levels and function of TRAF6 in breast carcinoma (n=32) and adjacent healthy (n=25) tissue samples. Compared with adjacent healthy tissues, TRAF6 protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in breast cancer tissues. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed a significant upregulation of the cellular proliferative marker Ki‑67 and proliferation cell nuclear antigen expression levels in breast carcinoma specimens. Furthermore, protein expression levels of the accessory molecule, transforming growth factor β‑activated kinase 1 (TAK1), were significantly increased in breast cancer patients, as detected by western blot analysis. As determined by MTT assay, TRAF6 exerted profoundly proliferative effects in the MCF‑7 breast cancer cell line; however, these detrimental effects were ameliorated by TAK1 inhibition. Notably, protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3β phosphorylation levels were markedly upregulated in breast cancer samples, compared with adjacent healthy tissues. In conclusion, an altered TRAF6‑TAK1 axis and its corresponding downstream AKT/GSK3β signaling molecules may contribute to breast cancer progression. Therefore, TRAF6 may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of breast cancer.

  14. Structure-function similarities between a plant receptor-like kinase and the human interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaus-Heisen, Dörte; Nurisso, Alessandra; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, Anna; Mbengue, Malick; Camut, Sylvie; Timmers, Ton; Pichereaux, Carole; Rossignol, Michel; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Imberty, Anne; Lefebvre, Benoit; Cullimore, Julie V

    2011-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has previously shown that plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are monophyletic with respect to the kinase domain and share an evolutionary origin with the animal interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase/Pelle-soluble kinases. The lysin motif domain-containing receptor-like kinase-3 (LYK3) of the legume Medicago truncatula shows 33% amino acid sequence identity with human IRAK-4 over the kinase domain. Using the structure of this animal kinase as a template, homology modeling revealed that the plant RLK contains structural features particular to this group of kinases, including the tyrosine gatekeeper and the N-terminal extension α-helix B. Functional analysis revealed the importance of these conserved features for kinase activity and suggests that kinase activity is essential for the biological role of LYK3 in the establishment of the root nodule nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia bacteria. The kinase domain of LYK3 has dual serine/threonine and tyrosine specificity, and mass spectrometry analysis identified seven serine, eight threonine, and one tyrosine residue as autophosphorylation sites in vitro. Three activation loop serine/threonine residues are required for biological activity, and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that Thr-475 is the prototypical phosphorylated residue that interacts with the conserved arginine in the catalytic loop, whereas Ser-471 and Thr-472 may be secondary sites. A threonine in the juxtamembrane region and two threonines in the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain are important for biological but not kinase activity. We present evidence that the structure-function similarities that we have identified between LYK3 and IRAK-4 may be more widely applicable to plant RLKs in general.

  15. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) participates in anti-lipopolysaccharide factors (ALFs) gene expression in mud crab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wan-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Xu; Wan, Wei-Song; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wen, Xiao-Bo; Zheng, Huai-Ping; Zhang, Yue-Ling; Li, Sheng-Kang

    2017-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is a key cytoplasm signal adaptor that mediates signals activated by tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily and the Interleukin-1 receptor/Toll-like receptor (IL-1/TLR) superfamily. The full-length 2492 bp TRAF6 (Sp-TRAF6) from Scylla paramamosain contains 1800 bp of open reading frame (ORF) encoding 598 amino acids, including an N-terminal RING-type zinc finger, two TRAF-type zinc fingers and a conserved C-terminal meprin and TRAF homology (MATH) domain. Multiple alignment analysis shows that the putative amino acid sequence of Sp-TRAf6 has highest identity of 88% with Pt-TRAF6 from Portunus trituberculatus, while the similarity of Sp-TRAF6 with other crustacean sequences was 54-55%. RT-PCR analysis indicated that Sp-TRAF6 transcripts were predominantly expressed in the hepatopancreas and stomach, whereas it was barely detected in the heart and hemocytes in our study. Moreover, Sp-TRAF6 transcripts were significantly up-regulated after Vibrio parahemolyticus and LPS challenges. RNA interference assay was carried out used by siRNA to investigate the genes expression patterns regulated by Sp-TRAF6. The qRT-PCR results showed that silencing Sp-TRAF6 gene could inhibit SpALF1, SpALF2, SpALF5 and SpALF6 expression in hemocytes, while inhibit SpALF1, SpALF3, SpALF4, SpALF5 and SpALF6 expression in hepatopancreas. Taken together, the acute-phase response to immune challenges and the inhibition of SpALFs gene expression indicate that Sp-TRAF6 plays an important role in host defense against pathogen invasions via regulation of ALF gene expression in S. paramamosain. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Disruption of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 5 Exacerbates Murine Experimental Colitis via Regulating T Helper Cell-Mediated Inflammation

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    Jian Shang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5 is a key mediator of TNF receptor superfamily members and is important in both T helper (Th cell immunity and the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To clarify TRAF5’s influence on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs, we investigated TRAF5 deficiency’s effect on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS- induced colitis. Colitis was induced in TRAF5 knockout (KO mice and their wild-type (WT littermates by administering 3% DSS orally for 7 days. The mice were then sacrificed, and their colons were removed. Our data suggested that KO mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17a mRNA and protein levels in the colons of DSS-fed mice, and the mRNA expression of T-bet and GATA-3 was also markedly elevated. However, ROR-α and ROR-γt mRNA levels did not differ between DSS-induced KO and WT mice. Flow cytometry showed increased frequencies of Th2 and IFN-γ/IL-17a-coproducing CD4+ T cells in the colons of DSS-induced KO mice. Additionally, TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced the activation of NF-κB in CD4+ T cells after DSS administration. These results indicated that TRAF5 deficiency significantly aggravated DSS-induced colitis, most likely by regulating Th cell-mediated inflammation.

  17. [Louse-borne-relapsing-fever in refugees from the Horn of Africa; a case series of 25 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seilmaier, M; Guggemos, W; Wieser, A; Fingerle, V; Balzer, L; Fenzl, T; Hoch, M; von Both, U; Schmidt, H U; Wendtner, C M; Strobel, E

    2016-07-01

    Background | Relapsing fever is divided into tick borne relapsing fever (TBRF) and louse borne relapsing fever (LBRF). This report describes 25 refugees from East Africa who were diagnosed to suffer from LBRF within a period of 6 month only at a single hospital in Munich / Germany. Material & Methods | The aim was to point out common clinical features as well as laboratory findings and clinical symptoms before and after initiation of treatment in 25 patients with louse borne relapsing fever (LBRF) who were diagnosed and treated at Klinikum München Schwabing from August 2015 to January 2016. To the best of our knowledge this is the largest case series of LBRF in the western world for decades. Main focus of the investigation was put on clinical aspects. Results | All 25 patients suffered from acute onset of high fever with chills, headache and severe prostration. Laboratory analysis showed high CRP and a marked thrombocytopenia. A Giemsa blood stain was procured immediately in order to look for malaria. In the blood smear spirochetes with typical shape and aspect of borrelia species could be detected.The further PCR analysis confirmed infection with Borrelia recurrentis. Treatment with Doxycycline was started forthwith. The condition improved already on the second day after treatment was started and all were restored to health in less than a week. Apart from a mild to moderate Jarisch-Herxheimer-reaction we didn`t see any side effects of the therapy. Conclusion | LBRF has to be taken into account in feverish patients who come as refugees from East-Africa. It seems that our patients belong to a cluster which probably has its origin in Libya and more patients are to be expected in the near future. As LBRF might cause outbreaks in refugee camps it is pivotal to be aware of this emerging infectious disease in refugees from East-Africa. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Identification of factors for physicians to facilitate early differential diagnosis of scrub typhus, murine typhus, and Q fever from dengue fever in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ko; Lee, Nan-Yao; Ko, Wen-Chien; Tsai, Jih-Jin; Lin, Wei-Ru; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Lu, Po-Liang; Chen, Yen-Hsu

    2017-02-01

    Dengue fever, rickettsial diseases, and Q fever are acute febrile illnesses with similar manifestations in tropical areas. Early differential diagnosis of scrub typhus, murine typhus, and Q fever from dengue fever may be made by understanding the distinguishing clinical characteristics and the significance of demographic and weather factors. We conducted a retrospective study to identify clinical, demographic, and meteorological characteristics of 454 dengue fever, 178 scrub typhus, 143 Q fever, and 81 murine typhus cases in three Taiwan hospitals. Case numbers of murine typhus and Q fever correlated significantly with temperature and rainfall; the scrub typhus case number was only significantly related with temperature. Neither temperature nor rainfall correlated with the case number of dengue fever. The rarity of dengue fever cases from January to June in Taiwan may be a helpful clue for diagnosis in the area. A male predominance was observed, as the male-to-female rate was 2.1 for murine typhus and 7.4 for Q fever. Multivariate analysis revealed the following six important factors for differentiating the rickettsial diseases and Q fever group from the dengue fever group: fever ≥8 days, alanine aminotransferase > aspartate aminotransferase, platelets >63,000/mL, C-reactive protein >31.9 mg/L, absence of bone pain, and absence of a bleeding syndrome. Understanding the rarity of dengue in the first half of a year in Taiwan and the six differentiating factors may help facilitate the early differential diagnosis of rickettsial diseases and Q fever from dengue fever, permitting early antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. [Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers--pathogens, epidemiology and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are severe, systemic viral diseases affecting humans and non-human primates. They are characterized by multiple symptoms such as hemorrhages, fever, headache, muscle and abdominal pain, chills, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Elevated liver-associated enzyme levels and coagulopathy are also associated with these diseases. Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are caused by (Lake victoria) Marburg virus and different species of Ebola viruses, respectively. They are enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses and belong to the family of filoviridae. Case fatality rates of filovirus disease outbreaks are among the highest reported for any human pathogen, ranging from 25 to 90% or more. Outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fever occur in certain regions of equatorial Africa at irregular intervals. Since 2000, the number of outbreaks has increased. In 2014, the biggest outbreak of a filovirus-induced hemorrhagic fever that has been documented so far occurred from March to July 2014 in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. The outbreak was caused by a new variant of Zaire Ebola-Virus, affected more than 2600 people (stated 20 August) and was associated with case-fatality rates of up to 67% (Guinea). Treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers is symptomatic and supportive, licensed antiviral agents are currently not available. Recently, BCX4430, a promising synthetic adenosine analogue with high in vitro and in vivo activity against filoviruses and other RNA viruses, has been described. BCX4430 inhibits viral RNA polymerase activity and protects cynomolgus macaques from Marburg virus infection when administered as late as 48 hours after infection. Nucleic acid-based products, recombinant vaccines and antibodies appear to be less suitable for the treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers.

  20. Yellow fever vaccination coverage following massive emergency immunization campaigns in rural Uganda, May 2011: a community cluster survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Following an outbreak of yellow fever in northern Uganda in December 2010, Ministry of Health conducted a massive emergency vaccination campaign in January 2011. The reported vaccination coverage in Pader District was 75.9%. Administrative coverage though timely, is affected by incorrect population estimates and over or under reporting of vaccination doses administered. This paper presents the validated yellow fever vaccination coverage following massive emergency immunization campaigns in Pader district. Methods A cross sectional cluster survey was carried out in May 2011 among communities in Pader district and 680 respondents were indentified using the modified World Health Organization (WHO) 40 × 17 cluster survey sampling methodology. Respondents were aged nine months and above. Interviewer administered questionnaires were used to collect data on demographic characteristics, vaccination status and reasons for none vaccination. Vaccination status was assessed using self reports and vaccination card evidence. Our main outcomes were measures of yellow fever vaccination coverage in each age-specific stratum, overall, and disaggregated by age and sex, adjusting for the clustered design and the size of the population in each stratum. Results Of the 680 survey respondents, 654 (96.1%, 95% CI 94.9 – 97.8) reported being vaccinated during the last campaign but only 353 (51.6%, 95% CI 47.2 – 56.1) had valid yellow fever vaccination cards. Of the 280 children below 5 years, 269 (96.1%, 95% CI 93.7 – 98.7) were vaccinated and nearly all males 299 (96.9%, 95% CI 94.3 – 99.5) were vaccinated. The main reasons for none vaccination were; having travelled out of Pader district during the campaign period (40.0%), lack of transport to immunization posts (28.0%) and, sickness at the time of vaccination (16.0%). Conclusions Our results show that actual yellow fever vaccination coverage was high and satisfactory in Pader district since it was above the

  1. Adverse event reports following yellow fever vaccination, 2007-13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Rabe, Ingrid B; Miller, Elaine R; Fischer, Marc; Staples, J Erin

    2016-05-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccines have been available since the 1930s and are generally considered safe and effective. However, rare reports of serious adverse events (SAE) following vaccination have prompted the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices to periodically expand the list of conditions considered contraindications and precautions to vaccination. We describe adverse events following YF vaccination reported to the U.S. Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) from 2007 through 2013 and calculate age- and sex-specific reporting rates of all SAE, anaphylaxis, YF vaccine-associated neurologic disease (YEL-AND) and YF vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD). There were 938 adverse events following YF vaccination reported to VAERS from 2007 through 2013. Of these, 84 (9%) were classified as SAEs for a rate of 3.8 per 100 000 doses distributed. Reporting rates of SAEs increased with increasing age with a rate of 6.5 per 100 000 in persons aged 60-69 years and 10.3 for ≥70 years. The reporting rate for anaphylaxis was 1.3 per 100 000 doses distributed and was highest in persons ≤18 years (2.7 per 100 000). Reporting rates of YEL-AND and YEL-AVD were 0.8 and 0.3 per 100 000 doses distributed, respectively; both rates increased with increasing age. These findings reinforce the generally acceptable safety profile of YF vaccine, but highlight the importance of continued physician and traveller education regarding the risks and benefits of YF vaccination, particularly for older travellers. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the United States.

  2. Evolving herbal formulations in management of dengue fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pawan Kumar; Rawat, Pooja

    Dengue is endemic in more than 100 countries and it is estimated that annually above 390 million infections occur globally. During the period between 1996-2015, a massive increase of more than 500 per cent has been recorded in number of dengue cases reported in India. Till date, there are no specific globally accepted treatments for dengue fever in any system of medicine. Dengue does not cause very high mortality if properly handled and is currently being managed by clinicians through various adjuvant and alternative therapeutic options. Various plant based preparations have been used in different parts of India for combating dengue and are simultaneously also being scientifically validated by researchers. However, number of such scientific validation studies on phytomedicines are very less in India. Out of twenty-two plants reported against dengue, only four have been studied scientifically. Azadirachta indica, Carica papaya, Hippophae rhamnoides and Cissampelos pareira extracts were found effective and demonstrated improvement in clinical symptoms and direct inhibitory effect on dengue virus. C. papaya clinical trial showed increase in platelet count and faster recovery. These plants may be explored further as probable candidates for drug discovery against dengue. There is a need to search more such herbal formulations, which are being practiced at local level, document properly and validate them scientifically to confirm efficacy, mechanistic action and safety, before use. The herbal formulations being used by communities are the low hanging fruits which may provide alternative or adjuvant therapy if proper validation, value addition and product development steps are followed. This paper aims to review the recent status of dengue cases, deaths and evolving curative herbal solutions adapted and reported from India to combat the disease. Copyright © 2017 Transdisciplinary University, Bangalore and World Ayurveda Foundation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights

  3. Ribavirin: an effective treatment of crimean-congo hemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficiency of Ribavirin, an anti-viral drug, in patients diagnosed to have CCHF. Patients and Methods: A total of 94 cases were included in the study on high index of suspicion of CCHF. The major criteria of admission were a short history of high-grade fever associated with bleeding from more than one site, i.e., haematemesis, epistaxis etc. the mean age was 34.71 plus minus 12.81 years. All the suspected cases were kept in isolation unit of the hospital and barrier nursing was advised. Results: All the 94 cases were sent to CDC, Atlanta, USA for confirmation and 39 (41.4%) were confirmed to have CCHF. Symptomatic treatment like platelet concentration transfusions, fresh-blood transfusions and antipyretics were given to all cases. Oral Ribavirin was given only to the confirmed cases. It was started in a dose of 2 gm initially, followed by 1 gm 6 hourly for 4 days and then 500 mg 8 hours for 6 days. After a mean period of 2.30 plus minus 0.69 days to treatment with Ribavirin, the clinical as well as the laboratory parameters started improving and returned to normal level after 10 -day course of treatment. Mild anemia and thrombocytosis were seen as adverse effects in some of the patients. Conclusion: For treatment of this fatal disease, we recommended use of oral Ribavirin in all patients diagnosed to have CCHF in the above-mentioned doses, on the basis of our study results.(author)

  4. TYPHOID FEVER WITH FATAL OUTCOME IN PEOPLE WITH SEVERE TROPHOLOGICAL FAILURE IN EXTREME CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. I. Lyashenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For purpose of clinical and morphological characterization of typhoid fever with fatal outcome was perform analysis of medical documentation as well as postmortem studies of internal tissues in 36men aged 21 to 34 years with severe body weight loss and in the conditions of combat stress in period from 1983 to 1985. The results of the study find a number of clinical and pathomorphological features of typhoid fever in patients with body weight deficiency that were in extreme conditions. Focal changes of the central nervous system were detected. The defeat of the respiratory system was characterized from the first days of the disease by bronchitis, and in the subsequent development of pneumonia, plevritis and empyema of the pleura. Majority of patients had symptoms of cardiovascular and renal failure. In died in the first week of the disease and in 2/3 parts – in a later period were combined with the symptoms of infectious-toxic encephalopathy and severe acute respiratory failure. All died had postmortem dystrophic changes of cardiomyocytes, and in patients had fatal outcome in 2–5 weeks – also focal or diffuse myocarditis. In a third of the patients who died, the disease was complicated by intestinal perforations. In a number of cases, peritonitis was a consequence of necrosis of mesenteric lymph nodes. In all patients with a fatal outcome, hemorrhagic (thrombohemorrhagic syndrome was diagnosed. A significant proportion of patients posthumously detected signs of sepsis and other complications, many of which could be the cause of death.

  5. Enhanced detection rate of typhoid fever among clinically suspected patients in a tertiary referral hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh using nested polymerase chain reaction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S; Miah, M R; Khatun, S

    2015-12-01

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) specific for Salmonella enterica subspecies enteric serovar Typhi was used for the detection of the pathogen, in blood. This study was done during the period of March 2013 to February 2014. A total of 80 clinically suspected cases of typhoid fever were included in the study. Blood was collected from all participating individuals. Nested PCR targeting the flagellin gene (fliC) of Salmonella Typhi & blood culture were done for each of the cases. The positivity rate of PCR & blood culture was 70%& 20% respectively. The positivity rate of PCR was significantly higher than blood culture (Ptyphoid fever cases on the basis of clinical features but with negative cultures. We conclude that the PCR technique could be used as a novel diagnostic method of typhoid fever, particularly in culture-negative cases in an endemic country like Bangladesh.

  6. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P. [Radboud University Medical Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Draaisma, Jos M.T. [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Paediatrics, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de [Radboud University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); University of Twente, MIRA Institute for Biomedical Technology and Technical Medicine, Biomedical Photonic Imaging Group, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-10-15

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  7. Diagnostic value of FDG-PET/(CT) in children with fever of unknown origin and unexplained fever during immune suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokhuis, Gijsbert J.; Diender, Marije G.; Oyen, Wim J.G.; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P.; Draaisma, Jos M.T.; Geus-Oei, Lioe-Fee de

    2014-01-01

    Fever of unknown origin (FUO) and unexplained fever during immune suppression in children are challenging medical problems. The aim of this study is to investigate the diagnostic value of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and FDG-PET combined with computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) in children with FUO and in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. All FDG-PET/(CT) scans performed in the Radboud university medical center for the evaluation of FUO or unexplained fever during immune suppression in the last 10 years were reviewed. Results were compared with the final clinical diagnosis. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 31 children with FUO. A final diagnosis was established in 16 cases (52 %). Of the total number of scans, 32 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in these patients was 80 % and 78 %, respectively. FDG-PET/(CT) scans were performed in 12 children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. A final diagnosis was established in nine patients (75 %). Of the total number of these scans, 58 % were clinically helpful. The sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT in children with unexplained fever during immune suppression was 78 % and 67 %, respectively. FDG-PET/CT appears a valuable imaging technique in the evaluation of children with FUO and in the diagnostic process of children with unexplained fever during immune suppression. Prospective studies of FDG-PET/CT as part of a structured diagnostic protocol are warranted to assess the additional diagnostic value. (orig.)

  8. Causes of fever in adults in thall and surrounding areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javed, S.A.S.; Javed, A.; Ali, S.

    2015-01-01

    The most common symptom for which the patients are admitted in our hospitals is fever. This study was carried out to know the causes of fever based on clinical and laboratory findings. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 865 consecutive male patients with fever of 100 degree F and above were included in the study conducted from January 2010 to April 2012. Results: All the patients were male having age between 17 years and 45 years. Out of the 865 patients, 507 (58.61%) came out to be malarial parasite slide positive, 186 (21.50%) patients were malarial parasite slide negative but were having clinical picture of malaria and responded to anti-malarial treatment, 73 (8.44%) patients were of respiratory tract infections, 21 (2.43%) patients were having gastro enteritis, 20 (2.31%) were diagnosed as cases of typhoid fever, 17 (1.97%) were having urinary tract infections, 24 (2.77%) patients were referred to medical specialist and the rest 17 (1.97%) were grouped as others. Conclusion: The most common cause of fever in our study was malaria. Respiratory tract infections are the second most common cause. (author)

  9. Biomagnetic Pair Therapy and Typhoid Fever: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Bryan L

    2017-10-01

    Objective: This pilot study examined the laboratory responses of patients with laboratory-documented typhoid fever who were treated with Biomagnetic Pair Therapy (BPT; medical biomagnetism), a specific application of pairs of magnets for various ailments that are infectious and otherwise. Materials and Methods: This study was an assessment of patients' response to treatment with only BPT for Salmonella typhi infections (typhoid fever) using standard conventional laboratory techniques. The research was conducted in an outpatient village clinic in Kenya. There were 52 participants who were evaluated for possible systemic illness, including typhoid fever, from an open-label study. Participants who felt sick and requested testing for possible typhoid fever were tested with a standard Widal test by a certified laboratory technician. Participants who tested positive (13 patients) were then treated with BPT (a "First Aid" approach) only. These participants then returned for follow-up laboratory and clinical evaluations after 2 days. Results: Most of the participants (10 of 13) retested as negative, and all patients reported symptomatic clinical improvement. Conclusions: As a significant majority of participants demonstrated clearing of their S. typhi after BPT, this technique should be studied further in larger trials for its efficacy in treating typhoid fever.

  10. Yellow Fever outbreaks in unvaccinated populations, Brazil, 2008-2009.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Pecego Martins Romano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the risk of severe vaccine-associated adverse events, yellow fever vaccination in Brazil is only recommended in areas considered at risk for disease. From September 2008 through June 2009, two outbreaks of yellow fever in previously unvaccinated populations resulted in 21 confirmed cases with 9 deaths (case-fatality, 43% in the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul and 28 cases with 11 deaths (39% in Sao Paulo state. Epizootic deaths of non-human primates were reported before and during the outbreak. Over 5.5 million doses of yellow fever vaccine were administered in the two most affected states. Vaccine-associated adverse events were associated with six deaths due to acute viscerotropic disease (0.8 deaths per million doses administered and 45 cases of acute neurotropic disease (5.6 per million doses administered. Yellow fever vaccine recommendations were revised to include areas in Brazil previously not considered at risk for yellow fever.

  11. Yellow fever, Asia and the East African slave trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathey, John T; Marr, John S

    2014-05-01

    Yellow fever is endemic in parts of sub-Saharan Africa and South America, yet its principal vectors--species of mosquito of the genus Aedes--are found throughout tropical and subtropical latitudes. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that yellow fever originated in Africa and that its spread to the New World coincided with the slave trade, but why yellow fever has never appeared in Asia remains a mystery. None of several previously proposed explanations for its absence there is considered satisfactory. We contrast the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and trade across the Sahara and to the Arabian Peninsula and Mesopotamia, with that to Far East and Southeast Asian ports before abolition of the African slave trade, and before the scientific community understood the transmission vector of yellow fever and the viral life cycle, and the need for shipboard mosquito control. We propose that these differences in slave trading had a primary role in the avoidance of yellow fever transmission into Asia in the centuries before the 20(th) century. The relatively small volume of the Black African slave trade between Africa and East and Southeast Asia has heretofore been largely ignored. Although focal epidemics may have occurred, the volume was insufficient to reach the threshold for endemicity.

  12. Q fever outbreak in the terraced vineyards of Lavaux, Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bellini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii infection (Q fever is a widespread zoonosis with low endemicity in Switzerland, therefore no mandatory public report was required. A cluster of initially ten human cases of acute Q fever infections characterized by prolonged fever, asthenia and mild hepatitis occurred in 2012 in the terraced vineyard of Lavaux. Epidemiological investigations based on patients’ interviews and veterinary investigations included environmental sampling as well as Coxiella-specific serological assay and molecular examinations (real-time PCR in vaginal secretions of suspected sheep. These investigations demonstrated that 43% of sheep carried the bacteria whereas 30% exhibited anti-Coxiella antibodies. Mitigation measures, including limiting human contacts with the flock, hygiene measures, flock vaccination and a public official alert, have permitted the detection of four additional human cases and the avoidance of a much larger outbreak. Since November 2012, mandatory reporting of Q fever to Swiss public health authorities has been reintroduced. A close follow up of human cases will be necessary to identify chronic Q fever.

  13. Changing clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.M.; Sadiq, M.; Rehman, A.U.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical profile of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic recurrence seems to have changed in countries where rheumatic fever is still endemic. The objectives of this study were to compare clinical profile and outcome of patients suffering initial and recurrent episodes of acute rheumatic fever in children. Methods: This prospective study was conducted in two tertiary care hospitals from January to June 2011. The diagnosis was based on the modified Jones criteria. Sixty children were included in the study, 15 having first episode of rheumatic fever and 45 with rheumatic recurrence. The severity of carditis was assessed by Clinical and echocardiography means. Results: Carditis was the commonest presentation in both first (80 percentage) and recurrent attacks (100 percentage). Arthritis was seen in 60 percentage of children with first episode and in 26.7 percentage with recurrence. The frequency of subcutaneous nodules, invariably associated with carditis, was very high (33.3 percentage in the first and 48.3 percentage in recurrent episodes). Carditis was generally mild during first episode (53.3 percentage) and severe with rheumatic recurrence (55.6 percentage). There was no death in either group. One patient with severe mitral regurgitation and rheumatic recurrence underwent mitral valve repair for intractable heart failure. Conclusion: Clinical profile of rheumatic recurrence and acute rheumatic fever has changed. Rheumatic recurrence is associated with severe carditis. Carditis is more common than arthritis even in the first attack. Sub-cutaneous nodules are a frequent finding invariably associated with carditis. (author)

  14. Poverty and fever vulnerability in Nigeria: a multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Oyindamola B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major public health problem in Sub Saharan Africa, where widespread poverty also contribute to the burden of the disease. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between the prevalence of childhood fever and socioeconomic factors including poverty in Nigeria, and to examine these effects at the regional levels. Methods Determinants of fever in the last two weeks among children under five years were examined from the 25004 children records extracted from the Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey 2008 data set. A two-level random effects logistic model was fitted. Results About 16% of children reported having fever in the two weeks preceding the survey. The prevalence of fever was highest among children from the poorest households (17%, compared to 15.8% among the middle households and lowest among the wealthiest (13% (p6months, whereas the effect of wealth no longer reached statistical significance. Conclusion While, overall bednet possession was low, less fever was reported in households that possessed bednets. Malaria control strategies and interventions should be designed that will target the poor and make an impact on poverty. The mechanism through which wealth may affect malaria occurrence needs further investigation.

  15. Fever: Views in Anthroposophic Medicine and Their Scientific Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To conduct a scoping review to characterize how fever is viewed in anthroposophic medicine (AM and discuss the scientific validity of these views. Methods. Systematic searches were run in Medline, Embase, CAMbase, and Google Scholar. Material from anthroposophic medical textbooks and articles was also used. Data was extracted and interpreted. Results. Most of the anthroposophic literature on this subject is in the German language. Anthroposophic physicians hold a beneficial view on fever, rarely suppress fever with antipyretics, and often use complementary means of alleviating discomfort. In AM, fever is considered to have the following potential benefits: promoting more complete recovery; preventing infection recurrences and atopic diseases; providing a unique opportunity for caregivers to provide loving care; facilitating individual development and resilience; protecting against cancer and boosting the anticancer effects of mistletoe products. These views are discussed with regard to the available scientific data. Conclusion. AM postulates that fever can be of short-term and long-term benefit in several ways; many of these opinions have become evidence-based (though still often not practiced while others still need empirical studies to be validated, refuted, or modified.

  16. The history of fever, leukocytic pyrogen and interleukin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinarello, Charles A

    2015-01-01

    There has been great progress in the 30 y since the reporting in 1984 of the cDNA for interleukin1 (IL1) β in the human and IL1α in the mouse. However, the history of IL1 begins in the early 1940s with investigations into the nature of an endogenous fever-producing protein released rabbit peritoneal neutrophils. Most researchers in immunology today are unaware that the field of cytokines, particularly the field of inflammatory cytokines. Toll-like receptors and innate immunity traces back to studies on fever. Researchers in infectious diseases wanted to know about an endogenous protein that caused fever, independent of infection. The endogenous fever-producing protein was called by various names: granulocyte, endogenous or leukocytic pyrogen. It is a fascinating and sometimes controversial story for biology and medicine and for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Few imagined that this fever-producing protein would play such a major role in nearly every cell and in most diseases. This paper reviews the true background and milestones of interleukin1 from the purification of leukocytic pyrogen to the first cDNA of IL1β and the validation of cytokine biology from ill-defined factors to its present day importance.

  17. STUDIES ON THE PATHOGENESIS OF FEVER WITH INFLUENZAL VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Elisha; Huang, Wei Cheng

    1958-01-01

    A substance with pyrogenic properties appears in the blood streams of rabbits made febrile by the intravenous inoculation of the PR8 strain of influenza A and Newcastle disease viruses (NDV). By means of a technique involving passive transfer of sera from animals given virus to recipient rabbits, the titer of circulating pyrogen was found to be closely correlated with the course of fever produced by virus. Certain properties of the pyrogen are described which differentiate it from the originally injected virus and suggest that the induced pyrogen is of endogenous origin. These properties resemble those of endogenous pyrogens occurring in other forms of experimental fever. The source of virus-induced pyrogen is unknown. In vitro incubation of virus with various constituents of the circulation did not result in the appearance of endogenous pyrogen. Granulocytopenia induced by HN2 failed to influence either fever or the production of endogenous pyrogen in rabbits injected with NDV. Similarly, the intraperitoneal inoculation of NDV into prepared exudates did not modify the febrile response. These findings do not lend support to the possibility that the polymorphonuclear leukocyte is a significant source of endogenous pyrogen in virus-induced fever. It is concluded that the liberation of an endogenous pyrogen from some as yet undefined source is an essential step in the pathogenesis of fever caused by the influenza group of viruses. PMID:13513908

  18. Tofacitinib suppresses disease activity and febrile attacks in a patient with coexisting rheumatoid arthritis and familial Mediterranean fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gök, Kevser; Cengiz, Gizem; Erol, Kemal; Ozgocmen, Salih

    2017-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common hereditary auto-inflammatory (periodic fever) syndrome, and usually successfully treated with colchicine. However, nearly 5-10% of FMF cases are resistant or intolerant to colchicine and treatment options are highly restricted in these cases. Biologics including anakinra, canakinumab, rilonacept, etanercept, infliximab, interferon-alpha, and tocilizumab are shown to have efficacy to control FMF attacks. Tofacitinib, a Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor, is an orally administered non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Herein we report a female patient with coexisting RA and colchicine resistant FMF whose FMF attacks and disease activity were completely controlled after treatment with tofacitinib, a small-molecule JAK3 inhibitor.

  19. Tofacitinib suppresses disease activity and febrile attacks in a patient with coexisting rheumatoid arthritis and familial Mediterranean fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevser Gök

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is the most common hereditary auto-inflammatory (periodic fever syndrome, and usually successfully treated with colchicine. However, nearly 5-10% of FMF cases are resistant or intolerant to colchicine and treatment options are highly restricted in these cases. Biologics including anakinra, canakinumab, rilonacept, etanercept, infliximab, interferon-alpha, and tocilizumab are shown to have efficacy to control FMF attacks. Tofacitinib, a Janus kinase (JAK inhibitor, is an orally administered non-biologic disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Herein we report a female patient with coexisting RA and colchicine resistant FMF whose FMF attacks and disease activity were completely controlled after treatment with tofacitinib, a small-molecule JAK3 inhibitor.

  20. Q fever in Quebec (1989–93: Report of 14 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Goyette

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Q fever, a zoonosis acquired by inhalation of the rickettsia Coxiella burnetii, is rarely diagnosed in Canada. The world incidence has been increasing since 1960, because of progressive dissemination of this microorganism in animal populations, particularly domestic ruminants. Some recent outbreaks were caused by cats. Of 14 cases reported in Quebec between 1989 and the beginning of 1993, nine occurred successively in an 18-month period in the rural region surrounding Trois-Rivières, after contact with livestock or cats. These cases are reported here, with the results of serological screening of the workers of an abattoir where one of the cases worked. Five additional cases reported in Quebec during the same period are briefly reviewed.

  1. 20 Years Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Dengue Fever and Hemorrhagic Fever in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Gaytán, Sendy Isarel; Díaz-Vásquez, Francisco Javier; Duran-Arenas, Luis Gerardo; López Cervantes, Malaquías; Rothenberg, Stephen J

    2017-10-01

    Dengue Fever (DF) is a human vector-borne disease and a major public health problem worldwide. In Mexico, DF and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) cases have increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to identify variations in the spatial distribution of DF and DHF cases over time using space-time statistical analysis and geographic information systems. Official data of DF and DHF cases were obtained in 32 states from 1995-2015. Space-time scan statistics were used to determine the space-time clusters of DF and DHF cases nationwide, and a geographic information system was used to display the location of clusters. A total of 885,748 DF cases was registered of which 13.4% (n = 119,174) correspond to DHF in the 32 states from 1995-2015. The most likely cluster of DF (relative risk = 25.5) contained the states of Jalisco, Colima, and Nayarit, on the Pacific coast in 2009, and the most likely cluster of DHF (relative risk = 8.5) was in the states of Chiapas, Tabasco, Campeche, Oaxaca, Veracruz, Quintana Roo, Yucatán, Puebla, Morelos, and Guerrero principally on the Gulf coast over 2006-2015. The geographic distribution of DF and DHF cases has increased in recent years and cases are significantly clustered in two coastal areas (Pacific and Gulf of Mexico). This provides the basis for further investigation of risk factors as well as interventions in specific areas. Copyright © 2018 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Yellow fever risk assessment in the Central African Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Junior, Alberto Novaes; Heukelbach, Jorg

    2015-04-01

    Yellow fever still causes high burden in several areas of sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. There are few well-designed epidemiological studies and limited data about yellow fever in Africa. Staples et al., in a recently published paper in Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine & Hygiene, performed a nationwide study in the Central African Republic (CAR) assessing infection risk and the operational impact of preventive measures. The rapid assessment of human, non-human and mosquito data call attention to the potential risk of future yellow fever outbreaks in the CAR and elsewhere. The study reinforces the need for intensified applied and operational research to address problems and human capacity needs in the realm of neglected tropical diseases in the post-2015 agenda. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Fever and Infections and Academic Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Julie Werenberg; Berg-Beckhoff, Gabriele; Kragh Andersen, Per

    2017-01-01

    of academic performance from the 2010–2013 Danish National Tests. Hierarchical multilevel linear regression of 216,350 assessments made in 71,850 children born to 67,528 mothers revealed no differences in academic performance among the children according to prenatal exposure to fever (odds ratio (OR) = 1......Prenatal exposure to fever and infections has been linked to various neurodevelopmental disorders, but it is not yet known whether more subtle effects on neurodevelopment may exist as well. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether these early-life exposures were associated with academic...... performance in childhood and early adolescence. Children and mothers who were enrolled in the Danish National Birth Cohort during 1996–2002 were included in this study. Information on fever and infections common in pregnancy was prospectively collected in 2 pregnancy interviews and linked with assessments...

  4. A Rare Case of Mediterranean Spotted Fever and Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Sousa Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediterranean spotted fever is a tick-borne zoonotic disease caused by Rickettsia conorii. It is transmitted by the dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus. It usually presents as a benign self-limited disease characterized by a skin rash, high fever, and, sometimes, a characteristic ulcer at the tick bite site called tache noir. The course of this disease is usually benign, although severe manifestations have been previously described, mainly in adults. Neurological manifestations are very unusual. We present a case of Mediterranean spotted fever with encephalitis to highlight the importance of clinical suspicion, mainly in endemic areas, the potential severity of this disease, and the need of early initiation of therapy in order to prevent severe complications.

  5. Q Fever in Dogs: An Emerging Infectious Disease in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdieh Rezaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Q fever is an important widespread reemerging zoonosis. The presence of Coxiellaburnetii in 100 tick-infested dogs was assessed in this study.Methods: The blood samples from 100 referred dogs were acquired and evaluated by nested-PCR.Results: C. burnetii was detected in 11 out of 100 (11% blood samples. Most of the positive dogswere kept outdoor and fed on raw diet. Based on our findings, Q fever should be considered as anemerging disease in dogs in Iran; so, zoonotic importance of this population must be notified. To betterunderstanding the role and pathogenic importance of dogs in Q fever outbreak and to determine whetherthis organism can be transmitted directly from dogs to human further in-depth studies are necessary.Conclusion: It is determined that C. burnetii is present in dogs in southeast of Iran and people who arein contact with this population, especially asymptomatic ones are at increased risk of infection.

  6. Fever during pregnancy and motor development in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Charlotte; Jørgensen, Sanne Ellegaard; Wohlfahrt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to examine how fever during pregnancy is associated with motor development in the child. METHOD: This cohort study was based on data from females and their children, from the Danish National Birth Cohort, who took part in an 18-month and/or 7-year follow-up study....... Information regarding fever (number of episodes, temperature, duration, and pregnancy week) was obtained around gestation week 12 and at the end of pregnancy. Assessments of motor development in early childhood were based on the ages at which the motor milestones 'sitting unsupported' (n=44 256) and 'walking...... unassisted' (n=53 959) were attained. The Developmental Coordination Disorder Questionnaire 2007 (DCDQ'07) was used to identify children with indication of developmental coordination disorder (DCD) at age 7 years (n=29 401). Any associations between the exposure to fever during pregnancy and motor...

  7. Rocky Mountain spotted fever in Panama: a cluster description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribaldos, Maribel; Zaldivar, Yamitzel; Bermudez, Sergio; Samudio, Franklyn; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Martinez, Alexander A; Villalobos, Rodrigo; Eremeeva, Marina E; Paddock, Christopher D; Page, Kathleen; Smith, Rebecca E; Pascale, Juan Miguel

    2011-10-13

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is a tick-borne infection caused by Rickettsia rickettsii. We report a cluster of fatal cases of RMSF in 2007 in Panama, involving a pregnant woman and two children from the same family.  The woman presented with a fever followed by respiratory distress, maculopapular rash, and an eschar at the site from which a tick had been removed.  She died four days after disease onset.  This is the second published report of an eschar in a patient confirmed by PCR to be infected with R. rickettsii.  One month later, the children presented within days of one another with fever and rash and died three and four days after disease onset. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry, PCR and sequencing of the genes of R. rickettsii in tissues obtained at autopsy. 

  8. Host genetic diversity enables Ebola hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Angela L; Okumura, Atsushi; Ferris, Martin T; Green, Richard; Feldmann, Friederike; Kelly, Sara M; Scott, Dana P; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; LaCasse, Rachel; Thomas, Matthew J; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Miller, Darla R; Shaw, Ginger D; Korth, Marcus J; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2014-11-21

    Existing mouse models of lethal Ebola virus infection do not reproduce hallmark symptoms of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, neither delayed blood coagulation and disseminated intravascular coagulation nor death from shock, thus restricting pathogenesis studies to nonhuman primates. Here we show that mice from the Collaborative Cross panel of recombinant inbred mice exhibit distinct disease phenotypes after mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection. Phenotypes range from complete resistance to lethal disease to severe hemorrhagic fever characterized by prolonged coagulation times and 100% mortality. Inflammatory signaling was associated with vascular permeability and endothelial activation, and resistance to lethal infection arose by induction of lymphocyte differentiation and cellular adhesion, probably mediated by the susceptibility allele Tek. These data indicate that genetic background determines susceptibility to Ebola hemorrhagic fever. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Hemodynamic and oxygenation changes in surgical intensive care unit patients with fever and fever lowering nursing interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Sevim; Yildirim, Ismail; Arslan, Ibrahim; Yildirim, Sinan; Erdal, Fatih; Yandi, Yunus Emre

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of fever and nursing interventions to lower fever on hemodynamic values and oxygenation in febrile (temperature greater than 38.3°C) surgical intensive care unit patients. This retrospective study was conducted in 53 febrile patients out of 519 patients admitted to the surgical intensive care unit at a university hospital. Data were obtained from the medical records, laboratory files and nursing notes. Statistical analysis of the data was analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance and a paired sample t-test. The average hourly urine output (F = 5.46; P = 0.002) and systolic blood pressure (F = 2.87; P = 0.03) were significantly lower after fever onset. Heart rate, respiratory rate, positive end-expiratory pressure settings and FiO(2) settings were unchanged after the development of fever. Diastolic blood pressure and oxygen saturation had non-statistically significant decreases. Nursing interventions for febrile patients consisted of medication administration (69.8%), ice (62.3%) and sponging with tepid water (62.3%). The present results showed that fever was associated with an increase in heart rate, decreased systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, oxygen saturation and hourly urine output. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Conserved Fever Pathways across Vertebrates: A Herpesvirus Expressed Decoy TNF-α Receptor Delays Behavioral Fever in Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakus, Krzysztof; Ronsmans, Maygane; Forlenza, Maria; Boutier, Maxime; Piazzon, M Carla; Jazowiecka-Rakus, Joanna; Gatherer, Derek; Athanasiadis, Alekos; Farnir, Frédéric; Davison, Andrew J; Boudinot, Pierre; Michiels, Thomas; Wiegertjes, Geert F; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2017-02-08

    Both endotherms and ectotherms (e.g., fish) increase their body temperature to limit pathogen infection. Ectotherms do so by moving to warmer places, hence the term "behavioral fever." We studied the manifestation of behavioral fever in the common carp infected by cyprinid herpesvirus 3, a native carp pathogen. Carp maintained at 24°C died from the infection, whereas those housed in multi-chamber tanks encompassing a 24°C-32°C gradient migrated transiently to the warmest compartment and survived as a consequence. Behavioral fever manifested only at advanced stages of infection. Consistent with this, expression of CyHV-3 ORF12, encoding a soluble decoy receptor for TNF-α, delayed the manifestation of behavioral fever and promoted CyHV-3 replication in the context of a temperature gradient. Injection of anti-TNF-α neutralizing antibodies suppressed behavioral fever, and decreased fish survival in response to infection. This study provides a unique example of how viruses have evolved to alter host behavior to increase fitness. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Rapid diagnostic tests for typhoid and paratyphoid (enteric) fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijedoru, Lalith; Mallett, Sue; Parry, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    Background Differentiating both typhoid (Salmonella Typhi) and paratyphoid (Salmonella Paratyphi A) infection from other causes of fever in endemic areas is a diagnostic challenge. Although commercial point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for enteric fever are available as alternatives to the current reference standard test of blood or bone marrow culture, or to the widely used Widal Test, their diagnostic accuracy is unclear. If accurate, they could potentially replace blood culture as the World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended main diagnostic test for enteric fever. Objectives To assess the diagnostic accuracy of commercially available rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and prototypes for detecting Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi A infection in symptomatic persons living in endemic areas. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index, IndMED, African Index Medicus, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) up to 4 March 2016. We manually searched WHO reports, and papers from international conferences on Salmonella infections. We also contacted test manufacturers to identify studies. Selection criteria We included diagnostic accuracy studies of enteric fever RDTs in patients with fever or with symptoms suggestive of enteric fever living in endemic areas. We classified the reference standard used as either Grade 1 (result from a blood culture and a bone marrow culture) or Grade 2 (result from blood culture and blood polymerase chain reaction, or from blood culture alone). Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted the test result data. We used a modified QUADAS-2 extraction form to assess methodological quality. We performed a meta-analysis when there were sufficient studies for the test and heterogeneity was reasonable. Main results Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion

  12. Safety of the yellow Fever vaccine: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, James D; Parker, Emily D; Vazquez-Benitez, Gabriela; Kharbanda, Elyse O; Naleway, Allison; Marcy, S Michael; Molitor, Beth; Kuckler, Leslie; Baggs, James

    2013-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) vaccine is considered safe; however, severe illness and death following vaccination have been reported. Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) and US Department of Defense (DoD) data were used to identify adverse reactions following YF vaccination. Within the VSD, YF-vaccine-exposed subjects were compared to age-, site-, and gender-matched unexposed subjects. YF-vaccine-exposed DoD subjects were studied using a risk-interval design. For both cohorts, ICD-9 codes were analyzed for allergic and local reactions, mild systemic reactions, and possible visceral and neurologic adverse events (AEs). The VSD cohort received 47,159 doses from 1991 through 2006. The DoD cohort received 1.12 million doses from 1999 through 2007. Most subjects received other vaccines simultaneously. In the VSD cohort, rates of allergic, local, and mild systemic reactions were not statistically different between YF-vaccine-exposed and -unexposed subjects. In the DoD, there was an increased risk for outpatient allergic events in the period following vaccination with YF and other vaccines rate ratios [RR 3.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.35-4.41] but with no increased risk for inpatient allergic reactions. In both cohorts, inpatient ICD-9 codes for visceral events were significantly less common following vaccination; inpatient codes for neurologic events were less common in the VSD YF-vaccine-exposed adult cohort, but did not differ between exposed and unexposed periods in the DoD. In the DoD, one fatal case of YF-vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YF-vaccine-AVD) was detected. The estimated death rate was 0.89 for 1,000,000 YF vaccine doses (95% CI 0.12-6.31/1,000,000 doses). No YF vaccine-associated deaths occurred in the VSD. In these closed cohorts we did not detect increased risk for visceral or neurologic events following YF vaccination. The death rate following YF vaccine was consistent with previous reports. These data support current recommendations for use of YF

  13. First recorded outbreak of yellow fever in Kenya, 1992-1993. II. Entomologic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, P; Cordellier, R; Ouma, J O; Cropp, C B; Savage, H M; Sanders, E J; Marfin, A A; Tukei, P M; Agata, N N; Gitau, L G; Rapuoda, B A; Gubler, D J

    1998-10-01

    The first recorded outbreak of yellow fever in Kenya occurred from mid-1992 through March 1993 in the south Kerio Valley, Rift Valley Province. We conducted entomologic studies in February-March 1993 to identify the likely vectors and determine the potential for transmission in the surrounding rural and urban areas. Mosquitoes were collected by landing capture and processed for virus isolation. Container surveys were conducted around human habitation. Transmission was mainly in woodland of varying density, at altitudes of 1,300-1,800 m. The abundance of Aedes africanus in this biotope, and two isolations of virus from pools of this species, suggest that it was the principal vector in the main period of the outbreak. A third isolate was made from a pool of Ae. keniensis, a little-known species that was collected in the same biotope. Other known yellow fever vectors that were collected in the arid parts of the valley may have been involved at an earlier stage of the epidemic. Vervet monkeys and baboons were present in the outbreak area. Peridomestic mosquito species were absent but abundant at urban sites outside the outbreak area. The entomologic and epidemiologic evidence indicate that this was a sylvatic outbreak in which human cases were directly linked to the epizootic and were independent of other human cases. The region of the Kerio Valley is probably subject to recurrent wandering epizootics of yellow fever, although previous episodes of scattered human infection have gone unrecorded. The risk that the disease could emerge as an urban problem in Kenya should not be ignored.

  14. Rotavirus infection as a frequent cause of neonatal fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ha-Na; Park, Hyun Kyung; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Moon, Jin-Hwa; Oh, Jae Won; Kim, Chang-Ryul

    2018-04-01

    Fever rather than diarrhea or vomiting was the most common symptom of neonatal rotavirus (RV) infection in our previous study. We investigated whether RV infection is a major cause of neonatal fever and compared the clinical characteristics of bacterial infection, viral infection and unknown causes of neonatal fever. We reviewed the electronic medical records of 48 newborns aged ≤28 days who were admitted to the Special Care Nursery of Hanyang University Guri Hospital for fever (≥38°C) from 2005 to 2009. All the newborns underwent complete blood count, urinalysis, C-reactive protein, cultures of blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid as well as stool RV enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Respiratory virus polymerase chain reaction for cough or rhinorrhea, and stool culture for diarrhea were also done. All the babies were term, with mean age 13 ± 8 days and peak body temperature 38.5 ± 0.5°C. The causes of neonatal fever were viral (44%), bacterial (10%) and unknown (46%). The viral infections included RV (n = 12), enterovirus (n = 6), respiratory syncytial virus (n = 2), and rhinovirus (n = 1). All the rotavirus genotypes were G4P[6]. Only three of 12 RV-infected febrile newborns had diarrhea. The bacterial infections included three cases of urinary tract infection (Escherichia coli, n = 2; Klebsiella pneumoniae, n = 1), and two cases of sepsis complicated with meningitis (all Streptococcus agalactiae). RV infection is the most common single cause of neonatal fever. It may be necessary to include stool RV tests for febrile newborns. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. African Swine Fever Virus Biology and Vaccine Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Yolanda; Pérez-Núñez, Daniel; Richt, Juergen A

    2018-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is an acute and often fatal disease affecting domestic pigs and wild boar, with severe economic consequences for affected countries. ASF is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and the island of Sardinia, Italy. Since 2007, the virus emerged in the republic of Georgia, and since then spread throughout the Caucasus region and Russia. Outbreaks have also been reported in Belarus, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Romania, Moldova, Czech Republic, and Poland, threatening neighboring West European countries. The causative agent, the African swine fever virus (ASFV), is a large, enveloped, double-stranded DNA virus that enters the cell by macropinocytosis and a clathrin-dependent mechanism. African Swine Fever Virus is able to interfere with various cellular signaling pathways resulting in immunomodulation, thus making the development of an efficacious vaccine very challenging. Inactivated preparations of African Swine Fever Virus do not confer protection, and the role of antibodies in protection remains unclear. The use of live-attenuated vaccines, although rendering suitable levels of protection, presents difficulties due to safety and side effects in the vaccinated animals. Several African Swine Fever Virus proteins have been reported to induce neutralizing antibodies in immunized pigs, and vaccination strategies based on DNA vaccines and recombinant proteins have also been explored, however, without being very successful. The complexity of the virus particle and the ability of the virus to modulate host immune responses are most likely the reason for this failure. Furthermore, no permanent cell lines able to sustain productive virus infection by both virulent and naturally attenuated African Swine Fever Virus strains exist so far, thus impairing basic research and the commercial production of attenuated vaccine candidates. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Geriatric Fever Score: a new decision rule for geriatric care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hsien Chung

    Full Text Available Evaluating geriatric patients with fever is time-consuming and challenging. We investigated independent mortality predictors of geriatric patients with fever and developed a prediction rule for emergency care, critical care, and geriatric care physicians to classify patients into mortality risk and disposition groups.Consecutive geriatric patients (≥65 years old visiting the emergency department (ED of a university-affiliated medical center between June 1 and July 21, 2010, were enrolled when they met the criteria of fever: a tympanic temperature ≥37.2°C or a baseline temperature elevated ≥1.3°C. Thirty-day mortality was the primary endpoint. Internal validation with bootstrap re-sampling was done.Three hundred thirty geriatric patients were enrolled. We found three independent mortality predictors: Leukocytosis (WBC >12,000 cells/mm3, Severe coma (GCS ≤ 8, and Thrombocytopenia (platelets <150 10(3/mm3 (LST. After assigning weights to each predictor, we developed a Geriatric Fever Score that stratifies patients into two mortality-risk and disposition groups: low (4.0% (95% CI: 2.3-6.9%: a general ward or treatment in the ED then discharge and high (30.3% (95% CI: 17.4-47.3%: consider the intensive care unit. The area under the curve for the rule was 0.73.We found that the Geriatric Fever Score is a simple and rapid rule for predicting 30-day mortality and classifying mortality risk and disposition in geriatric patients with fever, although external validation should be performed to confirm its usefulness in other clinical settings. It might help preserve medical resources for patients in greater need.

  17. FEVER AS INDICATOR TO SECONDARY INFECTION IN DENGUE VIRAL INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soegeng Soegijanto

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue Virus Infections are distributed in tropical and sub-tropical regions and transmitted by the mosquitoes such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Dengue virus can cause dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome or dengue and severe dengue classified by World Health Organization. Beside it concurrent infection virus salmonella had been found some cases who showed fever more than 7 days. Concurrent infection with two agents can result in an illness having overlapping symptoms creating a diagnostic dilemma for treating physician, such as dengue fever with typhoid fever. The aim of this research is detection of dengue virus and secondary infection with Salmonella typhi in patients suspected dengue virus infection. Detection of dengue virus and Salmonella typhi using immunochromatography test such as NS1, IgG/IgM for dengue virus infection, and IgM/IgG Salmonella and blood culture. The fifty children with dengue virus infection came to Soerya hospital and 17 cases suspected dengue virus infection, five cases showed a positive NS1 on the second day of fever and one case concurrent with clinical manifestation of convulsi on the third days of fever there were five cases only showed positive. It was showed in this study that on the fourth to six day of fever in dengue virus infection accompanied by antibody IgM & IgG dengue. There were 12 cases showed the clinical manifestation of concurrent dengue viral infection and Salmonella, all of them showed a mild clinical manifestation and did not show plasma leakage and shock. In this study we found the length of stay of concurrent Dengue Virus Infection and Salmonella infection is more than 10 days. These patients were also more likely to have co-existing haemodynamic disturbances and bacterial septicaemia which would have required treatment with inotropes and antibiotics. This idea is very important to make update dengue viral management to decrease mortality in outbreak try to

  18. Encephalitis in a traveller with typhoid fever: efficacy of corticosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Guillaume; Eme, Anne-Line; Rohaut, Benjamin; Brossier, Florence; Epelboin, Loïc; Caumes, Eric

    2017-09-01

    Typhoid fever is a bacterial infection caused by Salmonella typhi or S. paratyphi, recognized as a classical cause of fever in returning travellers. However, neuropsychiatric presentations are rarely reported in travellers diagnosed in western countries, whereas they are more commonly described in patients treated in endemic areas. We describe such a case and discuss the pathophysiologic mechanisms of this complication. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Pulmonary and Ileal Tuberculosis Presenting as Fever of Undetermined Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surewad, Gajanan; Lobo, Ivona

    2014-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl presented with prolonged fever with no obvious focus on either history or clinical examination. High-resolution computerized tomography of the chest revealed the ‘tree-in-bud’ sign in the right lung and necrotic mediastinal lymph nodes. Barium meal showed multiple ileal strictures. The child was treated with anti-tuberculous therapy for six months. At follow-up six months later, the child had gained weight and had no signs of intestinal obstruction. Tuberculosis is a common cause of fever of undetermined origin and should be investigated for especially in countries with a high prevalence. PMID:25478420

  20. Bilateral breast abscess: A rare complication of enteric fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast abscess is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus in pregnant or lactating females. Salmonella spp. is occasionally associated with abscess formation in various organs, but breast abscess is a very rare complication. In enteric fever dissemination to multiple organ systems following bacteraemia can lead to localized abscess. We report a case of bilateral breast abscess due to Salmonella Typhi in an unmarried 35-year-old female without any predisposing conditions. She presented with fever and painful swelling of both the breasts. S. typhi was isolated from both breasts. Such rare cause must be suspected in females without any evident predisposing factors for effective management.

  1. Bilateral breast abscess: a rare complication of enteric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Pandya, Y; Rathod, J; Trivedi, S

    2009-01-01

    Breast abscess is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus in pregnant or lactating females. Salmonella spp. is occasionally associated with abscess formation in various organs, but breast abscess is a very rare complication. In enteric fever dissemination to multiple organ systems following bacteraemia can lead to localized abscess. We report a case of bilateral breast abscess due to Salmonella Typhi in an unmarried 35-year-old female without any predisposing conditions. She presented with fever and painful swelling of both the breasts. S. typhi was isolated from both breasts. Such rare cause must be suspected in females without any evident predisposing factors for effective management.

  2. Yellow fever vaccine: worthy friend or stealthy foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Stephen J; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-06-01

    Recognition that the live yellow fever vaccine may rarely be associated with viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) has diminished its safety status. However, the vaccine remains the principal tool for limiting the occurrence of yellow fever, making large portions of Africa and South America more habitable. The subject has previously been exhaustively reviewed. Novel concepts in the current report include the description of a systematic method for deciding whom to vaccinate, recommendations for obtaining data helpful in making that decision, and suggestions for additional study. The vaccine is indeed a worthy friend, but its adverse reactions need to be recognized.

  3. Clinical features and patient management of Lujo hemorrhagic fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivesh H Sewlall

    Full Text Available In 2008 a nosocomial outbreak of five cases of viral hemorrhagic fever due to a novel arenavirus, Lujo virus, occurred in Johannesburg, South Africa. Lujo virus is only the second pathogenic arenavirus, after Lassa virus, to be recognized in Africa and the first in over 40 years. Because of the remote, resource-poor, and often politically unstable regions where Lassa fever and other viral hemorrhagic fevers typically occur, there have been few opportunities to undertake in-depth study of their clinical manifestations, transmission dynamics, pathogenesis, or response to treatment options typically available in industrialized countries.We describe the clinical features of five cases of Lujo hemorrhagic fever and summarize their clinical management, as well as providing additional epidemiologic detail regarding the 2008 outbreak. Illness typically began with the abrupt onset of fever, malaise, headache, and myalgias followed successively by sore throat, chest pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, rash, minor hemorrhage, subconjunctival injection, and neck and facial swelling over the first week of illness. No major hemorrhage was noted. Neurological signs were sometimes seen in the late stages. Shock and multi-organ system failure, often with evidence of disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, ensued in the second week, with death in four of the five cases. Distinctive treatment components of the one surviving patient included rapid commencement of the antiviral drug ribavirin and administration of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins, N-acetylcysteine, and recombinant factor VIIa.Lujo virus causes a clinical syndrome remarkably similar to Lassa fever. Considering the high case-fatality and significant logistical impediments to controlled treatment efficacy trials for viral hemorrhagic fever, it is both logical and ethical to explore the use of the various compounds used in the treatment of the surviving case reported here in future outbreaks

  4. IBUPROFEN IN COMPLEX TREATMENT OF FEVER IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А.А. Alexeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain and fever are one of the most frequent conditions in pediatric practice. Frequent occurrence of fever accompanied by a pain syndrome stipulates combined antipyretic and analgesic medications. This article contains information upon ibuprofen use («Nurofen for children» in pediatric patients as an antipyretic and analgesic medication to be used as part of complex treatment of acute respiratory infections.Key words: fewer, children, ibuprofen. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (6: 137–140

  5. Functional analysis of replication determinantsin classical swine fever virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne

    and animal pathogens should facilitate finding new approaches for efficient disease control. The principal aim of this thesis is to characterise determinants involved in the replication of classical swine fever virus (CSFV). Classical swine fever is a highly contagious virus disease of domestic pigs and wild...... in cell culture. Knowledge of these sequence variations and putative long-range interactions will provide valuable insights into mechanisms underlying virustranslation and replication. In manuscript 3, a selection marker has been inserted into a CSFV-based replicon making it suitable for screening...

  6. A case of acute quadriplegia complicating Mediterranean spotted fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroleo, Santo; Longo, Chiara; Pirritano, Domenico; Nisticò, Rita; Valentino, Paola; Iocco, Maurizio; Santangelo, Ermenegildo; Amantea, Bruno

    2007-06-01

    Mediterranean spotted fever is a rickettsiosis caused by Rickettsia conorii. Mediterranean spotted fever is considered to be a benign disease, however, approximately 10% of patients present with a severe systemic manifestation in which neurologic involvement occurs. We present a case of an 80-year-old man with a R. conorii infection who developed an acute quadriplegia secondary to an axonal polyneuropathy. The characteristic tache noire was observed on the lateral region of the thigh and elevated IgM antibody titres against R. conorii were detected by an indirect immunofluorescence test.

  7. Florence Nightingale: her Crimean fever and chronic illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossey, Barbara M

    2010-03-01

    Florence Nightingale's Crimean fever and chronic illness have intrigued historians for more than a century and a half. The purpose of this article is threefold: (a) to discuss the facts that point to the cause of Nightingale's Crimean fever as brucellosis, (b) to show that her debilitating illness for 32 years (1855-1887) was compatible with the specific form of chronic brucellosis, and (c) to present new evidence that she was still having severe symptoms in December 1887, when it was previously felt that she had no severe symptoms after 1870.

  8. Rat-bite fever in children: case report and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojukwu, Ifeoma C; Christy, Cynthia

    2002-01-01

    We report 2 cases of rat-bite fever (RBF), a multisystem zoonosis, in children and review the literature. RBF is caused by I of 2 Gram-negative organisms: Streptobacillus moniliformis or, less commonly, Spirillum minus. Both of our cases developed in school-aged girls with a history of rat exposure who presented with a multisystem illness consisting of fever, petechial and purpuric rash, arthralgia and polyarthritis. Both responded promptly to antibiotic treatment. An additional 10 cases from a MEDLINE review (1960-2000) are reviewed. RBF must be included in the differential diagnosis of febrile patients with rashes and a history of exposure to rats.

  9. [Rocky mountain spotted fever: report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Medina, Miguel Angel; Padilla-Zamudio, Guillermo; Solís-Gallardo, Lilia Patricia; Guevara-Tovar, Marcela

    2005-01-01

    Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an acute febrile illness caused by infection with Ricketsia Rickettsii, characterized by the presence of petechial rash. Even though the etiology, clinical characteristics and availability of effective antibiotics are known, RMSF related deaths have a prevalence of 4%. In its early stages RMFS can resemble many others infectious conditions and the diagnosis can be difficult. The present paper reports two patients with RMSF; these cases underscore the importance of prompt diagnosis and appropriate antimicrobial therapy, and consider RMSF as a differential diagnosis in any patient who develops fever and rash in an endemic area.

  10. High Lassa Fever activity in Northern part of Edo State, Nigeria: re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for the control of lassa fever in Nigeria. [Afr J Health Sci. 2010 ... by the Centre for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta,. USA, in 1969 ... malaria, typhoid, yellow fever, upper respiratory tract infection and other ..... Health Policy Plan. 2006; 21: 411.

  11. The Sensitivity Of Diazo Test In The Diagnosis Of Enteric Fevers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    serological) test in the diagnosis of enteric fevers, blood specimens from101 patients suspected of having enteric fevers were collected. 54.5% (55) of the patients were significantly seropositive. Fifteen urine specimens from these 55 seropositive ...

  12. The Periodic Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennigan, Jennifer N.; Grubbs, W. Tandy

    2013-01-01

    The chemical elements present in the modern periodic table are arranged in terms of atomic numbers and chemical periodicity. Periodicity arises from quantum mechanical limitations on how many electrons can occupy various shells and subshells of an atom. The shell model of the atom predicts that a maximum of 2, 8, 18, and 32 electrons can occupy…

  13. Book Reviews in Periodicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelt, Harold J.

    All recent issues of periodicals found which contain indexed book reviews are listed in this compilation from Drake Memorial Library at the New York State University at Brockport. The periodicals are listed by 29 subject headings in this informal guide designed to be used at Drake Library. The number of reviews in the periodical in a recent year…

  14. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate: a case report:

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2014-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  15. Fever of unknown origin as a presenting manifestation of craniopharyngioma in a child

    OpenAIRE

    NANDI, Madhumita; MONDAL, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    An unusual case of cranio-pharyngioma which presented with prolonged fever described here. Investigation revealed that the child was suffering from leaking craniopharyngioma with hypo-pituitarism Fever was due to chemical meningitis following cranio-pharyngioma as evident from the CSF findings. Craniopharyngioma can cause prolonged or recurrent fever due to various reasons [1]. Prolonged fever as the sole manifestation of cranio-pharyngioma has been rarely reported in literature and this is p...

  16. Yellow fever vaccine used in a psoriatic arthritis patient treated with methotrexate

    OpenAIRE

    Štuhec, Matej

    2015-01-01

    The yellow fever vaccines on the market are contraindicated for immunocompromised and elderly patients. A case of yellow fever vaccine used in a 27-year-old Slovenian male with psoriatic arthritis during treatment with methotrexate is described. We demonstrate a positive case, since there were noadverse effects in concurrent administration of yellow fever vaccine and methotrexate. This patient did not show severe adverse reactions and did not contract yellow fever despite potential exposure. ...

  17. The Significance of Prolonged and Saddleback Fever in Hospitalised Adult Dengue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Hl Ng

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is gaining importance in Singapore with an increase in the number of cases and mortality in recent years. Although prolonged and saddleback fever have been reported in dengue fever, there are no specific studies on their significance in dengue. This study aims to examine the prevalence of prolonged and saddleback fever in dengue as well as their associations with dengue severity. A total of 2843 polymerase-chain reaction (PCR confirmed dengue patients admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were included in the study. Sixty-nine percent of them were male with a median age of 34 years. Prolonged fever (fever > 7 days duration was present in 572 (20.1% of patients. Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, dengue shock syndrome (DSS and severe dengue (SD were significantly more likely to occur in patients with prolonged fever. Mucosal bleeding, anorexia, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, lethargy, rash, clinical fluid accumulation, hepatomegaly, nosocomial infection, leukopenia, higher neutrophil count, higher hematocrit, higher alanine transaminase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST, higher creatinine, lower protein and prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT were significantly associated with prolonged fever but not platelet count or prothrombin time (PT. Saddleback fever was present in 165 (5.8%. Although DHF and SD were more likely to occur in patients in those with saddleback fever, DSS was not. Compared with prolonged fever, saddleback fever did not show many significant associations except for diarrhea, abdominal pain, clinical fluid accumulation, hematocrit and platelet change, and lower systolic blood pressure. This study demonstrates that prolonged fever may be associated with various warning signs and more severe forms of dengue (SD, DSS, DHF, while saddleback fever showed associations with DHF and SD but not DSS. The presence of prolonged or saddleback fever in dengue patients should therefore

  18. [Epidemics and diseases during the Independence period in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viesca-Treviño, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    The epidemics and endemic diseases in Mexico were not a problem before the Independence period. Hunger was less than in the past. The 1806 Influenza epidemics had been forgotten. Measles was considered a benign illness. In 1810, there was an increase in the number of cases of black vomit in Veracruz. Sixty percent of 541 hospitalized patients die of the disease. In 1812, an outbreak of yellow fever spread from Veracruz to Jalapa accompanying the movement of troops and killing over 300 soldiers of the Castilla's Battalion. The appearance of petechial fever, maybe typhus marketed in 1813 the onset of the most important epidemics. The preceding was the indirect effect of war: diseases of prisons and military quarters which became overwhelming in times where the movements of troops and of important groups of populations along with crowing, loss homes, hunger and bad hygiene habits. There was also Influenza or "pestilent cold." Measures of detection and quarantine were taken. "Naranjate" mixed with tartaric cremor was used against fever. Fumigation with nitric acid and burners, where they incinerated gun powder were among the health protection policies. It is noteworthy the advance and relief provided by the introduction of smallpox vaccine, the only preventive mean useful against smallpox which was a breakthrough in public health.

  19. Dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever in Filipino children: clinical experience during the 1983-1984 epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songco, R S; Hayes, C G; Leus, C D; Manaloto, C O

    1987-09-01

    A total of 377 Filipino children out of a total of 5,427 admissions from October 31, 1983 to March 31, 1984 were found to have dengue fever/dengue haemorrhagic fever The present clinical presentation of these infections was basically similar to that in previous epidemics but hepatomegaly and pleural effusion were less frequent and cardiac involvement, more frequent. The discrepancies between the clinical syndromes and HI antibody responses were evident; thus, the values used for the interpretation of the antibody titers must be reassessed.

  20. Is a rheumatic fever register the best surveillance tool to evaluate rheumatic fever control in the Auckland region?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxon, Te Aro; Reed, Peter; Jelleyman, Timothy; Anderson, Philippa; Leversha, Alison; Jackson, Catherine; Lennon, Diana

    2017-08-11

    To determine the most accurate data source for acute rheumatic fever (ARF) epidemiology in the Auckland region. To assess coverage of the Auckland Regional Rheumatic Fever Register (ARRFR), (1998-2010) for children Auckland at the time of illness, register, hospitalisation and notification data were compared. A consistent definition was applied to determine definite and probable cases of ARF using clinical records. (www.heartfoundation.org.nz) RESULTS: Of 559 confirmed (definite and probable) RF cases Auckland. This was significantly more accurate than medical officer of health notification and hospitalisation data.