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Sample records for receptor-associated mhc molecule

  1. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

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    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    to develop. There is no molecular evidence yet to decide whether vertebrate immune systems (and particularly the MHC molecules) are evolutionarily related to invertebrate allorecognition systems, and the functional evidence can be interpreted either way. Even among the vertebrates, there is great...

  2. Donor MHC and adhesion molecules in transplant arteriosclerosis

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    Shi, Chengwei; Feinberg, Mark W.; Zhang, Dorothy; Patel, Anand; Sim, Chang U.; Dong, Zhao Ming; Chapman, Susan M.; Gutierrez-Ramos, Jose-Carlos; Wagner, Denisa D.; Sibinga, Nicholas E.S.; Haber, Edgar

    1999-01-01

    Transplant-associated arteriosclerosis remains an obstacle to long-term graft survival. To determine the contribution to transplant arteriosclerosis of MHC and adhesion molecules from cells of the donor vasculature, we allografted carotid artery loops from six mutant mouse strains into immunocompetent CBA/CaJ recipients. The donor mice were deficient in either MHC I molecules or MHC II molecules, both MHC I and MHC II molecules, the adhesion molecule P-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, or both P-selectin and ICAM-1. Donor arteries in which ICAM-1, MHC II, or both MHC I and MHC II were absent showed reductions in neointima formation of 52%, 33%, and 38%, respectively, due primarily to a reduction in smooth muscle cell (SMC) accumulation. In P-selectin–deficient donor arteries, neointima formation did not differ from that in controls. In donor arteries lacking both P-selectin and ICAM-1, the size of the neointima was similar to that in those lacking ICAM-1 alone. In contrast, neointima formation increased by 52% in MHC I–deficient donor arteries. The number of CD4-positive T cells increased by 2.8-fold in MHC I–deficient arteries, and that of α-actin–positive SMCs by twofold. These observations indicate that ICAM-1 and MHC II molecules expressed in the donor vessel wall may promote transplant-associated arteriosclerosis. MHC I molecules expressed in the donor may have a protective effect. PMID:10021454

  3. MHCcluster, a method for functional clustering of MHC molecules

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    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Lundegaard, Claus; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    The identification of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) is a critical step in the understanding of T cell immune responses. The human MHC genomic region (HLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising several thousand alleles, many encoding a distinct molecule. The potentiall...... supertype classification. Also, we use MHCcluster to show that chimpanzee MHC class I molecules have a reduced functional diversity compared to that of HLA class I molecules....

  4. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

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    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K

    1994-01-01

    MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...... lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1...

  5. MHC2NNZ: A novel peptide binding prediction approach for HLA DQ molecules

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    Xie, Jiang; Zeng, Xu; Lu, Dongfang; Liu, Zhixiang; Wang, Jiao

    2017-07-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecule plays a crucial role in immunology. Computational prediction of MHC-II binding peptides can help researchers understand the mechanism of immune systems and design vaccines. Most of the prediction algorithms for MHC-II to date have made large efforts in human leukocyte antigen (HLA, the name of MHC in Human) molecules encoded in the DR locus. However, HLA DQ molecules are equally important and have only been made less progress because it is more difficult to handle them experimentally. In this study, we propose an artificial neural network-based approach called MHC2NNZ to predict peptides binding to HLA DQ molecules. Unlike previous artificial neural network-based methods, MHC2NNZ not only considers sequence similarity features but also captures the chemical and physical properties, and a novel method incorporating these properties is proposed to represent peptide flanking regions (PFR). Furthermore, MHC2NNZ improves the prediction accuracy by combining with amino acid preference at more specific positions of the peptides binding core. By evaluating on 3549 peptides binding to six most frequent HLA DQ molecules, MHC2NNZ is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC-II prediction methods.

  6. Machine Learning Reveals a Non-Canonical Mode of Peptide Binding to MHC class II Molecules

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    Andreatta, Massimo; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Kaever, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    MHC class II molecules play a fundamental role in the cellular immune system: they load short peptide fragments derived from extracellular proteins and present them on the cell surface. It is currently thought that the peptide binds lying more or less flat in the MHC groove, with a fixed distance...

  7. Structural requirements for the interaction between class II MHC molecules and peptide antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Buus, S; Appella, E

    1990-01-01

    of binding, it is possible to define certain structural features of peptides that are associated with the capacity to bind to a particular MHC specificity (IA(d) or IE(d)); 3) IA(d) and IE(d) molecules recognize different and independent structures on the antigen molecule; 4) only about 10% of the single...... IA(d) and IE(d) molecules and their peptide ligands, we found that some structural characteristics apply to both antigen-MHC interactions. In particular, we found: 1) each MHC molecule is capable of binding many unrelated peptides through the same peptide-binding site; 2) despite this permissiveness...... amino acid substitutions tested on two IA(d)- and IE(d)-binding peptides had significant effect on their MHC-binding capacities, while over 80% of these substitutions significantly impaired T cell recognition of the Ia-peptide complex; 5) based on the segregation between residues that are crucial for T...

  8. Improved methods for predicting peptide binding affinity to MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kamilla Kjærgaard; Andreatta, Massimo; Marcatili, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules are expressed on the surface of professional antigen presenting cells where they display peptides to T helper cells, which orchestrate the onset and outcome of many host immune responses. Understanding which peptides will be presented...... by the MHC-II molecule is therefore important for understanding the activation of T helper cells and can be used to identify T-cell epitopes. We here present updated versions of two MHC class II peptide binding affinity prediction methods, NetMHCII and NetMHCIIpan. These were constructed using an extended...... data set of quantitative MHC-peptide binding affinity data obtained from the Immune Epitope Database covering HLA-DR, HLA-DQ, HLA-DP and H-2 mouse molecules. We show that training with this extended data set improved the performance for peptide binding predictions for both methods. Both methods...

  9. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

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    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    CTL staining and manipulation. This has enabled a complete mapping of all HLA-I specificities (“the Human MHC Project”). Here, we demonstrate that these approaches can be applied to other species. We systematically transferred domains of the frequently expressed swine MHC-I molecule, SLA-1*0401, onto...... a HLA-I molecule (HLA-A*11:01), thereby generating recombinant human/swine chimeric MHC-I molecules as well as the intact SLA-1*0401 molecule. Biochemical peptide-binding assays and positional scanning combinatorial peptide libraries were used to analyze the peptide-binding motifs of these molecules....... A pan-specific predictor of peptide–MHC-I binding, NetMHCpan, which was originally developed to cover the binding specificities of all known HLA-I molecules, was successfully used to predict the specificities of the SLA-1*0401 molecule as well as the porcine/human chimeric MHC-I molecules. These data...

  10. Ligation of MHC class I molecules on peripheral blood T lymphocytes induces new phenotypes and functions

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    Bregenholt, S; Röpke, M; Skov, S

    1996-01-01

    Microgram concentrations of immobilized anti-MHC class I (MHC-I) Ab induced proliferation of resting CD3+ T cells from peripheral blood. In contrast, soluble Ab did not activate T cells. Exposure of T cells to immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab for only 24 h was followed by proliferation and development...... of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Immediately following MHC-I ligation, the T cells responded with increased protein tyrosine phosphorylation, with new bands appearing in the SDS-PAGE. Exposure of T cells to immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab for 24 h induced an increased surface expression of the TCR/CD3 and CD......28 molecules. MHC-I-induced proliferation of purified T cells was dependent on cellular interactions with non-T cells. Under certain conditions, in which MHC-I was ligated by picogram concentrations of immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab, anti-TCR/CD3 Ab-induced proliferation of T cells was strongly inhibited...

  11. Class II MHC molecules are spontaneously internalized in acidic endosomes by activated B cells.

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    Weber, D A; Buck, L B; Delohery, T M; Agostino, N; Pernis, B

    1990-01-01

    The antibody response to protein antigens requires specific cooperation between B and T cells. In order to deliver the helper signal, T cells must recognize, in the context of Class II MHC, processed antigen on the membrane of B cells. Processed antigen is in the form of peptides bound in a given site of the Class II MHC molecule; in order to address the question of where, in the B cell, the complex of Class II MHC and processed antigen is formed, we studied the subcellular localization of these two molecules. Since the formation of this complex is the crucial step in antigen processing and presentation, the answer to this question is central to the whole problem of the physiology of antigen handling by B cells. To collect information pertinent to the question, we have compared, in B cells, the intracellular traffic of Class II MHC and of monovalent and divalent anti-immunoglobulin antibodies used as protein ligands of the membrane immunoglobulins. We have done so by two-color immunofluorescence microscopy, and we have detected extensive confluence of Class II MHC molecules with the immunoglobulin ligand, both mono- and bi-valent, in the endosomes of LPS-activated murine B cells. Whereas the ligand clearly reaches the endosomes by internalization from the cell membrane, the Class II MHC molecules could reach the same location either by endocytosis from the membrane or through targeting to the endosomes of newly synthesized Class II MHC molecules. We have collected quantitative evidence for endocytosis of Class II MHC by following, with the fluorescence activated cell sorter, the quenching of the fluorescence of fluoresceinated Fab' anti Class II MHC in LPS-activated murine B cells; this quenching indicates the entry of the label into an acidic intracellular compartment. Together with the results of others, obtained with different methods, our observations support the concept that, at least in mature activated B cells, Class II MHC molecules reach the organelles

  12. T-cell epitope prediction: rescaling can mask biological variation between MHC molecules.

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    Aidan MacNamara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical methods for predicting CD8+ T-cell epitopes are an important tool in vaccine design and for enhancing our understanding of the cellular immune system. The most popular methods currently available produce binding affinity predictions across a range of MHC molecules. In comparing results between these MHC molecules, it is common practice to apply a normalization procedure known as rescaling, to correct for possible discrepancies between the allelic predictors. Using two of the most popular prediction software packages, NetCTL and NetMHC, we tested the hypothesis that rescaling removes genuine biological variation from the predicted affinities when comparing predictions across a number of MHC molecules. We found that removing the condition of rescaling improved the prediction software's performance both qualitatively, in terms of ranking epitopes, and quantitatively, in the accuracy of their binding affinity predictions. We suggest that there is biologically significant variation among class 1 MHC molecules and find that retention of this variation leads to significantly more accurate epitope prediction.

  13. T-cell epitope prediction: rescaling can mask biological variation between MHC molecules.

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    MacNamara, Aidan; Kadolsky, Ulrich; Bangham, Charles R M; Asquith, Becca

    2009-03-01

    Theoretical methods for predicting CD8+ T-cell epitopes are an important tool in vaccine design and for enhancing our understanding of the cellular immune system. The most popular methods currently available produce binding affinity predictions across a range of MHC molecules. In comparing results between these MHC molecules, it is common practice to apply a normalization procedure known as rescaling, to correct for possible discrepancies between the allelic predictors. Using two of the most popular prediction software packages, NetCTL and NetMHC, we tested the hypothesis that rescaling removes genuine biological variation from the predicted affinities when comparing predictions across a number of MHC molecules. We found that removing the condition of rescaling improved the prediction software's performance both qualitatively, in terms of ranking epitopes, and quantitatively, in the accuracy of their binding affinity predictions. We suggest that there is biologically significant variation among class 1 MHC molecules and find that retention of this variation leads to significantly more accurate epitope prediction.

  14. Predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms

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    Feng Lin

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptides binding to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class II molecules are crucial for initiation and regulation of immune responses. Predicting peptides that bind to a specific MHC molecule plays an important role in determining potential candidates for vaccines. The binding groove in class II MHC is open at both ends, allowing peptides longer than 9-mer to bind. Finding the consensus motif facilitating the binding of peptides to a MHC class II molecule is difficult because of different lengths of binding peptides and varying location of 9-mer binding core. The level of difficulty increases when the molecule is promiscuous and binds to a large number of low affinity peptides. In this paper, we propose two approaches using multi-objective evolutionary algorithms (MOEA for predicting peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. One uses the information from both binders and non-binders for self-discovery of motifs. The other, in addition, uses information from experimentally determined motifs for guided-discovery of motifs. Results The proposed methods are intended for finding peptides binding to MHC class II I-Ag7 molecule – a promiscuous binder to a large number of low affinity peptides. Cross-validation results across experiments on two motifs derived for I-Ag7 datasets demonstrate better generalization abilities and accuracies of the present method over earlier approaches. Further, the proposed method was validated and compared on two publicly available benchmark datasets: (1 an ensemble of qualitative HLA-DRB1*0401 peptide data obtained from five different sources, and (2 quantitative peptide data obtained for sixteen different alleles comprising of three mouse alleles and thirteen HLA alleles. The proposed method outperformed earlier methods on most datasets, indicating that it is well suited for finding peptides binding to MHC class II molecules. Conclusion We present two MOEA-based algorithms for finding motifs

  15. Characterization of structural features controlling the receptiveness of empty class II MHC molecules.

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    Bernd Rupp

    Full Text Available MHC class II molecules (MHC II play a pivotal role in the cell-surface presentation of antigens for surveillance by T cells. Antigen loading takes place inside the cell in endosomal compartments and loss of the peptide ligand rapidly leads to the formation of a non-receptive state of the MHC molecule. Non-receptiveness hinders the efficient loading of new antigens onto the empty MHC II. However, the mechanisms driving the formation of the peptide inaccessible state are not well understood. Here, a combined approach of experimental site-directed mutagenesis and computational modeling is used to reveal structural features underlying "non-receptiveness." Molecular dynamics simulations of the human MHC II HLA-DR1 suggest a straightening of the α-helix of the β1 domain during the transition from the open to the non-receptive state. The movement is mostly confined to a hinge region conserved in all known MHC molecules. This shift causes a narrowing of the two helices flanking the binding site and results in a closure, which is further stabilized by the formation of a critical hydrogen bond between residues αQ9 and βN82. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed that replacement of either one of the two residues by alanine renders the protein highly susceptible. Notably, loading enhancement was also observed when the mutated MHC II molecules were expressed on the surface of fibroblast cells. Altogether, structural features underlying the non-receptive state of empty HLA-DR1 identified by theoretical means and experiments revealed highly conserved residues critically involved in the receptiveness of MHC II. The atomic details of rearrangements of the peptide-binding groove upon peptide loss provide insight into structure and dynamics of empty MHC II molecules and may foster rational approaches to interfere with non-receptiveness. Manipulation of peptide loading efficiency for improved peptide vaccination strategies could be one of the applications profiting

  16. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    alpha and beta MHC-II chain constructs, where the membrane-spanning regions were replaced by dimerization motifs, and the C-terminal of the beta chains was fused to a biotinylation signal peptide (BSP) allowing for in vivo biotinylation. These chains were produced separately as inclusion bodies in E......-II molecules and accompanying HTS peptide-binding assay were successfully developed for nine different MHC-II molecules including the DPA1*0103/DPB1*0401 (DP401) and DQA1*0501/DQB1*0201, where both alpha and beta chains are polymorphic, illustrating the advantages of producing the two chains separately....... coli , extracted into urea, and purified under denaturing and non-reducing conditions using conventional column chromatography. Subsequently, diluting the two chains into a folding reaction with appropriate peptide resulted in efficient peptide-MHC-II complex formation. Several different formats...

  17. The peptide-receptive transition state of MHC-1 molecules: Insight from structure and molecular dynamics

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    Robinson H.; Mage, M.; Dolan, M.; Wang, R.; Boyd, L.; Revilleza, M.; Natarajan, K.; Myers, N.; Hansen, T.; Margulies, D.

    2012-05-01

    MHC class I (MHC-I) proteins of the adaptive immune system require antigenic peptides for maintenance of mature conformation and immune function via specific recognition by MHC-I-restricted CD8(+) T lymphocytes. New MHC-I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum are held by chaperones in a peptide-receptive (PR) transition state pending release by tightly binding peptides. In this study, we show, by crystallographic, docking, and molecular dynamics methods, dramatic movement of a hinged unit containing a conserved 3(10) helix that flips from an exposed 'open' position in the PR transition state to a 'closed' position with buried hydrophobic side chains in the peptide-loaded mature molecule. Crystallography of hinged unit residues 46-53 of murine H-2L(d) MHC-I H chain, complexed with mAb 64-3-7, demonstrates solvent exposure of these residues in the PR conformation. Docking and molecular dynamics predict how this segment moves to help form the A and B pockets crucial for the tight peptide binding needed for stability of the mature peptide-loaded conformation, chaperone dissociation, and Ag presentation.

  18. Activation of MyD88 Signaling upon Staphylococcal Enterotoxin Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    Salisbury, UK), and was prepared under GMP condition, endotoxin free and stored at 250uC. Escherichia coli LPS (055:B5) was purchased from Difco...29. Spertini F, Chatila T, Geha RS (1992) Signals delivered via MHC class II molecules synergize with signals delivered via TCR/CD3 to cause

  19. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate MHC and antigen processing molecules in human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

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    Beatriz Suárez-Alvarez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are an attractive resource for new therapeutic approaches that involve tissue regeneration. hESCs have exhibited low immunogenicity due to low levels of Mayor Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class-I and absence of MHC class-II expression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms regulating MHC expression in hESCs had not been explored.We analyzed the expression levels of classical and non-classical MHC class-I, MHC class-II molecules, antigen-processing machinery (APM components and NKG2D ligands (NKG2D-L in hESCs, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and NTera2 (NT2 teratocarcinoma cell line. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the regulation of these genes were investigated by bisulfite sequencing and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays. We showed that low levels of MHC class-I molecules were associated with absent or reduced expression of the transporter associated with antigen processing 1 (TAP-1 and tapasin (TPN components in hESCs and iPSCs, which are involved in the transport and load of peptides. Furthermore, lack of beta2-microglobulin (beta2m light chain in these cells limited the expression of MHC class I trimeric molecule on the cell surface. NKG2D ligands (MICA, MICB were observed in all pluripotent stem cells lines. Epigenetic analysis showed that H3K9me3 repressed the TPN gene in undifferentiated cells whilst HLA-B and beta2m acquired the H3K4me3 modification during the differentiation to embryoid bodies (EBs. Absence of HLA-DR and HLA-G expression was regulated by DNA methylation.Our data provide fundamental evidence for the epigenetic control of MHC in hESCs and iPSCs. Reduced MHC class I and class II expression in hESCs and iPSCs can limit their recognition by the immune response against these cells. The knowledge of these mechanisms will further allow the development of strategies to induce tolerance and improve stem cell allograft acceptance.

  20. The first step of peptide selection in antigen presentation by MHC class I molecules

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    Garstka, Malgorzata A.; Fish, Alexander; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Joosten, Robbie P.; Janssen, George M. C.; Berlin, Ilana; Hoppes, Rieuwert; Stadnik, Magda; Janssen, Lennert; Ovaa, Huib; van Veelen, Peter A.; Perrakis, Anastassis; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    MHC class I molecules present a variable but limited repertoire of antigenic peptides for T-cell recognition. Understanding how peptide selection is achieved requires mechanistic insights into the interactions between the MHC I and candidate peptides. We find that, at first encounter, MHC I H-2Kb considers a wide range of peptides, including those with expanded N termini and unfitting anchor residues. Discrimination occurs in the second step, when noncanonical peptides dissociate with faster exchange rates. This second step exhibits remarkable temperature sensitivity, as illustrated by numerous noncanonical peptides presented by H-2Kb in cells cultured at 26 °C relative to 37 °C. Crystallographic analyses of H-2Kb–peptide complexes suggest that a conformational adaptation of H-2Kb drives the decisive step in peptide selection. We propose that MHC class I molecules consider initially a large peptide pool, subsequently refined by a temperature-sensitive induced-fit mechanism to retain the canonical peptide repertoire. PMID:25605945

  1. Anchor side chains of short peptide fragments trigger ligand-exchange of class II MHC molecules.

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    Shashank Gupta

    Full Text Available Class II MHC molecules display peptides on the cell surface for the surveillance by CD4+ T cells. To ensure that these ligands accurately reflect the content of the intracellular MHC loading compartment, a complex processing pathway has evolved that delivers only stable peptide/MHC complexes to the surface. As additional safeguard, MHC molecules quickly acquire a 'non-receptive' state once they have lost their ligand. Here we show now that amino acid side chains of short peptides can bypass these safety mechanisms by triggering the reversible ligand-exchange. The catalytic activity of dipeptides such as Tyr-Arg was stereo-specific and could be enhanced by modifications addressing the conserved H-bond network near the P1 pocket of the MHC molecule. It affected both antigen-loading and ligand-release and strictly correlated with reported anchor preferences of P1, the specific target site for the catalytic side chain of the dipeptide. The effect was evident also in CD4+ T cell assays, where the allele-selective influence of the dipeptides translated into increased sensitivities of the antigen-specific immune response. Molecular dynamic calculations support the hypothesis that occupation of P1 prevents the 'closure' of the empty peptide binding site into the non-receptive state. During antigen-processing and -presentation P1 may therefore function as important "sensor" for peptide-load. While it regulates maturation and trafficking of the complex, on the cell surface, short protein fragments present in blood or lymph could utilize this mechanism to alter the ligand composition on antigen presenting cells in a catalytic way.

  2. Direct binding of autoimmune disease related T cell epitopes to purified Lewis rat MHC class II molecules

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    Joosten, I; Wauben, M H; Holewijn, M C

    1994-01-01

    characteristics of the Lewis rat MHC class II RT1.B1 molecule. We have now developed a biochemical binding assay which enables competition studies in which the relative MHC binding affinity of a set of non-labelled peptides can be assessed while employing detection of biotinylated marker peptides...

  3. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

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    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant.......05). These observations suggest the absence of tolerance towards most MHC-I-restricted self-peptides and that strong antiself immunity can be generated preferentially towards self-peptides with an intermediate affinity for MHC-I. These data should be considered in the design of tumour vaccines based on MHC-I-binding self-peptides....

  4. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II but not MHC class I molecules are required for efficient control of Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice

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    Rodrigues, Rosângela M; Silva, Neide M; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia R; Cardoso, Cristina R; Alves, Ronaldo; Gonçalves, Flávia A; Beletti, Marcelo E; Ueta, Marlene T; Silva, João S; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2009-01-01

    Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal nematode capable of chronic, persistent infection and hyperinfection of the host; this can lead to dissemination, mainly in immunosuppressive states, in which the infection can become severe and result in the death of the host. In this study, we investigated the immune response against Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II deficient mice. We found that MHC II−/− animals were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection as a result of the presence of an elevated number of eggs in the faeces and a delay in the elimination of adult worms compared with wild-type (WT) and MHC I−/− mice. Histopathological analysis revealed that MHC II−/− mice had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the small intestine with a reduction in tissue eosinophilia. These mice also presented a significantly lower frequency of eosinophils and mononuclear cells in the blood, together with reduced T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokines in small intestine homogenates and sera compared with WT and MHC I−/− animals. Additionally, levels of parasite-specific immunoglobulin M (IgM), IgA, IgE, total IgG and IgG1 were also significantly reduced in the sera of MHC II−/− infected mice, while a non-significant increase in the level of IgG2a was found in comparison to WT or MHC I−/− infected mice. Together, these data demonstrate that expression of MHC class II but not class I molecules is required to induce a predominantly Th2 response and to achieve efficient control of S. venezuelensis infection in mice. PMID:19191916

  5. ZAP-70 and p72syk are signaling response elements through MHC class II molecules

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    Kanner, S B; Grosmaire, L S; Blake, J

    1995-01-01

    to antibody induced receptor ligation, bacterial superantigen (SEA and SEB) treatment of HLA-DR+ T-cells stimulated ZAP-70 tyrosine phosphorylation, consistent with class II transmembrane signaling by ligation of HLA-DR and V beta in cis. Modulation of the TCR/CD3 led to abrogation of class II induced ZAP-70......Ligation of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigens expressed on antigen-activated human CD4+ T-lymphocytes induces early signal transduction events including the activation of tyrosine kinases, the tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase-C gamma 1 and the mobilization...... of intracellular calcium. Similar responses have been observed in B-cells following stimulation of MHC class II molecules, including the increased production of intracellular cAMP. In this report, we demonstrate that the ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase is a responsive signaling element following cross-linking of HLA...

  6. MHC-like molecules in some nonmammalian vertebrates can be detected by some cross-reactive xenoantisera

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    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross-reaction......Rabbit antisera raised to human and chicken MHC molecules were used to immunoprecipitate cross-reactive molecules from biosynthetically and cell surface-labeled spleen and/or blood cells of representative vertebrate species. Five major points emerged: 1) There were many nonspecific cross...

  7. NetMHCpan-3.0; improved prediction of binding to MHC class I molecules integrating information from multiple receptor and peptide length datasets

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    Nielsen, Morten; Andreatta, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) is essential for antigen presentation to cytotoxic T-cells.Results: Here, we demonstrate how a simple alignment step allowing insertions and deletions in a pan-specific MHC-I binding machine-learning model enables combining informat...

  8. Generation of murine tumor cell lines deficient in MHC molecule surface expression using the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

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    Krishna Das

    Full Text Available In this study, the CRISPR/Cas9 technology was used to establish murine tumor cell lines, devoid of MHC I or MHC II surface expression, respectively. The melanoma cell line B16F10 and the murine breast cancer cell line EO-771, the latter stably expressing the tumor antigen NY-BR-1 (EO-NY, were transfected with an expression plasmid encoding a β2m-specific single guide (sgRNA and Cas9. The resulting MHC I negative cells were sorted by flow cytometry to obtain single cell clones, and loss of susceptibility of peptide pulsed MHC I negative clones to peptide-specific CTL recognition was determined by IFNγ ELISpot assay. The β2m knockout (KO clones did not give rise to tumors in syngeneic mice (C57BL/6N, unless NK cells were depleted, suggesting that outgrowth of the β2m KO cell lines was controlled by NK cells. Using sgRNAs targeting the β-chain encoding locus of the IAb molecule we also generated several B16F10 MHC II KO clones. Peptide loaded B16F10 MHC II KO cells were insusceptible to recognition by OT-II cells and tumor growth was unaltered compared to parental B16F10 cells. Thus, in our hands the CRISPR/Cas9 system has proven to be an efficient straight forward strategy for the generation of MHC knockout cell lines. Such cell lines could serve as parental cells for co-transfection of compatible HLA alleles together with human tumor antigens of interest, thereby facilitating the generation of HLA matched transplantable tumor models, e.g. in HLAtg mouse strains of the newer generation, lacking cell surface expression of endogenous H2 molecules. In addition, our tumor cell lines established might offer a useful tool to investigate tumor reactive T cell responses that function independently from MHC molecule surface expression by the tumor.

  9. Peptide selection by an MHC H-2Kb class I molecule devoid of the central anchor ("C") pocket.

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    Molano, A; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Fremont, D H; Messaoudi, I; Tempst, P; Nikolić-Zugić, J

    1998-03-15

    The peptide-binding site of the murine MHC class I molecule H-2Kb contains a deep C pocket, that is critical for peptide binding, as it accepts the anchor phenylalanine or tyrosine residue located in the middle (position 5, P5F/Y) of H-2Kb binding peptides. H-2Kb predominantly binds octameric peptides. By both criteria, H-2Kb is unique among the known murine and human class I molecules, none of which have a deep C pocket or preferentially select octamers. We investigated the relative importance of the C pocket in peptide selection and binding by the MHC. An MHC class I H-2Kb variant, Kbw9, predicted to contain no C pocket, was engineered by replacing valine at MHC9 with tryptophan. This mutation drastically altered the selection of peptides bound to Kbw9. The Kbw9 molecule predominantly, if not exclusively, bound nonamers. New peptide anchor residues substituted for the loss of the P5F/Y:C pocket interaction. P3P/Y, which plays an auxiliary role in binding to Kb, assumed the role of a primary anchor, and P5R was selected as a new primary anchor, most likely contacting the E pocket. These experiments demonstrate that the presence of a deep C pocket is responsible for the selection of octameric peptides as the preferred ligands for Kb and provide insight into the adaptation of peptides to a rearranged MHC groove.

  10. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.

    2006-01-01

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one...... MHC-determined resistance and susceptibility to Rous sarcoma virus. These results are consistent with the concept of a "minimal essential MHC" for chickens, in strong contrast to typical mammals....

  11. Self-peptides with intermediate capacity to bind and stabilize MHC class I molecules may be immunogenic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M L M; Ruhwald, Morten; Nissen, M H

    2003-01-01

    Thirty self-peptides were selected on the basis of their predicted binding to H-2b molecules. The binding of peptides was ascertained experimentally by biochemical (KD measurements) and cellular [major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) stabilization] assays. A weak, but significant, corr...

  12. Reversible epigenetic down-regulation of MHC molecules by devil facial tumour disease illustrates immune escape by a contagious cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kreiss, Alexandre; Tovar, Cesar

    2013-01-01

    occur in vivo during lymphocyte infiltration. These results explain why T cells do not target DFTD cells. We propose that MHC-positive or epigenetically modified DFTD cells may provide a vaccine to DFTD. In addition, we suggest that down-regulation of MHC molecules using regulatory mechanisms allows......, due to down-regulation of genes essential to the antigen-processing pathway, such as β2-microglobulin and transporters associated with antigen processing. Loss of gene expression is not due to structural mutations, but to regulatory changes including epigenetic deacetylation of histones. Consequently...

  13. pH dependence of the interaction between immunogenic peptides and MHC class II molecules. Evidence for an acidic intracellular compartment being the organelle of interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Buus, Anette Stryhn; Petersen, B L

    1992-01-01

    The pH dependence of the interaction between immunogenic peptide and MHC class II was studied both in a direct biochemical binding assay and in a functional Ag presentation assay. The two approaches yielded similar results. All of the peptides tested bound optimally to their relevant MHC class II...... restriction element at around pH 4.5. Indeed, several of the peptides did not bind at neutral pH. These results demonstrate that Ag under physiologic conditions meet MHC class II in a quite acidic environment. The very acidic pH optimal for peptide-MHC class II interaction is only found intracellularly...... and most notably in the endosome-lysosome compartment in which Ag processing is thought to occur. Thus, Ag processing and interaction with MHC class II molecules can potentially happen in the very same compartment. This yet undefined acidic compartment would have to contain proteolytic enzymes and MHC...

  14. The Recognition of the Nonclassical Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Molecule, T10, by the γδ T Cell, G8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Michael P.; Reich, Ziv; Mavaddat, Nasim; Altman, John D.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that many nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (class Ib) molecules have distinct antigen-binding capabilities, including the binding of nonpeptide moieties and the binding of peptides that are different from those bound to classical MHC molecules. Here, we show that one of the H-2T region–encoded molecules, T10, when produced in Escherichia coli, can be folded in vitro with β2-microglobulin (β2m) to form a stable heterodimer in the absence of peptide or nonpeptide moieties. This heterodimer can be recognized by specific antibodies and is stimulatory to the γδ T cell clone, G8. Circular dichroism analysis indicates that T10/β2m has structural features distinct from those of classical MHC class I molecules. These results suggest a new way for MHC-like molecules to adopt a peptide-free structure and to function in the immune system. PMID:9104809

  15. Distorting malaria peptide backbone structure to enable fitting into MHC class II molecules renders modified peptides immunogenic and protective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Gladys; Patarroyo, Manuel Elkin; Urquiza, Mauricio; Ramirez, Luis E; Reyes, Claudia; Rodriguez, Raul

    2003-05-22

    The conserved, nonantigenic, nonimmunogenic malaria Merozoite Surface Protein-2 peptide 1, having high affinity for red blood cells, was rendered immunogenic and protective in Aotus monkeys by specifically changing some critical residues. The NMR structure revealed a switch from classical type III' into distorted III' and III beta turns in the protective peptides. These changes may lead to a better fit into the Aotus MHC class II human HLA-DRbeta1 12 molecule equivalent, thus activating the immune system.

  16. Peptide-binding motif prediction by using phage display library for SasaUBA*0301, a resistance haplotype of MHC class I molecule from Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Hermsen, Trudi; Stet, Rene J M

    2008-01-01

    class I molecule might have a very similar binding motif at the C-terminus compared with a known mouse class I molecule H2-Kb which has L, or I, V, M at p8. Previous work showed that Atlantic Salmon carrying the allele SasaUBA*0301 are resistant to infectious Salmon aneamia virus......The structure of the peptide-binding specificity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I has been analyzed extensively in human and mouse. For fish, there are no crystallographic models of MHC molecules, neither are there data on the peptide-binding specificity. In this study, we describe...... for the first time the identification of a fish class I peptide-MHC ligand binding motif. Phage display technology using both 7mer and 12mer libraries enabled us to identify peptide ligands with unique specificity that interacts with the recombinant Salmon MHC class I molecule. The recombinant proteins, beta(2...

  17. NMR spectroscopy reveals unexpected structural variation at the protein-protein interface in MHC class I molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerbaum, Monika; Ballaschk, Martin; Erdmann, Natalja [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Schnick, Christina [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Diehl, Anne [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany); Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas [Freie Universitaet Berlin, Institut fuer Immungenetik, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Schmieder, Peter, E-mail: schmieder@fmp-berlin.de [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP) (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    {beta}{sub 2}-Microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}m) is a small, monomorphic protein non-covalently bound to the heavy chain (HC) in polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Given the high evolutionary conservation of structural features of {beta}{sub 2}m in various MHC molecules as shown by X-ray crystallography, {beta}{sub 2}m is often considered as a mere scaffolding protein. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we investigate here whether {beta}{sub 2}m residues at the interface to the HC exhibit changes depending on HC polymorphisms and the peptides bound to the complex in solution. First we show that human {beta}{sub 2}m can effectively be produced in deuterated form using high-cell-density-fermentation and we employ the NMR resonance assignments obtained for triple-labeled {beta}{sub 2}m bound to the HLA-B*27:09 HC to examine the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface. We then proceed to compare the resonances of {beta}{sub 2}m in two minimally distinct subtypes, HLA-B*27:09 and HLA-B*27:05, that are differentially associated with the spondyloarthropathy Ankylosing Spondylitis. Each of these subtypes is complexed with four distinct peptides for which structural information is already available. We find that only the resonances at the {beta}{sub 2}m-HC interface show a variation of their chemical shifts between the different complexes. This indicates the existence of an unexpected plasticity that enables {beta}{sub 2}m to accommodate changes that depend on HC polymorphism as well as on the bound peptide through subtle structural variations of the protein-protein interface.

  18. Crystal structure of human ZAG, a fat-depleting factor related to MHC molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L M; Chirino, A J; Bjorkman, P j

    1999-03-19

    Zn-alpha2-glycoprotein (ZAG) is a soluble protein that is present in serum and other body fluids. ZAG stimulates lipid degradation in adipocytes and causes the extensive fat losses associated with some advanced cancers. The 2.8 angstrom crystal structure of ZAG resembles a class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) heavy chain, but ZAG does not bind the class I light chain beta2-microglobulin. The ZAG structure includes a large groove analogous to class I MHC peptide binding grooves. Instead of a peptide, the ZAG groove contains a nonpeptidic compound that may be implicated in lipid catabolism under normal or pathological conditions.

  19. Limitations of Ab Initio Predictions of Peptide Binding to MHC Class II Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    potentials derived from the analysis of known protein structures; energetic evaluation of different peptide snapshots in a molecular dynamics simulation; and direct analysis of contacts made in known 3D structures of peptide:MHC complexes. These methods are ab initio in that they require structural data...

  20. The MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets...... is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  1. The dominantly expressed class I molecule of the chicken MHC is explained by coevolution with the polymorphic peptide transporter (TAP) genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Brian A; Hunt, Lawrence G; Sowa, Anna K

    2011-01-01

    In most mammals, the MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, whereas the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) heterodimers are functionally monomorphic. In chickens, there are two classical class I genes but only one is expres......In most mammals, the MHC class I molecules are polymorphic and determine the specificity of peptide presentation, whereas the transporter associated with antigen presentation (TAP) heterodimers are functionally monomorphic. In chickens, there are two classical class I genes but only one...... is expressed at a high level, which can result in strong MHC associations with resistance to particular infectious pathogens. However, the basis for having a single dominantly expressed class I molecule has been unclear. Here we report TAP1 and TAP2 sequences from 16 chicken lines, and show that both genes...... dominantly expressed class I molecule. These results show that coevolution between class I and TAP genes can explain the presence of a single dominantly expressed class I molecule in common chicken MHC haplotypes. Moreover, such coevolution in the primordial MHC may have been responsible for the appearance...

  2. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Single-chain Peptide-MHC Molecule that Modulates both Naive and Activated CD8plus T Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Samanta; G Mukherjee; U Ramagopal; R Chaparro; S Nathenson; T DiLorenzo; S Almo

    2011-12-31

    Peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers, in addition to being tools for tracking and quantifying antigen-specific T cells, can mediate downstream signaling after T-cell receptor engagement. In the absence of costimulation, this can lead to anergy or apoptosis of cognate T cells, a property that could be exploited in the setting of autoimmune disease. Most studies with class I pMHC multimers used noncovalently linked peptides, which can allow unwanted CD8{sup +} T-cell activation as a result of peptide transfer to cellular MHC molecules. To circumvent this problem, and given the role of self-reactive CD8{sup +} T cells in the development of type 1 diabetes, we designed a single-chain pMHC complex (scK{sup d}.IGRP) by using the class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup d} and a covalently linked peptide derived from islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP{sub 206-214}), a well established autoantigen in NOD mice. X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the peptide is presented in the groove of the MHC molecule in canonical fashion, and it was also demonstrated that scK{sup d}.IGRP tetramers bound specifically to cognate CD8{sup +} T cells. Tetramer binding induced death of naive T cells and in vitro- and in vivo-differentiated cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and tetramer-treated cytotoxic T lymphocytes showed a diminished IFN-{gamma} response to antigen stimulation. Tetramer accessibility to disease-relevant T cells in vivo was also demonstrated. Our study suggests the potential of single-chain pMHC tetramers as possible therapeutic agents in autoimmune disease. Their ability to affect the fate of naive and activated CD8{sup +} T cells makes them a potential intervention strategy in early and late stages of disease.

  3. Peptide-binding motifs of two common equine class I MHC molecules in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Tobias; Lindvall, Mikaela; Moore, Erin; Moore, Eugene; Sidney, John; Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Myers, Paisley T; Malaker, Stacy A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Osterrieder, Nikolaus; Peters, Bjoern; Hunt, Donald F; Antczak, Douglas F; Sette, Alessandro

    2017-05-01

    Quantitative peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I alleles provide a valuable tool to efficiently identify putative T cell epitopes. Detailed information on equine MHC class I alleles is still very limited, and to date, only a single equine MHC class I allele, Eqca-1*00101 (ELA-A3 haplotype), has been characterized. The present study extends the number of characterized ELA class I specificities in two additional haplotypes found commonly in the Thoroughbred breed. Accordingly, we here report quantitative binding motifs for the ELA-A2 allele Eqca-16*00101 and the ELA-A9 allele Eqca-1*00201. Utilizing analyses of endogenously bound and eluted ligands and the screening of positional scanning combinatorial libraries, detailed and quantitative peptide-binding motifs were derived for both alleles. Eqca-16*00101 preferentially binds peptides with aliphatic/hydrophobic residues in position 2 and at the C-terminus, and Eqca-1*00201 has a preference for peptides with arginine in position 2 and hydrophobic/aliphatic residues at the C-terminus. Interestingly, the Eqca-16*00101 motif resembles that of the human HLA A02-supertype, while the Eqca-1*00201 motif resembles that of the HLA B27-supertype and two macaque class I alleles. It is expected that the identified motifs will facilitate the selection of candidate epitopes for the study of immune responses in horses.

  4. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is related to the parasite load and absence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Rosângela Maria; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro; Gonçalves, Ana Lúcia Ribeiro; Silva, Neide Maria; Massa, Virgínia; Alves, Ronaldo; Ueta, Marlene Tiduko; Silva, João Santana; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-11-01

    In human and murine models strongyloidiasis induce a Th2 type response. In the current study we investigated the role of different loads of Strongyloides venezuelensis in the immune response raised against the parasite and the participation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule in the disease outcome in face of the different parasite burden. The C57BL/6 wild type (WT) and MHC II(-/-) mice were individually inoculated by subcutaneous injection with 500 or 3000 S. venezuelensis L3. The MHC II(-/-) mice infected with 3000L3 were more susceptible to S. venezuelensis infection when compared with WT groups, in which the parasite was completely eliminated. The production of Th2 cytokines and specific IgG1 or IgE antibodies against parasite were significantly lowered in MHC II(-/-) infected mice with different larvae inoculums. The infection of MHC II(-/-) mice with S. venezuelensis induced slight inflammatory alterations in the small intestine, and these lesions were lower when compared with WT mice, irrespective of the parasite load utilized to infect animals. Finally, we concluded that MHC class II molecules are essential in the immune response against S. venezuelensis mainly when infection occurs with high parasite inoculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MHC class I molecules with superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Wooldridge (Linda); M. Clement (Mathew); A. Lissina (Anna); E.S.J. Edwards (Emily); K. Ladell (Kristin); J. Ekeruche (Julia); R.E. Hewitt (Rachel); B. Laugel (Bruno); E. Gostick (Emma); D.K. Cole (David); J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.J. Miles (John); S.R. Burrows (Scott); D.A. Price (David); A.K. Sewell (Andrew)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractCD8+CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of

  6. Effect of conformational propensity of peptide antigens in their interaction with MHC class II molecules. Failure to document the importance of regular secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Lamont, A; Buus, S

    1989-01-01

    for its IAd binding capacity was analyzed. In most instances these substitutions had little or no effect, suggesting that neither alpha-helical nor beta-sheet regular structures may be strictly required for productive interaction with MHC molecules. Some of the same substitutions were also found to have...

  7. A combined prediction strategy increases identification of peptides bound with high affinity and stability to porcine MHC class I molecules SLA-1*04:01, SLA-2*04:01, and SLA-3*04:01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Rasmussen, Michael; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Affinity and stability of peptides bound by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules are important factors in presentation of peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In silico prediction methods of peptide-MHC binding followed by experimental analysis of peptide-MHC interactions...... constitute an attractive protocol to select target peptides from the vast pool of viral proteome peptides. We have earlier reported the peptide binding motif of the porcine MHC-I molecules SLA-1*04:01 and SLA-2*04:01, identified by an ELISA affinity-based positional scanning combinatorial peptide library...

  8. The diabetogenic mouse MHC class II molecule I-A[subscript g7] is endowed with a switch that modulates TCR affinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Kenji; Corper, Adam L.; Herro, Rana; Jabri, Bana; Wilson, Ian A.; Teyton, Luc (Scripps); (UC)

    2011-11-16

    Genetic susceptibility to autoimmunity is frequently associated with specific MHC alleles. Diabetogenic MHC class II molecules, such as human HLA-DQ8 and mouse I-A{sub g7}, typically have a small, uncharged amino acid residue at position 57 of their {beta} chain ({beta}57); this results in the absence of a salt bridge between {beta}57 and Arg{alpha}76, which is adjacent to the P9 pocket of the peptide-binding groove. However, the influence of Arg{alpha}76 on the selection of the TCR repertoire remains unknown, particularly when the MHC molecule binds a peptide with a neutral amino acid residue at position P9. Here, we have shown that diabetogenic MHC class II molecules bound to a peptide with a neutral P9 residue primarily selected and expanded cells expressing TCRs bearing a negatively charged residue in the first segment of their complementarity determining region 3{beta}. The crystal structure of one such TCR in complex with I-A{sub g7} bound to a peptide containing a neutral P9 residue revealed that a network of favorable long-range (greater than 4 {angstrom}) electrostatic interactions existed among Arg{alpha}76, the neutral P9 residue, and TCR, which supported the substantially increased TCR/peptide-MHC affinity. This network could be modulated or switched to a lower affinity interaction by the introduction of a negative charge at position P9 of the peptide. Our results support the existence of a switch at residue {beta}57 of the I-Ag7 and HLA-DQ8 class II molecules and potentially link normal thymic TCR selection with abnormal peripheral behavior.

  9. Hypoxia increases tumor cell shedding of MHC class I chain-related molecule: role of nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, D Robert; Hu, Nianping; Sheikhi, Abdol Karim; Chung, Eugene; Frederiksen, Lisa J; Pross, Hugh; Graham, Charles H

    2008-06-15

    The MHC class I chain-related (MIC) molecules play important roles in tumor immune surveillance through their interaction with the NKG2D receptor on natural killer and cytotoxic T cells. Thus, shedding of the MIC molecules from the tumor cell membrane represents a potential mechanism of escape from NKG2D-mediated immune surveillance. Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor clinical outcome for cancer patients. We show that hypoxia contributes to tumor cell shedding of MIC through a mechanism involving impaired nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Whereas hypoxia increased MIC shedding in human prostate cancer cells, activation of NO signaling inhibited hypoxia-mediated MIC shedding. Similar to incubation in hypoxia, pharmacologic inhibition of endogenous NO signaling increased MIC shedding. Parallel studies showed hypoxia-mediated tumor cell resistance to lysis by interleukin 2-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and NO-mediated attenuation of this resistance to lysis. Inhibition of NO production also led to resistance to PBL-mediated lysis. Interference of MIC-NKG2D interaction with a blocking anti-MIC antibody abrogated the effect of hypoxia and NO signaling on tumor cell sensitivity to PBL-mediated lysis. Finally, continuous transdermal delivery of the NO mimetic glyceryl trinitrate (7.3 mug/h) attenuated the growth of xenografted MIC-expressing human prostate tumors. These findings suggest that the hypoxic tumor microenvironment contributes to resistance to immune surveillance and that activation of NO signaling is of potential use in cancer immunotherapy.

  10. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 regulates human embryonic stem cell adhesion, stemness, and survival via control of epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Tae; Seo Choi, Hong; Min Lee, Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-10-01

    B-Cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) regulates the export of secreted membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the downstream secretory pathway. Previously, we generated a monoclonal antibody 297-D4 against the surface molecule on undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we found that 297-D4 antigen was localized to pluripotent hESCs and downregulated during early differentiation of hESCs and identified that the antigen target of 297-D4 was BAP31 on the hESC-surface. To investigate the functional role of BAP31 in hESCs, BAP31 expression was knocked down by small interfering RNA. BAP31 depletion impaired hESC self-renewal and pluripotency and drove hESC differentiation into multicell lineages. BAP31 depletion hindered hESC proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and inducing caspase-independent cell death. Interestingly, BAP31 depletion reduced hESC adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM). Analysis of cell surface molecules showed decreased expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in BAP31-depleted hESCs, while ectopic expression of BAP31 elevated the expression of EpCAM. EpCAM depletion also reduced hESC adhesion to ECM, arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and induced cell death, producing similar effects to those of BAP31 depletion. BAP31 and EpCAM were physically associated and colocalized at the ER and cell surface. Both BAP31 and EpCAM depletion decreased cyclin D1 and E expression and suppressed PI3K/Akt signaling, suggesting that BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression. These findings provide, for the first time, mechanistic insights into how BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  11. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to MHC class I molecules using specificity matrices and anchor-stratified calibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauemøller, S L; Holm, A; Hilden, J

    2001-01-01

    and predictions of peptide-MHC interactions are therefore important. Quantitative matrices representing MHC class I specificity can be used to search any query protein for the presence of MHC binding peptides. Assuming that each peptide residue contributes to binding in an additive and sequence independent manner...... predictions, we have measured the MHC class I binding of a large number of peptides. In an attempt to further improve predictions and to include sequence dependency, we subdivided the panel of peptides according to whether the peptides had zero, one or two primary anchor residues. This allowed us to define...

  12. Capacity of intact proteins to bind to MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sette, A; Adorini, L; Colon, S M

    1989-01-01

    Here we have demonstrated that denatured, but not native protein antigens can interact with Ia molecules. Thus, the failure of native antigens to be recognized as such by T cells appears to be at least in part due to a deficient antigen/Ia interaction. These results also support previous...

  13. Predominant Occupation of the Class I MHC Molecule H-2Kwm7 with a Single Self-peptide Suggests a Mechanism for its Diabetes-protective Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brims, D.; Qian, J; Jarchum, I; Mikesh, L; Palmieri, E; Ramagopal, U; Malashkevich, V; Chaparro, R; Lund, T; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease characterized by T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic {beta} cells. In both humans and the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D, class II MHC alleles are the primary determinant of disease susceptibility. However, class I MHC genes also influence risk. These findings are consistent with the requirement for both CD{sup 4+} and CD{sup 8+} T cells in the pathogenesis of T1D. Although a large body of work has permitted the identification of multiple mechanisms to explain the diabetes-protective effect of particular class II MHC alleles, studies examining the protective influence of class I alleles are lacking. Here, we explored this question by performing biochemical and structural analyses of the murine class I MHC molecule H-2K{sup wm7}, which exerts a diabetes-protective effect in NOD mice. We have found that H-2K{sup wm7} molecules are predominantly occupied by the single self-peptide VNDIFERI, derived from the ubiquitous protein histone H2B. This unexpected finding suggests that the inability of H-2K{sup wm7} to support T1D development could be due, at least in part, to the failure of peptides from critical {beta}-cell antigens to adequately compete for binding and be presented to T cells. Predominant presentation of a single peptide would also be expected to influence T-cell selection, potentially leading to a reduced ability to select a diabetogenic CD{sup 8+} T-cell repertoire. The report that one of the predominant peptides bound by T1D-protective HLA-A*31 is histone derived suggests the potential translation of our findings to human diabetes-protective class I MHC molecules.

  14. MHC class II-derived peptides can bind to class II molecules, including self molecules, and prevent antigen presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosloniec, E F; Vitez, L J; Buus, S

    1990-01-01

    Seven synthetic peptides corresponding to the polymorphic regions of the alpha and beta chains of the I-Ak molecule were examined for their ability to inhibit the presentation of foreign antigens to antigen-specific, I-A-restricted T cell hybridomas. Two of the peptides, representing the sequences...... found in the first and third polymorphic regions (PMR) of the A alpha k chain (alpha k-1 and alpha k-3) were capable of inhibiting the presentation of three different HEL-derived peptide antigens to their appropriate T cells. In addition, the alpha k-1 peptide inhibited the presentation of the OVA(323......-339) immunodominant peptide to the I-Ad-restricted T cell hybridomas specific for it. Prepulsing experiments demonstrated that the PMR peptides were interacting with the APC and not with the T cell hybridomas. These observations were confirmed and extended by the demonstration that the alpha k-1 and alpha k-3...

  15. The tetraspan protein CD82 is a resident of MHC class II compartments where it associates with HLA-DR, -DM, and -DO molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, C; Denzin, L K; Pan, M; Griffith, J M; Geuze, H J; Cresswell, P

    1998-10-01

    In specialized APCs, MHC class II molecules are synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum and transported through the Golgi apparatus to organelles of the endocytic pathway collectively called MHC class II compartments (MIICs). There, the class II-associated invariant chain is degraded, and peptides derived from internalized Ag bind to empty class II in a reaction that is facilitated by the class II-like molecule HLA-DM. An mAb raised to highly purified, immunoisolated MIICs from human B lymphoblastoid cells recognized CD82, a member of the tetraspan family of integral membrane proteins. Subcellular fractionation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy showed that CD82 is highly enriched in MIICs, particularly in their internal membranes. Coprecipitation analysis showed that CD82 associates in MIICs with class II, DM, and HLA-DO (an inhibitor of peptide loading that binds DM). Similar experiments showed CD63, another tetraspan protein found in MIICs, also associates with these molecules in the compartment and that CD82 and CD63 associate with each other. Preclearing experiments demonstrated that both CD82 and CD63 form complexes with DM-associated class II and DM-associated DO. The ability of CD82 and CD63 to form complexes with class II, DM, and DO in MIICs suggests that the tetraspan proteins may play an important role in the late stages of MHC class II maturation.

  16. Enhanced Prevalence of Plasmatic Soluble MHC Class I Chain-Related Molecule in Vascular Pregnancy Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Baptiste Haumonte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex class I related chain (MIC is a stress-inducible protein modulating the function of immune natural killer (NK cells, a major leukocyte subset involved in proper trophoblast invasion and spiral artery remodeling. Aim of the study was to evaluate whether upregulation of soluble MIC (sMIC may reflect immune disorders associated to vascular pregnancy diseases (VPD. sMIC was more frequently detected in the plasma of women with a diagnostic of VPD (32% than in normal term-matched pregnancies (1.6%, P<0.0001, with highest prevalence in intrauterine fetal death (IUDF, 44% and vascular intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR, 39%. sMIC levels were higher in preeclampsia (PE than in IUFD (P<0.01 and vascular IUGR (P<0.05. sMIC detection was associated with bilateral early diastolic uterine notches (P=0.037, thrombocytopenia (P=0.03, and high proteinuria (P=0.03 in PE and with the vascular etiology of IUGR (P=0.0038. Incubation of sMIC-positive PE plasma resulted in downregulation of NKG2D expression and NK cell-mediated IFN-γ production in vitro. Our work thus suggests that detection of sMIC molecule in maternal plasma may constitute a hallmark of altered maternal immune functions that contributes to vascular disorders that complicate pregnancy, notably by impairing NK-cell mediated production of IFN-γ, an essential cytokine favoring vascular modeling.

  17. Pathway of detergent-mediated and peptide ligand-mediated refolding of heterodimeric class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckel, J; Döring, K; Malotka, J; Jähnig, F; Dornmair, K

    1997-09-15

    We investigated the mechanism of refolding and reassembly of recombinant alpha and beta chains of the class II major histocompatibility molecules (MHC-II) HLA-DRB5*0101. Both chains were expressed in the cytosol of Escherichia coli, purified in urea and SDS, and reassembled to functional heterodimers by replacement of SDS by mild detergents, incubation in a redox-shuffling buffer and finally by oxidation and removal of detergent. Refolding was mediated by mild detergents and by peptide ligands. Early stages of structure formation were characterized by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay (FAD) spectroscopies. We found that formation of secondary structure was detectable after replacement of SDS by mild detergents. At that stage the alpha and beta chains were still monomeric, the buffer was strongly reducing, and the folding intermediates did not yet interact with peptide ligands. Formation of folding intermediates capable of interacting with peptide ligands was detected after adjusting the redox potential with oxidized glutathione and incubation in mild detergents. We conclude that at that stage a tertiary structure close to the native structure is formed at least locally. The nature and concentration of detergent critically determined the refolding efficiency. We compared detergents with different carbohydrate headgroups, and with aliphatic chains ranging from C6 to C14 in length. For each of the detergents we observed a narrow concentration range for mediating refolding. Surprisingly, detergents with long aliphatic chains had to be used at higher concentrations than short-chain detergents, indicating that increasing the solubility of folding intermediates is not the only function of detergents during a refolding reaction. We discuss structure formation and interactions of detergents with stable folding intermediates. Understanding such interactions will help to develop rational strategies for refolding hydrophobic or

  18. HLA-DO increases bacterial superantigen binding to human MHC molecules by inhibiting dissociation of class II-associated invariant chain peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezeshki, Abdul Mohammad; Azar, Georges A; Mourad, Walid; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Boulassel, Mohamed-Rachid; Denzin, Lisa K; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    HLA-DO (H2-O in mice) is an intracellular non-classical MHC class II molecule (MHCII). It forms a stable complex with HLA-DM (H2-M in mice) and shapes the MHC class II-associated peptide repertoire. Here, we tested the impact of HLA-DO and H2-O on the binding of superantigens (SAgs), which has been shown previously to be sensitive to the structural nature of the class II-bound peptides. We found that the binding of staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) A and B, as well as toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), was similar on the HLA-DO(+) human B cell lines 721.45 and its HLA-DO(-) counterpart. However, overexpressing HLA-DO in MHC class II(+) HeLa cells (HeLa-CIITA-DO) improved binding of SEA and TSST-1. Accordingly, knocking down HLA-DO expression using specific siRNAs decreased SEA and TSST-1 binding. We tested directly the impact of the class II-associated invariant chain peptide (CLIP), which dissociation from MHC class II molecules is inhibited by overexpressed HLA-DO. Loading of synthetic CLIP on HLA-DR(+) cells increased SEA and TSST-1 binding. Accordingly, knocking down HLA-DM had a similar effect. In mice, H2-O deficiency had no impact on SAgs binding to isolated splenocytes. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of SAgs to the MHCII-associated peptide has physiological basis and that the effect of HLA-DO on SEA and TSST-1 is mediated through the inhibition of CLIP release. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cryopreservation of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Maurer, Dominik; Laske, Karoline

    2015-01-01

    and long-term storage is generally not recommended. We investigated here the possibility of cryopreserving MHC multimers, both in-house produced and commercially available, using a wide range of peptide-MHC class I multimers comprising virus and cancer-associated epitopes of different affinities presented...... by various HLA-class I molecules. Cryopreservation of MHC multimers was feasible for at least 6 months, when they were dissolved in buffer containing 5-16% glycerol (v/v) and 0.5% serum albumin (w/v). The addition of cryoprotectants was tolerated across three different T-cell staining protocols for all...... fluorescence labels tested (PE, APC, PE-Cy7 and Quantum dots). We propose cryopreservation as an easily implementable method for stable storage of MHC multimers and recommend the use of cryopreservation in long-term immunomonitoring projects, thereby eliminating the variability introduced by different batches...

  20. Variations in the cytoplasmic region account for the heterogeneity of the chicken MHC class I (B-F) molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, L B; Kaufman, J; Verland, S

    1991-01-01

    Molecular variation among major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I (B-F) proteins from B-homozygous chickens is apparently caused by C-terminal variation. Analysis of the total B-F protein pool revealed substantial heterogeneity with two or three molecular mass constituents, each being comp...... properties of fragments obtained by gradual proteolytic digestion, indicated that the small peptide responsible for the major B-F heterogeneity was situated in the intracellular, C-terminal part. Udgivelsesdato: 1991-null...

  1. The Carboxy Terminus of the Ligand Peptide Determines the Stability of the MHC Class I Molecule H-2Kb: A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esam Tolba Abualrous

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules (proteins bind peptides of eight to ten amino acids to present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. The class I binding groove binds the peptide via hydrogen bonds with the peptide termini and via diverse interactions with the anchor residue side chains of the peptide. To elucidate which of these interactions is most important for the thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the peptide-bound state, we have combined molecular dynamics simulations and experimental approaches in an investigation of the conformational dynamics and binding parameters of a murine class I molecule (H-2Kb with optimal and truncated natural peptide epitopes. We show that the F pocket region dominates the conformational and thermodynamic properties of the binding groove, and that therefore the binding of the C terminus of the peptide to the F pocket region plays a crucial role in bringing about the peptide-bound state of MHC class I.

  2. MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    viewer, that allows the display of the likely binding motif for all human class I proteins of the loci HLA A, B, C, and E and for MHC class I molecules from chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), and mouse (Mus musculus). Furthermore, it covers all HLA-DR protein sequences...

  3. miR-9 modulates the expression of interferon-regulated genes and MHC class I molecules in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fei; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Fan, Quan-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Shi, Jun-Wen; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Wei [Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Zhang, Ting-Ting; Sun, Yong-Liang [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xu, Kang, E-mail: xukang1995@yahoo.com [Department of General Surgery, Sun Yat-sen Memorial Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510120 (China); Yao, Kai-Tai, E-mail: Yaokaitai@yahoo.com.cn [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Xiao, Dong, E-mail: Xiao_d@hotmail.com [Cancer Research Institute, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine and Laboratory Animal Center, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-9 can negatively or positively modulate interferon-induced gene expression. ► miR-9 can up-regulate major histocompatibility complex class I molecule expression. ► miR-9 can down-regulate the expression of interleukin-related genes. -- Abstract: The functions of miR-9 in some cancers are recently implicated in regulating proliferation, epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and tumor angiogenesis, etc. miR-9 is commonly down-regulated in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), but the exact roles of miR-9 dysregulation in the pathogenesis of NPC remains unclear. Therefore, we firstly used miR-9-expressing CNE2 cells to determine the effects of miR-9 overexpression on global gene expression profile by microarray analysis. Microarray-based gene expression data unexpectedly demonstrated a significant number of up- or down-regulated immune- and inflammation-related genes, including many well-known interferon (IFN)-induced genes (e.g., IFI44L, PSMB8, IRF5, PSMB10, IFI27, PSB9{sub H}UMAN, IFIT2, TRAIL, IFIT1, PSB8{sub H}UMAN, IRF1, B2M and GBP1), major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules (e.g., HLA-B, HLA-C, HLA-F and HLA-H) and interleukin (IL)-related genes (e.g., IL20RB, GALT, IL7, IL1B, IL11, IL1F8, IL1A, IL6 and IL7R), which was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Moreover, the overexpression of miR-9 with the miRNA mimics significantly up- or down-regulated the expression of above-mentioned IFN-inducible genes, MHC class I molecules and IL-related genes; on the contrary, miR-9 inhibition by anti-miR-9 inhibitor in CNE2 and 5–8F cells correspondingly decreased or increased the aforementioned immune- and inflammation-related genes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-9 can modulate the expression of IFN-induced genes and MHC class I molecules in human cancer cells, suggesting a novel role of miR-9 in linking inflammation and cancer, which remains to be fully characterized.

  4. How do CD4+ T cells detect and eliminate tumor cells that either lack or express MHC class II molecules?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Audun Werner Haabeth

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells contribute to tumor eradication, even in the absence of CD8+ T cells. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells can directly kill MHC class II positive tumor cells. More surprisingly, CD4+ T cells can indirectly eliminate tumor cells that lack MHC class II expression. Here, we review the mechanisms of direct and indirect CD4+ T cell-mediated elimination of tumor cells. An emphasis is put on T cell receptor (TCR transgenic models, where anti-tumor responses of naïve CD4+ T cells of defined specificity can be tracked. Some generalizations can tentatively be made. For both MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, presentation of tumor specific antigen by host antigen presenting cells (APCs appears to be required for CD4+ T cell priming. This has been extensively studied in a myeloma model (MOPC315, where host APCs in tumor-draining lymph nodes are primed with secreted tumor antigen. Upon antigen recognition, naïve CD4+ T cells differentiate into Th1 cells and migrate to the tumor. At the tumor site, the mechanisms for elimination of MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumor cells differ. In a TCR transgenic B16 melanoma model, MHCIIPOS melanoma cells are directly killed by cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in a perforin/granzyme B-dependent manner. By contrast, MHCIINEG myeloma cells are killed by IFN-g stimulated M1-like macrophages. In summary, while the priming phase of CD4+ T cells appears similar for MHCIIPOS and MHCIINEG tumors, the killing mechanisms are different. Unresolved issues and directions for future research are addressed.

  5. Human NK cells selective targeting of colon cancer-initiating cells: A role for natural cytotoxicity receptors and MHC class i molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Tallerico, Rossana

    2013-01-23

    Tumor cell populations have been recently proposed to be composed of two compartments: tumor-initiating cells characterized by a slow and asymmetrical growth, and the "differentiated" cancer cells with a fast and symmetrical growth. Cancer stem cells or cancer-initiating cells (CICs) play a crucial role in tumor recurrence. The resistance of CICs to drugs and irradiation often allows them to survive traditional therapy. NK cells are potent cytotoxic lymphocytes that can recognize tumor cells. In this study, we have analyzed the NK cell recognition of tumor target cells derived from the two cancer cell compartments of colon adenocarcinoma lesions. Our data demonstrate that freshly purified allogeneic NK cells can recognize and kill colorectal carcinoma- derived CICs whereas the non-CIC counterpart of the tumors (differentiated tumor cells), either autologous or allogeneic, is less susceptible to NK cells. This difference in the NK cell susceptibility correlates with higher expression on CICs of ligands for NKp30 and NKp44 in the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) group of activating NK receptors. In contrast, CICs express lower levels of MHC class I, known to inhibit NK recognition, on their surface than do the "differentiated" tumor cells. These data have been validated by confocal microscopy where NCR ligands and MHC class I molecule membrane distribution have been analyzed. Moreover, NK cell receptor blockade in cytotoxicity assays demonstrates that NCRs play a major role in the recognition of CIC targets. This study strengthens the idea that biology-based therapy harnessing NK cells could be an attractive opportunity in solid tumors. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Colostrum from cows immunized with a vaccine associated with bovine neonatal pancytopenia contains allo-antibodies that cross-react with human MHC-I molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahel Kasonta

    Full Text Available In 2006, a new haemorrhagic syndrome affecting newborn calves, Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP, was reported in southern Germany. It is characterized by severe bleeding, destruction of the red bone marrow, and a high case fatality rate. The syndrome is caused by alloreactive, maternal antibodies that are ingested by the calf with colostrum and result from a dam vaccination with one particular vaccine against Bovine-Viral-Diarrhoea-Virus. Because bovine colostrum is increasingly gaining interest as a dietary supplement for human consumption, the current study was initiated to elucidate whether BNP alloantibodies from BNP dams (i.e. animals that gave birth to a BNP-affected calf cross-react with human cells, which could pose a health hazard for human consumers of colostral products. The present study clearly demonstrates that BNP alloantibodies cross-react with human lymphocytes in vitro. In agreement with previous reports on BNP, the cross-reactive antibodies are specific for MHC-I molecules, and sensitize opsonised human cells for in vitro complement lysis. Cross-reactive antibodies are present in serum and colostrum of individual BNP dams. They can be traced in commercial colostrum powder manufactured from cows immunized with the vaccine associated with BNP, but are absent from commercial powder manufactured from colostrum excluding such vaccinated cows. In humans alloreactive, MHC-I specific antibodies are generally not believed to cause severe symptoms. However, to minimize any theoretical risk for human consumers, manufacturers of bovine colostrum for human consumption should consider using only colostrum from animals that have not been exposed to the vaccine associated with BNP.

  7. Evaluation of the responses of MHC class II molecule-expressing cells and macrophages to epoxy resin-based and 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based root canal sealers in rat subcutaneous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Yusuke; Shigetani, Yoshimi; Yoshiba, Kunihiko; Kaneko, Tomoatsu; Yoshiba, Nagako; Okiji, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecule-expressing cells and macrophages play a pivotal role in mediating the host tissue response to biomaterials. This study investigated the responses of these cells to epoxy resin-based and 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based endodontic sealers (AH Plus and MetaSEAL respectively) in rat connective tissue. Silicone tubes loaded with one of the sealers or solid silicone rods (control) were subcutaneously implanted in male Wistar rats for three time periods of 7, 14, or 28 days. Tissue specimens were immunoperoxidase-stained for MHC class II molecules and CD68 (a general macrophage marker). Results showed that AH Plus-implanted tissue displayed significantly more MHC class II-positive cells than the control at 14 and 28 days, whereas MetaSEAL-implanted tissue showed significantly more CD68-positive cells than both AH Plus-implanted tissue and the control at all time periods. It was concluded that the epoxy resin-based sealer induced the infiltration of MHC class II molecule-expressing cells, whereas 4-META-containing, methacrylate resin-based sealer elicited macrophage infiltration.

  8. MHC class I molecules with Superenhanced CD8 binding properties bypass the requirement for cognate TCR recognition and nonspecifically activate CTLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; Clement, Mathew; Lissina, Anna; Edwards, Emily S J; Ladell, Kristin; Ekeruche, Julia; Hewitt, Rachel E; Laugel, Bruno; Gostick, Emma; Cole, David K; Debets, Reno; Berrevoets, Cor; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2010-04-01

    CD8(+) CTLs are essential for effective immune defense against intracellular microbes and neoplasia. CTLs recognize short peptide fragments presented in association with MHC class I (MHCI) molecules on the surface of infected or dysregulated cells. Ag recognition involves the binding of both TCR and CD8 coreceptor to a single ligand (peptide MHCI [pMHCI]). The TCR/pMHCI interaction confers Ag specificity, whereas the pMHCI/CD8 interaction mediates enhanced sensitivity to Ag. Striking biophysical differences exist between the TCR/pMHCI and pMHCI/CD8 interactions; indeed, the pMHCI/CD8 interaction can be >100-fold weaker than the cognate TCR/pMHCI interaction. In this study, we show that increasing the strength of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction by approximately 15-fold results in nonspecific, cognate Ag-independent pMHCI tetramer binding at the cell surface. Furthermore, pMHCI molecules with superenhanced affinity for CD8 activate CTLs in the absence of a specific TCR/pMHCI interaction to elicit a full range of effector functions, including cytokine/chemokine release, degranulation and proliferation. Thus, the low solution binding affinity of the pMHCI/CD8 interaction is essential for the maintenance of CTL Ag specificity.

  9. Cell surface expression of MR1B, a splice variant of the MHC class I-related molecule MR1, revealed with antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hisateru; Tsukamoto, Kentaro; Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2014-01-10

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related molecule, MR1, is highly conserved in mammals and can present bacteria-derived vitamin B metabolites to mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, possibly having important defense function in the microbial infection. MR1B is a splice variant of MR1 and possesses an intriguing domain structure with only two extracellular domains resembling some NKG2D ligand molecules. Thus far, cell surface expression of MR1B could not be analyzed with flow cytometry due to a lack of appropriate antibodies reactive with MR1B. Here we clarified the expression of MR1B recombinant protein on the cell surface of the transfected cells by flow cytometry analyses using the antiserum against MR1. Consistently, MR1B tagged with FLAG peptide at the N-terminus also could be detected with anti-FLAG monoclonal antibodies. Our result showed that MR1B can be recognized on the cell surface by macromolecules such as antibodies, indicating its potential of interaction with certain receptor(s). We discuss possibility of interaction of MR1B and/or the full-length MR1 with some receptor(s) other than αβ T cell receptor (TCR) of MAIT cells based on the highly conserved characteristic residues of the ligand-binding domains of MR1 and its MAIT cells αβTCR footprints. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets...... is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  11. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka

    2010-01-01

    .3%) of the sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide...

  12. Sex-Associated Expression of Co-Stimulatory Molecules CD80, CD86, and Accessory Molecules, PDL-1, PDL-2 and MHC-II, in F480+ Macrophages during Murine Cysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Togno-Peirce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are critically involved in the interaction between T. crassiceps and the murine host immune system. Also, a strong gender-associated susceptibility to murine cysticercosis has been reported. Here, we examined the sex-associated expression of molecules MHC-II, CD80, CD86, PD-L1, and PD-L2 on peritoneal F4/80hi macrophages of BALB/c mice infected with Taenia crassiceps. Peritoneal macrophages from both sexes of mice were exposed to T. crassiceps total extract (TcEx. BALB/c Females mice recruit higher number of macrophages to the peritoneum. Macrophages from infected animals show increased expression of PDL2 and CD80 that was dependent from the sex of the host. These findings suggest that macrophage recruitment at early time points during T. crassiceps infection is a possible mechanism that underlies the differential sex-associated susceptibility displayed by the mouse gender.

  13. Transfected HEK293 cells expressing functional recombinant intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)--a receptor associated with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Barbati, Zachary R; Craig, Alister; Hviid, Lars; Jensen, Anja T R

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is a membrane-bound glycoprotein expressed on endothelial cells and cells of the immune system. Human ICAM-1 mediates adhesion and migration of leucocytes, and is implicated in inflammatory pathologies, autoimmune diseases and in many cancer processes. Additionally, ICAM-1 acts as receptor for pathogens like human rhinovirus and Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. A group of related P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) domains, the DBLβ, mediates ICAM-1 binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. This ICAM‑1-binding phenotype has been suggested to be involved in the development of cerebral malaria. However, more studies identifying cross-reactive antibody and ICAM-1-binding epitopes and the establishment of a clinical link between DBLβ expression and e.g. cerebral malaria are needed before the DBLβ domains can be put forward as vaccine candidates and go into clinical trials. Such studies require availability of functional recombinant ICAM-1 in large quantities. In this study, we compared recombinant ICAM-1 expressed in HEK293 and COS-7 cells with mouse myeloma NS0 ICAM-1 purchased from a commercial vendor in terms of protein purity, yield, fold, ability to bind DBLβ, and relative cost. We present a HEK293 cell-based, high-yield expression and purification scheme for producing inexpensive, functional ICAM‑1. ICAM-1 expressed in HEK293 is applicable to malaria research and can also be useful in other research fields.

  14. Facts on the fragmentation of antigens in presenting cells, on the association of antigen fragments with MHC molecules in cell-free systems, and speculation on the cell biology of antigen processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werdelin, O; Mouritsen, S; Petersen, B L

    1988-01-01

    The processing of a protein antigen is a multi-step event taking place in antigen-presenting cells. Processing is a prerequisite for the recognition of most antigens by T lymphocytes. The antigen is ingested by endocytosis, transported to an acid cellular compartment and subjected to proteolytic...... fragmentation. Some of the antigen fragments bind to MHC class II molecules and are transported to the surface of the antigen-presenting cell where the actual presentation to T lymphocytes occurs. The nature of the processed antigen, how and where it is derived and subsequently becomes associated with MHC...... molecules are the questions discussed in this review. To us, the entire concept of processing has appeal not only because it explains some hitherto well-established, but poorly understood, phenomena such as the fact that T lymphocytes focus their attention entirely upon antigens on other cells. It has...

  15. MHC class II molecules deliver costimulatory signals in human T cells through a functional linkage with IL-2-receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Kanner, S B; Ledbetter, J A

    1993-01-01

    a regulatory function in T cell activation. Here, we show that cross-linking HLA-DR and -DP but not -DQ molecules by immobilized mAb enhanced proliferative T cell responses to IL-2. In contrast, class II stimulation had no effect on IL-4-induced proliferation. The costimulatory effect was most pronounced...... at low concentrations of IL-2, was blocked by IL-2R mAb, and was at least partly mediated through an up-regulation of IL-2 high affinity receptors. As expected, activation of IL-2R by IL-2 induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins including p56lck, and class II cross-linking by mAb induced...... tyrosine phosphorylation of specific substrates including PLC-gamma 1. Combined stimulation of IL-2R and class II molecules had an additive effect on tyrosine phosphorylation. Pretreatment of T cells with a protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor, herbimycin A, inhibited IL-2 and class II-induced proliferation...

  16. MHC Class II epitope predictive algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Buus, S

    2010-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules sample peptides from the extracellular space, allowing the immune system to detect the presence of foreign microbes from this compartment. To be able to predict the immune response to given pathogens, a number of methods have been...... developed to predict peptide-MHC binding. However, few methods other than the pioneering TEPITOPE/ProPred method have been developed for MHC-II. Despite recent progress in method development, the predictive performance for MHC-II remains significantly lower than what can be obtained for MHC-I. One reason...... in the predictions. All attempts to make ab initio predictions based on protein structure have failed to reach predictive performances similar to those that can be obtained by data-driven methods. Thousands of different MHC-II alleles exist in humans. Recently developed pan-specific methods have been able to make...

  17. Genome-wide association study reveals class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule gene (CRTAM) variants interact with vitamin D levels to affect asthma exacerbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Rose; Litonjua, Augusto A; Tantisira, Kelan G; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Klanderman, Barbara J; Celedón, Juan C; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel E; Weiss, Scott T

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been shown that vitamin D deficiency can increase asthma development and severity and that variations in vitamin D receptor genes are associated with asthma susceptibility. We sought to find genetic factors that might interact with vitamin D levels to affect the risk of asthma exacerbation. We conducted a genome-wide study of gene-vitamin D interaction on asthma exacerbations using population-based and family-based approaches on 403 subjects and trios from the Childhood Asthma Management Program. Twenty-three polymorphisms with significant interactions were studied in a replication analysis in 584 children from a Costa Rican cohort. We identified 3 common variants in the class I MHC-restricted T cell-associated molecule gene (CRTAM) that were associated with an increased rate of asthma exacerbations based on the presence of a low circulating vitamin D level. These results were replicated in a second independent population (unadjusted combined interaction, P = .00028-.00097; combined odds ratio, 3.28-5.38). One variant, rs2272094, is a nonsynonymous coding polymorphism of CRTAM. Functional studies on cell lines confirmed the interaction of vitamin D and rs2272094 on CRTAM expression. CRTAM is highly expressed in activated human CD8(+) and natural killer T cells, both of which have been implicated in asthmatic patients. The findings highlight an important gene-environment interaction that elucidates the role of vitamin D and CD8(+) and natural killer T cells in asthma exacerbation in a genome-wide gene-environment interaction study that has been replicated in an independent population. The results suggest the potential importance of maintaining adequate vitamin D levels in subsets of high-risk asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Structural properties of MHC class II ligands, implications for the prediction of MHC class II epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper Winther Jørgensen

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC-II molecules sample peptides from the extracellular space allowing the immune system to detect the presence of foreign microbes from this compartment. Prediction of MHC class II ligands is complicated by the open binding cleft of the MHC class II molecule, allowing binding of peptides extending out of the binding groove. Furthermore, only a few HLA-DR alleles have been characterized with a sufficient number of peptides (100-200 peptides per allele to derive accurate description of their binding motif. Little work has been performed characterizing structural properties of MHC class II ligands. Here, we perform one such large-scale analysis. A large set of SYFPEITHI MHC class II ligands covering more than 20 different HLA-DR molecules was analyzed in terms of their secondary structure and surface exposure characteristics in the context of the native structure of the corresponding source protein. We demonstrated that MHC class II ligands are significantly more exposed and have significantly more coil content than other peptides in the same protein with similar predicted binding affinity. We next exploited this observation to derive an improved prediction method for MHC class II ligands by integrating prediction of MHC- peptide binding with prediction of surface exposure and protein secondary structure. This combined prediction method was shown to significantly outperform the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction method when used to identify MHC class II ligands. We also tried to integrate N- and O-glycosylation in our prediction methods but this additional information was found not to improve prediction performance. In summary, these findings strongly suggest that local structural properties influence antigen processing and/or the accessibility of peptides to the MHC class II molecule.

  19. Macrophages present pinocytosed exogenous antigen via MHC class I whereas antigen ingested by receptor-mediated endocytosis is presented via MHC class II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peppelenbosch, M. P.; DeSmedt, M.; Pynaert, G.; van Deventer, S. J.; Grooten, J.

    2000-01-01

    Macrophages present exogenous Ag either via MHC class I or MHC class II molecules. We investigated whether the mode of hemagglutinin (HA) uptake influences the class of MHC molecule by which this Ag is presented. Normally, HA is ingested by receptor-mediated endocytosis, but this may be switched to

  20. Innate lymphoid cells and the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, M L; Colonna, M

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new class of immune cells that include natural killer (NK) cells and appear to be the innate counterparts to CD4(+) helper T cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells based on developmental and functional similarities. Like T cells, both NK cells and other ILCs also show connections to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In human and mouse, NK cells recognize and respond to classical and nonclassical MHC I molecules as well as structural homologues, whereas mouse ILCs have recently been shown to express MHC II. We describe the history of MHC I recognition by NK cells and discuss emerging roles for MHC II expression by ILC subsets, making comparisons between both mouse and human when possible. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. MHC2SKpan: a novel kernel based approach for pan-specific MHC class II peptide binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Linyuan; Luo, Cheng; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2013-01-01

    Computational methods for the prediction of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II binding peptides play an important role in facilitating the understanding of immune recognition and the process of epitope discovery. To develop an effective computational method, we need to consider two important characteristics of the problem: (1) the length of binding peptides is highly flexible; and (2) MHC molecules are extremely polymorphic and for the vast majority of them there are no sufficient training data. We develop a novel string kernel MHC2SK (MHC-II String Kernel) method to measure the similarities among peptides with variable lengths. By considering the distinct features of MHC-II peptide binding prediction problem, MHC2SK differs significantly from the recently developed kernel based method, GS (Generic String) kernel, in the way of computing similarities. Furthermore, we extend MHC2SK to MHC2SKpan for pan-specific MHC-II peptide binding prediction by leveraging the binding data of various MHC molecules. MHC2SK outperformed GS in allele specific prediction using a benchmark dataset, which demonstrates the effectiveness of MHC2SK. Furthermore, we evaluated the performance of MHC2SKpan using various benckmark data sets from several different perspectives: Leave-one-allele-out (LOO), 5-fold cross validation as well as independent data testing. MHC2SKpan has achieved comparable performance with NetMHCIIpan-2.0 and outperformed NetMHCIIpan-1.0, TEPITOPEpan and MultiRTA, being statistically significant. MHC2SKpan can be freely accessed at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC2SKpan/index.html.

  2. High-risk human papillomavirus E7 expression reduces cell-surface MHC class I molecules and increases susceptibility to natural killer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bottley, G; Watherston, O G; Hiew, Y-L

    2007-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major causative agent of cervical cancer and the E6 and E7 genes encode the major HPV oncoproteins. The E7 protein from high-risk HPV types alters cell cycle progression and represses genes encoding components of the antigen-presentation pathway, suggesting...... a role for E7 in tumour immune evasion. We show that knockdown of E7 expression in HPV16- and HPV18-transformed cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference increased expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I at the cell surface and reduced susceptibility of these cells to natural...

  3. MHC Region and Its Related Disease Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi

    involved in the above diseases have not, with very few exceptions, been identified. Currently popular next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology, comprising massively parallel single-molecule sequencing, can generate billions of bases from amplified single DNA molecules within several days, holding great...... detection as well as HLA gene typing and large structural variation detection using optical mapping technic, to provide comprehensive and accurate information of the MHC region and apply them into disease causal mutation’s fine-mapping....... degree of polymorphisms within the MHC, the detection of variants in this region, and diagnostic HLA typing, still lacks a coherent, standardized, cost effective and high coverage protocol of clinical quality and reliability. And owing to marked linkage disequilibrium of MHC region, genes/mutations...

  4. Ia-specific mixed leukocyte reactive T cell hybridomas: analysis of their specificity by using purified class II MHC molecules in synthetic membrane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeshott, C M; Chesnut, R W; Kubo, R T; Grammer, S F; Jenis, D M; Grey, H M

    1986-04-15

    This study was undertaken to determine the nature of the antigens recognized in allogeneic and syngeneic mixed leukocyte reactions (MLR). Specifically, we wished to determine whether Ia antigens alone were recognized by MLR-reactive T cells, or whether the specificity was determined by the corecognition of non-MHC antigens together with syngeneic or allogeneic Ia. To do this we used 11 T cell hybrids that were characterized as being specific for Iad and were tested their capacity to respond to isolated I-Ad or I-Ed that had been incorporated into liposomes and had bound to the surface of glass beads. Of nine alloreactive T cell hybrids (five I-Ad-and four I-Ed-specific), seven were shown to be responsive to the relevant isolated Ia antigen on glass beads. Also, two of two syngeneic I-Ad-specific T cell hybrids responded to I-Ad on the glass beads. One of the two alloreactive T cell hybrids that failed to respond to the relevant Ia antigen on glass beads was shown to be specific for an antigen in fetal calf serum (FCS) that was recognized in the context of the allo-Ia antigen (I-Ed), because when intact accessory cells were used, a response by this hybrid was only observed when FCS was present in the assay culture medium or when the accessory cells were pre-pulsed with FCS. The possible involvement of FCS antigens and non-Ia accessory cell antigens in the stimulation of the nine T cell hybrids that responded to isolated Ia on glass beads was evaluated. T cell hybrids that were grown and were tested in serum free medium were still capable of reacting to Ia on beads. The isolated Ia preparations used were greater than 90% pure, and their capacity to stimulate the T cell hybrids did not correlate with the degree of contamination with non-Ia proteins. We conclude from these studies that the majority of T cells that respond to allogeneic or syngeneic Ia bearing stimulator cells are specific for the Ia antigens themselves, and do not require the co-recognition of other

  5. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents.

  6. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC50 determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2014-01-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC50 (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC50 value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC50 is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes. PMID:24583195

  7. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC Class I complex stability, a correlate of T cell immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    Binding of peptides to MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules is the most selective event in the processing and presentation of Ags to CTL, and insights into the mechanisms that govern peptide-MHC-I binding should facilitate our understanding of CTL biology. Peptide-MHC-I interactions have traditionally...... been quantified by the strength of the interaction, that is, the binding affinity, yet it has been shown that the stability of the peptide-MHC-I complex is a better correlate of immunogenicity compared with binding affinity. In this study, we have experimentally analyzed peptide-MHC-I complex stability...

  9. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    , and also new structures of MHC class I molecules with a bound peptide have been published. In order to test if the NetMHCpan method can be improved by integrating this novel information, we created new pseudo-sequence definitions for the MHC-binding cleft environment from sequence and structural analyses...... definition of the MHC-binding environment including information from non-human species....

  10. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T

    2002-01-01

    Many different assays for measuring peptide-MHC interactions have been suggested over the years. Yet, there is no generally accepted standard method available. We have recently generated preoxidized recombinant MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) which can be purified to homogeneity under denaturing...... dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards...

  11. Tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is an additional component of the MHC class I presentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Louise H; Hermann, Clemens; Boname, Jessica M

    2013-01-01

    Tapasin is an integral component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC) important for efficient peptide loading onto MHC class I molecules. We investigated the function of the tapasin-related protein, TAPBPR. Like tapasin, TAPBPR is widely expressed, IFN-γ-inducible, and binds to MHC class I coupled...... with β2-microglobulin in the endoplasmic reticulum. In contrast to tapasin, TAPBPR does not bind ERp57 or calreticulin and is not an integral component of the PLC. β2-microglobulin is essential for the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I. However, the association between TAPBPR and MHC class I...... occurs in the absence of a functional PLC, suggesting peptide is not required. Expression of TAPBPR decreases the rate of MHC class I maturation through the secretory pathway and prolongs the association of MHC class I on the PLC. The TAPBPR:MHC class I complex trafficks through the Golgi apparatus...

  12. One-pot, mix-and-read peptide-MHC tetramers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leisner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL recognize complexes of peptide ligands and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules presented at the surface of Antigen Presenting Cells (APC. Detection and isolation of CTL's are of importance for research on CTL immunity, and development of vaccines and adoptive immune therapy. Peptide-MHC tetramers have become important reagents for detection and enumeration of specific CTL's. Conventional peptide-MHC-tetramer production involves recombinant MHC production, in vitro refolding, biotinylation and tetramerization; each step followed by various biochemical steps such as chromatographic purification, concentration etc. Such cumbersome production protocols have limited dissemination and restricted availability of peptide-MHC tetramers effectively precluding large-scale screening strategies involving many different peptide-MHC tetramers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an approach whereby any given tetramer specificity can be produced within 2 days with very limited effort and hands-on time. The strategy is based on the isolation of correctly oxidized, in vivo biotinylated recombinant MHC I heavy chain (HC. Such biotinylated MHC I HC molecules can be refolded in vitro, tetramerized with streptavidin, and used for specific T cell staining-all in a one-pot reaction without any intervening purification steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed an efficient "one-pot, mix-and-read" strategy for peptide-MHC tetramer generation, and demonstrated specific T cell straining comparable to a commercially available MHC-tetramer. Here, seven peptide-MHC tetramers representing four different human MHC (HLA class I proteins have been generated. The technique should be readily extendable to any binding peptide and pre-biotinylated MHC (at this time we have over 40 different pre-biotinylated HLA proteins. It is simple, robust, and versatile technique with a very broad application

  13. MHC-dependent desensitization of intrinsic anti-self reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubala, Cristan M; Lamerato-Kozicki, Angela R; Borakove, Michelle; Lang, Julie; Gardner, Lori A; Coffey, David; Helm, Karen M; Schaack, Jerome; Baier, Monika; Cutter, Gary R; Bellgrau, Donald; Modiano, Jaime F

    2009-02-01

    The survival of naive T cells is compromised in the absence of molecules encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) while antigen-experienced T cells survive. We hypothesized that survival pressures in an in vivo, MHC-deficient environment would permit enrichment of less frequent antigen-experienced autoreactive cells at the expense of the majority of antigen naive T cells. To test this hypothesis, we generated MHC class I- and class II-deficient mice in NOD and C57Bl/6 (B6) backgrounds, and examined the capacity of adoptively transferred autoimmune-prone NOD T cells, or non-autoimmune prone naive B6 T cells, respectively, to reject transplanted wild-type pancreatic islets or transplantable tumors in the MHC-deficient mice. In the MHC-deficient environment, CD4 T cells acquired self-hostile properties (islet rejection and tumor invasion) that were independent from their genetic propensity for autoreactivity, while CD8 T cells required appropriate prior exposure to antigen in order to survive and function (reject tumor) in this environment; however, disengagement of Tob1, a negative regulator of proliferation, led to a reverse phenotype with regard to persistence of CD4 and CD8 T cells in the MHC-deficient environment. Our data suggest that self-peptide/MHC interactions have dual roles to facilitate survival and restrain autoreactivity, thus acting as integral components of an intrinsic network of negative regulation that maintains tolerance.

  14. Sibling rivalry: competition between MHC class II family members inhibits immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Lisa K; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules in the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen-presenting cells is catalyzed by human leukocyte antigen-DM (HLA-DM) and modulated by HLA-DO. In a structural study in this issue, Guce et al. show that HLA-DO is an MHC class II mimic and functions as a competitive and essentially irreversible inhibitor of HLA-DM activity, thereby inhibiting MHC class II antigen presentation.

  15. Virus encoded MHC-like decoys diversify the inhibitory KIR repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Carrillo-Bustamante

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self. Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV is able to evade NK cell responses by coding "decoy" molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules.

  16. Virus Encoded MHC-Like Decoys Diversify the Inhibitory KIR Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Bustamante, Paola; Keşmir, Can; de Boer, Rob J.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self). Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) is able to evade NK cell responses by coding “decoy” molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules. PMID:24130473

  17. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-01-01

    T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role in the deve......T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role...... detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions....

  18. MHC2MIL: a novel multiple instance learning based method for MHC-II peptide binding prediction by considering peptide flanking region and residue positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Qian, Mingjie; Huang, Xiaodi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2014-01-01

    Computational prediction of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) binding peptides can assist researchers in understanding the mechanism of immune systems and developing peptide based vaccines. Although many computational methods have been proposed, the performance of these methods are far from satisfactory. The difficulty of MHC-II peptide binding prediction comes mainly from the large length variation of binding peptides. We develop a novel multiple instance learning based method called MHC2MIL, in order to predict MHC-II binding peptides. We deem each peptide in MHC2MIL as a bag, and some substrings of the peptide as the instances in the bag. Unlike previous multiple instance learning based methods that consider only instances of fixed length 9 (9 amino acids), MHC2MIL is able to deal with instances of both lengths of 9 and 11 (11 amino acids), simultaneously. As such, MHC2MIL incorporates important information in the peptide flanking region. For measuring the distances between different instances, furthermore, MHC2MIL explicitly highlights the amino acids in some important positions. Experimental results on a benchmark dataset have shown that, the performance of MHC2MIL is significantly improved by considering the instances of both 9 and 11 amino acids, as well as by emphasizing amino acids at key positions in the instance. The results are consistent with those reported in the literature on MHC-II peptide binding. In addition to five important positions (1, 4, 6, 7 and 9) for HLA(human leukocyte antigen, the name of MHC in Humans) DR peptide binding, we also find that position 2 may play some roles in the binding process. By using 5-fold cross validation on the benchmark dataset, MHC2MIL outperforms two state-of-the-art methods of MHC2SK and NN-align with being statistically significant, on 12 HLA DP and DQ molecules. In addition, it achieves comparable performance with MHC2SK and NN-align on 14 HLA DR molecules. MHC2MIL is freely available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/service/MHC

  19. Systematic Characterisation of Cellular Localisation and Expression Profiles of Proteins Containing MHC Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Weinhold, Nils

    2009-01-01

    Background: Presentation of peptides on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules is the cornerstone in immune system activation and increased knowledge of the characteristics of MHC ligands and their source proteins is highly desirable. Methodology/Principal Finding: In the present large-...

  20. Peptide specific expansion of CD8(+) T cells by recombinant plate bound MHC/peptide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben G W; Buus, Soren; Thorn, Mette

    2009-01-01

    to in vitro T cell stimulation was investigated. By use of an antigenic peptide derived from the cytomegalovirus (CMVp) we tested the stimulatory efficacy of recombinant plate bound MHC molecules (PB-MHC), being immobilized in culture plates. A single stimulation of non-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear...

  1. MHC class I is functionally associated with antigen receptors in human T and B lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Jacoby, B F; Skov, S

    1996-01-01

    We have studied the antibody-induced effect of cross-linking the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) in human T leukemic cells (Jurkat) and human B lymphoma cells (Solubo, Burkitts lymphoma) on intracellular [Ca2+]i levels. The increase in [Ca2+]i after MHC-I cross-linking in Jurkat...... following cross-linking. Second, threshold levels for activation through antigen receptors in T and B cells are dependent on or determined by the actual numbers of MHC-I complexes present in the cell membrane. Thus the present data strongly point to a new, physiological role for MHC-I molecules in T and B...

  2. Gapped sequence alignment using artificial neural networks: application to the MHC class I system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    . On this relatively simple system, we developed a sequence alignment method based on artificial neural networks that allows insertions and deletions in the alignment. Results: We show that prediction methods based on alignments that include insertions and deletions have significantly higher performance than methods...... the length profile of different MHC molecules, and quantified the reduction of the experimental effort required to identify potential epitopes using our prediction algorithm. Availability and implementation: The NetMHC-4.0 method for the prediction of peptide-MHC class I binding affinity using gapped...... sequence alignment is publicly available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHC-4.0....

  3. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  4. MHC class I loci of the Bar-Headed goose (Anser indicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglong Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I proteins mediate functions in anti-pathogen defense. MHC diversity has already been investigated by many studies in model avian species, but here we chose the bar-headed goose, a worldwide migrant bird, as a non-model avian species. Sequences from exons encoding the peptide-binding region (PBR of MHC class I molecules were isolated from liver genomic DNA, to investigate variation in these genes. These are the first MHC class I partial sequences of the bar-headed goose to be reported. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of at least four MHC class I genes, which share great similarity with those of the goose and duck. A phylogenetic analysis of bar-headed goose, goose and duck MHC class I sequences using the NJ method supports the idea that they all cluster within the anseriforms clade.

  5. Evaluating the Role of HLA-DM in MHC Class II-Peptide Association Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Maben, Zachary J; Becerra, Aniuska; Stern, Lawrence J

    2015-07-15

    Ag presentation by MHC class II (MHC II) molecules to CD4(+) T cells plays a key role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response. Loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC II is catalyzed by HLA-DM (DM), a nonclassical MHC II molecule. The mechanism of DM-facilitated peptide loading is an outstanding problem in the field of Ag presentation. In this study, we systemically explored possible kinetic mechanisms for DM-catalyzed peptide association by measuring real-time peptide association kinetics using fluorescence polarization assays and comparing the experimental data with numerically modeled peptide association reactions. We found that DM does not facilitate peptide association by stabilizing peptide-free MHC II against aggregation. Moreover, DM does not promote transition of an inactive peptide-averse conformation of MHC II to an active peptide-receptive conformation. Instead, DM forms an intermediate with MHC II that binds peptide with faster kinetics than MHC II in the absence of DM. In the absence of peptides, interaction of MHC II with DM leads to inactivation and formation of a peptide-averse form. This study provides novel insights into how DM efficiently catalyzes peptide loading during Ag presentation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  8. Extensive diversification of MHC in Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC) reveals novel splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Chen, Zhong-yuan; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang-di; Liao, Xiang-yong; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-02-01

    A series of MHC alleles (including 26 class IA, 27 class IIA, and 17 class IIB) were identified from Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC). These genes are similar to classical MHC molecules in terms of characteristic domains, functional residues, deduced tertiary structures and genetic diversity. The majority of variation between alleles is found in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), which is driven by positive Darwinian selection. The coexistence of two isoforms in MHC IA, IIA, and IIB alleles are shown: one full-length transcript and one novel splice variant. Despite lake of the external domains, these variants exhibit similar subcellular localization with the full-length transcripts. Moreover, the expression of MHC isoforms are up-regulated upon in vivo and in vitro stimulation with Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), suggesting their potential roles in the immune response. The results provide insights into understanding MHC variation and function in this ancient and endangered urodele amphibian. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting...... and deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29 %. The peptide-binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and Mamu-B*010...... in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby warrants...

  10. NETMHCSTAB - predicting stability of peptide-MHC-I complexes; impacts for cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper W.; Rasmussen, Michael; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules play an essential role in the cellular immune response, presenting peptides to cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) allowing the immune system to scrutinize ongoing intracellular production of proteins. In the early 1990s, immunogenicity...... and stability of the peptide-MHC-I (pMHC-I) complex were shown to be correlated. At that time, measuring stability was cumbersome and time consuming and only small data sets were analysed. Here, we investigate this fairly unexplored area on a large scale compared with earlier studies. A recent small-scale study...... demonstrated that pMHC-I complex stability was a better correlate of CTL immunogenicity than peptide-MHC-I affinity. We here extended this study and analysed a total of 5509 distinct peptide stability measurements covering 10 different HLA class I molecules. Artificial neural networks were used to construct...

  11. Evaluating the role of HLA-DM in MHC II-peptide association reactions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liusong; Maben, Zachary; Becerra, Aniuska; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex class II molecules (MHC II) to CD4+ T cells plays a key role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response. Loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC II is catalyzed by HLA-DM (DM), a non-classical MHC II molecule. The mechanism of DM-facilitated peptide loading is an outstanding problem in the field of antigen presentation. In this study we systemically explored possible kinetic mechanisms for DM-catalyzed peptide association, by measuring real time peptide association kinetics using fluorescence polarization assays and comparing the experimental data with numerically modeled peptide association reactions. We found that DM does not facilitate peptide association by stabilizing peptide-free MHC II against aggregation. Moreover, DM does not promote transition of an inactive peptide-averse conformation of MHC II to an active peptide-receptive conformation. Instead, DM forms an intermediate with MHC II that binds peptide with faster kinetics than MHC II in the absence of DM. In the absence of peptides, interaction of MHC II with DM leads to inactivation and formation of a peptide-averse form. This study provides novel insights into how DM efficiently catalyzes peptide loading during antigen presentation. PMID:26062997

  12. Transcriptional profiling of MHC class I genes in rainbow trout infected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Eric D.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler , Paul A.; Hansen, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are important mediators of cell-mediated immunity in vertebrates. MHC class IA molecules are important for host anti-viral immunity as they present intracellular antigens and regulate natural killer cell (NK) activity. MHC class Ib molecules on the other hand are less understood and have demonstrated diverse immune and non-immune functions in mammals. Rainbow trout possess a single classical MHC IA locus (Onmy-UBA) that is believed to function similar to that of mammalian MHC class Ia. Numerous MHC class Ib genes with undetermined functions have also been described in trout. Here we utilize quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) techniques to survey the levels of basal and inducible transcription for selected trout MHC class Ib genes, sIgM and sentinels of IFN induction in response to viral infection. Basal transcription of all the class Ib genes examined in this study was lower than Onmy-UBA in naïve fish. UBA, along with all of the non-classical genes were induced in fish infected with virus but not in control fish. Our results support a non-classical designation for the majority of the class IB genes surveyed in this study based upon expression levels while also indicating that they may play an important role in anti-viral immunity in trout.

  13. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J

    2009-01-01

    MHC molecule. The potentially unique specificity of the majority of HLA alleles that have been identified to date remains uncharacterized. Likewise, only a limited number of chimpanzee and rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules have been characterized experimentally. Here, we present NetMHCpan-2.......0, a method that generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-MHC class I interaction. NetMHCpan-2.0 has been trained on the hitherto largest set of quantitative MHC binding data available, covering HLA-A and HLA-B, as well as chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, gorilla, and mouse MHC class I...... molecules. We show that the NetMHCpan-2.0 method can accurately predict binding to uncharacterized HLA molecules, including HLA-C and HLA-G. Moreover, NetMHCpan-2.0 is demonstrated to accurately predict peptide binding to chimpanzee and macaque MHC class I molecules. The power of NetMHCpan-2.0 to guide...

  14. CD1 and major histocompatibility complex II molecules follow a different course during dendritic cell maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, Nicole N.; Sugita, Masahiko; Fluitsma, Donna M.; Cao, Xaiochun; Schreibelt, Gerty; Brenner, Michael B.; Peters, Peter J.

    2003-01-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells is accompanied by the redistribution of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules from the lysosomal MHC class IT compartment to the plasma membrane to mediate presentation of peptide antigens. Besides MHC molecules, dendritic cells also express CD1

  15. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule plays a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response to infections. MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T cells, whereas MHC class II molecules stimulate cellular and humoral immunity through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting this binding event. Results Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. Conclusion The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.0.

  16. TAPBPR alters MHC class I peptide presentation by functioning as a peptide exchange catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Clemens; van Hateren, Andy; Trautwein, Nico; Neerincx, Andreas; Duriez, Patrick J; Stevanović, Stefan; Trowsdale, John; Deane, Janet E; Elliott, Tim; Boyle, Louise H

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the antigen presentation pathway has recently been enhanced with the identification that the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is a second major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-specific chaperone. We sought to determine whether, like tapasin, TAPBPR can also influence MHC class I peptide selection by functioning as a peptide exchange catalyst. We show that TAPBPR can catalyse the dissociation of peptides from peptide-MHC I complexes, enhance the loading of peptide-receptive MHC I molecules, and discriminate between peptides based on affinity in vitro. In cells, the depletion of TAPBPR increased the diversity of peptides presented on MHC I molecules, suggesting that TAPBPR is involved in restricting peptide presentation. Our results suggest TAPBPR binds to MHC I in a peptide-receptive state and, like tapasin, works to enhance peptide optimisation. It is now clear there are two MHC class I specific peptide editors, tapasin and TAPBPR, intimately involved in controlling peptide presentation to the immune system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09617.001 PMID:26439010

  17. NetCTLpan: pan-specific MHC class I pathway epitope predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lundegaard, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Reliable predictions of immunogenic peptides are essential in rational vaccine design and can minimize the experimental effort needed to identify epitopes. In this work, we describe a pan-specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitope predictor, NetCTLpan. The method integrates...... ligands and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes. It has been reported that MHC molecules are differentially dependent on TAP transport and proteasomal cleavage. Here, we did not find any consistent signs of such MHC dependencies, and the NetCTLpan method is implemented with fixed weights for proteasomal...... cleavage and TAP transport for all MHC molecules. The predictive performance of the NetCTLpan method was shown to outperform other state-of-the-art CTL epitope prediction methods. Our results further confirm the importance of using full-type human leukocyte antigen restriction information when identifying...

  18. Patterns of MHC-G-Like and MHC-B Diversification in New World Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S Lugo

    Full Text Available The MHC class I (MHC-I region in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini has remained relatively understudied. To evaluate the diversification patterns and transcription behavior of MHC-I in Platyrrhini, we first analyzed public genomic sequences from the MHC-G-like subregion in Saimiri boliviensis, Ateles geoffroyi and Callicebus moloch, and from the MHC-B subregion in Saimiri boliviensis. While S. boliviensis showed multiple copies of both MHC-G-like (10 and -B (15 loci, A. geoffroyi and C. moloch had only three and four MHC-G-like genes, respectively, indicating that not all Platyrrhini species have expanded their MHC-I loci. We then sequenced MHC-G-like and -B cDNAs from nine Platyrrhini species, recovering two to five unique cDNAs per individual for both loci classes. In two Saguinus species, however, no MHC-B cDNAs were found. In phylogenetic trees, MHC-G-like cDNAs formed genus-specific clusters whereas the MHC-B cDNAs grouped by Platyrrhini families, suggesting a more rapid diversification of the former. Furthermore, cDNA sequencing in 12 capuchin monkeys showed that they transcribe at least four MHC-G-like and five MHC-B polymorphic genes, showing haplotypic diversity for gene copy number and signatures of positive natural selection at the peptide binding region. Finally, a quantitative index for MHC:KIR affinity was proposed and tested to predict putative interacting pairs. Altogether, our data indicate that i MHC-I genes has expanded differentially among Platyrrhini species, ii Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets MHC-B loci have limited or tissue-specific expression, iii MHC-G-like genes have diversified more rapidly than MHC-B genes, and iv the MHC-I diversity is generated mainly by genetic polymorphism and gene copy number variation, likely promoted by natural selection for ligand binding.

  19. The P9 pocket of HLA-DQ2 (non-Aspbeta57) has no particular preference for negatively charged anchor residues found in other type 1 diabetes-predisposing non-Aspbeta57 MHC class II molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarsten, H; Paulsen, G; Johansen, B H

    1998-01-01

    -predisposing class II molecules. The molecular explanation for such a phenomenon could be that class II beta chains with Aspbeta57 form a salt bridge between Aspbeta57 and a conserved Arg of the a chain, whereas in non-Aspbeta57 molecules the Arg is unopposed and free to interact with negatively charged P9 peptide...

  20. Pan-specific MHC class I predictors: A benchmark of HLA class I pan-specific prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hao; Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    emerging pathogens. Methods have recently been published that are able to predict peptide binding to any human MHC class I molecule. In contrast to conventional allele-specific methods, these methods do allow for extrapolation to un-characterized MHC molecules. These pan-specific HLA predictors have...... not previously been compared using independent evaluation sets. Results: A diverse set of quantitative peptide binding affinity measurements was collected from IEDB, together with a large set of HLA class I ligands from the SYFPEITHI database. Based on these data sets, three different pan-specific HLA web......-accessible predictors NetMHCpan, Adaptive-Double-Threading (ADT), and KISS were evaluated. The performance of the pan-specific predictors was also compared to a well performing allele-specific MHC class I predictor, NetMHC, as well as a consensus approach integrating the predictions from the NetMHC and Net...

  1. Statistical deconvolution of enthalpic energetic contributions to MHC-peptide binding affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Michael GB

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC Class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells, which forms an integral part of the adaptive immune response. Peptides are bound within a groove formed by the MHC heavy chain. Previous approaches to MHC Class I-peptide binding prediction have largely concentrated on the peptide anchor residues located at the P2 and C-terminus positions. Results A large dataset comprising MHC-peptide structural complexes was created by re-modelling pre-determined x-ray crystallographic structures. Static energetic analysis, following energy minimisation, was performed on the dataset in order to characterise interactions between bound peptides and the MHC Class I molecule, partitioning the interactions within the groove into van der Waals, electrostatic and total non-bonded energy contributions. Conclusion The QSAR techniques of Genetic Function Approximation (GFA and Genetic Partial Least Squares (G/PLS algorithms were used to identify key interactions between the two molecules by comparing the calculated energy values with experimentally-determined BL50 data. Although the peptide termini binding interactions help ensure the stability of the MHC Class I-peptide complex, the central region of the peptide is also important in defining the specificity of the interaction. As thermodynamic studies indicate that peptide association and dissociation may be driven entropically, it may be necessary to incorporate entropic contributions into future calculations.

  2. MHC class I endosomal and lysosomal trafficking coincides with exogenous antigen loading in dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genc Basha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is a crucial prerequisite for effective priming of cytotoxic T-cell responses against bacterial, viral and tumor antigens; however, this antigen presentation pathway remains poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to develop a comprehensive understanding of this process, we tested the hypothesis that the internalization of MHC class I molecules (MHC-I from the cell surface is directly involved in cross-presentation pathway and the loading of antigenic peptides. Here we provide the first examination of the internalization of MHC-I in DCs and we demonstrate that the cytoplasmic domain of MHC-I appears to act as an addressin domain to route MHC-I to both endosomal and lysosomal compartments of DCs, where it is demonstrated that loading of peptides derived from exogenously-derived proteins occurs. Furthermore, by chasing MHC-I from the cell surface of normal and transgenic DCs expressing mutant forms of MHC-I, we observe that a tyrosine-based endocytic trafficking motif is required for the constitutive internalization of MHC-I molecules from the cell surface into early endosomes and subsequently deep into lysosomal peptide-loading compartments. Finally, our data support the concept that multiple pathways of peptide loading of cross-presented antigens may exist depending on the chemical nature and size of the antigen requiring processing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that DCs have 'hijacked' and adapted a common vacuolar/endocytic intracellular trafficking pathway to facilitate MHC I access to the endosomal and lysosomal compartments where antigen processing and loading and antigen cross-presentation takes place.

  3. HLA-DM is localized to conventional and unconventional MHC class II-containing endocytic compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, P; Denzin, L K; Hammond, C; Drake, J R; Amigorena, S; Cresswell, P; Mellman, I

    1996-03-01

    HLA-DM molecules remove invariant (Ii) chain peptides from newly synthesized MHC class II complexes. Their localization may thus delineate compartments, e.g., MIIC, specialized for loading peptides onto class II molecules. In murine A20 B cells, however, DM is not restricted to specialized endosomal class II-containing vesicles (CIIV). Although DM was found in CIIV, it was also found throughout the endocytic pathway, principally in lysosomes devoid of class II molecules. In human lymphoblasts, HLA-DM was found in structures indistinguishable from late endosomes or lysosomes, although in these cells the lysosomes contained MHC class II molecules. Thus, the distribution of HLA-DM does not necessarily identify specialized class II compartments. Many "MIIC" may represent conventional lysosomes that accumulate MHC class II and HLA-DM in a number of cell types.

  4. CDw78 defines MHC class II-peptide complexes that require Ii chain-dependent lysosomal trafficking, not localization to a specific tetraspanin membrane microdomain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poloso, Neil J; Denzin, Lisa K; Roche, Paul A

    2006-10-15

    MHC class II molecules (MHC-II) associate with detergent-resistant membrane microdomains, termed lipid rafts, which affects the function of these molecules during Ag presentation to CD4+ T cells. Recently, it has been proposed that MHC-II also associates with another type of membrane microdomain, termed tetraspan microdomains. These microdomains are defined by association of molecules to a family of proteins that contain four-transmembrane regions, called tetraspanins. It has been suggested that MHC-II associated with tetraspanins are selectively identified by a mAb to a MHC-II determinant, CDw78. In this report, we have re-examined this issue of CDw78 expression and MHC-II-association with tetraspanins in human dendritic cells, a variety of human B cell lines, and MHC-II-expressing HeLa cells. We find no correlation between the expression of CDw78 and the expression of tetraspanins CD81, CD82, CD53, CD9, and CD37. Furthermore, we find that the relative amount of tetraspanins bound to CDw78-reactive MHC-II is indistinguishable from the amount bound to peptide-loaded MHC-II. We found that expression of CDw78 required coexpression of MHC-II together with its chaperone Ii chain. In addition, analysis of a panel of MHC-II-expressing B cell lines revealed that different alleles of HLA-DR express different amounts of CDw78 reactivity. We conclude that CDw78 defines a conformation of MHC-II bound to peptides that are acquired through trafficking to lysosomal Ag-processing compartments and not MHC-II-associated with tetraspanins.

  5. MHC class II expression in human basophils: induction and lack of functional significance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid L Voskamp

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting abilities of basophils and their role in initiating a Th2 phenotype is a topic of current controversy. We aimed to determine whether human basophils can be induced to express MHC Class II and act as antigen presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Isolated human basophils were exposed to a panel of cytokines and TLR-ligands and assessed for MHC Class II expression. MHC Class II was expressed in up to 17% of isolated basophils following incubation with a combination of IL-3, IFN-γ and GM-CSF for 72 hours. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86 were expressed at very low levels after stimulation. Gene expression analysis of MHC Class II-positive basophils confirmed up-regulation of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, CD74 and Cathepsin S. However, MHC Class II expressing basophils were incapable of inducing antigen-specific T cell activation or proliferation. This is the first report of significant cytokine-induced MHC Class II up-regulation, at both RNA and protein level, in isolated human basophils. By testing stimulation with relevant T cell epitope peptide as well as whole antigen, the failure of MHC Class II expressing basophils to induce T cell response was shown not to be solely due to inefficient antigen uptake and/or processing.

  6. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  7. Paternal MHC expression on mouse trophoblast affects uterine vascularization and fetal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeja, Zofia; Yadi, Hakim; Apps, Richard; Boulenouar, Selma; Roper, Stephen J; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Colucci, Francesco; Hemberger, Myriam

    2011-03-08

    The mammalian fetus represents a semiallograft within the maternal uterus yet is not rejected. This situation is particularly pronounced in species with a hemochorial type of placentation, such as humans and rodents, where maternal tissues and blood are in direct contact with fetal trophoblast and thus potentially with paternal antigens. The main polymorphic antigens responsible for graft rejection are MHC antigens. In humans the trophoblast cells invading into the decidua have a unique pattern of MHC class I expression characterized by both classical (HLA-C) and nonclassical (HLA-G and HLA-E) molecules. Whether such an unusual MHC repertoire on the surface of trophoblast is a conserved feature between species with hemochorial placentation has not been resolved. Here we demonstrate, using a range of methods, that C57BL/6 mouse trophoblast predominantly expresses only one MHC class I antigen, H2-K, at the cell surface of giant cells but lacks expression of nonclassical MHC molecules. Antigenic disparity between parental MHCs affects trophoblast-induced transformation of the uterine vasculature and, consequently, placental and fetal gowth. Maternal uterine blood vessels were more dilated, allowing for increased blood supply, in certain combinations of maternal and paternal MHC haplotypes, and these allogeneic fetuses and placentas were heavier at term compared with syngeneic controls. Thus, maternal-fetal immune interactions are instrumental to optimize reproductive success. This cross-talk has important implications for human disorders of pregnancy, such as preeclampsia and fetal growth restriction.

  8. The Importance of Understanding MHC-I Diversity in Nonhuman Primate Models of Human Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, Nicholas J

    2017-01-01

    Decades of research, including the 1996 Nobel Prize in Medicine, confirm the evolutionary and immunological importance of CD8 T lymphocytes (TCD8+) that target peptides bound by the highly variable major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins. However, their perceived importance has varied dramatically over the past decade. Regardless, there remains myriad reasons to consider the diversity of MHC-I alleles and the TCD8+ that target them as enormously important in infectious disease research. Thus, understanding these molecules in the best animal models of human disease could be a necessity for optimizing the translational potential of these models. Knowledge of macaque MHC has substantially improved their utility for modeling HIV and could aid in modeling other viruses as well, both in the context of distribution of alleles across treatment groups in vaccine trials and in deciphering mechanisms of immune control of pathogens for which specific MHC alleles demonstrate differential impacts on disease.

  9. A new polymorphic and multicopy MHC gene family related to nonmammalian class I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leelayuwat, C; Townend, D C; Degli-Esposti, M A; Abraham, L J; Dawkins, R L

    1994-01-01

    We have used genomic analysis to characterize a region of the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) spanning approximately 300 kilobases (kb) between TNF and HLA-B. This region has been suggested to carry genetic factors relevant to the development of autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis (MG) and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Genomic sequence was analyzed for coding potential, using two neural network programs, GRAIL and GeneParser. A genomic probe, JAB, containing putative coding sequences (PERB11) located 60 kb centromeric of HLA-B, was used for northern analysis of human tissues. Multiple transcripts were detected. Southern analysis of genomic DNA and overlapping YAC clones, covering the region from BAT1 to HLA-F, indicated that there are at least five copies of PERB11, four of which are located within this region of the MHC. The partial cDNA sequence of PERB11 was obtained from poly-A RNA derived from skeletal muscle. The putative amino acid sequence of PERB11 shares approximately 30% identity to MHC class I molecules from various species, including reptiles, chickens, and frogs, as well as to other MHC class I-like molecules, such as the IgG FcR of the mouse and rat and the human Zn-alpha 2-glycoprotein. From direct comparison of amino acid sequences, it is concluded that PERB11 is a distinct molecule more closely related to nonmammalian than known mammalian MHC class I molecules. Genomic sequence analysis of PERB11 from five MHC ancestral haplotypes (AH) indicated that the gene is polymorphic at both DNA and protein level. The results suggest that we have identified a novel polymorphic gene family with multiple copies within the MHC.

  10. Dynamics of the membrane-cytoskeleton interface in MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretou, Marine; Kumari, Anita; Malbec, Odile; Moreau, Hélène D; Obino, Dorian; Pierobon, Paolo; Randrian, Violaine; Sáez, Pablo J; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria

    2016-07-01

    Antigen presentation refers to the ability of cells to show MHC-associated determinants to T lymphocytes, leading to their activation. MHC class II molecules mainly present peptide-derived antigens that are internalized by endocytosis in antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Here, we describe how the interface between cellular membranes and the cytoskeleton regulates the various steps that lead to the presentation of exogenous antigens on MHC class II molecules in the two main types of APCs: dendritic cells (DCs) and B lymphocytes. This includes antigen uptake, processing, APC migration, and APC-T cell interactions. We further discuss how the interaction between APC-specific molecules and cytoskeleton elements allows the coordination of antigen presentation and cell migration in time and space. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. MHC I Stabilizing Potential of Computer-Designed Octapeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Wisniewska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented for 180 in silico designed octapeptide sequences and their stabilizing effects on the major histocompatibility class I molecule H-2Kb. Peptide sequence design was accomplished by a combination of an ant colony optimization algorithm with artificial neural network classifiers. Experimental tests yielded nine H-2Kb stabilizing and 171 nonstabilizing peptides. 28 among the nonstabilizing octapeptides contain canonical motif residues known to be favorable for MHC I stabilization. For characterization of the area covered by stabilizing and non-stabilizing octapeptides in sequence space, we visualized the distribution of 100,603 octapeptides using a self-organizing map. The experimental results present evidence that the canonical sequence motives of the SYFPEITHI database on their own are insufficient for predicting MHC I protein stabilization.

  12. Extreme MHC class I diversity in the sedge warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus); selection patterns and allelic divergence suggest that different genes have different functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedrzycka, Aleksandra; O'Connor, Emily; Sebastian, Alvaro; Migalska, Magdalena; Radwan, Jacek; Zając, Tadeusz; Bielański, Wojciech; Solarz, Wojciech; Ćmiel, Adam; Westerdahl, Helena

    2017-07-05

    Recent work suggests that gene duplications may play an important role in the evolution of immunity genes. Passerine birds, and in particular Sylvioidea warblers, have highly duplicated major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which are key in immunity, compared to other vertebrates. However, reasons for this high MHC gene copy number are yet unclear. High-throughput sequencing (HTS) allows MHC genotyping even in individuals with extremely duplicated genes. This HTS data can reveal evidence of selection, which may help to unravel the putative functions of different gene copies, i.e. neofunctionalization. We performed exhaustive genotyping of MHC class I in a Sylvioidea warbler, the sedge warbler, Acrocephalus schoenobaenus, using the Illumina MiSeq technique on individuals from a wild study population. The MHC diversity in 863 genotyped individuals by far exceeds that of any other bird species described to date. A single individual could carry up to 65 different alleles, a large proportion of which are expressed (transcribed). The MHC alleles were of three different lengths differing in evidence of selection, diversity and divergence within our study population. Alleles without any deletions and alleles containing a 6 bp deletion showed characteristics of classical MHC genes, with evidence of multiple sites subject to positive selection and high sequence divergence. In contrast, alleles containing a 3 bp deletion had no sites subject to positive selection and had low divergence. Our results suggest that sedge warbler MHC alleles that either have no deletion, or contain a 6 bp deletion, encode classical antigen presenting MHC molecules. In contrast, MHC alleles containing a 3 bp deletion may encode molecules with a different function. This study demonstrates that highly duplicated MHC genes can be characterised with HTS and that selection patterns can be useful for revealing neofunctionalization. Importantly, our results highlight the need to consider the

  13. One-pot, mix-and-read peptide-MHC tetramers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, Christian Valdemar Vinge; Loeth, Nina; Lamberth, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL) recognize complexes of peptide ligands and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules presented at the surface of Antigen Presenting Cells (APC). Detection and isolation of CTL's are of importance for research on CTL immunity, and development...... molecules can be refolded in vitro, tetramerized with streptavidin, and used for specific T cell staining-all in a one-pot reaction without any intervening purification steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed an efficient "one-pot, mix-and-read" strategy for peptide-MHC tetramer generation...

  14. Signal transduction by the major histocompatibility complex class I molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Skov, S; Bregenholt, S

    1999-01-01

    Ligation of cell surface major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) proteins by antibodies, or by their native counter receptor, the CD8 molecule, mediates transduction of signals into the cells. MHC-I-mediated signaling can lead to both increased and decreased activity of the MHC-I-expressing cell...... and functioning, MHC-I molecules might be of importance for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis not only within the immune system, but also in the interplay between the immune system and other organ systems....

  15. MHC-Dependent Mate Selection within 872 Spousal Pairs of European Ancestry from the Health and Retirement Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Qiao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Disassortative mating refers to the phenomenon in which individuals with dissimilar genotypes and/or phenotypes mate with one another more frequently than would be expected by chance. Although the existence of disassortative mating is well established in plant and animal species, the only documented example of negative assortment in humans involves dissimilarity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC locus. Previous studies investigating mating patterns at the MHC have been hampered by limited sample size and contradictory findings. Inspired by the sparse and conflicting evidence, we investigated the role that the MHC region played in human mate selection using genome-wide association data from 872 European American spouses from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS. First, we treated the MHC region as a whole, and investigated genomic similarity between spouses using three levels of genomic variation: single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles (both four-digit and two-digit classifications, and amino acid polymorphisms. The extent of MHC dissimilarity between spouses was assessed using a permutation approach. Second, we investigated fine scale mating patterns by testing for deviations from random mating at individual SNPs, HLA genes, and amino acids in HLA molecules. Third, we assessed how extreme the spousal relatedness at the MHC region was compared to the rest of the genome, to distinguish the MHC-specific effects from genome-wide effects. We show that neither the MHC region, nor any single SNPs, classic HLA alleles, or amino acid polymorphisms within the MHC region, were significantly dissimilar between spouses relative to non-spouse pairs. However, dissimilarity in the MHC region was extreme relative to the rest of genome for both spousal and non-spouse pairs. Despite the long-standing controversy, our analyses did not support a significant role of MHC dissimilarity in human mate choice.

  16. Exploring the nature of the H-bonds between the human class II MHC protein, HLA-DR1 (DRB*0101) and the influenza virus hemagglutinin peptide, HA306-318, using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aray, Yosslen; Aguilera-García, Ricardo; Izquierdo, Daniel R

    2018-01-02

    The nature of the H-bonds between the human protein HLA-DR1 (DRB*0101) and the hemagglutinin peptide HA306-318 has been studied using the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules for the first time. We have found four H-bond groups: one conventional CO··HN bond group and three nonconventional CO··HC, π··HC involving aromatic rings and HN··HCaliphatic groups. The calculated electron density at the determined H-bond critical points suggests the follow protein pocket binding trend: P1 (2,311) > P9 (1.109) > P4 (0.950) > P6 (0.553) > P7 (0.213) which agrees and reveal the nature of experimental findings, showing that P1 produces by a long way the strongest binding of the HLA-DR1 human protein molecule with the peptide backbone as consequence of the vast number of H-bonds in the P1 area and at the same time the largest specific binding of the peptide Tyr308 residue with aromatic residues located at the binding groove floor. The present results suggest the topological analysis of the electronic density as a valuable tool that allows a non-arbitrary partition of the pockets binding energy via the calculated electron density at the determined critical points.

  17. A systematic assessment of MHC class II peptide binding predictions and evaluation of a consensus approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The identification of MHC class II restricted peptide epitopes is an important goal in immunological research. A number of computational tools have been developed for this purpose, but there is a lack of large-scale systematic evaluation of their performance. Herein, we used a comprehensive dataset consisting of more than 10,000 previously unpublished MHC-peptide binding affinities, 29 peptide/MHC crystal structures, and 664 peptides experimentally tested for CD4+ T cell responses to systematically evaluate the performances of publicly available MHC class II binding prediction tools. While in selected instances the best tools were associated with AUC values up to 0.86, in general, class II predictions did not perform as well as historically noted for class I predictions. It appears that the ability of MHC class II molecules to bind variable length peptides, which requires the correct assignment of peptide binding cores, is a critical factor limiting the performance of existing prediction tools. To improve performance, we implemented a consensus prediction approach that combines methods with top performances. We show that this consensus approach achieved best overall performance. Finally, we make the large datasets used publicly available as a benchmark to facilitate further development of MHC class II binding peptide prediction methods.

  18. MHC-IIB filament assembly and cellular localization are governed by the rod net charge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosenberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Actin-dependent myosin II molecular motors form an integral part of the cell cytoskeleton. Myosin II molecules contain a long coiled-coil rod that mediates filament assembly required for myosin II to exert its full activity. The exact mechanisms orchestrating filament assembly are not fully understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examine mechanisms controlling filament assembly of non-muscle myosin IIB heavy chain (MHC-IIB. We show that in vitro the entire C-terminus region of net positive charge, found in myosin II rods, is important for self-assembly of MHC-IIB fragments. In contrast, no particular sequences in the rod region with net negative charge were identified as important for self-assembly, yet a minimal area from this region is necessary. Proper paracrystal formation by MHC-IIB fragments requires the 196aa charge periodicity along the entire coiled-coil region. In vivo, in contrast to self-assembly in vitro, negatively-charged regions of the coiled-coil were found to play an important role by controlling the intracellular localization of native MHC-IIB. The entire positively-charged region is also important for intracellular localization of native MHC-IIB. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A correct distribution of positive and negative charges along myosin II rod is a necessary component in proper filament assembly and intracellular localization of MHC-IIB.

  19. pH dependence of MHC class I-restricted peptide presentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Romme, T

    1996-01-01

    The function of MHC class I molecules is to bind and present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. Here, we report that class I-restricted peptide presentation is strongly pH dependent. The presentation of some peptides was enhanced at acidic pH, whereas the presentation of others was inhibited...... of peptide-MHC class I combinations, in some cases leading to considerable peptide exchange. We further speculate that the relative instability of peptide-class I complexes under acidic conditions may affect the outcome of class I-restricted Ag presentation, as less stably associated peptides may dissociate...... from class I during passage of the acidic trans-Golgi network, and therefore may not be presented. Finally, our results may in part explain how endocytosed proteins can be presented by MHC class I molecules to cytotoxic T cells....

  20. How did variable NK-cell receptors and MHC class I ligands influence immunity, reproduction and human evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Preface Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, where they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of MHC-C in hominids drove the evolution of a system of MHC-C receptors that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. In contrast, the human system appears to have been subject to different and competing selection pressures that have acted on its immunological and reproductive functions. We suggest that this compromise facilitated development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out-of-Africa and populate other continents. PMID:23334245

  1. Influenza Virus Targets Class I MHC-Educated NK Cells for Immunoevasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ahmad Bakur; Tu, Megan M; Wight, Andrew; Zein, Haggag S; Rahim, Mir Munir A; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Sekhon, Harman S; Brown, Earl G; Makrigiannis, Andrew P

    2016-02-01

    The immune response to influenza virus infection comprises both innate and adaptive defenses. NK cells play an early role in the destruction of tumors and virally-infected cells. NK cells express a variety of inhibitory receptors, including those of the Ly49 family, which are functional homologs of human killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR). Like human KIR, Ly49 receptors inhibit NK cell-mediated lysis by binding to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules that are expressed on normal cells. During NK cell maturation, the interaction of NK cell inhibitory Ly49 receptors with their MHC-I ligands results in two types of NK cells: licensed ("functional"), or unlicensed ("hypofunctional"). Despite being completely dysfunctional with regard to rejecting MHC-I-deficient cells, unlicensed NK cells represent up to half of the mature NK cell pool in rodents and humans, suggesting an alternative role for these cells in host defense. Here, we demonstrate that after influenza infection, MHC-I expression on lung epithelial cells is upregulated, and mice bearing unlicensed NK cells (Ly49-deficient NKCKD and MHC-I-deficient B2m-/- mice) survive the infection better than WT mice. Importantly, transgenic expression of an inhibitory self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 receptor in NKCKD mice restores WT influenza susceptibility, confirming a direct role for Ly49. Conversely, F(ab')2-mediated blockade of self-MHC-I-specific Ly49 inhibitory receptors protects WT mice from influenza virus infection. Mechanistically, perforin-deficient NKCKD mice succumb to influenza infection rapidly, indicating that direct cytotoxicity is necessary for unlicensed NK cell-mediated protection. Our findings demonstrate that Ly49:MHC-I interactions play a critical role in influenza virus pathogenesis. We suggest a similar role may be conserved in human KIR, and their blockade may be protective in humans.

  2. MHC II expression in the CNS after long-term demyelination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannella, B.; Aquino, D.A.; Raine, C.S.

    1995-07-01

    The ability of chronically demyelinated central nervous system (CNS) tissue to express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules has been measured in mouse spinal cord cultures exposed for 1 and 3 weeks to demyelinating anti-white matter (WM) serum. From previous studies, It was known that after 3 weeks of demyelination in vitro, such cultures are incapable of remyelination. In the present report, MHC II levels were evaluated by immunocytochemistry and by Western and Northern blots. The results have shown that after both 1 and 3 weeks of exposure to myelinotoxic anti-WM serum, the cultures retained the ability to express MHC II and this could be further upregulated by incubation with interferon {gamma} (IFN{gamma}). Control groups showed increased expression of MHC II with age. By immunocytochemistry, all groups of cultures expressed high levels of MHC II and all groups showed upregulation after IFN{gamma} treatment. Anti-WM-treated cultures demonstrated slightly higher levels of MHC II than controls. Morphologically, the MHC II expression was associated with the surface of astrocytes. Semiquantitative analysis by Western blotting confirmed the increase in class II MHC expression in the long-term treated cultures after IFN{gamma} exposure, revealing no differences between anti-WM-treated and complement-treated cultures. This was also supported by Northern blotting which showed similar mRNA levels in both groups. These findings suggest that long-term demyelinated CNS tissue still possesses the ability to interact with CD4{sup +} T cells, observations of significance to the expansion of the chronic multiple sclerosis lesion. 50 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Nonclassical MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T Cells Recognize Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Derived Protein Antigens and Contribute to Protection Against Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shaobin; Siddiqui, Sarah; Bian, Yao; Zhao, Jie; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2016-01-01

    MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells have been implicated in host defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. However, the relative contribution of various MHC Ib-restricted T cell populations to anti-mycobacterial immunity remains elusive. In this study, we used mice that lack MHC Ia (Kb-/-Db-/-), MHC Ia/H2-M3 (Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/-), or β2m (β2m-/-) to study the role of M3-restricted and other MHC Ib-restricted T cells in immunity against Mtb. Unlike their dominant role in Listeria infection, we found that M3-restricted CD8+ T cells only represented a small proportion of the CD8+ T cells responding to Mtb infection. Non-M3, MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells expanded preferentially in the lungs of Mtb-infected Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/- mice, exhibited polyfunctional capacities and conferred protection against Mtb. These MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells recognized several Mtb-derived protein antigens at a higher frequency than MHC Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells. The presentation of Mtb antigens to MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells was mostly β2m-dependent but TAP-independent. Interestingly, a large proportion of Mtb-specific MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells in Kb-/-Db-/-M3-/- mice were Qa-2-restricted while no considerable numbers of MR1 or CD1-restricted Mtb-specific CD8+ T cells were detected. Our findings indicate that nonclassical CD8+ T cells other than the known M3, CD1, and MR1-restricted CD8+ T cells contribute to host immune responses against Mtb infection. Targeting these MHC Ib-restricted CD8+ T cells would facilitate the design of better Mtb vaccines with broader coverage across MHC haplotypes due to the limited polymorphism of MHC class Ib molecules. PMID:27272249

  4. Quantitative analysis of mouse urine volatiles: in search of MHC-dependent differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Röck

    Full Text Available Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, which play a critical role in immune recognition, influence mating preference and other social behaviors in mice. Training experiments using urine scent from mice differing only in the MHC complex, from MHC class I mutants or from knock-out mice lacking functional MHC class I molecules (beta2m-deficient, suggest that these behavioral effects are mediated by differences in MHC-dependent volatile components. In search for the physical basis of these behavioral studies, we have conducted a comparison of urinary volatiles in three sub-strains of C57BL/6 mice, a beta2m-deficient mutant lacking functional MHC class I expression and two unrelated inbred strains, using the technique of sorptive extraction with polydimethylsiloxan and subsequent analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. We show (i that qualitative differences occur between different inbred strains but not in mice with the C57BL/6 background, (ii that the individual variability in abundance in the same mouse strain is strongly component-dependent, (iii that C57BL/6 sub-strains obtained from different provenance show a higher fraction of quantitative differences than a sub-strain and its beta2m-mutant obtained from the same source and (iv that comparison of the spectra of beta2m mice and the corresponding wild type reveals no qualitative differences in close to 200 major and minor components and only minimal differences in a few substances from an ensemble of 69 selected for quantitative analysis. Our data suggest that odor is shaped by ontogenetic, environmental and genetic factors, and the gestalt of this scent may identify a mouse on the individual and population level; but, within the limits of the ensemble of components analysed, the results do not support the notion that functional MHC class I molecules influence the urinary volatile composition.

  5. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason A.; Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Lund, Ole; Sette, Alessandro; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given task. To provide a solid basis on which to compare different prediction tools, we here describe a framework for the automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding prediction tools. The framework runs weekly benchmarks on data that are newly entered into the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB), giving the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding capability. Upon experimental binding validation, these peptides entered the benchmark study. Results: The benchmark has run for 15 weeks and includes evaluation of 44 datasets covering 17 MHC alleles and more than 4000 peptide-MHC binding measurements. Inspection of the results allows the end-user to make educated selections between participating tools. Of the four participating servers, NetMHCpan performed the best, followed by ANN, SMM and finally ARB. Availability and implementation: Up-to-date performance evaluations of each server can be found online at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/weekly. All prediction tool developers are invited to participate in the benchmark. Sign-up instructions are available at http://tools.iedb.org/auto_bench/mhci/join. Contact: mniel@cbs.dtu.dk or bpeters@liai.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25717196

  6. Probing natural killer cell education by Ly49 receptor expression analysis and computational modelling in single MHC class I mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Johansson

    Full Text Available Murine natural killer (NK cells express inhibitory Ly49 receptors for MHC class I molecules, which allows for "missing self" recognition of cells that downregulate MHC class I expression. During murine NK cell development, host MHC class I molecules impose an "educating impact" on the NK cell pool. As a result, mice with different MHC class I expression display different frequency distributions of Ly49 receptor combinations on NK cells. Two models have been put forward to explain this impact. The two-step selection model proposes a stochastic Ly49 receptor expression followed by selection for NK cells expressing appropriate receptor combinations. The sequential model, on the other hand, proposes that each NK cell sequentially expresses Ly49 receptors until an interaction of sufficient magnitude with self-class I MHC is reached for the NK cell to mature. With the aim to clarify which one of these models is most likely to reflect the actual biological process, we simulated the two educational schemes by mathematical modelling, and fitted the results to Ly49 expression patterns, which were analyzed in mice expressing single MHC class I molecules. Our results favour the two-step selection model over the sequential model. Furthermore, the MHC class I environment favoured maturation of NK cells expressing one or a few self receptors, suggesting a possible step of positive selection in NK cell education. Based on the predicted Ly49 binding preferences revealed by the model, we also propose, that Ly49 receptors are more promiscuous than previously thought in their interactions with MHC class I molecules, which was supported by functional studies of NK cell subsets expressing individual Ly49 receptors.

  7. Recognition of core and flanking amino acids of MHC class II-bound peptides by the T cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Robinson, Eve; Janeway, Charles A; Denzin, Lisa K

    2002-09-01

    CD4 T cells recognize peptides bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. Most MHC class II molecules have four binding pockets occupied by amino acids 1, 4, 6, and 9 of the minimal peptide epitope, while the residues at positions 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8 are available to interact with the T cell receptor (TCR). In addition MHC class II bound peptides have flanking residues situated outside of this peptide core. Here we demonstrate that the flanking residues of the conalbumin peptide bound to I-A(k) have no effect on recognition by the D10 TCR. To study the role of peptide flanks for recognition by a second TCR, we determined the MHC and TCR contacting amino acids of the I-A(b) bound Ealpha peptide. The Ealpha peptide is shown to bind I-A(b) using four alanines as anchor residues. TCR recognition of Ealpha peptides with altered flanking residues again suggested that, in general, no specific interactions occurred with the peptide flanks. However, using an HLA-DM-mediated technique to measure peptide binding to MHC class II molecules, we found that the peptide flanking residues contribute substantially to MHC binding.

  8. Axotomy induces MHC class I antigen expression on rat nerve cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Schröder, H D; Klareskog, L

    1988-01-01

    on non-neural cells in the immediate vicinity of the injured nerve cells. As nerve regeneration after axotomy includes growth of new nerve cell processes and formation of new nerve cell contacts, the present findings raise the question of a role for MHC-coded molecules in cell-cell interactions during...

  9. Selective transport of internalized antigens to the cytosol for MHC class I presentation in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez, A; Regnault, A; Kleijmeer, M; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, P; Amigorena, S

    1999-01-01

    In order for cytotoxic T cells to initiate immune responses, peptides derived from internalized antigens must be presented to the cytotoxic T cells on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. Here we show that dendritic cells, the only antigen-presenting cells that initiate immune

  10. Aberrant Expression of MHC Class II in Melanoma Attracts Inflammatory Tumor-Specific CD4+ T- Cells, Which Dampen CD8+ T-cell Antitumor Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Andersen, Rikke; Kjeldsen, Julie W

    2015-01-01

    In the absence of a local inflammatory response, expression of MHC class II molecules is restricted mainly to hematopoietic cells and thymus epithelium. However, certain tumors, such as melanoma, may acquire aberrant constitutive expression of MHC class II. In a set of primary melanoma cell popul...... mechanism that can be activated by aberrant expression of MHC class II molecules, which by attracting tumor-specific CD4(+) T cells elicit a local inflammatory response dominated by TNF that, in turn, inhibits cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell responses...

  11. Processing of recombinant Listeria monocytogenes proteins for MHC class I presentation follows a dedicated, high-efficiency pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Princiotta, Michael F.

    2013-01-01

    CD8+ T lymphocytes recognize short peptides of ~8–10 amino acids bound to MHC class I molecules (pMHC) on the surface of antigen presenting cells. These peptides can be generated from either endogenous proteins synthesized by the biosynthetic machinery of the presenting cell or from exogenously sourced proteins. Because much of the research characterizing the MHC class I processing pathway has focused on endogenously synthesized proteins, it is not known whether differences exist in the processing pathway followed by endogenously synthesized versus exogenously sourced proteins. To highlight potential differences in the processing of endogenous versus exogenous proteins, we developed a model system to measure the efficiency of pMHC generation from nearly identical recombinant proteins expressed from vaccinia virus and Listeria monocytogenes. In these experiments, we uncovered a striking difference in the way recombinant Listeria antigens are processed and presented when compared to endogenously synthesized viral proteins. Specifically, we find that pMHC production from secreted Listeria proteins occurs at the same rate, independent of the cellular half-life of the protein from which it is derived, whereas the rate of pMHC production from endogenously synthesized viral proteins is absolutely dependent on its protein half-life. Accordingly, our data demonstrate the existence of a distinct and highly efficient MHC class I presentation pathway used for the processing of at least some exogenously synthesized proteins. PMID:23396941

  12. The SysteMHC Atlas project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shao, Wenguang; Pedrioli, Patrick G. A.; Wolski, Witold

    2018-01-01

    to enable better collaborations among researchers, to advance the field more efficiently and to establish quality measures required for the meaningful comparison of datasets. Here we present the SysteMHC Atlas (https://systemhcatlas.org), a public database that aims at collecting, organizing, sharing......, visualizing and exploring immunopeptidomic data generated by MS. The Atlas includes raw mass spectrometer output files collected from several laboratories around the globe, a catalog of context-specific datasets of MHC class I and class II peptides, standardized MHC allele-specific peptide spectral libraries...... consisting of consensus spectra calculated from repeat measurements of the same peptide sequence, and links to other proteomics and immunology databases. The SysteMHC Atlas project was created and will be further expanded using a uniform and open computational pipeline that controls the quality of peptide...

  13. Multiple Divergent Haplotypes Express Completely Distinct Sets of Class I MHC Genes in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Sean C.; Restaino, Anthony C.; de Jong, Jill L.O.

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish is an important animal model for stem cell biology, cancer, and immunology research. Histocompatibility represents a key intersection of these disciplines, however histocompatibility in zebrafish remains poorly understood. We examined a set of diverse zebrafish Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes that segregate with specific haplotypes at chromosome 19, and for which donor-recipient matching has been shown to improve engraftment after hematopoietic transplantation. Using flanking gene polymorphisms we identified six distinct chromosome 19 haplotypes. We describe several novel Class I U lineage genes and characterize their sequence properties, expression, and haplotype distribution. Altogether ten full-length zebrafish Class I genes were analyzed, mhc1uba through mhc1uka. Expression data and sequence properties indicate that most are candidate classical genes. Several substitutions in putative peptide anchor residues, often shared with deduced MHC molecules from additional teleost species, suggest flexibility in antigen binding. All ten zebrafish Class I genes were uniquely assigned among the six haplotypes, with dominant or co-dominant expression of one to three genes per haplotype. Interestingly, while the divergent MHC haplotypes display variable gene copy number and content, the different genes appear to have ancient origin, with extremely high levels of sequence diversity. Furthermore, haplotype variability extends beyond the MHC genes to include divergent forms of psmb8. The many disparate haplotypes at this locus therefore represent a remarkable form of genomic region configuration polymorphism. Defining the functional MHC genes within these divergent Class I haplotypes in zebrafish will provide an important foundation for future studies in immunology and transplantation. PMID:24291825

  14. Use of BONSAI decision trees for the identification of potential MHC class I peptide epitope motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoie, C J; Kamikawaji, N; Sasazuki, T; Kuhara, S

    1999-01-01

    Recognition of short peptides of 8 to 10 mer bound to MHC class I molecules by cytotoxic T lymphocytes forms the basis of cellular immunity. While the sequence motifs necessary for binding of intracellular peptides to MHC have been well studied, little is known about sequence motifs that may cause preferential affinity to the T cell receptor and/or preferential recognition and response by T cells. Here we demonstrate that computational learning systems can be useful to elucidate sequence motifs that affect T cell activation. Knowledge of T cell activation motifs could be useful for targeted vaccine design or immunotherapy. With the BONSAI computational learning algorithm, using a database of previously reported MHC bound peptides that had positive or negative T cell responses, we were able to identify sequence motif rules that explain 70% of positive T cell responses and 84% of negative T cell responses.

  15. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  16. HLA-DM induces CLIP dissociation from MHC class II alpha beta dimers and facilitates peptide loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, L K; Cresswell, P

    1995-07-14

    Human leukocyte antigen DM (HLA-DM) molecules are structurally related to classical MHC class II molecules and reside in the lysosome-like compartment where class II-restricted antigen processing is thought to occur. Mutant cell lines lacking HLA-DM are defective in antigen processing and accumulate class II molecules associated with a nested set of invariant chain-derived peptides (class II-associated invariant chain peptides, CLIP). Here we show that HLA-DM catalyzes the dissociation of CLIP from MHC class II-CLIP complexes in vitro and facilitates the binding of antigenic peptides. The reaction has an acidic pH optimum, consistent with its occurrence in a lysosome-like compartment in vivo. Antibody blocking experiments suggest that a transient interaction between HLA-DM and the MHC class II-CLIP complex is required.

  17. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D.; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F.; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A.; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S.; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal. PMID:25808889

  18. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-04-22

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal.

  19. Antigen presentation pathways to class I and class II MHC-restricted T lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braciale, T J; Morrison, L A; Sweetser, M T; Sambrook, J; Gething, M J; Braciale, V L

    1987-08-01

    Our observations on the cellular immune response to type-A influenza suggest the existence of two distinct pathways of protein antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. One of these pathways is involved with presentation of antigens introduced into the presenting cell from without. This exogenous presentation pathway is the well-recognized route of presentation of soluble and particulate antigens to T lymphocytes. This pathway probably involves uptake of antigen into endocytic vesicles, alteration of antigen within an intracellular compartment, and subsequent display of antigen on the presenting cell surface (Unanue 1984). The second pathway is one which we have tentatively designated as an endogenous presentation pathway. The constraints on this pathway have yet to be fully defined. At a minimum, this pathway appears to involve the presentation of antigens which are synthesized de novo in the presenting cell utilizing the cell's biosynthetic machinery. This pathway may also handle preformed antigens located within the cytosolic compartment of the presenting cell. Perhaps the most striking feature of these two antigen presentation pathways is the close association between the MHC restriction of an antigen-specific T lymphocyte and the pathway of antigen presentation to that T lymphocyte. Our data suggest that this association holds both at the effector level and at the level of induction of T lymphocytes. Thus, presentation of a given antigen by the endogenous pathway preferentially triggers a response from class I MHC-restricted T lymphocytes directed to that antigen. The molecular basis for this link of class I MHC-restriction to the endogenous pathway and MHC class II restriction to the exogenous pathway is unknown. It seems likely that interactions between MHC molecules and antigen within the presenting cell may be critical for the demarcation of these pathways. Thus, for example, antigen presented by the endogenous route may only be able to associate

  20. Evaluation of MHC class I peptide binding prediction servers: Applications for vaccine research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinherz Ellis L

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein antigens and their specific epitopes are formulation targets for epitope-based vaccines. A number of prediction servers are available for identification of peptides that bind major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. The lack of standardized methodology and large number of human MHC-I molecules make the selection of appropriate prediction servers difficult. This study reports a comparative evaluation of thirty prediction servers for seven human MHC-I molecules. Results Of 147 individual predictors 39 have shown excellent, 47 good, 33 marginal, and 28 poor ability to classify binders from non-binders. The classifiers for HLA-A*0201, A*0301, A*1101, B*0702, B*0801, and B*1501 have excellent, and for A*2402 moderate classification accuracy. Sixteen prediction servers predict peptide binding affinity to MHC-I molecules with high accuracy; correlation coefficients ranging from r = 0.55 (B*0801 to r = 0.87 (A*0201. Conclusion Non-linear predictors outperform matrix-based predictors. Most predictors can be improved by non-linear transformations of their raw prediction scores. The best predictors of peptide binding are also best in prediction of T-cell epitopes. We propose a new standard for MHC-I binding prediction – a common scale for normalization of prediction scores, applicable to both experimental and predicted data. The results of this study provide assistance to researchers in selection of most adequate prediction tools and selection criteria that suit the needs of their projects.

  1. MHC molecules protect T cell epitopes against proteolytic destruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, S; Meldal, M; Werdelin, O

    1992-01-01

    There is a subtle duality in the role of proteolytic enzymes in Ag processing. They are required to fragment protein Ag ingested by APC. However, prolonged exposure to proteolytic enzymes may lead to a complete degradation of the Ag, leaving nothing for the T cell system to recognize. What ensures...

  2. MHC class I phenotype and function of human beta 2-microglobulin transgenic murine lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerager, L; Pedersen, L O; Bregenholt, S

    1996-01-01

    . Based on data from cellular binding studies, Scatchard analyses and flow cytometry, it is concluded that exogenous h beta 2m does not bind to hybrid MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules composed of mouse heavy chain/h beta 2m molecules expressed on lymphocytes of transgenic mice. Immunoprecipitation and SDS......-PAGE analysis of metabolically labelled normal C57BL/6 lymph node cells showed binding of exogenous h beta 2m to MHC-I, in particular, to the H-2Db molecule through an exchange with endogenous mouse beta 2m. In contrast to normal H-2Db molecules, hybrid H-2Db expressed on the surface of transgenic lymphocytes...... binds radiolabelled peptide in the absence of exogenous added h beta 2m suggesting that a stable fraction of hybrid H-2Db molecules is empty or contain peptides with very low affinity. In a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture, transgenic splenocytes were found to be far less stimulatory than...

  3. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell's own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors-tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II-contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity.

  4. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I and MHC Class II Proteins: Conformational Plasticity in Antigen Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Marek; Abualrous, Esam T.; Sticht, Jana; Álvaro-Benito, Miguel; Stolzenberg, Sebastian; Noé, Frank; Freund, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is essential for adaptive immunity. Prior to presentation, peptides need to be generated from proteins that are either produced by the cell’s own translational machinery or that are funneled into the endo-lysosomal vesicular system. The prolonged interaction between a T cell receptor and specific pMHC complexes, after an extensive search process in secondary lymphatic organs, eventually triggers T cells to proliferate and to mount a specific cellular immune response. Once processed, the peptide repertoire presented by MHC proteins largely depends on structural features of the binding groove of each particular MHC allelic variant. Additionally, two peptide editors—tapasin for class I and HLA-DM for class II—contribute to the shaping of the presented peptidome by favoring the binding of high-affinity antigens. Although there is a vast amount of biochemical and structural information, the mechanism of the catalyzed peptide exchange for MHC class I and class II proteins still remains controversial, and it is not well understood why certain MHC allelic variants are more susceptible to peptide editing than others. Recent studies predict a high impact of protein intermediate states on MHC allele-specific peptide presentation, which implies a profound influence of MHC dynamics on the phenomenon of immunodominance and the development of autoimmune diseases. Here, we review the recent literature that describe MHC class I and II dynamics from a theoretical and experimental point of view and we highlight the similarities between MHC class I and class II dynamics despite the distinct functions they fulfill in adaptive immunity. PMID:28367149

  5. CD4+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity is associated with MHC class II expression on malignant CD19+ B cells in diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yong; Zha, Jie; Lin, Zhijuan; Fang, Zhihong; Zeng, Hanyan; Zhao, Jintao; Luo, Yiming; Li, Zhifeng; Xu, Bing

    2018-01-15

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a common B cell malignancy with approximately 30% of patients present relapsed or refractory disease after first-line therapy. Research of further treatment options is needed. Cytotoxic CD4+ T cells express cytolytic molecules and have potential antitumor function. Here, we showed that the CD19+ cells from DLBCL patients presented significantly reduced expression of MHC II molecules than those from healthy controls. Three years after the first-line treatment, patients that presented relapsed disease had significantly lower MHC II expression on their CD19+ cells than patients who did not show recurrence. Examining cytotoxic CD4+ T cells show that DLBCL patients presented significantly elevated frequencies of granzyme A-, granzyme B-, and/or perforin-expressing cytotoxic CD4+ T cells. Also, frequency of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells in DLBCL patients was positively correlated with the MHC II expression level. Subsequently, the cytotoxic potential of CD4+ T cells against autologous CD19+ cells was investigated. We found that the cytotoxic potential of CD4+ T cells was highest in MHC II-high, intermediate in MHC II-mid, and lowest in MHC II-low patients. The percentage of MHC II-expressing viable CD19+ cells presented a significant reduction after longer incubation with cytotoxic CD4+ T cells, suggesting that cytotoxic CD4+ T cells preferentially eliminated MHC II-expressing CD19+ cells. Blocking MHC II on CD19+ cells significantly reduced the cytolytic capacity of CD4+ T cells. Despite these discoveries, the frequency of cytotoxic CD4+ T cells did not predict the clinical outcome of DLBCL patients. Together, these results demonstrated that cytotoxic CD4+ T cells presented an MHC II-dependent cytotoxic potential against autologous CD19+ cells and could potentially represent a future treatment option for DLBCL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Intratumoral T-cell infiltrates and MHC class I expression in patients with stage IV melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Rafiyan, Mohammad-Reza; Atmaca, Akin; Neumann, Antje; Karbach, Julia; Bender, Armin; Weidmann, Eckhart; Altmannsberger, Hans-Michael; Knuth, Alexander; Jäger, Elke

    2005-05-01

    The infiltration of tumors by T cells has been shown to correlate with prolonged patients' survival. However, it remains unclear why only some tumors are infiltrated with T cells. This study was designed to investigate possible correlations between intratumoral T-cell infiltrates and the expression of cancer-associated antigens and MHC class I and II molecules in patients with melanoma. Fresh frozen samples from 124 stage IV melanoma patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for the expression of Melan-A/MART-1, tyrosinase, gp100, NY-ESO-1, and MHC class I and II. Intratumoral T-cell and B-cell infiltrates were detected by staining with anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD3, and L26 antibodies. The NY-ESO-1 serum antibody status was assessed by Western blot analysis. Intratumoral CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were detected in 63.9% and 71.3% of patients, respectively. We observed a significant heterogeneity of the expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens, NY-ESO-1, and MHC class I and II molecules. The only significant correlation was found between the expression of MHC class I and the presence of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (P definition of prognostic variables and for the identification of patients who may benefit from antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy.

  7. MHC class I ligation of human T cells activates the ZAP70 and p56lck tyrosine kinases, leads to an alternative phenotype of the TCR/CD3 zeta-chain, and induces apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Bregenholt, S; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    1997-01-01

    Cross-linking of MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules on human T cells induces signal-transduction events, including activation of tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-gamma 1, and elevation of the intracellular free calcium concentration. In this study, we demonstrate that the ...

  8. The opossum MHC genomic region revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnec, Katina V; Sharp, Alana R; Williams, Tracey L; Miller, Robert D

    2015-04-01

    The gray short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica is one of the few marsupial species for which a high quality whole genome sequence is available and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region has been annotated. Previous analyses revealed only a single locus within the opossum MHC region, designated Modo-UA1, with the features expected for encoding a functionally classical class I α-chain. Nine other class I genes found within the MHC are highly divergent and have features usually associated with non-classical roles. The original annotation, however, was based on an early version of the opossum genome assembly. More recent analyses of allelic variation in individual opossums revealed too many Modo-UA1 sequences per individual to be accounted for by a single MHC class I locus found in the genome assembly. A reanalysis of a later generation assembly, MonDom5, revealed the presence of two additional loci, now designated Modo-UA3 and UA4, in a region that was expanded and more complete than in the earlier assembly. Modo-UA1, UA3, and UA4 are all transcribed, although Modo-UA4 transcripts are rarer. Modo-UA4 is also relatively non-polymorphic. Evidence presented support the accuracy of the later assembly and the existence of three related class I genes in the opossum, making opossums more typical of mammals and most tetrapods by having multiple apparent classical MHC class I loci.

  9. Bacteria-induced neo-biosynthesis, stabilization, and surface expression of functional class I molecules in mouse dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rescigno, Maria; Citterio, Stefania; Thèry, Clotilde; Rittig, Michael; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni; Amigorena, Sebastian; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    1998-01-01

    Here, we show that bacteria induce de novo synthesis of both major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I and II molecules in a mouse dendritic cell culture system. The neo-biosynthesis of MHC class I molecules is delayed as compared with that of MHC class II. Furthermore, bacteria stabilize MHC class I molecules by a 3-fold increase of their half-life. This has important consequences for the capacity of dendritic cells to present bacterial antigens in the draining lymph nodes. In addition,...

  10. Modo-UG, a marsupial nonclassical MHC class I locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouin, Nicolas; Wright, April M; Miska, Katarzyna B; Parra, Zuly E; Samollow, Paul B; Baker, Michelle L; Miller, Robert D

    2006-06-01

    Modo-UG is a class I gene located in the MHC of the marsupial Monodelphis domestica, the gray, short-tailed opossum. Modo-UG is expressed as three alternatively spliced mRNA forms, all of which encode a transmembrane form with a short cytoplasmic tail that lacks phosphorylation sites typically found in classical class I molecules. The three alternative mRNAs would encode a full-length form, an isoform lacking the alpha2 domain, and one lacking both alpha2 and alpha3 domains. Genotyping both captive-bred and wild M. domestica from different geographic regions revealed no variation in the residues that make up Modo-UG's peptide-binding groove. Modo-UG's low polymorphism is contrasting to that of a nearby class I locus, Modo-UA1, which has a highly polymorphic peptide-binding region. Absence of functional polymorphism in Modo-UG is therefore not a general feature of opossum class I genes but the result of negative selection. Modo-UG is the first MHC linked marsupial class I to be described that appears to clearly have nonclassical features.

  11. MHC Class I and Integrin Ligation Induce ERK Activation Via an mTORC2-Dependent Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, Peter T.; Jin, Yi-Ping; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Reed, Elaine F.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction between mTOR and ERK in primary endothelial cells (EC) following MHC class I and integrin ligation. Ligation of MHC class I molecules or integrins on the surface of EC leads to phosphorylation of ERK at Thr202/Tyr204. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA) blockade of mTOR and proteins involved in mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2) to define a relationship between mTOR and ERK following MHC class I signaling. We found mTORC2 was responsible for MHC class I and integrin induced phosphorylation of ERK at Thr202/Tyr204. We corroborated these results demonstrating that long-term exposure to rapamycin also inhibited ERK pathway activation in response to MHC class I signaling. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, that engagement of either MHC class I or integrin on the surface of EC leads to ERK activation through an mTORC2-dependent pathway. PMID:18312854

  12. Contrasting evolutionary histories of MHC class I and class II loci in grouse—Effects of selection and gene conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2016-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) encode receptor molecules that are responsible for recognition of intracellular and extracellular pathogens (class I and class II genes, respectively) in vertebrates. Given the different roles of class I and II MHC genes, one might expect the strength of selection to differ between these two classes. Different selective pressures may also promote different rates of gene conversion at each class. Despite these predictions, surprisingly few studies have looked at differences between class I and II genes in terms of both selection and gene conversion. Here, we investigated the molecular evolution of MHC class I and II genes in five closely related species of prairie grouse (Centrocercus and Tympanuchus) that possess one class I and two class II loci. We found striking differences in the strength of balancing selection acting on MHC class I versus class II genes. More than half of the putative antigen-binding sites (ABS) of class II were under positive or episodic diversifying selection, compared with only 10% at class I. We also found that gene conversion had a stronger role in shaping the evolution of MHC class II than class I. Overall, the combination of strong positive (balancing) selection and frequent gene conversion has maintained higher diversity of MHC class II than class I in prairie grouse. This is one of the first studies clearly demonstrating that macroevolutionary mechanisms can act differently on genes involved in the immune response against intracellular and extracellular pathogens.

  13. Macroautophagy Proteins Control MHC Class I Levels on Dendritic Cells and Shape Anti-viral CD8+ T Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Loi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The macroautophagy machinery has been implicated in MHC class II restricted antigen presentation. Here, we report that this machinery assists in the internalization of MHC class I molecules. In the absence of the autophagy factors Atg5 and Atg7, MHC class I surface levels are elevated due to decreased endocytosis and degradation. Internalization of MHC class I molecules occurs less efficiently if AAK1 cannot be recruited via Atg8/LC3B. In the absence of Atg-dependent MHC class I internalization, dendritic cells stimulate CD8+ T cell responses more efficiently in vitro and in vivo. During viral infections, lack of Atg5 results in enhanced influenza- and LCMV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in vivo. Elevated influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses are associated with better immune control of this infection. Thus, the macroautophagy machinery orchestrates T cell immunity by supporting MHC class II but compromises MHC class I restricted antigen presentation.

  14. Thermodynamics of T cell receptor – peptide/MHC interactions: progress and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Insaidoo, Francis K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    αβ T cell receptors (TCR) recognize peptide antigens presented by class I or class II major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC). Here we review the use of thermodynamic measurements in the study of TCR-pMHC interactions, with attention to the diversity in binding thermodynamics and how this is related to the variation in TCR-pMHC interfaces. We show that there is no enthalpic or entropic signature for TCR binding; rather, enthalpy and entropy changes vary in a compensatory manner that reflects a narrow free energy window for the interactions that have been characterized. Binding enthalpy and entropy changes do not correlate with structural features such as buried surface area or the number of hydrogen bonds within TCR-pMHC interfaces, possibly reflecting the myriad of contributors to binding thermodynamics, but likely also reflecting a reliance on van’t Hoff over calorimetric measurements and the unaccounted influence of equilibria linked to binding. TCR-pMHC binding heat capacity changes likewise vary considerably. In some cases the heat capacity changes are consistent with conformational differences between bound and free receptors, but there is little data indicating these conformational differences represent the need to organize commonly disordered CDR loops. In this regard, we discuss how thermodynamics may provide additional insight into conformational changes occurring upon TCR binding. Finally, we highlight opportunities for the further use of thermodynamic measurements in the study of TCR-pMHC interactions, not only for understanding TCR binding in general, but for understanding specifics of individual interactions and the engineering of T cell receptors with desired molecular recognition properties. PMID:18496839

  15. GradDock: Rapid Simulation and Tailored Ranking Functions for Peptide-MHC Class I Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Choi, Yoonjoo; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2017-09-18

    The identification of T-cell epitopes has many profound translational applications in the areas of transplantation, disease diagnosis, vaccine/therapeutic protein development and personalized immunotherapy. While data-driven methods have been widely used for the prediction of peptide binders with notable successes, the structural modeling of peptide binding to MHC molecules is crucial for understanding the underlying molecular mechanism of the immunological processes. We developed GradDock, a structure-based method for the rapid and accurate modeling of peptide binding to MHC class I (pMHC-I). GradDock explicitly models diverse unbound peptides in vacuo and inserts them into the MHC-I groove through a steered gradient descent with a topological correction process. The simulation process yields diverse structural conformations including native-like peptides. We completely revised the Rosetta score terms and developed a new ranking function specifically for pMHC-I. Using the diverse peptides, a linear programming approach is applied to find the optimal weights for the individual Rosetta score terms. Our examination revealed that a refinement of the dihedral angles and a modification of the repulsion can dramatically improve the modeling quality. GradDock is five-times faster than a Rosetta-based docking approach for pMHC-I. We also demonstrate that the predictive capability of GradDock with the re-weighted Rosetta ranking function is consistently more accurate than the Rosetta-based method with the standard Rosetta score (approximately three-times better for a cross-docking set). GradDock is freely available for academic purposes. The program and the ranking score weights for Rosetta are available at http://bel.kaist.ac.kr/research/GradDock . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Inhibitor-binding mode of homobelactosin C to proteasomes: New insights into class I MHC ligand generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, Michael; Larionov, Oleg V.; Huber, Robert; de Meijere, Armin

    2006-01-01

    Most class I MHC ligands are generated from the vast majority of cellular proteins by proteolysis within the ubiquitin–proteasome pathway and are presented on the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. Here, we present the crystallographic analysis of yeast 20S proteasome in complex with the inhibitor homobelactosin C. The structure reveals a unique inhibitor-binding mode and provides information about the composition of proteasomal primed substrate-binding sites. IFN-γ inducible substitution of proteasomal constitutive subunits by immunosubunits modulates characteristics of generated peptides, thus producing fragments with higher preference for binding to MHC class I molecules. The structural data for the proteasome:homobelactosin C complex provide an explanation for involvement of immunosubunits in antigen generation and open perspectives for rational design of ligands, inhibiting exclusively constitutive proteasomes or immunoproteasomes. PMID:16537370

  17. The PickPocket method for predicting binding specificities for receptors based on receptor pocket similarities: application to MHC-peptide binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, H.; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, M.

    2009-01-01

    exist, making determination of the binding specificity for each variant experimentally infeasible. Here, we present a method that can extrapolate from variants with known binding specificity to those where no experimental data are available. Results: For each position in the peptide ligand, we extracted...... of the specificities of MHC molecules in this library weighted by the similarity of their pocket-residues to the query. This PickPocket method is demonstrated to accurately predict MHC-peptide binding for a broad range of MHC alleles, including human and non-human species. In contrast to neural network-based pan......-specific methods, PickPocket was shown to be robust both when data is scarce and when the similarity to MHC molecules with characterized binding specificity is low. A consensus method combining the PickPocket and NetMHCpan methods was shown to achieve superior predictive performance. This study demonstrates how...

  18. IMGT unique numbering for MHC groove G-DOMAIN and MHC superfamily (MhcSF) G-LIKE-DOMAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Duprat, E.; Kaas, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® (http://imgt.cines.fr) provides a common access to expertly annotated data on the genome, proteome, genetics and structure of immunoglobulins (IG), T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins...

  19. The mechanism of HLA-DM induced peptide exchange in the MHC class II antigen presentation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Monika-Sarah E D; Wucherpfennig, Kai W

    2012-02-01

    HLA-DM serves a critical function in the loading and editing of peptides on MHC class II (MHCII) molecules. Recent data showed that the interaction cycle between MHCII molecules and HLA-DM is dependent on the occupancy state of the peptide binding groove. Empty MHCII molecules form stable complexes with HLA-DM, which are disrupted by binding of high-affinity peptide. Interestingly, MHCII molecules with fully engaged peptides cannot interact with HLA-DM, and prior dissociation of the peptide N-terminus from the groove is required for HLA-DM binding. There are significant similarities to the peptide loading process for MHC class I molecules, even though it is executed by a distinct set of proteins in a different cellular compartment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigen presenting cells (APCs sample the extra cellular space and present peptides from here to T helper cells, which can be activated if the peptides are of foreign origin. The peptides are presented on the surface of the cells in complex with major histocompatibility class II (MHC II molecules. Identification of peptides that bind MHC II molecules is thus a key step in rational vaccine design and developing methods for accurate prediction of the peptide:MHC interactions play a central role in epitope discovery. The MHC class II binding groove is open at both ends making the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC and three mouse H2-IA alleles. Results The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation between peptide data set obtained from different sources demonstrated that direct incorporation of peptide length potentially results in over-fitting of the binding prediction method. Focusing on amino terminal peptide flanking residues (PFR, we demonstrate a consistent gain in predictive performance by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic amino acids at most anchor positions, whereas the SMM-align method identifies a preference for hydrophobic or neutral amino acids at the anchors. Conclusion

  1. Bacterial superantigens promote acute nasopharyngeal infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a human MHC Class II-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J; Zeppa, Joseph J; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T; Xu, Stacey X; Mazzuca, Delfina M; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P Patrick; Haeryfar, S M Mansour; McCormick, John K

    2014-05-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as 'trademark' virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC -II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms.

  2. Expression of the MHC class II in triple-negative breast cancer is associated with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and interferon signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Ah Park

    Full Text Available Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs have been known for their strong prognostic and predictive significance in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC. Several mechanisms for TIL influx in TNBC have been elucidated. Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II is an essential component of the adaptive immune system and is generally restricted to the surface of antigen-presenting cells. However, it has been reported that interferon-gamma signaling may induce MHC-II in almost all cell types, including those derived from cancer. We aimed to examine the relationship between MHC-II expression in tumor cells and the amount of TILs in 681 patients with TNBC. Further, the prognostic significance of MHC-II and the association of MHC-II with a couple of molecules involved in the interferon signaling pathway were investigated using immunohistochemical staining. Higher MHC-II expression in tumor cells was associated with the absence of lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.042; larger amounts of TILs (p < 0.001; frequent formations of tertiary lymphoid structures (p < 0.001; higher expression of myxovirus resistance gene A, one of the main mediators of the interferon signaling pathway (p < 0.001; and higher expression of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase, which can be induced by interferons (p = 0.008. Moreover, tumors that showed high MHC class I expression and any positivity for MHC-II had larger amounts of CD4- and CD8-positive T lymphocytes (p < 0.001. Positive MHC-II expression in tumor cells was associated with better disease-free survival in patients who had lymph node metastasis (p = 0.009. In conclusion, MHC-II expression in tumor cells was closely associated with an increase in TIL number and interferon signaling in TNBC. Further studies are warranted to improve our understanding regarding TIL influx, as well as patients' responses to immunotherapy.

  3. Variation analysis and gene annotation of eight MHC haplotypes: the MHC Haplotype Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Roger; Gibson, Richard; Coggill, Penny; Miretti, Marcos; Allcock, Richard J; Almeida, Jeff; Forbes, Simon; Gilbert, James G R; Halls, Karen; Harrow, Jennifer L; Hart, Elizabeth; Howe, Kevin; Jackson, David K; Palmer, Sophie; Roberts, Anne N; Sims, Sarah; Stewart, C Andrew; Traherne, James A; Trevanion, Steve; Wilming, Laurens; Rogers, Jane; de Jong, Pieter J; Elliott, John F; Sawcer, Stephen; Todd, John A; Trowsdale, John; Beck, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    The human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is contained within about 4 Mb on the short arm of chromosome 6 and is recognised as the most variable region in the human genome. The primary aim of the MHC Haplotype Project was to provide a comprehensively annotated reference sequence of a single, human leukocyte antigen-homozygous MHC haplotype and to use it as a basis against which variations could be assessed from seven other similarly homozygous cell lines, representative of the most common MHC haplotypes in the European population. Comparison of the haplotype sequences, including four haplotypes not previously analysed, resulted in the identification of >44,000 variations, both substitutions and indels (insertions and deletions), which have been submitted to the dbSNP database. The gene annotation uncovered haplotype-specific differences and confirmed the presence of more than 300 loci, including over 160 protein-coding genes. Combined analysis of the variation and annotation datasets revealed 122 gene loci with coding substitutions of which 97 were non-synonymous. The haplotype (A3-B7-DR15; PGF cell line) designated as the new MHC reference sequence, has been incorporated into the human genome assembly (NCBI35 and subsequent builds), and constitutes the largest single-haplotype sequence of the human genome to date. The extensive variation and annotation data derived from the analysis of seven further haplotypes have been made publicly available and provide a framework and resource for future association studies of all MHC-associated diseases and transplant medicine.

  4. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted a...

  5. Sensitive quantitative predictions of peptide-MHC binding by a 'Query by Committee' artificial neural network approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S; Lauemøller, S L; Worning, P

    2003-01-01

    We have generated Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) capable of performing sensitive, quantitative predictions of peptide binding to the MHC class I molecule, HLA-A*0204. We have shown that such quantitative ANN are superior to conventional classification ANN, that have been trained to predict...

  6. MHC class I signaling in T cells leads to tyrosine kinase activity and PLC-gamma 1 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, S; Odum, Niels; Claesson, M H

    1995-01-01

    phosphorylation and the subsequent calcium response. The early tyrosine kinase activity was found to be dependent on expression of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD45 molecule on the surface of the T cells. Furthermore, MHC-I cross-linking was shown to tyrosine phosphorylate PLC-gamma 1 (phospholipase C-gamma 1...

  7. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have......MHCIIpan-3.0 method is the first pan-specific predictor covering all HLA class II molecules with known sequences including HLA-DR, HLA-DP, and HLA-DQ. The NetMHCpan-3.0 method is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.0....

  8. Characterization of a nonclassical class I MHC gene in a reptile, the Galápagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Glaberman

    Full Text Available Squamates are a diverse order of vertebrates, representing more than 7,000 species. Yet, descriptions of full-length major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes in this group are nearly absent from the literature, while the number of MHC studies continues to rise in other vertebrate taxa. The lack of basic information about MHC organization in squamates inhibits investigation into the relationship between MHC polymorphism and disease, and leaves a large taxonomic gap in our understanding of amniote MHC evolution. Here, we use both cDNA and genomic sequence data to characterize a class I MHC gene (Amcr-UA from the Galápagos marine iguana, a member of the squamate subfamily Iguaninae. Amcr-UA appears to be functional since it is expressed in the blood and contains many of the conserved peptide-binding residues that are found in classical class I genes of other vertebrates. In addition, comparison of Amcr-UA to homologous sequences from other iguanine species shows that the antigen-binding portion of this gene is under purifying selection, rather than balancing selection, and therefore may have a conserved function. A striking feature of Amcr-UA is that both the cDNA and genomic sequences lack the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains that are necessary to anchor the class I receptor molecule into the cell membrane, suggesting that the product of this gene is secreted and consequently not involved in classical class I antigen-presentation. The truncated and conserved character of Amcr-UA lead us to define it as a nonclassical gene that is related to the few available squamate class I sequences. However, phylogenetic analysis placed Amcr-UA in a basal position relative to other published classical MHC genes from squamates, suggesting that this gene diverged near the beginning of squamate diversification.

  9. Trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class II molecules through intracellular compartments containing HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, N F; Hammond, C; Denzin, L K; Pan, M; Cresswell, P

    1996-01-01

    The endosomal site(s) where MHC class II molecules become competent to bind antigenic peptide has not been completely characterized. We identified endocytic compartments through which newly synthesized MHC class II molecules move prior to their expression on the plasma membrane. The compartments co-sediment with lysosomes in the most dense regions of Percoll gradients. The appearance of proteolytic fragments of the invariant chain (I chain), namely leupeptin-induced proteins (LIPs) and class-II-associated invariant chain peptides (CLIP), in this region of the gradient suggests that the release of MHC class II molecules from I chain association occurs within these vesicles. The formation of SDS-stable alpha beta dimers indicated that MHC class II molecules contained within these compartments are receptive to peptide binding. A majority of the HLA-DM protein was found in the same region of the Percoll gradient, consistent with its established function in MHC class-II-restricted antigen presentation. Immunoelectron micrographs of dense-sedimenting compartments indicated that I chain, MHC class II, and DM molecules are contained within both multivesicular and multilamellar vesicles. The final stages of I chain dissociation from MHC class II molecules and DM-mediated peptide loading probably occur in these compartments.

  10. MHC class II ligation induces CD58 (LFA-3)-mediated adhesion in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Gerwien, J; Geisler, C

    1998-01-01

    MHC class II positive T cells found in areas of inflammation are believed to play an important pathogenetic role in autoimmunity. In experimental models , class II molecules have been shown to regulate adhesion between human T cells. It is, however, not known in detail how class II molecules...... are functionally linked to adhesion molecules. Some data suggest that beta2 integrin (CD11a/CD18) molecules play a role in class-II-induced homotypic adhesion in B cells, monocytes, and virus-transformed or neoplastic cell lines. We have previously obtained evidence that adhesion molecules other than beta2...... integrins might play a role in class-II-mediated adhesion in T cells. To study further class-II-mediated adhesion in T cells, we have taken advantage of (allo)antigen-specific beta2-integrin-negative, CD4-positive T cell lines obtained from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency patient. We show that class II...

  11. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Corrie A; Negroni, Maria P; Kellersberger, Katherine A; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E; Stern, Lawrence J

    2011-11-29

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 3(10) helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange.

  12. Conformational lability in the class II MHC 310 helix and adjacent extended strand dictate HLA-DM susceptibility and peptide exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Corrie A.; Negroni, Maria P.; Kellersberger, Katherine A.; Zavala-Ruiz, Zarixia; Evans, James E.; Stern, Lawrence J.

    2011-01-01

    HLA-DM is required for efficient peptide exchange on class II MHC molecules, but its mechanism of action is controversial. We trapped an intermediate state of class II MHC HLA-DR1 by substitution of αF54, resulting in a protein with increased HLA-DM binding affinity, weakened MHC-peptide hydrogen bonding as measured by hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry, and increased susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Structural analysis revealed a set of concerted conformational alterations at the N-terminal end of the peptide-binding site. These results suggest that interaction with HLA-DM is driven by a conformational change of the MHC II protein in the region of the α-subunit 310 helix and adjacent extended strand region, and provide a model for the mechanism of DM-mediated peptide exchange. PMID:22084083

  13. Protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72syk in MHC class I-mediated signal transduction in B lymphoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Skov, S

    1998-01-01

    Crosslinking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules on the surface of human B lymphoma cells was shown to induce protein tyrosine phosphorylation and mobilization of intracellular free calcium. Immunoprecipitations indicated that the protein tyrosine kinases p53/56lyn and p72......syk are among the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. The kinetics of phosphorylation of these kinases after MHC-I crosslinking differ from the kinetics observed after crosslinking of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). Additional experiments were performed with chicken lyn- and syk-negative DT40 B cells...... and the results indicate that these two kinases have different substrate specificity and regulate intracellular free calcium differently in response to MHC-I crosslinking. In addition MHC-I crosslinking of a sIgM-negative DT40 chicken B cell variant results in less activity of tyrosine kinases and less...

  14. Anti-MHC Class I Antibody Activation of Proliferation and Survival Signaling in Murine Cardiac Allografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindra, Peter T.; Hsueh, Aileen; Hong, Longshen; Gjertson, David; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Dang, Julie; Mischel, Paul S.; Baldwin, William M.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-MHC class I alloantibodies have been implicated in the process of acute and chronic rejection because these Abs can bind to endothelial cells and transduce signals leading to the activation of cell survival and proliferation pathways. To characterize the role of the MHC class I-signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of Ab-mediated rejection, we developed a mouse vascularized heterotopic cardiac allograft model in which B6.RAG1 KO hosts (H-2Kb/Db) received a fully MHC-incompatible BALB/c (H-2Kd/Dd) heart transplant and were passively transfused with anti-donor MHC class I Ab. We demonstrate that cardiac allografts of mice treated with anti-MHC class I Abs show characteristic features of Ab-mediated rejection including microvascular changes accompanied by C4d deposition. Phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling molecules involved in the MHC class I cell proliferation and survival pathways were elevated in anti-class I-treated mice compared with the isotype control-treated group. Pairwise correlations, hierarchical clustering, and multidimensional scaling algorithms were used to dissect the class I-signaling pathway in vivo. Treatment with anti-H-2Kd Ab was highly correlated with the activation of Akt and p70S6Kinase (S6K). When measuring distance as a marker of interrelatedness, multidimensional scaling analysis revealed a close association between members of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway including mammalian target of rapamycin, S6K, and S6 ribosomal protein. These results provide the first analysis of the interrelationships between these signaling molecules in vivo that reflects our knowledge of the signaling pathway derived from in vitro experiments. PMID:18250428

  15. MHC-restricted antigen presentation and recognition: constraints on gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha-Neto E.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The target of any immunization is to activate and expand lymphocyte clones with the desired recognition specificity and the necessary effector functions. In gene, recombinant and peptide vaccines, the immunogen is a single protein or a small assembly of epitopes from antigenic proteins. Since most immune responses against protein and peptide antigens are T-cell dependent, the molecular target of such vaccines is to generate at least 50-100 complexes between MHC molecule and the antigenic peptide per antigen-presenting cell, sensitizing a T cell population of appropriate clonal size and effector characteristics. Thus, the immunobiology of antigen recognition by T cells must be taken into account when designing new generation peptide- or gene-based vaccines. Since T cell recognition is MHC-restricted, and given the wide polymorphism of the different MHC molecules, distinct epitopes may be recognized by different individuals in the population. Therefore, the issue of whether immunization will be effective in inducing a protective immune response, covering the entire target population, becomes an important question. Many pathogens have evolved molecular mechanisms to escape recognition by the immune system by variation of antigenic protein sequences. In this short review, we will discuss the several concepts related to selection of amino acid sequences to be included in DNA and peptide vaccines.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Murine Cytomegalovirus MHC-I Homolog m144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natarajan,K.; Hicks, A.; Mans, J.; Robinson, H.; Guan, R.; Mariuzza, R.; Margulies, D.

    2006-01-01

    Large DNA viruses of the herpesvirus family produce proteins that mimic host MHC-I molecules as part of their immunoevasive strategy. The m144 glycoprotein, expressed by murine cytomegalovirus, is thought to be an MHC-I homolog whose expression prolongs viral survival in vivo by preventing natural killer cell activation. To explore the structural basis of this m144 function, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of an m144/{beta}2-microglobulin ({beta}2m) complex at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. This structure reveals the canonical features of MHC-I molecules including readily identifiable {alpha}1, {alpha}2, and {alpha}3 domains. A unique disulfide bond links the {alpha}1 helix to the {beta}-sheet floor, explaining the known thermal stability of m144. Close juxtaposition of the {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 helices and the lack of critical residues that normally contribute to anchoring the peptide N and C termini eliminates peptide binding. A region of 13 amino acid residues, corresponding to the amino-terminal portion of the {alpha}2 helix, is missing in the electron density map, suggesting an area of structural flexibility that may be involved in ligand binding.

  17. Structural Properties of MHC Class II Ligands, Implications for the Prediction of MHC Class II Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper Winther; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    class II ligands by integrating prediction of MHC- peptide binding with prediction of surface exposure and protein secondary structure. This combined prediction method was shown to significantly outperform the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction method when used to identify MHC...... class II ligands. We also tried to integrate N- and O-glycosylation in our prediction methods but this additional information was found not to improve prediction performance. In summary, these findings strongly suggest that local structural properties influence antigen processing and......, allowing binding of peptides extending out of the binding groove. Furthermore, only a few HLA-DR alleles have been characterized with a sufficient number of peptides (100–200 peptides per allele) to derive accurate description of their binding motif. Little work has been performed characterizing structural...

  18. HLA-DM and HLA-DO, key regulators of MHC-II processing and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellins, Elizabeth D; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-02-01

    Peptide loading of class II MHC molecules in endosomal compartments is regulated by HLA-DM. HLA-DO modulates HLA-DM function, with consequences for the spectrum of MHC-bound epitopes presented at the cell surface for interaction with T cells. Here, we summarize and discuss recent progress in investigating the molecular mechanisms of action of HLA-DM and HLA-DO and in understanding their roles in immune responses. Key findings are the long-awaited structures of HLA-DM in complex with its class II substrate and with HLA-DO, and observation of a novel phenotype--autoimmunity combined with immunodeficiency--in mice lacking HLA-DO. We also highlight several areas where gaps persist in our knowledge about this pair of proteins and their molecular biology and immunobiology. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of the proteasome in the generation of MHC class I ligands and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sijts, E J A M; Kloetzel, P M

    2011-05-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades intracellular proteins into peptide fragments that can be presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. While the UPS is functional in all mammalian cells, its subunit composition differs depending on cell type and stimuli received. Thus, cells of the hematopoietic lineage and cells exposed to (pro)inflammatory cytokines express three proteasome immunosubunits, which form the catalytic centers of immunoproteasomes, and the proteasome activator PA28. Cortical thymic epithelial cells express a thymus-specific proteasome subunit that induces the assembly of thymoproteasomes. We here review new developments regarding the role of these different proteasome components in MHC class I antigen processing, T cell repertoire selection and CD8 T cell responses. We further discuss recently discovered functions of proteasomes in peptide splicing, lymphocyte survival and the regulation of cytokine production and inflammatory responses.

  20. The MHC I loading complex: a multitasking machinery in adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulpke, Sabine; Tampé, Robert

    2013-08-01

    Recognition and elimination of virally or malignantly transformed cells are pivotal tasks of the adaptive immune system. For efficient immune detection, snapshots of the cellular proteome are presented as epitopes on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules for recognition by cytotoxic T cells. Knowledge about the track from the equivocal protein to the presentation of antigenic peptides has greatly expanded, leading to an astonishingly elaborate understanding of the MHC I peptide loading pathway. Here, we summarize the current view on this complex process, which involves ABC transporters, proteases, chaperones, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control. The contribution of individual proteins and subcomplexes is discussed, with a focus on the architecture and dynamics of the key player in the pathway, the peptide-loading complex (PLC). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. NetMHCpan-4.0: Improved Peptide-MHC Class I Interaction Predictions Integrating Eluted Ligand and Peptide Binding Affinity Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Paul, Sinu; Andreatta, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells are of central importance in the immune system's response to disease. They recognize defective cells by binding to peptides presented on the cell surface by MHC class I molecules. Peptide binding to MHC molecules is the single most selective step in the Ag-presentation pathway. ...... the information from both data types. Large-scale benchmarking of the method demonstrates an increase in predictive performance compared with state-of-the-art methods when it comes to identification of naturally processed ligands, cancer neoantigens, and T cell epitopes....

  2. Expression and characterization of recombinant single-chain salmon class I MHC fused with beta2-microglobulin with biological activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Heng; Stet, René J M; Skjødt, Karsten

    2008-01-01

    , the recombinant proteins were purified by affinity chromatography using mAb against beta2m and alpha3. Eluates were analyzed by Western blot and refolded by the removal of denaturant. The correct folding was confirmed by measuring its binding capacity against mAb produced to recognize the native form of MHC......Heterodimeric class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules consist of a putative 45-kDa heavy chain and a 12-kDa beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) light chain. The knowledge about MHC genes in Atlantic salmon accumulated during the last decade has allowed us to generate soluble and stable...... with the resistance to infectious salmon anaemia virus. The single-chain salmon MHC class I molecule has been designed and generated, in which the carboxyl terminus of beta2m is joined together with a flexible 15 or 20 amino acid peptide linker to the amino terminus of the heavy chain (Sasabeta2mUBA*0301). Monoclonal...

  3. Expression, refolding, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic study of MHC H-2Kk complexed with octapeptides and nonapeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellenberger, Christine; Porciero, Sophie; Roussel, Alain

    2004-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are heterodimeric cell-surface receptors that play a crucial role in the cellular immune response by presenting epitope peptides to T-cell antigen receptors (TCR). Although the structural basis of the peptide-MHC binding mechanism is becoming better understood, it is still difficult to predict a binding mode for an MHC of unknown structure. Therefore, as the first stage of a TCR-MHC interaction study, the crystal structures of the mouse H-2K(k) molecule in complex with both an octapeptide from Influenza A virus and a nonapeptide from simian virus SV40 were solved. Here, the expression, refolding, purification and crystallization of the two complexes are reported. For the H-2K(k)-HA(259-266) complex, crystals were obtained via an extensive screen using a nanodrop-dispensing robot and diffracted to 2.5 A resolution. For the H-2K(k)-SV40(560-568) complex, microscopic needles were initially obtained and their size was improved by macroseeding and a stepwise increase in precipitant concentration. Diffraction data to a resolution of 3.0 A were collected at a synchrotron facility.

  4. MHC class I and MHC class II DRB gene variability in wild and captive Bengal tigers (Panthera tigris tigris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Ina; Sharma, Reeta; Goyal, Surendra Prakash; Mishra, Sudanshu; Tiedemann, Ralph

    2010-10-01

    Bengal tigers are highly endangered and knowledge on adaptive genetic variation can be essential for efficient conservation and management. Here we present the first assessment of allelic variation in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and MHC class II DRB genes for wild and captive tigers from India. We amplified, cloned, and sequenced alpha-1 and alpha-2 domain of MHC class I and beta-1 domain of MHC class II DRB genes in 16 tiger specimens of different geographic origin. We detected high variability in peptide-binding sites, presumably resulting from positive selection. Tigers exhibit a low number of MHC DRB alleles, similar to other endangered big cats. Our initial assessment-admittedly with limited geographic coverage and sample size-did not reveal significant differences between captive and wild tigers with regard to MHC variability. In addition, we successfully amplified MHC DRB alleles from scat samples. Our characterization of tiger MHC alleles forms a basis for further in-depth analyses of MHC variability in this illustrative threatened mammal.

  5. Structure of the Epstein-Barr virus gp42 protein bound to the MHC class II recepter HLA-DR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, M.; Haan, K.M.; Longnecker, R.; Jardetzky, T.

    2010-03-08

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) causes infectious mononucleosis, establishes long-term latent infections, and is associated with a variety of human tumors. The EBV gp42 glycoprotein binds MHC class II molecules, playing a critical role in infection of B lymphocytes. EBV gp42 belongs to the C-type lectin superfamily, with homology to NK receptors of the immune system. We report the crystal structure of gp42 bound to the human MHC class II molecule HLA-DR1. The gp42 binds HLA-DR1 using a surface site that is distinct from the canonical lectin and NK receptor ligand binding sites. At the canonical ligand binding site, gp42 forms a large hydrophobic groove, which could interact with other ligands necessary for EBV entry, providing a mechanism for coupling MHC recognition and membrane fusion.

  6. Processing of MHC class II in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past years we performed studies to gain more insight into the processing of major histocompatibility class II (MHC class II) in dendritic cells. We focused on the sorting mechanisms of MHC class II, the degradation of its associated Ii and peptide loading at the endosomal system. In addition,

  7. Viral immune evasion : Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weijer, Michael L.; Luteijn, Rutger D.; Wiertz, EJHJ

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I

  8. Characterization of duck (Anas platyrhynchos) MHC class I gene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-06-17

    Jun 17, 2017 ... ... groups division were exhibited on the homology modelling constructed based on theresolved protein structure of DuMHC I. This study explicit the characteristics of DuMHC I in the two duck lines and could contribute to design effective diagnostics and vaccines for the species against various infections.

  9. Retained orthologous relationships of the MHC Class I genes during euteleost evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Mayumi I; Aizawa, Kouichi; Mitani, Hiroshi; Bannai, Hidemi P; Nonaka, Masaru

    2011-11-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules play a pivotal role in immune defense system, presenting the antigen peptides to cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes. Most vertebrates possess multiple MHC class I loci, but the analysis of their evolutionary relationships between distantly related species has difficulties because genetic events such as gene duplication, deletion, recombination, and/or conversion have occurred frequently in these genes. Human MHC class I genes have been conserved only within the primates for up to 46-66 My. Here, we performed comprehensive analysis of the MHC class I genes of the medaka fish, Oryzias latipes, and found that they could be classified into four groups of ancient origin. In phylogenetic analysis using these genes and the classical and nonclassical class I genes of other teleost fishes, three extracellular domains of the class I genes showed quite different evolutionary histories. The α1 domains generated four deeply diverged lineages corresponding to four medaka class I groups with high bootstrap values. These lineages were shared with salmonid and/or other acanthopterygian class I genes, unveiling the orthologous relationships between the classical MHC class I genes of medaka and salmonids, which diverged approximately 260 Ma. This suggested that the lineages must have diverged in the early days of the euteleost evolution and have been maintained for a long time in their genome. In contrast, the α3 domains clustered by species or fish groups, regardless of classical or nonclassical gene types, suggesting that this domain was homogenized in each species during prolonged evolution, possibly retaining the potential for CD8 binding even in the nonclassical genes. On the other hand, the α2 domains formed no apparent clusters with the α1 lineages or with species, suggesting that they were diversified partly by interlocus gene conversion, and that the α1 and α2 domains evolved separately. Such evolutionary mode is

  10. Natural splice variant of MHC class I cytoplasmic tail enhances dendritic cell-induced CD8+ T-cell responses and boosts anti-tumor immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania G Rodríguez-Cruz

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC-mediated presentation of MHC class I (MHC-I/peptide complexes is a crucial first step in the priming of CTL responses, and the cytoplasmic tail of MHC-I plays an important role in modulating this process. Several species express a splice variant of the MHC-I tail that deletes exon 7-encoding amino acids (Δ7, including a conserved serine phosphorylation site. Previously, it has been shown that Δ7 MHC-I molecules demonstrate extended DC surface half-lives, and that mice expressing Δ7-K(b generate significantly augmented CTL responses to viral challenge. Herein, we show that Δ7-D(b-expressing DCs stimulated significantly more proliferation and much higher cytokine secretion by melanoma antigen-specific (Pmel-1 T cells. Moreover, in combination with adoptive Pmel-1 T-cell transfer, Δ7-D(b DCs were superior to WT-D(b DCs at stimulating anti-tumor responses against established B16 melanoma tumors, significantly extending mouse survival. Human DCs engineered to express Δ7-HLA-A*0201 showed similarly enhanced CTL stimulatory capacity. Further studies demonstrated impaired lateral membrane movement and clustering of human Δ7-MHC-I/peptide complexes, resulting in significantly increased bioavailability of MHC-I/peptide complexes for specific CD8+ T cells. Collectively, these data suggest that targeting exon 7-encoded MHC-I cytoplasmic determinants in DC vaccines has the potential to increase CD8+ T-cell stimulatory capacity and substantially improve their clinical efficacy.

  11. The MHC class II cofactor, HLA-DM, interacts with immunoglobulin in B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyangar, Sashi; Jiang, Wei; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Spura, Armin; Hessell, Ann J.; Madec, Anne-Marie; Mellins, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    B cells internalize extracellular antigen into endosomes using the immunoglobulin (Ig) component of the B cell receptor. In endosomes, antigen-derived peptides are loaded onto MHC class II proteins (MHC-II). How these pathways intersect remains unclear. We find that HLA-DM (DM), a catalyst for MHC-II peptide loading, co-precipitates with Ig in lysates from human tonsillar B cells and B cell lines. The molecules in the Ig/DM complexes have mature glycans, and the complexes co-localize with endosomal markers in intact cells. A larger fraction of Ig precipitates with DM after BCR crosslinking, implying that complexes can form when DM meets endocytosed Ig. In vitro, in the endosomal pH range, soluble HLA-DM (sDM) directly binds the Ig Fab domain, and increases levels of free antigen released from immune complexes. Together, these results argue that DM and Ig intersect in the endocytic pathway of B cells with potential functional consequences. PMID:25098292

  12. Colonizing the world in spite of reduced MHC variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoso, L.; Alcaide, M.; Grande, J.M.; Muñoz, J.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Sonsthagen, Sarah A.; Sage, Kevin; Figuerola, J.

    2012-01-01

    Reduced immune gene diversity is thought to negatively affect the capacity of organisms to adapt to pathogen challenges, which represent a major force in natural selection. Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are the most widely invoked adaptive loci in conservation biology, and have become the most popular genetic markers to investigate pathogen-host interactions in vertebrates. Although MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes described in the vertebrate genome, the extent to which MHC diversity determines the long-term persistence of populations is, unclear and often debated, as recent studies have documented the occurrence of natural populations thriving even after a depletion of MHC diversity caused by genetic drift. Here, we show that some phylogenetically related species belonging to the Falco genus (Aves: Falconidae) present a dramatically low MHC variability that has not precluded, nevertheless, the successful colonization of almost all existing regions and habitats worldwide. We found evidence for two remarkably different patterns of MHC variation within the genus. While kestrels show a high MHC variation according to the general theory, falcons exhibit an ancestrally low intra- and inter-specific MHC allelic diversity. We provide compelling evidence that this pattern is not caused by the degeneration of functional genes into pseudogenes, the inadvertent analyses of paralogous MHC genes, or the devastating action of genetic drift. Instead, our results strongly support the idea of an evolutionary transition driven and maintained by natural selection from primarily highly variable towards low polymorphic, but functional and expressed, MHC genes with species-specific pathogen-recognition capabilities.

  13. Simulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Structure and Peptide Loading into an MHC Binding Pocket with Teachers’Hands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Sankian

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular understanding of three-dimensional (3D peptide: MHC models require both basic knowledge of computational modeling and skilled visual perception, which are not possessed by all students. The present model aims to simulate MHC molecular structure with the hands and make a profound impression on the students.

  14. Defining MHC class II T helper epitopes for WT1 tumor antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroya; Nagato, Toshihiro; Aoki, Naoko; Sato, Keisuke; Kimura, Shoji; Tateno, Masatoshi; Celis, Esteban

    2006-07-01

    The product of Wilms' tumor gene 1 (WT1) is overexpressed in diverse human tumors, including leukemia, lung and breast cancer, and is often recognized by antibodies in the sera of patients with leukemia. Since WT1 encodes MHC class I-restricted peptides recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), WT1 has been considered as a promising tumor-associated antigen (TAA) for developing anticancer immunotherapy. In order to carry out an effective peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, MHC class II-restricted epitope peptides that elicit anti-tumor CD4(+) helper T lymphocytes (HTL) will be needed. In this study, we analyzed HTL responses against WT1 antigen using HTL lines elicited by in vitro immunization of human lymphocytes with synthetic peptides predicted to serve as HTL epitopes derived from the sequence of WT1. Two peptides, WT1(124-138) and WT1(247-261), were shown to induce peptide-specific HTL, which were restricted by frequently expressed HLA class II alleles. Here, we also demonstrate that both peptides-reactive HTL lines were capable of recognizing naturally processed antigens presented by dendritic cells pulsed with tumor lysates or directly by WT1+ tumor cells that express MHC class II molecules. Interestingly, the two WT1 HTL epitopes described here are closely situated to known MHC class I-restricted CTL epitopes, raising the possibility of stimulating CTL and HTL responses using a relatively small synthetic peptide vaccine. Because HTL responses to TAA are known to be important for promoting long-lasting anti-tumor CTL responses, the newly described WT1 T-helper epitopes could provide a useful tool for designing powerful vaccines against WT1-expressing tumors.

  15. Bacterial Superantigens Promote Acute Nasopharyngeal Infection by Streptococcus pyogenes in a Human MHC Class II-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; Wakabayashi, Adrienne T.; Xu, Stacey X.; Mazzuca, Delfina M.; Welch, Ian; Baroja, Miren L.; Kotb, Malak; Cairns, Ewa; Cleary, P. Patrick; Haeryfar, S. M. Mansour; McCormick, John K.

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the genetic determinants of niche adaptation by microbial pathogens to specific hosts is important for the management and control of infectious disease. Streptococcus pyogenes is a globally prominent human-specific bacterial pathogen that secretes superantigens (SAgs) as ‘trademark’ virulence factors. SAgs function to force the activation of T lymphocytes through direct binding to lateral surfaces of T cell receptors and class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules. S. pyogenes invariably encodes multiple SAgs, often within putative mobile genetic elements, and although SAgs are documented virulence factors for diseases such as scarlet fever and the streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS), how these exotoxins contribute to the fitness and evolution of S. pyogenes is unknown. Here we show that acute infection in the nasopharynx is dependent upon both bacterial SAgs and host MHC-II molecules. S. pyogenes was rapidly cleared from the nasal cavity of wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice, whereas infection was enhanced up to ∼10,000-fold in B6 mice that express human MHC-II. This phenotype required the SpeA superantigen, and vaccination with an MHC –II binding mutant toxoid of SpeA dramatically inhibited infection. Our findings indicate that streptococcal SAgs are critical for the establishment of nasopharyngeal infection, thus providing an explanation as to why S. pyogenes produces these potent toxins. This work also highlights that SAg redundancy exists to avoid host anti-SAg humoral immune responses and to potentially overcome host MHC-II polymorphisms. PMID:24875883

  16. Expressão do complexo de histocompatilidade principal de classe I (MHC I no sistema nervoso central: plasticidade sináptica e regeneração Expresión del complejo principal de histocompatibilidad de clase I (MHC I en el sistema nervioso central: plasticidad sináptica y regeneración Expression of class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC I in the central nervous system: role in synaptic plasticity and regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Graciele Zanon

    2010-06-01

    consecuencia, con la recuperación funcional. Por consiguiente, estos nuevos aspectos sobre la función del MHC I en el SNC orientan nuevas investigaciones con miras a entender el papel del MHC I en las enfermedades neurológicas y a desarrollar nuevas estrategias terapéuticas.It has been recently demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex of class I (MHC I expressed in the central nervous system (CNS does not only function as a molecule of the immune system, but also plays a role in the synaptic plasticity. The expression of MHC I influences the intensity and selectivity of elimination of synapses apposed to neurons that were subjected to lesion, besides influencing the reactivity of neighboring glial cells. MHC I expression and the degree of synaptic rearrangement and glial response after injury correlate with differences in the regenerative potential and functional recovery of isogenic mice strains. In this way, the new aspects regarding MHC I functions in the CNS may guide further studies aiming at searching the involvement of MCH I in neurologic disorders, as well as the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  17. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

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    Shan Wan

    Full Text Available Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT, a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through

  18. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shan; Pestka, Sidney; Jubin, Ronald G; Lyu, Yi Lisa; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Liu, Leroy F

    2012-01-01

    Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT), a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β) and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1) or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine) similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through T cell

  19. Intragraft selection of the T cell receptor repertoire by class I MHC sequences in tolerant recipients.

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    Dahai Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allograft tolerance of ACI (RT1(a recipients to WF (RT1(u hearts can be induced by allochimeric class I MHC molecules containing donor-type (RT1A(u immunogenic epitopes displayed on recipient-type (RT1A(a sequences. Here, we sought the mechanisms by which allochimeric sequences may affect responding T cells through T cell receptor (TCA repertoire restriction. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The soluble [alpha(1h (u]-RT1.A(a allochimeric molecule was delivered into ACI recipients of WF hearts in the presence of sub-therapeutic dose of cyclosporine (CsA. The TCR Vbeta spectrotyping of the splenocytes and cardiac allografts showed that the Vbeta gene families were differentially expressed within the TCR repertoire in allochimeric- or high-dose CsA-treated tolerant recipients at day +5 and +7 of post-transplantation. However, at day 30 of post-transplantation the allochimeric molecule-treated rats showed the restriction of TCR repertoire with altered dominant size peaks representing preferential clonal expansion of Vbeta7, Vbeta11, Vbeta13, Vbeta 14, and Vbeta15 genes. Moreover, we found a positive correlation between the alteration of Vbeta profile, restriction of TCR repertoire, and the establishment of allograft tolerance. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that presentation of allochimeric MHC class I sequences that partially mimic donor and recipient epitopes may induce unique tolerant state by selecting alloresponsive Vbeta genes.

  20. Negative regulation by HLA-DO of MHC class II-restricted antigen processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, L K; Sant'Angelo, D B; Hammond, C; Surman, M J; Cresswell, P

    1997-10-03

    HLA-DM is a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-like molecule that facilitates antigen processing by catalyzing the exchange of invariant chain-derived peptides (CLIP) from class II molecules for antigenic peptides. HLA-DO is a second class II-like molecule that physically associates with HLA-DM in B cells. HLA-DO was shown to block HLA-DM function. Purified HLA-DM-DO complexes could not promote peptide exchange in vitro. Expression of HLA-DO in a class II+ and DM+, DO- human T cell line caused the accumulation of class II-CLIP complexes, indicating that HLA-DO blocked DM function in vivo and suggesting that HLA-DO is an important modulator of class II-restricted antigen processing.

  1. Human MHC-II with Shared Epitope Motifs Are Optimal Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein 42 Ligands—Relation to Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole; Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Chailyan, Anna

    2018-01-01

    to as the shared epitope (SE) structure. By analyzing the structure of a HLA-DR molecule in complex with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the SE motif is suggested to play a vital role in the interaction of MHC II with the viral glycoprotein (gp) 42, an essential entry factor for EBV. EBV has been repeatedly linked to RA...

  2. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide...... blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8+ T‐cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan‐HLA class II and anti‐HLA‐DR antibodies. In addition, CD4+ T‐cell depletion before the 10......‐cell immunity against HLA‐I binding 9mer M. tuberculosis‐derived peptides might in many cases turn out to be mediated by CD4+ T cells and restricted by HLA‐II molecules. The use of 9mer peptides recognized by both CD8+ and CD4+ T cells might be of importance for the development of future M. tuberculosis peptide...

  3. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and costimulatory molecules in oral carcinomas in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel-Dorrego, Mariana; Speight, Paul M; Barrett, A William

    2005-01-01

    Recognition in the 1980 s that keratinocytes can express class II molecules of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) first raised the possibility that these cells might have an immunological function, and may even act as antigen presenting cells (APC). For effective T lymphocyte activation, APC require, in addition to MHC II, appropriate costimulatory signals. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of MHC class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD40, CD80 and CD86 in keratinocytes derived from healthy oral mucosa and oral carcinomas. Using flow cytometry, it was confirmed that oral keratinocytes, switch on, expression of MHC class II molecules after stimulation with IFNgamma in vitro. All keratinocyte lines expressed CD40 constitutively; by contrast, CD80 and CD86 were universally absent. Loss of CD80 and CD86 may be one means whereby tumours escape immunological surveillance.

  4. Limited MHC class I intron 2 repertoire variation in bonobos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natasja G; Heijmans, Corrine M C; Helsen, Philippe; Otting, Nel; Pereboom, Zjef; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2017-10-01

    Common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) experienced a selective sweep, probably caused by a SIV-like virus, which targeted their MHC class I repertoire. Based on MHC class I intron 2 data analyses, this selective sweep took place about 2-3 million years ago. As a consequence, common chimpanzees have a skewed MHC class I repertoire that is enriched for allotypes that are able to recognise conserved regions of the SIV proteome. The bonobo (Pan paniscus) shared an ancestor with common chimpanzees approximately 1.5 to 2 million years ago. To investigate whether the signature of this selective sweep is also detectable in bonobos, the MHC class I gene repertoire of two bonobo panels comprising in total 29 animals was investigated by Sanger sequencing. We identified 14 Papa-A, 20 Papa-B and 11 Papa-C alleles, of which eight, five and eight alleles, respectively, have not been reported previously. Within this pool of MHC class I variation, we recovered only 2 Papa-A, 3 Papa-B and 6 Papa-C intron 2 sequences. As compared to humans, bonobos appear to have an even more diminished MHC class I intron 2 lineage repertoire than common chimpanzees. This supports the notion that the selective sweep may have predated the speciation of common chimpanzees and bonobos. The further reduction of the MHC class I intron 2 lineage repertoire observed in bonobos as compared to the common chimpanzee may be explained by a founding effect or other subsequent selective processes.

  5. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Coggill, Penny C.; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G. R.; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC. PMID:23589541

  6. Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in MHC I Antigen Presentation After Lentivector Expression of a Gene Regulation System

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    Roland Vogel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapamycin-inducible gene regulation system was designed to minimize immune reactions in man and may thus be suited for gene therapy. We assessed whether this system indeed induces no immune responses. The protein components of the regulation system were produced in the human cell lines HEK 293T, D407, and HER 911 following lentiviral transfer of the corresponding genes. Stable cell lines were established, and the peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I molecules on transduced and wild-type (wt cells were compared by differential mass spectrometry. In all cell lines examined, expression of the transgenes resulted in prominent changes in the repertoire of MHC I-presented self-peptides. No MHC I ligands originating from the transgenic proteins were detected. In vitro analysis of immunogenicity revealed that transduced D407 cells displayed slightly higher capacity than wt controls to promote proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. These results indicate that therapeutic manipulations within the genome of target cells may affect pathways involved in the processing of peptide antigens and their presentation by MHC I. This makes the genomic modifications visible to the immune system which may recognize these events and respond. Ultimately, the findings call attention to a possible immune risk.

  7. Complex MHC class I gene transcription profiles and their functional impact in orangutans

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natasja G.; Heijmans, Corrine M.C.; van der Wiel, Marit K.H.; Blokhuis, Jeroen H.; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Doxiadis, Gaby G.M.; Claas, Frans H.J.; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E.

    2015-01-01

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two orangutan species, Pongo abelii and Pongo pygmaeus, is presented here. This analysis involved Sanger and next-generation sequencing methodologies, revealing diverse and complicated transcription profiles for orangutan MHC-A, -B, and -C. Thirty-five previously unreported MHC class I alleles are described. The data demonstrate that each orangutan MHC haplotype has one copy of the MHC-A gene, and that the MHC-B region has been subject to duplication, giving rise to at least three MHC-B genes. The MHC-B*03 and -B*08 lineages of alleles each account for a separate MHC-B gene. All MHC-B*08 allotypes have the C1-epitope motif recognized by KIR. At least one other MHC-B gene is present, pointing to MHC-B alleles that are not B*03 or B*08. The MHC-C gene is present only on some haplotypes, and each MHC-C allotype has the C1-epitope. The transcription profiles demonstrate that MHC-A alleles are highly transcribed, whereas MHC-C alleles, when present, are transcribed at very low levels. The MHC-B alleles are transcribed to a variable extent and over a wide range. For those orangutan MHC class I allotypes that are detected by human monoclonal anti-HLA class I antibodies, the level of cell-surface expression of proteins correlates with the level of transcription of the allele. PMID:26685209

  8. Complex MHC Class I Gene Transcription Profiles and Their Functional Impact in Orangutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Natasja G; Heijmans, Corrine M C; van der Wiel, Marit K H; Blokhuis, Jeroen H; Mulder, Arend; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Claas, Frans H J; Parham, Peter; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2016-01-01

    MHC haplotypes of humans and the African great ape species have one copy of the MHC-A, -B, and -C genes. In contrast, MHC haplotypes of orangutans, the Asian great ape species, exhibit variation in the number of gene copies. An in-depth analysis of the MHC class I gene repertoire in the two

  9. Dexamethasone inhibits the antigen presentation of dendritic cells in MHC class II pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J; Ju, D; Wang, Q; Zhang, M; Xia, D; Zhang, L; Yu, H; Cao, X

    2001-04-02

    Glucocorticoids (GC) are physiological inhibitors of inflammatory responses and are widely used as anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents in treatment of many autoimmune and allergic diseases. In the present study, we demonstrated that one of the mechanisms by which GC can suppress the immune responses is to inhibit the differentiation and antigen presentation of dendritic cells (DC). DC were differentiated from murine bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells by culture with GM-CSF and IL-4 with or without dexamethasone (Dex). Our data showed that Dex, in a dose dependent manner, down-regulated surface expression of CD86, CD40, CD54 and MHC class II molecules by DC, but the expression of MHC class I, CD80, CD95 and CD95L were not affected. In addition, Dex-treated DC showed an impaired function to activate alloreactive T cells and to secrete IL-Ibeta and IL-12p70. Moreover, Dex inhibited DC to present antigen by MHC class II pathway. However, the endocytotic activity of DC was not affected. The inhibitory effect of Dex on the expression of costimulatory molecules and the antigen-presenting capacity of DC could be blocked by the addition of RU486, a potent steroid hormone antagonist, suggesting the requirement of binding to cytosolic receptors in the above-described action of Dex. Since DC have the unique property to present antigen to responding naive T cells and are required in the induction of a primary response, the functional suppression of DC by Dex may be one of the mechanisms by which GC regulate immune responses in vivo.

  10. The combination of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and non-MHC genes influences murine lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eyler, Y L; Pfau, C J; Broomhall, K S

    1989-01-01

    Resistance to the acute lethal disease caused by the docile strain of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus varies widely between different mouse strains. In order to study the inheritance of host influence on susceptibility to this strain of LCM virus, we crossed the F1 to the parent...... susceptibility to the disease. When the parental strains carried similar MHC haplotypes but dissimilar background genes (B10.BR; CBA), 78% of the backcross mice succumbed, indicating that at least two non-MHC loci influenced disease susceptibility. It is unlikely, however, that the same two non-MHC loci...

  11. Circumsporozoite protein-specific K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells mediate protective antimalaria immunity in sporozoite-immunized MHC-I-K(d) transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Zhang, Min; Tsuji, Moriya

    2014-01-01

    Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6) transgenic (Tg) mice, expressing K(d) molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg), which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-K(d)-Tg × CS-Tg) F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-K(d)-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, K(d)-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  12. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  13. MHC-correlated mate choice in humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicek, Jan; Roberts, S Craig

    2009-05-01

    Extremely high variability in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates is assumed to be a consequence of frequency-dependent parasite-driven selection and mate preferences based on promotion of offspring heterozygosity at MHC, or potentially, genome-wide inbreeding avoidance. Where effects have been found, mate choice studies on rodents and other species usually find preference for MHC-dissimilarity in potential partners. Here we critically review studies on MHC-associated mate choice in humans. These are based on three broadly different aspects: (1) odor preferences, (2) facial preferences and (3) actual mate choice surveys. As in animal studies, most odor-based studies demonstrate disassortative preferences, although there is variation in the strength and nature of the effects. In contrast, facial attractiveness research indicates a preference for MHC-similar individuals. Results concerning MHC in actual couples show a bias towards similarity in one study, dissimilarity in two studies and random distribution in several other studies. These vary greatly in sample size and heterogeneity of the sample population, both of which may significantly bias the results. This pattern of mixed results across studies may reflect context-dependent and/or life history sensitive preference expression, in addition to higher level effects arising out of population differences in genetic heterogeneity or cultural and ethnic restrictions on random mating patterns. Factors of special relevance in terms of individual preferences are reproductive status and long- vs. short-term mating context. We discuss the idea that olfactory and visual channels may work in a complementary way (i.e. odor preference for MHC-dissimilarity and visual preference for MHC-similarity) to achieve an optimal level of genetic variability, methodological issues and interesting avenues for further research.

  14. HIV-1 Nef targets MHC-I and CD4 for degradation via a final common beta-COP-dependent pathway in T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malinda R Schaefer

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate viral infection and spread, HIV-1 Nef disrupts the surface expression of the viral receptor (CD4 and molecules capable of presenting HIV antigens to the immune system (MHC-I. To accomplish this, Nef binds to the cytoplasmic tails of both molecules and then, by mechanisms that are not well understood, disrupts the trafficking of each molecule in different ways. Specifically, Nef promotes CD4 internalization after it has been transported to the cell surface, whereas Nef uses the clathrin adaptor, AP-1, to disrupt normal transport of MHC-I from the TGN to the cell surface. Despite these differences in initial intracellular trafficking, we demonstrate that MHC-I and CD4 are ultimately found in the same Rab7(+ vesicles and are both targeted for degradation via the activity of the Nef-interacting protein, beta-COP. Moreover, we demonstrate that Nef contains two separable beta-COP binding sites. One site, an arginine (RXR motif in the N-terminal alpha helical domain of Nef, is necessary for maximal MHC-I degradation. The second site, composed of a di-acidic motif located in the C-terminal loop domain of Nef, is needed for efficient CD4 degradation. The requirement for redundant motifs with distinct roles supports a model in which Nef exists in multiple conformational states that allow access to different motifs, depending upon which cellular target is bound by Nef.

  15. HIV-1 Nef targets MHC-I and CD4 for degradation via a final common beta-COP-dependent pathway in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Malinda R; Wonderlich, Elizabeth R; Roeth, Jeremiah F; Leonard, Jolie A; Collins, Kathleen L

    2008-08-22

    To facilitate viral infection and spread, HIV-1 Nef disrupts the surface expression of the viral receptor (CD4) and molecules capable of presenting HIV antigens to the immune system (MHC-I). To accomplish this, Nef binds to the cytoplasmic tails of both molecules and then, by mechanisms that are not well understood, disrupts the trafficking of each molecule in different ways. Specifically, Nef promotes CD4 internalization after it has been transported to the cell surface, whereas Nef uses the clathrin adaptor, AP-1, to disrupt normal transport of MHC-I from the TGN to the cell surface. Despite these differences in initial intracellular trafficking, we demonstrate that MHC-I and CD4 are ultimately found in the same Rab7(+) vesicles and are both targeted for degradation via the activity of the Nef-interacting protein, beta-COP. Moreover, we demonstrate that Nef contains two separable beta-COP binding sites. One site, an arginine (RXR) motif in the N-terminal alpha helical domain of Nef, is necessary for maximal MHC-I degradation. The second site, composed of a di-acidic motif located in the C-terminal loop domain of Nef, is needed for efficient CD4 degradation. The requirement for redundant motifs with distinct roles supports a model in which Nef exists in multiple conformational states that allow access to different motifs, depending upon which cellular target is bound by Nef.

  16. Spatially and temporally fluctuating selection at non-MHC immune genes: evidence from TAP polymorphism in populations of brown trout ( Salmo trutta , L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L.F.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Mensberg, Karen-Lise Dons

    2008-01-01

    molecules that are central to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted antigen presentation and thus integral components in the adaptive immune system. As such, they could be influenced by selection, driven by pathogens and parasites in a manner similar to MHC genes. Analysis of allele...... frequencies at presumably neutral microsatellite loci revealed a temporally unstable population structure within regions, while the population structure was stable over time among regions. Analyses of the two TAP markers indicated an effect of selection at both a regional and micro-geographical spatial scale....... Moreover, signals of divergent selection among temporal samples within localities suggest that selection also might fluctuate at a temporal scale. These results suggest that immune genes other than the classical MHC class I and II might be subject to selection and warrant further studies of functional...

  17. Complex Mhc-based mate choice in a wild passerine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneaud, Camille; Chastel, Olivier; Federici, Pierre; Westerdahl, Helena; Sorci, Gabriele

    2006-05-07

    The extreme polymorphism of the vertebrate major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) is famous for protecting hosts against constantly evolving pathogens. Mate choice is often evoked as a means of maintaining Mhc variability through avoidance of partners with similar Mhc alleles or preference for heterozygotes. Evidence for these two hypotheses mostly comes from studies on humans and laboratory mice. Here, we tested these hypotheses in a wild outbred population of house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Females were not more or less closely related to the males they paired with when considering neutral genetic variation. However, males failed to form breeding pairs when they had too few Mhc alleles and when they were too dissimilar from females at Mhc loci (i.e. had no common alleles). Furthermore, pairs did not form at random as Mhc diversity positively correlated in mating pairs. These results suggest that mate choice evolves in response to (i) benefits in terms of parasite resistance acquired from allelic diversity, and (ii) costs associated with the disruption of co-adapted genes.

  18. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  19. MHC class I diversity in chimpanzees and bonobos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Vincent; Hans, Jörg B; Hvilsom, Christina; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Vigilant, Linda

    2017-10-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes are critically involved in the defense against intracellular pathogens. MHC diversity comparisons among samples of closely related taxa may reveal traces of past or ongoing selective processes. The bonobo and chimpanzee are the closest living evolutionary relatives of humans and last shared a common ancestor some 1 mya. However, little is known concerning MHC class I diversity in bonobos or in central chimpanzees, the most numerous and genetically diverse chimpanzee subspecies. Here, we used a long-read sequencing technology (PacBio) to sequence the classical MHC class I genes A, B, C, and A-like in 20 and 30 wild-born bonobos and chimpanzees, respectively, with a main focus on central chimpanzees to assess and compare diversity in those two species. We describe in total 21 and 42 novel coding region sequences for the two species, respectively. In addition, we found evidence for a reduced MHC class I diversity in bonobos as compared to central chimpanzees as well as to western chimpanzees and humans. The reduced bonobo MHC class I diversity may be the result of a selective process in their evolutionary past since their split from chimpanzees.

  20. An improved method for the detection of peptide-induced upregulation of HLA-A2 molecules on TAP-deficient T2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Regner, M; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Bregenholt, S

    1996-01-01

    Peptide-induced upregulation of MHC class I on TAP-deficient T2 cells is used to monitor peptide binding to class I molecules. We present a temperature-dependent modification of the T2 assay which increases the sensitivity of peptide binding to MHC class I with several orders of magnitude....

  1. Modified human beta 2-microglobulin (desLys(58)) displays decreased affinity for the heavy chain of MHC class I and induces nitric oxide production and apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, M; Harhaji, L; Lamberth, K

    2009-01-01

    Beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) is the light chain of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules, and is a prerequisite for the binding of peptides to the heavy chain and their presentation to CD8+ T cells. beta2m can be modified in vivo and in vitro by proteolytic cleavage...... by complement C1 and subsequent carboxypeptidase B-like activity--processes that lead to the generation of desLys(58) beta2m (dbeta2m). This work aims to study the effect of dbeta2m on peptide binding to MHC-I, the influence of dbeta2m on the binding of beta2m to the MHC-I heavy chain and the biological...... activity of dbeta2m. Both beta2m and dbeta2m are able to support the generation of MHC-I/peptide complexes at 18 degrees C, but complexes formed in the presence of dbeta2m destabilize at 37 degrees C. Moreover, a 250 times higher concentration of dbeta2m than of beta2m is needed to displace MHC...

  2. Self peptide/MHC class I complexes have a negligible effect on the response of some CD8+ T cells to foreign antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spörri, Roman; Reis e Sousa, Caetano

    2002-11-01

    MHC molecules loaded with self peptides do not trigger a T cell immune response but may deliver signals important for peripheral T cell survival and function. It is unclear if self peptide/MHC complexes on APC in addition can influence the T cell response to co-presented foreign ligands. To address this question, TAP-sufficient and TAP-deficient cells were loaded with ovalbumin peptide (pOVA) to generate APC that present pOVA/H-2Kb complexes in the context of high or low levels of self peptide-loaded MHC class I, respectively. The two cell types were then used to stimulate different CD8+ T cells specific for ovalbumin while the number of presented pOVA/H-2Kb complexes was independently assessed by staining with 25-D1, an antibody against pOVA/H-2Kb. In each case, T cell activation was independent of TAP expression by the APC and depended exclusively on the amount of 25-D1 staining. We conclude that the number of pOVA/Kb complexes and not their frequency relative to self peptide/MHC complexes determines the response of those T cells tested here. These results imply that the repertoire of self peptide/MHC class I complexes presented by APC has a negligible effect on the response of some CD8+ T cells to foreign ligands.

  3. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, A H; Kringelum, J V; Garde, C; Nielsen, M

    2016-12-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical. Most often so-called ligand clustering methods have been used to deal with these issues in the context of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions, and the MHC system the approach has proven highly effective for extrapolating information from a limited set of receptors with well characterized binding motifs, to others with no or very limited experimental characterization. The success of this approach has however proven to depend strongly on the similarity of the query molecule to the molecules with characterized specificity using in the machine-learning process. Here, we outline an alternative strategy with the aim of altering this and construct data sets optimal for training of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions focusing on receptor similarity rather than ligand similarity. We show that this receptor clustering method consistently in benchmarks covering affinity predictions, MHC ligand and MHC epitope identification perform better than the conventional ligand clustering method on the alleles with remote similarity to the training set. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. MHC haplotype analysis by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellgard, M I; Tay, G K; Hiew, H L; Witt, C S; Ketheesan, N; Christiansen, F T; Dawkins, R L

    1998-01-01

    Conventional matching is based on numbers of alleles shared between donor and recipient. This approach, however, ignores the degree of relationship between alleles and haplotypes, and therefore the actual degree of difference. To address this problem, we have compared family members using a block matching technique which reflects differences in genomic sequences. All parents and siblings had been genotyped using conventional MHC typing so that haplotypes could be assigned and relatives could be classified as sharing 0, 1 or 2 haplotypes. We trained an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) with subjects from 6 families (85 comparisons) to distinguish between relatives. Using the outputs of the ANN, we developed a score, the Histocompatibility Index (HI), as a measure of the degree of difference. Subjects from a further 3 families (106 profile comparisons) were tested. The HI score for each comparison was plotted. We show that the HI score is trimodal allowing the definition of three populations corresponding to approximately 0, 1 or 2 haplotype sharing. The means and standard deviations of the three populations were found. As expected, comparisons between family members sharing 2 haplotypes resulted in high HI scores with one exception. More interestingly, this approach distinguishes between the 1 and 0 haplotype groups, with some informative exceptions. This distinction was considered too difficult to attempt visually. The approach provides promise in the quantification of degrees of histocompatibility.

  5. Expression, Purification and Characterization of Ricin vectors used for exogenous antigen delivery into the MHC Class I presentation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Daniel C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Disarmed versions of the cytotoxin ricin can deliver fused peptides into target cells leading to MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation [Smith et al. J Immunol 2002; 169:99-107]. The ricin delivery vector must contain an attenuated catalytic domain to prevent target cell death, and the fused peptide epitope must remain intact for delivery and functional loading to MHC class I molecules. Expression in E. coli and purification by cation exchange chromatography of the fusion protein is described. Before used for delivery, the activity of the vector must be characterized in vitro, via an N-glycosidase assay, and in vivo, by a cytotoxicity assay. The presence of an intact epitope must be confirmed using mass spectrometry by comparing the actual mass with the predicted mass.

  6. Neurons are MHC class I-dependent targets for CD8 T cells upon neurotropic viral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégoire Chevalier

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Following infection of the central nervous system (CNS, the immune system is faced with the challenge of eliminating the pathogen without causing significant damage to neurons, which have limited capacities of renewal. In particular, it was thought that neurons were protected from direct attack by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL because they do not express major histocompatibility class I (MHC I molecules, at least at steady state. To date, most of our current knowledge on the specifics of neuron-CTL interaction is based on studies artificially inducing MHC I expression on neurons, loading them with exogenous peptide and applying CTL clones or lines often differentiated in culture. Thus, much remains to be uncovered regarding the modalities of the interaction between infected neurons and antiviral CD8 T cells in the course of a natural disease. Here, we used the model of neuroinflammation caused by neurotropic Borna disease virus (BDV, in which virus-specific CTL have been demonstrated as the main immune effectors triggering disease. We tested the pathogenic properties of brain-isolated CD8 T cells against pure neuronal cultures infected with BDV. We observed that BDV infection of cortical neurons triggered a significant up regulation of MHC I molecules, rendering them susceptible to recognition by antiviral CTL, freshly isolated from the brains of acutely infected rats. Using real-time imaging, we analyzed the spatio-temporal relationships between neurons and CTL. Brain-isolated CTL exhibited a reduced mobility and established stable contacts with BDV-infected neurons, in an antigen- and MHC-dependent manner. This interaction induced rapid morphological changes of the neurons, without immediate killing or impairment of electrical activity. Early signs of neuronal apoptosis were detected only hours after this initial contact. Thus, our results show that infected neurons can be recognized efficiently by brain-isolated antiviral CD8 T cells and

  7. The repertoire of MHC class I genes in the common marmoset: evidence for functional plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wiel, Marit K; Otting, Nel; de Groot, Natasja G; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2013-12-01

    In humans, the classical antigen presentation function of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is controlled by the human leukocyte antigen HLA -A, HLA-B and HLA-C loci. A similar observation has been made for great apes and Old World monkey species. In contrast, a New World monkey species such as the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus) appears to employ the G locus for its classical antigen presentation function. At present, little is known about the classical MHC class I repertoire of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), another New World monkey that is widely used in biomedical research. In the present population study, no evidence has been found for abundant transcription of classical I class genes. However, in each common marmoset, four to seven different G-like alleles were detected, suggesting that the ancestral locus has been subject to expansion. Segregation studies provided evidence for at least two G-like genes present per haplotype, which are transcribed by a variety of cell types. The alleles of these Caja-G genes cluster in separate lineages, suggesting that the loci diversified considerably after duplication. Phylogenetic analyses of the introns confirm that the Caja-G loci cluster in the vicinity of HLA-G, indicating that both genes shared an ancestor. In contrast to HLA-G, Caja-G shows considerable polymorphism at the peptide-binding sites. This observation, together with the lack of detectable transcripts of A and B-like genes, indicates that Caja-G genes have taken over the function of classical class I genes. These data highlight the extreme plasticity of the MHC class I gene system.

  8. Understanding TR binding to pMHC complexes: how does a TR scan many pMHC complexes yet preferentially bind to one.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Mohammed Khan

    Full Text Available Understanding the basis of the binding of a T cell receptor (TR to the peptide-MHC (pMHC complex is essential due to the vital role it plays in adaptive immune response. We describe the use of computed binding (free energy (BE, TR paratope, pMHC epitope, molecular surface electrostatic potential (MSEP and calculated TR docking angle (θ to analyse 61 TR/pMHC crystallographic structures to comprehend TR/pMHC interaction. In doing so, we have successfully demonstrated a novel/rational approach for θ calculation, obtained a linear correlation between BE and θ without any "codon" or amino acid preference, provided an explanation for TR ability to scan many pMHC ligands yet specifically bind one, proposed a mechanism for pMHC recognition by TR leading to T cell activation and illustrated the importance of the peptide in determining TR specificity, challenging the "germline bias" theory.

  9. DynaDom: structure-based prediction of T cell receptor inter-domain and T cell receptor-peptide-MHC (class I) association angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Marion, Antoine; Antes, Iris

    2017-02-02

    T cell receptor (TCR) molecules are involved in the adaptive immune response as they distinguish between self- and foreign-peptides, presented in major histocompatibility complex molecules (pMHC). Former studies showed that the association angles of the TCR variable domains (Vα/Vβ) can differ significantly and change upon binding to the pMHC complex. These changes can be described as a rotation of the domains around a general Center of Rotation, characterized by the interaction of two highly conserved glutamine residues. We developed a computational method, DynaDom, for the prediction of TCR Vα/Vβ inter-domain and TCR/pMHC orientations in TCRpMHC complexes, which allows predicting the orientation of multiple protein-domains. In addition, we implemented a new approach to predict the correct orientation of the carboxamide endgroups in glutamine and asparagine residues, which can also be used as an external, independent tool. The approach was evaluated for the remodeling of 75 and 53 experimental structures of TCR and TCRpMHC (class I) complexes, respectively. We show that the DynaDom method predicts the correct orientation of the TCR Vα/Vβ angles in 96 and 89% of the cases, for the poses with the best RMSD and best interaction energy, respectively. For the concurrent prediction of the TCR Vα/Vβ and pMHC orientations, the respective rates reached 74 and 72%. Through an exhaustive analysis, we could show that the pMHC placement can be further improved by a straightforward, yet very time intensive extension of the current approach. The results obtained in the present remodeling study prove the suitability of our approach for interdomain-angle optimization. In addition, the high prediction rate obtained specifically for the energetically highest ranked poses further demonstrates that our method is a powerful candidate for blind prediction. Therefore it should be well suited as part of any accurate atomistic modeling pipeline for TCRpMHC complexes and potentially

  10. Mechanical stress downregulates MHC class I expression on human cancer cell membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna La Rocca

    Full Text Available In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal, depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700-1800 cm(-1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK cells cytotoxic recognition.

  11. Mechanical Stress Downregulates MHC Class I Expression on Human Cancer Cell Membrane

    KAUST Repository

    La Rocca, Rosanna

    2014-12-26

    In our body, cells are continuously exposed to physical forces that can regulate different cell functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. In this work, we employed two different strategies to mechanically stress cancer cells. The cancer and healthy cell populations were treated either with mechanical stress delivered by a micropump (fabricated by deep X-ray nanolithography) or by ultrasound wave stimuli. A specific down-regulation of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules expression on cancer cell membrane compared to different kinds of healthy cells (fibroblasts, macrophages, dendritic and lymphocyte cells) was observed, stimulating the cells with forces in the range of nano-newton, and pressures between 1 and 10 bar (1 bar = 100.000 Pascal), depending on the devices used. Moreover, Raman spectroscopy analysis, after mechanical treatment, in the range between 700–1800 cm−1, indicated a relative concentration variation of MHC class I. PCA analysis was also performed to distinguish control and stressed cells within different cell lines. These mechanical induced phenotypic changes increase the tumor immunogenicity, as revealed by the related increased susceptibility to Natural Killer (NK) cells cytotoxic recognition.

  12. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  13. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  14. Characterization of binding specificities of bovine leucocyte class I molecules: impacts for rational epitope discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Andreas M.; Rasmussen, Michael; Svitek, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    . Using this strategy, we characterized eight BoLA-I molecules, and found the peptide specificity to resemble that of human MHC-I molecules with primary anchors most often at P2 and P9, and occasional auxiliary P1/P3/P5/P6 anchors. We analyzed nine reported CTL epitopes from Theileria parva, and in eight...

  15. Evolution of MHC class I in the Order Crocodylia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3...... events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia....

  16. Mamu-A*01/Kb Transgenic and MHC Class I Knockout Mice as a Tool for HIV Vaccine Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinliang; Srivastava, Tumul; Rawal, Ravindra; Manuel, Edwin; Isbell, Donna; Tsark, Walter; La Rosa, Corinna; Wang, Zhongde; Li, Zhongqi; Barry, Peter A.; Hagen, Katherine; Longmate, Jeffrey; Diamond, Don J.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a murine model expressing the rhesus macaque (RM) Mamu-A*01 MHC allele to characterize immune responses and vaccines based on antigens of importance to human disease processes. Towards that goal, transgenic (Tg) mice expressing chimeric RM (α1 and α2 Mamu-A*01 domains) and murine (α3, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic H-2Kb domains) MHC Class I molecules were derived by transgenesis of the H-2KbDb double MHC Class I knockout strain. After immunization of Mamu-A*01/Kb Tg mice with rVV-SIVGag-Pol, the mice generated CD8+ T-cell IFN-γ responses to several known Mamu-A*01 restricted epitopes from the SIV Gag and Pol antigen sequence. Fusion peptides of highly recognized CTL epitopes from SIV Pol and Gag and a strong T-help epitope were shown to be immunogenic and capable of limiting an rVV-SIVGag-Pol challenge. Mamu-A*01/Kb Tg mice provide a model system to study the Mamu-A*01 restricted T-cell response for various infectious diseases which are applicable to study in RM. PMID:19249807

  17. Genetic variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II B gene in the threatened Hume's pheasant, Syrmaticus humiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weicai Chen

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrates and encode molecules that play a crucial role in pathogen resistance. As a result of their diversity, they have received much attention in the fields of evolutionary and conservation biology. Here, we described the genetic variation of MHC class II B (MHCIIB exon 2 in a wild population of Hume's pheasant (Syrmaticus humiae, which has suffered a dramatic decline in population over the last three decades across its ranges in the face of heavy exploitation and habitat loss. Twenty-four distinct alleles were found in 73 S. humiae specimens. We found seven shared alleles among four geographical groups as well as six rare MHCIIB alleles. Most individuals displayed between one to five alleles, suggesting that there are at least three MHCIIB loci of the Hume's pheasant. The dN ⁄ dS ratio at putative antigen-binding sites (ABS was significantly greater than one, indicating balancing selection is acting on MHCIIB exon 2. Additionally, recombination and gene conversion contributed to generating MHCIIB diversity in the Hume's pheasant. One to three recombination events and seventy-five significant gene conversion events were observed within the Hume's pheasant MHCIIB loci. The phylogenetic tree and network analysis revealed that the Hume's pheasant alleles do not cluster together, but are scattered through the tree or network indicating a trans-species evolutionary mode. These findings revealed the evolution of the Hume's pheasant MHC after suffering extreme habitat fragmentation.

  18. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  19. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, P.; Sidney, J.; Kim, Y.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects...... affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated...... include all training data for maximum performance. 4) The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform...

  20. MHCBN 4.0: A database of MHC/TAP binding peptides and T-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lata, Sneh; Bhasin, Manoj; Raghava, Gajendra P S

    2009-04-20

    Many databases housing the information about MHC binders and non-binders have been developed in the past to help the scientific community working in the field of immunology, immune-informatics or vaccine design. As the information about these MHC binding and non-binding peptides continues to grow with the time and there is a need to keep the databases updated. So, in order to provide the immunological fraternity with the most recent information we need to maintain and update our database regularly. In this paper, we describe the updated version of 4.0 of the database MHCBN. MHCBN is a comprehensive database comprising over 25,857 peptide sequences (1053 TAP binding peptides), whose binding affinity with either MHC or TAP molecules has been assayed experimentally. It is a manually curated database where entries are collected & compiled from published literature and existing immunological public databases. MHCBN has a number of web-based tools for the analysis and retrieval of information like mapping of antigenic regions, creation of allele specific dataset, BLAST search, various diseases associated with MHC alleles etc. Further, all entries are hyper linked to major databases like SWISS-PROT, PDB etc. to provide the information beyond the scope of MHCBN. The latest version 4.0 of MHCBN has 6080 more entries than previously published version 1.1. MHCBN database updating is meant to facilitate immunologist in understanding the immune system and provide them the latest information. We feel that our database will complement the existing databases in serving scientific community.

  1. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Holman

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies.

  2. Evolution by selection, recombination, and gene duplication in MHC class I genes of two Rhacophoridae species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparison of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes across vertebrate species can reveal molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of adaptive immunity-related proteins. As the first terrestrial tetrapods, amphibians deserve special attention because of their exposure to probably increased spectrum of microorganisms compared with ancestral aquatic fishes. Knowledge regarding the evolutionary patterns and mechanisms associated with amphibian MHC genes remains limited. The goal of the present study was to isolate MHC class I genes from two Rhacophoridae species (Rhacophorus omeimontis and Polypedates megacephalus) and examine their evolution. Results We identified 27 MHC class I alleles spanning the region from exon 2 to 4 in 38 tree frogs. The available evidence suggests that these 27 sequences all belong to classical MHC class I (MHC Ia) genes. Although several anuran species only display one MHC class Ia locus, at least two or three loci were observed in P. megacephalus and R. omeimontis, indicating that the number of MHC class Ia loci varies among anuran species. Recombination events, which mainly involve the entire exons, played an important role in shaping the genetic diversity of the 27 MHC class Ia alleles. In addition, signals of positive selection were found in Rhacophoridae MHC class Ia genes. Amino acid sites strongly suggested by program to be under positive selection basically accorded with the putative antigen binding sites deduced from crystal structure of human HLA. Phylogenetic relationships among MHC class I alleles revealed the presence of trans-species polymorphisms. Conclusions In the two Rhacophoridae species (1) there are two or three MHC class Ia loci; (2) recombination mainly occurs between the entire exons of MHC class Ia genes; (3) balancing selection, gene duplication and recombination all contribute to the diversity of MHC class Ia genes. These findings broaden our knowledge on the evolution of amphibian MHC systems

  3. Cohesin regulates major histocompatibility complex class II genes through interactions with MHC-II insulators1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Parimal; Boss, Jeremy M.

    2011-01-01

    Cohesin is a multiprotein ringed complex that is most well known for its role in stabilizing the association of sister chromatids between S phase and M. More recently cohesin was found to be associated with transcriptional insulators, elements that are associated with the organization of chromatin into regulatory domains. The human major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) locuscontains ten intergenic elements, termed MHC-II insulators, which bind the transcriptional insulator protein CCCTC transcription factor (CTCF). MHC-II insulators interact with each other forming a base architecture of discrete loops and potential regulatory domains. When MHC-II genes are expressed, their proximal promoter regulatory regions reorganize to the foci established by the interacting MHC-II insulators. MHC-II insulators also bind cohesin, but the functional role of cohesin in regulating this system is not known. Here we show that the binding of cohesin to MHC-II insulators occurred irrespective of MHC-II expression but was required for optimal expression of the HLA-DR and HLA-DQ genes. In a DNA dependent manner, cohesin subunits interacted with CTCF and the MHC-II specific transcription factors RFX and CIITA. Intriguingly, cohesin subunits were important for DNA looping interactions between the HLA-DRA promoter region and a 5’ MHC-II insulator but were not required for interactions between the MHC-II insulators themselves. This latter observation introduces cohesin as a regulator of MHC-II expression by initiating or stabilizing MHC-II promoter regulatory element interactions with the MHC-II insulator elements; events which are required for maximal MHC-II transcription. PMID:21911605

  4. MHC promoter polymorphism in grey wolves and domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Karin T; Seddon, Jennifer M

    2005-05-01

    A functional immune system requires a tight control over major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene transcription, as the abnormal MHC expression patterns of severe immunodeficiency and autoimmune diseases demonstrate. Although the regulation of MHC expression has been well documented in humans and mice, little is known in other species. In this study, we detail the level of polymorphism in wolf and dog MHC gene promoters. The promoter regions of the DRB, DQA and DQB locus were sequenced in 90 wolves and 90 dogs. The level of polymorphism was high in the DQB promoters, with variation found within functionally relevant regions, including binding sites for transcription factors. Clear associations between DQB promoters and exon 2 alleles were noted in wolves, indicating strong linkage disequilibrium in this region. Low levels of polymorphism were found within the DRB and DQA promoter regions. However, a variable site was identified within the T box, a TNF-alpha response element, of the DQA promoter. Furthermore, we identified a previously unrecognised 18-base-pair deletion within exon 1 of the DQB locus.

  5. A hybrid approach for predicting promiscuous MHC class I restricted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-09-15

    Sep 15, 2006 ... A secondary artificial neural network (ANN)-based method was developed for 30 out of 47 MHC alleles having a minimum of 40 binders. Combination of these ANN- and QM-based prediction methods for 30 alleles improved the accuracy of prediction by 6% compared to each individual method. Average ...

  6. A hybrid approach for predicting promiscuous MHC class I restricted ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-09-15

    Sep 15, 2006 ... quantitative matrix based methods; (iii) machine learning techniques and (iv) ab ... learning techniques can handle the non-linearity in data in a facile way. ...... environment. The server is partitioned into two major parts,. ComPred and ANNPred. ComPred allows to prediction of binders for 67 MHC alleles.

  7. Characterization of duck (Anas platyrhynchos) MHC class Igene in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIN ZHANG

    2017-06-17

    Jun 17, 2017 ... could contribute to design effective diagnostics and vaccines for the species against various infections. [Zhang L., Liu W.-J., Wu J.-Q., Xu M.-L., Kong Z.-J., Huang Y.-Y. and Yang S.-H. 2017 Characterization of duck (Anas platyrhynchos). MHC class I gene in two duck lines. J. Genet. 96, 371–375].

  8. Sensitive quantitative predictions of peptide-MHC binding by a 'Query by Committee' artificial neural network approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S.; Lauemoller, S.L.; Worning, Peder

    2003-01-01

    We have generated Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) capable of performing sensitive, quantitative predictions of peptide binding to the MHC class I molecule, HLA-A*0204. We have shown that such quantitative ANN are superior to conventional classification ANN, that have been trained to predict...... binding vs non-binding peptides. Furthermore, quantitative ANN allowed a straightforward application of a 'Query by Committee' (QBC) principle whereby particularly information-rich peptides could be identified and subsequently tested experimentally. Iterative training based on QBC-selected peptides...

  9. MHC I presentation of Toxoplasma gondii immunodominant antigen does not require Sec22b and is regulated by antigen orientation at the vacuole membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaillon, Célia; Guerrero, Nestor A; Cebrian, Ignacio; Blanié, Sophie; Lopez, Jodie; Bassot, Emilie; Vasseur, Virginie; Santi-Rocca, Julien; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    The intracellular Toxoplasma gondii parasite replicates within a parasitophorous vacuole (PV). T. gondii secretes proteins that remain soluble in the PV space, are inserted into PV membranes or are exported beyond the PV boundary. In addition to supporting T. gondii growth, these proteins can be processed and presented by MHC I for CD8 + T-cell recognition. Yet it is unclear whether membrane binding influences the processing pathways employed and if topology of membrane antigens impacts their MHC I presentation. Here we report that the MHC I pathways of soluble and membrane-bound antigens differ in their requirement for host ER recruitment. In contrast to the soluble SAG1-OVA model antigen, we find that presentation of the membrane-bound GRA6 is independent from the SNARE Sec22b, a key molecule for transfer of host endoplasmic reticulum components onto the PV. Using parasites modified to secrete a transmembrane antigen with opposite orientations, we further show that MHC I presentation is highly favored when the C-terminal epitope is exposed to the host cell cytosol, which corresponds to GRA6 natural orientation. Our data suggest that the biochemical properties of antigens released by intracellular pathogens critically guide their processing pathway and are valuable parameters to consider for vaccination strategies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. MHC class I in activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    BOULANGER, LISA M.

    2007-01-01

    Members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I family of proteins are well known for their central role in the adaptive immune system, where they present self and non-self peptides for immune surveillance. Although the brain has been long considered immune privileged, in part because of an apparent lack of neuronal MHC class I, it has since been shown that MHC class I proteins are expressed by normal, uninfected neurons. Moreover, expression of MHC class I is unusually dynamic in the developing and adult brain, and MHC class I levels in neurons can be regulated by endogenous and exogenous electrical activity. Unexpectedly, several recent studies find that MHC class I is required for distinct activity-dependent events during brain development, adult plasticity, and in response to injury. Together, these studies indicate a novel role for MHC class I proteins in translating electrical activity into changes in synaptic strength and neuronal connectivity in vivo. PMID:18185853

  11. Molecule nanoweaver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II; Rex, E [Brookfield, IL; Klingler, Robert J [Glenview, IL; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL; Diaz, Rocio [Chicago, IL; Vukovic, Lela [Westchester, IL

    2009-03-10

    A method, apparatus, and system for constructing uniform macroscopic films with tailored geometric assemblies of molecules on the nanometer scale. The method, apparatus, and system include providing starting molecules of selected character, applying one or more force fields to the molecules to cause them to order and condense with NMR spectra and images being used to monitor progress in creating the desired geometrical assembly and functionality of molecules that comprise the films.

  12. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fluorescence usually originates from the lowest excited electronic state (singlet) irrespective of the excitation and hence, the fluorescence spectrum of a molecule is characterized by a single band. However, what makes DMABN a very special molecule is that it exhibits dual fluorescence (i.e. emission of. Molecule Matters.

  13. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) in Crossastrea gigas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Fan; Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Xiang, Zhiming; Zhang, Yang; Yu, Ziniu

    2017-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) has been demonstrated to be a key signaling molecule involved in adaptive and innate immunity. In this study, we obtained the full length CgTRAF6 cDNA and analyzed the characteristics of the ORF and the peptide sequence in Crassostrea gigas. The deduced protein sequence of CgTRAF6 includes a conserved C-terminal TRAF domain following the RING and the zinc finger domain. The TRAF domain is composed of coiled-coil TRAF-N and MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) subdomains. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis revealed that CgTRAF6 is clustered together with other members TRAF6 family and is placed in a sub-cluster singly which had a close relationship with Drosophila melanogaster. Expression analysis of CgTRAF6 indicated its constitutive expression in all tissues including mantle, adductor muscle, digestive tract, gonads, heart, gill, and hemocyte. Immune challenge with Vibrio alginolyticus and poly I:C resulted in significant up-regulation of CgTRAF6 expression. Dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that CgTRAF6 could activate both pNF-κB-Luc and pISRE-Luc expression, suggesting CgTRAF6 is potentially involved in NF-κB and the interferon signaling pathway. Furthermore, RNAi mediated knockdown of CgTRAF6 resulted in the down-regulation of several putative anti-viral signaling (IRF) and effector (PKR & Viperin) molecules coding genes, 7 days post-injection. These results collectively indicate that CgTRAF6 is a member of TRAF6 sub-family and is potentially involved in immune defense system against invading bacteria and viruses in Crassostrea gigas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diversity of Mhc class I and IIB genes in house sparrows (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneaud, Camille; Sorci, Gabriele; Morin, Véronique; Westerdahl, Helena; Zoorob, Rima; Wittzell, Håkan

    2004-03-01

    In order to understand the expression and evolution of host resistance to pathogens, we need to examine the links between genetic variability at the major histocompatibility complex ( Mhc), phenotypic expression of the immune response and parasite resistance in natural populations. To do so, we characterized the Mhc class I and IIB genes of house sparrows with the goal of designing a PCR-based genotyping method for the Mhc genes using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The incredible success of house sparrows in colonizing habitats worldwide allows us to assess the importance of the variability of Mhc genes in the face of various pathogenic pressures. Isolation and sequencing of Mhc class I and IIB alleles revealed that house sparrows have fewer loci and fewer alleles than great reed warblers. In addition, the Mhc class I genes divided in two distinct lineages with different levels of polymorphism, possibly indicating different functional roles for each gene family. This organization is reminiscent of the chicken B complex and Rfp-Y system. The house sparrow Mhc hence appears to be intermediate between the great reed warbler and the chicken Mhc, both in terms of numbers of alleles and existence of within-class lineages. We specifically amplified one Mhc class I gene family and ran the PCR products on DGGE gels. The individuals screened displayed between one and ten DGGE bands, indicating that this method can be used in future studies to explore the ecological impacts of Mhc diversity.

  15. Enhancing in silico protein-based vaccine discovery for eukaryotic pathogens using predicted peptide-MHC binding and peptide conservation scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Goodswen

    Full Text Available Given thousands of proteins constituting a eukaryotic pathogen, the principal objective for a high-throughput in silico vaccine discovery pipeline is to select those proteins worthy of laboratory validation. Accurate prediction of T-cell epitopes on protein antigens is one crucial piece of evidence that would aid in this selection. Prediction of peptides recognised by T-cell receptors have to date proved to be of insufficient accuracy. The in silico approach is consequently reliant on an indirect method, which involves the prediction of peptides binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. There is no guarantee nevertheless that predicted peptide-MHC complexes will be presented by antigen-presenting cells and/or recognised by cognate T-cell receptors. The aim of this study was to determine if predicted peptide-MHC binding scores could provide contributing evidence to establish a protein's potential as a vaccine. Using T-Cell MHC class I binding prediction tools provided by the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource, peptide binding affinity to 76 common MHC I alleles were predicted for 160 Toxoplasma gondii proteins: 75 taken from published studies represented proteins known or expected to induce T-cell immune responses and 85 considered less likely vaccine candidates. The results show there is no universal set of rules that can be applied directly to binding scores to distinguish a vaccine from a non-vaccine candidate. We present, however, two proposed strategies exploiting binding scores that provide supporting evidence that a protein is likely to induce a T-cell immune response-one using random forest (a machine learning algorithm with a 72% sensitivity and 82.4% specificity and the other, using amino acid conservation scores with a 74.6% sensitivity and 70.5% specificity when applied to the 160 benchmark proteins. More importantly, the binding score strategies are valuable evidence contributors to the overall in silico

  16. Assembly and function of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I peptide-loading complex are conserved across higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Jedamzick, Johanna; Herbring, Valentina; Fischbach, Hanna; Hartmann, Jessica; Parcej, David; Koch, Joachim; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-28

    Antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules depends on the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). For efficient antigen supply to MHC I molecules in the ER, TAP assembles a macromolecular peptide-loading complex (PLC) by recruiting tapasin. In evolution, TAP appeared together with effector cells of adaptive immunity at the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates and diversified further within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we compared TAP function and interaction with tapasin of a range of species within two classes of jawed vertebrates. We found that avian and mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 form heterodimeric complexes across taxa. Moreover, the extra N-terminal domain TMD0 of mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 as well as avian TAP2 recruits tapasin. Strikingly, however, only TAP1 and TAP2 from the same taxon can form a functional heterodimeric translocation complex. These data demonstrate that the dimerization interface between TAP1 and TAP2 and the tapasin docking sites for PLC assembly are conserved in evolution, whereas elements of antigen translocation diverged later in evolution and are thus taxon specific. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Edmond J; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  18. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family, Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family, Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families, Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family, Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family, Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family. for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1. Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  19. Absence of linkage between MHC and a gene involved in susceptibility to human schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiarella J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred million people are at risk of infection by Schistosoma mansoni. MHC haplotypes have been reported to segregate with susceptibility to schistosomiasis in murine models. In humans, a major gene related to susceptibility/resistance to infection by S. mansoni (SM1 and displaying the mean fecal egg count as phenotype was detected by segregation analysis. This gene displayed a codominant mode of inheritance with an estimated frequency of 0.20-0.25 for the deleterious allele and accounted for more than 50% of the variance of infection levels. To determine if the SM1 gene segregates with the human MHC chromosomal region, we performed a linkage study by the lod score method. We typed for HLA-A, B, C, DR and DQ antigens in 11 informative families from an endemic area for schistosomiasis in Bahia, Brazil, by the microlymphocytotoxicity technique. HLA-DR typing by the polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP and HLA-DQ were confirmed by PCR-sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes (PCR-SSOP. The lod scores for the different q values obtained clearly indicate that there is no physical linkage between HLA and SM1 genes. Thus, susceptibility or resistance to schistosomiasis, as defined by mean fecal egg count, is not primarily dependent on the host's HLA profile. However, if the HLA molecule plays an important role in specific immune responses to S. mansoni, this may involve the development of the different clinical aspects of the disease such as granuloma formation and development of hepatosplenomegaly.

  20. A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-based immunoassay for detection of cell surface antigens and its application to the study of MHC class I-binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigal, L J; Berens, S; Wylie, D

    1994-12-28

    A lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-based immunoassay, referred to as CPEIA (cell panning enzyme immunoassay), has been developed for the detection of cell-surface antigens. CPEIA is similar to a panning assay, in that it is based on the capture of cells bearing an antigen of interest by means of an antibody immobilized to a 96-well microtiter plate. Attachment of the cells is then measured by addition of a substrate for the intracellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The substrate solution also contains the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 to lyse the cells and release LDH, which converts the substrate p-iodonitrotetrazolium violet (INT) from yellow to red. The intensity of the color resulting from the LDH-catalyzed reaction is proportional to the number of cells bound to the plate. The procedure does not require fixation of the cells, centrifugation, and blocking steps, resulting in a more convenient assay. CPEIA has been used for the detection of MHC class I antigens and other molecules on the surfaces of mouse cell lines and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated T lymphocytes. In addition, the assay has been used to detect peptide binding to Db and Kb MHC class I molecules on the surface of the mutant cell line RMA-S. The half-maximal responses for peptide-MHC class I interactions at different peptide concentrations can be determined with the assay, allowing the apparent dissociation constants to be calculated.

  1. Subtle conformational changes induced in major histocompatibility complex class II molecules by binding peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervonsky, A V; Medzhitov, R M; Denzin, L K; Barlow, A K; Rudensky, A Y; Janeway, C A

    1998-08-18

    Intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules is characterized by passage through specialized endocytic compartment(s) where antigenic peptides replace invariant chain fragments in the presence of the DM protein. These changes are accompanied by structural transitions of the MHC molecules that can be visualized by formation of compact SDS-resistant dimers, by changes in binding of mAbs, and by changes in T cell responses. We have observed that a mAb (25-9-17) that is capable of staining I-Ab on the surface of normal B cells failed to interact with I-Ab complexes with a peptide derived from the Ealpha chain of the I-E molecule but bound a similar covalent complex of I-Ab with the class II binding fragment (class II-associated invariant chain peptides) of the invariant chain. Moreover, 25-9-17 blocked activation of several I-Ab-reactive T cell hybridomas but failed to block others, suggesting that numerous I-Ab-peptide complexes acquire the 25-9-17(+) or 25-9-17(-) conformation. Alloreactive T cells were also able to discriminate peptide-dependent variants of MHC class II molecules. Thus, peptides impose subtle structural transitions upon MHC class II molecules that affect T cell recognition and may thus be critical for T cell selection and autiommunity.

  2. Improved pan-specific prediction of MHC class I peptide binding using a novel receptor clustering data partitioning strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Kringelum, Jens Vindahl; Garde, C.

    2016-01-01

    Pan-specific prediction of receptor-ligand interaction is conventionally done using machine-learning methods that integrates information about both receptor and ligand primary sequences. To achieve optimal performance using machine learning, dealing with overfitting and data redundancy is critical...... strategy with the aim of altering this and construct data sets optimal for training of pan-specific receptor-ligand predictions focusing on receptor similarity rather than ligand similarity. We show that this receptor clustering method consistently in benchmarks covering affinity predictions, MHC ligand...... motifs, to others with no or very limited experimental characterization. The success of this approach has however proven to depend strongly on the similarity of the query molecule to the molecules with characterized specificity using in the machine-learning process. Here, we outline an alternative...

  3. MetaMHCpan, A Meta Approach for Pan-Specific MHC Peptide Binding Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichang; Luo, Cheng; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Zhu, Shanfeng

    2016-01-01

    Recent computational approaches in bioinformatics can achieve high performance, by which they can be a powerful support for performing real biological experiments, making biologists pay more attention to bioinformatics than before. In immunology, predicting peptides which can bind to MHC alleles is an important task, being tackled by many computational approaches. However, this situation causes a serious problem for immunologists to select the appropriate method to be used in bioinformatics. To overcome this problem, we develop an ensemble prediction-based Web server, which we call MetaMHCpan, consisting of two parts: MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan, for predicting peptides which can bind MHC-I and MHC-II, respectively. MetaMHCIpan and MetaMHCIIpan use two (MHC2SKpan and LApan) and four (TEPITOPEpan, MHC2SKpan, LApan, and MHC2MIL) existing predictors, respectively. MetaMHCpan is available at http://datamining-iip.fudan.edu.cn/MetaMHCpan/index.php/pages/view/info .

  4. DMPD: The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling networks controlling inflammation. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18249132 The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) i...2008 Jan 30. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kin...49132 Title The involvement of the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) incellular signaling ne

  5. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is such an innocuous molecule that you might not think it worthy of special attention. We take this molecule for granted because it is abundantly available on earth. About 80 % of the earth's atmosphere, which means a total of 4×1018 kg, is dinitrogen![1] Secondly, it is ignored because it is quite un- reactive. Nitrogen is such ...

  6. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 4. Molecule Matters – van der Waals Molecules - History and Some Perspectives on Intermolecular Forces. E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 4 April 2009 pp 346-356 ...

  7. Interspecific hybridization increases MHC class II diversity in two sister species of newts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadachowska-Brzyska, Krystyna; Zieliński, Piotr; Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2012-02-01

    Our understanding of the evolutionary mechanisms generating variation within the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes remains incomplete. Assessing MHC variation across multiple populations, of recent and ancient divergence, may facilitate understanding of geographical and temporal aspects of variation. Here, we applied 454 sequencing to perform a large-scale, comprehensive analysis of MHC class II in the closely related, hybridizing newts, Lissotriton vulgaris (Lv) and Lissotriton montandoni (Lm). Our study revealed an extensive (299 alleles) geographically structured polymorphism. Populations at the southern margin of the Lv distribution, inhabited by old and distinct lineages (southern Lv), exhibited moderate MHC variation and strong population structure, indicating little gene flow or extensive local adaptation. Lissotriton vulgaris in central Europe and the northern Balkans (northern Lv) and almost all Lm populations had a high MHC variation. A much higher proportion of MHC alleles was shared between Lm and northern Lv than between Lm and southern Lv. Strikingly, the average pairwise F(ST) between northern Lv and Lm was significantly lower than between northern and southern Lv for MHC, but not for microsatellites. Thus, high MHC variation in Lm and northern Lv may result from gene flow between species. We hypothesize that the interspecific exchange of MHC genes may be facilitated by frequency-dependent selection. A marginally significant correlation between the MHC and microsatellite allelic richness indicates that demographic factors may have contributed to the present-day pattern of MHC variation, but unequivocal signatures of adaptive evolution in MHC class II sequences emphasize the role of selection on a longer timescale. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Is Promiscuity Associated with Enhanced Selection on MHC-DQα  in Mice (genus Peromyscus)?

    OpenAIRE

    MacManes, Matthew D; Lacey, Eileen A

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive behavior may play an important role in shaping selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes. For example, the number of sexual partners that an individual has may affect exposure to sexually transmitted pathogens, with more partners leading to greater exposure and, hence, potentially greater selection for variation at MHC loci. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the strength of selection on exon 2 of the MHC-DQα locus in two species of Peromyscus. While the Cali...

  9. Measurement of peptide-MHC interactions in solution using the spin column filtration assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Soren; Lise Lauemøller, S; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    This unit describes how peptide-MHC complexes can be generated in vitro using affinity-purified MHC and synthetic peptide. The unit first describes how the interaction between peptide and MHC interaction can be measured in an accurate, quantitative biochemical assay. This procedure has been optim...... sensitivity and throughput. It also demands fewer resources both in terms of unique reagents and labor, and it generates less hazardous waste. Thus, the spin column gel-filtration assay is ideal for routine work....

  10. A community resource benchmarking predictions of peptide binding to MHC-I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, B; Bui, HH; Pletscher-Frankild, Sune

    2006-01-01

    on the internet. While differences in the data used to generate these predictions hamper direct comparisons, we do conclude that tools based on combinatorial peptide libraries perform remarkably well. The transparent prediction evaluation on this dataset provides tool developers with a benchmark for comparison...... of newly developed prediction methods. In addition, to generate and evaluate our own prediction methods, we have established an easily extensible web-based prediction framework that allows automated side-by-side comparisons of prediction methods implemented by experts. This is an advance over the current...

  11. Ectopic expression of HLA-DO in mouse dendritic cells diminishes MHC class II antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallas, Jennifer L; Tobin, Helen M; Lou, Olivia; Guo, Donglin; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; Denzin, Lisa K

    2004-08-01

    The MHC class II-like molecule HLA-DM (DM) (H-2M in mice) catalyzes the exchange of CLIP for antigenic peptides in the endosomes of APCs. HLA-DO (DO) (H-2O in mice) is another class II-like molecule that is expressed in B cells, but not in other APCs. Studies have shown that DO impairs or modifies the peptide exchange activity of DM. To further evaluate the role of DO in Ag processing and presentation, we generated transgenic mice that expressed the human HLA-DOA and HLA-DOB genes under the control of a dendritic cell (DC)-specific promoter. Our analyses of DCs from these mice showed that as DO levels increased, cell surface levels of A(b)-CLIP also increased while class II-peptide levels decreased. The presentation of some, but not all, exogenous Ags to T cells or T hybridomas was significantly inhibited by DO. Surprisingly, H-2M accumulated in DO-expressing DCs and B cells, suggesting that H-2O/DO prolongs the half-life of H-2M. Overall, our studies showed that DO expression impaired H-2M function, resulting in Ag-specific down-modulation of class II Ag processing and presentation.

  12. Comprehensive analysis of MHC ligands in clinical material by immunoaffinity-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Kie

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) are expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APC) that display peptide antigens. This is a crucial step to activate a T-cell response. Since immunogenic ligand of MHC is closely related with autoimmunity, inflammatory diseases, and cancer, comprehensive analysis of MHC ligands (the so-called Ligandome) is essential to unveil disease pathogenesis. Recently, immunotherapies such as vaccination have been focused on as new therapies of cancer, HIV, and infectious diseases. Therefore, the importance of comprehensive analysis of MHC ligands is increasing. Mass spectrometry has been the core technology of ligand identification since the 1990s. The sensitivity of mass spectrometers has been improved dramatically in recent years; thus, it enables to identify MHC ligands in clinical materials. This chapter lays out the workflow of MHC ligand identification in clinical materials, especially human bronchoalveolar (BAL) cells. MHC-ligand complexes are enriched by immunoaffinity extraction and captured ligand peptides are identified by LC-MS/MS. MHC class II ligand in BAL cells is described in this text; however, this approach is applicable to MHC class I and other clinical materials such as tissues.

  13. High levels of diversity characterize mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) Mhc-DRB sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kristin M; Wickings, E Jean; Knapp, Leslie A

    2006-08-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is highly polymorphic in most primate species studied thus far. The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) has been studied extensively and the Mhc-DRB region demonstrates variability similar to humans. The extent of MHC diversity is relatively unknown for other Old World monkeys (OWM), especially among genera other than Macaca. A molecular survey of the Mhc-DRB region in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) revealed extensive variability, suggesting that other OWMs may also possess high levels of Mhc-DRB polymorphism. In the present study, 33 Mhc-DRB loci were identified from only 13 animals. Eleven were wild-born and presumed to be unrelated and two were captive-born twins. Two to seven different sequences were identified for each individual, suggesting that some mandrills may have as many as four Mhc-DRB loci on a single haplotype. From these sequences, representatives of at least six Mhc-DRB loci or lineages were identified. As observed in other primates, some new lineages may have arisen through the process of gene conversion. These findings indicate that mandrills have Mhc-DRB diversity not unlike rhesus macaques and humans.

  14. Gorilla MHC class I gene and sequence variation in a comparative context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Jörg B; Bergl, Richard A; Vigilant, Linda

    2017-05-01

    Comparisons of MHC gene content and diversity among closely related species can provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms shaping immune system variation. After chimpanzees and bonobos, gorillas are humans' closest living relatives; but in contrast, relatively little is known about the structure and variation of gorilla MHC class I genes (Gogo). Here, we combined long-range amplifications and long-read sequencing technology to analyze full-length MHC class I genes in 35 gorillas. We obtained 50 full-length genomic sequences corresponding to 15 Gogo-A alleles, 4 Gogo-Oko alleles, 21 Gogo-B alleles, and 10 Gogo-C alleles including 19 novel coding region sequences. We identified two previously undetected MHC class I genes related to Gogo-A and Gogo-B, respectively, thereby illustrating the potential of this approach for efficient and highly accurate MHC genotyping. Consistent with their phylogenetic position within the hominid family, individual gorilla MHC haplotypes share characteristics with humans and chimpanzees as well as orangutans suggesting a complex history of the MHC class I genes in humans and the great apes. However, the overall MHC class I diversity appears to be low further supporting the hypothesis that gorillas might have experienced a reduction of their MHC repertoire.

  15. Peptide binding predictions for HLA DR, DP and DQ molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class II binding predictions are widely used to identify epitope candidates in infectious agents, allergens, cancer and autoantigens. The vast majority of prediction algorithms for human MHC class II to date have targeted HLA molecules encoded in the DR locus. This reflects a significant gap in knowledge as HLA DP and DQ molecules are presumably equally important, and have only been studied less because they are more difficult to handle experimentally. Results In this study, we aimed to narrow this gap by providing a large scale dataset of over 17,000 HLA-peptide binding affinities for a set of 11 HLA DP and DQ alleles. We also expanded our dataset for HLA DR alleles resulting in a total of 40,000 MHC class II binding affinities covering 26 allelic variants. Utilizing this dataset, we generated prediction tools utilizing several machine learning algorithms and evaluated their performance. Conclusion We found that 1 prediction methodologies developed for HLA DR molecules perform equally well for DP or DQ molecules. 2 Prediction performances were significantly increased compared to previous reports due to the larger amounts of training data available. 3 The presence of homologous peptides between training and testing datasets should be avoided to give real-world estimates of prediction performance metrics, but the relative ranking of different predictors is largely unaffected by the presence of homologous peptides, and predictors intended for end-user applications should include all training data for maximum performance. 4 The recently developed NN-align prediction method significantly outperformed all other algorithms, including a naïve consensus based on all prediction methods. A new consensus method dropping the comparably weak ARB prediction method could outperform the NN-align method, but further research into how to best combine MHC class II binding predictions is required.

  16. A quantitative assay to measure the interaction between immunogenic peptides and purified class I major histocompatibility complex molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, A C; Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S

    1994-01-01

    A direct and sensitive biochemical assay to measure the interaction in solution between peptides and affinity-purified major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules has been generated. Specific binding reflecting the known class I restriction of cytotoxic T cell responses was obtained....... Adding an excess of beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) significantly increased the rate of peptide association, but it did not affect the rate of dissociation. Binding was complicated by a rapid and apparently irreversible loss of functional MHC class I at 37 degrees C which might limit the life span...... of empty MHC class I thereby preventing the inadvertent exchange of peptides at the target cell surface. All class I molecules tested bound peptides of the canonical octa- to nona-meric length. However, one class I molecule, Kk, also bound peptides, which were much longer suggesting that the preference...

  17. [Effect of invigorating spleen and detoxification decoction on MHC I/MHC II in spleen-deficiency liver cancer rats survival].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Long; Sun, Bao-Guo; Xiang, Ting; Chen, Ze-Xiong; Zhang, Shi-Jun

    2014-03-01

    To explore that Invigorating Spleen and Detoxification Decoction (ISD) enhanced the survival of spleen-deficiency liver cancer rats and the effect on major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I) and major histocompatibility complex II (MHC II). 105 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into blank control group, liver cancer model group, spleen-deficiency model group, spleen-deficiency liver cancer model group, Thymopentin group and spleen-deficiency liver cancer model groups treated by low and high-concentration ISD for modeling and intervention. Recorded the animals' weight, survival time, moribund state and cachexia score of liver cancer rats, and collected specimens in the experiment. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot were used to detect MHC I/MHC II expression in liver tissue and liver cancer tissue. The cumulative survival of high concentration ISD group and Thymopentin group were higher than that of the other groups (P liver cancer model groups, MHC I expression in liver tissue was higher than that in liver cancer tissue, both in these two tissues, expression of high-concentration ISD group was the strongest (P liver cancer tissue was stronger than that in liver tissue, expression of high-concentration ISD group was the strongest in liver tissue, but in liver cancer tissue, the spleen-deficiency liver cancer model group was the strongest (P < 0.01). ISD can significantly decrease the progression of cachexia caused by transplantable tumor and prolong the survival time, the effect may be related to increasing MHC I/MHC II expression.

  18. Young Alu insertions within the MHC class I region in native American populations: insights into the origin of the MHC-Alu repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Pérez, Luis; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Dipierri, José E; Sánchez, Dora; Espinosa, Ibone; De Pancorbo, Marian M; Peña, José A

    2013-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity of two Amerindian populations (Jujuy province, Argentina, and Waorani tribe, Ecuador) was characterized by analyzing data on polymorphic Alu insertions within the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I region (6p21.31), which are completely nonexistent in Native Americans. We further evaluated the haplotype distribution and genetic diversity among continental ancestry groups and their potential implications for the dating of the origin of MHC-Alus. Five MHC-Alu elements (AluMicB, AluTF, AluHJ, AluHG, and AluHF) were typed in samples from Jujuy (N = 108) and Waorani (N = 36). Allele and haplotype frequency data on worldwide populations were compiled to explore spatial structuring of the MHC-Alu diversity through AMOVA tests. We utilized the median-joining network approach to illustrate the continental distribution of the MHC-Alu haplotypes and their phylogenetic relationships. Allele and haplotype distributions differed significantly between Jujuy and Waorani. The Waorani featured a low average heterozygosity attributable to strong population isolation. Overall, Alu markers showed great genetic heterogeneity both within and among populations. The haplotype distribution was distinctive of each continental ancestry group. Contrary to expectations, Africans showed the lowest MHC-Alu diversity. Genetic drift mainly associated to population bottlenecks seems to be reflected in the low MHC-Alu diversity of the Amerindians, mainly in Waorani. Geographical structuring of the haplotype distribution supports the efficiency of the MHC-Alu loci as lineage (ancestry) markers. The markedly low Alu diversity of African populations relative to other continental clusters suggests that these MHC-Alus might have arisen after the anatomically modern humans expanded out of Africa. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Interleukin 1-induced down-regulation of antibody binding to CD4 molecules on human lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, N; Christensen, L D; Ødum, Niels

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is involved in the early activation of T lymphocytes. The CD4 antigen, described as a phenotypic marker of helper T cells, is also important in early T-cell activation by its ability to bind to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells, and to transmit positive (and...

  20. Atkins' molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, Peters

    2003-01-01

    Originally published in 2003, this is the second edition of a title that was called 'the most beautiful chemistry book ever written'. In it, we see the molecules responsible for the experiences of our everyday life - including fabrics, drugs, plastics, explosives, detergents, fragrances, tastes, and sex. With engaging prose Peter Atkins gives a non-technical account of an incredible range of aspects of the world around us, showing unexpected connections, and giving an insight into how this amazing world can be understood in terms of the atoms and molecules from which it is built. The second edition includes dozens of extra molecules, graphical presentation, and an even more accessible and enthralling account of the molecules themselves.

  1. Interstellar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Philip M.

    1973-01-01

    Radioastronomy reveals that clouds between the stars, once believed to consist of simple atoms, contain molecules as complex as seven atoms and may be the most massive objects in our Galaxy. (Author/DF)

  2. Enumerating molecules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Donald Patrick, Jr. (, . Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN); Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Roe, Diana C.

    2004-04-01

    This report is a comprehensive review of the field of molecular enumeration from early isomer counting theories to evolutionary algorithms that design molecules in silico. The core of the review is a detail account on how molecules are counted, enumerated, and sampled. The practical applications of molecular enumeration are also reviewed for chemical information, structure elucidation, molecular design, and combinatorial library design purposes. This review is to appear as a chapter in Reviews in Computational Chemistry volume 21 edited by Kenny B. Lipkowitz.

  3. Polymorphism at expressed DQ and DR loci in five common equine MHC haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Binns, Matthew; Zhu, Baoli; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Ahmed, Ayeda; Brooks, Samantha A; Antczak, Douglas F

    2017-03-01

    The polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQ and DR genes in five common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) haplotypes was determined through sequencing of mRNA transcripts isolated from lymphocytes of eight ELA homozygous horses. Ten expressed MHC class II genes were detected in horses of the ELA-A3 haplotype carried by the donor horses of the equine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and the reference genome sequence: four DR genes and six DQ genes. The other four ELA haplotypes contained at least eight expressed polymorphic MHC class II loci. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of genomic DNA of these four MHC haplotypes revealed stop codons in the DQA3 gene in the ELA-A2, ELA-A5, and ELA-A9 haplotypes. Few NGS reads were obtained for the other MHC class II genes that were not amplified in these horses. The amino acid sequences across haplotypes contained locus-specific residues, and the locus clusters produced by phylogenetic analysis were well supported. The MHC class II alleles within the five tested haplotypes were largely non-overlapping between haplotypes. The complement of equine MHC class II DQ and DR genes appears to be well conserved between haplotypes, in contrast to the recently described variation in class I gene loci between equine MHC haplotypes. The identification of allelic series of equine MHC class II loci will aid comparative studies of mammalian MHC conservation and evolution and may also help to interpret associations between the equine MHC class II region and diseases of the horse.

  4. Conservation of MHC class II DOA sequences among carnivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, S J; Stewart, B S; Lehman, N

    2005-03-01

    We obtained the nucleotide sequence for most of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DOA locus for Weddell, leopard, northern elephant, and southern elephant seals and from the coyote and compared them to all known DOA data available to date. We found generally low levels of interspecific polymorphisms, providing further support for stabilizing selection acting on the DOA locus. This suggests that DO gene products play a substantial functional role in the regulation of antigen presentation. A seven-amino-acid motif of VWRLPEF was found to be conserved across all DOA sequences and may be a DO-specific recognition element.

  5. Immunotherapy of MHC class I-deficient tumors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reiniš, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 10 (2010), s. 1577-1589 ISSN 1479-6694 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/07/1410; GA ČR GAP301/10/2174; GA AV ČR IAA500520807; GA AV ČR IAA500520605 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 18933 - CLINIGENE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : tumor vaccine * MHC class I expression * antigen presenting machinery Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.455, year: 2010

  6. The Thermodynamic Mechanism of Peptide–MHC Class II Complex Formation Is a Determinant of Susceptibility to HLA-DM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Megan; Hoffman, Megan; Castellini, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    Peptides bind MHC class II molecules through a thermodynamically nonadditive process consequent to the flexibility of the reactants. Currently, how the specific outcome of this binding process affects the ensuing epitope selection needs resolution. Calorimetric assessment of binding thermodynamics for hemagglutinin 306–319 peptide variants to the human MHC class II HLA-DR1 (DR1) and a mutant DR1 reveals that peptide/DR1 complexes can be formed with different enthalpic and entropic contributions. Complexes formed with a smaller entropic penalty feature circular dichroism spectra consistent with a non–compact form, and molecular dynamics simulation shows a more flexible structure. The opposite binding mode, compact and less flexible, is associated with greater entropic penalty. These structural variations are associated with rearrangements of residues known to be involved in HLA-DR (DM) binding, affinity of DM for the complex, and complex susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Thus, the thermodynamic mechanism of peptide binding to DR1 correlates with the structural rigidity of the complex, and DM mediates peptide exchange by “sensing” flexible complexes in which the aforementioned residues are rearranged at a higher frequency than in more rigid ones. PMID:26116504

  7. The Thermodynamic Mechanism of Peptide-MHC Class II Complex Formation Is a Determinant of Susceptibility to HLA-DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Andrea; Templeton, Megan; Hoffman, Megan; Castellini, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    Peptides bind MHC class II molecules through a thermodynamically nonadditive process consequent to the flexibility of the reactants. Currently, how the specific outcome of this binding process affects the ensuing epitope selection needs resolution. Calorimetric assessment of binding thermodynamics for hemagglutinin 306-319 peptide variants to the human MHC class II HLA-DR1 (DR1) and a mutant DR1 reveals that peptide/DR1 complexes can be formed with different enthalpic and entropic contributions. Complexes formed with a smaller entropic penalty feature circular dichroism spectra consistent with a non-compact form, and molecular dynamics simulation shows a more flexible structure. The opposite binding mode, compact and less flexible, is associated with greater entropic penalty. These structural variations are associated with rearrangements of residues known to be involved in HLA-DR (DM) binding, affinity of DM for the complex, and complex susceptibility to DM-mediated peptide exchange. Thus, the thermodynamic mechanism of peptide binding to DR1 correlates with the structural rigidity of the complex, and DM mediates peptide exchange by "sensing" flexible complexes in which the aforementioned residues are rearranged at a higher frequency than in more rigid ones. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Neutralizing Antibody Responses to Viral Infections Are Linked to the Non-classical MHC Class II Gene H2-Ob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Lisa K; Khan, Aly A; Virdis, Francesca; Wilks, Jessica; Kane, Melissa; Beilinson, Helen A; Dikiy, Stanislav; Case, Laure K; Roopenian, Derry; Witkowski, Michele; Chervonsky, Alexander V; Golovkina, Tatyana V

    2017-08-15

    Select humans and animals control persistent viral infections via adaptive immune responses that include production of neutralizing antibodies. The precise genetic basis for the control remains enigmatic. Here, we report positional cloning of the gene responsible for production of retrovirus-neutralizing antibodies in mice of the I/LnJ strain. It encodes the beta subunit of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II)-like molecule H2-O, a negative regulator of antigen presentation. The recessive and functionally null I/LnJ H2-Ob allele supported the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies independently of the classical MHC haplotype. Subsequent bioinformatics and functional analyses of the human H2-Ob homolog, HLA-DOB, revealed both loss- and gain-of-function alleles, which could affect the ability of their carriers to control infections with human hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses. Thus, understanding of the previously unappreciated role of H2-O (HLA-DO) in immunity to infections may suggest new approaches in achieving neutralizing immunity to viruses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. MHC and non-MHC genes regulate elimination of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity mediating T lymphocyte activity in parallel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1989-01-01

    The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion, indicat......The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion...... responsiveness measured in terms of virus-specific cytotoxicity and delayed-type hypersensitivity, whereas no correlation was found with regard to NK cell activity and antiviral antibody response. Analysis of F1 progeny between H-2 identical high and low responder strains showed that low responsiveness...

  10. NetMHC-3.0: accurate web accessible predictions of human, mouse and monkey MHC class I affinities for peptides of length 8-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lamberth, K; Harndahl, M

    2008-01-01

    NetMHC-3.0 is trained on a large number of quantitative peptide data using both affinity data from the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and elution data from SYFPEITHI. The method generates high-accuracy predictions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC): peptide binding....... The predictions are based on artificial neural networks trained on data from 55 MHC alleles (43 Human and 12 non-human), and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) for additional 67 HLA alleles. As only the MHC class I prediction server is available, predictions are possible for peptides of length 8......–11 for all 122 alleles. artificial neural network predictions are given as actual IC50 values whereas PSSM predictions are given as a log-odds likelihood scores. The output is optionally available as download for easy post-processing. The training method underlying the server is the best available, and has...

  11. Ontogenic appearance of MHC class I (B-F) antigens during chicken embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1990-01-01

    Expression of chicken MHC class I (B-F) antigens during ontogeny was determined by binding of anticlass I antibody and appearance of B-F transcripts by Northern blotting in chicken organs during embryogenesis until 2 weeks after hatching. MHC class I transcripts first become detectable in day 6...

  12. MHC matching improves engraftment of iPSC-derived neurons in non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizane, Asuka; Kikuchi, Tetsuhiro; Hayashi, Takuya; Mizuma, Hiroshi; Takara, Sayuki; Doi, Hisashi; Mawatari, Aya; Glasser, Matthew F; Shiina, Takashi; Ishigaki, Hirohito; Itoh, Yasushi; Okita, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Emi; Doi, Daisuke; Onoe, Hirotaka; Ogasawara, Kazumasa; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Jun

    2017-08-30

    The banking of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-homozygous-induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is considered a future clinical strategy for HLA-matched cell transplantation to reduce immunological graft rejection. Here we show the efficacy of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched allogeneic neural cell grafting in the brain, which is considered a less immune-responsive tissue, using iPSCs derived from an MHC homozygous cynomolgus macaque. Positron emission tomography imaging reveals neuroinflammation associated with an immune response against MHC-mismatched grafted cells. Immunohistological analyses reveal that MHC-matching reduces the immune response by suppressing the accumulation of microglia (Iba-1+) and lymphocytes (CD45+) into the grafts. Consequently, MHC-matching increases the survival of grafted dopamine neurons (tyrosine hydroxylase: TH+). The effect of an immunosuppressant, Tacrolimus, is also confirmed in the same experimental setting. Our results demonstrate the rationale for MHC-matching in neural cell grafting to the brain and its feasibility in a clinical setting.Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) matching improves graft survival rates after organ transplantation. Here the authors show that in macaques, MHC-matched iPSC-derived neurons provide better engraftment in the brain, with a lower immune response and higher survival of the transplanted neurons.

  13. Tricks with tetramers: how to get the most from multimeric peptide–MHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Cole, David K; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    The development of fluorochrome-conjugated peptide–major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) multimers in conjunction with continuing advances in flow cytometry has transformed the study of antigen-specific T cells by enabling their visualization, enumeration, phenotypic characterization and isolation from ex vivo samples. Here, we bring together and discuss some of the ‘tricks’ that can be used to get the most out of pMHC multimers. These include: (1) simple procedures that can substantially enhance the staining intensity of cognate T cells with pMHC multimers; (2) the use of pMHC multimers to stain T cells with very-low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR)/pMHC interactions, such as those that typically predominate in tumour-specific responses; and (3) the physical grading and clonotypic dissection of antigen-specific T cells based on the affinity of their cognate TCR using mutant pMHC multimers in conjunction with new approaches to the molecular analysis of TCR gene expression. We also examine how soluble pMHC can be used to examine T-cell activation, manipulate T-cell responses and study allogeneic and superantigen interactions with TCRs. Finally, we discuss the problems that arise with pMHC class II (pMHCII) multimers because of the low affinity of TCR/pMHCII interactions and lack of ‘coreceptor help’. PMID:19125886

  14. Tricks with tetramers: how to get the most from multimeric peptide-MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Linda; Lissina, Anna; Cole, David K; van den Berg, Hugo A; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K

    2009-02-01

    The development of fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) multimers in conjunction with continuing advances in flow cytometry has transformed the study of antigen-specific T cells by enabling their visualization, enumeration, phenotypic characterization and isolation from ex vivo samples. Here, we bring together and discuss some of the 'tricks' that can be used to get the most out of pMHC multimers. These include: (1) simple procedures that can substantially enhance the staining intensity of cognate T cells with pMHC multimers; (2) the use of pMHC multimers to stain T cells with very-low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR)/pMHC interactions, such as those that typically predominate in tumour-specific responses; and (3) the physical grading and clonotypic dissection of antigen-specific T cells based on the affinity of their cognate TCR using mutant pMHC multimers in conjunction with new approaches to the molecular analysis of TCR gene expression. We also examine how soluble pMHC can be used to examine T-cell activation, manipulate T-cell responses and study allogeneic and superantigen interactions with TCRs. Finally, we discuss the problems that arise with pMHC class II (pMHCII) multimers because of the low affinity of TCR/pMHCII interactions and lack of 'coreceptor help'.

  15. Evidence for selection maintaining MHC diversity in a rodent species despite strong density fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Andrea C; Herde, Antje; Mazzoni, Camila J; Eccard, Jana A; Sommer, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Strong spatiotemporal variation in population size often leads to reduced genetic diversity limiting the adaptive potential of individual populations. Key genes of adaptive variation are encoded by the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) playing an essential role in parasite resistance. How MHC variation persists in rodent populations that regularly experience population bottlenecks remains an important topic in evolutionary genetics. We analysed the consequences of strong population fluctuations on MHC class II DRB exon 2 diversity in two distant common vole (Microtus arvalis) populations in three consecutive years using a high-throughput sequencing approach. In 143 individuals, we detected 25 nucleotide alleles translating into 14 unique amino acid MHC alleles belonging to at least three loci. Thus, the overall allelic diversity and amino acid distance among the remaining MHC alleles, used as a surrogate for the range of pathogenic antigens that can be presented to T-cells, are still remarkably high. Both study populations did not show significant population differentiation between years, but significant differences were found between sites. We concluded that selection processes seem to be strong enough to maintain moderate levels of MHC diversity in our study populations outcompeting genetic drift, as the same MHC alleles were conserved between years. Differences in allele frequencies between populations might be the outcome of different local parasite pressures and/or genetic drift. Further understanding of how pathogens vary across space and time will be crucial to further elucidate the mechanisms maintaining MHC diversity in cyclic populations.

  16. The Intensity of Human Body Odors and the MHC: Should We Expect a Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Wedekind

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC somehow affect the production of body odors in several vertebrates, including humans. Here we discuss whether variation in the intensity of body odors may be influenced by the MHC. In order to examine this question, we have to control for MHC-linked odor perception on the smeller's side. Such a control is necessary because the perception of pleasantness and intensity seem to be confounded, and the causalities are still unsolved. It has previously been found that intense odors are scored as less pleasant if the signaler and the receiver are of MHC-dissimilar type, but not if they are of MHC similar type. We argue, and first data suggest, that an effect of the degree of MHC-heterozygosity and odor intensity is likely (MHC-homozygotes may normally smell more intense, while there is currently no strong argument for other possible links between the MHC and body odor intensity.

  17. Fine mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger for celiac disease, risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles and

  18. Towards universal structure-based prediction of class II MHC epitopes for diverse allotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Bordner

    Full Text Available The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC proteins is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The discovery of these peptide epitopes is important for understanding the normal immune response and its misregulation in autoimmunity and allergies and also for vaccine design. In spite of their biomedical importance, the high diversity of class II MHC proteins combined with the large number of possible peptide sequences make comprehensive experimental determination of epitopes for all MHC allotypes infeasible. Computational methods can address this need by predicting epitopes for a particular MHC allotype. We present a structure-based method for predicting class II epitopes that combines molecular mechanics docking of a fully flexible peptide into the MHC binding cleft followed by binding affinity prediction using a machine learning classifier trained on interaction energy components calculated from the docking solution. Although the primary advantage of structure-based prediction methods over the commonly employed sequence-based methods is their applicability to essentially any MHC allotype, this has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. In order to test the transferability of the prediction method to different MHC proteins, we trained the scoring method on binding data for DRB1*0101 and used it to make predictions for multiple MHC allotypes with distinct peptide binding specificities including representatives from the other human class II MHC loci, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ, as well as for two murine allotypes. The results showed that the prediction method was able to achieve significant discrimination between epitope and non-epitope peptides for all MHC allotypes examined, based on AUC values in the range 0.632-0.821. We also discuss how accounting for peptide binding in multiple registers to class II MHC largely explains the systematically worse performance of prediction methods for class II MHC compared with

  19. Characterisation of MHC class I genes in the koala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Polkinghorne, Adam; Gillett, Amber; Jones, Elizabeth A; O'Meally, Denis; Timms, Peter; Belov, Katherine

    2017-07-01

    Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) populations are on the decline across the majority of Australia's mainland. Two major diseases threatening the long-term survival of affected koala populations are caused by obligate intracellular pathogens: Chlamydia and koala retrovirus (KoRV). To improve our understanding of the koala immune system, we characterised their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I genes, which are centrally involved in presenting foreign peptides derived from intracellular pathogens to cytotoxic T cells. A total of 11 class I genes were identified in the koala genome. Three genes, Phci-UA, UB and UC, showed relatively high genetic variability and were expressed in all 12 examined tissues, whereas the other eight genes had tissue-specific expression and limited polymorphism. Evidence of diversifying selection was detected in Phci-UA and UC, while gene conversion may have played a role in creating new alleles at Phci-UB. We propose that Phci-UA, UB and UC are likely classical MHC genes of koalas, and further research is needed to understand their role in koala chlamydial and KoRV infections.

  20. Population genetic segmentation of MHC-correlated perfume preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerli, A; Schweisgut, C; Kaegi, M

    2012-04-01

    It has become difficult to find a matching perfume. An overwhelming number of 300 new perfumes launch each year, and marketing campaigns target pre-defined groups based on gender, age or income rather than on individual preferences. Recent evidence for a genetic basis of perfume preferences, however, could be the starting point for a novel population genetic approach to better match perfumes with people's preferences. With a total of 116 participants genotyped for alleles of three loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the aim of this study was to test whether common MHC alleles could be used as genetic markers to segment a given population into preference types. Significant deviations from random expectations for a set of 10 common perfume ingredients indicate how such segmentation could be achieved. In addition, preference patterns of participants confronted with images that contained a sexual communication context significantly differed in their ratings for some of the scents compared with participants confronted with images of perfume bottles. This strongly supports the assumption that genetically correlated perfume preferences evolved in the context of sexual communication. The results are discussed in the light of perfume customization. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  1. Mamu-A01/K(b) transgenic and MHC Class I knockout mice as a tool for HIV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinliang; Srivastava, Tumul; Rawal, Ravindra; Manuel, Edwin; Isbell, Donna; Tsark, Walter; La Rosa, Corinna; Wang, Zhongde; Li, Zhongqi; Barry, Peter A; Hagen, Katharine D; Longmate, Jeffrey; Diamond, Don J

    2009-04-25

    We have developed a murine model expressing the rhesus macaque (RM) Mamu-A01 MHC allele to characterize immune responses and vaccines based on antigens of importance to human disease processes. Towards that goal, transgenic (Tg) mice expressing chimeric RM (alpha1 and alpha2 Mamu-A01 domains) and murine (alpha3, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic H-2K(b) domains) MHC Class I molecules were derived by transgenesis of the H-2K(b)D(b) double MHC Class I knockout strain. After immunization of Mamu-A01/K(b) Tg mice with rVV-SIVGag-Pol, the mice generated CD8(+) T-cell IFN-gamma responses to several known Mamu-A01 restricted epitopes from the SIV Gag and Pol antigen sequence. Fusion peptides of highly recognized CTL epitopes from SIV Pol and Gag and a strong T-help epitope were shown to be immunogenic and capable of limiting an rVV-SIVGag-Pol challenge. Mamu-A01/K(b) Tg mice provide a model system to study the Mamu-A01 restricted T-cell response for various infectious diseases which are applicable to a study in RM.

  2. Differential transcript profiles of MHC class Ib(Qa-1, Qa-2, and Qa-10) and Aire genes during the ontogeny of thymus and other tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo-Lima, Breno Luiz; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; de Magalhães, Danielle Aparecida Rosa; Passos, Geraldo Aleixo; Moreau, Philippe; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Qa-2 and Qa-1 are murine nonclassical MHC class I molecules involved in the modulation of immune responses by interacting with T CD8(+) and NK cell inhibitory receptors. During thymic education, the Aire gene imposes the expression of thousands of tissue-related antigens in the thymic medulla, permitting the negative selection events. Aiming to characterize the transcriptional profiles of nonclassical MHC class I genes in spatial-temporal association with the Aire expression, we evaluated the gene expression of H2-Q7(Qa-2), H2-T23(Qa-1), H2-Q10(Qa-10), and Aire during fetal and postnatal development of thymus and other tissues. In the thymus, H2-Q7(Qa-2) transcripts were detected at high levels throughout development and were positively correlated with Aire expression during fetal ages. H2-Q7(Qa-2) and H2-T23(Qa-1) showed distinct expression patterns with gradual increasing levels according to age in most tissues analyzed. H2-Q10(Qa-10) was preferentially expressed by the liver. The Aire transcriptional profile showed increased levels during the fetal period and was detectable in postnatal ages in the thymus. Overall, nonclassical MHC class I genes started to be expressed early during the ontogeny. Their levels varied according to age, tissue, and mouse strain analyzed. This differential expression may contribute to the distinct patterns of mouse susceptibility/resistance to infectious and noninfectious disorders.

  3. Differential Transcript Profiles of MHC Class Ib(Qa-1, Qa-2, and Qa-10 and Aire Genes during the Ontogeny of Thymus and Other Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Luiz Melo-Lima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Qa-2 and Qa-1 are murine nonclassical MHC class I molecules involved in the modulation of immune responses by interacting with T CD8+ and NK cell inhibitory receptors. During thymic education, the Aire gene imposes the expression of thousands of tissue-related antigens in the thymic medulla, permitting the negative selection events. Aiming to characterize the transcriptional profiles of nonclassical MHC class I genes in spatial-temporal association with the Aire expression, we evaluated the gene expression of H2-Q7(Qa-2, H2-T23(Qa-1, H2-Q10(Qa-10, and Aire during fetal and postnatal development of thymus and other tissues. In the thymus, H2-Q7(Qa-2 transcripts were detected at high levels throughout development and were positively correlated with Aire expression during fetal ages. H2-Q7(Qa-2 and H2-T23(Qa-1 showed distinct expression patterns with gradual increasing levels according to age in most tissues analyzed. H2-Q10(Qa-10 was preferentially expressed by the liver. The Aire transcriptional profile showed increased levels during the fetal period and was detectable in postnatal ages in the thymus. Overall, nonclassical MHC class I genes started to be expressed early during the ontogeny. Their levels varied according to age, tissue, and mouse strain analyzed. This differential expression may contribute to the distinct patterns of mouse susceptibility/resistance to infectious and noninfectious disorders.

  4. A urokinase receptor-associated protein with specific collagen binding properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Jensen, O N; Engelholm, L H

    2000-01-01

    molecular weight urokinase receptor-associated protein. The tryptic peptide mixture derived from a cross-linked complex of pro-urokinase and the latter protein was analyzed by nanoelectrospray tandem mass spectrometric sequencing. This analysis identified the novel protein as the human homologue of a murine...... membrane-bound lectin with hitherto unknown function. The human cDNA was cloned and sequenced. The protein, designated uPARAP, is a member of the macrophage mannose receptor protein family and contains a putative collagen-binding (fibronectin type II) domain in addition to 8 C-type carbohydrate recognition...... domains. It proved capable of binding strongly to a single type of collagen, collagen V. This collagen binding reaction at the exact site of plasminogen activation on the cell may lead to adhesive functions as well as a contribution to cellular degradation of collagen matrices....

  5. Identification of the cognate peptide-MHC target of T cell receptors using molecular modeling and force field scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanzarotti, Esteban; Marcatili, Paolo; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    terms. Building a benchmark of TCR:p:MHC complexes where epitopes and non-epitopes are modelled using state-of-the-art molecular modelling tools, scoring p:MHC to a given TCR using force-fields, optimized in a cross-validation setup to evaluate TCR inter atomic interactions involved with each p:MHC, we...

  6. IPD-MHC 2.0 : an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-01

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has

  7. Cardioprotective Role of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 2 by Suppressing Apoptosis and Necroptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yin, Haifeng; Li, Lei; Chen, Yi; Li, Jing; Doan, Jessica; Steinmetz, Rachel; Liu, Qinghang

    2017-08-22

    Programmed cell death, including apoptosis, mitochondria-mediated necrosis, and necroptosis, is critically involved in ischemic cardiac injury, pathological cardiac remodeling, and heart failure progression. Whereas apoptosis and mitochondria-mediated necrosis signaling is well established, the regulatory mechanisms of necroptosis and its significance in the pathogenesis of heart failure remain elusive. We examined the role of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (Traf2) in regulating myocardial necroptosis and remodeling using genetic mouse models. We also performed molecular and cellular biology studies to elucidate the mechanisms by which Traf2 regulates necroptosis signaling. We identified a critical role for Traf2 in myocardial survival and homeostasis by suppressing necroptosis. Cardiac-specific deletion of Traf2 in mice triggered necroptotic cardiac cell death, pathological remodeling, and heart failure. Plasma tumor necrosis factor α level was significantly elevated in Traf2-deficient mice, and genetic ablation of TNFR1 largely abrogated pathological cardiac remodeling and dysfunction associated with Traf2 deletion. Mechanistically, Traf2 critically regulates receptor-interacting proteins 1 and 3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein necroptotic signaling with the adaptor protein tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein with death domain as an upstream regulator and transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 as a downstream effector. It is important to note that genetic deletion of RIP3 largely rescued the cardiac phenotype triggered by Traf2 deletion, validating a critical role of necroptosis in regulating pathological remodeling and heart failure propensity. These results identify an important Traf2-mediated, NFκB-independent, prosurvival pathway in the heart by suppressing necroptotic signaling, which may serve as a new therapeutic target for pathological remodeling and heart failure. © 2017 American Heart

  8. MHC Intratumoral Heterogeneity May Predict Cancer Progression and Response to Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Irene; Garrido, Cristina; Algarra, Ignacio; Chamorro, Virginia; Collado, Antonia; Garrido, Federico; Garcia-Lora, Angel M.

    2018-01-01

    An individual tumor can present intratumoral phenotypic heterogeneity, containing tumor cells with different phenotypes that do not present irreversible genetic alterations. We have developed a mouse cancer model, named GR9, derived from a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma that was adapted to tissue culture and cloned into different tumor cell lines. The clones showed diverse MHC-I phenotypes, ranging from highly positive to weakly positive MHC-I expression. These MHC-I alterations are due to reversible molecular mechanisms, because surface MHC-I could be recovered by IFN-γ treatment. Cell clones with high MHC-I expression demonstrated low local oncogenicity and high spontaneous metastatic capacity, whereas MHC-I-low clones showed high local oncogenicity and no spontaneous metastatic capacity. Although MHC-I-low clones did not metastasize, they produced MHC-I-positive dormant micrometastases controlled by the host immune system, i.e., in a state of immunodormancy. The metastatic capacity of each clone was directly correlated with the host T-cell subpopulations; thus, a strong decrease in cytotoxic and helper T lymphocytes was observed in mice with numerous metastases derived from MHC-I positive tumor clones but a strong increase was observed in those with dormant micrometastases. Immunotherapy was administered to the hosts after excision of the primary tumor, producing a recovery in their immune status and leading to the complete eradication of overt spontaneous metastases or their decrease. According to these findings, the combination of MHC-I surface expression in primary tumor and metastases with host T-cell subsets may be a decisive indicator of the clinical outcome and response to immunotherapy in metastatic disease, allowing the identification of responders to this approach. PMID:29434605

  9. ER stress affects processing of MHC class I-associated peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meloche Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infection and neoplastic transformation trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Thus, a large proportion of the cells that must be recognized by the immune system are stressed cells. Cells respond to ER stress by launching the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR regulates the two key processes that control major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I-peptide presentation: protein synthesis and degradation. We therefore asked whether and how the UPR impinges on MHC I-peptide presentation. Results We evaluated the impact of the UPR on global MHC I expression and on presentation of the H2Kb-associated SIINFEKL peptide. EL4 cells stably transfected with vectors coding hen egg lysozyme (HEL-SIINFEKL protein variants were stressed with palmitate or exposed to glucose deprivation. UPR decreased surface expression of MHC I but did not affect MHC I mRNA level nor the total amount of intracellular MHC I proteins. Impaired MHC I-peptide presentation was due mainly to reduced supply of peptides owing to an inhibition of overall protein synthesis. Consequently, generation of H2Kb-SIINFEKL complexes was curtailed during ER stress, illustrating how generation of MHC I peptide ligands is tightly coupled to ongoing protein synthesis. Notably, the UPR-induced decline of MHC I-peptide presentation was more severe when the protein source of peptides was localized in the cytosol than in the ER. This difference was not due to changes in the translation rates of the precursor proteins but to increased stability of the cytosolic protein during ER stress. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ER stress impairs MHC I-peptide presentation, and that it differentially regulates expression of ER- vs. cytosol-derived peptides. Furthermore, this work illustrates how ER stress, a typical feature of infected and malignant cells, can impinge on cues for adaptive immune recognition.

  10. ER stress affects processing of MHC class I-associated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Diana P; Tanguay, Pierre-Luc; Hardy, Marie-Pierre; Caron, Etienne; de Verteuil, Danielle; Meloche, Sylvain; Perreault, Claude

    2009-02-16

    Viral infection and neoplastic transformation trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Thus, a large proportion of the cells that must be recognized by the immune system are stressed cells. Cells respond to ER stress by launching the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR regulates the two key processes that control major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I)-peptide presentation: protein synthesis and degradation. We therefore asked whether and how the UPR impinges on MHC I-peptide presentation. We evaluated the impact of the UPR on global MHC I expression and on presentation of the H2Kb-associated SIINFEKL peptide. EL4 cells stably transfected with vectors coding hen egg lysozyme (HEL)-SIINFEKL protein variants were stressed with palmitate or exposed to glucose deprivation. UPR decreased surface expression of MHC I but did not affect MHC I mRNA level nor the total amount of intracellular MHC I proteins. Impaired MHC I-peptide presentation was due mainly to reduced supply of peptides owing to an inhibition of overall protein synthesis. Consequently, generation of H2Kb-SIINFEKL complexes was curtailed during ER stress, illustrating how generation of MHC I peptide ligands is tightly coupled to ongoing protein synthesis. Notably, the UPR-induced decline of MHC I-peptide presentation was more severe when the protein source of peptides was localized in the cytosol than in the ER. This difference was not due to changes in the translation rates of the precursor proteins but to increased stability of the cytosolic protein during ER stress. Our results demonstrate that ER stress impairs MHC I-peptide presentation, and that it differentially regulates expression of ER- vs. cytosol-derived peptides. Furthermore, this work illustrates how ER stress, a typical feature of infected and malignant cells, can impinge on cues for adaptive immune recognition.

  11. Recombinant Lipoprotein Rv1016c Derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis Is a TLR-2 Ligand that Induces Macrophages Apoptosis and Inhibits MHC II Antigen Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Haibo; Zhu, Shenglin; Zhu, Lin; Huang, Wei; Wang, Honghai; Zhang, Zhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    TLR2-dependent cellular signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophages causes apoptosis and inhibits class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) molecules antigen processing, leading to evasion of surveillance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) lipoproteins are an important class of Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligand, and identified as specific components that mediate these effects. In this study, we identified and characterized MTB lipoprotein Rv1016c (lpqT) as a cell wall associated-protein that was exposed on the cell surface and enhanced the survival of recombinants M. smegmatis_Rv1016c under stress conditions. We found that Rv1016c lipoprotein was a novel TLR2 ligand and able to induce macrophage apoptosis in a both dose- and time-dependent manner. Additionally, apoptosis induced by Rv1016c was reserved in THP-1 cells blocked with anti-TLR-2 Abs or in TLR2-/- mouse macrophages, indicating that Rv1016c-induced apoptosis is dependent on TLR2. Moreover, we demonstrated that Rv1016c lipoprotein inhibited IFN-γ-induced MHC-II expression and processing of soluble antigens in a TLR2 dependent manner. Class II transactivator (CIITA) regulates MHC II expression. In this context, Rv1016c lipoprotein diminished IFN-γ-induced expression of CIITA IV through TLR2 and MAPK Signaling. TLR2-dependent apoptosis and inhibition of MHC-II Ag processing induced by Rv1016c during mycobacteria infection may promote the release of residual bacilli from apoptotic cells and decrease recognition by CD4+ T cells. These mechanisms may allow intracellular MTB to evade immune surveillance and maintain chronic infection.

  12. The CD4 and CD3δε Cytosolic Juxtamembrane Regions Are Proximal within a Compact TCR-CD3-pMHC-CD4 Macrocomplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Caleb R; Parrish, Heather L; Deshpande, Neha R; Kuhns, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    TCRs relay information about peptides embedded within MHC molecules (pMHC) to the ITAMs of the associated CD3γε, CD3δε, and CD3ζζ signaling modules. CD4 then recruits the Src kinase p56(Lck) (Lck) to the TCR-CD3 complex to phosphorylate the ITAMs, initiate intracellular signaling, and drive CD4(+) T cell fate decisions. Whereas the six ITAMs of CD3ζζ are key determinants of T cell development, activation, and the execution of effector functions, multiple models predict that CD4 recruits Lck proximal to the four ITAMs of the CD3 heterodimers. We tested these models by placing FRET probes at the cytosolic juxtamembrane regions of CD4 and the CD3 subunits to evaluate their relationship upon pMHC engagement in mouse cell lines. The data are consistent with a compact assembly in which CD4 is proximal to CD3δε, CD3ζζ resides behind the TCR, and CD3γε is offset from CD3δε. These results advance our understanding of the architecture of the TCR-CD3-pMHC-CD4 macrocomplex and point to regions of high CD4-Lck + ITAM concentrations therein. The findings thus have implications for TCR signaling, as phosphorylation of the CD3 ITAMs by CD4-associated Lck is important for CD4(+) T cell fate decisions. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 9. Molecule Matters - A Chromium Compound with a Quintuple Bond. K C Kumara Swamy. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 9 September 2006 pp 72-75. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 5. Molecule Matters - N-Heterocyclic Carbenes - The Stable Form of R2 C: Anil J Elias. Feature Article Volume 13 Issue 5 May 2008 pp 456-467. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Molecule Matters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 11; Issue 11. Molecule Matters - Carbon Dioxide: Molecular States and Beyond. T P Radhakrishnan. Feature Article Volume 11 Issue 11 November 2006 pp 88-92. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. MHC I-associated peptides preferentially derive from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Diana Paola; Yahyaoui, Wafaa; Laumont, Céline M; Daouda, Tariq; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara L; Côté, Caroline; Laverdure, Jean-Philippe; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2012-06-28

    MHC I-associated peptides (MIPs) play an essential role in normal homeostasis and diverse pathologic conditions. MIPs derive mainly from defective ribosomal products (DRiPs), a subset of nascent proteins that fail to achieve a proper conformation and the physical nature of which remains elusive. In the present study, we used high-throughput proteomic and transcriptomic methods to unravel the structure and biogenesis of MIPs presented by HLA-A and HLA-B molecules on human EBV-infected B lymphocytes from 4 patients. We found that although HLA-different subjects present distinctive MIPs derived from different proteins, these MIPs originate from proteins that are functionally interconnected and implicated in similar biologic pathways. Secondly, the MIP repertoire of human B cells showed no bias toward conserved versus polymorphic genomic sequences, were derived preferentially from abundant transcripts, and conveyed to the cell surface a cell-type-specific signature. Finally, we discovered that MIPs derive preferentially from transcripts bearing miRNA response elements. Furthermore, whereas MIPs of HLA-disparate subjects are coded by different sets of transcripts, these transcripts are regulated by mostly similar miRNAs. Our data support an emerging model in which the generation of MIPs by a transcript depends on its abundance and DRiP rate, which is regulated to a large extent by miRNAs.

  17. Accurate pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC class II binding affinity with improved binding core identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    by T helper lymphocytes. NetMHCIIpan is a state-of-the-art method for the quantitative prediction of peptide binding to any human or mouse MHC class II molecule of known sequence. In this paper, we describe an updated version of the method with improved peptide binding register identification. Binding...... with known binding registers, the new method NetMHCIIpan-3.1 significantly outperformed the earlier 3.0 version. We illustrate the impact of accurate binding core identification for the interpretation of T cell cross-reactivity using tetramer double staining with a CMV epitope and its variants mapped...... to the epitope binding core. NetMHCIIpan is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCIIpan-3.1....

  18. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  19. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Gouri Shankar; Yanover, Chen; Howard, Tom E; Sauna, Zuben E

    2013-01-01

    The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs) in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6) of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II) molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants). Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a) include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b) consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population). Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes and thus

  20. IOP induces upregulation of GFAP and MHC-II and microglia reactivity in mice retina contralateral to experimental glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gallego Beatriz I

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular hypertension is a major risk factor for glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease characterized by an irreversible decrease in ganglion cells and their axons. Macroglial and microglial cells appear to play an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms of the disease. Here, we study the effects of laser-induced ocular hypertension (OHT in the macroglia, microglia and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of eyes with OHT (OHT-eyes and contralateral eyes two weeks after lasering. Methods Two groups of adult Swiss mice were used: age-matched control (naïve, n = 9; and lasered (n = 9. In the lasered animals, both OHT-eyes and contralateral eyes were analyzed. Retinal whole-mounts were immunostained with antibodies against glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP, neurofilament of 200kD (NF-200, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule (Iba-1 and major histocompatibility complex class II molecule (MHC-II. The GFAP-labeled retinal area (GFAP-RA, the intensity of GFAP immunoreaction (GFAP-IR, and the number of astrocytes and NF-200 + RGCs were quantified. Results In comparison with naïve: i astrocytes were more robust in contralateral eyes. In OHT-eyes, the astrocyte population was not homogeneous, given that astrocytes displaying only primary processes coexisted with astrocytes in which primary and secondary processes could be recognized, the former having less intense GFAP-IR (P P P P P = 0.05 and in OHT-eyes (P  Conclusion The use of the contralateral eye as an internal control in experimental induction of unilateral IOP should be reconsidered. The gliotic behavior in contralateral eyes could be related to the immune response. The absence of NF-200+RGCs (sign of RGC degeneration leads us to postulate that the MHC-II upregulation in contralateral eyes could favor neuroprotection.

  1. NLRC5 exclusively transactivates MHC class I and related genes through a distinctive SXY module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ludigs

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available MHC class II (MHCII genes are transactivated by the NOD-like receptor (NLR family member CIITA, which is recruited to SXY enhancers of MHCII promoters via a DNA-binding "enhanceosome" complex. NLRC5, another NLR protein, was recently found to control transcription of MHC class I (MHCI genes. However, detailed understanding of NLRC5's target gene specificity and mechanism of action remained lacking. We performed ChIP-sequencing experiments to gain comprehensive information on NLRC5-regulated genes. In addition to classical MHCI genes, we exclusively identified novel targets encoding non-classical MHCI molecules having important functions in immunity and tolerance. ChIP-sequencing performed with Rfx5(-/- cells, which lack the pivotal enhanceosome factor RFX5, demonstrated its strict requirement for NLRC5 recruitment. Accordingly, Rfx5-knockout mice phenocopy Nlrc5 deficiency with respect to defective MHCI expression. Analysis of B cell lines lacking RFX5, RFXAP, or RFXANK further corroborated the importance of the enhanceosome for MHCI expression. Although recruited by common DNA-binding factors, CIITA and NLRC5 exhibit non-redundant functions, shown here using double-deficient Nlrc5(-/-CIIta(-/- mice. These paradoxical findings were resolved by using a "de novo" motif-discovery approach showing that the SXY consensus sequence occupied by NLRC5 in vivo diverges significantly from that occupied by CIITA. These sequence differences were sufficient to determine preferential occupation and transactivation by NLRC5 or CIITA, respectively, and the S box was found to be the essential feature conferring NLRC5 specificity. These results broaden our knowledge on the transcriptional activities of NLRC5 and CIITA, revealing their dependence on shared enhanceosome factors but their recruitment to distinct enhancer motifs in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrated selectivity of NLRC5 for genes encoding MHCI or related proteins, rendering it an attractive target for

  2. MHC Expression on Spleen Lymphocyte Subsets in Genetically Resistant and Susceptible Chickens Infected with Marek's Disease Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Tina; Bøving, Mette K.; Handberg, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease (MD) are strongly influenced by the chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In this study, splenic lymphocytes from MD-resistant and MD-susceptible chickens of three MHC genotypes (B21/B21, B19/B21, and B19/B19) were analyzed by flow...... genotypes were subjected to infection with MD virus (GA strain) and spleen samples from infected as well as MHC-matched negative controls were analyzed at 1, 4, and 8 wk post-infection (p.i.). It was observed that MDV induced an increase in MHC class I expression late in the infection. Thus, MHC class I...

  3. Protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by MHC class I and class II alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, M; Vingsbo, C; Olsson, T

    1994-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is influenced by polymorphism of the MHC. We have previously found that Lewis rats with certain MHC haplotypes are susceptible to disease induced with the myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88, whereas Lewis rats with other MHC haplotypes...... are resistant. Interestingly, rats with the MHC u haplotype develop an immune response to the MBP 63-88, but do not get EAE. In this study we have used intra-MHC recombinant rat strains to compare the influences of the MHC u with the a haplotype. We discovered the following: 1) The class II region of the MHC...... a haplotype permits EAE and a Th1 type of immune response as measured by IFN-gamma production after in vitro challenge of in vivo-primed T cells with MBP 63-88. 2) The class II region of the u haplotype is associated with a disease-protective immune response characterized by production of not only IFN...

  4. MHC diversity and mate choice in the magellanic penguin, Spheniscus magellanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafler, Gabrielle J; Clark, J Alan; Boersma, P Dee; Bouzat, Juan L

    2012-01-01

    We estimated levels of diversity at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DRß1 gene in 50 breeding pairs of the Magellanic penguin and compared those to estimates from Humboldt and Galapagos penguins. We tested for positive selection and 2 conditions required for the evolution of MHC-based disassortative mating: 1) greater MHC diversity between breeding pairs compared to random mating, and 2) associations between MHC genotype and fitness. Cloning and sequencing of the DRß1 gene showed that Magellanic penguins had higher levels of genetic variation than Galapagos and Humboldt penguins. Sequence analysis revealed 45 alleles with 3.6% average proportion of nucleotide differences, nucleotide diversity of 0.030, and observed heterozygosity of 0.770. A gene phylogeny showed 9 allelic lineages with interspersed DRß1 sequences from Humboldt and Galapagos penguins, indicating ancestral polymorphisms. d (N)/d (S) ratios revealed evidence for positive selection. Analysis of breeding pairs showed no disassortative mating preferences. Significant MHC genotype/fitness associations in females suggest, however, that selection for pathogen resistance plays a more important role than mate choice in maintaining diversity at the MHC in the Magellanic penguin. The differential effect of MHC heterozygosity on fitness between the sexes is likely associated with the relative role of hatching and fledging rates as reliable indicators of overall fitness in males and females.

  5. Choosy Wolves? Heterozygote Advantage But No Evidence of MHC-Based Disassortative Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaverni, Marco; Caniglia, Romolo; Milanesi, Pietro; Lapalombella, Silvana; Fabbri, Elena; Randi, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    A variety of nonrandom mate choice strategies, including disassortative mating, are used by vertebrate species to avoid inbreeding, maintain heterozygosity and increase fitness. Disassortative mating may be mediated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), an important gene cluster controlling immune responses to pathogens. We investigated the patterns of mate choice in 26 wild-living breeding pairs of gray wolf (Canis lupus) that were identified through noninvasive genetic methods and genotyped at 3 MHC class II and 12 autosomal microsatellite (STR) loci. We tested for deviations from random mating and evaluated the covariance of genetic variables at functional and STR markers with fitness proxies deduced from pedigree reconstructions. Results did not show evidences of MHC-based disassortative mating. Rather we found a higher peptide similarity between mates at MHC loci as compared with random expectations. Fitness values were positively correlated with heterozygosity of the breeders at both MHC and STR loci, whereas they decreased with relatedness at STRs. These findings may indicate fitness advantages for breeders that, while avoiding highly related mates, are more similar at the MHC and have high levels of heterozygosity overall. Such a pattern of MHC-assortative mating may reflect local coadaptation of the breeders, while a reduction in genetic diversity may be balanced by heterozygote advantages. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory M. Ayres

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic “energy landscapes” of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  7. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of MHC class II genes in teleost fish genomes reveals dispensability of the peptide-loading DM system in a large part of vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Johannes M; Grimholt, Unni; Leong, Jong; Koop, Ben F; Hashimoto, Keiichiro

    2013-11-26

    Classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules play an essential role in presenting peptide antigens to CD4+ T lymphocytes in the acquired immune system. The non-classical class II DM molecule, HLA-DM in the case of humans, possesses critical function in assisting the classical MHC class II molecules for proper peptide loading and is highly conserved in tetrapod species. Although the absence of DM-like genes in teleost fish has been speculated based on the results of homology searches, it has not been definitively clear whether the DM system is truly specific for tetrapods or not. To obtain a clear answer, we comprehensively searched class II genes in representative teleost fish genomes and analyzed those genes regarding the critical functional features required for the DM system. We discovered a novel ancient class II group (DE) in teleost fish and classified teleost fish class II genes into three major groups (DA, DB and DE). Based on several criteria, we investigated the classical/non-classical nature of various class II genes and showed that only one of three groups (DA) exhibits classical-type characteristics. Analyses of predicted class II molecules revealed that the critical tryptophan residue required for a classical class II molecule in the DM system could be found only in some non-classical but not in classical-type class II molecules of teleost fish. Teleost fish, a major group of vertebrates, do not possess the DM system for the classical class II peptide-loading and this sophisticated system has specially evolved in the tetrapod lineage.

  9. Natural selection on MHC IIβ in parapatric lake and stream stickleback: Balancing, divergent, both or neither?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, William E; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2017-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode proteins that play a central role in vertebrates' adaptive immunity to parasites. MHC loci are among the most polymorphic in vertebrates' genomes, inspiring many studies to identify evolutionary processes driving MHC polymorphism within populations and divergence between populations. Leading hypotheses include balancing selection favouring rare alleles within populations, and spatially divergent selection. These hypotheses do not always produce diagnosably distinct predictions, causing many studies of MHC to yield inconsistent or ambiguous results. We suggest a novel strategy to distinguish balancing vs. divergent selection on MHC, taking advantage of natural admixture between parapatric populations. With divergent selection, individuals with immigrant alleles will be more infected and less fit because they are susceptible to novel parasites in their new habitat. With balancing selection, individuals with locally rare immigrant alleles will be more fit (less infected). We tested these contrasting predictions using three-spine stickleback from three replicate pairs of parapatric lake and stream habitats. We found numerous positive and negative associations between particular MHC IIβ alleles and particular parasite taxa. A few allele-parasite comparisons supported balancing selection, and others supported divergent selection between habitats. But, there was no overall tendency for fish with immigrant MHC alleles to be more or less heavily infected. Instead, locally rare MHC alleles (not necessarily immigrants) were associated with heavier infections. Our results illustrate the complex relationship between MHC IIβ allelic variation and spatially varying multispecies parasite communities: different hypotheses may be concurrently true for different allele-parasite combinations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors – a model for MHC class I disease associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Louise Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I polymorphisms are associated with the outcome of some viral infections and autoimmune diseases. MHC-I proteins present antigenic peptides and are recognised by receptors on Natural Killer cells and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus enabling the immune system to detect self-antigens and eliminate targets lacking self or expressing foreign antigens. Recognition of MHC-I, however, extends beyond receptors on cytotoxic leukocytes. Members of the Leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LILR family are expressed on monocytic cells and can recognise both classical and non-classical MHC-I alleles. Despite their relatively broad specificity when compared to the T Cell Receptor or Killer Ig-like Receptors, variations in the strength of LILR binding between different MHC-I alleles have recently been shown to correlate with control of HIV infection. We suggest that LILR recognition may mediate MHC-I disease association in a manner that does not depend on a binary discrimination of self/non-self by cytotoxic cells. Instead, the effects of LILR activity following engagement by MHC-I may represent a degrees of self model, whereby strength of binding to different alleles determines the degree of influence exerted by these receptors on immune cell functions. LILR are expressed by myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes, extending their influence across antigen presenting cell subsets including dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. They have been identified as important players in the response to infection, inflammatory diseases and cancer, with recent literature to indicate that MHC-I recognition by these receptors and consequent allelic effects could extend an influence beyond the immune system.

  11. Crystal structure of a TAPBPR–MHC I complex reveals the mechanism of peptide editing in antigen presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jiansheng; Natarajan, Kannan; Boyd, Lisa F.; Morozov, Giora I.; Mage, Michael G.; Margulies, David H. (NIH); (Hebrew)

    2017-10-12

    Central to CD8+ T cell–mediated immunity is the recognition of peptide–major histocompatibility complex class I (p–MHC I) proteins displayed by antigen-presenting cells. Chaperone-mediated loading of high-affinity peptides onto MHC I is a key step in the MHC I antigen presentation pathway. However, the structure of MHC I with a chaperone that facilitates peptide loading has not been determined. We report the crystal structure of MHC I in complex with the peptide editor TAPBPR (TAP-binding protein–related), a tapasin homolog. TAPBPR remodels the peptide-binding groove of MHC I, resulting in the release of low-affinity peptide. Changes include groove relaxation, modifications of key binding pockets, and domain adjustments. This structure captures a peptide-receptive state of MHC I and provides insights into the mechanism of peptide editing by TAPBPR and, by analogy, tapasin.

  12. Oriented coupling of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to sensor surfaces using light assisted immobilisation technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snabe, Torben; Røder, Gustav Andreas; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa

    2005-01-01

    histocompatibility complex (MHC class I) to a sensor surface is presented. The coupling was performed using light assisted immobilisation--a novel immobilisation technology which allows specific opening of particular disulphide bridges in proteins which then is used for covalent bonding to thiol-derivatised surfaces...... procedure can be used for covalent immobilisation of MHC class II complexes. The results open for the development of efficient T cell sensors, sensors for recognition of peptides of pathogenic origin, as well as other applications that may benefit from oriented immobilisation of MHC proteins....

  13. Low genetic variation in the MHC class II DRB gene and MHC-linked microsatellites in endangered island populations of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Toshinori; Nishita, Yoshinori; Masuda, Ryuichi

    2017-07-09

    Isolated populations of the leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) on Tsushima and Iriomote islands in Japan are classified as subspecies P. b. euptilurus and P. b. iriomotensis, respectively. Because both populations have decreased to roughly 100, an understanding of their genetic diversity is essential for conservation. We genotyped MHC class II DRB exon 2 and MHC-linked microsatellite loci to evaluate the diversity of MHC genes in the Tsushima and Iriomote cat populations. We detected ten and four DRB alleles in these populations, respectively. A phylogenetic analysis showed DRB alleles from both populations to be closely related to those in other felid DRB lineages, indicating trans-species polymorphism. The MHC-linked microsatellites were more polymorphic in the Tsushima than in the Iriomote population. The MHC diversity of both leopard cat populations is much lower than in the domestic cat populations on these islands, probably due to inbreeding associated with founder effects, geographical isolation, or genetic drift. Our results predict low resistance of the two endangered populations to new pathogens introduced to the islands.

  14. Inhibition of HLA-DM Mediated MHC Class II Peptide Loading by HLA-DO Promotes Self Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denzin, Lisa K

    2013-12-17

    Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII) molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs). This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule HLA-DM (DM). DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO), another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCs. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  15. Inhibition of HLA-DM mediated MHC class II peptide loading by HLA-DO promotes self tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Denzin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility class II (MHCII molecules are loaded with peptides derived from foreign and self-proteins within the endosomes and lysosomes of antigen presenting cells (APCs. This process is mediated by interaction of MHCII with the conserved, nonpolymorphic MHCII-like molecule HLA-DM (DM. DM activity is directly opposed by HLA-DO (DO, another conserved, non-polymorphic MHCII like molecule. DO is an MHCII substrate mimic. Binding of DO to DM prevents MHCII from binding to DM, thereby inhibiting peptide loading. Inhibition of DM function enables low stability MHC complexes to survive and populate the surface of APCS. As a consequence, DO promotes the display of a broader pool of low abundance self-peptides. Broadening the peptide repertoire theoretically reduces the likelihood of inadvertently acquiring a density of self-ligands that is sufficient to activate self-reactive T cells. One function of DO, therefore, is to promote T cell tolerance by shaping the visible image of self. Recent data also shows that DO influences the adaptive immune response by controlling B cell entry into the germinal center reaction. This review explores the data supporting these concepts.

  16. Role of spatial inhomogenity in GPCR dimerisation predicted by receptor association-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sneha A.; Pawar, Aiswarya B.; Dighe, Anish; Athale, Chaitanya A.; Sengupta, Durba

    2017-06-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) association is an emerging paradigm with far reaching implications in the regulation of signalling pathways and therapeutic interventions. Recent super resolution microscopy studies have revealed that receptor dimer steady state exhibits sub-second dynamics. In particular the GPCRs, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M1 (M1MR) and formyl peptide receptor (FPR), have been demonstrated to exhibit a fast association/dissociation kinetics, independent of ligand binding. In this work, we have developed a spatial kinetic Monte Carlo model to investigate receptor homo-dimerisation at a single receptor resolution. Experimentally measured association/dissociation kinetic parameters and diffusion coefficients were used as inputs to the model. To test the effect of membrane spatial heterogeneity on the simulated steady state, simulations were compared to experimental statistics of dimerisation. In the simplest case the receptors are assumed to be diffusing in a spatially homogeneous environment, while spatial heterogeneity is modelled to result from crowding, membrane micro-domains and cytoskeletal compartmentalisation or ‘corrals’. We show that a simple association-diffusion model is sufficient to reproduce M1MR association statistics, but fails to reproduce FPR statistics despite comparable kinetic constants. A parameter sensitivity analysis is required to reproduce the association statistics of FPR. The model reveals the complex interplay between cytoskeletal components and their influence on receptor association kinetics within the features of the membrane landscape. These results constitute an important step towards understanding the factors modulating GPCR organisation.

  17. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 is a positive regulator of pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Luo, Yuxuan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng; Gao, Lu; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Peng; Zhao, Guang-Nian; Zhu, Xueyong; Li, Hongliang

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy, a common early symptom of heart failure, is regulated by numerous signaling pathways. Here, we identified tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 3 (TRAF3), an adaptor protein in tumor necrosis factor-related signaling cascades, as a key regulator of cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 expression was upregulated in hypertrophied mice hearts and failing human hearts. Four weeks after aortic banding, cardiac-specific conditional TRAF3-knockout mice exhibited significantly reduced cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, and dysfunction. Conversely, transgenic mice overexpressing TRAF3 in the heart developed exaggerated cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload. TRAF3 also promoted an angiotensin II- or phenylephrine-induced hypertrophic response in isolated cardiomyocytes. Mechanistically, TRAF3 directly bound to TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1), causing increased TBK1 phosphorylation in response to hypertrophic stimuli. This interaction between TRAF3 and TBK1 further activated AKT signaling, which ultimately promoted the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Our findings not only reveal a key role of TRAF3 in regulating the hypertrophic response but also uncover TRAF3-TBK1-AKT as a novel signaling pathway in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for this pathological process. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Absence of evidence for MHC-dependent mate selection within HapMap populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Derti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC of immunity genes has been reported to influence mate choice in vertebrates, and a recent study presented genetic evidence for this effect in humans. Specifically, greater dissimilarity at the MHC locus was reported for European-American mates (parents in HapMap Phase 2 trios than for non-mates. Here we show that the results depend on a few extreme data points, are not robust to conservative changes in the analysis procedure, and cannot be reproduced in an equivalent but independent set of European-American mates. Although some evidence suggests an avoidance of extreme MHC similarity between mates, rather than a preference for dissimilarity, limited sample sizes preclude a rigorous investigation. In summary, fine-scale molecular-genetic data do not conclusively support the hypothesis that mate selection in humans is influenced by the MHC locus.

  19. Improved prediction of MHC class I and class II epitopes using a novel Gibbs sampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Worning, Peder

    2004-01-01

    , identifying the correct alignment is a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. In this context, we wish to describe a novel Gibbs motif sampler method ideally suited for recognizing such weak sequence motifs. The method is based on the Gibbs sampling method, and it incorporates...... novel features optimized for the task of recognizing the binding motif of MHC classes I and II. The method locates the binding motif in a set of sequences and characterizes the motif in terms of a weight-matrix. Subsequently, the weight-matrix can be applied to identifying effectively potential MHC...... binding peptides and to guiding the process of rational vaccine design. Results: We apply the motif sampler method to the complex problem of MHC class II binding. The input to the method is amino acid peptide sequences extracted from the public databases of SYFPEITHI and MHCPEP and known to bind...

  20. Chicken major histocompatibility complex class II molecules of the B haplotype present self and foreign peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumberbatch, J A; Brewer, D; Vidavsky, I; Sharif, S

    2006-08-01

    The chicken major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or B-complex, mediates genetic resistance and susceptibility to infectious disease. For example, the B19 haplotype is associated with susceptibility to Marek's disease. Here, we describe the sequencing and analysis of peptides presented by B19 MHC class II molecules. A B19/B19 B-cell line was used for the immunoaffinity purification of MHC class II molecules, which was followed by acid elution of the bound peptides. The eluted peptides were then analysed using tandem mass spectrometry. Thirty peptide sequences were obtained, ranging from 11 to 25 amino acids in length. Source protein cellular localization included the plasma membrane, cytosol and endosomal pathway. In addition, five peptides from the envelope glycoprotein of chicken syncytial virus (CSV) were identified. Chicken syncytial virus had been used as a helper virus along with reticuloendotheliosis virus strain T for transformation of B19/B19B cells. Alignment and analysis of the peptide sequence pool provided a putative peptide-binding motif for the B19 MHC class II.

  1. Association of an MHC Class II Haplotype with Increased Risk of Polymyositis in Hungarian Vizsla Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Massey; Simon Rothwell; Clare Rusbridge; Anna Tauro; Diane Addicott; Hector Chinoy; Cooper, Robert G; William E R Ollier; Kennedy, Lorna J

    2013-01-01

    A breed-specific polymyositis is frequently observed in the Hungarian Vizsla. Beneficial clinical response to immunosuppressive therapies has been demonstrated which points to an immune-mediated aetiology. Canine inflammatory myopathies share clinical and histological similarities with the human immune-mediated myopathies. As MHC class II associations have been reported in the human conditions we investigated whether an MHC class II association was present in the canine myopathy seen in this ...

  2. Plasmodium relictum infection and MHC diversity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus)

    OpenAIRE

    Loiseau, Claire; Zoorob, Rima; Robert, Alexandre; Chastel, Olivier; Julliard, Romain; Sorci, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites has been proposed as a mechanism maintaining genetic diversity in both host and parasite populations. In particular, the high level of genetic diversity usually observed at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is generally thought to be maintained by parasite-driven selection. Among the possible ways through which parasites can maintain MHC diversity, diversifying selection has received relatively less attention. This hypothesis is ba...

  3. Variation in MHC genotypes in two populations of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) with different population histories

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Åsa Alexandra Borg; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Jensen, Henrik; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Small populations are likely to have a low genetic ability for disease resistance due to loss of genetic variation through inbreeding and genetic drift. In vertebrates, the highest genetic diversity of the immune system is located at genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Interestingly, parasite-mediated selection is thought to potentially maintain variation at MHC loci even in populations that are monomorphic at other loci. Therefore, general loss of genetic variation in th...

  4. Genomic architecture of MHC-linked odorant receptor gene repertoires among 16 vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Kellermann, Thomas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The recent sequencing and assembly of the genomes of different organisms have shown that almost all vertebrates studied in detail so far have one or more clusters of genes encoding odorant receptors (OR) in close physical linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). It has been postulated that MHC-linked OR genes could be involved in MHC-influenced mate choice, comprising both pre- as well as post-copulatory mechanisms. We have therefore carried out a systematic comparison of protein sequences of these receptors from the genomes of man, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, dog, cat, cow, pig, horse, elephant, opossum, frog and zebra fish (amounting to a total of 559 protein sequences) in order to identify OR families exhibiting evolutionarily conserved MHC linkage. In addition, we compared the genomic structure of this region within these 16 species, accounting for presence or absence of OR gene families, gene order, transcriptional orientation and linkage to the MHC or framework genes. The results are presented in the form of gene maps and phylogenetic analyses that reveal largely concordant repertoires of gene families, at least among tetrapods, although each of the eight taxa studied (primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, proboscids, marsupials, amphibians and teleosts) exhibits a typical architecture of MHC (or MHC framework loci)-linked OR genes. Furthermore, the comparison of the genomic organization of this region has implications for phylogenetic relationships between closely related taxa, especially in disputed cases such as the evolutionary history of even- and odd-toed ungulates and carnivores. Finally, the largely conserved linkage between distinct OR genes and the MHC supports the concept that particular alleles within a given haplotype function in a concerted fashion during self-/non-self-discrimination processes in reproduction.

  5. Characterisation of class II B MHC genes from a ratite bird, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Hilary C; Bowker-Wright, Gemma; Kharkrang, Marie; Ramstad, Kristina

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are important for vertebrate immune response and typically display high levels of diversity due to balancing selection from exposure to diverse pathogens. An understanding of the structure of the MHC region and diversity among functional MHC genes is critical to understanding the evolution of the MHC and species resilience to disease exposure. In this study, we characterise the structure and diversity of class II MHC genes in little spotted kiwi Apteryx owenii, a ratite bird representing the basal avian lineage (paleognaths). Results indicate that little spotted kiwi have a more complex MHC structure than that of other non-passerine birds, with at least five class II MHC genes, three of which are expressed and likely to be functional. Levels of MHC variation among little spotted kiwi are extremely low, with 13 birds assayed having nearly identical MHC genotypes (only two genotypes containing four alleles, three of which are fixed). These results suggest that recent genetic drift due to a species-wide bottleneck of at most seven birds has overwhelmed past selection for high MHC diversity in little spotted kiwi, potentially leaving the species highly susceptible to disease.

  6. Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ uptake rate and endogenous content in MHC I and MHC II fibres of human skeletal muscle following prolonged exercise in highly trained

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Jens Steen

    load time was increased by 8% (P direct measures that the SR Ca2+ loading time decreases in MHCI fibres following prolonged cycling exercise in highly trained humans, however...... no differences in eSR content between the fibre types before exercise and no change with exhaustive exercise. The loading time was 17% slower in MHC II fibres (13.4 ± 0.2 vs 15.7 ± 0.2 sec, MHCI and MHCII respectively). However, the maximum loading capacity was higher in MHC II fibres. Following exercise the SR...

  7. Variation in MHC genotypes in two populations of house sparrow (Passer domesticus) with different population histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Asa Alexandra; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Jensen, Henrik; Westerdahl, Helena

    2011-10-01

    Small populations are likely to have a low genetic ability for disease resistance due to loss of genetic variation through inbreeding and genetic drift. In vertebrates, the highest genetic diversity of the immune system is located at genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Interestingly, parasite-mediated selection is thought to potentially maintain variation at MHC loci even in populations that are monomorphic at other loci. Therefore, general loss of genetic variation in the genome may not necessarily be associated with low variation at MHC loci. We evaluated inter- and intrapopulation variation in MHC genotypes between an inbred (Aldra) and a relatively outbred population (Hestmannøy) of house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in a metapopulation at Helgeland, Norway. Genomic (gDNA) and transcribed (cDNA) alleles of functional MHC class I and IIB loci, along with neutral noncoding microsatellite markers, were analyzed to obtain relevant estimates of genetic variation. We found lower allelic richness in microsatellites in the inbred population, but high genetic variation in MHC class I and IIB loci in both populations. This suggests that also the inbred population could be under balancing selection to maintain genetic variation for pathogen resistance.

  8. Plasmodium relictum infection and MHC diversity in the house sparrow (Passer domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, Claire; Zoorob, Rima; Robert, Alexandre; Chastel, Olivier; Julliard, Romain; Sorci, Gabriele

    2011-04-22

    Antagonistic coevolution between hosts and parasites has been proposed as a mechanism maintaining genetic diversity in both host and parasite populations. In particular, the high level of genetic diversity usually observed at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is generally thought to be maintained by parasite-driven selection. Among the possible ways through which parasites can maintain MHC diversity, diversifying selection has received relatively less attention. This hypothesis is based on the idea that parasites exert spatially variable selection pressures because of heterogeneity in parasite genetic structure, abundance or virulence. Variable selection pressures should select for different host allelic lineages resulting in population-specific associations between MHC alleles and risk of infection. In this study, we took advantage of a large survey of avian malaria in 13 populations of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) to test this hypothesis. We found that (i) several MHC alleles were either associated with increased or decreased risk to be infected with Plasmodium relictum, (ii) the effects were population specific, and (iii) some alleles had antagonistic effects across populations. Overall, these results support the hypothesis that diversifying selection in space can maintain MHC variation and suggest a pattern of local adaptation where MHC alleles are selected at the local host population level.

  9. Identification of MHC Haplotypes Associated with Drug-induced Hypersensitivity Reactions in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Whritenour, Jessica; Sanford, Jonathan C; Houle, Christopher; Adkins, Karissa K

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can significantly impact drug development and use. Studies to understand risk factors for drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions have identified genetic association with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles. Interestingly, drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions can occur in nonhuman primates; however, association between drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles has not been described. In this study, tissue samples were collected from 62 cynomolgus monkeys from preclinical studies in which 9 animals had evidence of drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions. Microsatellite analysis was used to determine MHC haplotypes for each animal. A total of 7 haplotypes and recombinant MHC haplotypes were observed, with distribution frequency comparable to known MHC I allele frequency in cynomolgus monkeys. Genetic association analysis identified alleles from the M3 haplotype of the MHC I B region (B*011:01, B*075:01, B*079:01, B*070:02, B*098:05, and B*165:01) to be significantly associated (χ2 test for trend, p reactions. Sequence similarity from alignment of alleles in the M3 haplotype B region and HLA alleles associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions in humans was 86% to 93%. These data demonstrate that MHC alleles in cynomolgus monkeys are associated with drug-induced hypersensitivity reactions, similar to HLA alleles in humans.

  10. Evaluation of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in cranes: applications to conservation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Miller, M.M.; Goto, R.M.; Gee, G.F.; Briles, W.E.

    2001-01-01

    Although there have been heated discussions concerning the relative importance of using Mhc diversity as a basis for selecting breeders in conservation projects, most parties agree that the genetic variability residual in an endangered species should be maintained through genetic management, if at all possible. Substantial evidence exists (particularly in birds) documenting the influences of specific Mhc haplotypes on disease outcome and also that those individuals which are heterozygous for Mhc alleles appear to have an advantage for survival over those that are homozygous. Thus, conservation of genetic variability of the Mhc is likely important for the preservation of fitness, especially in small breeding populations. More than half of the world's crane species are listed as endangered. Members of all 15 known species are represented among breeding animals for captive propagation at the International Crane Foundation (Wisconsin) and the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Maryland). Collaborative multi-organization efforts and the availability of extensive pedigree records have allowed the study of Mhc variability in several species of cranes. We have found, for example, that Mhc diversity in the captive Florida sandhill crane (Grus canadensis pratensis) population appears high, whereas in the captive whooping crane (Grus americana), which has undergone a severe 'genetic bottleneck,? both the number of alleles and the levels of heterozygosity appear to be substantially reduced.

  11. MHC genotypes associate with resistance to a frog-killing fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Anna E; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2011-10-04

    The emerging amphibian disease chytridiomycosis is caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Amphibian populations and species differ in susceptibility to Bd, yet we know surprisingly little about the genetic basis of this natural variation. MHC loci encode peptides that initiate acquired immunity in vertebrates, making them likely candidates for determining disease susceptibility. However, MHC genes have never been characterized in the context of chytridiomycosis. Here, we performed experimental Bd infections in laboratory-reared frogs collected from five populations that show natural variation in Bd susceptibility. We found that alleles of an expressed MHC class IIB locus associate with survival following Bd infection. Across populations, MHC heterozygosity was a significant predictor of survival. Within populations, MHC heterozygotes and individuals bearing MHC allele Q had a significantly reduced risk of death, and we detected a significant signal of positive selection along the evolutionary lineage leading to allele Q. Our findings demonstrate that immunogenetic variation affects chytridiomycosis survival under controlled experimental conditions, confirming that host genetic polymorphisms contribute to chytridiomycosis resistance.

  12. No evidence for the effect of MHC on male mating success in the brown bear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuduk, Katarzyna; Babik, Wieslaw; Bellemain, Eva; Valentini, Alice; Zedrosser, Andreas; Taberlet, Pierre; Kindberg, Jonas; Swenson, Jon E; Radwan, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Mate choice is thought to contribute to the maintenance of the spectacularly high polymorphism of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes, along with balancing selection from parasites, but the relative contribution of the former mechanism is debated. Here, we investigated the association between male MHC genotype and mating success in the brown bear. We analysed fragments of sequences coding for the peptide-binding region of the highly polymorphic MHC class I and class II DRB genes, while controlling for genome-wide effects using a panel of 18 microsatellite markers. Male mating success did not depend on the number of alleles shared with the female or amino-acid distance between potential mates at either locus. Furthermore, we found no indication of female mating preferences for MHC similarity being contingent on the number of alleles the females carried. Finally, we found no significant association between the number of MHC alleles a male carried and his mating success. Thus, our results provided no support for the role of mate choice in shaping MHC polymorphism in the brown bear.

  13. MiR-125a TNF receptor-associated factor 6 to inhibit osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Li-Juan; Liao, Lan [Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Yang, Li [Department of Endocrinology, Hunan Province Geriatric Hospital, Changsha, Hunan 410001 (China); Li, Yu [Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Jiang, Tie-Jian, E-mail: jiangtiejian@gmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, 87 Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China)

    2014-02-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in osteoclastogenesis and bone resorption. In the present study, we found that miR-125a was dramatically down-regulated during macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) induced osteoclastogenesis of circulating CD14+ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Overexpression of miR-125a in CD14+ PBMCs inhibited osteoclastogenesis, while inhibition of miR-125a promoted osteoclastogenesis. TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), a transduction factor for RANKL/RANK/NFATc1 signal, was confirmed to be a target of miR-125a. EMSA and ChIP assays confirmed that NFATc1 bound to the promoter of the miR-125a. Overexpression of NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transcription, and block of NFATc1 expression attenuated RANKL-regulated miR-125a transcription. Here, we reported that miR-125a played a biological function in osteoclastogenesis through a novel TRAF6/ NFATc1/miR-125a regulatory feedback loop. It suggests that regulation of miR-125a expression may be a potential strategy for ameliorating metabolic disease. - Highlights: • MiR-125a was significantly down-regulated in osteoclastogenesis of CD14+ PBMCs. • MiR-125a inhibited osteoclast differentiation by targeting TRAF6. • NFATc1 inhibited miR-125a transciption by binding to the promoter of miR-125a. • TRAF6/NFATc1 and miR-125a form a regulatory feedback loop in osteoclastogenesis.

  14. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 14; Issue 12. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Noble Gas Clusters are London Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 14 Issue 12 December 2009 pp 1210-1222 ...

  15. In silico analysis of MHC-I restricted epitopes of Chikungunya virus proteins: Implication in understanding anti-CHIKV CD8(+) T cell response and advancement of epitope based immunotherapy for CHIKV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratheek, B M; Suryawanshi, Amol R; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne Alphavirus, responsible for acute febrile infection. The high morbidity and socio-economic loss associated with the recent CHIKV epidemics worldwide have raised a great public health concern and emphasize the need to study the immunological basis of CHIKV infection to control the disease. MHC-I restricted CD8(+) T cell response represent one of the major anti-viral immune responses. Accordingly, it is essential to have a detailed understanding towards CHIKV specific MHC-I restricted immunogenic epitopes for anti-viral CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. In the present study, a computational approach was used to predict the conserved MHC-I epitopes for mouse haplotypes (H2-Db and H2-Dd) and some alleles of the major HLA-I supertypes (HLA-A2, -A3, -A24, -B7, -B15) of all CHIKV proteins. Further, an in-depth computational analysis was carried out to validate the selected epitopes for their nature of conservation in different global CHIKV isolates to assess their binding affinities to the appropriate site of respective MHC-I molecules and to predict anti-CHIKV CD8(+) CTL immunogenicity. Our analyses resulted in fifteen highly conserved epitopes for H2-Db and H2-Dd and fifty epitopes for different HLA-I supertypes. Out of these, the MHC-I epitopes VLLPNVHTL and MTPERVTRL were found to have highest predictable CTL immunogenicities and least binding energies for H2-Db and H2-Dd, whereas, for HLA-I, the epitope FLTLFVNTL was with the highest population coverage, CTL immunogenicity and least binding energy. Hence, our study has identified MHC-I restricted epitopes that may help in the advancement of MHC-I restricted epitope based anti-CHIKV immune responses against this infection and this will be useful towards the development of epitope based anti-CHIKV immunotherapy in the future. However, further experimental investigations for cross validation and evaluation are warranted to establish the ability of epitopes to induce CD8(+) T cell

  16. Partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide constructs: a potential neuroimmune-based treatment for methamphetamine addiction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M Loftis

    Full Text Available Relapse rates following current methamphetamine abuse treatments are very high (∼40-60%, and the neuropsychiatric impairments (e.g., cognitive deficits, mood disorders that arise and persist during remission from methamphetamine addiction likely contribute to these high relapse rates. Pharmacotherapeutic development of medications to treat addiction has focused on neurotransmitter systems with only limited success, and there are no Food and Drug Administration approved pharmacotherapies for methamphetamine addiction. A growing literature shows that methamphetamine alters peripheral and central immune functions and that immune factors such as cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules play a role in the development and persistence of methamphetamine induced neuronal injury and neuropsychiatric impairments. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new immunotherapy, partial MHC/neuroantigen peptide construct (RTL551; pI-A(b/mMOG-35-55, in treating learning and memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure. C57BL/6J mice were exposed to two different methamphetamine treatment regimens (using repeated doses of 4 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg, s.c.. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Morris water maze and CNS cytokine levels were measured by multiplex assay. Immunotherapy with RTL551 improved the memory impairments induced by repeated methamphetamine exposure in both mouse models of chronic methamphetamine addiction. Treatment with RTL551 also attenuated the methamphetamine induced increases in hypothalamic interleukin-2 (IL-2 levels. Collectively, these initial results indicate that neuroimmune targeted therapies, and specifically RTL551, may have potential as treatments for methamphetamine-induced neuropsychiatric impairments.

  17. Spectrum of MHC Class II Variability in Darwin’s Finches and Their Close Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akie; Tichy, Herbert; Grant, Peter R.; Grant, B. Rosemary; Sato, Tetsuji; O’hUigin, Colm

    2011-01-01

    The study describes >400 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B exon 2 and 114 intron 2 sequences of 36 passerine bird species, 13 of which belong to the group of Darwin’s finches (DFs) and the remaining 23 to close or more distant relatives of DFs in Central and South America. The data set is analyzed by a combination of judiciously selected statistical methods. The analysis reveals that reliable information concerning MHC organization, including the assignment of sequences to loci, and evolution, as well as the process of species divergence, can be obtained in the absence of genomic sequence data, if the analysis is taken several steps beyond the standard phylogenetic tree construction approach. The main findings of the present study are these: The MHC class II B region of the passerine birds is as elaborate in its organization, divergence, and genetic diversity as the MHC of the eutherian mammals, specifically the primates. Hence, the reported simplicity of the fowl MHC is an oddity. With the help of appropriate markers, the divergence of the MHC genes can be traced deep in the phylogeny of the bird taxa. Transspecies polymorphism is rampant at many of the bird MHC loci. In this respect, the DFs behave as if they were a single, genetically undifferentiated population. There is thus far no indication of alleles that could be considered species, genus, or even DF group specific. The implication of these findings is that DFs are in the midst of adaptive radiations, in which morphological differentiation into species is running ahead of genetic differentiation in genetic systems such as the MHC or the mitochondrial DNA. The radiations are so young that there has not been enough time to sort out polymorphisms at most of the loci among the morphologically differentiating species. These findings parallel those on Lake Victoria haplochromine fishes. Several of the DF MHC allelic lineages can be traced back to the MHC genes of the species Tiaris obscura

  18. Comparative genomic analysis of the MHC: the evolution of class I duplication blocks, diversity and complexity from shark to man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulski, Jerzy K; Shiina, Takashi; Anzai, Tatsuya; Kohara, Sakae; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2002-12-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region is composed of a group of linked genes involved functionally with the adaptive and innate immune systems. The class I and class II genes are intrinsic features of the MHC and have been found in all the jawed vertebrates studied so far. The MHC genomic regions of the human and the chicken (B locus) have been fully sequenced and mapped, and the mouse MHC sequence is almost finished. Information on the MHC genomic structures (size, complexity, genic and intergenic composition and organization, gene order and number) of other vertebrates is largely limited or nonexistent. Therefore, we are mapping, sequencing and analyzing the MHC genomic regions of different human haplotypes and at least eight nonhuman species. Here, we review our progress with these sequences and compare the human MHC structure with that of the nonhuman primates (chimpanzee and rhesus macaque), other mammals (pigs, mice and rats) and nonmammalian vertebrates such as birds (chicken and quail), bony fish (medaka, pufferfish and zebrafish) and cartilaginous fish (nurse shark). This comparison reveals a complex MHC structure for mammals and a relatively simpler design for nonmammalian animals with a hypothetical prototypic structure for the shark. In the mammalian MHC, there are two to five different class I duplication blocks embedded within a framework of conserved nonclass I and/or nonclass II genes. With a few exceptions, the class I framework genes are absent from the MHC of birds, bony fish and sharks. Comparative genomics of the MHC reveal a highly plastic region with major structural differences between the mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Additional genomic data are needed on animals of the reptilia, crocodilia and marsupial classes to find the origins of the class I framework genes and examples of structures that may be intermediate between the simple and complex MHC organizations of birds and mammals, respectively.

  19. TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 1 is a Major Target of Soluble TWEAK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona Arana, José Antonio; Seher, Axel; Neumann, Manfred; Lang, Isabell; Siegmund, Daniela; Wajant, Harald

    2014-01-01

    Soluble tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), in contrast to membrane TWEAK and TNF, is only a weak activator of the classical NFκB pathway. We observed that soluble TWEAK was regularly more potent than TNF with respect to the induction of TNF receptor-associated factor 1 (TRAF1), a NFκB-controlled signaling protein involved in the regulation of inflammatory signaling pathways. TNF-induced TRAF1 expression was efficiently blocked by inhibition of the classical NFκB pathway using the IKK2 inhibitor, TPCA1. In contrast, in some cell lines, TWEAK-induced TRAF1 production was only partly inhibited by TPCA1. The NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924, however, which inhibits classical and alternative NFκB signaling, blocked TNF- and TWEAK-induced TRAF1 expression. This suggests that TRAF1 induction by soluble TWEAK is based on the cooperative activity of the two NFκB signaling pathways. We have previously shown that oligomerization of soluble TWEAK results in ligand complexes with membrane TWEAK-like activity. Oligomerization of soluble TWEAK showed no effect on the dose response of TRAF1 induction, but potentiated the ability of soluble TWEAK to trigger production of the classical NFκB-regulated cytokine IL8. Transfectants expressing soluble TWEAK and membrane TWEAK showed similar induction of TRAF1 while only the membrane TWEAK expressing cells robustly stimulated IL8 production. These data indicate that soluble TWEAK may efficiently induce a distinct subset of the membrane TWEAK-targeted genes and argue again for a crucial role of classical NFκB pathway-independent signaling in TWEAK-induced TRAF1 expression. Other TWEAK targets, which can be equally well induced by soluble and membrane TWEAK, remain to be identified and the relevance of the ability of soluble TWEAK to induce such a distinct subset of membrane TWEAK-targeted genes for TWEAK biology will have to be clarified in future studies. PMID:24600451

  20. Prediction of the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC using a regularized thermodynamic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of extracellular peptides to class II MHC is a crucial event in the adaptive immune response. Each MHC allotype generally binds a distinct subset of peptides and the enormous number of possible peptide epitopes prevents their complete experimental characterization. Computational methods can utilize the limited experimental data to predict the binding affinities of peptides to class II MHC. Results We have developed the Regularized Thermodynamic Average, or RTA, method for predicting the affinities of peptides binding to class II MHC. RTA accounts for all possible peptide binding conformations using a thermodynamic average and includes a parameter constraint for regularization to improve accuracy on novel data. RTA was shown to achieve higher accuracy, as measured by AUC, than SMM-align on the same data for all 17 MHC allotypes examined. RTA also gave the highest accuracy on all but three allotypes when compared with results from 9 different prediction methods applied to the same data. In addition, the method correctly predicted the peptide binding register of 17 out of 18 peptide-MHC complexes. Finally, we found that suboptimal peptide binding registers, which are often ignored in other prediction methods, made significant contributions of at least 50% of the total binding energy for approximately 20% of the peptides. Conclusions The RTA method accurately predicts peptide binding affinities to class II MHC and accounts for multiple peptide binding registers while reducing overfitting through regularization. The method has potential applications in vaccine design and in understanding autoimmune disorders. A web server implementing the RTA prediction method is available at http://bordnerlab.org/RTA/.

  1. Extensive shared polymorphism at non-MHC immune genes in recently diverged North American prairie grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2017-01-01

    Gene polymorphisms shared between recently diverged species are thought to be widespread and most commonly reflect introgression from hybridization or retention of ancestral polymorphism through incomplete lineage sorting. Shared genetic diversity resulting from incomplete lineage sorting is usually maintained for a relatively short period of time, but under strong balancing selection it may persist for millions of years beyond species divergence (balanced trans-species polymorphism), as in the case of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, balancing selection is much less likely to act on non-MHC immune genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of shared polymorphism and selection at non-MHC immune genes in five grouse species from Centrocercus and Tympanuchus genera. For this purpose, we genotyped five non-MHC immune genes that do not interact directly with pathogens, but are involved in signaling and regulate immune cell growth. In contrast to previous studies with MHC, we found no evidence for balancing selection or balanced trans-species polymorphism among the non-MHC immune genes. No haplotypes were shared between genera and in most cases more similar allelic variants sorted by genus. Between species within genera, however, we found extensive shared polymorphism, which was most likely attributable to introgression or incomplete lineage sorting following recent divergence and large ancestral effective population size (i.e., weak genetic drift). Our study suggests that North American prairie grouse may have attained relatively low degree of reciprocal monophyly at nuclear loci and reinforces the rarity of balancing selection in non-MHC immune genes.

  2. A four-step model for the IL-6 amplifier, a regulator of chronic inflammations in tissue-specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Masaaki; Hirano, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly thought that autoimmune diseases are caused by the breakdown of self-tolerance, which suggests the recognition of specific antigens by autoreactive CD4+ T cells contribute to the specificity of autoimmune diseases (Marrack et al., 2001; Mathis and Benoist, 2004). In several cases, however, even for diseases associated with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the causative tissue-specific antigens recognized by memory/activated CD4+ T cells have not been established (Mocci et al., 2000; Skapenko et al., 2005). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis in F759 knock-in mice (F759 mice) are such examples (Atsumi et al., 2002; Brennan et al., 2002; Falgarone et al., 2009). These include associations with class II MHC and CD4 molecules; increased numbers of memory/activated CD4+ T cells; and improved outcomes in response to suppressions and/or deficiencies in class II MHC molecules, CD4+ T cells, and the T cell survival cytokine IL-7. Regarding the development of arthritis in F759 mice, it is not only the immune system, but also non-immune tissue that are involved, indicating that the importance of their interactions (Sawa et al., 2006, 2009; Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Furthermore, we have shown that local events such as microbleeding together with an accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in a manner independent of tissue antigen-recognitions induces arthritis in the joints of F759 mice (Murakami et al., 2011). For example, local microbleeding-mediated CCL20 expression induce such an accumulation, causing arthritis development via chronic activation of an IL-17A-dependent IL-6 signaling amplification loop in type 1 collagen+ cells that is triggered by CD4+ T cell-derived cytokine(s) such as IL-17A, which leads to the synergistic activation of STAT3 and NFκB in non-hematopoietic cells in the joint (Murakami et al., 2011). We named this loop the IL-6-mediated inflammation amplifier, or IL-6 amplifier for

  3. Characterisation of monoclonal antibodies specific for hamster leukocyte differentiation molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jennifer; Haig, David; Mack, Victoria; Davis, William C

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry was used to identify mAbs that recognize conserved epitopes on hamster leukocyte differentiation molecules (hLDM) and also to characterize mAbs developed against hLDM. Initial screening of mAbs developed against LDMs in other species yielded mAbs specific for the major histocompatibility (MHC) II molecule, CD4 and CD18. Screening of sets of mAbs developed against hLDM yielded 22 new mAbs, including additional mAbs to MHC II molecules and mAbs that recognize LDMs expressed on all leukocytes, granulocytes, all lymphocytes, all T cells, a subset of T cells, or on all B cells. Based on comparison of the pattern of expression of LDMs expressed on all hamster leukocytes with the patterns of expression of known LDMs in other species, as detected by flow cytometry (FC), four mAbs are predicted to recognize CD11a, CD44, and CD45. Cross comparison of mAbs specific for a subset of hamster T cells with a cross reactive mAb known to recognize CD4 in mice and one recognising CD8 revealed they recognize CD4. The characterization of these mAbs expands opportunities to use hamsters as an additional model species to investigate the mechanisms of immunopathogenesis of infectious diseases. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Pan-specific prediction of peptide-MHC Class I complex stability, a correlate of T cell immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael; Fenoy, Emilio; Harndahl, Mikkel

    2016-01-01

    of a large panel of human MHC-I allotypes and generated a body of data sufficient to develop a neural network-based pan-specific predictor of peptide-MHC-I complex stability. Integrating the neural network predictors of peptide-MHC-I complex stability with state-of-the-art predictors of peptide-MHC-I binding...... is shown to significantly improve the prediction of CTL epitopes. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCstabpan....

  5. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biard Clotilde

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus. Results Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. Conclusions This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  6. Female house sparrows "count on" male genes: experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mate preference in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggio, Matteo; Biard, Clotilde; Penn, Dustin J; Hoi, Herbert

    2011-02-14

    Females can potentially assess the quality of potential mates using their secondary sexual traits, and obtain "good genes" that increase offspring fitness. Another potential indirect benefit from mating preferences is genetic compatibility, which does not require extravagant or viability indicator traits. Several studies with mammals and fish indicate that the genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) influence olfactory cues and mating preferences, and such preferences confer genetic benefits to offspring. We investigated whether individual MHC diversity (class I) influences mating preferences in house sparrows (Passer domesticus). Overall, we found no evidence that females preferred males with high individual MHC diversity. Yet, when we considered individual MHC allelic diversity of the females, we found that females with a low number of alleles were most attracted to males carrying a high number of MHC alleles, which might reflect a mating-up preference by allele counting. This is the first experimental evidence for MHC-dependent mating preferences in an avian species to our knowledge. Our findings raise questions about the underlying mechanisms through which birds discriminate individual MHC diversity among conspecifics, and they suggest a novel mechanism through which mating preferences might promote the evolution of MHC polymorphisms and generate positive selection for duplicated MHC loci.

  7. Novel MHC Class II Breast Cancer Vaccine Using RNA Interference (RNAi) to Down Regulate Invariant Chain (li)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    cDNA (in RSV.5 vector; ref. 31) contained two point mutations: a guanine instead of an adenine at base 13 and an adenine instead of a thymine at base 191...affecting MHC class II expression. MCF10/CIITA/CD80 cells down-regulated for Ii contain stable MHC class II heterodimers. Formation of stable ah heterodimers...is specific for MHC II ah dimers . Nonboiled samples contain bands migrating at f55 kDa that correspond to stable MHC class II ah heterodimers (Fig. 2D

  8. Quantitative predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence: NetMHCIIpan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten Nielsen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available CD4 positive T helper cells control many aspects of specific immunity. These cells are specific for peptides derived from protein antigens and presented by molecules of the extremely polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II system. The identification of peptides that bind to MHC class II molecules is therefore of pivotal importance for rational discovery of immune epitopes. HLA-DR is a prominent example of a human MHC class II. Here, we present a method, NetMHCIIpan, that allows for pan-specific predictions of peptide binding to any HLA-DR molecule of known sequence. The method is derived from a large compilation of quantitative HLA-DR binding events covering 14 of the more than 500 known HLA-DR alleles. Taking both peptide and HLA sequence information into account, the method can generalize and predict peptide binding also for HLA-DR molecules where experimental data is absent. Validation of the method includes identification of endogenously derived HLA class II ligands, cross-validation, leave-one-molecule-out, and binding motif identification for hitherto uncharacterized HLA-DR molecules. The validation shows that the method can successfully predict binding for HLA-DR molecules-even in the absence of specific data for the particular molecule in question. Moreover, when compared to TEPITOPE, currently the only other publicly available prediction method aiming at providing broad HLA-DR allelic coverage, NetMHCIIpan performs equivalently for alleles included in the training of TEPITOPE while outperforming TEPITOPE on novel alleles. We propose that the method can be used to identify those hitherto uncharacterized alleles, which should be addressed experimentally in future updates of the method to cover the polymorphism of HLA-DR most efficiently. We thus conclude that the presented method meets the challenge of keeping up with the MHC polymorphism discovery rate and that it can be used to sample the MHC "space," enabling a

  9. Very high MHC Class IIB diversity without spatial differentiation in the mediterranean population of greater Flamingos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, Mark A F; Béchet, Arnaud; Courtiol, Alexandre; Rendón-Martos, Manuel; Amat, Juan A; Samraoui, Boudjéma; Onmuş, Ortaç; Sommer, Simone; Cézilly, Frank

    2017-02-20

    Selective pressure from pathogens is thought to shape the allelic diversity of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in vertebrates. In particular, both local adaptation to pathogens and gene flow are thought to explain a large part of the intraspecific variation observed in MHC allelic diversity. To date, however, evidence that adaptation to locally prevalent pathogens maintains MHC variation is limited to species with limited dispersal and, hence, reduced gene flow. On the one hand high gene flow can disrupt local adaptation in species with high dispersal rates, on the other hand such species are much more likely to experience spatial variation in pathogen pressure, suggesting that there may be intense pathogen mediated selection pressure operating across breeding sites in panmictic species. Such pathogen mediated selection pressure operating across breeding sites should therefore be sufficient to maintain high MHC diversity in high dispersing species in the absence of local adaptation mechanisms. We used the Greater Flamingo, Phoenicopterus roseus, a long-lived colonial bird showing a homogeneous genetic structure of neutral markers at the scale of the Mediterranean region, to test the prediction that higher MHC allelic diversity with no population structure should occur in large panmictic populations of long-distance dispersing birds than in other resident species. We assessed the level of allelic diversity at the MHC Class IIB exon 2 from 116 individuals born in four different breeding colonies of Greater Flamingo in the Mediterranean region. We found one of the highest allelic diversity (109 alleles, 2 loci) of any non-passerine avian species investigated so far relative to the number of individuals and loci genotyped. There was no evidence of population structure between the four major Mediterranean breeding colonies. Our results suggest that local adaptation at MHC Class IIB in Greater Flamingos is constrained by high gene flow and high MHC diversity

  10. MHC class II β genes in the endangered Hainan Eld's deer (Cervus eldi hainanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Yi; Xue, Fei; Wan, Qiu-Hong; Ge, Yun-Fa

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to neutral markers, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can reflect the fitness and adaptive potential of a given species due to its association with the immune system. For this reason, the use of MHC in endangered wildlife management has increased greatly in recent years. Here, we isolated complementary DNA (cDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) sequences to characterize the MHC class II β genes in Hainan Eld's deer (Cervus eldi hainanus), a highly endangered cervid, which recovered from a severe population bottleneck consisting of 26 animals. Analysis of 7 individuals revealed the presence of 3 DRB and 3 DQB putatively functional gDNA sequences. The Ceel-DRB and DQB sequences displayed high variability in exon 2, and most nonsynonymous substitutions were detected in this region. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that trans-species evolution of MHC class II β might occur in the Cervinae subfamily. Comparison of the number of sequences between gDNA and cDNA revealed that all sequences isolated from the genome were detectable in the cDNA libraries derived from different tissues (including the liver, kidney, and spleen), suggesting none of these sequences were derived from silent genes or pseudogenes. Characterization of the MHC class II β genes may lay the foundation for future studies on genetic structure, mate choice, and viability analysis in Hainan Eld's deer.

  11. Evolution of Mhc Class i Complex Region with Special Reference to Fragmentary Line Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateno, Yoshio; Fukami-Kobayashi, Kaoru; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-03-01

    We reviewed the origin and evolution of the two pairs of immune genes, (MHC-B and MHC-C) and (MICA and MICB) in man, chimpanzee and rhesus monkey based mainly on our previous work. Since those genes were well known to have been subject to strong natural selection in evolution, they themselves were not suitable for our study. We thus took another approach to use fragmented and nonfunctional LINEs that had coevolved with the two pairs in the same genomic fragments. Our results showed that MHC-B and MHC-C duplicated about 22 Mry (million years) ago, and MICA and MICB duplicated about 14 Myr ago. Interestingly, rhesus monkey was found not to have either pair but many repeats similar to MHC-B. Therefore, we estimated the divergence time of the monkey, and found that it diverged out from a common ancestor of man and chimpanzee about 30 Myr ago. The divergence time was consistent with the duplication times of the two pairs of immune genes. Based on our results we would predict that orangutan and gorilla also have the two pairs, because the both primate species are considered to have diverged less than 14 Myr ago.

  12. A novel MHC class I-like gene is mutated in patients with hereditary haemochromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, J N; Gnirke, A; Thomas, W; Tsuchihashi, Z; Ruddy, D A; Basava, A; Dormishian, F; Domingo, R; Ellis, M C; Fullan, A; Hinton, L M; Jones, N L; Kimmel, B E; Kronmal, G S; Lauer, P; Lee, V K; Loeb, D B; Mapa, F A; McClelland, E; Meyer, N C; Mintier, G A; Moeller, N; Moore, T; Morikang, E; Prass, C E; Quintana, L; Starnes, S M; Schatzman, R C; Brunke, K J; Drayna, D T; Risch, N J; Bacon, B R; Wolff, R K

    1996-08-01

    Hereditary haemochromatosis (HH), which affects some 1 in 400 and has an estimated carrier frequency of 1 in 10 individuals of Northern European descent, results in multi-organ dysfunction caused by increased iron deposition, and is treatable if detected early. Using linkage-disequilibrium and full haplotype analysis, we have identified a 250-kilobase region more than 3 megabases telomeric of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) that is identical-by-descent in 85% of patient chromosomes. Within this region, we have identified a gene related to the MHC class I family, termed HLA-H, containing two missense alterations. One of these is predicted to inactivate this class of proteins and was found homozygous in 83% of 178 patients. A role of this gene in haemochromatosis is supported by the frequency and nature of the major mutation and prior studies implicating MHC class I-like proteins in iron metabolism.

  13. Nonlinear predictive modeling of MHC class II-peptide binding using Bayesian neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A; Burden, Frank R

    2007-01-01

    Methods for predicting the binding affinity of peptides to the MHC have become more sophisticated in the past 5-10 years. It is possible to use computational quantitative structure-activity methods to build models of peptide affinity that are truly predictive. Two of the most useful methods for building models are Bayesian regularized neural networks for continuous or discrete (categorical) data and support vector machines (SVMs) for discrete data. We illustrate the application of Bayesian regularized neural networks to modeling MHC class II-binding affinity of peptides. Training data comprised sequences and binding data for nonamer (nine amino acid) peptides. Peptides were characterized by mathematical representations of several types. Independent test data comprised sequences and binding data for peptides of length Bayesian neural networks are robust, efficient "universal approximators" that are well able to tackle the difficult problem of correctly predicting the MHC class II-binding activities of a majority of the test set peptides.

  14. Impact of genomic polymorphisms on the repertoire of human MHC class I-associated peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Diana Paola; Sriranganadane, Dev; Daouda, Tariq; Zieger, Antoine; Laumont, Céline M; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Boucher, Geneviève; Hardy, Marie-Pierre; Gendron, Patrick; Côté, Caroline; Lemieux, Sébastien; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2014-04-09

    For decades, the global impact of genomic polymorphisms on the repertoire of peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) has remained a matter of speculation. Here we present a novel approach that enables high-throughput discovery of polymorphic MHC class I-associated peptides (MIPs), which play a major role in allorecognition. On the basis of comprehensive analyses of the genomic landscape of MIPs eluted from B lymphoblasts of two MHC-identical siblings, we show that 0.5% of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations are represented in the MIP repertoire. The 34 polymorphic MIPs found in our subjects are encoded by bi-allelic loci with dominant and recessive alleles. Our analyses show that, at the population level, 12% of the MIP-coding exome is polymorphic. Our method provides fundamental insights into the relationship between the genomic self and the immune self and accelerates the discovery of polymorphic MIPs (also known as minor histocompatibility antigens).

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  17. Premature translational termination products are rapidly degraded substrates for MHC class I presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua R Lacsina

    Full Text Available Nearly thirty percent of all newly synthesized polypeptides are targeted for rapid proteasome-mediated degradation. These rapidly degraded polypeptides (RDPs are a source of antigenic substrates for the MHC class I presentation pathway, allowing for immunosurveillance of newly synthesized proteins by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Despite the recognized role of RDPs in MHC I presentation, it remains unclear what molecular characteristics distinguish RDPs from their more stable counterparts. It has been proposed that premature translational termination products may constitute a form of RDP; indeed, in prokaryotes translational drop-off products are normal by-products of protein synthesis and are subsequently rapidly degraded. To study the cellular fate of premature termination products, we used the antibiotic puromycin as a means to experimentally manipulate prematurely terminated polypeptide production in human cells. At low concentrations, puromycin enhanced flux into rapidly degraded polypeptide pools, with small polypeptides being markedly more labile then high molecular weight puromycin adducts. Immunoprecipitation experiments using anti-puromycin antisera demonstrated that the majority of peptidyl-puromycins are rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. Low concentrations of puromycin increased the recovery of cell surface MHC I-peptide complexes, indicating that prematurely terminated polypeptides can be processed for presentation via the MHC I pathway. In the continued presence of puromycin, however, MHC I export to the cell surface was inhibited, coincident with the accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins. The time- and dose-dependent effects of puromycin suggest that the pool of peptidyl-puromycin adducts differ in their targeting to various proteolytic pathways that, in turn, differ in the efficiency with which they access the MHC I presentation machinery. These studies highlight the diversity of cellular proteolytic pathways

  18. A quick and robust MHC typing method for free-ranging and captive primate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, N; Stanbury, K; de Vos-Rouweler, A J M; de Groot, N G; Poirier, N; Blancho, G; de Luna, C; Doxiadis, G G M; Bontrop, R E

    2017-04-01

    Gene products of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of human and non-human primates play a crucial role in adaptive immunity, and most of the relevant genes not only show a high degree of variability (polymorphism) but also copy number variation (CNV) is observed. Due to this diversity, MHC proteins influence the capability of individuals to cope with various pathogens. MHC and/or MHC-linked gene products such as odorant receptor genes are thought to influence mate choice and reproductive success. Therefore, MHC typing of wild and captive primate populations is considered to be useful in conservation biology, which is, however, often hampered by the need of invasive and time-consuming methods. All intact Mhc-DRB genes in primates appear to possess a complex and highly divergent microsatellite, DRB-STR. A panel of 154 pedigreed olive baboons (Papio anubis) was examined for their DRB content by DRB-STR analysis of genomic DNA. Using the same methodology on DNA of feces samples, DRB variability of a silvery gibbon population (Hylobates moloch) (N = 24), an endangered species, could successfully be studied. In both species, length determination of the DRB-STR resulted in the definition of unique genotyping patterns that appeared to be specific for a certain chromosome. Moreover, the different STR lengths were shown to segregate with the allelic variation of the respective gene. The results obtained expand data gained previously on DRB-STR typing in macaques, great apes, and humans and strengthen the conclusion that this protocol is applicable in molecular ecology, conservation biology, and colony management, especially of endangered primate species.

  19. Natural selection of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) in Hawaiian honeycreepers (Drepanidinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, S.I.; Tarr, C.L.; Mcintosh, C.E.; Atkinson, C.T.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2004-01-01

    The native Hawaiian honeycreepers represent a classic example of adaptive radiation and speciation, but currently face one the highest extinction rates in the world. Although multiple factors have likely influenced the fate of Hawaiian birds, the relatively recent introduction of avian malaria is thought to be a major factor limiting honeycreeper distribution and abundance. We have initiated genetic analyses of class II ?? chain Mhc genes in four species of honeycreepers using methods that eliminate the possibility of sequencing mosaic variants formed by cloning heteroduplexed polymerase chain reaction products. Phylogenetic analyses group the honeycreeper Mhc sequences into two distinct clusters. Variation within one cluster is high, with dN > d S and levels of diversity similar to other studies of Mhc (B system) genes in birds. The second cluster is nearly invariant and includes sequences from honeycreepers (Fringillidae), a sparrow (Emberizidae) and a blackbird (Emberizidae). This highly conserved cluster appears reminiscent of the independently segregating Rfp-Y system of genes defined in chickens. The notion that balancing selection operates at the Mhc in the honeycreepers is supported by transpecies polymorphism and strikingly high dN/dS ratios at codons putatively involved in peptide interaction. Mitochondrial DNA control region sequences were invariant in the i'iwi, but were highly variable in the 'amakihi. By contrast, levels of variability of class II ?? chain Mhc sequence codons that are hypothesized to be directly involved in peptide interactions appear comparable between i'iwi and 'amakihi. In the i'iwi, natural selection may have maintained variation within the Mhc, even in the face of what appears to a genetic bottleneck.

  20. MHC class II tetramers made from isolated recombinant α and β chains refolded with affinity-tagged peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braendstrup, Peter; Justesen, Sune Frederik Lamdahl; Osterbye, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Targeting CD4+ T cells through their unique antigen-specific, MHC class II-restricted T cell receptor makes MHC class II tetramers an attractive strategy to identify, validate and manipulate these cells at the single cell level. Currently, generating class II tetramers is a specialized undertakin...

  1. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  2. Peripheral nerve injury causes transient expression of MHC class I antigens in rat motor neurons and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maehlen, J; Nennesmo, I; Olsson, A B

    1989-01-01

    After a peripheral nerve lesion (rat facial and sciatic) an induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens class I was detected immunohistochemically in skeletal muscle fibers and motor neurons. This MHC expression was transient after a nerve crush, when regeneration occurred...

  3. Heterozygote advantage fails to explain the high degree of polymorphism of the MHC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Boer, R.J.; Borghans, J.A.M.; Boven, M.

    2004-01-01

    homozygous individuals. Whether or not heterozygote advantage is sufficient to account for a high degree of polymorphism is controversial, however. Using mathematical models we studied the degree of MHC polymorphism arising when heterozygote advantage is the only selection pressure. We argue that existing...... that a high degree of polymorphism can only be accounted for if the different MHC alleles confer unrealistically similar fitnesses. This conclusion was confirmed by stochastic simulations, including mutation, genetic drift, and a finite population size. Heterozygote advantage on its own is insufficient...

  4. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Powers

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  5. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Molecule Matters van der Waals Molecules - Rg•••HF Complexes are Debye Molecules! E Arunan. Feature Article Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 667-674. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  6. Superantigen-presentation by rat major histocompatibility complex class II molecules RT1.Bl and RT1.Dl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlaske, Henry; Karaüzüm, Hatice; Monzon-Casanova, Elisa; Rudolf, Ronald; Starick, Lisa; Müller, Ingrid; Wildner, Gerhild; Diedrichs-Möhring, Maria; Koch, Norbert; Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Uchiyama, Takehiko; Wonigeit, Kurt; Fleischer, Bernhard; Overbeck, Silke; Rink, Lothar; Herrmann, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    Rat major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules RT1.B(l) (DQ-like) and RT1.D(l) (DR-like) were cloned from the LEW strain using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and expressed in mouse L929 cells. The transduced lines bound MHC class II-specific monoclonal antibodies in an MHC-isotype-specific manner and presented peptide antigens and superantigens to T-cell hybridomas. The T-cell-hybridomas responded well to all superantigens presented by human MHC class II, whereas the response varied considerably with rat MHC class II-transduced lines as presenters. The T-cell hybridomas responded to the pyrogenic superantigens Staphylococcus enterotoxin B (SEB), SEC1, SEC2 and SEC3 only at high concentrations with RT1.B(l)-transduced and RT1.D(l)-transduced cells as presenters. The same was true for streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A (SPEA), but this was presented only by RT1.B(l) and not by RT1.D(l). SPEC was recognized only if presented by human MHC class II. Presentation of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis superantigen (YPM) showed no MHC isotype preference, while Mycoplasma arthritidis superantigen (MAS or MAM) was presented by RT1.D(l) but not by RT1.B(l). Interestingly, and in contrast to RT1.B(l), the RT1.D(l) completely failed to present SEA and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 even after transduction of invariant chain (CD74) or expression in other cell types such as the surface MHC class II-negative mouse B-cell lymphoma (M12.4.1.C3). We discuss the idea that a lack of SEA presentation may not be a general feature of RT1.D molecules but could be a consequence of RT1.D(l)beta-chain allele-specific substitutions (arginine 80 to lysine, asparagine 82 to aspartic acid) in the extremely conserved region flanking the Zn(2+)-binding histidine 81, which is crucial for high-affinity SEA-binding.

  7. MHC-I Ligand Discovery Using Targeted Database Searches of Mass Spectrometry Data: Implications for T-Cell Immunotherapies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, J. Patrick; Konda, Prathyusha; Kowalewski, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I)-bound peptide ligands dictate the activation and specificity of CD8+ T cells and thus are important for devising T-cell immunotherapies. In recent times, advances in mass spectrometry (MS) have enabled the precise identification of these MHC......-I peptides, wherein MS spectra are compared against a reference proteome. Unfortunately, matching these spectra to reference proteome databases is hindered by inflated search spaces attributed to a lack of enzyme restriction in the searches, limiting the efficiency with which MHC ligands are discovered. Here...... we offer a solution to this problem whereby we developed a targeted database search approach and accompanying tool SpectMHC, that is based on a priori-predicted MHC-I peptides. We first validated the approach using MS data from two different allotype-specific immunoprecipitates for the C57BL/6 mouse...

  8. Transfected HEK293 Cells Expressing Functional Recombinant Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 (ICAM-1) - A Receptor Associated with Severe Plasmodium falciparum Malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Anja; Joergensen, Louise; Barbati, Zachary R

    2013-01-01

    . Additionally, ICAM-1 acts as receptor for pathogens like human rhinovirus and Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites. A group of related P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) domains, the DBLβ, mediates ICAM-1 binding of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. This ICAM‑1-binding phenotype has...... been suggested to be involved in the development of cerebral malaria. However, more studies identifying cross-reactive antibody and ICAM-1-binding epitopes and the establishment of a clinical link between DBLβ expression and e.g. cerebral malaria are needed before the DBLβ domains can be put forward...... as vaccine candidates and go into clinical trials. Such studies require availability of functional recombinant ICAM-1 in large quantities. In this study, we compared recombinant ICAM-1 expressed in HEK293 and COS-7 cells with mouse myeloma NS0 ICAM-1 purchased from a commercial vendor in terms of protein...

  9. The interaction between beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2m) and purified class-I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L O; Hansen, A S; Olsen, A C

    1994-01-01

    been generated recently and this paper reports on a similar assay for the interaction between beta 2m and class I. As a model system human beta 2m binding to mouse class I was used. The assay is strictly biochemical using purified reagents which interact in solution and complex formation is determined......The function of MHC class-I molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present them to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To understand the molecular details of the assembly (and disassembly) of peptide-beta 2m-class-I complexes a biochemical peptide-class-I binding assay has...... by size separation. It is specific and highly sensitive. The observed affinity of the interaction, KD, is close to 0.4 nM. The rate of association at 37 degrees C is very fast (the ka is around 5 x 10(4)/M/s) whereas the dissociation is slow (the kd is around 8 x 10(-6)/s); the ratio of dissociation...

  10. Comparison of the transcriptional regulation of classical and non-classical MHC class II genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hake, Sandra B; Tobin, Helen M; Steimle, Viktor; Denzin, Lisa K

    2003-09-01

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) regulates expression of the classical and non-classical MHC class II genes, HLA-DR, -DP, -DQ and -DM, but not the B cell-specific HLA-DO (DO). Here we show that only HLA-DR expression is completely dependent on CIITA, since residual expression of HLA-DM, -DP and the beta chain of DQ was observed in CIITA-deficient RJ2.2.5 cells. Although DO shows a unique expression pattern compared to other MHC class II genes, prolonged IFN-gamma treatment of HeLa cells induced DOB expression. Similar to all MHC class II promoters, the DOB promoter contains the highly conserved W, X1, and Y boxes in addition to a putative OCT box. Mutational analysis of the DOB promoter demonstrated that the X1, Y and OCT boxes are necessary for maximum promoter activity.Furthermore, our results demonstrate that CREB-1, RFXANK and Oct-2 occupy the DOB promoter in vivo, However, CIITA and Bob-1 were only minimally recruited. Finally, fusion of Bjab, a DOB-negative B cell line, with.174 B cells that lack the complete MHC class II region (including the DO genes), lead to DO expression. These data indicate that the expression of DO is regulated by an unidentified factor in B cells.

  11. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Jan Ejsmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process. Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  12. Red Queen Processes Drive Positive Selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejsmond, Maciej Jan; Radwan, Jacek

    2015-11-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes code for proteins involved in the incitation of the adaptive immune response in vertebrates, which is achieved through binding oligopeptides (antigens) of pathogenic origin. Across vertebrate species, substitutions of amino acids at sites responsible for the specificity of antigen binding (ABS) are positively selected. This is attributed to pathogen-driven balancing selection, which is also thought to maintain the high polymorphism of MHC genes, and to cause the sharing of allelic lineages between species. However, the nature of this selection remains controversial. We used individual-based computer simulations to investigate the roles of two phenomena capable of maintaining MHC polymorphism: heterozygote advantage and host-pathogen arms race (Red Queen process). Our simulations revealed that levels of MHC polymorphism were high and driven mostly by the Red Queen process at a high pathogen mutation rate, but were low and driven mostly by heterozygote advantage when the pathogen mutation rate was low. We found that novel mutations at ABSs are strongly favored by the Red Queen process, but not by heterozygote advantage, regardless of the pathogen mutation rate. However, while the strong advantage of novel alleles increased the allele turnover rate, under a high pathogen mutation rate, allelic lineages persisted for a comparable length of time under Red Queen and under heterozygote advantage. Thus, when pathogens evolve quickly, the Red Queen is capable of explaining both positive selection and long coalescence times, but the tension between the novel allele advantage and persistence of alleles deserves further investigation.

  13. Is promiscuity associated with enhanced selection on MHC-DQα in mice (genus Peromyscus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D MacManes

    Full Text Available Reproductive behavior may play an important role in shaping selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes. For example, the number of sexual partners that an individual has may affect exposure to sexually transmitted pathogens, with more partners leading to greater exposure and, hence, potentially greater selection for variation at MHC loci. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the strength of selection on exon 2 of the MHC-DQα locus in two species of Peromyscus. While the California mouse (P. californicus is characterized by lifetime social and genetic monogamy, the deer mouse (P. maniculatus is socially and genetically promiscuous; consistent with these differences in mating behavior, the diversity of bacteria present within the reproductive tracts of females is significantly greater for P. maniculatus. To test the prediction that more reproductive partners and exposure to a greater range of sexually transmitted pathogens are associated with enhanced diversifying selection on genes responsible for immune function, we compared patterns and levels of diversity at the Class II MHC-DQα locus in sympatric populations of P. maniculatus and P. californicus. Using likelihood based analyses, we show that selection is enhanced in the promiscuous P. maniculatus. This study is the first to compare the strength of selection in wild sympatric rodents with known differences in pathogen milieu.

  14. Is promiscuity associated with enhanced selection on MHC-DQα in mice (genus Peromyscus)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacManes, Matthew D; Lacey, Eileen A

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive behavior may play an important role in shaping selection on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) genes. For example, the number of sexual partners that an individual has may affect exposure to sexually transmitted pathogens, with more partners leading to greater exposure and, hence, potentially greater selection for variation at MHC loci. To explore this hypothesis, we examined the strength of selection on exon 2 of the MHC-DQα locus in two species of Peromyscus. While the California mouse (P. californicus) is characterized by lifetime social and genetic monogamy, the deer mouse (P. maniculatus) is socially and genetically promiscuous; consistent with these differences in mating behavior, the diversity of bacteria present within the reproductive tracts of females is significantly greater for P. maniculatus. To test the prediction that more reproductive partners and exposure to a greater range of sexually transmitted pathogens are associated with enhanced diversifying selection on genes responsible for immune function, we compared patterns and levels of diversity at the Class II MHC-DQα locus in sympatric populations of P. maniculatus and P. californicus. Using likelihood based analyses, we show that selection is enhanced in the promiscuous P. maniculatus. This study is the first to compare the strength of selection in wild sympatric rodents with known differences in pathogen milieu.

  15. Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci with the B (MHC) and C histocompatibility loci in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachý, J; Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Zdĕnková, E

    1985-01-01

    Genetic linkage of endogenous viral loci and histocompatibility loci B (MHC) and C has been demonstrated serologically in backcross progeny of inbred lines of chickens. The endogenous viral locus linked to the B complex is the first case of the localization of an endogenous viral gene to the microchromosomes in chickens.

  16. Isolation and characterization of MHC-DQA1 and -DQA2 from yak ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saud Qaim Khani

    immunological functions, selective and evolutionary forces that affect MHC variation within and between species. ... genetic diversity is known to be associated with the capacity for adaptation and evolution to environmental ... rabbit and pig, there was a single gene of the DQ genes whereas in dogs and human multiple DQ.

  17. Scrutinizing MHC-I binding peptides and their limits of variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian P Koch

    Full Text Available Designed peptides that bind to major histocompatibility protein I (MHC-I allomorphs bear the promise of representing epitopes that stimulate a desired immune response. A rigorous bioinformatical exploration of sequence patterns hidden in peptides that bind to the mouse MHC-I allomorph H-2K(b is presented. We exemplify and validate these motif findings by systematically dissecting the epitope SIINFEKL and analyzing the resulting fragments for their binding potential to H-2K(b in a thermal denaturation assay. The results demonstrate that only fragments exclusively retaining the carboxy- or amino-terminus of the reference peptide exhibit significant binding potential, with the N-terminal pentapeptide SIINF as shortest ligand. This study demonstrates that sophisticated machine-learning algorithms excel at extracting fine-grained patterns from peptide sequence data and predicting MHC-I binding peptides, thereby considerably extending existing linear prediction models and providing a fresh view on the computer-based molecular design of future synthetic vaccines. The server for prediction is available at http://modlab-cadd.ethz.ch (SLiDER tool, MHC-I version 2012.

  18. Physical mapping of the MHC and grc by pulse field electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardimon, D; Locker, J; Kunz, H W; Gill, T J

    1992-01-01

    The development of the physical map of the major histocompatibility complex of the rat was undertaken using pulse field gel electrophoresis of fragments of genomic DNA from the BIL/2 (grc+) and BIL/1 (grc-) strains obtained primarily from single and double digests with the enzymes Mlu I, Not I, and Sfi I and hybridized with a variety of mouse, rat, and human probes. Both strains are maintained by inbreeding the BIL heterozygote (forced heterozygosity; F31); hence, their differences lie almost entirely in the MHC-grc regions. The MHC-grc region was contained in five fragments of DNA comprising 3000-3200 kilobases (kb); thus, its size appears to be closer to that of the human MHC than to that of the mouse MHC. This distance may be an underestimate of the size of the entire region, however, because the cluster of class I loci in the RT1. A region could not be defined in detail in this study. The most striking difference between the BIL/2 strain, which has normal growth and reproductive characteristics, and the BIL/1 strain, which has growth and reproductive defects and an enhanced susceptibility to chemical carcinogens, is a deletion of approximately 70 kb in the latter strain. The studies on grc+ and grc- strains suggest that the phenotypic defects of the grc- strains may be due to the loss of genes that are normally present in this deleted region.

  19. Signatures of Crested Ibis MHC Revealed by Recombination Screening and Short-Reads Assembly Strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Chang

    Full Text Available Whole-genome shotgun (WGS sequencing has become a routine method in genome research over the past decade. However, the assembly of highly polymorphic regions in WGS projects remains a challenge, especially for large genomes. Employing BAC library constructing, PCR screening and Sanger sequencing, traditional strategy is laborious and expensive, which hampers research on polymorphic genomic regions. As one of the most highly polymorphic regions, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC plays a central role in the adaptive immunity of all jawed vertebrates. In this study, we introduced an efficient procedure based on recombination screening and short-reads assembly. With this procedure, we constructed a high quality 488-kb region of crested ibis MHC that consists of 3 superscaffolds and contains 50 genes. Our sequence showed comparable quality (97.29% identity to traditional Sanger assembly, while the workload was reduced almost 7 times. Comparative study revealed distinctive features of crested ibis by exhibiting the COL11A2-BLA-BLB-BRD2 cluster and presenting both ADPRH and odorant receptor (OR gene in the MHC region. Furthermore, the conservation of the BF-TAP1-TAP2 structure in crested ibis and other vertebrate lineages is interesting in light of the hypothesis that coevolution of functionally related genes in the primordial MHC is responsible for the appearance of the antigen presentation pathways at the birth of the adaptive immune system.

  20. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA-DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA-DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place.

  1. Variation in MHC class II B genes in marbled murrelets: implications for delineating conservation units

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Vásquez-Carrillo; V. Friesen; L. Hall; M.Z. Peery

    2013-01-01

    Conserving genetic variation is critical for maintaining the evolutionary potential and viability of a species. Genetic studies seeking to delineate conservation units, however, typically focus on characterizing neutral genetic variation and may not identify populations harboring local adaptations. Here, variation at two major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II...

  2. MHC class I epitope binding prediction trained on small data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    The identification of potential T-cell epitopes is important for development of new human or vetenary vaccines, both considering single protein/subunit vaccines, and for epitope/peptide vaccines as such. The highly diverse MHC class I alleles bind very different peptides, and accurate binding pre...... in situations where only very limited data are available for training....

  3. Further observations on the role of the MHC genes and certain hearing disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernstein, JM; Shanahan, TC; Schaffer, FM

    The pathogenetic mechanism of many hearing disorders have not been fully defined. Studies of certain hearing disorders in man have suggested a role for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded genes in disease pathogenesis, In a cohort of unrelated patients with Meniere's Disease,

  4. Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harndahl, Mikkel Nors; Rasmussen, Michael; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-MHC class I stability is a stronger predictor of CTL immunogenicity than peptide affinity Mikkel Harndahla, Michael Rasmussena, Morten Nielsenb, Soren Buusa,∗ a Laboratory of Experimental Immunology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark b Center for Biological Seq...... al., 2007. J. Immunol. 178, 7890–7901. doi:10.1016/j.molimm.2012.02.025...

  5. 454 screening of individual MHC variation in an endemic island passerine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalez-Quevedo, Catalina; Phillips, Karl P.; Spurgin, Lewis G.; Richardson, David S.

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) code for receptors that are central to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates. These genes are therefore important genetic markers with which to study adaptive genetic variation in the wild. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has increasingly

  6. Classing it up to get noticed : MHC class 1 antigen display in dendritic cells and neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the process of MHC-1-mediated antigen presentation in two distinctive cell types: dendritic cells and neuroblastoma tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal players that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are able to engulf tumor-derived material and

  7. MHC-based patterns of social and extra-pair mate choice in the Seychelles warbler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, DS; Komdeur, J; Burke, T; von Schantz, T; Richardson, David S.

    2005-01-01

    The existence and nature of indirect genetic benefits to mate choice remain contentious. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, which play a vital role in determining pathogen resistance in vertebrates, may be the link between mate choice and the genetic inheritance of vigour in offspring.

  8. MHC class II-assortative mate choice in European badgers (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Annavi, Geetha; Newman, Chris; Buesching, Christina D.; Burke, Terry; Macdonald, David W.; Dugdale, Hannah

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a crucial role in the immune system, and in some species, it is a target by which individuals choose mates to optimize the fitness of their offspring, potentially mediated by olfactory cues. Under the genetic compatibility hypothesis, individuals are

  9. Functional epistasis on a common MHC haplotype associated with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Jon Waarst; Kranc, Kamil R; Ke, Xiayi

    2006-01-01

    report that the human MHC HLA-DR2 haplotype, which predisposes to multiple sclerosis, shows more extensive linkage disequilibrium than other common caucasian HLA haplotypes in the DR region and thus seems likely to have been maintained through positive selection. Characterization of two multiple...... disequilibrium in this and perhaps other HLA haplotypes....

  10. Suppression of MHC class I antigen expression by N-myc through enhancer inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenardo, M.; Rustgi, A.K.; Schievella, A.R.; Bernards, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    Amplification of the N-myc oncogene in human neuroblastoma is associated with increased metastatic ability. We previously found that over-expression of N-myc in rat neuroblastoma tumor cells causes a dramatic reduction in the expression of MHC class I mRNA. We show here that two distinct

  11. [MHC class I antigens, CD4 and CD8 expressions in polymyositis and dermatomyositis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graça, Carla Renata; Kouyoumdjian, João Aris

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the frequencies of the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) antigens, and CD4 and CD8 cells in skeletal muscle in polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM). This was a retrospective study of 34 PM cases, 8 DM cases, and 29 control patients with non-inflammatory myopathies. MHC-I antigens were expressed in the sarcolemma and/or sarcoplasm in 79.4% of PM cases, 62.5% of DM cases, and 27.6% of controls (CD4 expression was observed in 76.5%, 75%, and 13.8%, respectively). There was a high suspicion of PM/DM (mainly PM) in patients in whom MHC-I antigens and CD4 were co-expressed. In 14.3% of PM/DM cases, we observed MHC-I antigens expression alone, without inflammatory cells. MCH-I antigens expression and CD4 positivity might add to strong diagnostic suspicion of PM/DM. No cellular infiltration was observed in 14.3% of such cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. MHC-linked and un-linked class I genes in the wallaby

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrow Jennifer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MHC class I antigens are encoded by a rapidly evolving gene family comprising classical and non-classical genes that are found in all vertebrates and involved in diverse immune functions. However, there is a fundamental difference between the organization of class I genes in mammals and non-mammals. Non-mammals have a single classical gene responsible for antigen presentation, which is linked to the antigen processing genes, including TAP. This organization allows co-evolution of advantageous class Ia/TAP haplotypes. In contrast, mammals have multiple classical genes within the MHC, which are separated from the antigen processing genes by class III genes. It has been hypothesized that separation of classical class I genes from antigen processing genes in mammals allowed them to duplicate. We investigated this hypothesis by characterizing the class I genes of the tammar wallaby, a model marsupial that has a novel MHC organization, with class I genes located within the MHC and 10 other chromosomal locations. Results Sequence analysis of 14 BACs containing 15 class I genes revealed that nine class I genes, including one to three classical class I, are not linked to the MHC but are scattered throughout the genome. Kangaroo Endogenous Retroviruses (KERVs were identified flanking the MHC un-linked class I. The wallaby MHC contains four non-classical class I, interspersed with antigen processing genes. Clear orthologs of non-classical class I are conserved in distant marsupial lineages. Conclusion We demonstrate that classical class I genes are not linked to antigen processing genes in the wallaby and provide evidence that retroviral elements were involved in their movement. The presence of retroviral elements most likely facilitated the formation of recombination hotspots and subsequent diversification of class I genes. The classical class I have moved away from antigen processing genes in eutherian mammals and the wallaby

  13. MHC class II DQB diversity in the Japanese black bear, Ursus thibetanus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukochi, Yoshiki; Kurosaki, Toshifumi; Yoneda, Masaaki; Koike, Hiroko; Satta, Yoko

    2012-11-29

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes are one of the most important genetic systems in the vertebrate immune response. The diversity of MHC genes may directly influence the survival of individuals against infectious disease. However, there has been no investigation of MHC diversity in the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus). Here, we analyzed 270-bp nucleotide sequences of the entire exon 2 region of the MHC DQB gene by using 188 samples from the Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus) from 12 local populations. Among 185 of 188 samples, we identified 44 MHC variants that encoded 31 different amino acid sequences (allotypes) and one putative pseudogene. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that MHC variants detected from the Japanese black bear are derived from the DQB locus. One of the 31 DQB allotypes, Urth-DQB*01, was found to be common to all local populations. Moreover, this allotype was shared between the black bear on the Asian continent and the Japanese black bear, suggesting that Urth-DQB*01 might have been maintained in the ancestral black bear population for at least 300,000 years. Our findings, from calculating the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, indicate that balancing selection has maintained genetic variation of peptide-binding residues at the DQB locus of the Japanese black bear. From examination of genotype frequencies among local populations, we observed a considerably lower level of observed heterozygosity than expected. The low level of observed heterozygosity suggests that genetic drift reduced DQB diversity in the Japanese black bear due to a bottleneck event at the population or species level. The decline of DQB diversity might have been accelerated by the loss of rare variants that have been maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection. Nevertheless, DQB diversity of the black bear appears to be relatively high compared with some other endangered mammalian species. This result suggests that

  14. Patterns of evolution of MHC class II genes of crows (Corvus suggest trans-species polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Eimes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A distinguishing characteristic of genes that code for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC is that alleles often share more similarity between, rather than within species. There are two likely mechanisms that can explain this pattern: convergent evolution and trans-species polymorphism (TSP, in which ancient allelic lineages are maintained by balancing selection and retained by descendant species. Distinguishing between these two mechanisms has major implications in how we view adaptation of immune genes. In this study we analyzed exon 2 of the MHC class IIB in three passerine bird species in the genus Corvus: jungle crows (Corvus macrorhynchos japonensis American crows (C. brachyrhynchos and carrion crows (C. corone orientalis. Carrion crows and American crows are recently diverged, but allopatric, sister species, whereas carrion crows and jungle crows are more distantly related but sympatric species, and possibly share pathogens linked to MHC IIB polymorphisms. These patterns of evolutionary divergence and current geographic ranges enabled us to test for trans-species polymorphism and convergent evolution of the MHC IIB in crows. Phylogenetic reconstructions of MHC IIB sequences revealed several well supported interspecific clusters containing all three species, and there was no biased clustering of variants among the sympatric carrion crows and jungle crows. The topologies of phylogenetic trees constructed from putatively selected sites were remarkably different than those constructed from putatively neutral sites. In addition, trees constructed using non-synonymous substitutions from a continuous fragment of exon 2 had more, and generally more inclusive, supported interspecific MHC IIB variant clusters than those constructed from the same fragment using synonymous substitutions. These phylogenetic patterns suggest that recombination, especially gene conversion, has partially erased the signal of allelic ancestry in these species. While

  15. Deep convolutional neural networks for pan-specific peptide-MHC class I binding prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Youngmahn; Kim, Dongsup

    2017-12-28

    Computational scanning of peptide candidates that bind to a specific major histocompatibility complex (MHC) can speed up the peptide-based vaccine development process and therefore various methods are being actively developed. Recently, machine-learning-based methods have generated successful results by training large amounts of experimental data. However, many machine learning-based methods are generally less sensitive in recognizing locally-clustered interactions, which can synergistically stabilize peptide binding. Deep convolutional neural network (DCNN) is a deep learning method inspired by visual recognition process of animal brain and it is known to be able to capture meaningful local patterns from 2D images. Once the peptide-MHC interactions can be encoded into image-like array(ILA) data, DCNN can be employed to build a predictive model for peptide-MHC binding prediction. In this study, we demonstrated that DCNN is able to not only reliably predict peptide-MHC binding, but also sensitively detect locally-clustered interactions. Nonapeptide-HLA-A and -B binding data were encoded into ILA data. A DCNN, as a pan-specific prediction model, was trained on the ILA data. The DCNN showed higher performance than other prediction tools for the latest benchmark datasets, which consist of 43 datasets for 15 HLA-A alleles and 25 datasets for 10 HLA-B alleles. In particular, the DCNN outperformed other tools for alleles belonging to the HLA-A3 supertype. The F1 scores of the DCNN were 0.86, 0.94, and 0.67 for HLA-A*31:01, HLA-A*03:01, and HLA-A*68:01 alleles, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of other tools. We found that the DCNN was able to recognize locally-clustered interactions that could synergistically stabilize peptide binding. We developed ConvMHC, a web server to provide user-friendly web interfaces for peptide-MHC class I binding predictions using the DCNN. ConvMHC web server can be accessible via http://jumong.kaist.ac.kr:8080/convmhc

  16. Zika Virus Escapes NK Cell Detection by Upregulating Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasner, Ariella; Oiknine-Djian, Esther; Weisblum, Yiska; Diab, Mohammad; Panet, Amos; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2017-11-15

    infection is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that Zika virus infection is almost undetected by NK cells, as evidenced by the fact that the expression of activating ligands for NK cells is not induced following Zika infection. We identified a mechanism whereby Zika virus sensing via the RIGI-IRF3 pathway resulted in IFN-β-mediated upregulation of MHC-I molecules and inhibition of NK cell activity. Countering MHC class I upregulation and boosting NK cell activity may be employed as prophylactic measures to combat Zika virus infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Quantum dot/pMHC multimers vs. phycoerythrin/pMHC tetramers for identification of HLA-A*0201-restricted pHBV core antigen18-27-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianmeng; Huang, Yong; Su, Jing; He, Jian; Yu, Yating; Zhao, Yongxiang; Lu, Xiaoling

    2017-08-01

    Detection of human leukocyte antigens-A2-restricted p-hepatitis B virus (HBV) core antigen‑specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is important in the study of HBV immunopathogenesis and vaccine design. Currently, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/peptide‑(p) MHCI tetramers are considered the optimal tools to detect antigen‑specific CTLs. However, the MHC‑tetramer technique also has certain drawbacks and is under continuous development. The quantum dot (QD) bioconjugates nanotechnology with its unique inorganic‑biological properties has been developing fast. However, QD/pMHC multimers have seldom been used for the identification of the C18‑27 epitope, which is important in HBV infection. QD/pMHC multimers were synthesized by metal‑affinity coordination and an avidin‑biotin system. In the present study they were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and fluorescence spectrophotometry. C18‑27‑specific CTLs were obtained by ex vivo expansion of CD8+ T cells. Cultured CTLs were tested for the secretion level of interferon (IFN)‑γ by ELISA and for cytotoxicity by lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Then, the performance of phycoerythrin (PE)/pMHC tetramers and QD/pMHC multimers were compared by flow cytometry. The synthesized QD/pMHC multimers dispersed well and their emission spectrum exhibited only slight differences compared with original QDs. C18‑27‑specific CTLs not only secreted IFN‑γ but also effectively targeted T2 cells pulsed with peptide C18‑27. The frequencies of C18‑27‑specific CTLs determined by QD/pMHC multimers were higher compared with PE/pMHC tetramers. The present results suggested that QD/pMHC multimers may be able to characterize greater numbers of C18‑27‑specific CTLs with increased sensitivity compared to conventional strategies.

  18. Characterization of MHC class IIB for four endangered Australian freshwater fishes obtained from ecologically divergent populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracamonte, Seraina E; Smith, Steve; Hammer, Michael; Pavey, Scott A; Sunnucks, Paul; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2015-10-01

    Genetic diversity is an essential aspect of species viability, and assessments of neutral genetic diversity are regularly implemented in captive breeding and conservation programs. Despite their importance, information from adaptive markers is rarely included in such programs. A promising marker of significance in fitness and adaptive potential is the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), a key component of the adaptive immune system. Populations of Australian freshwater fishes are generally declining in numbers due to human impacts and the introduction of exotic species, a scenario of particular concern for members of the family Percichthyidae, several of which are listed as nationally vulnerable or endangered, and hence subject to management plans, captive breeding, and restoration plans. We used a next-generation sequencing approach to characterize the MHC IIB locus and provide a conservative description of its levels of diversity in four endangered percichthyids: Gadopsis marmoratus, Macquaria australasica, Nannoperca australis, and Nannoperca obscura. Evidence is presented for a duplicated MHC IIB locus, positively selected sites and recombination of MHC alleles. Relatively moderate levels of diversity were detected in the four species, as well as in different ecotypes within each species. Phylogenetic analyses revealed genus specific clustering of alleles and no allele sharing among species. There were also no shared alleles observed between two ecotypes within G. marmoratus and within M. australasica, which might be indicative of ecologically-driven divergence and/or long divergence times. This represents the first characterization and assessment of MHC diversity for Percichthyidae, and also for Australian freshwater fishes in general, providing key genetic resources for a vertebrate group of increasing conservation concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Population Differences at MHC Do Not Explain Enhanced Resistance of Song Sparrows to Local Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Joel W G; Sarquis-Adamson, Yanina; Gloor, Gregory B; Lachance, Marc-André; MacDougall-Shackleton, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-01

    Infectious disease represents an emerging threat to natural populations, particularly when hosts are more susceptible to novel parasites (allopatric) than to parasites from the local area (sympatric). This pattern could arise through evolutionary processes (host populations become adapted to their local parasites and genetically differentiated from other populations at immune-related loci) and/or through ecological interactions (host individuals develop resistance to local parasites through previous exposure). The relative importance of these candidate mechanisms remains unclear. In jawed vertebrates, genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) play a fundamental role in immunity and are compelling candidates for spatially varying selection. We recently showed that song sparrows (Melospiza melodia) are more susceptible to allopatric than to sympatric strains of malaria (Plasmodium). In the current study, to determine whether population differences at MHC explain this pattern, we characterized the peptide-binding regions of MHC (classes I and II) of birds that did or did not become infected in the previous experiment. We recovered up to 4 alleles per individual at class I, implying at least 2 loci, and up to 26 alleles per individual at class II, implying at least 13 loci. Individuals with more class I alleles were less likely to become infected by Plasmodium, consistent with parasite-mediated balancing selection. However, we found no evidence for population genetic differentiation at either class of MHC, based on 36 individuals sequenced. Resistance to sympatric parasites previously described for this system likely stems from individuals' prior immune experience, not from population differentiation and locally protective alleles at MHC. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Attractors in Sequence Space: Agent-Based Exploration of MHC I Binding Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Natalie; Wisniewska, Joanna M; Hiss, Jan A; Freier, Anja; Losch, Florian O; Walden, Peter; Wrede, Paul; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-01-12

    Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is a meta-heuristic that utilizes a computational analogue of ant trail pheromones to solve combinatorial optimization problems. The size of the ant colony and the representation of the ants' pheromone trails is unique referring to the given optimization problem. In the present study, we employed ACO to generate novel peptides that stabilize MHC I protein on the plasma membrane of a murine lymphoma cell line. A jury of feedforward neural network classifiers served as fitness function for peptide design by ACO. Bioactive murine MHC I H-2K(b) stabilizing as well as nonstabilizing octapeptides were designed, synthesized and tested. These peptides reveal residue motifs that are relevant for MHC I receptor binding. We demonstrate how the performance of the implemented ACO algorithm depends on the colony size and the size of the search space. The actual peptide design process by ACO constitutes a search path in sequence space that can be visualized as trajectories on a self-organizing map (SOM). By projecting the sequence space on a SOM we visualize the convergence of the different solutions that emerge during the optimization process in sequence space. The SOM representation reveals attractors in sequence space for MHC I binding peptides. The combination of ACO and SOM enables systematic peptide optimization. This technique allows for the rational design of various types of bioactive peptides with minimal experimental effort. Here, we demonstrate its successful application to the design of MHC-I binding and nonbinding peptides which exhibit substantial bioactivity in a cell-based assay. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structural basis for ineffective T-cell responses to MHC anchor residue-improved "heteroclitic" peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madura, Florian; Rizkallah, Pierre J; Holland, Christopher J; Fuller, Anna; Bulek, Anna; Godkin, Andrew J; Schauenburg, Andrea J; Cole, David K; Sewell, Andrew K

    2015-02-01

    MHC anchor residue-modified "heteroclitic" peptides have been used in many cancer vaccine trials and often induce greater immune responses than the wild-type peptide. The best-studied system to date is the decamer MART-1/Melan-A26-35 peptide, EAAGIGILTV, where the natural alanine at position 2 has been modified to leucine to improve human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201 anchoring. The resulting ELAGIGILTV peptide has been used in many studies. We recently showed that T cells primed with the ELAGIGILTV peptide can fail to recognize the natural tumor-expressed peptide efficiently, thereby providing a potential molecular reason for why clinical trials of this peptide have been unsuccessful. Here, we solved the structure of a TCR in complex with HLA-A*0201-EAAGIGILTV peptide and compared it with its heteroclitic counterpart , HLA-A*0201-ELAGIGILTV. The data demonstrate that a suboptimal anchor residue at position 2 enables the TCR to "pull" the peptide away from the MHC binding groove, facilitating extra contacts with both the peptide and MHC surface. These data explain how a TCR can distinguish between two epitopes that differ by only a single MHC anchor residue and demonstrate how weak MHC anchoring can enable an induced-fit interaction with the TCR. Our findings constitute a novel demonstration of the extreme sensitivity of the TCR to minor alterations in peptide conformation. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Changes in blood lymphocyte subpopulations and expression of MHC-II molecules in wild mares before and after parturition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krakowski Leszek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pregnancy is a physiological state in which the immune system undergoes certain changes. On the one hand, by depleting cell defence mechanisms, it favours development and maintenance of the pregnancy. At the same time cells of the immune system ensure resistance to many risk factors, including infectious agents.

  3. Negative relationships between cellular immune response, Mhc class II heterozygosity and secondary sexual trait in the montane water vole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Nathalie; Bryja, Josef; Galan, Maxime; Deter, Julie; Tollenaere, Charlotte; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Cosson, Jean-François

    2010-05-01

    Heterogeneities in immune responsiveness may affect key epidemiological parameters and the dynamics of pathogens. The roles of immunogenetics in these variations remain poorly explored. We analysed the influence of Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes and epigamic traits on the response to phytohaemagglutinin in males from cyclic populations of the montane water vole (Arvicola scherman). Besides, we tested the relevance of lateral scent glands as honest signals of male quality. Our results did not corroborate neither the hypotheses of genome-wide heterozygosity-fitness correlation nor the Mhc heterozygote advantage. We found a negative relationship between Mhc hetetozygosity and response to phytohaemagglutinin, mediated by a specific Mhc homozygous genotype. Our results therefore support the hypothesis of the Arte-Dqa-05 homozygous genotype being a 'good' Mhc variant in terms of immunogenetic quality. The development of the scent glands seems to be an honest signal for mate choice as it is negatively correlated with helminth load. The 'good gene' hypothesis was not validated as Arte-Dqa-05 homozygous males did not exhibit larger glands. Besides, the negative relationship observed between the size of these glands and the response to phytohaemagglutinin, mainly for Mhc homozygotes, corroborates the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis. The Mhc variants associated with larger glands remain yet to be determined.

  4. Negative relationships between cellular immune response, Mhc class II heterozygosity and secondary sexual trait in the montane water vole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, Nathalie; Bryja, Josef; Galan, Maxime; Deter, Julie; Tollenaere, Charlotte; Chaval, Yannick; Morand, Serge; Cosson, Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Heterogeneities in immune responsiveness may affect key epidemiological parameters and the dynamics of pathogens. The roles of immunogenetics in these variations remain poorly explored. We analysed the influence of Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes and epigamic traits on the response to phytohaemagglutinin in males from cyclic populations of the montane water vole (Arvicola scherman). Besides, we tested the relevance of lateral scent glands as honest signals of male quality. Our results did not corroborate neither the hypotheses of genome-wide heterozygosity-fitness correlation nor the Mhc heterozygote advantage. We found a negative relationship between Mhc hetetozygosity and response to phytohaemagglutinin, mediated by a specific Mhc homozygous genotype. Our results therefore support the hypothesis of the Arte-Dqa-05 homozygous genotype being a ‘good’ Mhc variant in terms of immunogenetic quality. The development of the scent glands seems to be an honest signal for mate choice as it is negatively correlated with helminth load. The ‘good gene’ hypothesis was not validated as Arte-Dqa-05 homozygous males did not exhibit larger glands. Besides, the negative relationship observed between the size of these glands and the response to phytohaemagglutinin, mainly for Mhc homozygotes, corroborates the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis. The Mhc variants associated with larger glands remain yet to be determined. PMID:25567924

  5. HUBUNGAN ANTARA PERTUMBUHAN DENGAN KEBERADAAN GEN TAHAN PENYAKIT MAJOR HISTOCOMPATIBILITY COMPLEX (MHC PADA IKAN MAS (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erma Primanita Hayuningtyas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Wabah penyakit koi herpes virus (KHV di Indonesia yang terjadi sejak tahun 2002 merupakan salah satu faktor yang memicu kemerosotan produksi ikan mas budidaya. Pembentukan strain unggul ikan mas tahan KHV dapat menjadi solusi bagi permasalahan tersebut. Pemilihan genotip ikan mas tahan KHV dengan marka molekuler gen major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II, khususnya pada alel Cyca DAB 1*05 akan membantu dalam kegiatan seleksi. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keberadaan gen MHC-II pada populasi dasar G0 ikan mas strain Rajadanu dan hubungannya dengan pertumbuhan (bobot. Metode deteksi keberadaan gen MHC-II pada dua kelompok ikan dengan ukuran berbeda dilakukan dengan teknik PCR. Hubungan antara pertumbuhan ikan mas dengan persentase kemunculan gen MHC-II dianalisis dengan menggunakan program SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, sehingga diperoleh korelasi di antara keduanya. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa hubungan antara pertumbuhan dengan persentase keberadaan gen MHC-II berkorelasi negatif dengan nilai R = -0,742. Hal ini mengindikasikan bahwa semakin cepat pertumbuhan populasi ikan mas maka semakin sedikit persentase individu yang mempunyai gen MHC-II pada setiap populasi ikan mas. Sehingga populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya lambat memiliki tingkat persentase positif MHC-II lebih tinggi (85,71%-100% dibandingkan populasi ikan mas yang pertumbuhannya cepat (42,86%-85,71%.

  6. PAComplex: a web server to infer peptide antigen families and binding models from TCR-pMHC complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, I-Hsin; Lo, Yu-Shu; Yang, Jinn-Moon

    2011-07-01

    One of the most adaptive immune responses is triggered by specific T-cell receptors (TCR) binding to peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC). Despite the availability of many prediction servers to identify peptides binding to MHC, these servers are often lacking in peptide-TCR interactions and detailed atomic interacting models. PAComplex is the first web server investigating both pMHC and peptide-TCR interfaces to infer peptide antigens and homologous peptide antigens of a query. This server first identifies significantly similar TCR-pMHC templates (joint Z-value ≥ 4.0) of the query by using antibody-antigen and protein-protein interacting scoring matrices for peptide-TCR and pMHC interfaces, respectively. PAComplex then identifies the homologous peptide antigens of these hit templates from complete pathogen genome databases (≥10(8) peptide candidates from 864,628 protein sequences of 389 pathogens) and experimental peptide databases (80,057 peptides in 2287 species). Finally, the server outputs peptide antigens and homologous peptide antigens of the query and displays detailed interacting models (e.g. hydrogen bonds and steric interactions in two interfaces) of hitTCR-pMHC templates. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed server can achieve high prediction accuracy and offer potential peptide antigens across pathogens. We believe that the server is able to provide valuable insights for the peptide vaccine and MHC restriction. The PAComplex sever is available at http://PAcomplex.life.nctu.edu.tw.

  7. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otten Celine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops incanus, to investigate characteristic features of MHC selection. This study is the first investigation of MHC selection in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials. In addition, the evolutionary history of MHC lineages within the group of marsupials was examined. Results G. microtarsus showed extensive levels of MHC diversity within and among individuals as 47 MHC-DAB alleles and high levels of sequence divergence were detected at a minimum of four loci. Positively selected codon sites were identified, of which most were congruent with human antigen binding sites. The diversity in M. incanus was rather low with only eight observed alleles at presumably two loci. However, these alleles also revealed high sequence divergence. Again, positive selection was identified on specific codon sites, all congruent with human ABS and with positively selected sites observed in G. microtarsus. In a phylogenetic comparison alleles of M. incanus interspersed widely within alleles of G. microtarsus with four alleles being present in both species. Conclusion Our investigations revealed extensive MHC class II polymorphism in a natural marsupial population, contrary to previous assumptions. Furthermore, our study confirms for the first time in marsupials the presence of three characteristic features common at MHC loci of eutherian mammals, birds and fish: large allelic sequence divergence, positive selection on specific sites and trans-specific polymorphism.

  8. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data...... class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. CONCLUSION: The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/Net...

  9. HLA class II (DR0401) molecules induce Foxp3+ regulatory T cell suppression of B cells in Plasmodium yoelii strain 17XNL malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Danner, Rebecca; Kleschenko, Yuliya; Majji, Sai; Villasante, Eileen Franke; Richie, Thomas L; Brumeanu, Teodor-Doru; David, Chella S; Casares, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Unlike human malaria parasites that induce persistent infection, some rodent malaria parasites, like Plasmodium yoelii strain 17XNL (Py17XNL), induce a transient (self-curing) malaria infection. Cooperation between CD4 T cells and B cells to produce antibodies is thought to be critical for clearance of Py17XNL parasites from the blood, with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules being required for activation of CD4 T cells. In order to better understand the correspondence between murine malaria models and human malaria, and in particular the role of MHC (HLA) class II molecules, we studied the ability of humanized mice expressing human HLA class II molecules to clear Py17XNL infection. We showed that humanized mice expressing HLA-DR4 (DR0401) molecules and lacking mouse MHC class II molecules (EA(0)) have impaired production of specific antibodies to Py17XNL and cannot cure the infection. In contrast, mice expressing HLA-DR4 (DR0402), HLA-DQ6 (DQ0601), HLA-DQ8 (DQ0302), or HLA-DR3 (DR0301) molecules in an EA(0) background were able to elicit specific antibodies and self-cure the infection. In a series of experiments, we determined that the inability of humanized DR0401.EA(0) mice to elicit specific antibodies was due to expansion and activation of regulatory CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T cells (Tregs) that suppressed B cells to secrete antibodies through cell-cell interactions. Treg depletion allowed the DR0401.EA(0) mice to elicit specific antibodies and self-cure the infection. Our results demonstrated a differential role of MHC (HLA) class II molecules in supporting antibody responses to Py17XNL malaria and revealed a new mechanism by which malaria parasites stimulate B cell-suppressogenic Tregs that prevent clearance of infection.

  10. Molecular characterization of a novel human hybrid-type receptor that binds the alpha2-macroglobulin receptor-associated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Linda; Madsen, P; Moestrup, S K

    1996-01-01

    The 39-40-kDa receptor-associated protein (RAP) binds to the members of the low density lipoprotein receptor gene family and functions as a specialized endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi chaperone. Using RAP affinity chromatography, we have purified a novel approximately 250-kDa brain protein and isolated...... the corresponding cDNA. The gene, designated SORL1, maps to chromosome 11q 23/24 and encodes a 2214-residue type 1 receptor containing a furin cleavage site immediately preceding the N terminus determined in the purified protein. The receptor, designated sorLA-1, has a short cytoplasmic tail containing a tyrosine......-based internalization signal and a large external part containing (from the N-terminal): 1) a segment homologous to domains in the yeast vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein, Vps10p, that binds carboxypeptidase Y, 2) five tandemly arranged YWTD repeats and a cluster of 11 class A repeats characteristic of the low...

  11. [Biophysics of single molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serdiuk, I N; Deriusheva, E I

    2011-01-01

    The modern methods of research of biological molecules whose application led to the development of a new field of science, biophysics of single molecules, are reviewed. The measurement of the characteristics of single molecules enables one to reveal their individual features, and it is just for this reason that much more information can be obtained from one molecule than from the entire ensample of molecules. The high sensitivity of the methods considered in detail makes it possible to come close to the solution of the basic problem of practical importance, namely, the determination of the nucleotide sequence of a single DNA molecule.

  12. A modern approach for epitope prediction: identification of foot-and-mouth disease virus peptides binding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA) class I molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandya, Mital; Rasmussen, Michael; Hansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules regulate adaptive immune responses through the presentation of antigenic peptides to CD8+ T cells. Polymorphisms in the peptide binding region of class I molecules determine peptide binding affinity and stability during antigen presentation......, and different antigen peptide motifs are associated with specific genetic sequences of class I molecules. Understanding bovine leukocyte antigen (BoLA), peptide-MHC class I binding specificities may facilitate development of vaccines or reagents for quantifying the adaptive immune response to intracellular....... The results of these analyses showed that BoLA alleles cluster into three distinct groups with the potential to define “BoLA supertypes.” This streamlined approach identifies potential T cell epitopes from pathogens, such as FMDV, and provides insight into T cell immunity following infection or vaccination....

  13. Antibody Stabilization of Peptide–MHC Multimers Reveals Functional T Cells Bearing Extremely Low-Affinity TCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tungatt, Katie; Bianchi, Valentina; Crowther, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    staining of tumor-specific, autoimmune, or MHC class II-restricted T cells can be particularly challenging, as these T cells tend to express relatively low-affinity TCRs. In this study, we attempted to improve staining using anti-fluorochrome unconjugated primary Abs followed by secondary staining...... with anti-Ab fluorochrome-conjugated Abs to amplify fluorescence intensity. Unexpectedly, we found that the simple addition of an anti-fluorochrome unconjugated Ab during staining resulted in considerably improved fluorescence intensity with both pMHC tetramers and dextramers and with PE-, allophycocyanin......-, or FITC-based reagents. Importantly, when combined with protein kinase inhibitor treatment, Ab stabilization allowed pMHC tetramer staining of T cells even when the cognate TCR-pMHC affinity was extremely low (KD >1 mM) and produced the best results that we have observed to date. We find...

  14. The mRNA expression profile of metabolic genes relative to MHC isoform pattern in human skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plomgaard, Peter; Penkowa, Milena; Leick, Lotte

    2006-01-01

    The metabolic profile of rodent muscle is generally reflected in the myosin heavy chain (MHC) fiber-type composition. The present study was conducted to test the hypothesis that metabolic gene expression is not tightly coupled with MHC fiber-type composition for all genes in human skeletal muscle...... was more than twofold higher in soleus and vastus than in triceps. Contrary, phosphofructokinase and total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was approximately three- and twofold higher in triceps than in both soleus and vastus. Expression of metabolic genes was assessed by determining the mRNA content...... of a broad range of metabolic genes. The triceps muscle had two- to fivefold higher MHC IIa, phosphofructokinase, and LDH A mRNA content and two- to fourfold lower MHC I, lipoprotein lipase, CD36, hormone-sensitive lipase, and LDH B and hexokinase II mRNA than vastus lateralis or soleus. Interestingly...

  15. Characterization of MHC-Related Volatile Organic Compounds in Heterologous Expression Systems: Role of Infection in Odor Compound Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in humans plays significant role in mate selection and kin recognition mainly through apparition of organism specific odor recognized by other individuals...

  16. Prediction of MHC class II binding affinity using SMM-align, a novel stabilization matrix alignment method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    the correct alignment of a peptide in the binding groove a crucial part of identifying the core of an MHC class II binding motif. Here, we present a novel stabilization matrix alignment method, SMM-align, that allows for direct prediction of peptide:MHC binding affinities. The predictive performance...... of the method is validated on a large MHC class II benchmark data set covering 14 HLA-DR (human MHC) and three mouse H2-IA alleles. RESULTS: The predictive performance of the SMM-align method was demonstrated to be superior to that of the Gibbs sampler, TEPITOPE, SVRMHC, and MHCpred methods. Cross validation...... by favoring binding registers with a minimum PFR length of two amino acids. Visualizing the binding motif as obtained by the SMM-align and TEPITOPE methods highlights a series of fundamental discrepancies between the two predicted motifs. For the DRB1*1302 allele for instance, the TEPITOPE method favors basic...

  17. jMHC: software assistant for multilocus genotyping of gene families using next-generation amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuglik, Michał T; Radwan, Jacek; Babik, Wiesław

    2011-07-01

    Genotyping of multilocus gene families, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), may be challenging because of problems with assigning alleles to loci and copy number variation among individuals. Simultaneous amplification and genotyping of multiple loci may be necessary, and in such cases, next-generation deep amplicon sequencing offers a great promise as a genotyping method of choice. Here, we describe jMHC, a computer program developed for analysing and assisting in the visualization of deep amplicon sequencing data. Software operates on FASTA files; therefore, output from any sequencing technology may be used. jMHC was designed specifically for MHC studies but it may be useful for analysing amplicons derived from other multigene families or for genotyping other polymorphic systems. The program is written in Java with user-friendly graphical interface (GUI) and can be run on Microsoft Windows, Linux OS and Mac OS. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Detection of MHC class II expression on human basophils is dependent on antibody specificity but independent of atopic disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Britta C; Poulsen, Lars K; Jensen, Bettina M

    2012-07-31

    A debate has recently arisen as to whether murine basophils can function as antigen presenting cells in allergic inflammation. However, mouse and human basophils differ considerably, and the expression of MHC class II on human basophils has been investigated as a proxy for their capability of antigen presentation but conflicting results have emerged. In this technical note, we show that an antibody specific for all three MHC class II subtypes (HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ), leads to a significantly higher amount of MHC class II+ basophils compared to antibodies specific for HLA-DR only. A significant difference was also observed between the HLA-DR specific antibodies, indicating that the choice of antibody is crucial. Furthermore, critical compensation was essential to avoid false HLA-DR+ basophils. Finally, we found that detection of MHC class II on human basophils was independent of atopic disposition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 plays an essential role for Toll-like receptor (TLR)7- and TLR9-mediated interferon-α induction

    OpenAIRE

    Uematsu, Satoshi; Sato, Shintaro; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Hirotani, Tomonori; Kato, Hiroki; Takeshita, Fumihiko; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Coban, Cevayir; Ishii, Ken J.; Kawai, Taro; Takeuchi, Osamu; Akira, Shizuo

    2005-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize microbial pathogens and trigger innate immune responses. Among TLR family members, TLR7, TLR8, and TLR9 induce interferon (IFN)-α in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). This induction requires the formation of a complex consisting of the adaptor MyD88, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 7. Here we show an essential role of IL-1 receptor-associated kinase (IRAK)-1 in TLR7- and TLR9-mediated IRF7...

  20. A single-chain fusion molecule consisting of peptide, major histocompatibility gene complex class I heavy chain and beta2-microglobulin can fold partially correctly, but binds peptide inefficiently

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    The function of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is to sample peptides from the intracellular environment and present these peptides to CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). We have attempted to develop a general approach to produce large amounts of pure and active recombi...

  1. DPA1*02012: A DPA1*0201-related Mhc class II allele in West Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, C.G.; May, J.; Spauke, D.; Schnittger, L. [Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine, Hamburg (Germany)

    1994-12-31

    DNA techniques such as sequence-specific oligonucleotide probe (SSOP) hybridizations, restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses, and DNA sequencing have greatly supported the characterization of Mhc class II allelic polymorphism. Here the authors describe a DPA 1 allele which has been identified in two male individuals from Liberia and Benin, West Africa, during a survey study on Mhc class II associations with the different manifestations after infection with Onchocerca volvulus. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Derivation of an amino acid similarity matrix for peptide:MHC binding and its application as a Bayesian prior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sette Alessandro

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experts in peptide:MHC binding studies are often able to estimate the impact of a single residue substitution based on a heuristic understanding of amino acid similarity in an experimental context. Our aim is to quantify this measure of similarity to improve peptide:MHC binding prediction methods. This should help compensate for holes and bias in the sequence space coverage of existing peptide binding datasets. Results Here, a novel amino acid similarity matrix (PMBEC is directly derived from the binding affinity data of combinatorial peptide mixtures. Like BLOSUM62, this matrix captures well-known physicochemical properties of amino acid residues. However, PMBEC differs markedly from existing matrices in cases where residue substitution involves a reversal of electrostatic charge. To demonstrate its usefulness, we have developed a new peptide:MHC class I binding prediction method, using the matrix as a Bayesian prior. We show that the new method can compensate for missing information on specific residues in the training data. We also carried out a large-scale benchmark, and its results indicate that prediction performance of the new method is comparable to that of the best neural network based approaches for peptide:MHC class I binding. Conclusion A novel amino acid similarity matrix has been derived for peptide:MHC binding interactions. One prominent feature of the matrix is that it disfavors substitution of residues with opposite charges. Given that the matrix was derived from experimentally determined peptide:MHC binding affinity measurements, this feature is likely shared by all peptide:protein interactions. In addition, we have demonstrated the usefulness of the matrix as a Bayesian prior in an improved scoring-matrix based peptide:MHC class I prediction method. A software implementation of the method is available at: http://www.mhc-pathway.net/smmpmbec.

  3. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism restores peripheral tolerance of noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in NOD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingfeng; Racine, Jeremy J; Lin, Qing; Liu, Yuqing; Tang, Shanshan; Qin, Qi; Qi, Tong; Riggs, Arthur D; Zeng, Defu

    2018-02-20

    Autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) and other autoimmune diseases are associated with particular MHC haplotypes and expansion of autoreactive T cells. Induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism by hematopoietic cell transplantation effectively reverses autoimmunity in diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, even those with established diabetes. As expected, MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism mediates deletion in the thymus of host-type autoreactive T cells that have T-cell receptor (TCR) recognizing (cross-reacting with) donor-type antigen presenting cells (APCs), which have come to reside in the thymus. However, how MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism tolerizes host autoreactive T cells that recognize only self-MHC-peptide complexes remains unknown. Here, using NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC2.5 or NOD.Rag1 -/- BDC12-4.1 mice that have only noncross-reactive transgenic autoreactive T cells, we show that induction of MHC-mismatched but not -matched mixed chimerism restores immune tolerance of peripheral noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells. MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism results in increased percentages of both donor- and host-type Foxp3 + Treg cells and up-regulated expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) by host-type plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that engraftment of donor-type dendritic cells (DCs) and expansion of donor-type Treg cells are required for tolerizing the noncross-reactive autoreactive T cells in the periphery, which are in association with up-regulation of host-type DC expression of PD-L1 and increased percentage of host-type Treg cells. Thus, induction of MHC-mismatched mixed chimerism may establish a peripheral tolerogenic DC and Treg network that actively tolerizes autoreactive T cells, even those with no TCR recognition of the donor APCs. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  4. Down regulation of genes involved in T cell polarity and motility during the induction of heart allograft tolerance by allochimeric MHC I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Lisik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The allochimeric MHC class I molecule [alpha1h1/u]-RT1.Aa that contains donor-type (Wistar Furth, WF; RT1u epitopes displayed on recipient-type (ACI, RT1a administered in conjunction with sub-therapeutic dose of cyclosporine (CsA induces indefinite survival of heterotopic cardiac allografts in rat model. In vascularized transplantation models, the spleen contributes to graft rejection by generating alloantigen reactive T cells. The immune response in allograft rejection involves a cascade of molecular events leading to the formation of immunological synapses between T cells and the antigen-presenting cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in the immunosuppressive function of allochimeric molecule we performed microarray and quantitative RTPCR analyses of gene expression profile of splenic T cells from untreated, CsA treated, and allochimeric molecule + subtherapeutic dose of CsA treated animals at day 1, 3 and 7 of post transplantation. Allochimeric molecule treatment caused down regulation of genes involved in actin filament polymerization (RhoA and Rac1, cell adhesion (Catna1, Vcam and CD9, vacuolar transport (RhoB, Cln8 and ATP6v1b2, and MAPK pathway (Spred1 and Dusp6 involved in tubulin cytoskeleton reorganization and interaction between actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. All these genes are involved in T cell polarity and motility, i.e., their ability to move, scan and to form functional immunological synapse with antigen presenting cells (APCs. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the immunosuppressive function of allochimeric molecule may depend on the impairment of T cells' movement and scanning ability, and possibly also the formation of immunological synapse. We believe that these novel findings may have important clinical implications for organ transplantation.

  5. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  6. Vaccination against lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in MHC class II-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2011-01-01

    The impact of prophylactic vaccination against acute and chronic infection in a Th-deficient host has not been adequately addressed because of difficulties in generating protective immunity in the absence of CD4(+) T cell help. In this study, we demonstrated that a broad CD8(+) T cell immune...... response could be elicited in MHC class II-deficient mice by vaccination with adenovirus encoding lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) glycoprotein tethered to MHC class II-associated invariant chain. Moreover, the response induced conferred significant cytolytic CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection...... against challenge with a high dose of the invasive clone 13 strain of LCMV. In contrast, vaccination with adenovirus encoding unlinked LCMV glycoprotein induced weak virus control in the absence of CD4(+) T cells, and mice may die of increased immunopathology associated with incomplete protection. Acute...

  7. Ontogenic appearance of MHC class I (B-F) antigens during chicken embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunon, D; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1990-01-01

    .5 of embryogenesis. B-F cell-surface expression first becomes detectable in hemopoietic organs by day 10-12 of embryogenesis and somewhat later in nonhemopoietic organs. Flow cytometry analysis of hemopoietic cells throughout embryogenesis revealed B-Fhi and B-Flo cell populations. The percentage of B-F+ cells......Expression of chicken MHC class I (B-F) antigens during ontogeny was determined by binding of anticlass I antibody and appearance of B-F transcripts by Northern blotting in chicken organs during embryogenesis until 2 weeks after hatching. MHC class I transcripts first become detectable in day 6...... in spleen and bone marrow decreased around hatching, which could reflect either cell flows in these organs during this period or the sensitivity of hemopoietic cells to hatching stress. Udgivelsesdato: 1990-null...

  8. New recombinants within the MHC (B-complex) of the chicken

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, C; Skjødt, K; Toivanen, A

    1983-01-01

    In a search for genetic recombinations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the chicken, the B-complex, the offspring from matings between heterozygous B15/B21 and B4/B6 animals were analysed by red cell agglutination. Among the progeny, 8,912 informative typings were performed...... followed B-F/B-L. The mapping distance between the two loci B-F and B-G is in the range of 0.04 centimorgan. The lack of recombinants separating individual B-F loci in this study and in the studies of others might indicate that chicken MHC is less complex than those of mammalian species, but alternative...

  9. CD molecules 2005: human cell differentiation molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zola, H.; Swart, B.; Nicholson, I.; Aasted, B.; Bensussan, A.; Boumsell, L.; Buckley, C.; Clark, G.; Drbal, Karel; Engel, P.; Hart, D.; Hořejší, Václav; Isacke, C.; Macardle, P.; Malavasi, F.; Mason, D.; Olive, D.; Saalmüller, A.; Schlossman, S.F.; Schwartz-Albiez, R.; Simmons, P.; Tedder, T.F.; Uguccioni, M.; Warren, H.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 9 (2005), s. 3123-3126 ISSN 0006-4971 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : CD molecules * leukocyte antigen Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 10.131, year: 2005

  10. Crystal structure of Vδ1 T cell receptor in complex with CD1d-sulfatide shows MHC-like recognition of a self-lipid by human γδ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Adrienne M; Castro, Caitlin D; Mayassi, Toufic; Bembinster, Leslie A; Bai, Li; Picard, Damien; Anderson, Brian; Scharf, Louise; Kung, Jennifer E; Sibener, Leah V; Savage, Paul B; Jabri, Bana; Bendelac, Albert; Adams, Erin J

    2013-12-12

    The nature of the antigens recognized by γδ T cells and their potential recognition of major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecules has remained unclear. Members of the CD1 family of lipid-presenting molecules are suggested ligands for Vδ1 TCR-expressing γδ T cells, the major γδ lymphocyte population in epithelial tissues. We crystallized a Vδ1 TCR in complex with CD1d and the self-lipid sulfatide, revealing the unusual recognition of CD1d by germline Vδ1 residues spanning all complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, as well as sulfatide recognition separately encoded by nongermline CDR3δ residues. Binding and functional analysis showed that CD1d presenting self-lipids, including sulfatide, was widely recognized by gut Vδ1+ γδ T cells. These findings provide structural demonstration of MHC-like recognition of a self-lipid by γδ T cells and reveal the prevalence of lipid recognition by innate-like T cell populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Premalignant quiescent melanocytic nevi do not express the MHC class I chain-related protein A Los nevos melanocíticos premalignos quiescentes no expresan la molécula MHC class I chain-related protein A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes B. Fuertes

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA is an inducible molecule almost not expressed by normal cells but strongly up-regulated in tumor cells. MICA-expressing cells are recognized by natural killer (NK cells, CD8+ aßTCR and ?dTCR T lymphocytes through the NKG2D receptor. Engagement of NKG2D by MICA triggers IFN-? secretion and cytotoxicity against malignant cells. Although most solid tumors express MICA and this molecule is a target during immune surveillance against tumors, it has been observed that high grade tumors from different histotypes express low amounts of cell surface MICA due to a metalloprotease- induced shedding. Also, melanomas develop after a complex process of neotransformation of normal melanocytes. However, the expression of MICA in premalignant stages (primary human quiescent melanocytic nevi remains unknown. Here, we assessed expression of MICA by flow cytometry using cell suspensions from 15 primary nevi isolated from 11 patients. When collected material was abundant, cell lysates were prepared and MICA expression was also analyzed by Western blot. We observed that MICA was undetectable in the 15 primary nevi (intradermic, junction, mixed, lentigo and congenital samples as well as in normal skin, benign lesions (seborrheic keratosis, premalignant lesions (actinic keratosis and benign basocellular cancer. Conversely, a primary recently diagnosed melanoma showed intense cell surface MICA. We conclude that the onset of MICA expression is a tightly regulated process that occurs after melanocytes trespass the stage of malignant transformation. Thus, analysis of MICA expression in tissue sections of skin samples may constitute a useful marker to differentiate between benign and malignant nevi.MHC class I chain-related protein A (MICA es una molécula casi ausente en células normales pero sobre-expresada por células tumorales, que promueve el reconocimiento por células citotóxicas naturales (natural killer o NK y por

  12. Protein kinase inhibitors substantially improve the physical detection of T-cells with peptide-MHC tetramers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissina, Anna; Ladell, Kristin; Skowera, Ania; Clement, Matthew; Edwards, Emily; Seggewiss, Ruth; van den Berg, Hugo A; Gostick, Emma; Gallagher, Kathleen; Jones, Emma; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Godkin, Andrew J; Peakman, Mark; Price, David A; Sewell, Andrew K; Wooldridge, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Flow cytometry with fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) tetramers has transformed the study of antigen-specific T-cells by enabling their visualization, enumeration, phenotypic characterization and isolation from ex vivo samples. Here, we demonstrate that the reversible protein kinase inhibitor (PKI) dasatinib improves the staining intensity of human (CD8+ and CD4+) and murine T-cells without concomitant increases in background staining. Dasatinib enhances the capture of cognate pMHC tetramers from solution and produces higher intensity staining at lower pMHC concentrations. Furthermore, dasatinib reduces pMHC tetramer-induced cell death and substantially lowers the T-cell receptor (TCR)/pMHC interaction affinity threshold required for cell staining. Accordingly, dasatinib permits the identification of T-cells with very low affinity TCR/pMHC interactions, such as those that typically predominate in tumour-specific responses and autoimmune conditions that are not amenable to detection by current technology.

  13. IPD-MHC 2.0: an improved inter-species database for the study of the major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccari, Giuseppe; Robinson, James; Ballingall, Keith; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Grimholt, Unni; Kaufman, Jim; Ho, Chak-Sum; de Groot, Natasja G; Flicek, Paul; Bontrop, Ronald E; Hammond, John A; Marsh, Steven G E

    2017-01-04

    The IPD-MHC Database project (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/ipd/mhc/) collects and expertly curates sequences of the major histocompatibility complex from non-human species and provides the infrastructure and tools to enable accurate analysis. Since the first release of the database in 2003, IPD-MHC has grown and currently hosts a number of specific sections, with more than 7000 alleles from 70 species, including non-human primates, canines, felines, equids, ovids, suids, bovins, salmonids and murids. These sequences are expertly curated and made publicly available through an open access website. The IPD-MHC Database is a key resource in its field, and this has led to an average of 1500 unique visitors and more than 5000 viewed pages per month. As the database has grown in size and complexity, it has created a number of challenges in maintaining and organizing information, particularly the need to standardize nomenclature and taxonomic classification, while incorporating new allele submissions. Here, we describe the latest database release, the IPD-MHC 2.0 and discuss planned developments. This release incorporates sequence updates and new tools that enhance database queries and improve the submission procedure by utilizing common tools that are able to handle the varied requirements of each MHC-group. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  14. Epigenetic control of MHC-II: interplay between CIITA and histone-modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zika, Eleni; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2005-02-01

    Recent advances have shown the crucial role of histone-modifying enzymes in controlling gene activation and repression. This led to the 'histone code' hypothesis, which proposes that combinations of histone modifications work in concert to affect specific gene expression. Mounting evidence suggests that the class II transactivator modulates promoter accessibility by coordinating the recruitment of chromatin modifiers in a time-dependent fashion. MHC-II expression is exquisitely controlled by these highly specific, coordinated and dynamic interactions at the promoter.

  15. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF)

    OpenAIRE

    Lamers, S.M.A.; Westerhof, Gerben Johan; Bohlmeijer, Ernst Thomas; ten Klooster, Peter M; Keyes, Cory L.M.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that mental health is not merely the absence of mental illness, but it also includes the presence of positive feelings (emotional well-being) and positive functioning in individual life (psychological well-being) and community life (social well-being). We examined the structure, reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF), a new self-report questionnaire for positive mental health assessment. We ex...

  16. MHC class II DRB diversity in raccoons (Procyon lotor) reveals associations with raccoon rabies virus (Lyssavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Castillo, Sarrah; Rosatte, Rick C; Kyle, Christopher J

    2011-02-01

    In North America, the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) is an endemic wildlife disease which causes acute encephalopathies and is a strong selective force on raccoons (Procyon lotor), with estimates of ∼85% of the population succumbing to the disease when epizootic. RRV is regarded as a lethal disease if untreated; therefore, no evolutionary response would be expected of raccoon populations. However, variable immune responses to RRV have been observed in raccoons indicating a potential for evolutionary adaptation. Studies of variation within the immunologically important major histocompatibility complex (MHC) have revealed relationships between MHC alleles and diseases in humans and other wildlife species. This enhances our understanding of how hosts and pathogens adapt and co-evolve. In this study, we used RRV as a model system to study host-pathogen interaction in raccoons from a challenge study and from four wild populations that differ in exposure times and viral lineages. We investigated the potential role of Prlo-DRB polymorphism in relation to susceptibility/resistance to RRV in 113 RRV positive and 143 RRV negative raccoons. Six alleles were found to be associated with RRV negative status and five alleles with RRV positive animals. We found variable patterns of MHC associations given the relative number of selective RRV sweeps in the studied regions and correlations between MHC diversity and RRV lineages. The allelic associations established provide insight into how the genetic variation of raccoons may affect the disease outcome and this can be used to examine similar associations between other rabies variants and their hosts.

  17. Evolution of MHC class IIB in the genome of wild and ornamental guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosterhout, C; Joyce, D A; Cummings, S M

    2006-08-01

    This is the first study to quantify genomic sequence variation of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in wild and ornamental guppies, Poecilia reticulata. We sequenced 196-219 bp of exon 2 MHC class IIB (DAB) in 56 wild Trinidadian guppies and 14 ornamental strain guppies. Each of two natural populations possessed high allelic richness (15-16 alleles), whereas only three or fewer DAB alleles were amplified from ornamental guppies. The disparity in allelic richness between wild and ornamental fish cannot be fully explained by fixation of alleles by inbreeding, nor by the presence of non-amplified sequences (ie null alleles). Rather, we suggest that the same allele is fixed at duplicated MHC DAB loci owing to gene conversion. Alternatively, the number of loci in the ornamental strains has contracted during >100 generations in captivity, a hypothesis consistent with the accordion model of MHC evolution. We furthermore analysed the substitution patterns by making pairwise comparisons of sequence variation at the putative peptide binding region (PBR). The rate of non-synonymous substitutions (dN) only marginally exceeded synonymous substitutions (dS) in PBR codons. Highly diverged sequences showed no evidence for diversifying selection, possibly because synonymous substitutions have accumulated since their divergence. Also, the substitution pattern of similar alleles did not show evidence for diversifying selection, plausibly because advantageous non-synonymous substitutions have not yet accumulated. Intermediately diverged sequences showed the highest relative rate of non-synonymous substitutions, with dN/dS>14 in some pairwise comparisons. Consequently, a curvilinear relationship was observed between the dN/dS ratio and the level of sequence divergence.

  18. Mouse mast cell protease-6 and MHC are involved in the development of experimental asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Dahlin, Joakim S; Feinstein, Ricardo; Bankova, Lora G; Xing, Wei; Shin, Kichul; Gurish, Michael F; Hallgren, Jenny

    2014-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a complex disease with a strong genetic component where mast cells play a major role by the release of proinflammatory mediators. In the mouse, mast cell protease-6 (mMCP-6) closely resembles the human version of mast cell tryptase, β-tryptase. The gene that encodes mMCP-6, Tpsb2, resides close by the H-2 complex (MHC gene) on chromosome 17. Thus, when the original mMCP-6 knockout mice were backcrossed to the BALB/c strain, these mice were carrying the 129/Sv haplotype of MHC (mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc). Further backcrossing yielded mMCP-6(-/-) mice with the BALB/c MHC locus. BALB/c mice were compared with mMCP-6(-/-) and mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice in a mouse model of experimental asthma. Although OVA-sensitized and challenged wild type mice displayed a striking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), mMCP-6(-/-) mice had less AHR that was comparable with that of mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice, suggesting that mMCP-6 is required for a full-blown AHR. The mMCP-6(-/-)/H-2bc mice had strikingly reduced lung inflammation, IgE responses, and Th2 cell responses upon sensitization and challenge, whereas the mMCP-6(-/-) mice responded similarly to the wild type mice but with a minor decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophils. These findings suggest that inflammatory Th2 responses are highly dependent on the MHC-haplotype and that they can develop essentially independently of mMCP-6, whereas mMCP-6 plays a key role in the development of AHR. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  19. Mouse mast cell protease -6 and MHC are involved in the development of experimental asthma1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Ricardo; Bankova, Lora G.; Xing, Wei; Shin, Kichul; Gurish, Michael F.; Hallgren, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex disease with a strong genetic component where mast cells play a major role by the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. In the mouse, mast cell protease-6 (mMCP-6) closely resembles the human version of mast cell tryptase, β-tryptase. The gene that encodes mMCP-6, Tpsb2, resides close by the H-2 complex (MHC gene) on chromosome 17. Thus, when the original mMCP-6 knockout mice were backcrossed to the BALB/c strain, these mice were carrying the 129/Sv haplotype of MHC (mMCP-6−/−/H-2bc). Further backcrossing yielded mMCP-6−/− mice with the BALB/c MHC locus. BALB/c mice were compared with mMCP-6−/− and mMCP-6−/−/H-2bc mice in a mouse model of experimental asthma. While OVA-sensitized and challenged wild type mice displayed a striking airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), mMCP-6−/− mice had less AHR that was comparable to that of mMCP-6−/−/H-2bc mice, suggesting that mMCP-6 is required for a full-blown AHR. The mMCP-6−/−/H-2bc mice had strikingly reduced lung inflammation, IgE-responses and Th2 cell-responses upon sensitization and challenge, whereas the mMCP-6−/− mice responded similarly to the wild type mice but with a minor decrease in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) eosinophils. These findings suggest that inflammatory Th2-responses are highly dependent on the MHC-haplotype and that they can develop essentially independently of mMCP-6 while mMCP-6 plays a key role in the development of AHR. PMID:25320274

  20. Retention of functional variation despite extreme genomic erosion: MHC allelic repertoires in the Lynx genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmesat, Elena; Schmidt, Krzysztof; Saveljev, Alexander P; Seryodkin, Ivan V; Godoy, José A

    2017-07-04

    Demographic bottlenecks erode genetic diversity and may increase endangered species' extinction risk via decreased fitness and adaptive potential. The genetic status of species is generally assessed using neutral markers, whose dynamic can differ from that of functional variation due to selection. The MHC is a multigene family described as the most important genetic component of the mammalian immune system, with broad implications in ecology and evolution. The genus Lynx includes four species differing immensely in demographic history and population size, which provides a suitable model to study the genetic consequences of demographic declines: the Iberian lynx being an extremely bottlenecked species and the three remaining ones representing common and widely distributed species. We compared variation in the most variable exon of the MHCI and MHCII-DRB loci among the four species of the Lynx genus. The Iberian lynx was characterised by lower number of MHC alleles than its sister species (the Eurasian lynx). However, it maintained most of the functional genetic variation at MHC loci present in the remaining and genetically healthier lynx species at all nucleotide, amino acid, and supertype levels. Species-wide functional genetic diversity can be maintained even in the face of severe population bottlenecks, which caused devastating whole genome genetic erosion. This could be the consequence of divergent alleles being retained across paralogous loci, an outcome that, in the face of frequent gene conversion, may have been favoured by balancing selection.

  1. Evaluating the psychometric properties of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Sanne M A; Westerhof, Gerben J; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T; ten Klooster, Peter M; Keyes, Corey L M

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing consensus that mental health is not merely the absence of mental illness, but it also includes the presence of positive feelings (emotional well-being) and positive functioning in individual life (psychological well-being) and community life (social well-being). We examined the structure, reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity of the Mental Health Continuum-Short Form (MHC-SF), a new self-report questionnaire for positive mental health assessment. We expected that the MHC-SF is reliable and valid, and that mental health and mental illness are 2 related but distinct continua. This article draws on data of the LISS panel of CentERdata, a representative panel for Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences (N = 1,662). Results revealed high internal and moderate test-retest reliability. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) confirmed the 3-factor structure in emotional, psychological, and social well-being. These subscales correlated well with corresponding aspects of well-being and functioning, showing convergent validity. CFA supported the hypothesis of 2 separate yet related factors for mental health and mental illness, showing discriminant validity. Although related to mental illness, positive mental health is a distinct indicator of mental well-being that is reliably assessed with the MHC-SF. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Preserved MHC class II antigen processing in monocytes from HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Woc-Colburn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available MHC-II restricted CD4+ T cells are dependent on antigen presenting cells (APC for their activation. APC dysfunction in HIV-infected individuals could accelerate or exacerbate CD4+ T cell dysfunction and may contribute to increased levels of immunodeficiency seen in some patients regardless of their CD4+ T cell numbers. Here we test the hypothesis that APC from HIV-infected individuals have diminished antigen processing and presentation capacity.Monocytes (MN were purified by immuno-magnetic bead isolation techniques from HLA-DR1.01+ or DR15.01+ HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. MN were analyzed for surface MHC-II expression and for antigen processing and presentation capacity after overnight incubation with soluble antigen or peptide and HLA-DR matched T cell hybridomas. Surface expression of HLA-DR was 20% reduced (p<0.03 on MN from HIV-infected individuals. In spite of this, there was no significant difference in antigen processing and presentation by MN from 14 HIV-infected donors (8 HLA-DR1.01+ and 6 HLA-DR15.01+ compared to 24 HIV-uninfected HLA-matched subjects.We demonstrated that MHC class II antigen processing and presentation is preserved in MN from HIV-infected individuals. This further supports the concept that this aspect of APC function does not further contribute to CD4+ T cell dysfunction in HIV disease.

  3. MHC class II genes in European wolves: a comparison with dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Jennifer M; Ellegren, Hans

    2002-10-01

    The genome of the grey wolf, one of the most widely distributed land mammal species, has been subjected to both stochastic factors, including biogeographical subdivision and population fragmentation, and strong selection during the domestication of the dog. To explore the effects of drift and selection on the partitioning of MHC variation in the diversification of species, we present nine DQA, 10 DQB, and 17 DRB1 sequences of the second exon for European wolves and compare them with sequences of North American wolves and dogs. The relatively large number of class II alleles present in both European and North American wolves attests to their large historical population sizes, yet there are few alleles shared between these regions at DQB and DRB1. Similarly, the dog has an extensive array of class II MHC alleles, a consequence of a genetically diverse origin, but allelic overlap with wolves only at DQA. Although we might expect a progression from shared alleles to shared allelic lineages during differentiation, the partitioning of diversity between wolves and dogs at DQB and DRB1 differs from that at DQA. Furthermore, an extensive region of nucleotide sequence shared between DRB1 and DQB alleles and a shared motif suggests intergenic recombination may have contributed to MHC diversity in the Canidae.

  4. Peptide-MHC-based nanomedicines for autoimmunity function as T-cell receptor microclustering devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singha, Santiswarup; Shao, Kun; Yang, Yang; Clemente-Casares, Xavier; Solé, Patricia; Clemente, Antonio; Blanco, Jesús; Dai, Qin; Song, Fayi; Liu, Shang Wan; Yamanouchi, Jun; Umeshappa, Channakeshava Sokke; Nanjundappa, Roopa Hebbandi; Detampel, Pascal; Amrein, Matthias; Fandos, César; Tanguay, Robert; Newbigging, Susan; Serra, Pau; Khadra, Anmar; Chan, Warren C. W.; Santamaria, Pere

    2017-07-01

    We have shown that nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as ligand-multimerization platforms to activate specific cellular receptors in vivo. Nanoparticles coated with autoimmune disease-relevant peptide-major histocompatibility complexes (pMHC) blunted autoimmune responses by triggering the differentiation and expansion of antigen-specific regulatory T cells in vivo. Here, we define the engineering principles impacting biological activity, detail a synthesis process yielding safe and stable compounds, and visualize how these nanomedicines interact with cognate T cells. We find that the triggering properties of pMHC-NPs are a function of pMHC intermolecular distance and involve the sustained assembly of large antigen receptor microclusters on murine and human cognate T cells. These compounds show no off-target toxicity in zebrafish embryos, do not cause haematological, biochemical or histological abnormalities, and are rapidly captured by phagocytes or processed by the hepatobiliary system. This work lays the groundwork for the design of ligand-based NP formulations to re-program in vivo cellular responses using nanotechnology.

  5. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Nieves; Mecha, Miriam; Espejo, Carmen; Mestre, Leyre; Eixarch, Herena; Montalban, Xavier; Álvarez-Cermeño, José C.; Guaza, Carmen; Villar, Luisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain) and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens) mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55). We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P = 0.001) and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P = 0.02) compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P = 0.02) and IL-17 (P = 0.009) and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P = 0.04) than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism. PMID:24868560

  6. Regulatory Lymphocytes Are Key Factors in MHC-Independent Resistance to EAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nieves Marín

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Resistant and susceptible mouse strains to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, an inducible demyelinating experimental disease serving as animal model for multiple sclerosis, have been described. We aimed to explore MHC-independent mechanisms inducing resistance to EAE. Methods. For EAE induction, female C57BL/6 (susceptible strain and CD1 (resistant outbred strain showing heterogeneous MHC antigens mice were immunized with the 35–55 peptide of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35−55. We studied T cell proliferation, regulatory and effector cell subpopulations, intracellular and serum cytokine patterns, and titers of anti-MOG serum antibodies. Results. Upon immunization with MOG35−55, T lymphocytes from susceptible mice but not that of resistant strain were capable of proliferating when stimulated with MOG35−55. Accordingly, resistant mice experienced a rise in regulatory B cells (P=0.001 and, to a lower extent, in regulatory T cells (P=0.02 compared with C57BL/6 susceptible mice. As a consequence, MOG35−55-immunized C57BL/6 mice showed higher percentages of CD4+ T cells producing both IFN-gamma (P=0.02 and IL-17 (P=0.009 and higher serum levels of IL-17 (P=0.04 than resistant mice. Conclusions. Expansion of regulatory B and T cells contributes to the induction of resistance to EAE by an MHC-independent mechanism.

  7. Prolonged expression of MHC class I - peptide expression in bone marrow derived retrovirus transfected matured dendritic cells by continuous centrifugation in the presence of IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettihewa, L M

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells which proceed from immature to a mature stage during their differentiation. There are several methods of obtaining long lasting mature antigen expressing DCs and different methods show different levels of antigen expressions. We investigated bone marrow derived DCs for the degree of maturation and genetically engineered antigen presentation in the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4) as a maturity enhancer. DCs and transfected retrovirus were cultured together in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF)-IL4, GMCSF +IL4, lipopolysaccharide (LPS). B 7.1, B7.2 and CD11c were measured by the degree of immune fluorescence using enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) shuttled retrovirus transfected antigen. Degree of MHC class I molecule with antigen presentation of antigen was also evaluated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. The antigen presenting capacity of transfected DCs was investigated. Bone marrow DCs were generated in the presence of GMCSF and IL-4 in vitro. Dividing bone marrow cells were infected with EGFP shuttled retrovirus expressing SSP2 by prolonged centrifugation for three consecutive days from day 5, 6 and 7 and continued to culture in the presence of GMSCF and IL-4 until day 8. IL-4 as a cytokine increased the maturation of retrovirus transfected DCs by high expression of B 7-1 and B 7-2. Also, IL-4 induced DC enhanced by the prolonged centrifugation and it was shown by increased antigen presentation of these dendric cells as antigen presenting cell (APC). Cytolytic effects were significantly higher in cytotoxic T cell response (CTLs) mixed with transfected DCs than CTLs mixed with pulsed DCs. There was an enhanced antigen presentation by prolonged expression of antigen loaded MHC class I receptors in DCs in the presence of IL-4 by prolonged centrifugation.

  8. Structure-function similarities between a plant receptor-like kinase and the human interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaus-Heisen, D.; Nurisso, A.; Pietraszewska-Bogiel, A.; Mbengue, M.; Camut, S.; Timmers, T.; Pichereaux, C.; Rossignol, M.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Imberty, A.; Lefebvre, B.; Cullimore, J.V.

    2011-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis has previously shown that plant receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are monophyletic with respect to the kinase domain and share an evolutionary origin with the animal interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase/Pelle-soluble kinases. The lysin motif domain-containing receptor-like

  9. MultiRTA: A simple yet reliable method for predicting peptide binding affinities for multiple class II MHC allotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mittelmann Hans D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of peptide fragments of antigens to class II MHC is a crucial step in initiating a helper T cell immune response. The identification of such peptide epitopes has potential applications in vaccine design and in better understanding autoimmune diseases and allergies. However, comprehensive experimental determination of peptide-MHC binding affinities is infeasible due to MHC diversity and the large number of possible peptide sequences. Computational methods trained on the limited experimental binding data can address this challenge. We present the MultiRTA method, an extension of our previous single-type RTA prediction method, which allows the prediction of peptide binding affinities for multiple MHC allotypes not used to train the model. Thus predictions can be made for many MHC allotypes for which experimental binding data is unavailable. Results We fit MultiRTA models for both HLA-DR and HLA-DP using large experimental binding data sets. The performance in predicting binding affinities for novel MHC allotypes, not in the training set, was tested in two different ways. First, we performed leave-one-allele-out cross-validation, in which predictions are made for one allotype using a model fit to binding data for the remaining MHC allotypes. Comparison of the HLA-DR results with those of two other prediction methods applied to the same data sets showed that MultiRTA achieved performance comparable to NetMHCIIpan and better than the earlier TEPITOPE method. We also directly tested model transferability by making leave-one-allele-out predictions for additional experimentally characterized sets of overlapping peptide epitopes binding to multiple MHC allotypes. In addition, we determined the applicability of prediction methods like MultiRTA to other MHC allotypes by examining the degree of MHC variation accounted for in the training set. An examination of predictions for the promiscuous binding CLIP peptide revealed

  10. Heterodimeric barnase-barstar vaccine molecules: influence of one versus two targeting units specific for antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Cecilie Larsen Spång

    Full Text Available It is known that targeting of antigen to antigen presenting cells (APC increases immune responses. However, it is unclear if more than one APC-specific targeting unit in the antigenic molecule will increase responses. To address this issue, we have here made heterodimeric vaccine molecules that each express four different fusion subunits. The bacterial ribonuclease barnase and its inhibitor barstar interact with high affinity, and the barnase-barstar complex was therefore used as a dimerization unit. Barnase and barstar were fused N-terminally with single chain fragment variable (scFvs targeting units specific for either MHC class II molecules on APC or the hapten 5-iodo-4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NIP. C-terminal antigenic fusions were either the fluorescent protein mCherry or scFv(315 derived from myeloma protein M315. The heterodimeric vaccine molecules were formed both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the four different fused moieties appeared to fold correctly since they retained their specificity and function. DNA vaccination with MHC class II-targeted vaccine induced higher mCherry-specific IgG1 responses compared to non-targeted control. Since mCherry and MHC class II are in trans in this heterodimer, this suggests that heterodimeric proteins are formed in vivo without prior protein purification. Surprisingly, one targeting moiety was sufficient for the increased IgG1 response, and addition of a second targeting moiety did not increase responses. Similar results were found in in vitro T cell assays; vaccine molecules with one targeting unit were as potent as those with two. In combination with the easy cloning strategy, the heterodimeric barnase-barstar vaccine molecule could provide a flexible platform for development of novel DNA vaccines with increased potency.

  11. Characterization of Receptor-Associated Protein Complex Assembly in Interleukin (IL)-2- and IL-15-Activated T-Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinalde, Nerea; Sanchez-Quiles, Virginia; Akimov, Vyacheslav; Aloria, Kerman; Arizmendi, Jesus M; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2017-01-06

    It remains a paradox that IL-2 and IL-15 can differentially modulate the immune response using the same signaling receptors. We have previously dissected the phosphotyrosine-driven signaling cascades triggered by both cytokines in Kit225 T-cells, unveiling subtle differences that may contribute to their functional dichotomy. In this study, we aimed to decipher the receptor complex assembly in IL-2- and IL-15-activated T-lymphocytes that is highly orchestrated by site-specific phosphorylation events. Comparing the cytokine-induced interactome of the interleukin receptor beta and gamma subunits shared by the two cytokines, we defined the components of the early IL-2 and IL-15 receptor-associated complex discovering novel constituents. Additionally, phosphopeptide-directed analysis allowed us to detect several cytokine-dependent and -independent phosphorylation events within the activated receptor complex including novel phosphorylated sites located in the cytoplasmic region of IL-2 receptor β subunit (IL-2Rβ). We proved that the distinct phosphorylations induced by the cytokines serve for recruiting different types of effectors to the initial receptor/ligand complex. Overall, our study sheds new light into the initial molecular events triggered by IL-2 and IL-15 and constitutes a further step toward a better understanding of the early signaling aspects of the two closely related cytokines in T-lymphocytes.

  12. Expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1 and its clinical significance in kidney cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Tong; Yang, Guosheng; Qiu, Xiaofu; Luo, Youhua; Liu, Baichuan; Wang, Bingwei

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the expression and clinical significance of TRAP1 (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated protein 1) in kidney cancer. TRAP1 expression was detected in kidney cancer and normal kidney tissues by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Then, the correlation of TRAP1 expression with clinicopathological characters and patients' prognosis was evaluated in kidney cancer. IHC results revealed that the high-expression rates of TRAP1 in kidney cancer tissues and normal kidney tissues were 51.3% (41/80), 23.3% (7/30), and the difference was statistically significant (P=0.01). Also, TRAP1 mRNA level in kidney cancer was found to be significantly greater compared with those in normal kidney by qRT-PCR. In addition, TRAP1 expression in kidney cancer significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (Pkidney cancer and correlates with patients prognosis, which may be served as a potential marker for the diagnosis and treatment of kidney cancer.

  13. Immunoelectron Microscopic Localization of MHC Class 1 and 2 Antigens on Bile Duct Epithelial Cells in Patients with Primary Biliary Cirrhosis

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Yamada, Gotaro; Mizuno, Motowo; Tsuji, Takao

    1994-01-01

    We studied the distribution of class 1 and class 2 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens on bile duct epithelial cells in liver from patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) by an immunohistochemical method using monoclonal antibodies to HLA-ABC products and HLA-D subregion products (HLA-DR, -DP, -DQ). By light microscopy, the expression of MHC class 1 antigens (HLA-ABC antigens) was enhanced in PBC compared with controls. While negligible staining of MHC class 2 antigens was d...

  14. Formation of Ultracold Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, Robin [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Advances in our ability to slow down and cool atoms and molecules to ultracold temperatures have paved the way to a revolution in basic research on molecules. Ultracold molecules are sensitive of very weak interactions, even when separated by large distances, which allow studies of the effect of those interactions on the behavior of molecules. In this program, we have explored ways to form ultracold molecules starting from pairs of atoms that have already reached the ultracold regime. We devised methods that enhance the efficiency of ultracold molecule production, for example by tuning external magnetic fields and using appropriate laser excitations. We also investigates the properties of those ultracold molecules, especially their de-excitation into stable molecules. We studied the possibility of creating new classes of ultra-long range molecules, named macrodimers, thousand times more extended than regular molecules. Again, such objects are possible because ultra low temperatures prevent their breakup by collision. Finally, we carried out calculations on how chemical reactions are affected and modified at ultracold temperatures. Normally, reactions become less effective as the temperature decreases, but at ultracold temperatures, they can become very effective. We studied this counter-intuitive behavior for benchmark chemical reactions involving molecular hydrogen.

  15. Myosin heavy chain expression pattern as a marker for anabolic potency: desoxymethyltestosterone (madol), norandrostenedione and testosterone repress MHC-IIb expression and stimulate MHC-IId/x expression in orchiectomized rat gastrocnemius muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, S; Velders, M; Schleipen, B; Schänzer, W; Bloch, W; Diel, P

    2011-06-01

    Both 19-norandrostenedione (estr-4-ene-3,17-dione, NOR) and desoxymethyltestosterone (17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androst-2-en-17beta-ol, DMT or "madol") are 'designer steroids' misused for doping purposes in the bodybuilding scene. We have previously characterized the pharmacological profile of madol and identified potential adverse side effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the anabolic potency of NOR, madol and the reference substance testosterone propionate (TP). Besides wet weight of the M.levator ani (LA), we examined the effects on muscle fiber type composition and myosin heavy chain (MHC) expression in the M.gastrocnemius (Gas) muscle as additional markers for anabolic potency. A Hershberger assay was performed, where orchiectomized (orchi) male Wistar rats were treated subcutaneously with NOR, madol, TP or vehicle control (all 1 mg/kg BW/day) for 12 days. Wet weights of the Gas, LA, prostate and seminal vesicle were examined to determine anabolic and androgenic effects. Fiber type composition of the Gas muscle was analyzed using ATPase staining, and MHC protein profiles were determined by silver stain and Western blot analysis. NOR and madol exhibited strong anabolic and weak androgenic potency by stimulating growth of the LA but not the prostate and seminal vesicle. Skeletal muscle fiber type composition characterized by ATPase staining was not significantly altered between the treatment groups, although there was a tendency toward lower levels of type IIB and increased type IIA fibers in all treatment groups relative to orchi. MHC protein expression determined by Western blot and silver stain analysis revealed that MHC IId/x was significantly up-regulated, while MHC IIb was significantly down-regulated in NOR, madol and TP groups relative to orchi. There were no significant differences for MHC IIa and MHC I expression between groups. Results suggest that the observed MHC expression shift could serve as a molecular marker to determine anabolic

  16. Ultracold Polar Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    formation of ultracold 87RbCs molecules in their rovibrational ground state by magnetoassociation followed by STIRAP, resulting in 14 papers acknowledging...produce at high densities. We revealed broad Feshbach resonances that we hope will allow production of higher-density 85Rb clouds. We are now...attempting to achieve the next step, formation of 85RbCs molecules. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, ultracold polar molecules, Feshbach resonance 16. SECURITY

  17. Cathepsin S inhibition suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis because cathepsin S is essential for MHC class II-mediated CD4 T cell and B cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Lichtnekert, Julia; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Guido; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-mediated priming of T and B lymphocytes is a central element of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. The cysteine protease cathepsin S degrades the invariant peptide chain during MHC II assembly with antigenic peptide in antigen-presenting cells; therefore, we hypothesised that cathepsin S inhibition would be therapeutic in SLE. We developed a highly specific small molecule, orally available, cathepsin S antagonist, RO5461111, with suitable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties that efficiently suppressed antigen-specific T cell and B cell priming in vitro and in vivo. When given to MRL-Fas(lpr) mice with SLE and lupus nephritis, RO5461111 significantly reduced the activation of spleen dendritic cells and the subsequent expansion and activation of CD4 T cells and CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. Cathepsin S inhibition impaired the spatial organisation of germinal centres, suppressed follicular B cell maturation to plasma cells and Ig class switch. This reversed hypergammaglobulinemia and significantly suppressed the plasma levels of numerous IgG (but not IgM) autoantibodies below baseline, including anti-dsDNA. This effect was associated with less glomerular IgG deposits, which protected kidneys from lupus nephritis. Together, cathepsin S promotes SLE by driving MHC class II-mediated T and B cell priming, germinal centre formation and B cell maturation towards plasma cells. These afferent immune pathways can be specifically reversed with the cathepsin S antagonist RO5461111, which prevents lupus nephritis progression even when given after disease onset. This novel therapeutic strategy could correct a common pathomechanism of SLE and other immune complex-related autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  18. Natural host genetic resistance to lentiviral CNS disease: a neuroprotective MHC class I allele in SIV-infected macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Mankowski

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection frequently causes neurologic disease even with anti-retroviral treatment. Although associations between MHC class I alleles and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS have been reported, the role MHC class I alleles play in restricting development of HIV-induced organ-specific diseases, including neurologic disease, has not been characterized. This study examined the relationship between expression of the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 and development of lentiviral-induced central nervous system (CNS disease using a well-characterized simian immunodeficiency (SIV/pigtailed macaque model. The risk of developing CNS disease (SIV encephalitis was 2.5 times higher for animals that did not express the MHC class I allele Mane-A*10 (P = 0.002; RR = 2.5. Animals expressing the Mane-A*10 allele had significantly lower amounts of activated macrophages, SIV RNA, and neuronal dysfunction in the CNS than Mane-A*10 negative animals (P<0.001. Mane-A*10 positive animals with the highest CNS viral burdens contained SIV gag escape mutants at the Mane-A*10-restricted KP9 epitope in the CNS whereas wild type KP9 sequences dominated in the brain of Mane-A*10 negative animals with comparable CNS viral burdens. These concordant findings demonstrate that particular MHC class I alleles play major neuroprotective roles in lentiviral-induced CNS disease.

  19. A TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant SNP (rs8177374) confers protection against premature birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karody, V R; Le, M; Nelson, S; Meskin, K; Klemm, S; Simpson, P; Hines, R; Sampath, V

    2013-05-01

    To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway modulate susceptibility to preterm birth (PTB). Prospective case-control study examining the contribution of nine TLR SNPs to PTB (<37 weeks) and PTB <32 weeks. Genotyping was done on neonatal blood using a multiplexed single-base extension assay. Chi-square test, Fischer's exact test and classification trees were used for data analysis. Preterm infants (n=177) were more likely to be African American (P=0.02), and were more likely to be born to mothers who smoked (P=0.007), had pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH; P=0.002) and placental abruption (P=0.0004) when compared with term infants (n=146). The TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR9, nuclear factor-kappa B1 (NFκB1), NFκBIA and IRAK1 variants were not associated with PTB whereas the TIR domain receptor-associated protein (TIRAP) variant was more prevalent in term infants when compared with preterm infants born <32 weeks (P=0.004). PTB <32 weeks was more prevalent in infants without the TIRAP variant whose mothers had PIH and did not smoke (P=0.001). Presence of the TIRAP variant protected against PTB <32 weeks (P=0.015) in Caucasian infants. In our study, a TLR pathway adapter variant (TIRAP (rs8177374)) protected against PTB<32 weeks, supporting our hypothesis that genetic variation in the innate immune signaling pathway contributes to altered risk of PTB.

  20. The enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC Tir effector inhibits NF-κB activity by targeting TNFα receptor-associated factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Hélène Ruchaud-Sparagano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC disease depends on the transfer of effector proteins into epithelia lining the human small intestine. EPEC E2348/69 has at least 20 effector genes of which six are located with the effector-delivery system genes on the Locus of Enterocyte Effacement (LEE Pathogenicity Island. Our previous work implied that non-LEE-encoded (Nle effectors possess functions that inhibit epithelial anti-microbial and inflammation-inducing responses by blocking NF-κB transcription factor activity. Indeed, screens by us and others have identified novel inhibitory mechanisms for NleC and NleH, with key co-operative functions for NleB1 and NleE1. Here, we demonstrate that the LEE-encoded Translocated-intimin receptor (Tir effector has a potent and specific ability to inhibit NF-κB activation. Indeed, biochemical, imaging and immunoprecipitation studies reveal a novel inhibitory mechanism whereby Tir interaction with cytoplasm-located TNFα receptor-associated factor (TRAF adaptor proteins induces their proteasomal-independent degradation. Infection studies support this Tir-TRAF relationship but reveal that Tir, like NleC and NleH, has a non-essential contribution in EPEC's NF-κB inhibitory capacity linked to Tir's activity being suppressed by undefined EPEC factors. Infections in a disease-relevant intestinal model confirm key NF-κB inhibitory roles for the NleB1/NleE1 effectors, with other studies providing insights on host targets. The work not only reveals a second Intimin-independent property for Tir and a novel EPEC effector-mediated NF-κB inhibitory mechanism but also lends itself to speculations on the evolution of EPEC's capacity to inhibit NF-κB function.