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Sample records for receptor sorts polyomavirus

  1. A lipid receptor sorts polyomavirus from the endolysosome to the endoplasmic reticulum to cause infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengding Qian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which receptors guide intracellular virus transport are poorly characterized. The murine polyomavirus (Py binds to the lipid receptor ganglioside GD1a and traffics to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER where it enters the cytosol and then the nucleus to initiate infection. How Py reaches the ER is unclear. We show that Py is transported initially to the endolysosome where the low pH imparts a conformational change that enhances its subsequent ER-to-cytosol membrane penetration. GD1a stimulates not viral binding or entry, but rather sorting of Py from late endosomes and/or lysosomes to the ER, suggesting that GD1a binding is responsible for ER targeting. Consistent with this, an artificial particle coated with a GD1a antibody is transported to the ER. Our results provide a rationale for transport of Py through the endolysosome, demonstrate a novel endolysosome-to-ER transport pathway that is regulated by a lipid, and implicate ganglioside binding as a general ER targeting mechanism.

  2. Discrimination between sialic acid-containing receptors and pseudoreceptors regulates polyomavirus spread in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, P H; Cui, C; Liu, W R; Stehle, T; Harrison, S C; DeCaprio, J A; Benjamin, T L

    1999-07-01

    Variations in the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1 underlie important biological differences between highly pathogenic large-plaque and relatively nonpathogenic small-plaque strains. These polymorphisms constitute major determinants of virus spread in mice and also dictate previously recognized strain differences in sialyloligosaccharide binding. X-ray crystallographic studies have shown that these determinants affect binding to the sialic acids. Here we report results of further experiments designed to test the importance of specific contacts between VP1 and the carbohydrate moieties of the receptor. With minor exceptions, substitutions at positions predicted from crystallography to be important in binding the terminal alpha-2,3-linked sialic acid or the penultimate sugar (galactose) destroyed the ability of the virus to replicate in cell culture. Substitutions that prevented binding to a branched disialyloligosaccharide were found to result in viruses that were both viable in culture and tumorigenic in the mouse. Conversely, substitutions that allowed recognition and binding of the branched carbohydrate chain inhibited spread in the mouse, though the viruses remained viable in culture. Mice of five different inbred strains, all highly susceptible to large-plaque virus, showed resistance to the spread of polyomavirus strains bearing the VP1 type which binds the branched-chain receptor. We suggest that glycoproteins bearing the appropriate O-linked branched sialyloligosaccharide chains are effective pseudoreceptors in the host and that they block the spread of potentially tumorigenic or virulent virus strains.

  3. Discrimination between Sialic Acid-Containing Receptors and Pseudoreceptors Regulates Polyomavirus Spread in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Variations in the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1 underlie important biological differences between highly pathogenic large-plaque and relatively nonpathogenic small-plaque strains. These polymorphisms constitute major determinants of virus spread in mice and also dictate previously recognized strain differences in sialyloligosaccharide binding. X-ray crystallographic studies have shown that these determinants affect binding to the sialic acids. Here we report results of further experim...

  4. An ultrasensitive sorting mechanism for EGF Receptor Endocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikic Ivan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF receptor has been shown to internalize via clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE in a ligand concentration dependent manner. From a modeling point of view, this resembles an ultrasensitive response, which is the ability of signaling networks to suppress a response for low input values and to increase to a pre-defined level for inputs exceeding a certain threshold. Several mechanisms to generate this behaviour have been described theoretically, the underlying assumptions of which, however, have not been experimentally demonstrated for the EGF receptor internalization network. Results Here, we present a mathematical model of receptor sorting into alternative pathways that explains the EGF-concentration dependent response of CIE. The described mechanism involves a saturation effect of the dominant clathrin-dependent endocytosis pathway and implies distinct steady-states into which the system is forced for low vs high EGF stimulations. The model is minimal since no experimentally unjustified reactions or parameter assumptions are imposed. We demonstrate the robustness of the sorting effect for large parameter variations and give an analytic derivation for alternative steady-states that are reached. Further, we describe extensibility of the model to more than two pathways which might play a role in contexts other than receptor internalization. Conclusion Our main result is that a scenario where different endocytosis routes consume the same form of receptor corroborates the observation of a clear-cut, stimulus dependent sorting. This is especially important since a receptor modification discriminating between the pathways has not been found experimentally. The model is not restricted to EGF receptor internalization and might account for ultrasensitivity in other cellular contexts.

  5. Membrane glycoprotein M6A promotes μ-opioid receptor endocytosis and facilitates receptor sorting into the recycling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Jian Liang; Dai-Fei Wu; Ralf Stumm; Volker H(o)llt; Thomas Koch

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of μ-opioid receptor (MOPr) with the neuronal membrane glycoprotein M6a is known to facilitate MOPr endocytosis in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. To further study the role of M6a in the post-endocytotic sorting of MOPr, we investigated the agonist-induced co-internalization of MOPr and M6a and protein targeting after internalization in HEK293 cells that co-expressed HA-tagged MOPr and Myc-tagged M6a. We found that M6a, MOPr, and Rab 11, a marker for recycling endosomes, co-localized in endocytotic vesicles, indicating that MOPr and M6a are primarily targeted to recycling endosomes after endocytosis. Furthermore, co-expression of M6a augmented the post-endocytotic sorting of δ-opioid receptors into the recycling pathway, indicating that M6a might have a more general role in opioid receptor post-ndocytotic sorting. The enhanced post-endocytotic sorting of MOPr into the recycling pathway was accompanied by a decrease in agonist-induced receptor down-regulation of M6a in co-expressing cells. We tested the physiological relevance of these findings in primary cultures of cortical neurons and found that co-expression of M6a markedly increased the translocation of MOPrs from the plasma membrane to intracellular vesicles at steady state and significantly enhanced both constitutive and agonist-induced receptor endocytosis. In conclusion, our results strongly indicate that M6a modulates MOPr endocytosis and post-endocytotic sorting and has an important role in receptor regulation.

  6. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...... established that the AP-1 adaptor complex is essential to SorLA's transport between Golgi membranes and endosomes. Our results further implicate the GGA proteins in SorLA trafficking and provide evidence that SNX1 and Vps35, as parts of the retromer complex or possibly in a separate context, are engaged...

  7. Complete Sequence of the Smallest Polyomavirus Genome, Giant Guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis) Polyomavirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Jennifer A; Ng, Terry F F; Camus, Alvin C

    2016-05-19

    Polyomaviruses are known to infect mammals and birds. Deep sequencing and metagenomic analysis identified the first polyomavirus from a cartilaginous fish, the giant guitarfish (Rhynchobatus djiddensis). Giant guitarfish polyomavirus 1 (GfPyV1) has typical polyomavirus genome organization, but is the smallest polyomavirus genome (3.96 kb) described to date.

  8. Differential effects of EGFR ligands on endocytic sorting of the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roepstorff, Kirstine; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Henriksen, Lasse; Knudsen, Stine Louise Jeppe; Lerdrup, Mads; Grøvdal, Lene; Willumsen, Berthe Marie; van Deurs, Bo

    2009-08-01

    Endocytic downregulation is a pivotal mechanism turning off signalling from the EGF receptor (EGFR). It is well established that whereas EGF binding leads to lysosomal degradation of EGFR, transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha causes receptor recycling. TGF-alpha therefore leads to continuous signalling and is a more potent mitogen than EGF. In addition to EGF and TGF-alpha, five EGFR ligands have been identified. Although many of these ligands are upregulated in cancers, very little is known about their effect on EGFR trafficking. We have compared the effect of six different ligands on endocytic trafficking of EGFR. We find that, whereas they all stimulate receptor internalization, they have very diverse effects on endocytic sorting. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor and Betacellulin target all EGFRs for lysosomal degradation. In contrast, TGF-alpha and epiregulin lead to complete receptor recycling. EGF leads to lysosomal degradation of the majority but not all EGFRs. Amphiregulin does not target EGFR for lysosomal degradation but causes fast as well as slow EGFR recycling. The Cbl ubiquitin ligases, especially c-Cbl, are responsible for EGFR ubiquitination after stimulation with all ligands, and persistent EGFR phosphorylation and ubiquitination largely correlate with receptor degradation.

  9. The GPRC6A Receptor displays Constitutive Internalization and Sorting to the Slow Recycling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jansen, Anna Mai; Gether, Ulrik; Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-03-09

    The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface availability also remain enigmatic. In the present study, we investigated the trafficking properties of GPRC6A by use of both a classical antibody feeding internalization assay in which cells were visualized using confocal microscopy and a novel internalization assay that is based on real-time measurements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Both assays revealed that GPRC6A predominantly undergoes constitutive internalization while the agonist-induced effects were imperceptible. Moreover, post-endocytic sorting was investigated by assessing the co-localization of internalized GPRC6A with selected Rab protein markers. Internalized GPRC6A was mainly co-localized with the early endosome marker Rab5 and the long loop recycling endosome marker Rab11 and to a much lesser extent with the late endosome marker Rab7. This suggests that upon agonist-independent internalization, GPRC6A is recycled via the Rab11-positive slow recycling pathway, which may be responsible for ensuring a persistent pool of GPRC6A receptors at the cell surface despite chronic agonist exposure. Distinct trafficking pathways have been reported for several of the class C receptors, and our results thus substantiate that non-canonical trafficking mechanisms are a common feature for the nutrient sensing class C family that ensure functional receptors in the cell membrane despite prolonged agonist exposure.

  10. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W Bruce; Ardura, Juan A; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A; Friedman, Peter A

    2016-05-20

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor.

  11. Actin-Sorting Nexin 27 (SNX27)-Retromer Complex Mediates Rapid Parathyroid Hormone Receptor Recycling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarvey, Jennifer C.; Xiao, Kunhong; Bowman, Shanna L.; Mamonova, Tatyana; Zhang, Qiangmin; Bisello, Alessandro; Sneddon, W. Bruce; Ardura, Juan A.; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A.; Friedman, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR) regulates mineral-ion homeostasis and bone remodeling. Upon parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulation, the PTHR internalizes into early endosomes and subsequently traffics to the retromer complex, a sorting platform on early endosomes that promotes recycling of surface receptors. The C terminus of the PTHR contains a type I PDZ ligand that binds PDZ domain-containing proteins. Mass spectrometry identified sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) in isolated endosomes as a PTHR binding partner. PTH treatment enriched endosomal PTHR. SNX27 contains a PDZ domain and serves as a cargo selector for the retromer complex. VPS26, VPS29, and VPS35 retromer subunits were isolated with PTHR in endosomes from cells stimulated with PTH. Molecular dynamics and protein binding studies establish that PTHR and SNX27 interactions depend on the PDZ recognition motif in PTHR and the PDZ domain of SNX27. Depletion of either SNX27 or VPS35 or actin depolymerization decreased the rate of PTHR recycling following agonist stimulation. Mutating the PDZ ligand of PTHR abolished the interaction with SNX27 but did not affect the overall rate of recycling, suggesting that PTHR may directly engage the retromer complex. Coimmunoprecipitation and overlay experiments show that both intact and mutated PTHR bind retromer through the VPS26 protomer and sequentially assemble a ternary complex with PTHR and SNX27. SNX27-independent recycling may involve N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor, which binds both PDZ intact and mutant PTHRs. We conclude that PTHR recycles rapidly through at least two pathways, one involving the ASRT complex of actin, SNX27, and retromer and another possibly involving N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. PMID:27008860

  12. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis vacuolar sorting receptor 3 reveals a putative function in guard cells.

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    Avila, Emily L; Brown, Michelle; Pan, Songqin; Desikan, Radhika; Neill, Steven J; Girke, Thomas; Surpin, Marci; Raikhel, Natasha V

    2008-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are responsible for the proper targeting of soluble cargo proteins to their destination compartments. The Arabidopsis genome encodes seven VSRs. In this work, the spatio-temporal expression of one of the members of this gene family, AtVSR3, was determined by RT-PCR and promoter::reporter gene fusions. AtVSR3 was expressed specifically in guard cells. Consequently, a reverse genetics approach was taken to determine the function of AtVSR3 by using RNA interference (RNAi) technology. Plants expressing little or no AtVSR3 transcript had a compressed life cycle, bolting approximately 1 week earlier and senescing up to 2 weeks earlier than the wild-type parent line. While the development and distribution of stomata in AtVSR3 RNAi plants appeared normal, stomatal function was altered. The guard cells of mutant plants did not close in response to abscisic acid treatment, and the mean leaf temperatures of the RNAi plants were on average 0.8 degrees C lower than both wild type and another vacuolar sorting receptor mutant, atvsr1-1. Furthermore, the loss of AtVSR3 protein caused the accumulation of nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide, signalling molecules implicated in the regulation of stomatal opening and closing. Finally, proteomics and western blot analyses of cellular proteins isolated from wild-type and AtVSR3 RNAi leaves showed that phospholipase Dgamma, which may play a role in abscisic acid signalling, accumulated to higher levels in AtVSR3 RNAi guard cells. Thus, AtVSR3 may play an important role in responses to plant stress.

  13. Ligand recognition and domain structure of Vps10p, a vacuolar protein sorting receptor in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M U; Emr, S D; Winther, Jakob R.

    1999-01-01

    Vp10p is a receptor that sorts several different vacuolar proteins by cycling between a late Golgi compartment and the endosome. The cytoplasmic tail of Vps10p is necessary for the recycling, whereas the lumenal domain is predicted to interact with the soluble ligands. We have studied ligand bind...

  14. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne; Holst, Birgitte; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Haft, Carol Renfrew; Whistler, Jennifer; Schwartz, Thue W

    2004-12-24

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequestration through interactions, mainly with the C-terminal intracellular tails of the receptors. A library of tails from 59 representative members of the super family of seven-transmembrane receptors was probed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins for interactions with four different adaptor proteins previously proposed to be involved in post-endocytotic sorting of receptors. Of the two proteins suggested to target receptors for recycling to the cell membrane, which is the route believed to be taken by a majority of receptors, ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) bound only a single receptor tail, i.e. the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor, whereas N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor bound 11 of the tail-fusion proteins. Of the two proteins proposed to target receptors for lysosomal degradation, sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) bound 10 and the C-terminal domain of G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein bound 23 of the 59 tail proteins. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding kinetics of selected hits from the glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, i.e. the tails of the virally encoded receptor US28 and the delta-opioid receptor, confirmed the expected nanomolar affinities for interaction with SNX1. Truncations of the NK(1) receptor revealed that an extended binding epitope is responsible for the interaction with both SNX1 and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein as well as with N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. It is concluded that the tail library provides useful information on the general importance of certain adaptor proteins, for example, in this case, ruling out EBP50 as being a broad spectrum

  15. Phylogenetics, evolution, and medical importance of polyomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumbholz, Andi; Bininda-Emonds, Olaf R P; Wutzler, Peter; Zell, Roland

    2009-09-01

    The increasing frequency of tissue transplantation, recent progress in the development and application of immunomodulators, and the depressingly high number of AIDS patients worldwide have placed human polyomaviruses, a group of pathogens that can become reactivated under the status of immunosuppression, suddenly in the spotlight. Since the first description of a polyomavirus a half-century ago in 1953, a multiplicity of human and animal polyomaviruses have been discovered. After reviewing the history of research into this group, with a special focus is made on the clinical importance of human polyomaviruses, we conclude by elucidating the phylogenetic relationships and thus evolutionary history of these viruses. Our phylogenetic analyses are based on all available putative polyomavirus species as well as including all subtypes, subgroups, and (sub)lineages of the human BK and JC polyomaviruses. Finally, we reveal that the hypothesis of a strict codivergence of polyomaviruses with their respective hosts does not represent a realistic assumption in light of phylogenetic findings presented here.

  16. Receptor-mediated sorting of soluble vacuolar proteins: myths, facts, and a new model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David G; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    To prevent their being released to the cell exterior, acid hydrolases are recognized by receptors at some point in the secretory pathway and diverted towards the lytic compartment of the cell (lysosome or vacuole). In animal cells, the receptor is called the mannosyl 6-phosphate receptor (MPR) and it binds hydrolase ligands in the trans-Golgi network (TGN). These ligands are then sequestered into clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) because of motifs in the cytosolic tail of the MPR which interact first with monomeric adaptors (Golgi-localized, Gamma-ear-containing, ARF-binding proteins, GGAs) and then with tetrameric (adaptin) adaptor complexes. The CCVs then fuse with an early endosome, whose more acidic lumen causes the ligands to dissociate. The MPRs are then recycled back to the TGN via retromer-coated carriers. Plants have vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) which were originally identified in CCVs isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) cotyledons. It was therefore assumed that VSRs would have an analogous function in plants to MPRs in animals. Although this dogma has enjoyed wide support over the last 20 years there are many inconsistencies. Recently, results have been published which are quite contrary to it. It now emerges that VSRs and their ligands can interact very early in the secretory pathway, and dissociate in the TGN, which, in contrast to its mammalian counterpart, has a pH of 5.5. Multivesicular endosomes in plants lack proton pump complexes and consequently have an almost neutral internal pH, which discounts them as organelles of pH-dependent receptor-ligand dissociation. These data force a critical re-evaluation of the role of CCVs at the TGN, especially considering that vacuolar cargo ligands have never been identified in them. We propose that one population of TGN-derived CCVs participate in retrograde transport of VSRs from the TGN. We also present a new model to explain how secretory and vacuolar cargo proteins are effectively separated after

  17. The sorting receptor Rer1 controls Purkinje cell function via voltage gated sodium channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valkova, Christina; Liebmann, Lutz; Krämer, Andreas; Hübner, Christian A.; Kaether, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Rer1 is a sorting receptor in the early secretory pathway that controls the assembly and the cell surface transport of selected multimeric membrane protein complexes. Mice with a Purkinje cell (PC) specific deletion of Rer1 showed normal polarization and differentiation of PCs and normal development of the cerebellum. However, PC-specific loss of Rer1 led to age-dependent motor deficits in beam walk, ladder climbing and gait. Analysis of brain sections revealed a specific degeneration of PCs in the anterior cerebellar lobe in old animals. Electrophysiological recordings demonstrated severe deficits in spontaneous action potential generation. Measurements of resurgent currents indicated decreased surface densities of voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav), but not changes in individual channels. Analysis of mice with a whole brain Rer1-deletion demonstrated a strong down-regulation of Nav1.6 and 1.1 in the absence of Rer1, whereas protein levels of the related Cav2.1 and of Kv3.3 and 7.2 channels were not affected. The data suggest that Rer1 controls the assembly and transport of Nav1.1 and 1.6, the principal sodium channels responsible for recurrent firing, in PCs. PMID:28117367

  18. The Arabidopsis Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 Is Required for Osmotic Stress-Induced Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2014-11-21

    Osmotic stress activates the biosynthesis of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through a pathway that is rate limited by the carotenoid cleavage enzyme 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED). To understand the signal transduction mechanism underlying the activation of ABA biosynthesis, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate mutants defective in osmotic stress regulation of the NCED3 gene. Here, we identified the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Vacuolar Sorting Receptor1 (VSR1) as a unique regulator of ABA biosynthesis. The vsr1 mutant not only shows increased sensitivity to osmotic stress, but also is defective in the feedback regulation of ABA biosynthesis by ABA. Further analysis revealed that vacuolar trafficking mediated by VSR1 is required for osmotic stress-responsive ABA biosynthesis and osmotic stress tolerance. Moreover, under osmotic stress conditions, the membrane potential, calcium flux, and vacuolar pH changes in the vsr1 mutant differ from those in the wild type. Given that manipulation of the intracellular pH is sufficient to modulate the expression of ABA biosynthesis genes, including NCED3, and ABA accumulation, we propose that intracellular pH changes caused by osmotic stress may play a signaling role in regulating ABA biosynthesis and that this regulation is dependent on functional VSR1.

  19. Vacuolar Sorting Receptor (VSR) Proteins Reach the Plasma Membrane in Germinating Pollen Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Xiao-Hong Zhuang; Stefan Hillmer; David G. Robinson; Li-Wen Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) are type I integral membrane proteins that mediate the vacuolar transport of soluble cargo proteins via prevacuolar compartments (PVCs) in plants.Confocal immunofluorescent and immunogold Electron Microscope (EM) studies have localized VSRs to PVCs or multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and trans-Golgi network (TGN) in various plant cell types,including suspension culture cells,root cells,developing and germinating seeds.Here,we provide evidence that VSRs reach plasma membrane (PM) in growing pollen tubes.Both immunofluorescent and immunogold EM studies with specific VSR antibodies show that,in addition to the previously demonstrated PVC/MVB localization,VSRs also localize to PM in lily and tobacco pollen tubes prepared from chemical fixation or high-pressure freezing/frozen substitution.Such a PM localization suggests an additional role of VSR proteins in mediating protein transport to PM and endocytosis in growing pollen tubes.Using a high-speed Spinning Disc Confocal Microscope,the possible fusion between VSR-positive PVC organelles and the PM was also observed in living tobacco pollen tubes transiently expressing the PVC reporter GFP-VSR.In contrast,the lack of a prominent PM localization of GFP-VSR in living pollen tubes may be due to the highly dynamic situation of vesicular transport in this fast-growing cell type.

  20. The Ancient Evolutionary History of Polyomaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Buck

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyomaviruses are a family of DNA tumor viruses that are known to infect mammals and birds. To investigate the deeper evolutionary history of the family, we used a combination of viral metagenomics, bioinformatics, and structural modeling approaches to identify and characterize polyomavirus sequences associated with fish and arthropods. Analyses drawing upon the divergent new sequences indicate that polyomaviruses have been gradually co-evolving with their animal hosts for at least half a billion years. Phylogenetic analyses of individual polyomavirus genes suggest that some modern polyomavirus species arose after ancient recombination events involving distantly related polyomavirus lineages. The improved evolutionary model provides a useful platform for developing a more accurate taxonomic classification system for the viral family Polyomaviridae.

  1. The Ancient Evolutionary History of Polyomaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B.; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Peretti, Alberto; Geoghegan, Eileen M.; Tisza, Michael J.; An, Ping; Katz, Joshua P.; Pipas, James M.; McBride, Alison A.; Camus, Alvin C.; McDermott, Alexa J.; Dill, Jennifer A.; Delwart, Eric; Ng, Terry F. F.; Farkas, Kata; Austin, Charlotte; Kraberger, Simona; Davison, William; Pastrana, Diana V.; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Polyomaviruses are a family of DNA tumor viruses that are known to infect mammals and birds. To investigate the deeper evolutionary history of the family, we used a combination of viral metagenomics, bioinformatics, and structural modeling approaches to identify and characterize polyomavirus sequences associated with fish and arthropods. Analyses drawing upon the divergent new sequences indicate that polyomaviruses have been gradually co-evolving with their animal hosts for at least half a billion years. Phylogenetic analyses of individual polyomavirus genes suggest that some modern polyomavirus species arose after ancient recombination events involving distantly related polyomavirus lineages. The improved evolutionary model provides a useful platform for developing a more accurate taxonomic classification system for the viral family Polyomaviridae. PMID:27093155

  2. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a ubiquitous tumor marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoyi; Chang, Frank; Zhang, Xinmin; Rothman, Vicki L; Tuszynski, George P

    2012-08-01

    Using an innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of breast cancer patients and was over-expressed in early and late stage breast tumors (Tuszynski, G.P. et al., 2011). In this study we further investigated the significance of GASP-1 as a tumor marker by investigating the expression GASP-1 in different kinds of tumors as well as in the sera of patients with various cancers. Over expression of GASP-1 was detected in brain, pancreatic, and breast cancers as compared to their respective normal tissues as assessed by immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays using a "peptide specific" GASP-1 antibody. We found that across these cancers, GASP-1 was expressed approximately 10 fold more in the cancer as compared to normal tissue. The increase in GASP-1 expression was also seen in hyperplastic and inflammatory lesions of breast and pancreatic cancers as compared to normal tissue. GASP-1 was primarily expressed in the tumor epithelium of the epithelial-derived cancers and in the transformed glial cells of the brain tumors. Using a sensitive "competitive ELISA" for GASP-1, we found that sera from patients with brain, liver, breast and lung cancers expressed 4-7 fold more GASP-1 peptide than sera from normal healthy individuals. These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for several cancers and suggest that GASP-1 may be a novel target for development of cancer therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The deubiquitinating enzyme USP8 promotes trafficking and degradation of the chemokine receptor 4 at the sorting endosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Ilana; Higginbotham, Katherine M; Dise, Rebecca S; Sierra, Maria I; Nash, Piers D

    2010-11-26

    Reversible ubiquitination orchestrated by the opposition of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes mediates endocytic trafficking of cell surface receptors for lysosomal degradation. Ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) has previously been implicated in endocytosis of several receptors by virtue of their deubiquitination. The present study explores an indirect role for USP8 in cargo trafficking through its regulation of the chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). Contrary to the effects of USP8 loss on enhanced green fluorescent protein, we find that USP8 depletion stabilizes CXCR4 on the cell surface and attenuates receptor degradation without affecting its ubiquitination status. In the presence of ligand, diminished CXCR4 turnover is accompanied by receptor accumulation on enlarged early endosomes and leads to enhancement of phospho-ERK signaling. Perturbation in CXCR4 trafficking, resulting from USP8 inactivation, occurs at the ESCRT-0 checkpoint, and catalytic mutation of USP8 specifically targeted to the ESCRT-0 complex impairs the spatial and temporal organization of the sorting endosome. USP8 functionally opposes the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 with respect to ESCRT-0 ubiquitination, thereby promoting trafficking of CXCR4. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a functional cooperation between USP8, AIP4, and the ESCRT-0 machinery at the early sorting phase of CXCR4 and underscore the versatility of USP8 in shaping trafficking events at the early-to-late endosome transition.

  4. The Role of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus and Other Human Polyomaviruses in Emerging Hallmarks of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugo Moens

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyomaviruses are non-enveloped, dsDNA viruses that are common in mammals, including humans. All polyomaviruses encode the large T-antigen and small t-antigen proteins that share conserved functional domains, comprising binding motifs for the tumor suppressors pRb and p53, and for protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. At present, 13 different human polyomaviruses are known, and for some of them their large T-antigen and small t-antigen have been shown to possess oncogenic properties in cell culture and animal models, while similar functions are assumed for the large T- and small t-antigen of other human polyomaviruses. However, so far the Merkel cell polyomavirus seems to be the only human polyomavirus associated with cancer. The large T- and small t-antigen exert their tumorigenic effects through classical hallmarks of cancer: inhibiting tumor suppressors, activating tumor promoters, preventing apoptosis, inducing angiogenesis and stimulating metastasis. This review elaborates on the putative roles of human polyomaviruses in some of the emerging hallmarks of cancer. The reciprocal interactions between human polyomaviruses and the immune system response are discussed, a plausible role of polyomavirus-encoded and polyomavirus-induced microRNA in cancer is described, and the effect of polyomaviruses on energy homeostasis and exosomes is explored. Therapeutic strategies against these emerging hallmarks of cancer are also suggested.

  5. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails - Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, A.; Sondergaard, B.P.; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    -coupled receptor-associated sorting protein bound 23 of the 59 tail proteins. Surface plasmon resonance analysis of the binding kinetics of selected hits from the glutathione S-transferase pull-down experiments, i.e. the tails of the virally encoded receptor US28 and the delta-opioid receptor, confirmed......Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor...... sequestration through interactions, mainly with the C-terminal intracellular tails of the receptors. A library of tails from 59 representative members of the super family of seven-transmembrane receptors was probed as glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins for interactions with four different adaptor...

  6. SorLA Controls Neurotrophic Activity by Sorting of GDNF and Its Receptors GFRα1 and RET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glerup, Simon; Lume, Maria; Olsen, Ditte;

    2013-01-01

    Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent neurotrophic factor that has reached clinical trials for Parkinson's disease. GDNF binds to its coreceptor GFRα1 and signals through the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase RET, or RET independently through NCAM or syndecan-3....... Whereas the GDNF signaling cascades are well described, cellular turnover and trafficking of GDNF and its receptors remain poorly characterized. Here, we find that SorLA acts as sorting receptor for the GDNF/GFRα1 complex, directing it from the cell surface to endosomes. Through this mechanism, GDNF...... is targeted to lysosomes and degraded while GFRα1 recycles, creating an efficient GDNF clearance pathway. The SorLA/GFRα1 complex further targets RET for endocytosis but not for degradation, affecting GDNF-induced neurotrophic activities. SorLA-deficient mice display elevated GDNF levels, altered dopaminergic...

  7. α-Taxilin interacts with sorting nexin 4 and participates in the recycling pathway of transferrin receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Sakane

    Full Text Available Membrane traffic plays a crucial role in delivering proteins and lipids to their intracellular destinations. We previously identified α-taxilin as a binding partner of the syntaxin family, which is involved in intracellular vesicle traffic. α-Taxilin is overexpressed in tumor tissues and interacts with polymerized tubulin, but the precise function of α-taxilin remains unclear. Receptor proteins on the plasma membrane are internalized, delivered to early endosomes and then either sorted to the lysosome for degradation or recycled back to the plasma membrane. In this study, we found that knockdown of α-taxilin induced the lysosomal degradation of transferrin receptor (TfnR, a well-known receptor which is generally recycled back to the plasma membrane after internalization, and impeded the recycling of transferrin. α-Taxilin was immunoprecipitated with sorting nexin 4 (SNX4, which is involved in the recycling of TfnR. Furthermore, knockdown of α-taxilin decreased the number and length of SNX4-positive tubular structures. We report for the first time that α-taxilin interacts with SNX4 and plays a role in the recycling pathway of TfnR.

  8. Molecular characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate: squirrel monkey polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Ernst J; Groenewoud, Marlous J; Fagrouch, Zahra; Kewalapat, Aruna; van Gessel, Sabine; Kik, Marja J L; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2008-01-01

    DNA samples from a variety of New World monkeys were screened by using a broad-spectrum PCR targeting the VP1 gene of polyomaviruses. This resulted in the characterization of the first polyomavirus from a New World primate. This virus naturally infects squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sp.) and is provisionally named squirrel monkey polyomavirus (SquiPyV). The complete genome of SquiPyV is 5,075 bp in length, and encodes the small T and large T antigens and the three structural proteins VP1, VP2 and VP3. Interestingly, the late region also encodes a putative agnoprotein, a feature that it shares with other polyomaviruses from humans, baboons and African green monkeys. Comparison with other polyomaviruses revealed limited sequence similarity to any other polyomavirus, and phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene confirmed its uniqueness.

  9. T cell receptor zeta allows stable expression of receptors containing the CD3gamma leucine-based receptor-sorting motif

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Geisler, C

    1998-01-01

    The leucine-based motif in the T cell receptor (TCR) subunit CD3gamma constitutes a strong internalization signal. In fully assembled TCR this motif is inactive unless phosphorylated. In contrast, the motif is constitutively active in CD4/CD3gamma and Tac/CD3gamma chimeras independently of phosph......The leucine-based motif in the T cell receptor (TCR) subunit CD3gamma constitutes a strong internalization signal. In fully assembled TCR this motif is inactive unless phosphorylated. In contrast, the motif is constitutively active in CD4/CD3gamma and Tac/CD3gamma chimeras independently...... of phosphorylation and leads to rapid internalization and sorting of these chimeras to lysosomal degradation. Because the TCRzeta chain rescues incomplete TCR complexes from lysosomal degradation and allows stable surface expression of fully assembled TCR, we addressed the question whether TCRzeta has the potential...... to mask the CD3gamma leucine-based motif. By studying CD4/CD3gamma and CD16/CD3gamma chimeras, we found that CD16/CD3gamma chimeras associated with TCRzeta. The CD16/CD3gamma-TCRzeta complexes were stably expressed at the cell surface and had a low spontaneous internalization rate, indicating...

  10. The GPRC6A Receptor displays Constitutive Internalization and Sorting to the Slow Recycling Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Engesgaard; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jansen, Anna Mai

    2017-01-01

    The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface a......-canonical trafficking mechanisms are a common feature for the nutrient sensing class C family that ensure functional receptors in the cell membrane despite prolonged agonist exposure.......The class C G protein-coupled receptor GPRC6A is a putative nutrient sensing receptor and represents a possible new drug target in metabolic disorders. However, the specific physiological role of this receptor has yet to be identified, and the mechanisms regulating its activity and cell surface...

  11. Novel human polyomaviruses, Merkel cell polyomavirus and human polyomavirus 9, in Japanese chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imajoh Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the rarest adult leukemia in Japan, whereas it is the most common leukemia in the Western world. Recent studies from the United States and Germany suggest a possible etiological association between Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV and CLL, although no data have been reported from Eastern countries. To increase the volume of relevant data, this study investigated the prevalence and DNA loads of MCPyV and human polyomavirus 9 (HPyV9, another lymphotropic polyomavirus, in Japanese CLL cases. Findings We found that 9/27 CLL cases (33.3 % were positive for MCPyV using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. The viral DNA loads ranged from 0.000017 to 0.0012 copies per cell. All cases were negative for HPyV9. One MCPyV-positive CLL case was evaluated by mutational analysis of the large T (LT gene, which indicated the presence of wild-type MCPyV without a nucleotide deletion. DNA sequence analysis of the entire small T (ST gene and the partial LT gene revealed that a Japanese MCPyV isolate, designated CLL-JK, had two nucleotide gaps when compared with the reference sequence of the North American isolate MCC350. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that MCPyV is present in a subset of Japanese CLL cases with low viral DNA loads. MCPyV and HPyV9 are unlikely to contribute directly to the development of CLL in the majority of Japanese cases. MCPyV isolated from the Japanese CLL cases may constitute an Asian group and its pathogenicity needs to be clarified in future studies.

  12. Novel role of sorting nexin 5 in renal D(1) dopamine receptor trafficking and function: implications for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Armando, Ines; Sanada, Hironobu; Frazer, Lauren C; Russo, Christen M; Notario, Patricia M; Lee, Hewang; Comisky, Lauren; Russell, Holly Ann; Yang, Yu; Jurgens, Julie A; Jose, Pedro A; Jones, John E

    2013-05-01

    The D1 dopamine receptor (D1R) is widely expressed in the kidney and plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation. Although much is known about D1R desensitization, especially through G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 (GRK4), comparatively little is known about other aspects of D1R trafficking and the proteins involved in the process. We now report the discovery of a dynamic interaction between sorting nexin 5 (SNX5), a component of the mammalian retromer, and D1R in human renal epithelial cells. We show that internalization of agonist-activated D1R is regulated by both SNX5 and GRK4, and that SNX5 is critical to the recycling of the receptor to the plasma membrane. SNX5 depletion increases agonist-activated D1R phosphorylation (>50% at basal condition), prevents D1R internalization and cAMP response, and delays receptor recycling compared to mock siRNA-transfected controls. Moreover, renal restricted subcapsular infusion of Snx5-specific siRNA (vs. mock siRNA) decreases sodium excretion (Δ=-0.2±0.005 mEq/mg creatinine) and further elevates the systolic blood pressure (Δ=48±5 mm Hg) in spontaneously hypertensive rats, indicating that SNX5 depletion impairs renal D1R function. These studies demonstrate an essential role for SNX5 in regulating D1R function, which may have important diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications in the management of essential hypertension.

  13. Cloning and subcellular location of an arabidopsis receptor-like protein that shares common features with protein-sorting receptors of eukaryotic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S.U.; Bar-Peled, M.; Raikhel, N.V. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Many receptors involved in clathrin-mediated protein transport through the endocytic and secretary pathways of yeast and animal cells share common features. They are all type I integral membrane proteins containing cysteine-rich lumenal domains and cytoplasmic tails with tyrosine-containing sorting signals. The cysteine-rich domains are thought to be involved in ligand binding, whereas the cytoplasmic tyrosine motifs interact with clathrin-associated adaptor proteins during protein sorting along these pathways. in addition, tyrosine-containing signals are required for the retention and recycling of some of these membrane proteins to the trans-Golgi network. Here we report the characterization of an approximately 80-kD epidermal growth factor receptor-like type I integral membrane protein containing all of these functional motifs from Arabidopsis thaliana (called AtELP for A. thaliana Epidermal growth factor receptor-Like Protein). Biochemical analysis indicates that AtELP is a membrane protein found at high levels in the roots of both monocots and dicots. Subcellular fractionation studies indicate that the AtELP protein is present in two membrane fractions corresponding to a novel, undefined compartment and a fraction enriched in vesicles containing clathrin and its associated adaptor proteins. AtELP may therefore serve as a marker for compartments involved in intracellular protein trafficking in the plant cell. 87 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Common exposure to STL polyomavirus during childhood

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lim, Efrem S; Meinerz, Natalie M; Primi, Blake; Wang, David; Garcea, Robert L

    2014-01-01

    STL polyomavirus (STLPyV) was recently identified in human specimens. To determine seropositivity for STLPyV, we developed an ELISA and screened patient samples from 2 US cities (Denver, Colorado [500]; St. Louis, Missouri [419...

  15. Endosomal sorting of Notch receptors through COMMD9-dependent pathways modulates Notch signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.; Koo, Y.; Mao, X.; Sifuentes-Dominguez, L.; Morris, L.L.; Jia, D.; Miyata, N; Faulkner, R.A.; Deursen, J.M.A. van; Vooijs, M.; Billadeau, D.D.; Sluis, B. van de; Cleaver, O.; Burstein, E.

    2015-01-01

    Notch family members are transmembrane receptors that mediate essential developmental programs. Upon ligand binding, a proteolytic event releases the intracellular domain of Notch, which translocates to the nucleus to regulate gene transcription. In addition, Notch trafficking across the endolysosom

  16. SorLA Controls Neurotrophic Activity by Sorting of GDNF and Its Receptors GFRα1 and RET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Glerup

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF is a potent neurotrophic factor that has reached clinical trials for Parkinson’s disease. GDNF binds to its coreceptor GFRα1 and signals through the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase RET, or RET independently through NCAM or syndecan-3. Whereas the GDNF signaling cascades are well described, cellular turnover and trafficking of GDNF and its receptors remain poorly characterized. Here, we find that SorLA acts as sorting receptor for the GDNF/GFRα1 complex, directing it from the cell surface to endosomes. Through this mechanism, GDNF is targeted to lysosomes and degraded while GFRα1 recycles, creating an efficient GDNF clearance pathway. The SorLA/GFRα1 complex further targets RET for endocytosis but not for degradation, affecting GDNF-induced neurotrophic activities. SorLA-deficient mice display elevated GDNF levels, altered dopaminergic function, marked hyperactivity, and reduced anxiety, all of which are phenotypes related to abnormal GDNF activity. Taken together, these findings establish SorLA as a critical regulator of GDNF activity in the CNS.

  17. Polyomavirus interaction with the DNA damage response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joshua; L.Justice; Brandy; Verhalen; Mengxi; Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that subvert cellular metabolism and pathways to mediate their own replication—normally at the expense of the host cell. Polyomaviruses are a group of small DNA viruses, which have long been studied as a model for eukaryotic DNA replication. Polyomaviruses manipulate host replication proteins, as well as proteins involved in DNA maintenance and repair, to serve as essential cofactors for productive infection. Moreover, evidence suggests that polyomavirus infection poses a unique genotoxic threat to the host cell. In response to any source of DNA damage, cells must initiate an effective DNA damage response(DDR) to maintain genomic integrity, wherein two protein kinases, ataxia telangiectasia mutated(ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related(ATR), are major regulators of DNA damage recognition and repair. Recent investigation suggests that these essential DDR proteins are required for productive polyomavirus infection. This review will focus on polyomaviruses and their interaction with ATMand ATR-mediated DNA damage responses and the effect of this interaction on host genomic stability.

  18. G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1), a potential biomarker in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszynski, George P; Rothman, Vicki L; Zheng, Xiaoyi; Gutu, Mohammed; Zhang, Xinmin; Chang, Frank

    2011-10-01

    An innovative "2-D high performance liquid electrophoresis" (2-D HPLE) technology was used to identify serum biomarkers associated with the early stage of breast cancer in addition to other more advanced stages. 2-D HPLE is a newly developed electrophoretic technology that separates 100s of serum albumin complexes on a polyvinyl membrane based on their surface charges. Association of cancer proteins or their fragments (biomarkers) with pre-existing albumin complexes in the blood of cancer patients results in altered mobility on the membrane. Using 2-D HPLE we identified that a specific fragment of G-protein coupled receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP-1) was present in the sera of patients with early stage disease but absent in sera of normal patients. GASP-1 has been shown to modulate lysosomal sorting and functional down-regulation of a variety of G-protein coupled receptors in neuronal cells. However, no reports have linked GASP-1 to breast cancer pathogenesis. GASP-1 was detected in tumor extracts of 7 cases of Stage 2 and Stage 3 breast cancers, but not in adjacent normal tissue as revealed by western blot analysis using an antibody developed against a GASP-1 peptide identified by our 2-D HPLE technology. Using this antibody, we immunohistochemically detected over-expression of GASP-1 in all of 107 cases of archived ductal breast carcinoma tumor samples, while normal adjacent breast tissue from 12 cases of ductal carcinoma showed little or no staining. Additionally, all 10 cases of metastatic breast carcinoma present in lymph nodes were positive. Strong positive GASP-1 staining was observed in all tumor tissue including ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and invasive ductal carcinoma. Additionally, we observed a wide spectrum of enhanced staining of premalignant ductal epithelial cells present in benign ducts and those found in atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH). These studies identify GASP-1 as a potential new serum and tumor biomarker for breast cancer

  19. The G-protein coupled receptor associated sorting protein GASP-1 regulates the signalling and trafficking of the viral chemokine receptor US28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschische, Pia; Moser, Elisabeth; Thompson, Dawn; Vischer, Henry F; Parzmair, Gerald P; Pommer, Veronika; Platzer, Wolfgang; Schwarzbraun, Thomas; Schaider, Helmut; Smit, Martine J; Martini, Lene; Whistler, Jennifer L; Waldhoer, Maria

    2010-05-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) encodes the seven transmembrane(7TM)/G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) US28, which signals and endocytoses in a constitutive, ligand-independent manner. Here we show that, following endocytosis, US28 is targeted to the lysosomes for degradation as a consequence of its interaction with the GPCR-associated sorting protein-1 (GASP-1). We find that GASP-1 binds to US28 in vitro and that disruption of the GASP-1/US28 interaction by either (i) overexpression of dominant negative cGASP-1 or by (ii) shRNA knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 is sufficient to inhibit the lysosomal targeting of US28 and slow its post-endocytic degradation. Furthermore, we found that GASP-1 affects US28-mediated signalling. The knock-down of endogenous GASP-1 impairs the US28-mediated Galphaq/PLC/inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation as well as the activation of the transcription factors Nuclear Factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB). Overexpression of GASP-1 enhances both IP accumulation and transcription factor activity. Thus, GASP-1 is an important cellular determinant that not only regulates the post-endocytic trafficking of US28, but also regulates the signalling capacities of US28.

  20. Identification of a novel protein-protein interaction motif mediating interaction of GPCR-associated sorting proteins with G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornert, Olivier; Møller, Thor Christian; Boeuf, Julien

    2013-01-01

    GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward the degra......GPCR desensitization and down-regulation are considered key molecular events underlying the development of tolerance in vivo. Among the many regulatory proteins that are involved in these complex processes, GASP-1 have been shown to participate to the sorting of several receptors toward...... the degradation pathway. This protein belongs to the recently identified GPCR-associated sorting proteins (GASPs) family that comprises ten members for which structural and functional details are poorly documented. We present here a detailed structure-function relationship analysis of the molecular interaction...... between GASPs and a panel of GPCRs. In a first step, GST-pull down experiments revealed that all the tested GASPs display significant interactions with a wide range of GPCRs. Importantly, the different GASP members exhibiting the strongest interaction properties were also characterized by the presence...

  1. MW polyomavirus and STL polyomavirus present in tonsillar tissues from children with chronic tonsillar disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, J; Li, K; Zhang, C; Jin, Q

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to explore the frequency of all 13 human polyomaviruses (HPyVs), especially MW polyomavirus (MWPyV) and STL polyomavirus (STLPyV), in tonsillar tissues from Chinese children with chronic tonsillar disease. We examined 99 swabs from mucosal surfaces of palatine tonsils, in which six HPyVs were detected. MWPyV and STLPyV were each detected in two samples. This provides new evidence for the hypothesis that the lymphoid system may play a role in HPyV infection and persistence. We need to define their role in tonsillar disease in the future. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Exposing the Molecular Machinery of BK Polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B

    2016-04-05

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is an opportunistic pathogen that poses a serious threat to organ transplant recipients. In this issue of Structure, Hurdiss and colleagues' (Hurdiss et al., 2016) beautiful new high-resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of BKV provides a structural roadmap for the ongoing development of therapeutic antibodies and vaccines targeting this potentially deadly virus. The study also serves as a platform for exploring the basic biology of virion assembly and infectious entry.

  3. Polymerase chain reaction assay for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Graham, D L

    1991-05-01

    A polymerase chain reaction assay was developed for detection of budgerigar fledgling disease virus (BFDV). The assay used a single set of primers complementary to sequences located in the putative coding region for the BFDV VP1 gene. The observed amplification product had the expected size of 550 bp and was confirmed to derive from BFDV DNA by its restriction digestion pattern. This assay was specific for BFDV and highly sensitive, being able to detect as few as 20 copies of the virus. By using the polymerase chain reaction, BFDV was detected in adult, nestling, and embryo budgerigar (Melopsitticus undulatus) tissue DNAs and in sera from adult and nestling budgerigars. These results suggest the possibility of persistent infections in adult birds and lend further support to previously described evidence of possible in ovo transmission. BFDV was also detected in chicken embryo fibroblast cell cultures and chicken eggs inoculated with the virus. A 550-bp product with identical restriction enzyme sites was amplified from a suspected polyomavirus isolated from a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis pesonata) and from tissue DNA from a Hahn's macaw (Ara nobilis) and a sun conure (Aratinga solstitialis) with histological lesions suggestive of polyomavirus infection. These fragments also hybridized with a BFDV-derived probe, proving that they were derived from a polyomavirus very similar, if not identical, to BFDV.

  4. Detection and characterization of a novel polyomavirus in wild rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orba, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Nakamura, Ichiro; Ishii, Akihiro; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi

    2011-04-01

    To investigate polyomavirus infection in wild rodents, we analysed DNA samples from the spleens of 100 wild rodents from Zambia using a broad-spectrum PCR-based assay. A previously unknown polyomavirus genome was identified in a sample from a multimammate mouse (Mastomys species) and the entire viral genome of 4899 bp was subsequently sequenced. This viral genome contained potential ORFs for the capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3, and early proteins, small t antigen and large T antigen. Phylogenetic analysis showed that it was a novel member of the family Polyomaviridae, and thus the virus was tentatively named mastomys polyomavirus. After transfection of the viral genome into several mammalian cell lines, transient expression of the VP1 and large T antigen proteins was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunocytochemical analyses. Comparison of large T antigen function in mastomys polyomavirus with that in rhesus monkey polyomavirus SV40 and human polyomavirus JC virus revealed that the large T antigen from mastomys polyomavirus interacted with the tumour suppressor protein pRb, but not with p53.

  5. Biology, evolution, and medical importance of polyomaviruses: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Ugo; Krumbholz, Andi; Ehlers, Bernhard; Zell, Roland; Johne, Reimar; Calvignac-Spencer, Sébastien; Lauber, Chris

    2017-06-17

    The family Polyomaviridae encompasses non-enveloped viruses with a circular dsDNA genome that is typically approximately 5000bp in length. Originally isolated from mammals, polyomavirus sequences have now been detected in invertebrates, fish, amphibians, reptiles and birds, although it remains to be determined whether all these animals are genuine hosts. The genomes of all polyomaviruses encode at least two regulatory proteins (large and small tumour antigen) and two structural proteins (capsid proteins VP1 and VP2) whose functions have been defined. The large and small tumour antigens have domains conserved among the polyomaviruses, which are responsible for specific interactions with cellular proteins and may result in alteration of the cell cycle. Additional open reading frames (ORFs) are present in the genomes of the different polyomavirus species. Some of these ORFs are transcribed and translated in viral proteins, but their functions remain poorly understood. Polyomaviruses have a restricted host specificity. This may indicate that co-divergence with their hosts, which has been demonstrated in a few cases, was an important factor during polyomavirus diversification. However, a strict co-divergence scenario fails to explain family-wide patterns of diversity, suggesting an important contribution of lineage duplication and, possibly to a lesser extent, recombination and cross-species transmission. Polyomaviruses are pathogens that can cause various malignant and non-malignant diseases in birds and mammals, including humans, but so far they have not been linked to disease in lower vertebrates. In immunosuppressed individuals, reactivation of polyomavirus BK or JC can cause serious disease of the urogenital tract and brain, respectively, while Merkel cell polyomavirus is most probably associated with the development of a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin tumour in elderly or patients with pre-existing conditions. This review provides an update on the life

  6. Human exposure to bovine polyomavirus: a zoonosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, J.V.; Gardner, S.D.

    1986-01-01

    A competitive-type solid phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed for the detection of antibody to bovine polyomavirus. Comparison of RIA and counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) results on 273 cattle sera indicated that both techniques were detecting antibody of like specificity. Human sera from 256 blood donors, 219 people recently vaccinated against polio, rubella or rabies, 50 immunosuppressed patients and 472 people with various occupational exposure to cattle were tested for antibody to bovine polyomavirus, the foetal rhesus monkey kidney strain, (anti-FRKV) by RIA. Apart from one blood donor and one of 108 rabies vaccinees only those in close contact with cattle possessed anti-FRKV. Compared with 62 per cent seropositive in the natural hosts, cattle, 71 per cent of veterinary surgeons, 50 per cent of cattle farmers, 40 per cent of abattoir workers, 16 per cent of veterinary institute technical staff and 10 per cent of veterinary students were anti-FRKV positive. Our findings indicate that the theoretical hazard of FRKV infection from undetected contamination of current tissue culture derived vaccines may, in practice, be remote. Proposed wider use of primate kidney cells as substrates for new vaccines may increase this risk.

  7. Expression and purification of recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein and its interactions with polyomavirus proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Chang, D.; Rottinghaus, S.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Recombinant polyomavirus VP2 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448), using the recombinant expression system pFPYV2. Recombinant VP2 was purified to near homogeneity by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, electroelution, and Extracti-Gel chromatography. Polyclonal serum to this protein which reacted specifically with recombinant VP2 as well as polyomavirus virion VP2 and VP3 on Western blots (immunoblots) was produced. Purified VP2 was used to establish an in vitro protein-protein interaction assay with polyomavirus structural proteins and purified recombinant VP1. Recombinant VP2 interacted with recombinant VP1, virion VP1, and the four virion histones. Recombinant VP1 coimmunoprecipitated with recombinant VP2 or truncated VP2 (delta C12VP2), which lacked the carboxy-terminal 12 amino acids. These experiments confirmed the interaction between VP1 and VP2 and revealed that the carboxyterminal 12 amino acids of VP2 and VP3 were not necessary for formation of this interaction. In vivo VP1-VP2 interaction study accomplished by cotransfection of COS-7 cells with VP2 and truncated VP1 (delta N11VP1) lacking the nuclear localization signal demonstrated that VP2 was capable of translocating delta N11VP1 into the nucleus. These studies suggest that complexes of VP1 and VP2 may be formed in the cytoplasm and cotransported to the nucleus for virion assembly to occur.

  8. Sorting nexin 1 loss results in D5 dopamine receptor dysfunction in human renal proximal tubule cells and hypertension in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Jones, John Edward; Armando, Ines; Asico, Laureano D; Escano, Crisanto S; Lee, Hewang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yu; Pascua-Crusan, Annabelle M; Palmes-Saloma, Cynthia P; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-01-04

    The peripheral dopaminergic system plays a crucial role in blood pressure regulation through its actions on renal hemodynamics and epithelial ion transport. The dopamine D5 receptor (D(5)R) interacts with sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), a protein involved in receptor retrieval from the trans-Golgi network. In this report, we elucidated the spatial, temporal, and functional significance of this interaction in human renal proximal tubule cells and HEK293 cells stably expressing human D(5)R and in mice. Silencing of SNX1 expression via RNAi resulted in the failure of D(5)R to internalize and bind GTP, blunting of the agonist-induced increase in cAMP production and decrease in sodium transport, and up-regulation of angiotensin II receptor expression, of which expression was previously shown to be negatively regulated by D(5)R. Moreover, siRNA-mediated depletion of renal SNX1 in C57BL/6J and BALB/cJ mice resulted in increased blood pressure and blunted natriuretic response to agonist in salt-loaded BALB/cJ mice. These data demonstrate a crucial role for SNX1 in D(5)R trafficking and that SNX1 depletion results in D(5)R dysfunction and thus may represent a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of essential hypertension.

  9. Sorting choanoflagellates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Veronica I.; Miño, Gaston L.; Sparacino, Javier; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Condat, Carlos A.; Koehl, Mimi A. R.; King, Nicole; Stocker, Roman

    2015-03-01

    In freshwater environments, as well as in oceans, environmental conditions are in constant fluctuation. Some heterotrophic plankton must adapt their swimming behavior in order to survive under these conditions. In the case of the choanoflagellate, the closest animal ancestor, the ability to forage for food is given not only by its single flagellum, but also by its differentiation between fast and slow swimmers. The understanding of how these cells with different strategies to swim search for food can give us a better insight into how eukaryotes respond to different stimuli. In this work, we have designed a microfluidic device that sorts choanoflagellates by their speed. The optimal geometry was found by a numerical model using the experimentally determined motilities of each swimmer type.

  10. Sorting of ligand-activated epidermal growth factor receptor to lysosomes requires its actin-binding domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, W; Kerstens, S; Fritzsche, I; den Hartigh, JC; Oud, R; van der Heyden, MAG; Henegouwen, PMPVE

    2004-01-01

    Ligand-induced down-regulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) comprises activation of two sequential transport steps. The first involves endocytic uptake by clathrin-coated vesicles, the second transfer of endocytosed EGFR from endosomes to lysosomes. Here we demonstrate that the sec

  11. The trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus : infection, pathogenesis, evolution and adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazem, Siamaque

    2015-01-01

    Until a few years ago, only two human polyomaviruses (JC and BK) were known to infect humans and cause severe illness in immunocompromised hosts. Since 2007, at least eleven new polyomaviruses became known that infect humans. Among them is the polyomavirus associated with trichodysplasia spinulosa (

  12. A library of 7TM receptor C-terminal tails. Interactions with the proposed post-endocytic sorting proteins ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50), N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF), sorting nexin 1 (SNX1), and G protein-coupled receptor-associated sorting protein (GASP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Søndergaard, Birgitte P; Ersbøll, Bjarne

    2004-01-01

    Adaptor and scaffolding proteins determine the cellular targeting, the spatial, and thereby the functional association of G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors with co-receptors, transducers, and downstream effectors and the adaptors determine post-signaling events such as receptor sequ...

  13. Multiple pathways for vacuolar sorting of yeast proteinase A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphal, V; Marcusson, E G; Winther, Jakob R.

    1996-01-01

    The sorting of the yeast proteases proteinase A and carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole is a saturable, receptor-mediated process. Information sufficient for vacuolar sorting of the normally secreted protein invertase has in fusion constructs previously been found to reside in the propeptide...... of proteinase A. We found that sorting of such a hybrid protein is dependent on the vacuolar protein-sorting receptor Vps10p. This was unexpected, as strains disrupted for VPS10 sort more than 85% of the proteinase A to the vacuole. Consistent with a role for Vps10p in sorting of proteinase A, we found that 1...

  14. Trichodysplasia spinulosa-Associated Polyomavirus Uses a Displaced Binding Site on VP1 to Engage Sialylated Glycolipids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa J Ströh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated Polyomavirus (TSPyV was isolated from a patient suffering from trichodysplasia spinulosa, a skin disease that can appear in severely immunocompromised patients. While TSPyV is one of the five members of the polyomavirus family that are directly linked to a human disease, details about molecular recognition events, the viral entry pathway, and intracellular trafficking events during TSPyV infection remain unknown. Here we have used a structure-function approach to shed light on the first steps of TSPyV infection. We established by cell binding and pseudovirus infection studies that TSPyV interacts with sialic acids during attachment and/or entry. Subsequently, we solved high-resolution X-ray structures of the major capsid protein VP1 of TSPyV in complex with three different glycans, the branched GM1 glycan, and the linear trisaccharides α2,3- and α2,6-sialyllactose. The terminal sialic acid of all three glycans is engaged in a unique binding site on TSPyV VP1, which is positioned about 18 Å from established sialic acid binding sites of other polyomaviruses. Structure-based mutagenesis of sialic acid-binding residues leads to reduction in cell attachment and pseudovirus infection, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the TSPyV VP1-glycan interaction. Furthermore, treatments of cells with inhibitors of N-, O-linked glycosylation, and glycosphingolipid synthesis suggest that glycolipids play an important role during TSPyV infection. Our findings elucidate the first molecular recognition events of cellular infection with TSPyV and demonstrate that receptor recognition by polyomaviruses is highly variable not only in interactions with sialic acid itself, but also in the location of the binding site.

  15. Mortality due to polyomavirus infection in two nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroube, Ana Sofia; Halami, Mohammad Yahya; Johne, Reimar; Dorrestein, Gerry M

    2009-06-01

    Two nightjars (Caprimulgus europaeus) from a bird park in the Netherlands died suddenly, with no clinical signs, within 1 month of each other. The main pathologic findings at necropsy were splenomegaly and hepatic necrosis. On histologic examination, intranuclear viral inclusion bodies consistent with avian polyomavirus were observed in the liver, spleen, and kidneys. Polymerase chain reaction testing of samples from the liver, spleen, and kidneys detected avian polyomaviral DNA, and sequence analysis showed that the virus had a sequence homology of 99% to psittacine avian polyomavirus strains. To our knowledge, this is the first report of avian polyomavirus infection in the order Caprimulgiformes. Lovebirds (Agapornis species), which were housed near the nightjars, were considered as the possible source of infection.

  16. k -Bitonic sort

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高庆狮; 胡玥; 刘志勇

    1999-01-01

    A k-bitonic sort which generalizes the bitonic sort is proposed. The theorem of the bitonic sort, which merges two monotonic sequences into one order sequence, is extended into the theorem of k-bitonic sort. The k-bitonic sort merges K (=2k or 2k-1) monotonic sequences into one order sequence in steps, where k=[K/2] is an integer and k≥1. The k-bitonic sort is the Batcher’s bitonic sort when k=1.

  17. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn K White

    Full Text Available The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR. NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  18. Polyomavirus BK Neutralizing Activity in Human Immunoglobulin Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Parmjeet S; Schonder, Kristine; Shapiro, Ron; Farasati, Nousha; Huang, Yuchen

    2011-01-01

    Background Polyomavirus BK (BKV) infection can cause nephropathy in the allograft kidney. No well-established drug treatment is available at this time. Human intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) have been used as an empiric therapy without proof of effectiveness. Methods We tested five lots of commercially available IVIG preparations from two different suppliers for polyomavirus neutralizing activity. BKV and mouse polyomavirus were used to infect human and murine host cells, respectively, with or without prior treatment with IVIG. Neutralization activity was measured by quantitation of viral DNA after 7 days in culture. Results Coincubation of BKV but not mouse polyomavirus with clinically relevant concentrations of IVIG derived from healthy and hepatitis B vaccinated subjects caused more than 90% inhibition of viral DNA yield after 7 days in culture. Consistent with a direct neutralizing mechanism, this effect was significantly diminished if viral infection was performed in immunoglobulin pretreated cells or if immunoglobulin treatment was delayed 2 hr after addition of infectious virus. Conclusion Human IVIG preparations contain BKV neutralizing antibodies. Data on neutralizing capacity of these antibodies are presented to aid dose exploration in clinical trials seeking to validate the use of IVIG in patients with BKV infection. PMID:20568674

  19. ARF6 and GASP-1 are post-endocytic sorting proteins selectively involved in the intracellular trafficking of dopamine D₂ receptors mediated by GRK and PKC in transfected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, D I; Zheng, M; Min, C; Kwon, K J; Shin, C Y; Choi, H K; Kim, K M

    2013-03-01

    GPCRs undergo both homologous and heterologous regulatory processes in which receptor phosphorylation plays a critical role. The protein kinases responsible for each pathway are well established; however, other molecular details that characterize each pathway remain unclear. In this study, the molecular mechanisms that determine the differences in the functional roles and intracellular trafficking between homologous and PKC-mediated heterologous internalization pathways for the dopamine D₂ receptor were investigated. All of the S/T residues located within the intracellular loops of D₂ receptor were mutated, and the residues responsible for GRK- and PKC-mediated internalization were determined in HEK-293 cells and SH-SY5Y cells. The functional role of receptor internalization and the cellular components that determine the post-endocytic fate of internalized D₂ receptors were investigated in the transfected cells. T134, T225/S228/S229 and S325 were involved in PKC-mediated D₂ receptor desensitization. S229 and adjacent S/T residues mediated the PKC-dependent internalization of D₂ receptors, which induced down-regulation and desensitization. S/T residues within the second intracellular loop and T225 were the major residues involved in GRK-mediated internalization of D₂ receptors, which induced receptor resensitization. ARF6 mediated the recycling of D₂ receptors internalized in response to agonist stimulation. In contrast, GASP-1 mediated the down-regulation of D₂ receptors internalized in a PKC-dependent manner. GRK- and PKC-mediated internalizations of D₂ receptors occur through different intracellular trafficking pathways and mediate distinct functional roles. Distinct S/T residues within D₂ receptors and different sorting proteins are involved in the dissimilar regulation of D₂ receptors by GRK2 and PKC. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  20. ARF6 and GASP-1 are post-endocytic sorting proteins selectively involved in the intracellular trafficking of dopamine D2 receptors mediated by GRK and PKC in transfected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, DI; Zheng, M; Min, C; Kwon, KJ; Shin, CY; Choi, HK; Kim, KM

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose GPCRs undergo both homologous and heterologous regulatory processes in which receptor phosphorylation plays a critical role. The protein kinases responsible for each pathway are well established; however, other molecular details that characterize each pathway remain unclear. In this study, the molecular mechanisms that determine the differences in the functional roles and intracellular trafficking between homologous and PKC-mediated heterologous internalization pathways for the dopamine D2 receptor were investigated. Experimental Approach All of the S/T residues located within the intracellular loops of D2 receptor were mutated, and the residues responsible for GRK- and PKC-mediated internalization were determined in HEK-293 cells and SH-SY5Y cells. The functional role of receptor internalization and the cellular components that determine the post-endocytic fate of internalized D2 receptors were investigated in the transfected cells. Key Results T134, T225/S228/S229 and S325 were involved in PKC-mediated D2 receptor desensitization. S229 and adjacent S/T residues mediated the PKC-dependent internalization of D2 receptors, which induced down-regulation and desensitization. S/T residues within the second intracellular loop and T225 were the major residues involved in GRK-mediated internalization of D2 receptors, which induced receptor resensitization. ARF6 mediated the recycling of D2 receptors internalized in response to agonist stimulation. In contrast, GASP-1 mediated the down-regulation of D2 receptors internalized in a PKC-dependent manner. Conclusions and Implications GRK- and PKC-mediated internalizations of D2 receptors occur through different intracellular trafficking pathways and mediate distinct functional roles. Distinct S/T residues within D2 receptors and different sorting proteins are involved in the dissimilar regulation of D2 receptors by GRK2 and PKC. PMID:23082996

  1. What is a Sorting Function?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henglein, Fritz

    2009-01-01

    What is a sorting function—not a sorting function for a given ordering relation, but a sorting function with nothing given? Formulating four basic properties of sorting algorithms as defining requirements, we arrive at intrinsic notions of sorting and stable sorting: A function is a sorting...

  2. Depletion of CpG Dinucleotides in Papillomaviruses and Polyomaviruses: A Role for Divergent Evolutionary Pressures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohita Upadhyay

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are small ds-DNA viruses infecting a wide-range of vertebrate hosts. Evidence supporting co-evolution of the virus with the host does not fully explain the evolutionary path of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. Studies analyzing CpG dinucleotide frequencies in virus genomes have provided interesting insights on virus evolution. CpG dinucleotide depletion has not been extensively studied among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. We sought to analyze the relative abundance of dinucleotides and the relative roles of evolutionary pressures in papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses.We studied 127 full-length sequences from papillomaviruses and 56 full-length sequences from polyomaviruses. We analyzed the relative abundance of dinucleotides, effective codon number (ENC, differences in synonymous codon usage. We examined the association, if any, between the extent of CpG dinucleotide depletion and the evolutionary lineage of the infected host. We also investigated the contribution of mutational pressure and translational selection to the evolution of papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses.All papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses are CpG depleted. Interestingly, the evolutionary lineage of the infected host determines the extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses. CpG dinucleotide depletion was more pronounced among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses infecting human and other mammals as compared to those infecting birds. Our findings demonstrate that CpG depletion among papillomaviruses is linked to mutational pressure; while CpG depletion among polyomaviruses is linked to translational selection. We also present evidence that suggests methylation of CpG dinucleotides may explain, at least in part, the depletion of CpG dinucleotides among papillomaviruses but not polyomaviruses.The extent of CpG depletion among papillomaviruses and polyomaviruses is linked to the evolutionary lineage of the

  3. Parallel sorting algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Akl, Selim G

    1985-01-01

    Parallel Sorting Algorithms explains how to use parallel algorithms to sort a sequence of items on a variety of parallel computers. The book reviews the sorting problem, the parallel models of computation, parallel algorithms, and the lower bounds on the parallel sorting problems. The text also presents twenty different algorithms, such as linear arrays, mesh-connected computers, cube-connected computers. Another example where algorithm can be applied is on the shared-memory SIMD (single instruction stream multiple data stream) computers in which the whole sequence to be sorted can fit in the

  4. Polyomaviruses KI and WU in immunocompromised patients with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourez, Thomas; Bergeron, Anne; Ribaud, Patricia; Scieux, Catherine; de Latour, Régis Peffault; Tazi, Abdellatif; Socié, Gérard; Simon, François; LeGoff, Jérôme

    2009-01-01

    Polyomaviruses KI (KIPyV) and WU (WUPyV) were recently identified, mainly in respiratory specimens from children. Among 200 patients with respiratory disorders admitted to Saint Louis Hospital, Paris, France, KIPyV was detected in 8% and WUPyV in 1%. KIPyV was significantly more frequent among human stem cell transplant patients (17.8% vs. 5.1%; p = 0.01).

  5. Role of Human Polyomavirus Bkv in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    been surgically removed due to prostate cancer diagnosis . A normal prostate is defined as prostate that has been removed either during autopsy or by...immunosuppressed transplant patients, in whom it is associated with haemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus nephropathy (5, 35, 58, 70). BKV transforms rodent cells...cystoprostatectomy specimens from bladder cancer patients with the diagnosis of muscle invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma, with no prostate cancer histology

  6. Sorting a distribution theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmoud, Hosam M

    2011-01-01

    A cutting-edge look at the emerging distributional theory of sorting Research on distributions associated with sorting algorithms has grown dramatically over the last few decades, spawning many exact and limiting distributions of complexity measures for many sorting algorithms. Yet much of this information has been scattered in disparate and highly specialized sources throughout the literature. In Sorting: A Distribution Theory, leading authority Hosam Mahmoud compiles, consolidates, and clarifies the large volume of available research, providing a much-needed, comprehensive treatment of the

  7. Individual cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovel, R T; Sweet, R G

    1979-01-01

    Current cell sorting machines do not preserve the individual identity of processed cells; after analysis, the cells are assigned to a subpopulation where they are pooled with other similar cells. This paper reports progress on a system that sorts cells individually to precise locations on a microscope slide and preserves them for further observation with a light microscope while recording flow measurement data for each cell. Various electronic and mechanical modifications to an existing sorting machine are described that increase drop placement accuracy and permit individual cell sorting.

  8. Designing sorting networks

    CERN Document Server

    Baddar, Sherenaz W Al-Haj

    2012-01-01

    Designing Sorting Networks: A New Paradigm provides an in-depth guide to maximizing the efficiency of sorting networks, and uses 0/1 cases, partially ordered sets and Haase diagrams to closely analyze their behavior in an easy, intuitive manner. This book also outlines new ideas and techniques for designing faster sorting networks using Sortnet, and illustrates how these techniques were used to design faster 12-key and 18-key sorting networks through a series of case studies. Finally, it examines and explains the mysterious behavior exhibited by the fastest-known 9-step 16-key network. Designi

  9. High prevalence of antibodies against polyomavirus WU, polyomavirus KI, and human bocavirus in German blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opitz Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA of the polyomaviruses WU (WUPyV and KI (KIPyV and of human bocavirus (HBoV has been detected with varying frequency in respiratory tract samples of children. However, only little is known about the humoral immune response against these viruses. Our aim was to establish virus-specific serological assays and to determine the prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG against these three viruses in the general population. Methods The capsid proteins VP1 of WUPyV and KIPyV and VP2 of HBoV were cloned into baculovirus vectors and expressed in Sf9 insect cells. IgG antibodies against WUPyV VP1, KIPyV VP1, and HBoV VP2 were determined by immunofluorescence assays in 100 plasma samples of blood donors. Results The median age of the blood donors was 31 years (range 20 - 66 yrs, 52% were male. 89% of the samples were positive for WUPyV IgG (median age 31 yrs, 49.4% male, 67% were positive for KIPyV IgG (median age 32 yrs, 46.3% male, and 76% were positive for HBoV IgG (median age 32 yrs, 51.3% male. For WUPyV and HBoV, there were no significant differences of the seropositivity rates with respect to age groups or gender. For KIPyV, the seropositivity rate increased significantly from 59% in the age group 20 - 29 years to 100% in the age group > 50 years. Conclusions High prevalences of antibodies against WUPyV, KIPyV, and HBoV were found in plasma samples of healthy adults. The results indicate that primary infection with these viruses occurs during childhood or youth. For KIPyV, the seropositivity appears to increase further during adulthood.

  10. Sorting out Downside Beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); P. van Vliet (Pim); S.D. Lansdorp (Simon)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractDownside risk, when properly defined and estimated, helps to explain the cross-section of US stock returns. Sorting stocks by a proper estimate of downside market beta leads to a substantially larger cross-sectional spread in average returns than sorting on regular market beta. This

  11. Cell sorting in development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krens, S F Gabby; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2011-01-01

    During the development of multicellular organisms, cell fate specification is followed by the sorting of different cell types into distinct domains from where the different tissues and organs are formed. Cell sorting involves both the segregation of a mixed population of cells with different fates and properties into distinct domains, and the active maintenance of their segregated state. Because of its biological importance and apparent resemblance to fluid segregation in physics, cell sorting was extensively studied by both biologists and physicists over the last decades. Different theories were developed that try to explain cell sorting on the basis of the physical properties of the constituent cells. However, only recently the molecular and cellular mechanisms that control the physical properties driving cell sorting, have begun to be unraveled. In this review, we will provide an overview of different cell-sorting processes in development and discuss how these processes can be explained by the different sorting theories, and how these theories in turn can be connected to the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving these processes.

  12. Newly described human polyomaviruses Merkel Cell, KI and WU are present in urban sewage and may represent potential environmental contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carratala Anna

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently, three new polyomaviruses (KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomavirus have been reported to infect humans. It has also been suggested that lymphotropic polyomavirus, a virus of simian origin, infects humans. KI and WU polyomaviruses have been detected mainly in specimens from the respiratory tract while Merkel cell polyomavirus has been described in a very high percentage of Merkel cell carcinomas. The distribution, excretion level and transmission routes of these viruses remain unknown. Here we analyzed the presence and characteristics of newly described human polyomaviruses in urban sewage and river water in order to assess the excretion level and the potential role of water as a route of transmission of these viruses. Nested-PCR assays were designed for the sensitive detection of the viruses studied and the amplicons obtained were confirmed by sequencing analysis. The viruses were concentrated following a methodology previously developed for the detection of JC and BK human polyomaviruses in environmental samples. JC polyomavirus and human adenoviruses were used as markers of human contamination in the samples. Merkel cell polyomavirus was detected in 7/8 urban sewage samples collected and in 2/7 river water samples. Also one urine sample from a pregnant woman, out of 4 samples analyzed, was positive for this virus. KI and WU polyomaviruses were identified in 1/8 and 2/8 sewage samples respectively. The viral strains detected were highly homologous with other strains reported from several other geographical areas. Lymphotropic polyomavirus was not detected in any of the 13 sewage neither in 9 biosolid/sludge samples analyzed. This is the first description of a virus isolated from sewage and river water with a strong association with cancer. Our data indicate that the Merkel cell polyomavirus is prevalent in the population and that it may be disseminated through the fecal/urine contamination of water. The procedure developed may

  13. Polyomavirus and Naturally Occuring Neuroglial Tumors in Raccoons (Procyon Lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Patricia A; Brostoff, Terza; Church, Molly E; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Polyomavirus (PyV) infections are widespread in human populations and, although generally associated with silent persistence, rarely cause severe disease. Among diseases convincingly associated with natural PyV infections of humans, there are remarkably different tissue tropisms and outcomes, including progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, transient or progressive nephropathy, and cancer. The variable character and unpredictable outcomes of infection attest to large gaps in our basic understanding of PyV biology. In particular, the rich history of research demonstrating the oncogenic potential of PyVs in laboratory animals begs the question of why cancer is not more often associated with infection. Raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV), discovered in 2010, is consistently identified in neuroglial tumors in free-ranging raccoons in the western United States. Exposure to RacPyV is widespread, and RacPyV is detected in tissues of raccoons without tumors. Studying the relationship of RacPyV with its natural host is a unique opportunity to uncover cogent cellular targets and protein interactions between the virus and its host. Our hypothesis is that RacPyV, as an intact episome, alters cellular pathways within neural progenitor cells and drives oncogenesis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Characterization of the DNA binding properties of polyomavirus capsid protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D.; Cai, X.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    The DNA binding properties of the polyomavirus structural proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3 were studied by Southwestern analysis. The major viral structural protein VP1 and host-contributed histone proteins of polyomavirus virions were shown to exhibit DNA binding activity, but the minor capsid proteins VP2 and VP3 failed to bind DNA. The N-terminal first five amino acids (Ala-1 to Lys-5) were identified as the VP1 DNA binding domain by genetic and biochemical approaches. Wild-type VP1 expressed in Escherichia coli (RK1448) exhibited DNA binding activity, but the N-terminal truncated VP1 mutants (lacking Ala-1 to Lys-5 and Ala-1 to Cys-11) failed to bind DNA. The synthetic peptide (Ala-1 to Cys-11) was also shown to have an affinity for DNA binding. Site-directed mutagenesis of the VP1 gene showed that the point mutations at Pro-2, Lys-3, and Arg-4 on the VP1 molecule did not affect DNA binding properties but that the point mutation at Lys-5 drastically reduced DNA binding affinity. The N-terminal (Ala-1 to Lys-5) region of VP1 was found to be essential and specific for DNA binding, while the DNA appears to be non-sequence specific. The DNA binding domain and the nuclear localization signal are located in the same N-terminal region.

  15. Layers in sorting practices: Sorting out patients with potential cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Naja Holten; Bjørn, Pernille

    2011-01-01

    mechanism, but is handled by informal sorting mechanisms. We identify two informal sorting mechanisms with large impact on the sorting practices, namely subtle categorizing and collective remembering. These informal sorting mechanisms have implications for the design of electronic booking systems because...

  16. LazySorted: A Lazily, Partially Sorted Python List

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naftali Harris

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available LazySorted is a Python C extension implementing a partially and lazily sorted list data structure. It solves a common problem faced by programmers, in which they need just part of a sorted list, like its middle element (the median, but sort the entire list to get it. LazySorted presents them with the abstraction that they are working with a fully sorted list, while actually only sorting the list partially with quicksort partitions to return the requested sub-elements. This enables programmers to use naive "sort first" algorithms but nonetheless attain linear run-times when possible. LazySorted may serve as a drop-in replacement for the built-in sorted function in most cases, and can sometimes achieve run-times more than 7 times faster.

  17. Rapid detection of trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus in skin biopsy specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Paulo Roberto P; Pannuti, Cláudio Sérgio; Pierrotti, Ligia C; David-Neto, Elias; Romano, Camila Malta

    2014-07-24

    Trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV) is responsible for a rare skin cancer. Using metagenomic approaches, we determined the complete genome sequence of a TSV first detected in Brazil in spicules of an immunocompromised patient suspected to have trichodysplasia spinulosa.

  18. Review on the Relationship between Human Polyomaviruses-Associated Tumors and Host Immune System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Delbue

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The polyomaviruses are small DNA viruses that can establish latency in the human host. The name polyomavirus is derived from the Greek roots poly-, which means “many,” and -oma, which means “tumours.” These viruses were originally isolated in mouse (mPyV and in monkey (SV40. In 1971, the first human polyomaviruses BK and JC were isolated and subsequently demonstrated to be ubiquitous in the human population. To date, at least nine members of the Polyomaviridae family have been identified, some of them playing an etiological role in malignancies in immunosuppressed patients. Here, we describe the biology of human polyomaviruses, their nonmalignant and malignant potentials ability, and their relationship with the host immune response.

  19. Sorting Plastic Waste in Hydrocyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestas Šutinys

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents material about sorting plastic waste in hydrocyclone. The tests on sorting plastic waste were carried out. Also, the findings received from the performed experiment on the technology of sorting plastic waste are interpreted applying an experimental model of the equipment used for sorting plastics of different density.Article in Lithuanian

  20. Ready, steady, SORT!

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    The selective or ecological sorting of waste is already second nature to many of us and concerns us all. As the GS Department's new awareness-raising campaign reminds us, everything we do to sort waste contributes to preserving the environment.    Placemats printed on recycled paper using vegetable-based ink will soon be distributed in Restaurant No.1.   Environmental protection is never far from the headlines, and CERN has a responsibility to ensure that the 3000 tonnes and more of waste it produces every year are correctly and selectively sorted. Materials can be given a second life through recycling and re-use, thereby avoiding pollution from landfill sites and incineration plants and saving on processing costs. The GS Department is launching a new poster campaign designed to raise awareness of the importance of waste sorting and recycling. "After conducting a survey to find out whether members of the personnel were prepared to make an effort to sort a...

  1. Discovery of a new human polyomavirus associated with trichodysplasia spinulosa in an immunocompromized patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els van der Meijden

    Full Text Available The Polyomaviridae constitute a family of small DNA viruses infecting a variety of hosts. In humans, polyomaviruses can cause infections of the central nervous system, urinary tract, skin, and possibly the respiratory tract. Here we report the identification of a new human polyomavirus in plucked facial spines of a heart transplant patient with trichodysplasia spinulosa, a rare skin disease exclusively seen in immunocompromized patients. The trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSV genome was amplified through rolling-circle amplification and consists of a 5232-nucleotide circular DNA organized similarly to known polyomaviruses. Two putative "early" (small and large T antigen and three putative "late" (VP1, VP2, VP3 genes were identified. The TSV large T antigen contains several domains (e.g. J-domain and motifs (e.g. HPDKGG, pRb family-binding, zinc finger described for other polyomaviruses and potentially involved in cellular transformation. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship of TSV with the Bornean orangutan polyomavirus and, more distantly, the Merkel cell polyomavirus that is found integrated in Merkel cell carcinomas of the skin. The presence of TSV in the affected patient's skin was confirmed by newly designed quantitative TSV-specific PCR, indicative of a viral load of 10(5 copies per cell. After topical cidofovir treatment, the lesions largely resolved coinciding with a reduction in TSV load. PCR screening demonstrated a 4% prevalence of TSV in an unrelated group of immunosuppressed transplant recipients without apparent disease. In conclusion, a new human polyomavirus was discovered and identified as the possible cause of trichodysplasia spinulosa in immunocompromized patients. The presence of TSV also in clinically unaffected individuals suggests frequent virus transmission causing subclinical, probably latent infections. Further studies have to reveal the impact of TSV infection in relation to other

  2. Flow sorting in aquatic ecology

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus Reckermann

    2000-01-01

    Flow sorting can be a very helpful tool in revealing phytoplankton and bacterial community structure and elaborating specific physiological parameters of isolated species. Droplet sorting has been the most common technique. Despite the high optical and hydro-dynamic stress for the cells to be sorted, many species grow in culture subsequent to sorting. To date, flow sorting has been applied to post-incubation separation in natural water samples to account for group-specific physiological param...

  3. Sorting by Recursive Partitioning,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    asymptotic time-complexity. This paper has the following main parts: First, a Pidgin -Algol version of the algorithm is presented and we discuss the main...those sorted subsets e) end "UsingBin*; end "AdaptSorting. 4 "Figure 1: A condensed Pidgin -Algol version of Adaptsort eiFor some conditions that we will...algorithm which have to be completed in either linear or constant times (these required critical times appear as comments in the Pidgin -Algol version

  4. Wage Sorting Trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jesper; Vejlin, Rune Majlund; Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke

    Using a population-wide Danish Matched Employer-Employee panel from 1980-2006, we document a strong trend towards more positive assortative wage sorting. The correlation between worker and firm fixed effects estimated from a log wage regression increases from -0.07 in 1981 to .14 in 2001. The non......Using a population-wide Danish Matched Employer-Employee panel from 1980-2006, we document a strong trend towards more positive assortative wage sorting. The correlation between worker and firm fixed effects estimated from a log wage regression increases from -0.07 in 1981 to .14 in 2001...

  5. JC Polyomavirus (JCV and Monoclonal Antibodies: Friends or Potential Foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Antonia Diotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS, observed in immunodeficient patients and caused by JC virus ((JCV, also called JC polyomavirus (JCPyV. After the HIV pandemic and the introduction of immunomodulatory therapy, the PML incidence significantly increased. The correlation between the use of natalizumab, a drug used in multiple sclerosis (MS, and the PML development of particular relevance. The high incidence of PML in natalizumab-treated patients has highlighted the importance of two factors: the need of PML risk stratification among natalizumab-treated patients and the need of effective therapeutic options. In this review, we discuss these two needs under the light of the major viral models of PML etiopathogenesis.

  6. Gender Differences in Sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlino, Luca Paolo; Parrotta, Pierpaolo; Pozzoli, Dario

    In this paper, we investigate the sorting of workers in firms to understand gender gaps in labor market outcomes. Using Danish employer-employee matched data, we fiend strong evidence of glass ceilings in certain firms, especially after motherhood, preventing women from climbing the career ladder...

  7. Protein Sorting Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Many computational methods are available for predicting protein sorting in bacteria. When comparing them, it is important to know that they can be grouped into three fundamentally different approaches: signal-based, global-property-based and homology-based prediction. In this chapter, the strengths...

  8. Sorting and sustaining cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikander, Nick

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at cooperation in teams where some people are selfish and others are conditional cooperators, and where lay-offs will occur at a fixed future date. I show that the best way to sustain cooperation prior to the lay-offs is often in a sorting equilibrium, where conditional cooperato...

  9. Det sorte USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndal, Jørn

    Bogen gennemgår det sorte USAs historie fra 1776 til 2016, idet grundtemaet er spændingsforholdet mellem USAs grundlæggelsesidealer og den racemæssige praksis, et spændingsforhold som Gunnar Myrdal kaldte "det amerikanske dilemma." Bogen, der er opbygget som politisk, social og racemæssig historie...

  10. Online Sorted Range Reporting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Greve, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We study the following one-dimensional range reporting problem: On an arrayA of n elements, support queries that given two indices i ≤ j and an integerk report the k smallest elements in the subarray A[i..j] in sorted order. We present a data structure in the RAM model supporting such queries in ...

  11. Activity-Dependent Ubiquitination of GluA1 and GluA2 Regulates AMPA Receptor Intracellular Sorting and Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Jocelyn Widagdo; Ye Jin Chai; Margreet C. Ridder; Yu Qian Chau; Richard C. Johnson; Pankaj Sah; Richard L. Huganir; Victor Anggono

    2015-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) have recently been shown to undergo post-translational ubiquitination in mammalian neurons. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and remain controversial. Here, we report that all four AMPAR subunits (GluA1-4) are rapidly ubiquitinated upon brief application of AMPA or bicuculline in cultured neurons. This process is Ca2+ dependent and requires the activity of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II. The ...

  12. Genotypic diversity of polyomaviruses circulating among kidney transplant recipients in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chehadeh, Wassim; Nampoory, Mangalathillam Raman

    2013-09-01

    BK virus (BKV) and JC virus (JCV) are human polyomaviruses that cause asymptomatic latent infections. Under immunosuppression, BKV-associated nephropathy has been documented in Kuwait and elsewhere. Even though different BKV and JCV genotypes with distinct geographical distribution have been described, the genotype of polyomavirus detected in Kuwait is still unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypes of BKV and JCV detected in renal transplant recipients. The detection of polyomavirus DNA was carried out in serum and urine samples of 200 post-transplant recipients during a 1-year follow-up period. Fifty-one (25.5%) post-transplant recipients were tested positive for polyomavirus DNA by semi-nested PCR. JCV DNA could be detected in 29 (57%) patients, and BKV DNA in 22 (43%) patients. In two renal transplant recipients, both BKV and JCV were detected. According to the Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of polyomavirus VP1 sequences, the majority of detected BKV sequences were most closely related to genotypes I and IV, whereas the majority of JCV sequences were most closely related to genotype 3. Polyomavirus VP1 sequences showed strong stability for up to 12 months in most patients; however, in one patient, an amino acid substitution in the BKV VP1 protein was identified over time. The results suggest a close relationship of BKV sequences with the Asian and European strains, and of JCV sequences with the African strains. Long follow-up studies are needed to investigate the association of polyomavirus polymorphism or genotypic shift with the development of nephropathy.

  13. K-sort: A new sorting algorithm that beats Heap sort for n <= 70 lakhs!

    CERN Document Server

    Sundararajan, Kiran Kumar; Chakraborty, Soubhik; Mahanti, N C

    2011-01-01

    Sundararajan and Chakraborty (2007) introduced a new version of Quick sort removing the interchanges. Khreisat (2007) found this algorithm to be competing well with some other versions of Quick sort. However, it uses an auxiliary array thereby increasing the space complexity. Here, we provide a second version of our new sort where we have removed the auxiliary array. This second improved version of the algorithm, which we call K-sort, is found to sort elements faster than Heap sort for an appreciably large array size (n <= 70,00,000) for uniform U[0, 1] inputs.

  14. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  15. Chip-based droplet sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham; Hatch, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    A non-contact system for sorting monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets in a microfluidic device based on the droplet's contents and their interaction with an applied electromagnetic field or by identification and sorting.

  16. Heideggers sorte arv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren Gosvig

    2015-01-01

    Martin Heidegger var antisemit, men er hans tænkning og intellektuelle arv det også? Søren Gosvig Olesen opsøger den store tyske tænkers arvinger og bindene fra 1938-48 i Heideggers efterladte ’Sorte hæfter’, hvor den lille mands meninger blander sig med en stor tænkers tanker......Martin Heidegger var antisemit, men er hans tænkning og intellektuelle arv det også? Søren Gosvig Olesen opsøger den store tyske tænkers arvinger og bindene fra 1938-48 i Heideggers efterladte ’Sorte hæfter’, hvor den lille mands meninger blander sig med en stor tænkers tanker...

  17. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-05-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation.

  18. Simultaneous BK Polyomavirus (BKPyV)-associated nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis after living donor kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helanterä, Ilkka; Hirsch, Hans H; Wernli, Marion; Ortiz, Fernanda; Lempinen, Marko; Räisänen-Sokolowski, Anne; Auvinen, Eeva; Mannonen, Laura; Lautenschlager, Irmeli

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) commonly reactivates after kidney transplantation, and can cause polyomavirus-associated nephropathy (PyVAN), whereas after allogeneic stem cell transplantation the most frequent manifestation of BKPyV is polyomavirus-associated hemorrhagic cystitis (PyVHC). Despite high-level BKPyV replication in both, the pathogenesis and manifestation of both BKPyV entities appears to differ substantially. We describe an unusual case of simultaneous PyVAN and PyVHC presenting with acute symptoms in a BKPyV-IgG positive recipient eight months after kidney transplantation from a haploidentical living donor, who was BKPyV-IgG negative. Symptoms of cystitis and viremia subsided rapidly after reduction of immunosuppression.

  19. Identification of a novel cetacean polyomavirus from a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) with Tracheobronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Simon J; St Leger, Judy A; Navarrete-Macias, Isamara; Nilson, Erica; Sanchez-Leon, Maria; Liang, Eliza; Seimon, Tracie; Jain, Komal; Karesh, William; Daszak, Peter; Briese, Thomas; Lipkin, W Ian

    2013-01-01

    A female short-beaked common dolphin calf was found stranded in San Diego, California in October 2010, presenting with multifocal ulcerative lesions in the trachea and bronchi. Viral particles suggestive of polyomavirus were detected by EM, and subsequently confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Full genome sequencing (Ion Torrent) revealed a circular dsDNA genome of 5,159 bp that was shown to form a distinct lineage within the genus Polyomavirus based on phylogenetic analysis of the early and late transcriptomes. Viral infection and distribution in laryngeal mucosa was characterised using in-situ hybridisation, and apoptosis observed in the virus-infected region. These results demonstrate that polyomaviruses can be associated with respiratory disease in cetaceans, and expand our knowledge of their diversity and clinical significance in marine mammals.

  20. Identification of a novel cetacean polyomavirus from a common dolphin (Delphinus delphis with Tracheobronchitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J Anthony

    Full Text Available A female short-beaked common dolphin calf was found stranded in San Diego, California in October 2010, presenting with multifocal ulcerative lesions in the trachea and bronchi. Viral particles suggestive of polyomavirus were detected by EM, and subsequently confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Full genome sequencing (Ion Torrent revealed a circular dsDNA genome of 5,159 bp that was shown to form a distinct lineage within the genus Polyomavirus based on phylogenetic analysis of the early and late transcriptomes. Viral infection and distribution in laryngeal mucosa was characterised using in-situ hybridisation, and apoptosis observed in the virus-infected region. These results demonstrate that polyomaviruses can be associated with respiratory disease in cetaceans, and expand our knowledge of their diversity and clinical significance in marine mammals.

  1. Receptorligand sorting along the endocytic pathway

    CERN Document Server

    Linderman, Jennifer J

    1989-01-01

    This research monograph focuses on a biomolecular separation process that occurs within most cells. Two types of molecules, receptors and ligands, are separated and routed along different intracellular pathways; this is a critical step in the process of receptor-mediated endocytosis. The development of an understanding of the basic mechanisms of this separation process is presented, with an emphasis on discovering the fundamental and measurable parameters that influence the event. Mathematical models of sorting are evaluated to predict the range of possible outcomes. These are compared with a variety of experimental data on different receptor/ligand systems. In addition, the influence of the separation on overall receptor/ligand processing dynamics is discussed. The book is intended for both biomathematicians and biologists. It is not necessary to understand the details of the model equations and their solution in order to test the models experimentally. The analysis suggests experiments that might be done to...

  2. JC polyomavirus mutants escape antibody-mediated neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Upasana; Cinque, Paola; Gerevini, Simonetta; Longo, Valeria; Lazzarin, Adriano; Schippling, Sven; Martin, Roland; Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V

    2015-09-23

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) persistently infects the urinary tract of most adults. Under conditions of immune impairment, JCV causes an opportunistic brain disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV strains found in the cerebrospinal fluid of PML patients contain distinctive mutations in surface loops of the major capsid protein, VP1. We hypothesized that VP1 mutations might allow the virus to evade antibody-mediated neutralization. Consistent with this hypothesis, neutralization serology revealed that plasma samples from PML patients neutralized wild-type JCV strains but failed to neutralize patient-cognate PML-mutant JCV strains. This contrasted with serological results for healthy individuals, most of whom robustly cross-neutralized all tested JCV variants. Mice administered a JCV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine initially showed neutralizing "blind spots" (akin to those observed in PML patients) that closed after booster immunization. A PML patient administered an experimental JCV VLP vaccine likewise showed markedly increased neutralizing titer against her cognate PML-mutant JCV. The results indicate that deficient humoral immunity is a common aspect of PML pathogenesis and that vaccination may overcome this humoral deficiency. Thus, vaccination with JCV VLPs might prevent the development of PML.

  3. Efficient propagation of archetype BK and JC polyomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekema, Nicole M; Imperiale, Michael J

    2012-01-20

    BKPyV and JCPyV are closely related, ubiquitous human pathogens that cause disease in immunocompromised patients. The DNA sequence of the regulatory regions distinguishes two forms of these viruses, designated archetype and rearranged. Although cell culture systems exist for rearranged BKPyV and JCPyV, currently there is no robust cell culture system to study the archetype viruses. Large T antigen (TAg) is a virally encoded protein required to initiate viral DNA synthesis. Because archetype virus produces undetectable levels of TAg, we hypothesized that TAg overexpression would stimulate archetype virus replication. Efficient propagation of the archetype forms of BKPyV and JCPyV was observed in 293TT cells, human embryonic kidney cells overexpressing SV40 TAg. Importantly, the archetypal structure of the regulatory region was maintained during viral growth. Significant replication was not observed for Merkel cell, KI, or WU polyomaviruses. 293TT cells provide a means of propagating archetype BKPyV and JCPyV for detailed study.

  4. Molecular Networks Involved in the Immune Control of BK Polyomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Girmanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%–80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%–10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n=11, infected asymptomatic patients (n=9, and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n=10. Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI (P<0.05, and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P<0.05. Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  5. Molecular networks involved in the immune control of BK polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girmanova, Eva; Brabcova, Irena; Klema, Jiri; Hribova, Petra; Wohlfartova, Mariana; Skibova, Jelena; Viklicky, Ondrej

    2012-01-01

    BK polyomavirus infection is the important cause of virus-related nephropathy following kidney transplantation. BK virus reactivates in 30%-80% of kidney transplant recipients resulting in BK virus-related nephropathy in 1%-10% of cases. Currently, the molecular processes associated with asymptomatic infections in transplant patients infected with BK virus remain unclear. In this study we evaluate intrarenal molecular processes during different stages of BKV infection. The gene expression profiles of 90 target genes known to be associated with immune response were evaluated in kidney graft biopsy material using TaqMan low density array. Three patient groups were examined: control patients with no evidence of BK virus reactivation (n = 11), infected asymptomatic patients (n = 9), and patients with BK virus nephropathy (n = 10). Analysis of biopsies from asymptomatic viruria patients resulted in the identification of 5 differentially expressed genes (CD3E, CD68, CCR2, ICAM-1, and SKI) (P < 0.05), and functional analysis showed a significantly heightened presence of costimulatory signals (e.g., CD40/CD40L; P < 0.05). Gene ontology analysis revealed several biological networks associated with BKV immune control in comparison to the control group. This study demonstrated that asymptomatic BK viruria is associated with a different intrarenal regulation of several genes implicating in antiviral immune response.

  6. Sortilin regulates sorting and secretion of Sonic hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Charles; Beug, Shawn; Nickerson, Philip E B; Peng, Jimmy; Mazerolle, Chantal; Bassett, Erin A; Ringuette, Randy; Jama, Fadumo A; Morales, Carlos; Christ, Annabel; Wallace, Valerie A

    2016-10-15

    Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) is a secreted morphogen that is an essential regulator of patterning and growth. The Shh full-length protein undergoes autocleavage in the endoplasmic reticulum to generate the biologically active N-terminal fragment (ShhN), which is destined for secretion. We identified sortilin (Sort1), a member of the VPS10P-domain receptor family, as a new Shh trafficking receptor. We demonstrate that Sort-Shh interact by performing coimmunoprecipitation and proximity ligation assays in transfected cells and that they colocalize at the Golgi. Sort1 overexpression causes re-distribution of ShhN and, to a lesser extent, of full-length Shh to the Golgi and reduces Shh secretion. We show loss of Sort1 can partially rescue Hedgehog-associated patterning defects in a mouse model that is deficient in Shh processing, and we show that Sort1 levels negatively regulate anterograde Shh transport in axons in vitro and Hedgehog-dependent axon-glial interactions in vivo Taken together, we conclude that Shh and Sort1 can interact at the level of the Golgi and that Sort1 directs Shh away from the pathways that promote its secretion.

  7. Spin-the-bottle Sort and Annealing Sort: Oblivious Sorting via Round-robin Random Comparisons

    CERN Document Server

    Goodrich, Michael T

    2010-01-01

    We study sorting algorithms based on randomized round-robin comparisons. Specifically, we study Spin-the-bottle sort, where comparisons are unrestricted, and Annealing sort, where comparisons are restricted to a distance bounded by a \\emph{temperature} parameter. Both algorithms are simple, randomized, data-oblivious sorting algorithms, which are useful in privacy-preserving computations, but, as we show, Annealing sort is much more efficient. We show that there is an input permutation that causes Spin-the-bottle sort to require $\\Omega(n^2\\log n)$ expected time in order to succeed, and that in $O(n^2\\log n)$ time this algorithm succeeds with high probability for any input. We also show there is an implementation of Annealing sort that runs in $O(n\\log n)$ time and succeeds with very high probability.

  8. Spin-the-bottle Sort and Annealing Sort: Oblivious Sorting via Round-robin Random Comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Michael T

    2014-03-01

    We study sorting algorithms based on randomized round-robin comparisons. Specifically, we study Spin-the-bottle sort, where comparisons are unrestricted, and Annealing sort, where comparisons are restricted to a distance bounded by a temperature parameter. Both algorithms are simple, randomized, data-oblivious sorting algorithms, which are useful in privacy-preserving computations, but, as we show, Annealing sort is much more efficient. We show that there is an input permutation that causes Spin-the-bottle sort to require Ω(n(2) log n) expected time in order to succeed, and that in O(n(2) log n) time this algorithm succeeds with high probability for any input. We also show there is a specification of Annealing sort that runs in O(n log n) time and succeeds with very high probability.

  9. Deductive sort and climbing sort: new methods for non-dominated sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClymont, Kent; Keedwell, Ed

    2012-01-01

    In recent years an increasing number of real-world many-dimensional optimisation problems have been identified across the spectrum of research fields. Many popular evolutionary algorithms use non-dominance as a measure for selecting solutions for future generations. The process of sorting populations into non-dominated fronts is usually the controlling order of computational complexity and can be expensive for large populations or for a high number of objectives. This paper presents two novel methods for non-dominated sorting: deductive sort and climbing sort. The two new methods are compared to the fast non-dominated sort of NSGA-II and the non-dominated rank sort of the omni-optimizer. The results demonstrate the improved efficiencies of the deductive sort and the reductions in comparisons that can be made when applying inferred dominance relationships defined in this paper.

  10. Selective sorting of waste

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Not much effort needed, just willpower In order to keep the cost of disposing of waste materials as low as possible, CERN provides two types of recipient at the entrance to each building: a green plastic one for paper/cardboard and a metal one for general refuse. For some time now we have noticed, to our great regret, a growing negligence as far as selective sorting is concerned, with, for example, the green recipients being filled with a mixture of cardboard boxes full of polystyrene or protective wrappers, plastic bottles, empty yogurts pots, etc. …We have been able to ascertain, after careful checking, that this haphazard mixing of waste cannot be attributed to the cleaning staff but rather to members of the personnel who unscrupulously throw away their rubbish in a completely random manner. Non-sorted waste entails heavy costs for CERN. For information, once a non-compliant item is found in a green recipient, the entire contents are sent off for incineration rather than recycling… We are all concerned...

  11. Efficient uptake of blood-borne BK and JC polyomavirus-like particles in endothelial cells of liver sinusoids and renal vasa recta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaione Simon-Santamaria

    Full Text Available Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs are specialized scavenger cells that mediate high-capacity clearance of soluble waste macromolecules and colloid material, including blood-borne adenovirus. To explore if LSECs function as a sink for other viruses in blood, we studied the fate of virus-like particles (VLPs of two ubiquitous human DNA viruses, BK and JC polyomavirus, in mice. Like complete virions, VLPs specifically bind to receptors and enter cells, but unlike complete virions, they cannot replicate. 125I-labeled VLPs were used to assess blood decay, organ-, and hepatocellular distribution of ligand, and non-labeled VLPs to examine cellular uptake by immunohisto- and -cytochemistry. BK- and JC-VLPs rapidly distributed to liver, with lesser uptake in kidney and spleen. Liver uptake was predominantly in LSECs. Blood half-life (∼1 min, and tissue distribution of JC-VLPs and two JC-VLP-mutants (L55F and S269F that lack sialic acid binding affinity, were similar, indicating involvement of non-sialic acid receptors in cellular uptake. Liver uptake was not mediated by scavenger receptors. In spleen, the VLPs localized to the red pulp marginal zone reticuloendothelium, and in kidney to the endothelial lining of vasa recta segments, and the transitional epithelium of renal pelvis. Most VLP-positive vessels in renal medulla did not express PV-1/Meca 32, suggesting location to the non-fenestrated part of vasa recta. The endothelial cells of these vessels also efficiently endocytosed a scavenger receptor ligand, formaldehyde-denatured albumin, suggesting high endocytic activity compared to other renal endothelia. We conclude that LSECs very effectively cleared a large fraction of blood-borne BK- and JC-VLPs, indicating a central role of these cells in early removal of polyomavirus from the circulation. In addition, we report the novel finding that a subpopulation of endothelial cells in kidney, the main organ of polyomavirus persistence, showed

  12. Fatal avian polyomavirus infection during quarantine in adult wild-caught red-faced lovebirds (Agapornis pullaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, F; Gravendyck, M; Gerlach, H; Kaleta, E F

    1997-01-01

    An outbreak of avian polyomavirus infection is reported in a group of six wild-caught red-faced lovebirds (Agapornis pullaria), all of which died during quarantine. The birds had not shown any previous symptoms. Histologic examination of the lungs, kidneys, livers, and spleens revealed the presence of basophilic intranuclear inclusions. Avian polyomavirus was isolated from the liver and the spleen. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in the sera from other lovebirds (Agapornis personata, Agapornis taranta) that had contact with the A. pullaria. A serologic comparison showed a close relationship with budgerigar polyomavirus.

  13. Identification of a novel polyomavirus from vervet monkeys in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Ishii, Akihiro; Ogawa, Hirohito; Nakamura, Ichiro; Moonga, Ladslav; Hang'ombe, Bernard M; Mweene, Aaron S; Thomas, Yuka; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Orba, Yasuko

    2013-06-01

    To examine polyomavirus (PyV) infection in wildlife, we investigated the presence of PyVs in Zambia with permission from the Zambia Wildlife Authority. We analysed 200 DNA samples from the spleens and kidneys (n = 100 each) of yellow baboons and vervet monkeys (VMs) (n = 50 each). We detected seven PyV genome fragments in 200 DNA samples using a nested broad-spectrum PCR method, and identified five full-length viral genomes using an inverse PCR method. Phylogenetic analysis of virally encoded proteins revealed that four PyVs were closely related to either African green monkey PyV or simian agent 12. Only one virus detected from a VM spleen was found to be related, with relatively low nucleotide sequence identity (74 %), to the chimpanzee PyV, which shares 48 % nucleotide sequence identity with the human Merkel cell PyV identified from Merkel cell carcinoma. The obtained entire genome of this virus was 5157 bp and had large T- and small t-antigens, and VP1 and VP2 ORFs. This virus was tentatively named vervet monkey PyV 1 (VmPyV1) as a novel PyV. Comparison with other PyVs revealed that VmPyV1, like chimpanzee PyV, had a longer VP1 ORF. To examine whether the VmPyV1 genome could produce viral proteins in cultured cells, the whole genome was transfected into HEK293T cells. We detected VP1 protein expression in the transfected HEK293T cells by immunocytochemical and immunoblot analyses. Thus, we identified a novel PyV genome from VM spleen.

  14. Genetic diversity in twenty variants of the avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phalen, D N; Wilson, V G; Gaskin, J M; Derr, J N; Graham, D L

    1999-01-01

    To determine if different pathotypes of the avian polyomavirus (APV) exist and to compare the genomes of APVs originating from different geographic areas, dates, and species of birds, the partial sequences of 18 APVs were determined. New viral sequences were compared with three published APV sequences. Two of the new viruses had identical sequences. Forty point mutations were found at 31 loci. A 27-bp deletion was found in the VP2 and VP3 open reading frames of one virus. A duplication of the putative origin of replication and adjacent enhancer region was previously reported in one APV. Smaller duplications involving the origin in one APV and a second enhancer region in another were discovered. All duplications were in tissue culture-adapted viruses, suggesting they occurred during the isolation process. Excluding duplications and the deletion, maximum variation between viruses was small (11 bp). A maximum parsimony tree was constructed that contained three major branches. The three earliest isolates were on separate branches. The European viruses were confined to branch I, but APVs from the United States were on all three branches. Lovebird, budgerigar, and macaw APVs were also on each of the three branches, suggesting that species-specific pathotypes have not developed. Most nonsynonymous mutations occurred in a small portion of the VP2 and VP3 open reading frames, demonstrating a selection for these mutations. That a glycine at VP2 221 will inhibit virus replication in chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEFs) has been previously reported. In contrast, six of seven of the new APVs isolated in CEFs had a glycine at VP2 221.

  15. Whole-genome characterization and genotyping of global WU polyomavirus strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialasiewicz, Seweryn; Rockett, Rebecca; Whiley, David W.; Abed, Yacine; Allander, Tobias; Binks, Michael; Boivin, Guy; Cheng, Allen C.; Chung, Ju-Young; Ferguson, Patricia E.; Gilroy, Nicole M.; Leach, Amanda J.; Lindau, Cecilia; Rossen, John W.; Sorrell, Tania C.; Nissen, Michael D.; Sloots, Theo P.

    2010-01-01

    Exploration of the genetic diversity of WU polyomavirus (WUV) has been limited in terms of the specimen numbers and particularly the sizes of the genomic fragments analyzed. Using whole-genome sequencing of 48 WUV strains collected in four continents over a 5-year period and 16 publicly available wh

  16. WU Polyomavirus in Respiratory Epithelial Cells from Lung Transplant Patient with Job Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrasse, Erica A.; Pastrana, Diana V.; Nguyen, Nang L.; Wang, Annie; Roth, Mark J.; Holland, Steven M.; Freeman, Alexandra F.; McDyer, John; Buck, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    We detected WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample from lungs transplanted into a recipient with Job syndrome by using immunoassays specific for the WUPyV viral protein 1. Co-staining for an epithelial cell marker identified most WUPyV viral protein 1–positive cells as respiratory epithelial cells. PMID:25531075

  17. Renal expression of polyomavirus large T antigen is associated with nephritis in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenton, Kristin Andreassen; Mjelle, Janne Erikke; Jacobsen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    ) that these complexes bound induced anti-nucleosome antibodies and finally (iv) that they associated with glomerular membranes as immune complexes. This process may be relevant for human lupus nephritis, since productive polyomavirus infection is associated with this organ manifestation. Here, we compare nephritis...... to the evolution of lupus nephritis in human SLE....

  18. Resolving sorting mechanisms into exosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoorvogel, Willem

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of mechanisms driving protein sorting into exosomes is only beginning to emerge. In a paper recently published in Cell Research, Roucourt et al. report that trimming of heparan sulfate side chains of syndecans by endosomal heparanase facilitates sorting into exosomes by the formation

  19. Discovery of a novel polyomavirus in acute diarrheal samples from children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Yu

    Full Text Available Polyomaviruses are small circular DNA viruses associated with chronic infections and tumors in both human and animal hosts. Using an unbiased deep sequencing approach, we identified a novel, highly divergent polyomavirus, provisionally named MX polyomavirus (MXPyV, in stool samples from children. The ∼5.0 kB viral genome exhibits little overall homology (<46% amino acid identity to known polyomaviruses, and, due to phylogenetic variation among its individual proteins, cannot be placed in any existing taxonomic group. PCR-based screening detected MXPyV in 28 of 834 (3.4% fecal samples collected from California, Mexico, and Chile, and 1 of 136 (0.74% of respiratory samples from Mexico, but not in blood or urine samples from immunocompromised patients. By quantitative PCR, the measured titers of MXPyV in human stool at 10% (weight/volume were as high as 15,075 copies. No association was found between the presence of MXPyV and diarrhea, although girls were more likely to shed MXPyV in the stool than boys (p=0.012. In one child, viral shedding was observed in two stools obtained 91 days apart, raising the possibility of chronic infection by MXPyV. A multiple sequence alignment revealed that MXPyV is a closely related variant of the recently reported MWPyV and HPyV10 polyomaviruses. Further studies will be important to determine the association, if any, of MXPyV with disease in humans.

  20. Flow sorting in aquatic ecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Reckermann

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow sorting can be a very helpful tool in revealing phytoplankton and bacterial community structure and elaborating specific physiological parameters of isolated species. Droplet sorting has been the most common technique. Despite the high optical and hydro-dynamic stress for the cells to be sorted, many species grow in culture subsequent to sorting. To date, flow sorting has been applied to post-incubation separation in natural water samples to account for group-specific physiological parameters (radiotracer-uptake rates, to the production of clonal or non-clonal cultures from mixtures, to the isolaton of cell groups from natural assemblages for molecular analyses, and for taxonomic identification of sorted cells by microscopy. The application of cell sorting from natural water samples from the Wadden Sea, including different cryptophytes, cyanobacteria and diatoms, is shown, as well as the establishment of laboratory cultures from field samples. The optional use of a red laser to account for phycocyanine-rich cells is also discussed.

  1. Characterization of a novel polyomavirus isolated from a fibroma on the trunk of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Hans; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Sijmons, Steven; Van Ranst, Marc; Maes, Piet

    2013-01-01

    Viruses of the family Polyomaviridae infect a wide variety of avian and mammalian hosts with a broad spectrum of outcomes including asymptomatic infection, acute systemic disease, and tumor induction. In this study a novel polyomavirus, the African elephant polyomavirus 1 (AelPyV-1) found in a protruding hyperplastic fibrous lesion on the trunk of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana) was characterized. The AelPyV-1 genome is 5722 bp in size and is one of the largest polyomaviruses characterized to date. Analysis of the AelPyV-1 genome reveals five putative open-reading frames coding for the classic small and large T antigens in the early region, and the VP1, VP2 and VP3 capsid proteins in the late region. In the area preceding the VP2 start codon three putative open-reading frames, possibly coding for an agnoprotein, could be localized. A regulatory, non-coding region separates the 2 coding regions. Unique for polyomaviruses is the presence of a second 854 bp long non-coding region between the end of the early region and the end of the late region. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the large T antigen of the AelPyV-1 and 61 other polyomavirus sequences, AelPyV-1 clusters within a heterogeneous group of polyomaviruses that have been isolated from bats, new world primates and rodents.

  2. Characterization of a novel polyomavirus isolated from a fibroma on the trunk of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Stevens

    Full Text Available Viruses of the family Polyomaviridae infect a wide variety of avian and mammalian hosts with a broad spectrum of outcomes including asymptomatic infection, acute systemic disease, and tumor induction. In this study a novel polyomavirus, the African elephant polyomavirus 1 (AelPyV-1 found in a protruding hyperplastic fibrous lesion on the trunk of an African elephant (Loxodonta africana was characterized. The AelPyV-1 genome is 5722 bp in size and is one of the largest polyomaviruses characterized to date. Analysis of the AelPyV-1 genome reveals five putative open-reading frames coding for the classic small and large T antigens in the early region, and the VP1, VP2 and VP3 capsid proteins in the late region. In the area preceding the VP2 start codon three putative open-reading frames, possibly coding for an agnoprotein, could be localized. A regulatory, non-coding region separates the 2 coding regions. Unique for polyomaviruses is the presence of a second 854 bp long non-coding region between the end of the early region and the end of the late region. Based on maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of the large T antigen of the AelPyV-1 and 61 other polyomavirus sequences, AelPyV-1 clusters within a heterogeneous group of polyomaviruses that have been isolated from bats, new world primates and rodents.

  3. The polyomavirus middle T-antigen oncogene activates the Hippo pathway tumor suppressor Lats in a Src-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanzer, M; Ricardo-Lax, I; Keshet, R; Reuven, N; Shaul, Y

    2015-08-06

    The polyomavirus middle T antigen (PyMT) is an oncogene that activates the non-receptor tyrosine kinase, c-Src, and physically interacts with Taz (WWTR1). Taz is a pro-oncogenic transcription coactivator of the Tead transcription factors. The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway activates the kinase Lats, which phosphorylates Taz, leading to its nuclear exclusion and blunting Tead coactivation. We found that Taz was required for transformation by PyMT, but counter-intuitively, Taz was exclusively cytoplasmic in the presence of PyMT. We demonstrate that in the presence of PyMT, wild-type Taz was phosphorylated by Lats, in a Src-dependent manner. Consistently, a Lats refractory Taz mutant did not undergo cytoplasmic retention by PyMT. We show that Yap, the Taz paralog, and Shp2 phosphatase were nuclear excluded as well. Our findings describe a noncanonical activation of Lats, and an unprecedented Tead-independent role for Taz and Yap in viral-mediated oncogenesis.

  4. Novel Polyomavirus associated with Brain Tumors in Free-Ranging Raccoons, Western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Florante N.; Giannitti, Federico; Li, Linlin; Woods, Leslie W.; Del Valle, Luis; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of any type are exceedingly rare in raccoons. High-grade brain tumors, consistently located in the frontal lobes and olfactory tracts, were detected in 10 raccoons during March 2010–May 2012 in California and Oregon, suggesting an emerging, infectious origin. We have identified a candidate etiologic agent, dubbed raccoon polyomavirus, that was present in the tumor tissue of all affected animals but not in tissues from 20 unaffected animals. Southern blot hybridization and rolling circle amplification showed the episomal viral genome in the tumors. The multifunctional nuclear protein large T-antigen was detectable by immunohistochemical analyses in a subset of neoplastic cells. Raccoon polyomavirus may contribute to the development of malignant brain tumors of raccoons. PMID:23260029

  5. Novel polyomavirus associated with brain tumors in free-ranging raccoons, western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Cruz, Florante N; Giannitti, Federico; Li, Linlin; Woods, Leslie W; Del Valle, Luis; Delwart, Eric; Pesavento, Patricia A

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of any type are exceedingly rare in raccoons. High-grade brain tumors, consistently located in the frontal lobes and olfactory tracts, were detected in 10 raccoons during March 2010-May 2012 in California and Oregon, suggesting an emerging, infectious origin. We have identified a candidate etiologic agent, dubbed raccoon polyomavirus, that was present in the tumor tissue of all affected animals but not in tissues from 20 unaffected animals. Southern blot hybridization and rolling circle amplification showed the episomal viral genome in the tumors. The multifunctional nuclear protein large T-antigen was detectable by immunohistochemical analyses in a subset of neoplastic cells. Raccoon polyomavirus may contribute to the development of malignant brain tumors of raccoons.

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Models for the Study of Human Polyomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Barth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Developments of genome amplification techniques have rapidly expanded the family of human polyomaviruses (PyV. Following infection early in life, PyV persist in their hosts and are generally of no clinical consequence. High-level replication of PyV can occur in patients under immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapy and causes severe clinical entities, such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, polyomavirus-associated nephropathy or Merkel cell carcinoma. The characterization of known and newly-discovered human PyV, their relationship to human health, and the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis remain to be elucidated. Here, we summarize the most widely-used in vitro and in vivo models to study the PyV-host interaction, pathogenesis and anti-viral drug screening. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the different models and the lessons learned.

  7. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  8. KI and WU polyomaviruses and CD4+ cell counts in HIV-1-infected patients, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco

    2010-09-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1-positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1-positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1-positive patients.

  9. Identification of an avian polyomavirus associated with Adélie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varsani, Arvind; Porzig, Elizabeth L; Jennings, Scott; Kraberger, Simona; Farkas, Kata; Julian, Laurel; Massaro, Melanie; Ballard, Grant; Ainley, David G

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about viruses associated with Antarctic animals, although they are probably widespread. We recovered a novel polyomavirus from Adélie penguin (Pygoscelis adeliae) faecal matter sampled in a subcolony at Cape Royds, Ross Island, Antarctica. The 4988 nt Adélie penguin polyomavirus (AdPyV) has a typical polyomavirus genome organization with three ORFs that encoded capsid proteins on the one strand and two non-structural protein-coding ORFs on the complementary strand. The genome of AdPyV shared ~60 % pairwise identity with all avipolyomaviruses. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of the large T-antigen (T-Ag) amino acid sequences showed that the T-Ag of AdPyV clustered with those of avipolyomaviruses, sharing between 48 and 52 % identities. Only three viruses associated with Adélie penguins have been identified at a genomic level, avian influenza virus subtype H11N2 from the Antarctic Peninsula and, respectively, Pygoscelis adeliae papillomavirus and AdPyV from capes Crozier and Royds on Ross Island.

  10. Hrs and SNX3 functions in sorting and membrane invagination within multivesicular bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Pons

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available After internalization, ubiquitinated signaling receptors are delivered to early endosomes. There, they are sorted and incorporated into the intralumenal invaginations of nascent multivesicular bodies, which function as transport intermediates to late endosomes. Receptor sorting is achieved by Hrs--an adaptor--like protein that binds membrane PtdIns3P via a FYVE motif-and then by ESCRT complexes, which presumably also mediate the invagination process. Eventually, intralumenal vesicles are delivered to lysosomes, leading to the notion that EGF receptor sorting into multivesicular bodies mediates lysosomal targeting. Here, we report that Hrs is essential for lysosomal targeting but dispensable for multivesicular body biogenesis and transport to late endosomes. By contrast, we find that the PtdIns3P-binding protein SNX3 is required for multivesicular body formation, but not for EGF receptor degradation. PtdIns3P thus controls the complementary functions of Hrs and SNX3 in sorting and multivesicular body biogenesis.

  11. Limited variation during circulation of a polyomavirus in the human population involves the COCO-VA toggling site of Middle and Alternative T-antigen(s)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Kazem (Siamaque); C. Lauber (Chris); E. van der Meijden (Els); S. Kooijman (Sander); A.A. Kravchenko (Alexander A.); M.C.W. Feltkamp (Mariet C.W.); A.E. Gorbalenya (Alexander); J.C. Browning (John C.); K. Busam (Klaus); S. Bialasiewicz (Seweryn); T. Benoit (Taylor); P. Fleckman (Philip); L.C. Hughey (Lauren C.); R.W.A. Janssens (René W.A.); F. Mechinaud (Francoise); E. Pope (Elena); A.S. Rosenberg (Arlene S.); E. Rácz (Emoke); G. Sadler (Genevieve); S.N. Tabrizi (Sepehr N.); E. de Vries (E.); R.C. Wang (Richard C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe have recently shown that the trichodysplasia spinulosa-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV) belongs to a large monophyletic group of mammalian polyomaviruses that experienced accelerated codon-constrained Val-Ala (COCO-VA) toggling at a protein site common to both Middle and Alternative T-

  12. Sex-sorting sperm using flow cytometry/cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Duane L; Evans, K Michael; Seidel, George E

    2013-01-01

    The sex of mammalian offspring can be predetermined by flow sorting relatively pure living populations of X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm. This method is based on precise staining of the DNA of sperm with the nucleic acid-specific fluorophore, Hoechst 33342, to differentiate between the subpopulations of X- and Y-sperm. The fluorescently stained sperm are then sex-sorted using a specialized high speed sorter, MoFlo(®) SX XDP, and collected into biologically supportive media prior to reconcentration and cryopreservation in numbers adequate for use with artificial insemination for some species or for in vitro fertilization. Sperm sorting can provide subpopulations of X- or Y-bearing bovine sperm at rates in the 8,000 sperm/s range while maintaining; a purity of 90% such that it has been applied to cattle on a commercial basis. The sex of offspring has been predetermined in a wide variety of mammalian species including cattle, swine, horses, sheep, goats, dogs, cats, deer, elk, dolphins, water buffalo as well as in humans using flow cytometric sorting of X- and Y-sperm.

  13. Automated Sorting of Transuranic Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2001-03-01

    The HANDSS-55 Transuranic Waste Sorting Module is designed to sort out items found in 55-gallon drums of waste as determined by an operator. Innovative imaging techniques coupled with fast linear motor-based motion systems and a flexible end-effector system allow the operator to remove items from the waste stream by a touch of the finger. When all desired items are removed from the waste stream, the remaining objects are automatically moved to a repackaging port for removal from the glovebox/cell. The Transuranic Waste Sorting Module consists of 1) a high accuracy XYZ Stereo Measurement and Imaging system, 2) a vibrating/tilting sorting table, 3) an XY Deployment System, 4) a ZR Deployment System, 5) several user-selectable end-effectors, 6) a waste bag opening system, 7) control and instrumentation, 8) a noncompliant waste load-out area, and 9) a Human/Machine Interface (HMI). The system is modular in design to accommodate database management tools, additional load-out ports, and other enhancements. Manually sorting the contents of a 55-gallon drum takes about one day per drum. The HANDSS-55 Waste Sorting Module is designed to significantly increase the throughput of this sorting process by automating those functions that are strenuous and tiresome for an operator to perform. The Waste Sorting Module uses the inherent ability of an operator to identify the items that need to be segregated from the waste stream and then, under computer control, picks that item out of the waste and deposits it in the appropriate location. The operator identifies the object by locating the visual image on a large color display and touches the image on the display with his finger. The computer then determines the location of the object, and performing a highspeed image analysis determines its size and orientation, so that a robotic gripper can be deployed to pick it up. Following operator verification by voice or function key, the object is deposited into a specified location.

  14. COINFECTION OF CALIFORNIA SEA LION ADENOVIRUS 1 AND A NOVEL POLYOMAVIRUS IN A HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL (NEOMONACHUS SCHAUINSLANDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Hinojosa, Galaxia; Doescher, Bethany; Kinsel, Michael; Lednicky, John; Loeb, Julia; Waltzek, Thomas; Wellehan, James F X

    2016-06-01

    The Hawaiian monk seal (Neomonachus schauinslandi) is an endangered species. Here, we present a clinical case of a 26-yr-old male Hawaiian monk seal (HMS) kept in an aquarium with a history of intermittent anorexia and evidence of renal disease. Histologic examination revealed eosinophilic intranuclear inclusions in the liver. Conventional nested PCR protocols were used to test for viruses, and it tested positive for adenovirus and polyomavirus, and negative for herpesvirus. The adenovirus partial polymerase gene is 100% homologous to that of California sea lion adenovirus 1 (CSLAdV-1). CSLAdV-1 causes viral hepatitis in CSL, and has recently been reported in different species of otariids in an aquarium in Japan ( Otaria flavescens and Arctocephalus pusillus ) and a sequence from Spain has been submitted in NCBI as Otaria flavescens adenovirus-1. The polyomavirus in this animal is a novel virus, and is the first polyomavirus discovered in Hawaiian monk seals. This new virus is designated Hawaiian monk seal polyomavirus (HMSPyV-1), and is 83% homologous to California sea lion Polyomavirus-1 (CSLPyV-1). This is the first report of viral coinfection in a HMS and clinical significance in this case remains unclear but may be associated with advanced age.

  15. Sorting and selection in posets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daskalakis, Constantinos; Karp, Richard M.; Mossel, Elchanan

    2011-01-01

    Classical problems of sorting and searching assume an underlying linear ordering of the objects being compared. In this paper, we study these problems in the context of partially ordered sets, in which some pairs of objects are incomparable. This generalization is interesting from a combinatorial...

  16. A Case Report of Avian Polyomavirus Infection in a Blue Fronted Parrot (Amazona aestiva Associated with Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Azevedo Philadelpho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An adult Blue Fronted Amazon parrot (A. aestiva presenting with emesis, apathy, undigested seed in feces, and severe anemia was treated for approximately 2 months. Upon radiographic examination, an enlarged kidney was the only alteration. PCR for avian Bornavirus, Circovirus, and Polyomavirus was performed for the feces and blood. The results were positive for APV in both samples and negative for the other viruses. After 6 months, the feces from the same animal were negative for APV. Because the animal was positive for APV in both the feces and the blood, it is likely that these clinical symptoms were due to Polyomavirus infection. Severe anemia is an unusual clinical sign of Polyomavirus, and this study aims to identify novel differential diagnostic criteria for the disease.

  17. Sorting cells by their density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, Nazila; Bhakta, Heran C.

    2017-01-01

    Sorting cells by their type is an important capability in biological research and medical diagnostics. However, most cell sorting techniques rely on labels or tags, which may have limited availability and specificity. Sorting different cell types by their different physical properties is an attractive alternative to labels because all cells intrinsically have these physical properties. But some physical properties, like cell size, vary significantly from cell to cell within a cell type; this makes it difficult to identify and sort cells based on their sizes alone. In this work we continuously sort different cells types by their density, a physical property with much lower cell-to-cell variation within a cell type (and therefore greater potential to discriminate different cell types) than other physical properties. We accomplish this using a 3D-printed microfluidic chip containing a horizontal flowing micron-scale density gradient. As cells flow through the chip, Earth’s gravity makes each cell move vertically to the point where the cell’s density matches the surrounding fluid’s density. When the horizontal channel then splits, cells with different densities are routed to different outlets. As a proof of concept, we use our density sorter chip to sort polymer microbeads by their material (polyethylene and polystyrene) and blood cells by their type (white blood cells and red blood cells). The chip enriches the fraction of white blood cells in a blood sample from 0.1% (in whole blood) to nearly 98% (in the output of the chip), a 1000x enrichment. Any researcher with access to a 3D printer can easily replicate our density sorter chip and use it in their own research using the design files provided as online Supporting Information. Additionally, researchers can simulate the performance of a density sorter chip in their own applications using the Python-based simulation software that accompanies this work. The simplicity, resolution, and throughput of this

  18. Swarm-Based Spatial Sorting

    CERN Document Server

    Amos, Martyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To present an algorithm for spatially sorting objects into an annular structure. Design/Methodology/Approach: A swarm-based model that requires only stochastic agent behaviour coupled with a pheromone-inspired "attraction-repulsion" mechanism. Findings: The algorithm consistently generates high-quality annular structures, and is particularly powerful in situations where the initial configuration of objects is similar to those observed in nature. Research limitations/implications: Experimental evidence supports previous theoretical arguments about the nature and mechanism of spatial sorting by insects. Practical implications: The algorithm may find applications in distributed robotics. Originality/value: The model offers a powerful minimal algorithmic framework, and also sheds further light on the nature of attraction-repulsion algorithms and underlying natural processes.

  19. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  20. Prevalence of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus in Tehran: An Age-Specific Serological Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Mohajel, Nasir; Keyvani, Hossein; Nasimi, Maryam; Esghaei, Maryam; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2016-05-01

    Several new types of polyomavirus have been discovered in recent years mainly because of the recent state-of-the-art detection technologies. Among the polyomaviruses, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) has attracted the most attention because of its possible role in the etiology of Merkel cell carcinoma, a rare but lethal form of skin cancer. This study aimed to determine age-specific seroprevalence of MCPyV in Tehran. In this cross-sectional study, we collected 440 serum samples from healthy individuals 2 to 78 years of age who visited the Pasteur Institute's clinic in Tehran, Iran, using a convenience sampling strategy. We developed a virus-like particle-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses VP1, the major capsid protein of MCPyV, to detect and quantitate serum antibodies to MCPyV. We compared the prevalence of MCPyV between males and females and across eight age groups. A total of 255 (57.9%) of the serum samples were MCPyV positive. The seroprevalence in children under 10 years of age was 25%. The seroprevalence increased to 56% over the next decade of life (10 - 19 years of age). The seroprevalence rate in males and females was 56.1% and 59.7% respectively, and a binary logistic regression showed no significant difference between males and females (P = 0.77). However, the prevalence of MCPyV increased with age (P = 0.012). Our results suggest that human exposure to MCPyV occurs throughout life. The MCPyV antibody levels remained high among older adults in our population, consistent with reports from other populations.

  1. Sorting Techniques for Plastics Recycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the basic principles of three different types of separating methods and a general guideline for choosing the most effective method for sorting plastic mixtures. It also presents the results of the tests carried out for separation of PVC, ABS and PET from different kinds of plastic mixtures in order to improve the grade of the raw input used in mechanical or feedstock recycling.

  2. Sorting of Sperm by Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, James; Marcos, Marcos

    2016-11-01

    Many studies have proven that the percentage of morphologically normal sperm is a significant factor in determining the success of assisted reproduction. The velocity of sperm in a microchannel with shear flow subjected to an external field will be explored theoretically. The difference in response between morphologically normal and abnormal sperm will be computed from a statistical approach, to study the feasibility and effectiveness of sorting by an external field to remove abnormal sperm. The full name of this author is Marcos.

  3. Physiology and Pathology of Endosome-to-Golgi Retrograde Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Burd, Christopher G.

    2011-01-01

    Bi-directional traffic between the Golgi apparatus and the endosomal system sustains the functions of the trans Golgi network (TGN) in secretion and organelle biogenesis. Export of cargo from the TGN via the anterograde pathways depletes the organelle of sorting receptors, processing proteases, SNARE molecules, and other factors that are subsequently retrieved from endosomes via the retrograde pathway. Recent studies indicate that retrograde trafficking is vital to early metazoan development,...

  4. Self-sorting molecular clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumyadip; Wu, Anxin; Fettinger, James C; Zavalij, Peter Y; Isaacs, Lyle

    2008-08-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of 12 C-shaped methylene-bridged glycoluril dimers (1-12) bearing H-bonding groups on their aromatic rings. Compounds 1, 2, (+/-)-4a, (+/-)-5, (+/-)-7, and 8 form tightly associated homodimers in CDCl3, due to the combined driving force of pi-pi and H-bonding interactions. Compounds 2, (+/-)-5, and 8, having disparate spatial distribution of their H-bonding groups, display the ability to efficiently distinguish between self and nonself even within three-component mixtures in CDCl3. When the spatial distributions of the H-bonding groups of the molecular clips are similar (e.g., 1 and 2), a mixture of homodimers and heterodimers is formed. The effect of various structural modifications (e.g., chirality, side chain steric bulk, number and pattern of H-bonds) on the strength of self-assembly and the fidelity of self-sorting are presented. On the basis of these results we prepared self-sorting systems comprising three (e.g., 1, (+/-)-5, and (+/-)-7) and even four ( 2, (+/-)-5, 9, and 10) components. The potential of molecular clips 1-12 as robust, functionalizable, self-sorting modules to control the noncovalent interaction network in systems chemistry studies is described.

  5. Flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sherrif F; van den Engh, Ger

    2007-01-01

    Flow cytometry and cell sorting are well-established technologies in clinical diagnostics and biomedical research. Heterogeneous mixtures of cells are placed in suspension and passed single file across one or more laser interrogation points. Light signals emitted from the particles are collected and correlated to entities such as cell morphology, surface and intracellular protein expression, gene expression, and cellular physiology. Based on user-defined parameters, individual cells can then be diverted from the fluid stream and collected into viable, homogeneous fractions at exceptionally high speeds and a purity that approaches 100%. As such, the cell sorter becomes the launching point for numerous downstream studies. Flow cytometry is a cornerstone in clinical diagnostics, and cheaper, more versatile machines are finding their way into widespread and varied uses. In addition, advances in computing and optics have led to a new generation of flow cytometers capable of processing cells at orders of magnitudes faster than their predecessors, and with staggering degrees of complexity, making the cytometer a powerful discovery tool in biotechnology. This chapter will begin with a discussion of basic principles of flow cytometry and cell sorting, including a technical description of factors that contribute to the performance of these instruments. The remaining sections will then be divided into clinical- and research-based applications of flow cytometry and cell sorting, highlighting salient studies that illustrate the versatility of this indispensable technology.

  6. Successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipient with previous known polyomavirus nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midtvedt, Karsten; Bjorang, Ola; Letting, Anne-Sofie

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy after renal transplantation has become increasingly common. Studies in non-immunocompromised patients have shown that pregnant women have increased susceptibility to infection or reactivation of latent virus such as BK virus. To what extent a renal transplant recipient is at risk for reactivation of polyoma virus during pregnancy remains unknown. We hereby report successful pregnancy outcome in a renal transplant recipient with a known history of BK virus nephropathy treated with cidofovir i.v. To our knowledge, this is the first published experience with a successful pregnancy in renal transplant recipients with known history of polyomavirus-associated nephropathy.

  7. Word Sorts for General Music Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardany, Audrey Berger

    2015-01-01

    Word sorts are standard practice for aiding children in acquiring skills in English language arts. When included in the general music classroom, word sorts may aid students in acquiring a working knowledge of music vocabulary. The author shares a word sort activity drawn from vocabulary in John Lithgow's children's book "Never Play…

  8. How does the Shift-insertion sort behave when the sorting elements follow a Normal distribution?

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Mita; Mahanti, N C

    2012-01-01

    The present paper examines the behavior of Shift-insertion sort (insertion sort with shifting) for normal distribution inputs and is in continuation of our earlier work on this new algorithm for discrete distribution inputs, namely, negative binomial. Shift insertion sort is found more sensitive for main effects but not for all interaction effects compared to conventional insertion sort.

  9. Polarized sorting and trafficking in epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinwang Cao; Michal A Surma; Kai Simons

    2012-01-01

    The polarized distribution of proteins and lipids at the surface membrane of epithelial cells results in the formation of an apical and a basolateral domain,which are separated by tight junctions.The generation and maintenance of epithelial polarity require elaborate mechanisms that guarantee correct sorting and vectorial delivery of cargo molecules.This dynamic process involves the interaction of sorting signals with sorting machineries and the formation of transport carriers.Here we review the recent advances in the field of polarized sorting in epithelial cells.We especially highlight the role of lipid rafts in apical sorting.

  10. Exposure to raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV) in free-ranging North American raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, M E; Dela Cruz, F N; Estrada, M; Leutenegger, C M; Pesavento, P A; Woolard, K D

    2016-02-01

    There is evidence that raccoon polyomavirus is causative for neuroglial brain tumors in the western United States. It is unknown if infection is limited to geographic locales where tumors have been reported or is widespread, like human polyomaviruses. We demonstrate raccoons in western, eastern and midwestern states have been exposed to RacPyV by detection of antibodies to capsid protein, VP1. While raccoons in eastern and midwestern states are seropositive, exposure is lower than in the western states. Additionally, across geographic areas seropositivity is higher in older as compared to younger raccoons, similar to polyomavirus exposure in humans. Serum titers are significantly higher in raccoons with tumors compared to raccoons without. Unlike polyomavirus-associated diseases in humans, we did not detect significant sequence variation between tumor and non-tumor tissue in raccoons with tumors compared to those without tumors. This warrants further investigation into co-morbid diseases or genetic susceptibility studies of the host. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of mouse polyomavirus-specific antibodies in laboratory mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.W.J. Broeders; J. Groen (Jan); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAn enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection and quantification of IgM and IgG serum antibodies to mouse polyomavirus (MPV). To evaluate the potential of this ELISA for the screening of laboratory rodents, serum samples from specific pathogen free (SPF) BA

  12. Vaccine to Prevent BK Polyomavirus-associated Kidney and Bladder Infections in Organ Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate or commercialize therapeutic compositions and methods for pre-vaccination of organ transplant recipients against BK polyomavirus (BKV) as well as methods for producing a BKV vaccine against all four known BKV serotypes.

  13. Bromodomain protein Brd4 plays a key role in Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV is the first human polyomavirus to be definitively linked to cancer. The mechanisms of MCV-induced oncogenesis and much of MCV biology are largely unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that bromodomain protein 4 (Brd4 interacts with MCV large T antigen (LT and plays a critical role in viral DNA replication. Brd4 knockdown inhibits MCV replication, which can be rescued by recombinant Brd4. Brd4 colocalizes with the MCV LT/replication origin complex in the nucleus and recruits replication factor C (RFC to the viral replication sites. A dominant negative inhibitor of the Brd4-MCV LT interaction can dissociate Brd4 and RFC from the viral replication complex and abrogate MCV replication. Furthermore, obstructing the physiologic interaction between Brd4 and host chromatin with the chemical compound JQ1(+ leads to enhanced MCV DNA replication, demonstrating that the role of Brd4 in MCV replication is distinct from its role in chromatin-associated transcriptional regulation. Our findings demonstrate mechanistic details of the MCV replication machinery; providing novel insight to elucidate the life cycle of this newly discovered oncogenic DNA virus.

  14. Immunomagnetic Indirect Positive Sorting of Precartilaginous Stem Cells from Neonatal Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the technique of sorting high-purity precartilaginous stem cells from rat's perichondrium, neonatal rat's perichondrium cells suspensions were incubated with monoclone antibody of anti-fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (anti-FGFR-3), and the labeled cells were separated from the suspension in the magnetic field by immuno-beads coated with the second antibody. Purityof the sorted neural stem cells was found to be 93.0 %-99.0 %, with living cells amounting to 80 %-85 %. The magnetic cell sorting system could effectively separate precartilaginous stem cells fromperichondrium cell suspensions.

  15. Sorting and Selection in Posets

    CERN Document Server

    Daskalakis, Constantinos; Mossel, Elchanan; Riesenfeld, Samantha; Verbin, Elad

    2007-01-01

    Classical problems of sorting and searching assume an underlying linear ordering of the objects being compared. In this paper, we study a more general setting, in which some pairs of objects are incomparable. This generalization is relevant in applications related to rankings in sports, college admissions, or conference submissions. It also has potential applications in biology, such as comparing the evolutionary fitness of different strains of bacteria, or understanding input-output relations among a set of metabolic reactions or the causal influences among a set of interacting genes or proteins. Our results improve and extend results from two decades ago of Faigle and Tur\\'{a}n. A measure of complexity of a partially ordered set (poset) is its width. Our algorithms obtain information about a poset by queries that compare two elements. We present an algorithm that sorts, i.e. completely identifies, a width w poset of size n and has query complexity O(wn + nlog(n)), which is within a constant factor of the in...

  16. Fixing the Sorting Algorithm for Android, Java and Python

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.T. de Gouw (Stijn); F.S. de Boer (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractTim Peters developed the Timsort hybrid sorting algorithm in 2002. TimSort was first developed for Python, a popular programming language, but later ported to Java (where it appears as java.util.Collections.sort and java.util.Arrays.sort). TimSort is today used as the default sorting alg

  17. Fixing the Sorting Algorithm for Android, Java and Python

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouw, C.P.T. de; Boer, F.S. de

    2015-01-01

    Tim Peters developed the Timsort hybrid sorting algorithm in 2002. TimSort was first developed for Python, a popular programming language, but later ported to Java (where it appears as java.util.Collections.sort and java.util.Arrays.sort). TimSort is today used as the default sorting algorithm in Ja

  18. Fixing the Sorting Algorithm for Android, Java and Python

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P.T. de Gouw (Stijn); F.S. de Boer (Frank)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractTim Peters developed the Timsort hybrid sorting algorithm in 2002. TimSort was first developed for Python, a popular programming language, but later ported to Java (where it appears as java.util.Collections.sort and java.util.Arrays.sort). TimSort is today used as the default sorting

  19. Energy efficient data sorting using standard sorting algorithms

    KAUST Repository

    Bunse, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Protecting the environment by saving energy and thus reducing carbon dioxide emissions is one of todays hottest and most challenging topics. Although the perspective for reducing energy consumption, from ecological and business perspectives is clear, from a technological point of view, the realization especially for mobile systems still falls behind expectations. Novel strategies that allow (software) systems to dynamically adapt themselves at runtime can be effectively used to reduce energy consumption. This paper presents a case study that examines the impact of using an energy management component that dynamically selects and applies the "optimal" sorting algorithm, from an energy perspective, during multi-party mobile communication. Interestingly, the results indicate that algorithmic performance is not key and that dynamically switching algorithms at runtime does have a significant impact on energy consumption. © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011.

  20. Identification and Characterization of Novel Rat Polyomavirus 2 in a Colony of X-SCID Rats by P-PIT assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Lora H.; Toptan, Tuna; Newsome, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyomaviruses (PyVs) are known to infect a wide range of vertebrates and invertebrates and are associated with a broad spectrum of diseases, including cancers, particularly in immune-suppressed hosts. A novel polyomavirus, designated rat polyomavirus 2 (RatPyV2), was identified from a breeding colony of rats having X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency. Using a human panpolyomavirus immunohistochemistry test (P-PIT), RatPyV2 was initially detected in the parotid salivary gland of a colony member. Rolling circle amplification using DNA from harderian and parotid glands identified a novel 5.1-kb polyomavirus genome closely related to human Washington University (WU) and Karolinska Institute (KI) and vole polyomaviruses but notably divergent from Rattus norvegicus PyV1 (RnorPyV1; also designated RatPyV1). Further screening showed RatPyV2 inclusion body infection in the lung epithelium and variably in other respiratory, reproductive, and glandular tissues of 12/12 (100%) rats. IMPORTANCE Although P-PIT was developed to detect diseases associated with known human polyomaviruses, the identification of a new polyomavirus in rats suggests that it may have utility as a broad-based screen for new, as well as known polyomaviruses. Our findings suggest that RatPyV2 may be a commensal infection of laboratory rats that can lead to disseminated disease in T cell immune-deficient rats. Infection of the X-SCID rats with RatPyV2 and Pneumocystis carinii is a potential model for coinfection pathogenesis and treatment options during transplant preclinical studies. PMID:28028546

  1. Transformation by Polyomavirus Middle T Antigen Involves a Unique Bimodal Interaction with the Hippo Effector YAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Cecile; Pores Fernando, Arun T; Hwang, Justin H; Faure, Nathalie; Jiang, Tao; White, Elizabeth A; Roberts, Thomas M; Schaffhausen, Brian S

    2016-08-15

    Murine polyomavirus has repeatedly provided insights into tumorigenesis, revealing key control mechanisms such as tyrosine phosphorylation and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. We recently demonstrated that polyomavirus small T antigen (ST) binds YAP, a major effector of Hippo signaling, to regulate differentiation. Here we characterize YAP as a target of middle T antigen (MT) important for transformation. Through a surface including residues R103 and D182, wild-type MT binds to the YAP WW domains. Mutation of either R103 or D182 of MT abrogates YAP binding without affecting binding to other signaling molecules or the strength of PI3K or Ras signaling. Either genetic abrogation of YAP binding to MT or silencing of YAP via short hairpin RNA (shRNA) reduced MT transformation, suggesting that YAP makes a positive contribution to the transformed phenotype. MT targets YAP both by activating signaling pathways that affect it and by binding to it. MT signaling, whether from wild-type MT or the YAP-binding MT mutant, promoted YAP phosphorylation at S127 and S381/397 (YAP2/YAP1). Consistent with the known functions of these phosphorylated serines, MT signaling leads to the loss of YAP from the nucleus and degradation. Binding of YAP to MT brings it together with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), leading to the dephosphorylation of YAP in the MT complex. It also leads to the enrichment of YAP in membranes. Taken together, these results indicate that YAP promotes MT transformation via mechanisms that may depart from YAP's canonical oncogenic transcriptional activation functions. The highly conserved Hippo/YAP pathway is important for tissue development and homeostasis. Increasingly, changes in this pathway are being associated with cancer. Middle T antigen (MT) is the primary polyomavirus oncogene responsible for tumor formation. In this study, we show that MT signaling promotes YAP phosphorylation, loss from the nucleus, and increased turnover. Notably, MT genetics

  2. On the Construction of Sorted Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkedal, Lars; Debois, Søren; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    We develop a theory of sorted bigraphical reactive systems. Every application of bigraphs in the literature has required an extension, a sorting, of pure bigraphs. In turn, every such application has required a redevelopment of the theory of pure bigraphical reactive systems for the sorting at hand...... bigraphs. Technically, we give our construction for ordinary reactive systems, then lift it to bigraphical reactive systems. As such, we give also a construction of sortings for ordinary reactive systems. This construction is an improvement over previous attempts in that it produces smaller and much more...

  3. Design and realization of sort manipulator of crystal-angle sort machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-shun; Chen, Shu-ping; Guan, Shou-ping; Zhang, Yao-wei

    2005-12-01

    It is a current tendency of development in automation technology to replace manpower with manipulators in working places where dangerous, harmful, heavy or repetitive work is involved. The sort manipulator is installed in a crystal-angle sort machine to take the place of manpower, and engaged in unloading and sorting work. It is the outcome of combing together mechanism, electric transmission, and pneumatic element and micro-controller control. The step motor makes the sort manipulator operate precisely. The pneumatic elements make the sort manipulator be cleverer. Micro-controller's software bestows some simple artificial intelligence on the sort manipulator, so that it can precisely repeat its unloading and sorting work. The combination of manipulator's zero position and step motor counting control puts an end to accumulating error in long time operation. A sort manipulator's design in the practice engineering has been proved to be correct and reliable.

  4. JC Polyomavirus Infection Is Strongly Controlled by Human Leucocyte Antigen Class II Variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Emilie; Buck, Dorothea; Warnke, Clemens

    2014-01-01

    JC polyomavirus (JCV) carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV...... antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and lays the ground for risk stratification for PML and development of therapy and prevention....... mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA), instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate...

  5. Infectious offspring: how birds acquire and transmit an avian polyomavirus in the wild.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Potti

    Full Text Available Detailed patterns of primary virus acquisition and subsequent dispersal in wild vertebrate populations are virtually absent. We show that nestlings of a songbird acquire polyomavirus infections from larval blowflies, common nest ectoparasites of cavity-nesting birds, while breeding adults acquire and renew the same viral infections via cloacal shedding from their offspring. Infections by these DNA viruses, known potential pathogens producing disease in some bird species, therefore follow an 'upwards vertical' route of an environmental nature mimicking horizontal transmission within families, as evidenced by patterns of viral infection in adults and young of experimental, cross-fostered offspring. This previously undescribed route of viral transmission from ectoparasites to offspring to parent hosts may be a common mechanism of virus dispersal in many taxa that display parental care.

  6. Characterization of novel polyomaviruses from Bornean and Sumatran orang-utans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewoud, Marlous J; Fagrouch, Zahra; van Gessel, Sabine; Niphuis, Henk; Bulavaite, Aiste; Warren, Kristin S; Heeney, Jonathan L; Verschoor, Ernst J

    2010-03-01

    Serological screening of sera from orang-utans demonstrated a high percentage of sera that cross-reacted with antigens of the polyomavirus (PyV) simian virus 40. Analysis of archival DNA samples from 71 Bornean and eight Sumatran orang-utans with a broad-spectrum PCR assay resulted in the detection of PyV infections in 11 animals from both species. Sequence analysis of the amplicons revealed considerable differences between the PyVs from Bornean and Sumatran orang-utans. The genome from two PyVs, one from each species, was therefore amplified and sequenced. Both viral genomes revealed a characteristic PyV architecture, but lacked an obvious agnogene. Neighbour-joining analysis positioned the viruses in a large cluster together with viruses from bats, bovines, rodents and several primate PyVs from chimpanzees, African green monkeys, squirrel monkeys and the human Merkel cell PyV.

  7. CRISPR/Cas9 System as an Agent for Eliminating Polyomavirus JC Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassen S Wollebo

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML is a fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS caused by reactivation of the human polyomavirus JCV gene expression and its replication in oligodendrocytes, the myelin producing cells in the brain. Once a rare disease seen in patients with lymphotproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders, PML has been seen more frequently in HIV-1 positive/AIDS patients as well as patients undergoing immunomodulatory therapy due for autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and others. As of now there is no cure for PML and in most cases disease progression leads to death within two years. Similar to other polyomaviruses, the JCV genome is small circular double stranded DNA that includes coding sequences for the viral early protein, T-antigen, which is critical for directing viral reactivation and lytic infection. Here, we employ a newly developed gene editing strategy, CRISPR/Cas9, to introduce mutations in the viral genome and, by inactivating the gene encoding T-antigen, inhibit viral replication. We first used bioinformatics screening and identified several potential targets within the JCV T-antigen gene that can serve as sites for the creation of guide RNAs (gRNAs for positioning the Cas9 nuclease on the designated area of the viral genome for editing. Results from a series of integrated genetic and functional studies showed that transient or conditional expression of Cas9 and gRNAs specifically targets the DNA sequences corresponding to the N-terminal region of T-antigen, and by introducing mutation, interferes with expression and function of of the viral protein, hence suppressing viral replication in permissive cells. Results from SURVEYOR assay revealed no off-target effects of the JCV-specific CRISPR/Cas9 editing apparatus. These observations provide the first evidence for the employment of a gene editing strategy as a promising tool for the

  8. Reactivation of BK polyomavirus in patients with multiple sclerosis receiving natalizumab therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Roisin M

    2012-02-01

    Natalizumab therapy in multiple sclerosis has been associated with JC polyomavirus-induced progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy. We hypothesized that natalizumab may also lead to reactivation of BK, a related human polyomavirus capable of causing morbidity in immunosuppressed groups. Patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis treated with natalizumab were prospectively monitored for reactivation of BK virus in blood and urine samples, and for evidence of associated renal dysfunction. In this cohort, JC and BK DNA in blood and urine; cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA in blood and urine; CD4 and CD8 T-lymphocyte counts and ratios in peripheral blood; and renal function were monitored at regular intervals. BK subtyping and noncoding control region sequencing was performed on samples demonstrating reactivation. Prior to commencement of natalizumab therapy, 3 of 36 patients with multiple sclerosis (8.3%) had BK viruria and BK reactivation occurred in 12 of 54 patients (22.2%). BK viruria was transient in 7, continuous in 2 patients, and persistent viruria was associated with transient viremia. Concomitant JC and CMV viral loads were undetectable. CD4:CD8 ratios fluctuated, but absolute CD4 counts did not fall below normal limits. In four of seven patients with BK virus reactivation, transient reductions in CD4 counts were observed at onset of BK viruria: these resolved in three of four patients on resuppression of BK replication. No renal dysfunction was observed in the cohort. BK virus reactivation can occur during natalizumab therapy; however, the significance in the absence of renal dysfunction is unclear. We propose regular monitoring for BK reactivation or at least for evidence of renal dysfunction in patients receiving natalizumab.

  9. Surveillance of polyomavirus BK in relation to immunosuppressive therapy in kidney transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Reactivation of polyomavirus BK in kidney transplant recipients has been associated to the development of nephropathy (polyomavirus-associated nephropathy, PVAN, possibly leading to the loss of the transplanted organ. Immunosuppression is the condicio sine qua non for the onset of PVAN; however, a lower incidence of BK viremia has been reported with low-level tacrolimus based immunosuppressive protocols in comparison to cyclosporine A.Aim of this study was to compare the two immunosuppressive protocols. Methods. Virological monitoring of BK was performed in 468 consecutive renal transplant patients over a period of 3 years (2370 urine e 2370 serum specimens: in particular, 1780 specimens from 362 patients treated with tacrolimus and 590 from 106 treated with cyclosporine A. Results. BK viremia was evidenced in 124 (7.0% and 12 (2.0% specimens from 40 (11.0% and 11 (10.4% patients treated with tacrolimus and cyclosporine A, respectively; similarly, BK viruria in 289 (16.2% and 58 (9.8% specimens from 67 (18.5% and 27 (25.5% patients, being the difference of incidence highly significant (p <0.0001 for both viremia and viruria at comparison between specimens and not significant for patients. No case of PVAN was diagnosed at histophatology evaluation. Conclusions. The incidence of viremia and viruria was similar to that previously reported. Our results evidenced that with low-level tacrolimus-based protocols the overall incidence of reactivation in renal transplant patients is not significantly different and there is no increased risk of PVAN, nevertheless the higher incidence of episodes of reactivation.

  10. The spectrum of Merkel cell polyomavirus expression in Merkel cell carcinoma, in a variety of cutaneous neoplasms, and in neuroendocrine carcinomas from different anatomical sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thai Yen; Walsh, Noreen M; Pasternak, Sylvia

    2012-04-01

    Most Merkel cell carcinomas display pure neuroendocrine differentiation (pure Merkel cell carcinoma), whereas a minority show combined neuroendocrine and nonneuroendocrine elements (combined Merkel cell carcinoma). Recent identification of Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA and Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen expression in a proportion of Merkel cell carcinomas has suggested viral-induced oncogenesis. To date, Merkel cell polyomavirus immunohistochemistry has shown an absence of viral large T antigen expression in combined Merkel cell carcinoma as well as select non-Merkel cell carcinoma cutaneous lesions and visceral neuroendocrine tumors. In our series, we aimed to further characterize the frequency and pattern of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen expression by CM2B4 immunohistochemistry in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (pure Merkel cell carcinoma and combined Merkel cell carcinoma) and various non-Merkel cell carcinoma lesions from patients with Merkel cell carcinoma, patients without Merkel cell carcinoma, and individuals with altered immune function. Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen was detected in 17 (63%) of 27 pure Merkel cell carcinomas and absent in all 15 (0%) combined Merkel cell carcinomas. Furthermore, complete concordance (100%) of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen expression was observed in 10 cases of primary Merkel cell carcinoma and subsequent tumor metastases. We also evaluated 70 non-Merkel cell carcinoma lesions including 15 cases each of pulmonary and gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors. All 70 non-Merkel cell carcinoma lesions were negative for Merkel cell polyomavirus by CM2B4 immunohistochemistry, irrespective of any known Merkel cell carcinoma diagnosis and immune status. In summary, our identification of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen expression in a subset of Merkel cell carcinoma and lack of findings in combined Merkel cell carcinomas and non-Merkel cell carcinoma lesions concur with

  11. Recent advances in flow cytometric cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Geoffrey W

    2011-01-01

    The classification and separation of one cell type or particle from others is a fundamental task in many areas of science. Numerous techniques are available to perform this task; however, electrostatic cell sorting has gained eminence over others because, when combined with the analysis capabilities of flow cytometry it provides flexible separations based on multiple parameters. Unlike competing technologies, such as gradient or magnetic separations that offer much larger total throughput, flow cytometric cell sorting permits selections based on various levels of fluorescent reporters, rather the complete presence or absence of the reporter. As such, this technology has found application in a huge range of fields. This chapter aims to describe the utility of single-cell sorting with particular emphasis given to index sorting. This is followed by two recently developed novel techniques of sorting cells or particles. The first of these is positional sorting which is useful in cell-based studies where sorting can proceed and produce meaningful results without being inherently dependant on prior knowledge of where gates should be set. Secondly, reflective plate sorting is introduced which positionally links multiwell sample and collection plates in a convenient assay format so that cells in the collection plate "reflect" those in the sample plate.

  12. Chemokines as novel and versatile reagents for flow cytometry and cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brocq, Michelle L; Fraser, Alasdair R; Cotton, Graham; Woznica, Kerry; McCulloch, Clare V; Hewit, Kay D; McKimmie, Clive S; Nibbs, Robert J B; Campbell, John D M; Graham, Gerard J

    2014-06-15

    Cell therapy regimens are frequently compromised by low-efficiency cell homing to therapeutic niches. Improvements in this regard would enhance effectiveness of clinically applicable cell therapy. The major regulators of tissue-specific cellular migration are chemokines, and therefore selection of therapeutic cellular populations for appropriate chemokine receptor expression would enhance tissue-homing competence. A number of practical considerations preclude the use of Abs in this context, and alternative approaches are required. In this study, we demonstrate that appropriately labeled chemokines are at least as effective in detecting their cognate receptors as commercially available Abs. We also demonstrate the utility of biotinylated chemokines as cell-sorting reagents. Specifically, we demonstrate, in the context of CCR7 (essential for lymph node homing of leukocytes), the ability of biotinylated CCL19 with magnetic bead sorting to enrich for CCR7-expressing cells. The sorted cells demonstrate improved CCR7 responsiveness and lymph node-homing capability, and the sorting is effective for both T cells and dendritic cells. Importantly, the ability of chemokines to detect CCR7, and sort for CCR7 positivity, crosses species being effective on murine and human cells. This novel approach to cell sorting is therefore inexpensive, versatile, and applicable to numerous cell therapy contexts. We propose that this represents a significant technological advance with important therapeutic implications.

  13. Data parallel sorting for particle simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagum, Leonardo

    1992-01-01

    Sorting on a parallel architecture is a communications intensive event which can incur a high penalty in applications where it is required. In the case of particle simulation, only integer sorting is necessary, and sequential implementations easily attain the minimum performance bound of O (N) for N particles. Parallel implementations, however, have to cope with the parallel sorting problem which, in addition to incurring a heavy communications cost, can make the minimun performance bound difficult to attain. This paper demonstrates how the sorting problem in a particle simulation can be reduced to a merging problem, and describes an efficient data parallel algorithm to solve this merging problem in a particle simulation. The new algorithm is shown to be optimal under conditions usual for particle simulation, and its fieldwise implementation on the Connection Machine is analyzed in detail. The new algorithm is about four times faster than a fieldwise implementation of radix sort on the Connection Machine.

  14. Scalable, Multithreaded, Partially-in-Place Sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haglin, David J.; Adolf, Robert D.; Mackey, Greg E.

    2013-05-20

    A recent trend in hardware development is producing computing systems that are stretching the number of cores and size of shared-memory beyond where most fundamental serial algorithms perform well. The expectation is that this trend will continue. So it makes sense to rethink our fundamental algorithms such as sorting. There are many situations where data that needs to be sorted will actually fit into the shared memory so applications could benefit from an efficient parallel sorting algorithm. When sorting large data (at least hundreds of Gigabytes) in a single shared memory, there are two factors that affect the algorithm choice. First, does the algorithm sort in-place? And second, does the algorithm scale well beyond tens of threads? Surprisingly, existing algorithms posses either one of these factors, but not both. We present an approach that gracefully degrades in performance as the amount of available working memory decreases relative to the size of the input.

  15. Data Sorting Using Graphics Processing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Mišić

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Graphics processing units (GPUs have been increasingly used for general-purpose computation in recent years. The GPU accelerated applications are found in both scientific and commercial domains. Sorting is considered as one of the very important operations in many applications, so its efficient implementation is essential for the overall application performance. This paper represents an effort to analyze and evaluate the implementations of the representative sorting algorithms on the graphics processing units. Three sorting algorithms (Quicksort, Merge sort, and Radix sort were evaluated on the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA platform that is used to execute applications on NVIDIA graphics processing units. Algorithms were tested and evaluated using an automated test environment with input datasets of different characteristics. Finally, the results of this analysis are briefly discussed.

  16. Polyomavirus specific cellular immunity: from BK-virus-specific cellular immunity to BK-virus-associated nephropathy ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    manon edekeyser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In renal transplantation, BK-virus-associated nephropathy has emerged as a major complication, with a prevalence of 5–10% and graft loss in >50% of cases. BK-virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family and rarely induces apparent clinical disease in the general population. However, replication of polyomaviruses, associated with significant organ disease, is observed in patients with acquired immunosuppression, which suggests a critical role for virus-specific cellular immunity to control virus replication and prevent chronic disease. Monitoring of specific immunity combined with viral load could be used to individually assess the risk of viral reactivation and virus control. We review the current knowledge on BK-virus specific cellular immunity and, more specifically, in immunocompromised patients. In the future, immune-based therapies could allow us to treat and prevent BK-virus-associated nephropathy.

  17. Sorting carbon nanotubes for electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Richard

    2008-11-25

    Because of their unique structure and composition, single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are at the interface between molecules and crystalline solids. They also present properties that are ideal for making lightweight, inexpensive, and flexible electronics. The raw material is composed of a heterogeneous mixture of SWNTs that differ in helicity and diameter and, therefore, requires purification and separation. In a series of groundbreaking experiments, a robust process serving this purpose was developed based on SWNTs encapsulated in surfactants and water. Ultracentrifugation in a density gradient combined with surfactant mixtures provided buoyant density differences, enabling enrichment for both diameter and electronic properties. A new paper in this issue explores further the process through the hydrodynamic properties of SWNT-surfactant complexes. The study reveals that we have just begun to uncover the dynamics and properties of nanotube-surfactant interactions and highlights the potential that could be gained from a better understanding of their chemistry. The time scale of integration of carbon nanotubes into electronics applications remains unclear, but the recent developments in sorting out SWNTs paves the way for improving on the properties of network-based SWNTs.

  18. Asymmetric Assembly of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Large T-Antigen Origin Binding Domains at the Viral Origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Harrison; G Meinke; H Kwun; H Rogalin; P Phelan; P Bullock; Y Chang; P Moore; A Bohm

    2011-12-31

    The double-stranded DNA polyomavirus Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) causes Merkel cell carcinoma, an aggressive but rare human skin cancer that most often affects immunosuppressed and elderly persons. As in other polyomaviruses, the large T-antigen of MCV recognizes the viral origin of replication by binding repeating G(A/G)GGC pentamers. The spacing, number, orientation, and necessity of repeats for viral replication differ, however, from other family members such as SV40 and murine polyomavirus. We report here the 2.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of the MCV large T-antigen origin binding domain (OBD) in complex with a DNA fragment from the MCV origin of replication. Consistent with replication data showing that three of the G(A/G)GGC-like binding sites near the center of the origin are required for replication, the crystal structure contains three copies of the OBD. This stoichiometry was verified using isothermal titration calorimetry. The affinity for G(A/G)GGC-containing double-stranded DNA was found to be {approx} 740 nM, approximately 8-fold weaker than the equivalent domain in SV40 for the analogous region of the SV40 origin. The difference in affinity is partially attributable to DNA-binding residue Lys331 (Arg154 in SV40). In contrast to SV40, a small protein-protein interface is observed between MCV OBDs when bound to the central region of the origin. This protein-protein interface is reminiscent of that seen in bovine papilloma virus E1 protein. Mutational analysis indicates, however, that this interface contributes little to DNA binding energy.

  19. KI and WU Polyomaviruses and CD4+ Cell Counts in HIV-1–infected Patients, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakir-Mina, Muhammed; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Farchi, Francesca; Bergallo, Massimiliano; Cavallo, Rossana; Adorno, Gaspare; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2010-01-01

    To investigate an association between KI and WU polyomavirus (KIPyV and WUPyV) infections and CD4+ cell counts, we tested HIV-1–positive patients and blood donors. No association was found between cell counts and virus infections in HIV-1–positive patients. Frequency of KIPyV infection was similar for both groups. WUPyV was more frequent in HIV-1–positive patients. PMID:20735940

  20. DNA from KI, WU and Merkel cell polyomaviruses is not detected in childhood central nervous system tumours or neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Giraud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BK and JC polyomaviruses (BKV and JCV are potentially oncogenic and have in the past inconclusively been associated with tumours of the central nervous system (CNS, while BKV has been hinted, but not confirmed to be associated with neuroblastomas. Recently three new polyomaviruses (KIPyV, WUPyV and MCPyV were identified in humans. So far KIPyV and WUPyV have not been associated to human diseases, while MCPyV was discovered in Merkel Cell carcinomas and may have neuroepithelial cell tropism. However, all three viruses can be potentially oncogenic and this compelled us to investigate for their presence in childhood CNS and neuroblastomas. METHODOLOGY: The presence of KI, WU and MCPyV DNA was analysed, by a joint WU and KI specific PCR (covering part of VP1 and by a MCPyV specific regular and real time quantitative PCR (covering part of Large T in 25 CNS tumour biopsies and 31 neuroblastoma biopsies from the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden. None of the three new human polyomaviruses were found to be associated with any of the tumours, despite the presence of PCR amplifiable DNA assayed by a S14 housekeeping gene PCR. CONCLUSION: In this pilot study, the presence of MCPyV, KI and WU was not observed in childhood CNS tumours and neuroblastomas. Nonetheless, we suggest that additional data are warranted in tumours of the central and peripheral nervous systems and we do not exclude that other still not yet detected polyomaviruses could be present in these tumours.

  1. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  2. Computed Tomography Findings of Human Polyomavirus BK (BKV)-Associated Cystitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, M.; Beck, R.; Igney, A.; Vogel, M.; Maksimovic, O.; Claussen, C.D.; Faul, C.; Horger, M. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dept. of Internal Medicine-Oncology, and Inst. of Medical Virology, Eberhard-Karls Univ., Tbingen (Germany))

    2008-12-15

    Background: Over 70% of the general population worldwide is positive for antibodies against polyomavirus hominis type 1 (BKV). Polyomavirus can be reactivated in immunocompromised patients and thereby induce urogenital tract infection, including cystitis. Purpose: To describe the computed tomography (CT) findings of human polyomavirus-induced cystitis in adult patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allogeneic HCT). Material and Methods: The study population was a retrospective cohort of 11 consecutive adult patients (eight men, three women; age range 22-59 years, mean 42.9 years) who received allogeneic HCT between December 2003 and December 2007 and were tested positive for urinary BKV infection. All CT scans were evaluated with regard to bladder wall thickness, mucosal enhancement, distinct layering of thickened bladder wall, and presence of intravesical clots, perivesical stranding as well as attenuation values of intravesical urine. Clinical data concerning transplant and conditioning regimen variables and laboratory parameters were correlated with degree and extent of imaging findings. Results: All patients had clinical signs of cystitis with different degrees of thickening of the urinary bladder wall. Well-delineated urinary bladder layers were present in six patients. Thickening of the urinary bladder wall was continuous in nine of 11 patients. Increased attenuation of intravesical urine was found in seven patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. Four patients had intraluminal clots. Perivesical stranding was not a major CT finding, occurring in a mild fashion in three of 11 patients. The clinical classification of hemorrhagic cystitis did not correlate with the analyzed imaging parameters. Patient outcome was not influenced by this infectious complication. Conclusion: CT findings in patients with polyomavirus BK cystitis consist of different degrees of bladder wall thickening usually with good delineation of all mural layers and

  3. Unravelling the pivotal role of Alix in MVB sorting and silencing of the activated EGFR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Gallick, Gary E; Kuang, Jian

    2015-03-15

    Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III-mediated membrane invagination and scission are a critical step in multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors, and generally thought to be required for degradation of these receptors in lysosomes. The adaptor protein Alix is critically involved in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated, membrane-remodelling processes in mammalian cells. However, Alix knockdown does not inhibit degradation of the activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in mammalian cell lines, leading to a widely held notion that Alix is not critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that, despite its non-essential role in degradation of the activated EGFR, Alix plays a critical role in its MVB sorting and silencing Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation of mammalian cell lines induces Alix's interaction with the ubiquitinated EGFR via the Alix V domain, and increases Alix's association with membrane-bound charged multivesicular body protein 4 (CHMP4) via the Alix Bro1 domain. Under both continuous and pulse-chase EGF stimulation conditions, inhibition of Alix's interaction with membrane-bound CHMP4, inhibition of Alix dimerization through the V domain or Alix knockdown dramatically inhibits MVB sorting of the activated EGFR and promotes sustained activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1/2. Under the continuous EGF stimulation conditions, these cell treatments also retard degradation of the activated EGFR. These findings indicate that Alix is critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells.

  4. Enhancement of Selection, Bubble and Insertion Sorting Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq Umar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In everyday life there is a large amount of data to arrange because sorting removes any ambiguities and make the data analysis and data processing very easy, efficient and provides with cost less effort. In this study a set of improved sorting algorithms are proposed which gives better performance and design idea. In this study five new sorting algorithms (Bi-directional Selection Sort, Bi-directional bubble sort, MIDBiDirectional Selection Sort, MIDBidirectional bubble sort and linear insertion sort are presented. Bi-directional Selection Sort and MIDBiDirectional Selection Sort are the enhancement on basic selection sort while Bidirectional bubble sort and MIDBidirectional bubble sort are the enhancement on basic bubble sort by changing the selection and swapping mechanism of data for sorting. Enhanced sorting algorithms reduced the iteration by half and quarter times respectively. Asymptotically complexities of these algorithms are reduced to O (n2/2 and O (n2/4 from O (n2. Linear insertion sort is the enhancement of insertion sort by changing the design of algorithm (convert two loops to one loop. So asymptotically this algorithm is converted to linear time complexity from quadratic complexity. These sorting algorithms are described using C. The proposed algorithms are analyzed using asymptotic analysis and also using machine-running time and compared with their basic sorting algorithms. In this study we also discuss how the performance and complexity can be improved by optimizing the code and design.

  5. Temporal and geographic clustering of polyomavirus-associated olfactory tumors in 10 free-ranging raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannitti, F; Higgins, R J; Pesavento, P A; Dela Cruz, F; Clifford, D L; Piazza, M; Parker Struckhoff, A; Del Valle, L; Bollen, A W; Puschner, B; Kerr, E; Gelberg, H; Mete, A; McGraw, S; Woods, L W

    2014-07-01

    Reports of primary nervous system tumors in wild raccoons are extremely rare. Olfactory tumors were diagnosed postmortem in 9 free-ranging raccoons from 4 contiguous counties in California and 1 raccoon from Oregon within a 26-month period between 2010 and 2012. We describe the geographic and temporal features of these 10 cases, including the laboratory diagnostic investigations and the neuropathologic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics of these tumors in the affected animals. All 9 raccoons from California were found within a localized geographic region of the San Francisco Bay Area (within a 44.13-km radius). The tight temporal and geographic clustering and consistent anatomic location in the olfactory system of tumor types not previously described in raccoons (malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and undifferentiated sarcomas) strongly suggest either a common cause or a precipitating factor leading to induction or potentiation of neuro-oncogenesis and so prompted an extensive diagnostic investigation to explore possible oncogenic infectious and/or toxic causes. By a consensus polymerase chain reaction strategy, a novel, recently reported polyomavirus called raccoon polyomavirus was identified in all 10 tumors but not in the normal brain tissue from the affected animals, suggesting that the virus might play a role in neuro-oncogenesis. In addition, expression of the viral protein T antigen was detected in all tumors containing the viral sequences. We discuss the potential role of raccoon polyomavirus as an oncogenic virus. © The Author(s) 2013.

  6. An Unsupervised Online Spike-Sorting Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knieling, Simeon; Sridharan, Kousik S; Belardinelli, Paolo; Naros, Georgios; Weiss, Daniel; Mormann, Florian; Gharabaghi, Alireza

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular neuronal microelectrode recordings can include action potentials from multiple neurons. To separate spikes from different neurons, they can be sorted according to their shape, a procedure referred to as spike-sorting. Several algorithms have been reported to solve this task. However, when clustering outcomes are unsatisfactory, most of them are difficult to adjust to achieve the desired results. We present an online spike-sorting framework that uses feature normalization and weighting to maximize the distinctiveness between different spike shapes. Furthermore, multiple criteria are applied to either facilitate or prevent cluster fusion, thereby enabling experimenters to fine-tune the sorting process. We compare our method to established unsupervised offline (Wave_Clus (WC)) and online (OSort (OS)) algorithms by examining their performance in sorting various test datasets using two different scoring systems (AMI and the Adamos metric). Furthermore, we evaluate sorting capabilities on intra-operative recordings using established quality metrics. Compared to WC and OS, our algorithm achieved comparable or higher scores on average and produced more convincing sorting results for intra-operative datasets. Thus, the presented framework is suitable for both online and offline analysis and could substantially improve the quality of microelectrode-based data evaluation for research and clinical application.

  7. An improved infrared technique for sorting pecans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeve, Thorsten; Dereniak, Eustace L.; Lamonica, John A., Jr.

    1991-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of pecan spectral reflectances. It describes an experiment for measuring the contrast between several components of raw pecan product to be sorted. An analysis of the experimental data reveals high contrast ratios in the infrared spectrum, suggesting a potential improvement in sorting efficiency when separating pecan meat from shells. It is believed that this technique has the potential to dramatically improve the efficiency of current sorting machinery, and to reduce the cost of processing pecans for the consumer market.

  8. Minimal Model Semantics for Sorted Constraint Representation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖乐健; 史忠植

    1995-01-01

    Sorted constraint representation is a very useful representation in AI which combines class hierarchies and constraint networks.For such sorted constraint representation,a problem is how to generalize the idea of default inheritance to constraint network,where the attributes in a class or between different classes interact with each other via the network.To give a formal account for the defeasible reasoning in such representation,a general sorted constraint logic is proposed,and a minimal-model semantics for the logic is presented.

  9. Engineering a Cache-Oblivious Sorting Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Vinther, Kristoffer

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an algorithmic engineering study of cache-oblivious sorting. We investigate by empirical methods a number of implementation issues and parameter choices for the cache-oblivious sorting algorithm Lazy Funnelsort, and compare the final algorithm with Quicksort, the established standard...... for comparison-based sorting, as well as with recent cache-aware proposals. The main result is a carefully implemented cache-oblivious sorting algorithm, which our experiments show can be faster than the best Quicksort implementation we are able to find, already for input sizes well within the limits of RAM....... It is also at least as fast as the recent cache-aware implementations included in the test. On disk the difference is even more pronounced regarding Quicksort and the cache-aware algorithms, whereas the algorithm is slower than a careful implementation of multiway Mergesort such as TPIE....

  10. Filter-less submicron hydrodynamic size sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouet, M; Mader, M-A; Iraïn, S; Yanha, Z; Naillon, A; Cargou, S; Gué, A-M; Joseph, P

    2016-02-21

    We propose a simple microfluidic device able to separate submicron particles (critical size ∼0.1 μm) from a complex sample with no filter (minimum channel dimension being 5 μm) by hydrodynamic filtration. A model taking into account the actual velocity profile and hydrodynamic resistances enables prediction of the chip sorting properties for any geometry. Two design families are studied to obtain (i) small sizes within minutes (low-aspect ratio, two-level chip) and (ii) micron-sized sorting with a μL flow rate (3D architecture based on lamination). We obtain quantitative agreement of sorting performances both with experiments and with numerical solving, and determine the limits of the approach. We therefore demonstrate a passive, filter-less sub-micron size sorting with a simple, robust, and easy to fabricate design.

  11. Visual ergonomics interventions in mail sorting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphälä, H; Hansson, G-Å; Dahlqvist, C; Eklund, J

    2012-01-01

    This study was performed between 2004 and 2011 at mail sorting facilities in Sweden. During this time, different interventions were performed. The first was a lighting intervention that had a positive impact on the postal workers, especially those with eyestrain. A new lighting system also improved the illuminance and gave better light distribution. The second intervention involved new personal spectacles for the postal workers who needed them and this had a positive effect on eyestrain. The third intervention involved a specific type of sorting spectacles for the postal workers who already used progressive lenses privately. The reading distances that the postal workers had while sorting the mail was inverted to the distances in their regular progressive lenses. The new sorting spectacles had a positive effect on head postures and on muscular activity.

  12. Efficient sorting of Bessel beams [Conference paper

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlanga, T

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A procedure to efficiently sort orbital angular momentum (OAM) states of light, by performing a Cartesian to log-polar coordinate transformation which translates helically phased beams into a transverse phase gradient, currently exists1. We...

  13. Quantum Database Search can do without Sorting

    CERN Document Server

    Patel, A

    2001-01-01

    Sorting is a fundamental computational process, which facilitates subsequent searching of a database. It can be thought of as factorisation of the search process. The location of a desired item in a sorted database can be found by classical queries that inspect one letter of the label at a time. For an unsorted database, no such classical quick search algorithm is available. If the database permits quantum queries, however, then mere digitisation is sufficient for efficient search. Sorting becomes redundant with the quantum superposition of states. A quantum algorithm is written down which locates the desired item in an unsorted database a factor of two faster than the best classical algorithm can in a sorted database. This algorithm has close resemblance to the assembly process in DNA replication.

  14. Card Sorts, State Tests, and Meaningful Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvot, Jennifer B.; Benson, Sharon L. D.

    2008-01-01

    This article shares card-sorting activities that involve state-mandated test items to use with prospective and practicing mathematics teachers to teach about accountability measures while exploring reform-minded mathematics instruction recommendations. (Contains 2 figures.)

  15. Sorting it out: regulation of exosome loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Baixauli, Francesc; Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Mittelbrunn, María

    2014-10-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs), a term that includes both exosomes of endocytic origin and vesicles derived from plasma membranes, are continuously secreted by cells to the extracellular environment, and represent a novel vehicle for cell-cell communication. Exosomes contain specific repertoires of proteins and RNAs, indicating the existence of mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into them. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the loading of proteins into exosomes have been studied for years, the sorting of RNA has been elusive until recently. Here we review the molecular mechanisms that control the sorting of molecules into exosomes, with special attention to the sorting of RNA. We also discuss how the cellular context affects the composition of exosomes, and thus the outcome of the communication between the exosome-producer and recipient cells, with particular focus on the communication between tumor cells and with cells of the tumor microenvironment.

  16. Routing of Hansenula polymorpha alcohol oxidase : An alternative peroxisomal protein-sorting machinery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunkel, Katja; Dijk, Ralf van; Veenhuis, Marten; Klei, Ida J. van der

    Import of Hansenula polymorpha alcohol oxidase (AO) into peroxisomes is dependent on the PTS1 receptor, HpPex5p. The PTS1 of AO (-LARF) is sufficient to direct reporter proteins to peroxisomes. To study AO sorting in more detail, strains producing mutant AO proteins were constructed. AO containing a

  17. Another Definition of Order—Sorted Algebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何自强

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the definition of order-sorted algebra is generalized by introducing transformation functions between subtypes and supertypes.According to our definition,a type needn't be a subset of its supertype and a record model may form an order-sorted algebra.A new definition of equation is given.It has also been proved that equational theories and describing single inheritance have the initial model.

  18. Automatic spike sorting using tuning information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Valérie

    2009-09-01

    Current spike sorting methods focus on clustering neurons' characteristic spike waveforms. The resulting spike-sorted data are typically used to estimate how covariates of interest modulate the firing rates of neurons. However, when these covariates do modulate the firing rates, they provide information about spikes' identities, which thus far have been ignored for the purpose of spike sorting. This letter describes a novel approach to spike sorting, which incorporates both waveform information and tuning information obtained from the modulation of firing rates. Because it efficiently uses all the available information, this spike sorter yields lower spike misclassification rates than traditional automatic spike sorters. This theoretical result is verified empirically on several examples. The proposed method does not require additional assumptions; only its implementation is different. It essentially consists of performing spike sorting and tuning estimation simultaneously rather than sequentially, as is currently done. We used an expectation-maximization maximum likelihood algorithm to implement the new spike sorter. We present the general form of this algorithm and provide a detailed implementable version under the assumptions that neurons are independent and spike according to Poisson processes. Finally, we uncover a systematic flaw of spike sorting based on waveform information only.

  19. Glycosphingolipids as Receptors for Non-Enveloped Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Taube

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Glycosphingolipids are ubiquitous molecules composed of a lipid and a carbohydrate moiety. Their main functions are as antigen/toxin receptors, in cell adhesion/recognition processes, or initiation/modulation of signal transduction pathways. Microbes take advantage of the different carbohydrate structures displayed on a specific cell surface for attachment during infection. For some viruses, such as the polyomaviruses, binding to gangliosides determines the internalization pathway into cells. For others, the interaction between microbe and carbohydrate can be a critical determinant for host susceptibility. In this review, we summarize the role of glycosphingolipids as receptors for members of the non-enveloped calici-, rota-, polyoma- and parvovirus families.

  20. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation.

  1. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioni, M.; Leboeuf, C.; Comoli, P.; Ginevri, F.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus‐associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV‐specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4+ T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV‐specific CD8+ T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty‐nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon‐γ enzyme‐linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG–seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  2. JC polyomavirus infection in candidates for kidney transplantation living in the Brazilian Amazon Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Assis Ferreira Melo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the relative occurrences of BK virus (BKV and JC virus (JCV infections in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD. Urine samples were analysed from CKD patients and from 99 patients without CKD as a control. A total of 100 urine samples were analysed from the experimental (CKD patients group and 99 from the control group. Following DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to amplify a 173 bp region of the gene encoding the T antigen of the BKV and JCV. JCV and BKV infections were differentiated based on the enzymatic digestion of the amplified products using BamHI endonuclease. The results indicated that none of the patients in either group was infected with the BKV, whereas 11.1% (11/99 of the control group subjects and 4% (4/100 of the kidney patients were infected with the JCV. High levels of urea in the excreted urine, low urinary cellularity, reduced bladder washout and a delay in analysing the samples may have contributed to the low prevalence of infection. The results indicate that there is a need to increase the sensitivity of assays used to detect viruses in patients with CDK, especially given that polyomavirus infections, especially BKV, can lead to a loss of kidney function following transplantation.

  3. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Small T Antigen Promotes Pro-Glycolytic Metabolic Perturbations Required for Transformation.

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    Christian Berrios

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV is an etiological agent of Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a highly aggressive skin cancer. The MCPyV small tumor antigen (ST is required for maintenance of MCC and can transform normal cells. To gain insight into cellular perturbations induced by MCPyV ST, we performed transcriptome analysis of normal human fibroblasts with inducible expression of ST. MCPyV ST dynamically alters the cellular transcriptome with increased levels of glycolytic genes, including the monocarboxylate lactate transporter SLC16A1 (MCT1. Extracellular flux analysis revealed increased lactate export reflecting elevated aerobic glycolysis in ST expressing cells. Inhibition of MCT1 activity suppressed the growth of MCC cell lines and impaired MCPyV-dependent transformation of IMR90 cells. Both NF-κB and MYC have been shown to regulate MCT1 expression. While MYC was required for MCT1 induction, MCPyV-induced MCT1 levels decreased following knockdown of the NF-κB subunit RelA, supporting a synergistic activity between MCPyV and MYC in regulating MCT1 levels. Several MCC lines had high levels of MYCL and MYCN but not MYC. Increased levels of MYCL was more effective than MYC or MYCN in increasing extracellular acidification in MCC cells. Our results demonstrate the effects of MCPyV ST on the cellular transcriptome and reveal that transformation is dependent, at least in part, on elevated aerobic glycolysis.

  4. Characterization of self-assembled virus-like particles of Merkel cell polyomavirus.

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    Tian-Cheng Li

    Full Text Available In our recombinant baculovirus system, VP1 protein of merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV, which is implicated as a causative agent in Merkel cell carcinoma, was self-assembled into MCPyV-like particles (MCPyV-LP with two different sizes in insect cells, followed by being released into the culture medium. DNA molecules of 1.5- to 5-kb, which were derived from host insect cells, were packaged in large, ~50-nm spherical particles but not in small, ~25-nm particles. Structure reconstruction using cryo-electron microscopy showed that large MCPyV-LPs are composed of 72 pentameric capsomeres arranged in a T = 7 icosahedral surface lattice and are 48 nm in diameter. The MCPyV-LPs did not share antigenic determinants with BK- and JC viruses (BKPyV and JCPyV. The VLP-based enzyme immunoassay was applied to investigate age-specific prevalence of MCPyV infection in the general Japanese population aged 1-70 years. While seroprevalence of MCPyV increased with age in children and young individuals, its seropositivity in each age group was lower compared with BKPyV and JCPyV.

  5. Evaluation of the Gastrointestinal Tract as Potential Route of Primary Polyomavirus Infection in Mice.

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    Gang Huang

    Full Text Available Detection of Polyomavirus (PyV DNA in metropolitan rivers worldwide has led to the suggestion that primary viral infection can occur by the oral route. The aim of this study was to test this notion experimentally.Mouse PyV (MPyV was used to infect C57BL/6J mice by the nasal or intragastric route. Viral load kinetics was studied 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 28 days post-infection (dpi using quantitative PCR.Following nasal infection, MPyV DNA was readily detected in many organs including lung, heart, aorta, colon, and stool with viral loads in the range of 10(3-10(6 copies/mg wet weight that peaked 7-10 dpi. Complete viral clearance occurred in the serum and kidney by 28 dpi, while clearance in other organs was partial with a 10-100 fold decrease in viral load. In contrast, following intragastric infection peak detection of PyV was delayed to 21 dpi, and viral loads were up to 3 logs lower. There was no detectable virus in the heart, colon, or stool.The intragastric route of MPyV infection is successful, not as efficacious as the respiratory route, and associated with delayed viral dissemination as well as a lower peak MPyV load in individual organs.

  6. BK polyomavirus reactivation after reduced-intensity double umbilical cord blood cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, Gowri; Hammond, Sarah P; Broge, Thomas A; Mackenzie, Matthew R; Viscidi, Raphael; Politikos, Ioannis; Koralnik, Igor J; Cutler, Corey S; Ballen, Karen; Boussiotis, Vassiliki; Marty, Francisco M; Tan, Chen Sabrina

    2015-03-01

    Serial serum samples from 27 patients who underwent double umbilical cord blood transplantation (dUCBT) were analyzed for BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) DNA by real-time PCR and BKPyV-specific immune globulin by ELISA. Clinical data were collected on all patients. All pre-transplant sera had detectable anti-BKPyV IgG. Fifteen patients (56%) had detectable serum BKPyV DNA (median 8.9 × 10(4) copies/ml; range 4.1 × 10(3)-7.9 × 10(6) copies/ml) a median of 40 days (range, 27-733 days) after dUCBT, with highest viral loads on Day 100 assessment. The cumulative probability of developing BKPyV viremia by Day 100 was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.33-0.71). Six of 15 patients with BKPyV viremia experienced hemorrhagic cystitis by Day 100. By Day 100, there was a trend towards higher BKPyV viral loads in sera of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis than in those BKPyV viremic patients without hemorrhagic cystitis (p = 0.06). BKPyV viremia was associated with significantly higher anti-BKPyV IgM values at 6 months post-dUCBT (P = 0.003). BKPyV viremia occurs early after dUBCT and is associated with a detectable humoral immune response by 6 months post-dUBCT.

  7. Atypical presentation of Merkel cell carcinoma positive to polyomavirus DNA detection: Experience from a single center

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    Iovino F

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC is a rare malignant tumor of the skin with tendency to rapid local progression and frequent spread to regional lymph nodes. In this paper we retrospectively describe the atypical presentation of 5 cases of Merkel cell carcinoma observed in our surgical department in the last ten years. Four patients had buttock localization whilst one patient had primary nodal presentation. Since integration of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV DNA into the tumor genome is frequently recorded in this type of cancer, we analyzed formalin-fixed paraffin embedded MCC tissue samples from our five patients for the presence of MCPyV DNA by means of polymerase chain reaction (PCR. MCPyV DNA was present in all five carcinomas. All patients were treated with wide surgical excision of the tumor and sentinel node biopsy. One patient had stage I disease, three patients had stage II disease, and one patient had stage III disease. Adjuvant radiotherapy was administered in all cases for local control. Chemotherapy was administered to the patient with primary nodal presentation and in stage III disease. Median time of follow-up was 84 months. None of the patients relapsed. Despite the low number of patients examined, our experience suggests that surgery is a necessary step whereas implementation of adjuvant therapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy depends on individual risk assessment. Treatment outcome was very good, probably due to early detection of MCC.

  8. Laboratory reporting accuracy of polymerase chain reaction testing for avian polyomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Brenna; Olsen, Geoff; Speer, Brian

    2013-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are available for detection of birds infected with avian polyomavirus (APV). Several laboratories offer this diagnostic assay in the United States, but little information is available regarding assay sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. In this study, known APV-positive and APV-negative samples (each n = 10, 5 undiluted and 5 diluted) were sent to 5 commercial laboratories. A significant difference in reporting accuracy was found among laboratories, most notably for dilute APV-positive samples. Two out of 5 laboratories provided 100% accurate results, 1 had an accuracy of 90%, and 2 reported 80% and 75% accuracy, respectively. The accuracies of the last 2 laboratories were negatively affected by test sensitivities of 60% and 50%, respectively. These findings show that although accurate results were reported by most laboratories, both false-positive and false-negative results were reported by at least 3 laboratories, and false-negative results reported for dilute APV-positive samples predominated. These study findings illustrate a need for veterinary diagnostic laboratories to institute improved voluntary quality control measures.

  9. A PDI family network acts distinctly and coordinately with ERp29 to facilitate polyomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczak, Christopher P; Tsai, Billy

    2011-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-cytosol membrane transport is a decisive infection step for the murine polyomavirus (Py). We previously determined that ERp29, a protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) member, extrudes the Py VP1 C-terminal arm to initiate ER membrane penetration. This reaction requires disruption of Py's disulfide bonds. Here, we found that the PDI family members ERp57, PDI, and ERp72 facilitate virus infection. However, while all three proteins disrupt Py's disulfide bonds in vitro, only ERp57 and PDI operate in concert with ERp29 to unfold the VP1 C-terminal arm. An alkylated Py cannot stimulate infection, implying a pivotal role of viral free cysteines during infection. Consistent with this, we found that although PDI and ERp72 reduce Py, ERp57 principally isomerizes the virus in vitro, a reaction that requires viral free cysteines. Our mutagenesis study subsequently identified VP1 C11 and C15 as important for infection, suggesting a role for these residues during isomerization. C11 and C15 also act together to stabilize interpentamer interactions for a subset of the virus pentamers, likely because some of these residues form interpentamer disulfide bonds. This study reveals how a PDI family functions coordinately and distinctly to promote Py infection and pinpoints a role of viral cysteines in this process.

  10. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

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    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  11. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  12. Laser ablation cell sorting in scanning cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Feimo; Price, Jeffrey H.

    2001-05-01

    Flow cytometry has been an important tool for automated cells sorting. However, the lack of good sensitivity prevents it from being used for rare events sorting; furthermore, fragile cells, anchorage-dependent cells, and clump forming cells cannot be sorted this way. A fully automated, high-speed scanning cytometer with autofocus and image segmentation is capable of accurately locating contaminant cells in a monolayer cell population. A laser ablation system was incorporated into the cytometer to negatively sort out the unwanted cells by applying a focused, ultra-short laser pulse (sub-micron diameter, pulse duration = 4 nsec, wavelength - 500 nm) to each targeted cell. Due to the high power density (approximately 1010 W/cm2) that was present at the focal point, disruptive mechanical forces were generated and were responsible for the kill. Fluorescently stained NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells were used as a model contaminant target ells in an unstained NIH-3T3 population to determine the identification-kill effectiveness. The contaminant cells were stained with the fluorochrome CellTracker Blue CMAC, whereas the background cells were left intact. Ablation pulses were applied in frame-by-frame increment batches to the cell culture on the microscope. The negative sorting effectiveness was analyzed by automatically re-scanning the post-ablation cell culture in phase contrast and propidium iodide stained epi fluorescent fields to verify cell death.

  13. Polyomavirus-associated Trichodysplasia spinulosa involves hyperproliferation, pRB phosphorylation and upregulation of p16 and p21.

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    Siamaque Kazem

    Full Text Available Trichodysplasia spinulosa (TS is a proliferative skin disease observed in severely immunocompromized patients. It is characterized by papule and trichohyalin-rich spicule formation, epidermal acanthosis and distention of dysmorphic hair follicles overpopulated by inner root sheath cells (IRS. TS probably results from active infection with the TS-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV, as indicated by high viral-load, virus protein expression and particle formation. The underlying pathogenic mechanism imposed by TSPyV infection has not been solved yet. By analogy with other polyomaviruses, such as the Merkel cell polyomavirus associated with Merkel cell carcinoma, we hypothesized that TSPyV T-antigen promotes proliferation of infected IRS cells. Therefore, we analyzed TS biopsy sections for markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67 and cell cycle regulation (p16ink4a, p21waf, pRB, phosphorylated pRB, and the putatively transforming TSPyV early large tumor (LT antigen. Intense Ki-67 staining was detected especially in the margins of TS hair follicles, which colocalized with TSPyV LT-antigen detection. In this area, staining was also noted for pRB and particularly phosphorylated pRB, as well as p16ink4a and p21waf. Healthy control hair follicles did not or hardly stained for these markers. Trichohyalin was particularly detected in the center of TS follicles that stained negative for Ki-67 and TSPyV LT-antigen. In summary, we provide evidence for clustering of TSPyV LT-antigen-expressing and proliferating cells in the follicle margins that overproduce negative cell cycle regulatory proteins. These data are compatible with a scenario of TSPyV T-antigen-mediated cell cycle progression, potentially creating a pool of proliferating cells that enable viral DNA replication and drive papule and spicule formation.

  14. Polyomavirus-associated Trichodysplasia spinulosa involves hyperproliferation, pRB phosphorylation and upregulation of p16 and p21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazem, Siamaque; van der Meijden, Els; Wang, Richard C; Rosenberg, Arlene S; Pope, Elena; Benoit, Taylor; Fleckman, Philip; Feltkamp, Mariet C W

    2014-01-01

    Trichodysplasia spinulosa (TS) is a proliferative skin disease observed in severely immunocompromized patients. It is characterized by papule and trichohyalin-rich spicule formation, epidermal acanthosis and distention of dysmorphic hair follicles overpopulated by inner root sheath cells (IRS). TS probably results from active infection with the TS-associated polyomavirus (TSPyV), as indicated by high viral-load, virus protein expression and particle formation. The underlying pathogenic mechanism imposed by TSPyV infection has not been solved yet. By analogy with other polyomaviruses, such as the Merkel cell polyomavirus associated with Merkel cell carcinoma, we hypothesized that TSPyV T-antigen promotes proliferation of infected IRS cells. Therefore, we analyzed TS biopsy sections for markers of cell proliferation (Ki-67) and cell cycle regulation (p16ink4a, p21waf, pRB, phosphorylated pRB), and the putatively transforming TSPyV early large tumor (LT) antigen. Intense Ki-67 staining was detected especially in the margins of TS hair follicles, which colocalized with TSPyV LT-antigen detection. In this area, staining was also noted for pRB and particularly phosphorylated pRB, as well as p16ink4a and p21waf. Healthy control hair follicles did not or hardly stained for these markers. Trichohyalin was particularly detected in the center of TS follicles that stained negative for Ki-67 and TSPyV LT-antigen. In summary, we provide evidence for clustering of TSPyV LT-antigen-expressing and proliferating cells in the follicle margins that overproduce negative cell cycle regulatory proteins. These data are compatible with a scenario of TSPyV T-antigen-mediated cell cycle progression, potentially creating a pool of proliferating cells that enable viral DNA replication and drive papule and spicule formation.

  15. Specific IgG Antibodies React to Mimotopes of BK Polyomavirus, a Small DNA Tumor Virus, in Healthy Adult Sera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrobon, Silvia; Bononi, Ilaria; Mazzoni, Elisa; Lotito, Francesca; Manfrini, Marco; Puozzo, Andrea; Destro, Federica; Guerra, Giovanni; Nocini, Pier Francesco; Martini, Fernanda; Tognon, Mauro G.

    2017-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) was isolated in 1971 from the urine of a kidney transplant patient. Soon after its identification, BKPyV was characterized as a kidney-tropic virus, which is responsible of a significant fraction of the rejection of transplant kidney in the host. Moreover, in experimental conditions, BKPyV is able to transform different types of animal and human cells and to induce tumors of different histotypes in experimental animals. BKPyV DNA sequences have been detected in healthy individuals and cancer patients using polymerase chain reaction/Shouthern blot hybridization methods. Serum antibodies against this polyomavirus were revealed using immunological techniques, which, however, cross-react with other polyomaviruses such as JC (JCPyV) and Simian Virus 40. These non-specific data indicate the need of novel immunological methods and new investigations to check in a specific manner, BKPyV spread in humans. To this aim, mimotopes from BKPyV structural capsid protein 1 (VP1) were employed for specific immunological reactions to IgG antibodies of human serum samples. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic peptides mimicking immunogenic epitopes of BKPyV VP1 was set up and employed to test sera of healthy adult subjects. Data from this innovative immunological assay indicate that serum antibodies against BKPyV VP1 mimotopes are detectable in healthy subjects ranging from 18 to 90 years old. The overall prevalence of serum samples that reacted to BKPyV VP1 mimotopes was 72%. The strong points from this investigation are the novelty of the immunological method, its simplicity of the approach, and the specificity of BKPyV antibody reaction to VP1 mimotopes. PMID:28321224

  16. Flow karyotyping and sorting of human chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Lucas, J.; Peters, D.; Pinkel, D.; Trask, B.; van den Engh, G.; Van Dilla, M.A.

    1986-07-16

    Flow cytometry and sorting are becoming increasingly useful as tools for chromosome classfication and for the detection of numerical and structural chromosome aberrations. Chromosomes of a single type can be purified with these tools to facilitate gene mapping or production of chromosome specific recombinant DNA libraries. For analysis of chromosomes with flow cytometry, the chromosomes are extracted from mitotic cells, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes and classified one-by-one according to their dye content(s). Thus, the flow approach is fundamentally different than conventional karyotyping where chromosomes are classified within the context of a metaphase spread. Flow sorting allows purification of chromosomes that can be distinguished flow cytometrically. The authors describe the basic principles of flow cytometric chromosome classification i.e. flow karyotyping, and chromosome sorting and describe several applications. 30 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Applications of cell sorting in biotechnology

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    Mattanovich Diethard

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to its unique capability to analyze a large number of single cells for several parameters simultaneously, flow cytometry has changed our understanding of the behavior of cells in culture and of the population dynamics even of clonal populations. The potential of this method for biotechnological research, which is based on populations of living cells, was soon appreciated. Sorting applications, however, are still less frequent than one would expect with regard to their potential. This review highlights important contributions where flow cytometric cell sorting was used for physiological research, protein engineering, cell engineering, specifically emphasizing selection of overproducing cell lines. Finally conclusions are drawn concerning the impact of cell sorting on inverse metabolic engineering and systems biology.

  18. T-cell responses to oncogenic merkel cell polyomavirus proteins distinguish patients with merkel cell carcinoma from healthy donors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Rikke Birgitte Lyngaa; Pedersen, Natasja Wulff; Schrama, David

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a highly aggressive skin cancer with strong evidence of viral carcinogenesis. The association of MCC with the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) may explain the explicit immunogenicity of MCC. Indeed, MCPyV-encoded proteins are likely targets for cytotoxic...... the MCPyV oncoprotein large T and small T antigens and the virus capsid protein VP1 for potential T-cell epitopes, and tested for MHC class I affinity. We confirmed the relevance of these epitopes using a high-throughput platform for T-cell enrichment and combinatorial encoding of MHC class I multimers...

  19. cis-acting sequences that control the level of viral DNA synthesis in the polyomavirus late region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melucci-Vigo, G; Ciotta, C; Risuleo, G

    1989-01-01

    A deletion in the polyomavirus late region results in a drastic reduction of viral replication, as shown after transfection of viral DNA into 3T6 cells. This mutation is cis acting, since cotransfection with wild-type DNA did not restore the normal phenotype. Viral DNA synthesis returned to normal levels only after reintroduction of the authentic sequences in either orientation. The data presented here suggest that these sequences are involved in the binding of a factor(s) that controls the level of viral replication. Images PMID:2552181

  20. The Natural History of Human Polyomaviruses and Herpesviruses in Early Life--The Rhea Birth Cohort in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachaliou, Marianna; Waterboer, Tim; Casabonne, Delphine; Chalkiadaki, Georgia; Roumeliotaki, Theano; Michel, Angelika; Stiakaki, Eftichia; Chatzi, Leda; Pawlita, Michael; Kogevinas, Manolis; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Sparse data exist on the patterns and determinants of acquisition of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses in childhood. We measured immunoglobulin G seroreactivity against 10 polyomaviruses (BKPyV, JCPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, MCPyV, HPyV6, HPyV7, TSPyV, HPyV9, HPyV10) and 5 herpesviruses (Epstein Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, human herpesvirus 8) using multiplex serology on blood samples collected at birth (cord blood, n = 626) and at follow-up at 3 years (n = 81) and 4 years (n = 690) of age among the Rhea birth cohort recruited in Greece from pregnant women in 2007-2008. We used Poisson regression with robust variance to identify determinants of seropositivity at age 4. Seroprevalence of polyomaviruses ranged from 38.5% to 99.8% in cord blood and from 20.9% to 82.3% at age 4. Seroprevalence of EBV, CMV, herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, and human herpesvirus 8 was 99.4%, 74.9%, 26.2%, 8.0%, and 1.6% in cord blood and 52.5%, 25.8%, 3.6%, 1.4%, and 0% at age 4, respectively. Determinants of seropositivity at age 4 were cord seropositivity (JCPyV, HPyV7, HPyV10, CMV), vaginal delivery (HPyV10), breastfeeding (CMV), younger age at day-care entry (BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, TSPyV, HPyV10, HPyV9, EBV, CMV), and swimming pool attendance (BKPyV, KIPyV, WUPyV, HPyV10). Television viewing, parental stress, and hygiene practices were inversely associated with the seroprevalence of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Optical cell sorting with multiple imaging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Carrissemoux, Caro; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    techniques. Scattering forces from beams actuated via efficient phase-only efficient modulation has been adopted. This has lowered the required power for sorting cells to a tenth of our previous approach, and also makes the cell sorter safer for use in clinical settings. With the versatility of dynamically...... programmable phase spatial light modulators, a plurality of light shaping techniques, including hybrid approaches, can be utilized in cell sorting....... healthy cells. With the richness of visual information, a lot of microscopy techniques have been developed and have been crucial in biological studies. To utilize their complementary advantages we adopt both fluorescence and brightfield imaging in our optical cell sorter. Brightfield imaging has...

  2. Order-Sorted Parameterization and Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meseguer, José

    Parameterization is one of the most powerful features to make specifications and declarative programs modular and reusable, and our best hope for scaling up formal verification efforts. This paper studies order-sorted parameterization at three different levels: (i) its mathematical semantics; (ii) its operational semantics by term rewriting; and (iii) the inductive reasoning principles that can soundly be used to prove properties about such specifications. It shows that achieving the desired properties at each of these three levels is a considerably subtler matter than for many-sorted specifications, but that such properties can be attained under reasonable conditions.

  3. MODELING WORK OF SORTING STATION USING UML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gorbova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this paper is the construction of methods and models for the graphical representation process of sorting station, using the unified modeling language (UML. Methodology. Methods of graph theory, finite automata and the representation theory of queuing systems were used as the methods of investigation. A graphical representation of the process was implemented with using the Unified Modeling Language UML. The sorting station process representation is implemented as a state diagram and actions through a set of IBM Rational Rose. Graphs can show parallel operation of sorting station, the parallel existence and influence of objects process and the transition from one state to another. The IBM Rational Rose complex allows developing a diagram of work sequence of varying degrees of detailing. Findings. The study has developed a graphical representation method of the process of sorting station of different kind of complexity. All graphical representations are made using the UML. They are represented as a directed graph with the states. It is clear enough in the study of the subject area. Applying the methodology of the representation process, it allows becoming friendly with the work of any automation object very fast, and exploring the process during algorithms construction of sorting stations and other railway facilities. This model is implemented with using the Unified Modeling Language (UML using a combination of IBM Rational Rose. Originality. The representation process of sorting station was developed by means of the Unified Modeling Language (UML use. Methodology of representation process allows creating the directed graphs based on the order of execution of the works chain, objects and performers of these works. The UML allows visualizing, specifying, constructing and documenting, formalizing the representation process of sorting station and developing sequence diagrams of works of varying degrees of detail. Practical

  4. The RCP-Rab11 complex regulates endocytic protein sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Andrew A; Schonteich, Eric; Chun, John; Junutula, Jagath R; Scheller, Richard H; Prekeris, Rytis

    2004-08-01

    Rab 11 GTPase is an important regulator of endocytic membrane traffic. Recently, we and others have identified a novel family of Rab11 binding proteins, known as Rab11-family interacting proteins (FIPs). One of the family members, Rab coupling protein (RCP), was identified as a protein binding to both Rab4 and Rab11 GTPases. RCP was therefore suggested to serve a dual function as Rab4 and Rab11 binding protein. In this study, we characterized the cellular functions of RCP and mapped its interactions with Rab4 and Rab11. Our data show that RCP interacts only weakly with Rab4 in vitro and does not play the role of coupling Rab11 and Rab4 in vivo. Furthermore, our data indicate that the RCP-Rab11 complex regulates the sorting of transferrin receptors from the degradative to the recycling pathway. We therefore propose that RCP functions primarily as a Rab11 binding protein that regulates protein sorting in tubular endosomes.

  5. Conserved archetypal configuration of the transcriptional control region during the course of BK polyomavirus evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogo, Yoshiaki; Zhong, Shan; Xu, Yawei; Zhu, Mengyun; Chao, Yuegen; Sugimoto, Chie; Ikegaya, Hiroshi; Shibuya, Ayako; Kitamura, Tadaichi

    2008-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKV) is widespread among humans, asymptomatically infecting children and then persisting in renal tissue. The transcriptional control region (TCR) of the BKV genome is variable among clinical isolates. Thus, archetypal TCRs with a common basic configuration generally occur in BKV isolates from the urine of immunocompromised patients, but rearranged TCRs that possibly arise from the archetypal configuration have also been detected in clinical specimens. To examine the hypothesis that archetypal strains represent wild-type strains circulating in the human population (the archetype hypothesis), we analysed 145 complete viral genomes amplified directly from the urine of non-immunocompromised individuals worldwide. These genomes included 82, three, two and 58 sequences classified as belonging to subtypes I, II, III and IV, respectively. Rearranged TCRs with long duplications or deletions were detected from two subtype I and two subtype IV genomes, but not from the other 141 genomes (thus, the TCRs of these genomes were judged to be archetypal). The variations in the archetypal TCRs were nucleotide substitutions and single-nucleotide deletions, most of which were unique to particular subtypes or subgroups. We confirmed that the four complete BKV genomes with rearranged TCRs did not form a unique lineage on a phylogenetic tree. Collectively, the findings demonstrate that the archetypal TCR configuration has been conserved during the evolution of BKV, providing support for the archetype hypothesis. Additionally, we suggest that 'archetype' should be used as a conceptual term that denotes a prototypical structure that can generate various rearranged TCRs during viral growth in vivo and in vitro.

  6. Human polyomaviruses and incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma in the New Hampshire skin cancer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossai, Anala; Waterboer, Tim; Hoen, Anne G; Farzan, Shohreh F; Nelson, Heather H; Michel, Angelika; Willhauck-Fleckenstein, Martina; Christensen, Brock C; Perry, Ann E; Pawlita, Michael; Karagas, Margaret R

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin is a malignancy arising from epithelial keratinocytes. Experimental and epidemiologic evidence raise the possibility that human polyomaviruses (PyV) may be associated with the occurrence of SCC. To investigate whether the risk for SCC was associated with PyV infection, seropositivity to 10 PyV types was assessed following diagnosis in a population-based case-control study conducted in the United States. A total of 253 SCC cases and 460 age group and gender-matched controls were included. Antibody response against each PyV was measured using a multiplex serology-based glutathione S-transferase capture assay of recombinantly expressed VP1 capsid proteins. Odds ratios (OR) for SCC associated with seropositivity to each PyV type were estimated using logistic regression, with adjustment for potentially confounding factors. SCC cases were seropositive for a greater number of PyVs than controls (P = 0.049). Those who were JC seropositive had increased odds of SCC when compared to those who were JC seronegative (OR = 1.37, 95% CI: 0.98-1.90), with an increasing trend in SCC risk with increasing quartiles of seroreactivity (P for trend = 0.04). There were no clear associations between SCC risk and serostatus for other PyV types. This study provides limited evidence that infection with certain PyVs may be related to the occurrence of SCC in the general population of the United States.

  7. Factors Influencing Graft Outcomes Following Diagnosis of Polyomavirus -Associated Nephropathy after Renal Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Huang

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus associated nephropathy (PVAN is a significant cause of early allograft loss and the course is difficult to predict. The aim of this study is to identify factors influencing outcome for PVAN.Between 2006 and 2014, we diagnosed PVAN in 48 (7.8% of 615 patients monitored for BK virus every 1-4 weeks after modification of maintenance immunosuppression. Logistic or Cox regression analysis were performed to determine which risk factors independently affected clinical outcome and graft loss respectively.After 32.1±26.4 months follow-up, the frequencies of any graft functional decline at 1 year post-diagnosis, graft loss and any graft functional decline at the last available follow-up were 27.1% (13/48, 25.0% (12/48, and 33.3% (16/48, respectively. The 1, 3, 5 year graft survival rates were 100%, 80.5% and 69.1%, respectively. The mean level of serum creatinine at 1 year post-diagnosis and long-term graft survival rates were the worst in class C (p2.75 months for >90% decrease in urine (OR 16.7, p = 0.055 correlated with worse creatinine at 1 year post-diagnosis. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that extensive interstitial inflammation (HR 46988, p = 0.032 at diagnosis, and high PVAN stage (HR 162.2, p = 0.021 were associated with worse long-term graft survival rates.The extent of interstitial inflammation influences short and long-term graft outcomes in patients with PVAN. The degree of PVAN, rate of reduction in viral load, and viral clearance also can be used as prognostic markers in PVAN.

  8. Ureteral stent duration and the risk of BK polyomavirus viremia or bacteriuria after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Jonathan T; Brandenberger, Jared; Weiss, Andrew; Scovel, Lauren G; Kuhr, Christian S

    2017-02-01

    Ureteral stents are used in kidney transplantation (KTX) to decrease post-operative complications, but they are associated with BK polyomavirus viremia (BKV). Our primary outcome was to determine the association between ureteral stent duration and BKV. Secondary outcome measures were the association between bacteriuria and stent duration or use of ureteral stent strings. Between January 2010 and January 2015, 403 patients underwent KTX at the Virginia Mason Medical Center and met inclusion criteria. Stent duration was classified as short (3 weeks). Multivariate logistic regression models were created to assess for factors associated with BKV. The covariates in the BKV model were chosen a priori based on stent duration and risk factors previously described in the literature. Ureteral stents were placed in 304 (75.4%) transplants. Stent strings were left attached in 166 (54.6%) patients. On multivariate analyses, long stent duration was significantly associated with increased risk of BKV compared with no stent (odds ratio [OR] 1.92, P=.044, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04-3.74). Short stent duration was not associated with BKV. Sixty-two (15.4%) patients had bacteriuria. Bacteriuria was associated with female gender (OR 2.77, P<.001, 95% CI 1.58-4.95), and there was a dose-dependent effect with stent duration compared with no stent-short duration (OR 2.46, P=.049, 95% CI 1.05-6.49) and long duration (OR 3.58, P=.004, 95% CI 1.58-9.25). Stent strings were not associated with either complication. The association between ureteral stents and BKV may be dose dependent. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Merkel cell polyomavirus and human papillomavirus infections in cervical disease in Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Sadeghi, Farzin; Alamsi-Hashiani, Amir; Haeri, Hayedeh; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza; Keyvani, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary cause of cervical neoplasia. Concomitant infection with other infectious agents has been demonstrated to be a cofactor for HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis. The present investigation aimed to determine the prevalence of HPV and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) infections and to evaluate the role of MCPyV as a co-factor for HPV-related cervical carcinogenesis in Iranian women. From 2011 to 2013, a total of 112 cervical samples were examined. Forty-five samples (40.2 %) were positive for HPV. MCPyV was found in 37 samples (33 %). Both HPV and MCPyV were present in 14 samples (12.5 %). MCPyV was seen in 30 % of squamous cell carcinomas, 37.5 % of adenocarcinomas, and 16.7 % of undifferentiated carcinomas. The MCPyV large T antigen (LT-Ag) DNA load was determined as the viral copy number per cell. The median MCPyV LT-Ag copy number in positive women was 0.049 × 10(-3) per cell (range 0.0006 × 10(-3)-4.558 × 10(-3) copies per cell). In comparison with other types of cervical cancer, the MCPyV LT-Ag load was higher in adenocarcinomas (0.1024 × 10(-3) copies per cell). A logistic regression model adjusted to HPV positivity and age revealed no statistically significant association between MCPyV infection and cervical cancer (OR, 1.12; 95 % CI, 0.07-16.83). More studies should be conducted to clarify the role of MCPyV in cervical carcinogenesis.

  10. Antiviral effects of artesunate on JC polyomavirus replication in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Biswa Nath; Marschall, Manfred; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen

    2014-11-01

    The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) causes the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). A growing number of patients with induced or acquired immunosuppression are at risk for infection, and no effective antiviral therapy is presently available. The widely used antimalarial drug artesunate has shown broad antiviral activity in vitro but limited clinical success. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of artesunate on JCPyV replication in vitro. The permissivity for JCPyV MAD-4 was first compared in four cell lines, and the monkey kidney cell line COS-7 was selected. Artesunate caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the extracellular JCPyV DNA load 96 h postinfection, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2.9 μM. This effect correlated with a decreased expression of capsid protein VP1 and a reduced release of infectious viral progeny. For concentrations of <20 μM, transient reductions in cellular DNA replication and proliferation were seen, while for higher concentrations, some cytotoxicity was detected. A selective index of 16.6 was found when cytotoxicity was calculated based on cellular DNA replication in the mock-infected cells, but interestingly, cellular DNA replication in the JCPyV-infected cells was more strongly affected. In conclusion, artesunate is efficacious in inhibiting JCPyV replication at micromolar concentrations, which are achievable in plasma. The inhibition at EC50 probably reflects an effect on cellular proteins and involves transient cytostatic effects. Our results, together with the favorable distribution of the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin to the central nervous system, suggest a potential use for artesunate in patients with PML.

  11. Pre-transplant immune factors may be associated with BK polyomavirus reactivation in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWolfe, David; Gandhi, Jinal; Mackenzie, Matthew R; Broge, Thomas A; Bord, Evelyn; Babwah, Amaara; Mandelbrot, Didier A; Pavlakis, Martha; Cardarelli, Francesca; Viscidi, Raphael; Chandraker, Anil; Tan, Chen S

    2017-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation in kidney transplant recipients can lead to allograft damage and loss. The elements of the adaptive immune system that are permissive of reactivation and responsible for viral control remain incompletely described. We performed a prospective study evaluating BKPyV-specific T-cell response, humoral response and overall T-cell phenotype beginning pre-transplant through one year post-transplant in 28 patients at two centers. We performed an exploratory analysis of risk factors for the development of viremia and viruria as well as compared the immune response to BKPyV in these groups and those who remained BK negative. 6 patients developed viruria and 3 developed viremia. BKPyV-specific CD8+ T-cells increased post-transplant in viremic and viruric but not BK negative patients. BKPyV-specific CD4+ T-cells increased in viremic, but not viruric or BK negative patients. Anti-BKPyV IgG antibodies increased in viruric and viremic patients but remained unchanged in BK negative patients. Viremic patients had a greater proportion of CD8+ effector cells pre-transplant and at 12 months post-transplant. Viremic patients had fewer CD4+ effector memory cells at 3 months post-transplant. Exploratory analysis demonstrated lower CD4 and higher total CD8 proportions, higher anti-BKPyV antibody titers and the cause of renal failure were associated BKPyV reactivation. In conclusion, low CD4, high CD8 and increased effector CD8 cells were found pre-transplant in patients who became viremic, a phenotype associated with immune senescence. This pre-transplant T-cell senescence phenotype could potentially be used to identify patients at increased risk of BKPyV reactivation.

  12. System for optical sorting of microscopic objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for optical sorting of microscopic objects and corresponding method. An optical detection system (52) is capable of determining the positions of said first and/or said second objects. One or more force transfer units (200, 205, 210, 215) are placed...

  13. Economics of Grading and Sorting Pallet Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; John A. McLeod; Philip A. Araman

    1993-01-01

    Before trying to develop an automated inspection system for pallet part grading we analyzed the economics of such a system. Our results suggest that higher quality pallets produced by grading and sorting pallet parts would be attractive to both manufacturers and their customers, who would have to pay increased prices for higher quality pallets. Reductions in cost-per-...

  14. Matlab Code for Sorted Real Schur Forms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandts, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    In Matlab, there exists a standard command to generate a real Schur form, and another command transforms a real Schur form into a complex one. In Golub and Van Loan (1996), a Matlab-like routine is sketched that sorts a complex Schur form: given a target value ? in the complex plane, the diagonal el

  15. Wavelet adaptation for automatic voice disorders sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erfanian Saeedi, Nafise; Almasganj, Farshad

    2013-07-01

    Early diagnosis of voice disorders and abnormalities by means of digital speech processing is a subject of interest for many researchers. Various methods are introduced in the literature, some of which are able to extensively discriminate pathological voices from normal ones. Voice disorders sorting, on the other hand, has received less attention due to the complexity of the problem. Although, previous publications show satisfactory results in classifying one type of disordered voice from normal cases, or two different types of abnormalities from each other, no comprehensive approach for automatic sorting of vocal abnormalities has been offered yet. In this paper, a solution for this problem is suggested. We create a powerful wavelet feature extraction approach, in which, instead of standard wavelets, adaptive wavelets are generated and applied to the voice signals. Orthogonal wavelets are parameterized via lattice structure and then, the optimal parameters are investigated through an iterative process, using the genetic algorithm (GA). GA is guided by the classifier results. Based on the generated wavelet, a wavelet-filterbank is constructed and the voice signals are decomposed to compute eight energy-based features. A support vector machine (SVM) then classifies the signals using the extracted features. Experimental results show that six various types of vocal disorders: paralysis, nodules, polyps, edema, spasmodic dysphonia and keratosis are fully sorted via the proposed method. This could be a successful step toward sorting a larger number of abnormalities associated with the vocal system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  17. Credit Scores, Race, and Residential Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ashlyn Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Credit scores have a profound impact on home purchasing power and mortgage pricing, yet little is known about how credit scores influence households' residential location decisions. This study estimates the effects of credit scores on residential sorting behavior using a novel mortgage industry data set combining household demographic, credit, and…

  18. Integration through a Card-Sort Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kris; Ricca, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to compute integrals via the various techniques of integration (e.g., integration by parts, partial fractions, etc.) is difficult for many students. Here, we look at how students in a college level Calculus II course develop the ability to categorize integrals and the difficulties they encounter using a card sort-resort activity. Analysis…

  19. Integration through a Card-Sort Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kris; Ricca, Bernard P.

    2015-01-01

    Learning to compute integrals via the various techniques of integration (e.g., integration by parts, partial fractions, etc.) is difficult for many students. Here, we look at how students in a college level Calculus II course develop the ability to categorize integrals and the difficulties they encounter using a card sort-resort activity. Analysis…

  20. Irregular dunes, sediment sorting, and river morphodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Astrid; Weerts, H.J.T.; Ritsema, I.L; van Os, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research project focuses on modelling the large-scale morphodynamics of low-slope rivers dominated by mixed sediment, such as the Dutch part of the Rhine River. Usually we simply neglect the effects of sorting and variability in dune dimensions on the large-scale morphodynamics. This paper

  1. Sorting cells by their dynamical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Ewan; Holm, Stefan H.; Zhang, Zunmin; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Fedosov, Dmitry A.; Gompper, Gerhard

    2016-10-01

    Recent advances in cell sorting aim at the development of novel methods that are sensitive to various mechanical properties of cells. Microfluidic technologies have a great potential for cell sorting; however, the design of many micro-devices is based on theories developed for rigid spherical particles with size as a separation parameter. Clearly, most bioparticles are non-spherical and deformable and therefore exhibit a much more intricate behavior in fluid flow than rigid spheres. Here, we demonstrate the use of cells’ mechanical and dynamical properties as biomarkers for separation by employing a combination of mesoscale hydrodynamic simulations and microfluidic experiments. The dynamic behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) within deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) devices is investigated for different device geometries and viscosity contrasts between the intra-cellular fluid and suspending medium. We find that the viscosity contrast and associated cell dynamics clearly determine the RBC trajectory through a DLD device. Simulation results compare well to experiments and provide new insights into the physical mechanisms which govern the sorting of non-spherical and deformable cells in DLD devices. Finally, we discuss the implications of cell dynamics for sorting schemes based on properties other than cell size, such as mechanics and morphology.

  2. Ubiquitination-deubiquitination balance dictates ligand-stimulated PTHR sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Verónica; Magyar, Clara E; Wang, Bin; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A

    2011-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone receptors (PTHR) are promptly internalized upon stimulation by activating (PTH[1-84], PTH[1-34]) and non-activating (PTH[7-84], PTH[7-34]) ligands. Here, we characterized the mechanism regulating the sorting of internalized receptors between recycling and degradative pathways. PTHR recycles faster after challenge with PTH(1-34) than with PTH(7-34). PTHR recycling is complete by 2 h after PTH(1-34) stimulation, but incomplete at this time in cells treated with PTH(7-34). The slower and incomplete recycling induced by PTH(7-34) is due to proteasomal degradation. Both PTH(1-34) and PTH(7-34) induced PTHR polyubiquitination. Ubiquitination by PTH(1-34) was transient, whereas receptor ubiquitination after PTH(7-34) was sustained. PTH(1-34), but not PTH(7-34), induced expression of the PTHR-specific deubiquitinating enzyme USP2. Overexpression of USP2 prevented PTH(7-34)-induced PTHR degradation. We conclude that PTH(1-34) promotes coupled PTHR ubiquitination and deubiquitination, whereas PTH(7-34) activates only ubiquitination, thereby leading to PTHR downregulation. These findings may explain PTH resistance in diseases associated with elevated PTH(7-84) levels. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  3. Ubiquitination–Deubiquitination Balance Dictates Ligand-stimulated PTHR Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Verónica; Magyar, Clara E.; Wang, Bin; Bisello, Alessandro; Friedman, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone receptors (PTHR) are promptly internalized upon stimulation by activating [PTH(1–84), PTH(1–34)] and non-activating [PTH(7–84), PTH(7–34)] ligands. Here, we characterized the mechanism regulating the sorting of internalized receptors between recycling and degradative pathways. PTHR recycles faster after challenge with PTH(1–34) than with PTH(7–34). PTHR recycling is complete by 2 hr after PTH(1–34) stimulation but incomplete at this time in cells treated with PTH(7–34). The slower and incomplete recycling induced by PTH(7–34) is due to proteasomal degradation. Both PTH(1–34) and PTH(7–34) induced PTHR polyubiquitination. Ubiquitination by PTH(1–34) was transient, whereas receptor ubiquitination following PTH(7–34) was sustained. PTH(1–34), but not PTH(7–34), induced expression of the PTHR-specific deubiquitinating enzyme USP2. Overexpression of USP2 prevented PTH(7–34)-induced PTHR degradation. We conclude that PTH(1–34) promotes coupled PTHR ubiquitination and deubiquitination, whereas PTH(7–34) activates only ubiquitination, thereby leading to PTHR downregulation. These findings may explain PTH resistance in diseases associated with elevated PTH(7–84) levels. PMID:21898592

  4. Fluoroquinolone prophylaxis in preventing BK polyomavirus infection after renal transplant: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tu-Run; Rao, Zheng-Sheng; Qiu, Yang; Liu, Jin-Peng; Huang, Zhong-Li; Wang, Xian-Ding; Lin, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Previous studies regarding the prevention of BK viremia following renal transplantation with fluoroquinolone have yielded conflicting results. The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the evidence regarding the efficacy of fluoroquinolone in preventing BK polyomavirus infection following renal transplantation. We searched PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for research articles published prior to January 2015 using keywords such as "fluoroquinolone," "BK viremia," and "renal transplantation." We extracted all types of study published in English. The primary outcome was BK viremia and viruria at 1 year post-transplantation. Secondary outcomes were BK virus-associated nephropathy (BKVN), graft failure, and fluoroquinolone-resistant infection. We identified eight trials, including a total of 1477 participants with a mean duration of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis of >1 month. At 1 year, fluoroquinolone prophylaxis was not associated with a decreased incidence of BK viremia [risk ratio (RR), 0.84; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.58-1.20). No significant differences in BKVN (RR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.37-2.11), risk of graft failure due to BKVN (RR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.29-1.59), or fluoroquinolone-resistant infection (RR, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.64-1.83) were observed between the fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and control groups. The results of this study suggest that fluoroquinolone is ineffective in preventing BK polyomavirus infection following renal transplantation. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  5. Potent Anti-HIV Chemokine Analogs Direct Post-Endocytic Sorting of CCR5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bönsch

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are desensitized and internalized following activation. They are then subjected to post-endocytic sorting (degradation, slow recycling or fast recycling. The majority of research on post-endocytic sorting has focused on the role of sequence-encoded address structures on receptors. This study focuses on trafficking of CCR5, a GPCR chemokine receptor and the principal entry coreceptor for HIV. Using Chinese Hamster Ovary cells stably expressing CCR5 we show that two different anti-HIV chemokine analogs, PSC-RANTES and 5P14-RANTES, direct receptor trafficking into two distinct subcellular compartments: the trans-Golgi network and the endosome recycling compartment, respectively. Our results indicate that a likely mechanism for ligand-directed sorting of CCR5 involves capacity of the chemokine analogs to elicit the formation of durable complexes of CCR5 and arrestin2 (beta-arrestin-1, with PSC-RANTES eliciting durable association in contrast to 5P14-RANTES, which elicits only transient association.

  6. Development of a Prototype Automated Sorting System for Plastic Recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Wahab

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated sorting for plastic recyclables has been seen as the way forward in the plastic recycling industry. Automated sorting provides significant improvements in terms of efficiency and consistency in the sorting process. In the case of macro sorting, which is the most common type of automated sorting, efficiency is determined by the mechanical details of the material handling system as well as the detection system. This paper provides a review on the state of-the-art technologies that have been deployed by some of the recycling facilities abroad. The design and development of a cost effective prototype automated system for sorting plastic recyclables is proposed and discussed.

  7. PhySortR: a fast, flexible tool for sorting phylogenetic trees in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G. Stephens

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A frequent bottleneck in interpreting phylogenomic output is the need to screen often thousands of trees for features of interest, particularly robust clades of specific taxa, as evidence of monophyletic relationship and/or reticulated evolution. Here we present PhySortR, a fast, flexible R package for classifying phylogenetic trees. Unlike existing utilities, PhySortR allows for identification of both exclusive and non-exclusive clades uniting the target taxa based on tip labels (i.e., leaves on a tree, with customisable options to assess clades within the context of the whole tree. Using simulated and empirical datasets, we demonstrate the potential and scalability of PhySortR in analysis of thousands of phylogenetic trees without a priori assumption of tree-rooting, and in yielding readily interpretable trees that unambiguously satisfy the query. PhySortR is a command-line tool that is freely available and easily automatable.

  8. Colour based sorting station with Matlab simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the design process and manufacturing elements of a colour-based sorting station. The system is comprised of a gravitational storage, which also contains the colour sensor. Parts are extracted using a linear pneumatic motor and are fed onto an electrically driven conveyor belt. Extraction of the parts is done at 4 points, using two pneumatic motors and a geared DC motor, while the 4th position is at the end of the belt. The mechanical parts of the system are manufactured using 3D printer technology, allowing for easy modification and adaption to the geometry of different parts. The paper shows all of the stages needed to design, optimize, test and implement the proposed solution. System optimization was performed using a graphical Matlab interface which also allows for sorting algorithm optimization.

  9. Microtechnology for cell manipulation and sorting

    CERN Document Server

    Tseng, Peter; Carlo, Dino

    2017-01-01

    This book delves into the recent developments in the microscale and microfluidic technologies that allow manipulation at the single and cell aggregate level. Expert authors review the dominant mechanisms that manipulate and sort biological structures, making this a state-of-the-art overview of conventional cell sorting techniques, the principles of microfluidics, and of microfluidic devices. All chapters highlight the benefits and drawbacks of each technique they discuss, which include magnetic, electrical, optical, acoustic, gravity/sedimentation, inertial, deformability, and aqueous two-phase systems as the dominant mechanisms utilized by microfluidic devices to handle biological samples. Each chapter explains the physics of the mechanism at work, and reviews common geometries and devices to help readers decide the type of style of device required for various applications. This book is appropriate for graduate-level biomedical engineering and analytical chemistry students, as well as engineers and scientist...

  10. Machine-vision based optofluidic cell sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew

    In contemporary life science there is an increasing emphasis on sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of optofluidic lab-on-chip devices. Our approach to this is based on the use of optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by advanc...... the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam’s propagation and its interaction with the laser catapulted and sorted cells....... machine vision1. This approach is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS-systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass objects commonly used in the optical manipulation literature2, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient...

  11. A mower detector to judge soil sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bramlitt, E.T.; Johnson, N.R. [Thermo Nuclear Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Thermo Nuclear Services (TNS) has developed a mower detector as an inexpensive and fast means for deciding potential value of soil sorting for cleanup. It is a shielded detector box on wheels pushed over the ground (as a person mows grass) at 30 ft/min with gamma-ray counts recorded every 0.25 sec. It mirror images detection by the TNS transportable sorter system which conveys soil at 30 ft/min and toggles a gate to send soil on separate paths based on counts. The mower detector shows if contamination is variable and suitable for sorting, and by unique calibration sources, it indicates detection sensitivity. The mower detector has been used to characterize some soil at Department of Energy sites in New Jersey and South Carolina.

  12. Efficient sorting using registers and caches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickremesinghe, Rajiv; Arge, Lars Allan; Chase, Jeffrey S.;

    2002-01-01

    Modern computer systems have increasingly complex memory systems. Common machine models for algorithm analysis do not reflect many of the features of these systems, e.g., large register sets, lockup-free caches, cache hierarchies, associativity, cache line fetching, and streaming behavior...... on sorting performance. We introduce a new cache-conscious sorting algorithm, R-MERGE, which achieves better performance in practice over algorithms that are superior in the theoretical models. R-MERGE is designed to minimize memory stall cycles rather than cache misses by considering features common to many....... Inadequate models lead to poor algorithmic choices and an incomplete understanding of algorithm behavior on real machines.A key step toward developing better models is to quantify the performance effects of features not reflected in the models. This paper explores the effect of memory system features...

  13. Sorting Network for Reversible Logic Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Md Saiful; Mahmud, Abdullah Al; karim, Muhammad Rezaul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have introduced an algorithm to implement a sorting network for reversible logic synthesis based on swapping bit strings. The algorithm first constructs a network in terms of n*n Toffoli gates read from left to right. The number of gates in the circuit produced by our algorithm is then reduced by template matching and removing useless gates from the network. We have also compared the efficiency of the proposed method with the existing ones.

  14. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W

    2007-01-01

    . Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our...... results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation....

  15. Evaluating Effects of Cell Sorting on Cellular Integrity

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    During the past year the Flow Cytometry Research Group has continued on its goal to establish best practice guidelines for cell sorting conditions that minimize cell stress, perturbation, or injury to the sorted cells. Towards this goal the group has followed up on an observation from our initial study that showed poor cell recovery when a clonal population of cells (Jurkat) was sorted aggressively under intentionally adverse sorting conditions (excessive pressure as well as undersized sortin...

  16. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas from Japanese patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imajoh Masayuki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV was identified originally in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC, a rare form of human skin neuroendocrine carcinoma. Evidence of MCPyV existence in other forms of malignancy such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs is growing. Cervical cancers became the focus of our interest in searching for potentially MCPyV-related tumors because: (i the major histological type of cervical cancer is the SCC; (ii the uterine cervix is a common site of neuroendocrine carcinomas histologically similar to MCCs; and (iii MCPyV might be transmitted during sexual interaction as demonstrated for human papillomavirus (HPV. In this study, we aimed to clarify the possible presence of MCPyV in cervical SCCs from Japanese patients. Cervical adenocarcinomas (ACs were also studied. Results Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 48 cervical SCCs and 16 cervical ACs were examined for the presence of the MCPyV genome by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing analyses. PCR analysis revealed that 9/48 cervical SCCs (19% and 4/16 cervical ACs (25% were positive for MCPyV DNA. MCPyV-specific PCR products were sequenced to compare them with reference sequences. The nucleotide sequences in the MCPyV large T (LT-sequenced region were the same among MCPyV-positive cervical SCCs and AC. Conversely, in the MCPyV viral protein 1 (VP1-sequenced region, two cervical SCCs and three cervical ACs showed several nucleotide substitutions, of which three caused amino acid substitutions. These sequencing results suggested that three MCPyV variants of the VP1 were identified in our cases. Immunohistochemistry showed that the LT antigen was expressed in tumor cells in MCPyV-positive samples. Genotyping of human HPV in the MCPyV-positive samples revealed that infected HPVs were HPV types 16, 31 and 58 for SCCs and HPV types 16 and 18 for ACs. Conclusions This study provides the first observation that MCPyV coexists in a subset

  17. JC polyomavirus infection is strongly controlled by human leucocyte antigen class II variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Sundqvist

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available JC polyomavirus (JCV carriers with a compromised immune system, such as in HIV, or subjects on immune-modulating therapies, such as anti VLA-4 therapy may develop progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML which is a lytic infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. Serum antibodies to JCV mark infection occur only in 50-60% of infected individuals, and high JCV-antibody titers seem to increase the risk of developing PML. We here investigated the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA, instrumental in immune defense in JCV antibody response. Anti-JCV antibody status, as a surrogate for JCV infection, were compared to HLA class I and II alleles in 1621 Scandinavian persons with MS and 1064 population-based Swedish controls and associations were replicated in 718 German persons with MS. HLA-alleles were determined by SNP imputation, sequence specific (SSP kits and a reverse PCR sequence-specific oligonucleotide (PCR-SSO method. An initial GWAS screen displayed a strong HLA class II region signal. The HLA-DRB1*15 haplotype was strongly negatively associated to JCV sero-status in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 0.42, p = 7×10(-15 and controls (OR = 0.53, p = 2×10(-5. In contrast, the DQB1*06:03 haplotype was positively associated with JCV sero-status, in Scandinavian MS cases (OR = 1.63, p = 0.006, and controls (OR = 2.69, p = 1×10(-5. The German dataset confirmed these findings (OR = 0.54, p = 1×10(-4 and OR = 1.58, p = 0.03 respectively for these haplotypes. HLA class II restricted immune responses, and hence CD4+ T cell immunity is pivotal for JCV infection control. Alleles within the HLA-DR1*15 haplotype are associated with a protective effect on JCV infection. Alleles within the DQB1*06:03 haplotype show an opposite association. These associations between JC virus antibody response and human leucocyte antigens supports the notion that CD4+ T cells are crucial in the immune defence to JCV and

  18. How Schwann Cells Sort Axons: New Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltri, M Laura; Poitelon, Yannick; Previtali, Stefano Carlo

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral nerves contain large myelinated and small unmyelinated (Remak) fibers that perform different functions. The choice to myelinate or not is dictated to Schwann cells by the axon itself, based on the amount of neuregulin I-type III exposed on its membrane. Peripheral axons are more important in determining the final myelination fate than central axons, and the implications for this difference in Schwann cells and oligodendrocytes are discussed. Interestingly, this choice is reversible during pathology, accounting for the remarkable plasticity of Schwann cells, and contributing to the regenerative potential of the peripheral nervous system. Radial sorting is the process by which Schwann cells choose larger axons to myelinate during development. This crucial morphogenetic step is a prerequisite for myelination and for differentiation of Remak fibers, and is arrested in human diseases due to mutations in genes coding for extracellular matrix and linkage molecules. In this review we will summarize progresses made in the last years by a flurry of reverse genetic experiments in mice and fish. This work revealed novel molecules that control radial sorting, and contributed unexpected ideas to our understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control radial sorting of axons.

  19. Chromosome analysis and sorting using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doležel, Jaroslav; Kubaláková, Marie; Cíhalíková, Jarmila; Suchánková, Pavla; Simková, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Chromosome analysis and sorting using flow cytometry (flow cytogenetics) is an attractive tool for fractionating plant genomes to small parts. The reduction of complexity greatly simplifies genetics and genomics in plant species with large genomes. However, as flow cytometry requires liquid suspensions of particles, the lack of suitable protocols for preparation of solutions of intact chromosomes delayed the application of flow cytogenetics in plants. This chapter outlines a high-yielding procedure for preparation of solutions of intact mitotic chromosomes from root tips of young seedlings and for their analysis using flow cytometry and sorting. Root tips accumulated at metaphase are mildly fixed with formaldehyde, and solutions of intact chromosomes are prepared by mechanical homogenization. The advantages of the present approach include the use of seedlings, which are easy to handle, and the karyological stability of root meristems, which can be induced to high degree of metaphase synchrony. Chromosomes isolated according to this protocol have well-preserved morphology, withstand shearing forces during sorting, and their DNA is intact and suitable for a range of applications.

  20. Generalized sorting profile of alluvial fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kimberly Litwin; Reitz, Meredith D.; Jerolmack, Douglas J.

    2014-10-01

    Alluvial rivers often exhibit self-similar gravel size distributions and abrupt gravel-sand transitions. Experiments suggest that these sorting patterns are established rapidly, but how—and how fast—this convergence occurs in the field is unknown. We examine the establishment of downstream sorting patterns in a kilometer-scale alluvial fan. The sharp transition from canyon to unconfined, channelized fan provides a well-defined boundary condition. The channel changes from deep and entrenched at the fan apex to shallow and depositional over a short distance, exhibiting nonequilibrium behavior. The resulting gravel-fining profile is not self-similar; the particle size distribution narrows until approximate equal mobility is achieved. Downfan, the gravel-sand transition appears to exhibit a self-similar form; field and laboratory data collapse when downstream distance is normalized by the location of the transition. Results suggest a generalized sorting profile for alluvial fans as a consequence of the threshold of motion and nonequilibrium channels.

  1. Categorizing Variations of Student-Implemented Sorting Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Korhonen, Ari; Malmi, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined freshmen students' sorting algorithm implementations in data structures and algorithms' course in two phases: at the beginning of the course before the students received any instruction on sorting algorithms, and after taking a lecture on sorting algorithms. The analysis revealed that many students have insufficient…

  2. Gender Sorting across K-12 Schools in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Mark C.; Conger, Dylan

    2013-01-01

    This article documents evidence of nonrandom gender sorting across K-12 schools in the United States. The sorting exists among coed schools and at all grade levels, and it is highest in the secondary school grades. We observe some gender sorting across school sectors and types: for instance, males are slightly underrepresented in private schools…

  3. Automatic Color Sorting of Hardwood Edge-Glued Panel Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Earl Kline; Richard Conners; Qiang Lu; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic color sorting system for red oak edge-glued panel parts. The color sorting system simultaneously examines both faces of a panel part and then determines which face has the "best" color, and sorts the part into one of a number of color classes at plant production speeds. Initial test results show that the system generated over...

  4. Categorizing Variations of Student-Implemented Sorting Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherkhani, Ahmad; Korhonen, Ari; Malmi, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we examined freshmen students' sorting algorithm implementations in data structures and algorithms' course in two phases: at the beginning of the course before the students received any instruction on sorting algorithms, and after taking a lecture on sorting algorithms. The analysis revealed that many students have insufficient…

  5. Resveratrol exhibits a strong cytotoxic activity in cultured cells and has an antiviral action against polyomavirus: potential clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galati Gaspare

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resveratrol is a non flavonoid polyphenol compound present in many plants and fruits and, at especially high concentrations, in the grape berries of Vitis vinifera. This compound has a strong bioactivity and its cytoprotective action has been demonstrated, however at high concentrations the drug exhibits also an effective anti-proliferative action. We recently showed its ability to abolish the effects of oxidative stress in cultured cells. In this work we assayed the bioactivity of resveratrol as antiproliferative and antiviral drug in cultured fibroblasts. Studies by other Authors showed that this natural compound inhibits the proliferation of different viruses such as herpes simplex, varicella-zoster and influenza A. The results presented here show an evident toxic activity of the drug at high concentrations, on the other hand at sub-cytotoxic concentrations, resveratrol can effectively inhibit the synthesis of polyomavirus DNA. A possible interpretation is that, due to the damage caused by resveratrol to the plasma membrane, the transfer of the virus from the endoplasmic reticulum to the nucleus, may be hindered thus inhibiting the production of viral DNA. Methods The mouse fibroblast line 3T6 and the human tumor line HL60 were used throughout the work. Cell viability and vital cell count were assessed respectively, by the MTT assay and Trypan Blue staining. Cytotoxic properties and evaluation of viral DNA production by agarose gel electrophoresis were performed according to standard protocols. Results Our results show a clear dose dependent both cytotoxic and antiviral effect of resveratrol respectively at high and low concentrations. The cytotoxic action is exerted towards a stabilized cell-line (3T6 as well as a tumor-line (HL60. Furthermore the antiviral action is evident after the phase of virion entry, therefore data suggest that the drug acts during the synthesis of the viral progeny DNA. Conclusion Resveratrol is

  6. Bioassay and biomolecular identification, sorting, and collection methods using magnetic microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Zhou, Feng; Nolan, John P

    2007-06-19

    The present invention is directed to processes of separating, analyzing and/or collecting selected species within a target sample by use of magnetic microspheres including magnetic particles, the magnetic microspheres adapted for attachment to a receptor agent that can subsequently bind to selected species within the target sample. The magnetic microspheres can be sorted into a number of distinct populations, each population with a specific range of magnetic moments and different receptor agents can be attached to each distinct population of magnetic microsphere.

  7. Cache-Aware and Cache-Oblivious Adaptive Sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Fagerberg, Rolf; Moruz, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Two new adaptive sorting algorithms are introduced which perform an optimal number of comparisons with respect to the number of inversions in the input. The first algorithm is based on a new linear time reduction to (non-adaptive) sorting. The second algorithm is based on a new division protocol ...... for the GenericSort algorithm by Estivill-Castro and Wood. From both algorithms we derive I/O-optimal cache-aware and cache-oblivious adaptive sorting algorithms. These are the first I/O-optimal adaptive sorting algorithms....

  8. The dynamics of herpesvirus and polyomavirus reactivation and shedding in healthy adults: a 14-month longitudinal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Paul D.; Lednicky, John A.; Keitel, Wendy A.; Poston, David G.; White, Zoe S.; Peng, RongSheng; Liu, Zhensheng; Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Vilchez, Regis A.; Smith, E. O'Brian; Butel, Janet S.

    2003-01-01

    Humans are infected with viruses that establish long-term persistent infections. To address whether immunocompetent individuals control virus reactivation globally or independently and to identify patterns of sporadic reactivation, we monitored herpesviruses and polyomaviruses in 30 adults, over 14 months. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA was quantitated in saliva and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), cytomegalovirus (CMV) was assayed in urine, and JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) DNAs were assayed in urine and PBMCs. All individuals shed EBV in saliva, whereas 67% had >or=1 blood sample positive for EBV. Levels of EBV varied widely. CMV shedding occurred infrequently but occurred more commonly in younger individuals (Por=40 years old (PEBV and JCV, but there was no correlation among shedding of EBV, CMV, and JCV (P>.50). Thus, adults independently control persistent viruses, which display discordant, sporadic reactivations.

  9. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kenneth Lindegaard; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels;

    2012-01-01

    of PICK1 co-clusters in Rab11-positive compartments. Furthermore, PICK1 inhibited Rab11-mediated recycling of the receptor in a BAR and PDZ domain-dependent manner. In contrast, transfer of the DAT C terminus to the δ-opioid receptor, which sorts to degradation, did not result in PICK1 co-clusters or any...... primarily sorts to degradation upon internalization, did not form perinuclear clusters with PICK1, and PICK1 did not affect DAT internalization/recycling. However, transfer of the PICK1-binding DAT C terminus to the β(2)-adrenergic receptor, which sorts to recycling upon internalization, led to formation...... change in internalization/recycling. Further support for a role of PICK1 determined by its PDZ cargo was obtained for the PICK1 interaction partner prolactin-releasing peptide receptor (GPR10). GPR10 co-localized with Rab11 and clustered with PICK1 upon constitutive internalization but co...

  10. 1-O-hexadecyloxypropyl cidofovir (CMX001) effectively inhibits polyomavirus BK replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen; Gosert, Rainer; Bernhoff, Eva; Finstad, Solrun; Hirsch, Hans H

    2010-11-01

    Antiviral drugs for treating polyomavirus BK (BKV) replication in polyomavirus-associated nephropathy or hemorrhagic cystitis are of considerable clinical interest. Unlike cidofovir, the lipid conjugate 1-O-hexadecyloxypropyl cidofovir (CMX001) is orally available and has not caused detectable nephrotoxicity in rodent models or human studies to date. Primary human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells were infected with BKV-Dunlop, and CMX001 was added 2 h postinfection (hpi). The intracellular and extracellular BKV DNA load was determined by quantitative PCR. Viral gene expression was examined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy. We also examined host cell viability, proliferation, metabolic activity, and DNA replication. The titration of CMX001 identified 0.31 μM as the 90% effective concentration (EC(90)) for reducing the extracellular BKV load at 72 hpi. BKV large T antigen mRNA and protein expression was unaffected at 24 hpi, but the intracellular BKV genome was reduced by 90% at 48 hpi. Late gene expression was reduced by 70 and 90% at 48 and 72 hpi, respectively. Comparisons of CMX001 and cidofovir EC(90)s from 24 to 96 hpi demonstrated that CMX001 had a more rapid and enduring effect on BKV DNA and infectious progeny at 96 hpi than cidofovir. CMX001 at 0.31 μM had little effect on overall cell metabolism but reduced bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and host cell proliferation by 20 to 30%, while BKV infection increased cell proliferation in both rapidly dividing and near-confluent cultures. We conclude that CMX001 inhibits BKV replication with a longer-lasting effect than cidofovir at 400× lower levels, with fewer side effects on relevant host cells in vitro.

  11. Stochastic Models of Vesicular Sorting in Cellular Organelles

    CERN Document Server

    Vagne, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    The proper sorting of membrane components by regulated exchange between cellular organelles is crucial to intra-cellular organization. This process relies on the budding and fusion of transport vesicles, and should be strongly influenced by stochastic fluctuations considering the relatively small size of many organelles. We identify the perfect sorting of two membrane components initially mixed in a single compartment as a first passage process, and we show that the mean sorting time exhibits two distinct regimes as a function of the ratio of vesicle fusion to budding rates. Low ratio values leads to fast sorting, but results in a broad size distribution of sorted compartments dominated by small entities. High ratio values result in two well defined sorted compartments but is exponentially slow. Our results suggests an optimal balance between vesicle budding and fusion for the rapid and efficient sorting of membrane components, and highlight the importance of stochastic effects for the steady-state organizati...

  12. GLUT4 traffic through an ESCRT-III-dependent sorting compartment in adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Koumanov

    Full Text Available In insulin target tissues, GLUT4 is known to traffic through multiple compartments that may involve ubiquitin- and/or SUMO-dependent targeting. During these trafficking steps, GLUT4 is sorted into a storage reservoir compartment that is acutely released by insulin signalling processes that are downstream of PI 3-kinase associated changes in inositol phospholipids. As ESCRT components have recently been found to influence cellular sorting processes that are related to changes in both ubiquitination and inositol phospholipids, we have examined whether GLUT4 traffic is routed through ESCRT dependent sorting steps. Introduction of the dominant negative inhibitory constructs of the ESCRT-III components CHMP3 (CHMP3(1-179 and Vps4 (GFP-Vps4(E235Q into rat adipocytes leads to the accumulation of GLUT4 in large, coalesced and extended vesicles structures that co-localise with the inhibitory constructs over large parts of the extended structure. A new swollen hybrid and extensively ubiquitinated compartment is produced in which GLUT4 co-localises more extensively with the endosomal markers including EEA1 and transferrin receptors but also with the TGN marker syntaxin6. These perturbations are associated with failure of insulin action on GLUT4 traffic to the cell surface and suggest impairment in an ESCRT-dependent sorting step used for GLUT4 traffic to its specialised reservoir compartment.

  13. Sorting waste - A question of good will

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department - FM Group

    2006-01-01

    In order to minimise waste-sorting costs, CERN provides two types of container at the entrance of buildings: a green plastic container for paper/cardboard and a metal container for household-type waste. We regret that recently there has been a significant decrease in the extent to which these types of waste are sorted, for example green containers have been found to hold assorted waste such as cardboard boxes filled with polystyrene, bubble-wrap or even plastic bottles, yoghurt pots, etc. Checks have shown that this 'non-compliant' waste does not come from the rubbish bins emptied by the cleaners but is deposited there directly by inconsiderate users. During the months of October and November alone, for example, only 15% of the waste from the paper/cardboard containers was recycled and the remaining 85% had to be incinerated, which entails a high cost for CERN. You should note that once an item of non-compliant waste is found in a green container its contents are immediately sent as waste to be incinerated ...

  14. Human-powered Sorts and Joins

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Adam; Karger, David; Madden, Samuel; Miller, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Crowdsourcing markets like Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) make it possible to task people with small jobs, such as labeling images or looking up phone numbers, via a programmatic interface. MTurk tasks for processing datasets with humans are currently designed with significant reimplementation of common workflows and ad-hoc selection of parameters such as price to pay per task. We describe how we have integrated crowds into a declarative workflow engine called Qurk to reduce the burden on workflow designers. In this paper, we focus on how to use humans to compare items for sorting and joining data, two of the most common operations in DBMSs. We describe our basic query interface and the user interface of the tasks we post to MTurk. We also propose a number of optimizations, including task batching, replacing pairwise comparisons with numerical ratings, and pre-filtering tables before joining them, which dramatically reduce the overall cost of running sorts and joins on the crowd. In an experiment joining tw...

  15. PACMan to Help Sort Hubble Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Every year, astronomers submit over a thousand proposals requesting time on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Currently, humans must sort through each of these proposals by hand before sending them off for review. Could this burden be shifted to computers?A Problem of VolumeAstronomer Molly Peeples gathered stats on the HST submissions sent in last week for the upcoming HST Cycle 25 (the deadline was Friday night), relative to previous years. This years proposal round broke the record, with over 1200 proposals submitted in total for Cycle 25. [Molly Peeples]Each proposal cycle for HST time attracts on the order of 1100 proposals accounting for far more HST time than is available. The proposals are therefore carefully reviewed by around 150 international members of the astronomy community during a six-month process to select those with the highest scientific merit.Ideally, each proposal will be read by reviewers that have scientific expertise relevant to the proposal topic: if a proposal requests HST time to study star formation, for instance, then the reviewers assigned to it should have research expertise in star formation.How does this matching of proposals to reviewers occur? The current method relies on self-reported categorization of the submitted proposals. This is unreliable, however; proposals are often mis-categorized by submitters due to misunderstanding or ambiguous cases.As a result, the Science Policies Group at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) which oversees the review of HST proposals must go through each of the proposals by hand and re-categorize them. The proposals are then matched to reviewers with self-declared expertise in the same category.With the number of HST proposals on the rise and the expectation that the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will elicit even more proposals for time than Hubble scientists at STScI and NASA are now asking: could the human hours necessary for this task be spared? Could a computer program

  16. Quantum bounds for ordered searching and sorting

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyer, P; Shi, Y; Hoyer, Peter; Neerbek, Jan; Shi, Yaoyun

    2001-01-01

    We consider the quantum complexities of searching an ordered list and sorting an un-ordered list. For searching an ordered list of N elements, we prove a lower bound of \\frac{1}{\\pi}(\\ln(N)-1) on the number of oracle queries that access the list elements. This improves the previously best lower bound of ({1/12}\\log_2(N) - O(1)) due to Ambainis. For sorting N numbers, we prove a lower bound of \\frac{N}{2\\pi}(\\ln(N)-1) on the number of binary comparisons. The previously best lower bound is \\Omega(N). Our proofs are based on a weighted all-pairs inner product argument, and our results generalize to bounded error quantum algorithms. Both results are proven in the so-called quantum black box model, a quantum analogue of classical decision trees. In addition to our lower bound results, we give an exact quantum algorithm for ordered searching using (\\log_3(N) + O(1)) queries, which is roughly 0.631 \\log_2(N). Although our algorithm is worse than that of Farhi, Goldstone, Gutmann and Sipser, which makes 0.526 \\log_2(...

  17. Developing Automated Methods of Waste Sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurtliff, Rodney Marvin

    2002-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyzed the need complex-wide for remote and automated technologies as they relate to the treatment and disposal of mixed wastes. This analysis revealed that several DOE sites need the capability to open drums containing waste, visually inspect and sort the contents, and finally repackage the containers that are acceptable at a waste disposal facility such as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in New Mexico. Conditioning contaminated waste so that it is compatible with the WIPP criteria for storage is an arduous task whether the waste is contact handled (waste having radioactivity levels below 200 mrem/hr) or remote handled. Currently, WIPP non-compliant items are removed from the waste stream manually, at a rate of about one 55-gallon drum per day. Issues relating to contamination-based health hazards as well as repetitive motion health hazards are steering industry towards a more user-friendly, method of conditioning or sorting waste.

  18. Corner Sort for Pareto-Based Many-Objective Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Handing; Yao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Nondominated sorting plays an important role in Pareto-based multiobjective evolutionary algorithms (MOEAs). When faced with many-objective optimization problems multiobjective optimization problems (MOPs) with more than three objectives, the number of comparisons needed in nondominated sorting becomes very large. In view of this, a new corner sort is proposed in this paper. Corner sort first adopts a fast and simple method to obtain a nondominated solution from the corner solutions, and then uses the nondominated solution to ignore the solutions dominated by it to save comparisons. Obtaining the nondominated solutions requires much fewer objective comparisons in corner sort. In order to evaluate its performance, several state-of-the-art nondominated sorts are compared with our corner sort on three kinds of artificial solution sets of MOPs and the solution sets generated from MOEAs on benchmark problems. On one hand, the experiments on artificial solution sets show the performance on the solution sets with different distributions. On the other hand, the experiments on the solution sets generated from MOEAs show the influence that different sorts bring to MOEAs. The results show that corner sort performs well, especially on many-objective optimization problems. Corner sort uses fewer comparisons than others.

  19. Vertical sorting and the morphodynamics of bed form-dominated rivers: a sorting evolution model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, Astrid; Ribberink, Jan S.; Parker, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Existing sediment continuity models for nonuniform sediment suffer from a number of shortcomings, as they fail to describe vertical sorting fluxes other than through net aggradation or degradation of the bed and are based on a discrete representation of the bed material interacting with the flow. We

  20. Evaluating sewage-associated JCV and BKV polyomaviruses for sourcing human fecal pollution in a coastal river in Southeast Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, W; Wan, C; Goonetilleke, A; Gardner, T

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the host-sensitivity and host-specificity of JC virus (JCV) and BK virus (BKV) polyomaviruses were evaluated by testing wastewater and fecal samples from nine host groups in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The JCV and BKV polyomaviruses were detected in 63 human wastewater samples collected from primary and secondary effluent, suggesting high sensitivity of these viruses in human wastewater. In the 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples tested, 80 were polymerase chain reaction (PCR) negative for the JCV and BKV markers. Only one sample (out of 81 animal wastewater and fecal samples) from pig wastewater was positive. Nonetheless, the overall host-specificity of these viruses to differentiate between human and animal wastewater and fecal samples was 0.99. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Australia that reports on the high specificity of JCV and BKV polyomaviruses. To evaluate the field application of these viral markers for detecting human fecal pollution, 20 environmental samples were collected from a coastal river. In the 20 samples tested, 15% (3/20) and 70% (14/20) samples exceeded the regulatory guidelines for Escherichia coli and enterococci levels for marine waters. In all, five (25%) samples were PCR positive for JCV and BKV, indicating the presence of human fecal pollution in the coastal river investigated. The results suggest that JCV and BKV detection using PCR could be a useful tool for identifying human-sourced fecal pollution in coastal waters.

  1. Fluorescence activated cell sorting of plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargmann, Bastiaan O R; Birnbaum, Kenneth D

    2010-02-18

    High-resolution, cell type-specific analysis of gene expression greatly enhances understanding of developmental regulation and responses to environmental stimuli in any multicellular organism. In situ hybridization and reporter gene visualization can to a limited extent be used to this end but for high resolution quantitative RT-PCR or high-throughput transcriptome-wide analysis the isolation of RNA from particular cell types is requisite. Cellular dissociation of tissue expressing a fluorescent protein marker in a specific cell type and subsequent Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) makes it possible to collect sufficient amounts of material for RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis/amplification and microarray analysis. An extensive set of cell type-specific fluorescent reporter lines is available to the plant research community. In this case, two marker lines of the Arabidopsis thaliana root are used: P(SCR;)::GFP (endodermis and quiescent center) and P(WOX5;)::GFP (quiescent center). Large numbers (thousands) of seedlings are grown hydroponically or on agar plates and harvested to obtain enough root material for further analysis. Cellular dissociation of plant material is achieved by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This procedure makes use of high osmolarity-induced plasmolysis and commercially available cellulases, pectinases and hemicellulases to release protoplasts into solution. FACS of GFP-positive cells makes use of the visualization of the green versus the red emission spectra of protoplasts excited by a 488 nm laser. GFP-positive protoplasts can be distinguished by their increased ratio of green to red emission. Protoplasts are typically sorted directly into RNA extraction buffer and stored for further processing at a later time. This technique is revealed to be straightforward and practicable. Furthermore, it is shown that it can be used without difficulty to isolate sufficient numbers of cells for transcriptome analysis, even for very scarce

  2. Passive chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham P; Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S

    2015-11-05

    An apparatus for passive sorting of microdroplets including a main flow channel, a flow stream of microdroplets in the main flow channel wherein the microdroplets have substantially the same diameter and wherein the flow stream of microdroplets includes first microdroplets having a first degree of stiffness and second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness wherein the second degree of stiffness is different than the first degree of stiffness. A second flow channel is connected to the main flow channel for the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness. A separator separates the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness from the first microdroplets and directs the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness into the second flow channel.

  3. Phase sorting wave-particle correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletzing, C. A.; LaBelle, J.; Bounds, S. R.; Dolan, J.; Kaeppler, S. R.; Dombrowski, M.

    2017-02-01

    Wave-particle correlations, particularly of Langmuir waves and electrons, have been the subject of significant interest extending back to the 1970s. Often, these correlations have been simply observing modulation of the electrons at the plasma frequency with no phase resolution. The first phase-resolving correlators were developed at UC Berkeley in the late 1980s and reported by Ergun in the early 1990s. A design is presented which further improves on phase resolution in correlations of Langmuir waves and electrons with phase resolution of 22.5°. In this technique, a phase-locked loop (PLL) is used to lock onto the wave and subdivide the phase. Electrons are sorted on-the-fly as they arrive into the phase bins. Discussed are details of accurate timing, testing, and calibration of this system as well as results from rocket flights in which statistically significant phase correlations have been observed.

  4. Passive chip-based droplet sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Lee, Abraham P; Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for passive sorting of microdroplets including a main flow channel, a flow stream of microdroplets in the main flow channel wherein the microdroplets have substantially the same diameter and wherein the flow stream of microdroplets includes first microdroplets having a first degree of stiffness and second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness wherein the second degree of stiffness is different than the first degree of stiffness. A second flow channel is connected to the main flow channel for the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness. A separator separates the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness from the first microdroplets and directs the second microdroplets having a second degree of stiffness into the second flow channel.

  5. Carbon Nanotube–Purification and Sorting Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornendu Chaturvedi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs have shown extraordinary mechanical, thermal, electrical, and electronic properties. Electronic properties of CNT are very sensitive to its diameter and chirality, making it metallicor semiconducting, depending upon its chiral vector. The extraordinary properties of CNTs have led to demonstration of several applications but commercial realisation of these devices require consistent qualityof CNTs, and these should be  free of any impurity. For development of electronic devices, CNTs should notjust be pure but also of similar length, diameter, and electronic behaviour. Such demanding requirements need development of elaborate purification and sorting protocols. In this paper,  a brief review of the existing technologies and the research done is presented.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.591-599, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1694

  6. Discrete and continuous models of protein sorting in the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haijun; Schwartz, Russell

    2009-03-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays an important role in processing and sorting proteins and lipids. Golgi compartments constantly exchange material with each other and with other cellular components, allowing them to maintain and reform distinct identities despite dramatic changes in structure and size during cell division, development and osmotic stress. We have developed two minimal models of membrane and protein exchange in the Golgi --- a discrete, stochastic model [1] and a continuous ordinary differential equation (ODE) model --- both based on two fundamental mechanisms: vesicle-coat-mediated selective concentration of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins during vesicle formation and SNARE-mediated selective fusion of vesicles. Both show similar ability to establish and maintain distinct identities over broad parameter ranges, but they diverge in extreme conditions where Golgi collapse and reassembly may be observed. By exploring where the models differ, we hope to better identify those features essential to minimal models of various Golgi behaviors. [1] H. Gong, D. Sengupta, A. D. Linstedt, R. Schwartz. Biophys J. 95: 1674-1688, 2008.

  7. Improved method for pulse sorting based on PRI transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chunhui; Cao, Junqing; Fu, Yusheng; Barner, Kenneth E.

    2014-06-01

    To solve the problem of pulse sorting in complex electromagnetic environment, we propose an improved method for pulse sorting through in-depth analysis of the PRI transform algorithm principle and the advantages and disadvantages in this paper. The method is based on the traditional PRI transform algorithm, using spectral analysis of PRI transform spectrum to estimate the PRI centre value of jitter signal. Simulation results indicate that, the improved sorting method overcome the shortcomings of the traditional PRI jitter separation algorithm which cannot effectively sort jitter pulse sequence, in addition to the advantages of simple and accurate.

  8. Pattern matching based active optical sorting of colloids/cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, R. S.; Dasgupta, R.; Ahlawat, S.; Kumar, N.; Uppal, A.; Gupta, P. K.

    2013-08-01

    We report active optical sorting of colloids/cells by employing a cross correlation based pattern matching technique for selection of the desired objects and thereafter sorting using dynamically controllable holographic optical traps. The problem of possible collision between the different sets of objects during sorting was avoided by raising one set of particles to a different plane. We also present the results obtained on using this approach for some representative applications such as sorting of silica particles of two different sizes, of closely packed colloids and of white blood cells and red blood cells from a mixture of the two.

  9. A many-sorted calculus based on resolution and paramodulation

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Christoph

    1987-01-01

    A Many-Sorted Calculus Based on Resolution and Paramodulation emphasizes the utilization of advantages and concepts of many-sorted logic for resolution and paramodulation based automated theorem proving.This book considers some first-order calculus that defines how theorems from given hypotheses by pure syntactic reasoning are obtained, shifting all the semantic and implicit argumentation to the syntactic and explicit level of formal first-order reasoning. This text discusses the efficiency of many-sorted reasoning, formal preliminaries for the RP- and ?RP-calculus, and many-sorted term rewrit

  10. Learning sorting algorithms through visualization construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Ibrahim; Andrews-Larson, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Recent increased interest in computational thinking poses an important question to researchers: What are the best ways to teach fundamental computing concepts to students? Visualization is suggested as one way of supporting student learning. This mixed-method study aimed to (i) examine the effect of instruction in which students constructed visualizations on students' programming achievement and students' attitudes toward computer programming, and (ii) explore how this kind of instruction supports students' learning according to their self-reported experiences in the course. The study was conducted with 58 pre-service teachers who were enrolled in their second programming class. They expect to teach information technology and computing-related courses at the primary and secondary levels. An embedded experimental model was utilized as a research design. Students in the experimental group were given instruction that required students to construct visualizations related to sorting, whereas students in the control group viewed pre-made visualizations. After the instructional intervention, eight students from each group were selected for semi-structured interviews. The results showed that the intervention based on visualization construction resulted in significantly better acquisition of sorting concepts. However, there was no significant difference between the groups with respect to students' attitudes toward computer programming. Qualitative data analysis indicated that students in the experimental group constructed necessary abstractions through their engagement in visualization construction activities. The authors of this study argue that the students' active engagement in the visualization construction activities explains only one side of students' success. The other side can be explained through the instructional approach, constructionism in this case, used to design instruction. The conclusions and implications of this study can be used by researchers and

  11. Low prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus with low viral loads in oral and maxillofacial tumours or tumour-like lesions from immunocompetent patients: Absence of Merkel cell polyomavirus-associated neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    TANIO, SHUNSUKE; MATSUSHITA, MICHIKO; KUWAMOTO, SATOSHI; HORIE, YASUSHI; KODANI, ISAMU; MURAKAMI, ICHIRO; RYOKE, KAZUO; HAYASHI, KAZUHIKO

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that ~80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) harbour a novel polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). MCPyV has been detected in various human tissue samples. However, previous studies on the prevalence of MCPyV in oral tumours or tumour-like lesions are incomplete. To address this issue, we measured MCPyV DNA quantity using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in 327 oral tumours or tumour-like lesions and 54 jaw tumours or cyst lesions from 381 immunocompetent patients, as well as in 4 oral lesions from 4 immunosuppressed patients. qPCR revealed a low MCPyV prevalence (25/381, 6.6%) with low viral loads (0.00024-0.026 copies/cell) in oral and maxillofacial tumours and tumour-like lesions from immunocompetent patients. The prevalence was 7/176 (4.0%) in invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) [2/60 (3.33%) SCCs of the tongue, 4/52 (7.7%) SCCs of the gingiva and 1/19 (5.3%) SCCs of the floor of the mouth], 1/10 (10%) in dysplasias, 1/5 (20%) in adenocarcinomas, 2/13 (15.4%) in adenoid cystic carcinomas, 1/10 (10%) in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3/10 (30%) in lipomas, 3/5 (60%) in neurofibromas, 1/3 (33.3%) in Schwannomas, 2/12 (16.7%) in Warthin's tumours, 2/11 (18.2%) in pyogenic granulomas, 1/14 (7.1%) in radicular cysts and 1/12 (8.3%) in ameloblastomas. The prevalence in lesions from immunosuppressed patients (1/4, 25%) was higher compared with that in lesions from immunocompetent patients (25/381, 6.6%), but the difference was not statistically significant. To the best of our knowledge, this study was the first to report prevalence data of MCPyV in tumours and cysts of the jaws (2/54, 3.7%). These data indicated absence of MCPyV-related tumours or tumour-like lesions in the oral cavity and jaws and suggested that the detected MCPyV DNA was derived from non-neoplastic background tissues with widespread low-level MCPyV infection. PMID:26807237

  12. Seminal plasma affects sperm sex sorting in boars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkmin, Diego V; Parrilla, Inmaculada; Tarantini, Tatiana; Del Olmo, David; Vazquez, Juan M; Martinez, Emilio A; Roca, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted in boar semen samples to evaluate how both holding time (24h) and the presence of seminal plasma (SP) before sorting affect sperm sortability and the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid storage. Whole ejaculate samples were divided into three aliquots immediately after collection: one was diluted (1:1, v/v) in Beltsville thawing solution (BTS; 50% SP); the SP of the other two aliquots was removed and the sperm pellets were diluted with BTS + 10% of their own SP (10% SP) or BTS alone (0% SP). The three aliquots of each ejaculate were divided into two portions, one that was processed immediately for sorting and a second that was sorted after 24h storage at 15-17°C. In the first experiment, the ability to exhibit well-defined X- and Y-chromosome-bearing sperm peaks (split) in the cytometry histogram and the subsequent sorting efficiency were assessed (20 ejaculates). In contrast with holding time, the SP proportion influenced the parameters examined, as evidenced by the higher number of ejaculates exhibiting split and better sorting efficiency (P<0.05) in semen samples with 0-10% SP compared with those with 50% SP. In a second experiment, the quality (viability, total and progressive motility) and functionality (plasma membrane fluidity and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species) of sex-sorted spermatozoa were evaluated after 0, 72 and 120h storage at 15-17°C (10 ejaculates). Holding time and SP proportion did not influence the quality or functionality of stored sex-sorted spermatozoa. In conclusion, a holding time as long as 24h before sorting did not negatively affect sex sorting efficiency or the ability of sorted boar spermatozoa to tolerate long-term liquid storage. A high proportion of SP (50%) in the semen samples before sorting reduced the number of ejaculates to be sorted and negatively influenced the sorting efficiency, but did not affect the ability of sex-sorted spermatozoa to tolerate liquid

  13. Viable cell sorting of dinoflagellates by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinigalliano, Christopher D; Winshell, Jamie; Guerrero, Maria A; Scorzetti, Gloria; Fell, Jack W; Eaton, Richard W; Brand, Larry; Rein, Kathleen S

    2009-07-01

    Electronic cell sorting for isolation and culture of dinoflagellates and other marine eukaryotic phytoplankton was compared to the traditional method of manually picking cells using a micropipette. Trauma to electronically sorted cells was not a limiting factor, as fragile dinoflagellates, such as Karenia brevis (Dinophyceae), survived electronic cell sorting to yield viable cells. The rate of successful isolation of large-scale (> 4 litres) cultures was higher for manual picking than for electronic cell sorting (2% vs 0.5%, respectively). However, manual picking of cells is more labor intensive and time consuming. Most manually isolated cells required repicking, as the cultures were determined not to be unialgal after a single round of isolation; whereas, no cultures obtained in this study from electronic single-cell sorting required resorting. A broad flow cytometric gating logic was employed to enhance species diversity. The percentages of unique genotypes produced by manual picking or electronic cell sorting were similar (57% vs 54%, respectively), and each approach produced a variety of dinoflagellate or raphidophyte genera. Alternatively, a highly restrictive gating logic was successfully used to target K. brevis from a natural bloom sample. Direct electronic single-cell sorting was more successful than utilizing a pre-enrichment sort followed by electronic single-cell sorting. The appropriate recovery medium may enhance the rate of successful isolations. Seventy percent of isolated cells were recovered in a new medium (RE) reported here, which was optimized for axenic dinoflagellate cultures. The greatest limiting factor to the throughput of electronic cell sorting is the need for manual postsort culture maintenance and assessment of the large number of isolated cells. However, when combined with newly developed automated methods for growth screening, electronic single-cell sorting has the potential to accelerate the discovery of new algal strains.

  14. A Comparison of Card-sorting Analysis Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nawaz, Ather

    2012-01-01

    the recurrent patterns found and thus has consequences for the resulting website design. This paper draws an attention to the choice of card sorting analysis and techniques and shows how it impacts the results. The research focuses on how the same data for card sorting can lead to different website structures...

  15. Tradeoffs Between Branch Mispredictions and Comparisons for Sorting Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Moruz, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    Branch mispredictions is an important factor affecting the running time in practice. In this paper we consider tradeoffs between the number of branch mispredictions and the number of comparisons for sorting algorithms in the comparison model. We prove that a sorting algorithm using O(dnlog n...

  16. Real-Time Implementation of a Color Sorting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikathyanyani Srikanteswara; Qiang Lu; William King; Thomas Drayer; Richard Conners; D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    Wood edge glued panels are used extensively in the furniture and cabinetry industries. They are used to make doors, tops, and sides of solid wood furniture and cabinets. Since lightly stained furniture and cabinets are gaining in popularity, there is an increasing demand to color sort the parts used to make these edge glued panels. The goal of the sorting processing is...

  17. Magnetic fluid equipment for sorting of secondary polyolefins from waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Di Maio, F.; Hu, B.; Houzeaux, G...; Baltes, L.; Tierean, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the researches made on the FP7 project „Magnetic Sorting and Ultrasound Sensor Technologies for Production of High Purity Secondary Polyolefins from Waste” in order to develop a magnetic fluid equipment for sorting of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) from polymers mixed

  18. Method and set-up for uranium ore sorting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragulescu, E.; Ivascu, M.; Popescu, D.; Semenescu, G. (Institutul de Fizica si Inginerie Nucleara, Bucharest (Romania)); Gherea, Gh. (Intreprinderea metalelor rare, Bucuresti (Romania)); Draga, Z.; Funaru, Gh. (Exploatarea miniera Oravita, Oravita (Romania))

    1981-01-01

    A method was studied for uranium ore sorting. After the discussion of the principle, some particular conditions of the sorting are pointed out. A radiometric assembly is described and some results obtained on the simulator and in industrial conditions are reported.

  19. Magnetic fluid equipment for sorting of secondary polyolefins from waste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Di Maio, F.; Hu, B.; Houzeaux, G...; Baltes, L.; Tierean, M.

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the researches made on the FP7 project „Magnetic Sorting and Ultrasound Sensor Technologies for Production of High Purity Secondary Polyolefins from Waste” in order to develop a magnetic fluid equipment for sorting of polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) from polymers mixed wa

  20. Feed sorting in dairy cattle: Causes, consequences, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Cushon, E K; DeVries, T J

    2016-12-29

    Dairy cattle commonly sort total mixed rations, a behavior that influences individual nutrient intake and reduces the nutritive value of the ration left in the bunk across the day. Typical patterns of feed sorting in lactating dairy cows, against longer forage particles, result in greater intake of highly-fermentable carbohydrates and lesser intake of effective fiber than intended, and are associated with reduced rumen pH and altered milk composition. To understand the reason for this behavior and reduce it on-farm, numerous studies have explored the influences of ration characteristics, feeding strategies, and management factors on the expression of feed sorting. In mature cows and young calves, feed sorting is influenced by forage inclusion rate, particle size, and dry matter content. Feeding strategies that increase the time available to manipulate feed-including decreased feeding frequency and increased feeding level-may result in increased feed sorting. The extent of feed sorting is also influenced by a variety of herd-level factors, but variability between individuals in the extent of feed sorting suggests that this behavior may be subject to additional factors, including previous experience and internal state. The development of feed sorting in young calves has been explored in several recent studies, suggesting that early opportunities to sort feed, as provided by access to mixed diets, may encourage the early onset of this behavior and help it persist beyond weaning. Evidence also supports the role of feedback mechanisms that influence this behavior at the individual level. In calves and adult cows, selective consumption of higher-energy ration components may be linked to energy demands, as influenced by the availability of supplemental feed or changing metabolic status. Further, considerable evidence suggests that cattle will adjust patterns of feed sorting in favor of physically effective fiber to attenuate low rumen pH, providing evidence for the role

  1. Degree of molecular self-sorting in multicomponent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manik Lal; Schmittel, Michael

    2012-06-28

    Self-sorting represents the spontaneous and high fidelity self and/or non-self-recognition of two or more related components within a complex mixture. While the effective management of self-sorting principles perceptibly requires some key expertise in molecular programming, at a higher stage of operation it is of supreme interest to guide the process to increasingly higher degrees of self-sorting. In this article, we present the emerging principles of how to guide several components toward formation of self-sorted multicomponent architectures. To provide further guidance in denominating such systems, we suggest to utilise a systematic classification as well as a formula to evaluate their degree of self-sorting (M).

  2. Standard practice for cell sorting in a BSL-3 facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, Stephen P; Ambrozak, David R; Nguyen, Richard; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A; Holmes, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid growth in the number of BSL-3 and BSL-4 laboratories in the USA and an increase in demand for infectious cell sorting in BSL-3 laboratories. In 2007, the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Biosafety Committee published standards for the sorting of unfixed cells and is an important resource for biosafety procedures when performing infectious cell sorting. Following a careful risk assessment, if it is determined that a cell sorter must be located within a BSL-3 laboratory, there are a variety of factors to be considered prior to the establishment of the laboratory. This chapter outlines procedures for infectious cell sorting in a BSL-3 environment to facilitate the establishment and safe operation of a BSL-3 cell sorting laboratory. Subjects covered include containment verification, remote operation, disinfection, personal protective equipment (PPE), and instrument-specific modifications for enhanced aerosol evacuation.

  3. Sorting Pairs of Points Based on Their Distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Farshi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Sorting data is one of the main problems in computer science which studied vastly and used in several places. In several geometric problems, like problems on point sets or lines in the plane or Euclidean space with higher dimensions, the problem of sorting pairs of points based on the distance (between them is used. Using general sorting algorithms, sorting n 2 distances between n points can be done in O(n2 log n time. Ofcourse, sorting (n2 independent numbers does not have a faster solution, but since we have dependency between numbers in this case, finding a faster algorithm or showing that the problem in this case has O(n2 log n time complexity is interesting. In this paper, we try to answer this question.

  4. Help the planet by sorting your waste!

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Paper and cardboard waste comes in various forms, from newspapers to the toughest cardboard. Every year CERN dispatches about 200 tonnes of paper and cardboard to a recycling plant, but this is still too little when you take into consideration the tonnes of paper and cardboard that are still thrown out as part of ordinary rubbish or are incorrectly sorted into other rubbish skips.   Each office is equipped with a wastepaper bin, and a paper and cardboard container is available near every building. Cardboard boxes should be folded before they are placed in the containers in order to save space. Please note: Here are some sobering statistics: - 2 to 3 tonnes of wood pulp are required to manufacture 1 tonne of paper. - Each tonne of recycled paper means that we can save approximately 15 trees and substantial amounts of the water that is needed to extract cellulose (60 litres of water per kilo of paper). - A production of 100% recycled paper represents a 90% saving in water. - 5000 kWh of e...

  5. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. In our work, we use optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by machine vision. This approach is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass beads commonly used in the optical manipulation literature, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient approaches in utilizing lasers and light modulation devices. The Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method that can be used for efficiently illuminating spatial light modulators or creating well-defined contiguous optical traps is supplemented by diffractive techniques capable of integrating the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam's propagation and its interaction with the catapulted cells.

  6. Microfluidic-chip platform for cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sarul; Balyan, Prerna; Akhtar, J.; Agarwal, Ajay

    2016-04-01

    Cell sorting and separation are considered to be very crucial preparatory steps for numerous clinical diagnostics and therapeutics applications in cell biology research arena. Label free cell separation techniques acceptance rate has been increased to multifold by various research groups. Size based cell separation method focuses on the intrinsic properties of the cell which not only avoids clogging issues associated with mechanical and centrifugation filtration methods but also reduces the overall cost for the process. Consequentially flow based cell separation method for continuous flow has attracted the attention of millions. Due to the realization of structures close to particle size in micro dimensions, the microfluidic devices offer precise and rapid particle manipulation which ultimately leads to an extraordinary cell separation results. The proposed microfluidic device is fabricated to separate polystyrene beads of size 1 µm, 5 µm, 10 µm and 20 µm. The actual dimensions of blood corpuscles were kept in mind while deciding the particle size of polystyrene beads which are used as a model particles for study.

  7. The polyomaviruses WUPyV and KIPyV: a retrospective quantitative analysis in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motamedi Nasim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polyomaviruses WUPyV and KIPyV have been detected in various sample types including feces indicating pathogenicity in the gastrointestinal (GI system. However, quantitative viral load data from other simultaneously collected sample types are missing. As a consequence, primary replication in the GI system cannot be differentiated from swallowed virus from the respiratory tract. Here we present a retrospective quantitative longitudinal analysis in simultaneously harvested specimens from different organ sites of patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. This allows the definition of sample types where deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection can be expected and, as a consequence, the identification of their primary replication site. Findings Viral DNA loads from 37 patients undergoing HSCT were quantified in respiratory tract secretions (RTS, stool and urine samples as well as in leukocytes (n = 449. Leukocyte-associated virus could not be found. WUPyV was found in feces, RTS and urine samples of an infant, while KIPyV was repeatedly detected in RTS and stool samples of 4 adult patients. RTS and stool samples were matched to determine the viral load difference showing a mean difference of 2.3 log copies/ml (p  Conclusions The data collected in this study suggest that virus detection in the GI tract results from swallowed virus from the respiratory tract (RT. We conclude that shedding from the RT should be ruled out before viral DNA detection in the feces can be correlated to GI symptoms.

  8. Microfluidic EmbryoSort technology: towards in flow analysis, sorting and dispensing of individual vertebrate embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nurul M.; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2013-12-01

    The demand to reduce the numbers of laboratory animals has facilitated the emergence of surrogate models such as tests performed on zebrafish (Danio rerio) or African clawed frog's (Xenopus levis) eggs, embryos and larvae. Those two model organisms are becoming increasingly popular replacements to current adult animal testing in toxicology, ecotoxicology and also in drug discovery. Zebrafish eggs and embryos are particularly attractive for toxicological analysis due their size (diameter 1.6 mm), optical transparency, large numbers generated per fish and very straightforward husbandry. The current bottleneck in using zebrafish embryos for screening purposes is, however, a tedious manual evaluation to confirm the fertilization status and subsequent dispensing of single developing embryos to multitier plates to perform toxicity analysis. Manual procedures associated with sorting hundreds of embryos are very monotonous and as such prone to significant analytical errors due to operator's fatigue. In this work, we present a proofof- concept design of a continuous flow embryo sorter capable of analyzing, sorting and dispensing objects ranging in size from 1.5 - 2.5 mm. The prototypes were fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) transparent thermoplastic using infrared laser micromachining. The application of additive manufacturing processes to prototype Lab-on-a-Chip sorters using both fused deposition manufacturing (FDM) and stereolithography (SLA) were also explored. The operation of the device was based on a revolving receptacle capable of receiving, holding and positioning single fish embryos for both interrogation and subsequent sorting. The actuation of the revolving receptacle was performed using a DC motor and/or microservo motor. The system was designed to separate between fertilized (LIVE) and non-fertilized (DEAD) eggs, based on optical transparency using infrared (IR) emitters and receivers.

  9. Flow virometric sorting and analysis of HIV quasispecies from plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jenkins, Lisa M. Miller; Demberg, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    Flow cytometry is utilized extensively for cellular analysis, but technical limitations have prevented its routine application for characterizing virus. The recent introduction of nanoscale fluorescence-activated cytometric cell sorting now allows analysis of individual virions. Here, we demonstrate staining and sorting of infectious HIV. Fluorescent antibodies specific for cellular molecules found on budding virions were used to label CCR5-tropic Bal HIV and CXCR4-tropic NL4.3 HIV Env-expressing pseudovirions made in THP-1 cells (monocyte/macrophage) and H9 cells (T cells), respectively. Using a flow cytometer, we resolved the stained virus beyond isotype staining and demonstrated purity and infectivity of sorted virus populations on cells with the appropriate coreceptors. We subsequently sorted infectious simian/human immunodeficiency virus from archived plasma. Recovery was approximately 0.5%, but virus present in plasma was already bound to viral-specific IgG generated in vivo, likely contributing to the low yield. Importantly, using two broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies, PG9 and VRC01, we also sorted virus from archived human plasma and analyzed the sorted populations genetically and by proteomics, identifying the quasispecies present. The ability to sort infectious HIV from clinically relevant samples provides material for detailed molecular, genetic, and proteomic analyses applicable to future design of vaccine antigens and potential development of personalized treatment regimens. PMID:28239654

  10. Microfluidic droplet sorting using integrated bilayer micro-valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuncong; Tian, Yang; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Xinran; Yu, Sicong; Dong, Liang

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports on a microfluidic device capable of sorting microfluidic droplets utilizing conventional bilayer pneumatic micro-valves as sorting controllers. The device consists of two micro-valves placed symmetrically on two sides of a sorting area, each on top of a branching channel at an inclined angle with respect to the main channel. Changes in transmitted light intensity, induced by varying light absorbance by each droplet, are used to divert the droplet from the sorting area into one of the three outlet channels. When no valve is activated, the droplet flows into the outlet channel in the direction of the main channel. When one of the valves is triggered, the flexible membrane of valve will first be deflected. Once the droplet leaves the detection point, the deflected membrane will immediately return to its default flattened position, thereby exerting a drawing pressure on the droplet and deviating it from its original streamline to the outlet on the same side as the valve. This sorting method will be particularly suitable for numerous large-scale integrated microfluidic systems, where pneumatic micro-valves are already used. Only few structural modifications are needed to achieve droplet sorting capabilities in these systems. Due to the mechanical nature of diverting energy applied to droplets, the proposed sorting method may induce only minimal interference to biological species or microorganisms encapsulated inside the droplets that may accompany electrical, optical and magnetic-based techniques.

  11. TRAM is involved in IL-18 signaling and functions as a sorting adaptor for MyD88.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Ohnishi

    Full Text Available MyD88, a Toll/interleukin-1 receptor homology (TIR domain-containing adaptor protein, mediates signals from the Toll-like receptors (TLR or IL-1/IL-18 receptors to downstream kinases. In MyD88-dependent TLR4 signaling, the function of MyD88 is enhanced by another TIR domain-containing adaptor, Mal/TIRAP, which brings MyD88 to the plasma membrane and promotes its interaction with the cytosolic region of TLR4. Hence, Mal is recognized as the "sorting adaptor" for MyD88. In this study, a direct interaction between MyD88-TIR and another membrane-sorting adaptor, TRAM/TICAM-2, was demonstrated in vitro. Cell-based assays including RNA interference experiments and TRAM deficient mice revealed that the interplay between MyD88 and TRAM in cells is important in mediating IL-18 signal transduction. Live cell imaging further demonstrated the co-localized accumulation of MyD88 and TRAM in the membrane regions in HEK293 cells. These findings suggest that TRAM serves as the sorting adaptor for MyD88 in IL-18 signaling, which then facilitates the signal transduction. The binding sites for TRAM are located in the TIR domain of MyD88 and actually overlap with the binding sites for Mal. MyD88, the multifunctional signaling adaptor that works together with most of the TLR members and with the IL-1/IL-18 receptors, can interact with two distinct sorting adaptors, TRAM and Mal, in a conserved manner in a distinct context.

  12. Expression of pRb and p16INK4 in human thymic epithelial tumors in relation to the presence of human polyomavirus 7

    OpenAIRE

    Keijzers, Marlies; Rensspiess, Dorit; Pujari, Sreedhar; Abdul-Hamid, Myrurgia A.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Dingemans, Anne-Marie; Kurz, Anna Kordelia; Haugg, Anke; Maessen, Jos G; Baets, Marc H. De; zur Hausen, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Background We have recently reported the presence of the Human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) in human thymic epithelial tumors as assessed by diverse molecular techniques. Here we report on the co-expression of p16, retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (phospho-Rb) in human thymic epithelial tumors in relation to HPyV7. Methods PRB, phospho-RB and p16 expression was assessed by immuno-histochemistry in 37 thymomas and 2 thymic carcinomas. 17 thymomas (46 %) and 1 th...

  13. Production of a recombinant capsid protein VP1 from a newly described polyomavirus (RacPyV for downstream use in virus characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly E. Church

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe the methods for production of a recombinant viral capsid protein and subsequent use in an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, and for use in production of a rabbit polyclonal antibody. These reagents were utilized in development and optimization of an ELISA, which established the extent of exposure of free ranging raccoons to a newly described polyomavirus (RacPyV [1]. Production of a polyclonal antibody has allowed for further characterization of RacPyV, including immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry techniques, in order to answer questions about pathogenesis of this virus.

  14. Automatic gear sorting system based on monocular vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Wu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available An automatic gear sorting system based on monocular vision is proposed in this paper. A CCD camera fixed on the top of the sorting system is used to obtain the images of the gears on the conveyor belt. The gears׳ features including number of holes, number of teeth and color are extracted, which is used to categorize the gears. Photoelectric sensors are used to locate the gears׳ position and produce the trigger signals for pneumatic cylinders. The automatic gear sorting is achieved by using pneumatic actuators to push different gears into their corresponding storage boxes. The experimental results verify the validity and reliability of the proposed method and system.

  15. A Novel Auto-Sorting System for Chinese Cabbage Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Yi; Cheng, Jian-Feng

    2017-04-18

    This paper presents a novel machine vision-based auto-sorting system for Chinese cabbage seeds. The system comprises an inlet-outlet mechanism, machine vision hardware and software, and control system for sorting seed quality. The proposed method can estimate the shape, color, and textural features of seeds that are provided as input neurons of neural networks in order to classify seeds as "good" and "not good" (NG). The results show the accuracies of classification to be 91.53% and 88.95% for good and NG seeds, respectively. The experimental results indicate that Chinese cabbage seeds can be sorted efficiently using the developed system.

  16. Efficient Sorting of Free Electron Orbital Angular Momentum

    CERN Document Server

    McMorran, Benjamin J; Lavery, Martin P J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for sorting electrons by orbital angular momentum (OAM). Several methods now exist to prepare electron wavefunctions in OAM states, but no technique has been developed for efficient, parallel measurement of pure and mixed electron OAM states. The proposed technique draws inspiration from the recent demonstration of the sorting of OAM through modal transformation. We show that the same transformation can be performed with electrostatic electron optical elements. Specifically, we show that a charged needle and an array of electrodes perform the transformation and phase correction necessary to sort orbital angular momentum states. This device may enable the analysis of the spatial mode distribution of inelastically scattered electrons.

  17. Running worms: C. elegans self-sorting by electrotaxis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Manière

    Full Text Available The nematode C. elegans displays complex dynamical behaviors that are commonly used to identify relevant phenotypes. Although its maintenance is straightforward, sorting large populations of worms when looking for a behavioral phenotype is difficult, time consuming and hardly quantitative when done manually. Interestingly, when submitted to a moderate electric field, worms move steadily along straight trajectories. Here, we report an inexpensive method to measure worms crawling velocities and sort them within a few minutes by taking advantage of their electrotactic skills. This method allows to quantitatively measure the effect of mutations and aging on worm's crawling velocity. We also show that worms with different locomotory phenotypes can be spatially sorted, fast worms traveling away from slow ones. Group of nematodes with comparable locomotory fitness could then be isolated for further analysis. C. elegans is a growing model for neurodegenerative diseases and using electrotaxis for self-sorting can improve the high-throughput search of therapeutic bio-molecules.

  18. Sorting and quantifying orbital angular momentum of laser beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel tool for sorting the orbital angular momentum and to determine the orbital angular momentum density of laser beams, which is based on the use of correlation filters....

  19. Natural Selection Is a Sorting Process: What Does that Mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Rebecca M.

    2013-01-01

    To learn why natural selection acts only on existing variation, students categorize processes as either creative or sorting. This activity helps students confront the misconception that adaptations evolve because species need them.

  20. FPGA-based Accelerators for Parallel Data Sort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sklyarov Valery

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is dedicated to parallel data sort based on sorting networks. The proposed methods and circuits have the following characteristics: 1 using two-level parallel comparators in even-odd transition networks with feedback to a register keeping input/intermediate data; 2 parallel merging of many sorted sequences; 3 using even-odd transition networks built from other sorting networks; 4 rational reuse of comparators in different types of networks, namely even-odd transition and for discovering maximum/minimum values. The experiments in FPGA, which were done for up to 16×220 32-bit data items, demonstrate very good results (as fast as 3-5 ns per data item.

  1. Unsupervised Spike Sorting Based on Discriminative Subspace Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtkaran, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Spike sorting is a fundamental preprocessing step for many neuroscience studies which rely on the analysis of spike trains. In this paper, we present two unsupervised spike sorting algorithms based on discriminative subspace learning. The first algorithm simultaneously learns the discriminative feature subspace and performs clustering. It uses histogram of features in the most discriminative projection to detect the number of neurons. The second algorithm performs hierarchical divisive clustering that learns a discriminative 1-dimensional subspace for clustering in each level of the hierarchy until achieving almost unimodal distribution in the subspace. The algorithms are tested on synthetic and in-vivo data, and are compared against two widely used spike sorting methods. The comparative results demonstrate that our spike sorting methods can achieve substantially higher accuracy in lower dimensional feature space, and they are highly robust to noise. Moreover, they provide significantly better cluster separab...

  2. Combination of the Sorting Line Priority Polling Control Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxue Ran

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposed the priority polling control mechanism of the unit material combinations sorting lines, and sorters operating process is understood to be the arrival process of orders, service process of each sorter sorts orders and the conversion process between sorting machines. Control process, sorters of the combined sorting lines are divided into the priority sorters and ordinary sorters, priority sorters use full service control, ordinary sorters use limited service (k = 1, applies the polling service system theory, through the embedded Markov chain and probability generating function to establish the mathematical model of the system, the exact solution of the control mechanism of the polling system model and the first and second characteristic parameters, combined with the actual production priority parameters of orders picking for simulation analysis

  3. Using Sorting Networks for Skill Building and Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Robert; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2007-01-01

    Sorting networks, used in graph theory, have instructional value as a skill- building tool as well as an interesting exploration in discrete mathematics. Students can practice mathematics facts and develop reasoning and logic skills with this topic. (Contains 4 figures.)

  4. Optical sorting and photo-transfection of mammalian cells

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Recently, laser light sources of different regimes have emerged as an essential tool in the biophotonics research area. Classic applications include, for example: manipulating single cells and their subcellular organelles, sorting cells...

  5. Using Sorting Networks for Skill Building and Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Robert; Wiest, Lynda R.

    2007-01-01

    Sorting networks, used in graph theory, have instructional value as a skill- building tool as well as an interesting exploration in discrete mathematics. Students can practice mathematics facts and develop reasoning and logic skills with this topic. (Contains 4 figures.)

  6. Sorting nexin 27 couples PTHR trafficking to retromer for signal regulation in osteoblasts during bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Audrey S M; Clairfeuille, Thomas; Landao-Bassonga, Euphemie; Kinna, Genevieve; Ng, Pei Ying; Loo, Li Shen; Cheng, Tak Sum; Zheng, Minghao; Hong, Wanjin; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M; Pavlos, Nathan J

    2016-04-15

    The parathyroid hormone 1 receptor (PTHR) is central to the process of bone formation and remodeling. PTHR signaling requires receptor internalization into endosomes, which is then terminated by recycling or degradation. Here we show that sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) functions as an adaptor that couples PTHR to the retromer trafficking complex. SNX27 binds directly to the C-terminal PDZ-binding motif of PTHR, wiring it to retromer for endosomal sorting. The structure of SNX27 bound to the PTHR motif reveals a high-affinity interface involving conserved electrostatic interactions. Mechanistically, depletion of SNX27 or retromer augments intracellular PTHR signaling in endosomes. Osteoblasts genetically lacking SNX27 show similar disruptions in PTHR signaling and greatly reduced capacity for bone mineralization, contributing to profound skeletal deficits in SNX27-knockout mice. Taken together, our data support a critical role for SNX27-retromer mediated transport of PTHR in normal bone development. © 2016 Chan et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. EGFRvIII escapes down-regulation due to impaired internalization and sorting to lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandal, Michael V; Zandi, Roza; Pedersen, Mikkel W; Willumsen, Berthe M; van Deurs, Bo; Poulsen, Hans S

    2007-07-01

    EGFRvIII is a mutant variant of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) found exclusively in various cancer types. EGFRvIII lacks a large part of the extracellular domain and is unable to bind ligands; however, the receptor is constitutively phosphorylated and able to activate downstream signaling pathways. Failure to attenuate signaling by receptor down-regulation could be one of the major mechanisms by which EGFRvIII becomes oncogenic. Using a cell system expressing either EGFR or EGFRvIII with no expression of other EGFR family members and with endogenous levels of key degradation proteins, we have investigated the down-regulation of EGFRvIII and compared it to that of EGFR. We show that, in contrast to EGFR, EGFRvIII is inefficiently degraded. EGFRvIII is internalized, but the internalization rate of the mutated receptor is significantly less than that of unstimulated EGFR. Moreover, internalized EGFRvIII is recycled rather than delivered to lysosomes. EGFRvIII binds the ubiquitin ligase c-Cbl via Grb2, whereas binding via phosphorylated tyrosine residue 1045 seems to be limited. Despite c-Cbl binding, the receptor fails to become effectively ubiquitinylated. Thus, our results suggest that the long lifetime of EGFRvIII is caused by inefficient internalization and impaired sorting to lysosomes due to lack of effective ubiquitinylation.

  8. Driving gradual endogenous c-myc overexpression by flow-sorting: intracellular signaling and tumor cell phenotype correlate with oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kasper Jermiin; Holm, G.M.N.; Krabbe, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    cells than in the nonsorted cell population. To our knowledge, this is the first in vitro system allowing functional coupling between mitogenic signaling by a well-defined growth factor and gradual overexpression of the normal, endogenous c-myc gene. Thus, our flow-sorting approach provides...... an alternative modeling of the receptor-mediated carcinogenic process, compared to the currently used approaches of recombinant constitutive or conditional overexpression of oncogenic transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinases or oncogenic transcription factors....

  9. Merkel cell polyomavirus IgG antibody levels are associated with progression to AIDS among HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahabpour, Rouhollah; Nasimi, Maryam; Naderi, Niloofar; Salehi-Vaziri, Mostafa; Mohajel, Nasir; Sadeghi, Farzin; Keyvani, Hossein; Monavari, Seyed Hamidreza

    2017-04-01

    The association of Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in immunocompromised individuals has been revealed in a number of surveys. The study of MCPyV specific antibody titers and viral loads in such patients has a great attraction for research groups interested in viral reactivation. In this cross-sectional study to evaluate MCPyV antibody titer, DNA prevalence and viral load in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), we examined 205 HIV-1 infected patients and 100 un-infected controls. The HIV-1 infected patients divided into two groups (HIV/AIDS and non-AIDS) according to their CD4 status. Total IgG antibody titer against MCPyV was analyzed by virus like particle (VLP)-based enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Presence of MCPyV-DNA in subject's PBMCs was examined by quantitative real-time PCR assay. Levels of anti-MCPyV IgG in HIV/AIDS patients were significantly higher than those in non-AIDS HIV-infected and control subjects (p value = <0.001). The prevalence rate of MCPyV-DNA in PBMCs of HIV/AIDS, non-AIDS HIV-infected and un-infected controls were 17%, 16%, and 14% respectively. The MCPyV viral load among the groups ranged between 0.15 to 2.9 copies/10(3)cells (median, 1.9 copies/10(3)cells), with no significant difference between the studied populations (p value = 0.3).

  10. Archetypal and rearranged sequences of human polyomavirus JC transcription control region in peripheral blood leukocytes and in cerebrospinal fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappi, S; Azzi, A; De Santis, R; Leoncini, F; Sterrantino, G; Mazzotta, F; Mecocci, L

    1999-04-01

    Two forms of human polyomavirus JC (JCV) genome are known based upon the structure of the transcriptional control region (TCR) of the virus: the archetypal form, which is commonly detected in urine, and the rearranged form, which was first detected in brain tissue from progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) patients. The latter actually includes a group of TCR variants that, relative to the former, are characterized by various deletions and/or duplications. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not a correlation exists among the TCR type, the spreading of the virus within the host and its ability to cause PML. JCV TCR sequences from peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from various groups of patients were compared. JCV with archetypal TCR was detected in CSF and PBL specimens from patients without neurological disorders or who eventually received a diagnosis of a non-PML neurological disorder. Rearranged TCR sequences were detected in all the CSF and PBL specimens from PML patients. The high similarity observed between the TCR structure detected in PBL and CSF specimens from individual patients could strengthen the hypothesis that PBL has a role in spreading JCV to the brain. Moreover, heterogeneous TCR patterns have been shown in individual PBL specimens from PML patients. This supports the hypothesis that, in PBL, JCV may replicate and undergo rearrangements of the TCR. The detection of JCV DNA by PCR in CSF independently from PML, although rare, could suggest that this assay is not sufficient for a virological diagnosis of PML. Further studies are required to assess the usefulness of quantitative assays or TCR typing in combination with PCR for diagnostic purposes.

  11. Progressive renal failure due to renal infiltration by BK polyomavirus and leukaemic cells: which is the culprit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangala, Nicholas; Dewdney, Alex; Marley, Nicholas; Cranfield, Tanya; Venkat-Raman, Gopalakrishnan

    2011-02-01

    Renal infiltration with leukaemic cells is a common finding in patients suffering with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) but rarely does it lead to significant renal dysfunction. Similarly, BK nephropathy is a recognized cause of graft failure in renal transplant recipients but rarely causes significant disease in native kidneys. In the few reports where leukaemic infiltration of the kidney has led to significant renal impairment, the pathological process causing renal dysfunction is not identified on biopsy. In these cases, it is unclear whether BK polyomavirus (BKV) nephropathy has been excluded. We describe a case of dual pathologies in a patient with Binet stage C CLL and deteriorating renal function where renal biopsy reveals leukaemic infiltration of the kidney occurring alongside BKV nephropathy. The relative importance of each pathology in relation to the rapid decline to end-stage renal failure remains unclear, but the presence of both pathologies appears to impart a poor prognosis. Additionally, we describe the novel histological finding of loss of tubular integrity resulting in tubular infiltration and occlusion by leukaemic cells. It is possible that the patient with advanced CLL is at particular risk of BK activation, and the presence of BK nephropathy may compromise tubular integrity allowing leukaemic cell infiltration and obstruction of tubules. This case bares remarkable resemblance to the first and only other report of its kind in the literature. It is not clear how available immunocytochemistry for polyoma infection is outside transplant centres, and it is possible that BK nephropathy is being under-diagnosed in patients with CLL in the context of declining renal function. At present, the combination of BKV nephropathy and leukaemic infiltration represents a management conundrum and the prognosis is poor. Further research is required in order to better understand the pathological process and therefore develop management strategies.

  12. Quantification of BKV in urine and plasma in renal transplant recipients at PVAN (Polyomavirus-associated nephropathy risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio De Nisco

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. BKV infection usually occurs in early childhood through the respiratory tract.The virus persists in a latent form in the kidney and it could be reactivated under favorable condition.The most important clinical manifestations affect kidney transplanted in which the BK polyomavirus nephropathy (PVAN can lead to kidney failure. Objectives. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical utility of quantification of BKV viruria and especially viremia detected by real-time PCR method to select the patients at risk of PVAN. Study Design. We carried out a quantitative (dosing assay of BKV-DNA in 24 patients transplanted in Salerno’s hospital, or elsewhere, all treated with cyclosporine or tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil or Prednisolone. The enrollment was made on the basis of impaired renal function, in particular of the values of serum creatinine (> 25% of baseline level and / or appearance of proteinuria. The nucleic acid extraction was performed by EXTRAgen kit (Nanogen; the extracts were submitted to quantitative evaluation by BKV Q-PCR Alert Kit indicare regione target in Real Time PCR (Nanogen using the instrument ABI7300 (Applied Biosystems. Results. 16 patients were negative both for viremia and viruria,4 patients showed positive viruria but viremia <10,000 copies / ml, 4 patients showed positive viruria and viremia > 10,000 copies / ml. In the last group, biopsy, performed to diagnose PVAN was positive and immunosuppressive therapy was reformulate leading to the decline, but never to the negativity of viral load. Conclusions. The renal impairement combined with the quantification of BKV’s viral load in urine and especially in plasma, can also be effective predictors of PVAN.

  13. Molecular characterization of flow-sorted mammalian centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Henschen, A.; Parseghian, M.H. [Univ. of Calfornia, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved experiments directed towards developing a molecular characterization of the centromere region of mammalian chromosomes. Attempts to purify this essential chromosomal locus by conventional methods have thus far been unsuccessful. However, preliminary data obtained in collaboration with the National Flow Cytometry Resource (NFCR) showed that it is possible to purify a chromosome fragment that is present in certain cultured mouse cell lines and has all the properties expected of an intact centromere region. To begin sorting this minichromosome for the identification of proteins preferentially associated with centromere regions, standard buffers utilized in chromosome sorting were evaluated for potential effects on maintenance of chromosomal proteins during sorting. The data indicate that the presence of several buffer constituents results in the extraction of all but a few chromosomal proteins. The subsequent use of a magnesium sulfate buffer resulted in the sorting of mouse chromosomes that do not suffer a significant loss of proteins. Several DNA stains were also evaluated for causing protein dissociation, but no significant losses were observed. Although flow-sorted chromosomes have been used extensively for DNA analysis and cloning, this is a pioneering effort by the NFCR, and its collaborators, to exploit chromosome sorting capabilities for the analysis of chromosomal proteins.

  14. Automatic particle detection and sorting in an electrokinetic microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongxin; Peng, Ran; Wang, Junsheng; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yeqing; Li, Dongqing

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports a lab-on-a-chip device that can automatically detect and sort particles based on their size differences with a high resolution. The PDMS-glass microfluidic chip is made by soft-lithography technique. A differential resistive pulse sensor is employed to electrically detect the sizes of the particles in EOF generated by applying DC voltages across channels. The detected resistive pulse sensor signals, whose amplitudes are proportional to particles' sizes, will automatically trigger the sorting process that is controlled by applying a voltage pulse (36 V) whenever a target particle is detected. This method was applied to automatically detect and sort polystyrene particles and microalgae in aqueous solutions. Sorting 5 μm polymer particle from a mixture of 4- and 5-μm polystyrene particles in aqueous solution, i.e. 1 μm sorting resolution, was demonstrated. The device described in this paper is simple, automatic, and label-free with high sorting resolution. It has wide applications in sample pretreatment and target particles detection. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Molecular characterization of flow-sorted mammalian centromeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamkalo, B.A.; Henschen, A.; Parseghian, M.H. [Univ. of Calfornia, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry] [and others

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project involved experiments directed towards developing a molecular characterization of the centromere region of mammalian chromosomes. Attempts to purify this essential chromosomal locus by conventional methods have thus far been unsuccessful. However, preliminary data obtained in collaboration with the National Flow Cytometry Resource (NFCR) showed that it is possible to purify a chromosome fragment that is present in certain cultured mouse cell lines and has all the properties expected of an intact centromere region. To begin sorting this minichromosome for the identification of proteins preferentially associated with centromere regions, standard buffers utilized in chromosome sorting were evaluated for potential effects on maintenance of chromosomal proteins during sorting. The data indicate that the presence of several buffer constituents results in the extraction of all but a few chromosomal proteins. The subsequent use of a magnesium sulfate buffer resulted in the sorting of mouse chromosomes that do not suffer a significant loss of proteins. Several DNA stains were also evaluated for causing protein dissociation, but no significant losses were observed. Although flow-sorted chromosomes have been used extensively for DNA analysis and cloning, this is a pioneering effort by the NFCR, and its collaborators, to exploit chromosome sorting capabilities for the analysis of chromosomal proteins.

  16. NOVEL RADAR SIGNAL SORTING METHOD BASED ON GEOMETRIC COVERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万建; 国强; 宋文明

    2013-01-01

    With the increase of complexity of electromagnetic environment and continuous appearance of advanced system radars ,signals received by radar reconnaissance receivers become even more intensive and complex .There-fore ,traditional radar sorting methods based on neural network algorithms and support vector machine (SVM ) cannot process them effectively .Aiming at solving this problem ,a novel radar signal sorting method based on the cloud model theory and the geometric covering algorithm is proposed .By applying the geometric covering algo-rithm to divide input signals into different covering domains based on their distribution characteristics ,the method can overcome a typical problem that it is easy for traditional sorting algorithms to fall into the local extrema due to the use of complex nonlinear equation to describe input signals .The method uses the cloud model to describe the membership degree between signals to be sorted and their covering domains ,thus it avoids the disadvantage that traditional sorting methods based on hard clustering cannot deinterleave the signal samples with overlapped param-eters .Experimental results show that the presented method can effectively sort advanced system radar signals with overlapped parameters in complex electromagnetic environment .

  17. Random walk models of worker sorting in ant colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendova-Franks, Ana B; Van Lent, Jan

    2002-07-21

    Sorting can be an important mechanism for the transfer of information from one level of biological organization to another. Here we study the algorithm underlying worker sorting in Leptothorax ant colonies. Worker sorting is related to task allocation and therefore to the adaptive advantages associated with an efficient system for the division of labour in ant colonies. We considered four spatially explicit individual-based models founded on two-dimensional correlated random walk. Our aim was to establish whether sorting at the level of the worker population could occur with minimal assumptions about the behavioural algorithm of individual workers. The behaviour of an individual worker in the models could be summarized by the rule "move if you can, turn always". We assume that the turning angle of a worker is individually specific and negatively dependent on the magnitude of an internal parameter micro which could be regarded as a measure of individual experience or task specialization. All four models attained a level of worker sortedness that was compatible with results from experiments onLeptothorax ant colonies. We found that the presence of a sorting pivot, such as the nest wall or an attraction force towards the centre of the worker population, was crucial for sorting. We make a distinction between such pivots and templates and discuss the biological implications of their difference.

  18. An Evaluation of the Critical Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Some Sorting Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olabiyisi S.O.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sorting allows information or data to be put into a meaningful order. As efficiency is a major concern of computing, data are sorted in order to gain the efficiency in retrieving or searching tasks. The factors affecting the efficiency of shell, Heap, Bubble, Quick and Merge sorting techniques in terms of running time, memory usage and the number of exchanges were investigated. Experiment was conducted for the decision variables generated from algorithms implemented in Java programming and factor analysis by principal components of the obtained experimental data was carried out in order to estimate the contribution of each factor to the success of the sorting algorithms. Further statistical analysis was carried out to generate eigenvalue of the extracted factor and hence, a system of linear equations which was used to estimate the assessment of each factor of the sorting techniques was proposed. The study revealed that the main factor affecting these sorting techniques was time taken to sort. It contributed 97.842%, 97.693%, 89.351%, 98.336% and 90.480% for Bubble sort, Heap sort, Merge sort, Quick sort and Shell sort respectively. The number of swap came second contributing 1.587% for Bubble sort, 2.305% for Heap sort, 10.63% for Merge sort, 1.643% for Quick sort and 9.514% for Shell sort. The memory used was the least of the factors contributing negligible percentage for the five sorting techniques. It contributed 0.571% for Bubble sort, 0.002% for Heap sort, 0.011% for Merge sort, 0.021% for Quick sort and 0.006% for Shell sort.

  19. High prevalence of the simultaneous excretion of polyomaviruses JC and BK in the urine of HIV-infected patients without neurological symptoms in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique da Silva Nali

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of the urinary excretion of BKV and JCV in HIV-infected patients without neurological symptoms. METHODS: Urine samples from HIV-infected patients without neurological symptoms were tested for JC virus and BK virus by PCR. Samples were screened for the presence of polyomavirus with sets of primers complementary to the early region of JCV and BKV genome (AgT. The presence of JC virus or BK virus were confirmed by two other PCR assays using sets of primers complementary to the VP1 gene of each virus. Analysis of the data was performed by the Kruskal-Wallis test for numerical data and Pearson or Yates for categorical variables. RESULTS: A total of 75 patients were included in the study. The overall prevalence of polyomavirus DNA urinary shedding was 67/75 (89.3%. Only BKV DNA was detected in 14/75 (18.7% urine samples, and only JCV DNA was detected in 11/75 (14.7% samples. Both BKV and JCV DNA were present in 42/75 (56.0% samples. CONCLUSION: In this study we found high rates of excretion of JCV, BKV, and simultaneous excretion in HIV+ patients. Also these results differ from the others available on the literature.

  20. Microfluidic train station: highly robust and multiplexable sorting of droplets on electric rails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Daniel; Merten, Christoph A

    2017-02-24

    Fluorescence-activated droplet sorting (FADS) has become a widely used technique for high-throughput screening applications. However, existing methods are very sensitive to fluctuating flow rates at the sorting junction, which can be caused by the pulsing effects of mechanical pumps, droplet aggregates or the accumulation of precipitates during lengthy biological screening applications. Furthermore, existing sorting devices allow only 2-way sorting. We present here a dielectrophoretic sorting system in which the droplets are sorted along multiple electrode pairs that run parallel to the channels. This enables highly reliable sorting (no errors were detected for more than 2000 sorting events) even when inverting the relative flow rates at a 2-way sorting junction from 80 : 20 to 20 : 80. Furthermore, our toolbox is scalable: we demonstrate on the example of a triple-colour sorting experiment with a total of four decoupled electrodes that multi-way sorting is feasible.

  1. Contribution of Chitinase A’s C-Terminal Vacuolar Sorting Determinant to the Study of Soluble Protein Compartmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egidio Stigliano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant chitinases have been studied for their importance in the defense of crop plants from pathogen attacks and for their peculiar vacuolar sorting determinants. A peculiarity of the sequence of many family 19 chitinases is the presence of a C-terminal extension that seems to be important for their correct recognition by the vacuole sorting machinery. The 7 amino acids long C-terminal vacuolar sorting determinant (CtVSD of tobacco chitinase A is necessary and sufficient for the transport to the vacuole. This VSD shares no homology with other CtVSDs such as the phaseolin’s tetrapeptide AFVY (AlaPheValTyr and it is also sorted by different mechanisms. While a receptor for this signal has not yet been convincingly identified, the research using the chitinase CtVSD has been very informative, leading to the observation of phenomena otherwise difficult to observe such as the presence of separate vacuoles in differentiating cells and the existence of a Golgi-independent route to the vacuole. Thanks to these new insights in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER-to-vacuole transport, GFPChi (Green Fluorescent Protein carrying the chitinase A CtVSD and other markers based on chitinase signals will continue to help the investigation of vacuolar biogenesis in plants.

  2. Distinct pathways mediate the sorting of tail-anchored proteins to the plastid outer envelope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preetinder K Dhanoa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tail-anchored (TA proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34 and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9. Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie

  3. Neuronal spike sorting based on radial basis function neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taghavi Kani M

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Studying the behavior of a society of neurons, extracting the communication mechanisms of brain with other tissues, finding treatment for some nervous system diseases and designing neuroprosthetic devices, require an algorithm to sort neuralspikes automatically. However, sorting neural spikes is a challenging task because of the low signal to noise ratio (SNR of the spikes. The main purpose of this study was to design an automatic algorithm for classifying neuronal spikes that are emitted from a specific region of the nervous system."n "nMethods: The spike sorting process usually consists of three stages: detection, feature extraction and sorting. We initially used signal statistics to detect neural spikes. Then, we chose a limited number of typical spikes as features and finally used them to train a radial basis function (RBF neural network to sort the spikes. In most spike sorting devices, these signals are not linearly discriminative. In order to solve this problem, the aforesaid RBF neural network was used."n "nResults: After the learning process, our proposed algorithm classified any arbitrary spike. The obtained results showed that even though the proposed Radial Basis Spike Sorter (RBSS reached to the same error as the previous methods, however, the computational costs were much lower compared to other algorithms. Moreover, the competitive points of the proposed algorithm were its good speed and low computational complexity."n "nConclusion: Regarding the results of this study, the proposed algorithm seems to serve the purpose of procedures that require real-time processing and spike sorting.

  4. Spike sorting for polytrodes: a divide and conquer approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas V. Swindale

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine patterns of neural activity, spike signals recorded by extracellular electrodes have to be clustered (sorted with the aim of ensuring that each cluster represents all the spikes generated by an individual neuron. Many methods for spike sorting have been proposed but few are easily applicable to recordings from polytrodes which may have 16 or more recording sites. As with tetrodes, these are spaced sufficiently closely that signals from single neurons will usually be recorded on several adjacent sites. Although this offers a better chance of distinguishing neurons with similarly shaped spikes, sorting is difficult in such cases because of the high dimensionality of the space in which the signals must be classified. This report details a method for spike sorting based on a divide and conquer approach. Clusters are initially formed by assigning each event to the channel on which it is largest. Each channel-based cluster is then sub-divided into as many distinct clusters as possible. These are then recombined on the basis of pairwise tests into a final set of clusters. Pairwise tests are also performed to establish how distinct each cluster is from the others. A modified gradient ascent clustering (GAC algorithm is used to do the clustering. The method can sort spikes with minimal user input in times comparable to real time for recordings lasting up to 45 minutes. Our results illustrate some of the difficulties inherent in spike sorting, including changes in spike shape over time. We show that some physiologically distinct units may have very similar spike shapes. We show that RMS measures of spike shape similarity are not sensitive enough to discriminate clusters that can otherwise be separated by principal components analysis. Hence spike sorting based on least-squares matching to templates may be unreliable. Our methods should be applicable to tetrodes and scaleable to larger multi-electrode arrays (MEAs.

  5. Rab14 limits the sorting of Glut4 from endosomes into insulin-sensitive regulated secretory compartments in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Paul Duffield; Habtemichael, Estifanos N; Romenskaia, Irina; Coster, Adelle C F; Mastick, Cynthia Corley

    2016-05-15

    Insulin increases glucose uptake by increasing the rate of exocytosis of the facilitative glucose transporter isoform 4 (Glut4) relative to its endocytosis. Insulin also releases Glut4 from highly insulin-regulated secretory compartments (GSVs or Glut4 storage vesicles) into constitutively cycling endosomes. Previously it was shown that both overexpression and knockdown of the small GTP-binding protein Rab14 decreased Glut4 translocation to the plasma membrane (PM). To determine the mechanism of this perturbation, we measured the effects of Rab14 knockdown on the trafficking kinetics of Glut4 relative to two proteins that partially co-localize with Glut4, the transferrin (Tf) receptor and low-density-lipoprotein-receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Our data support the hypothesis that Rab14 limits sorting of proteins from sorting (or 'early') endosomes into the specialized GSV pathway, possibly through regulation of endosomal maturation. This hypothesis is consistent with known Rab14 effectors. Interestingly, the insulin-sensitive Rab GTPase-activating protein Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) affects both sorting into and exocytosis from GSVs. It has previously been shown that exocytosis of GSVs is rate-limited by Rab10, and both Rab10 and Rab14 are in vitro substrates of AS160. Regulation of both entry into and exit from GSVs by AS160 through sequential Rab substrates would provide a mechanism for the finely tuned 'quantal' increases in cycling Glut4 observed in response to increasing concentrations of insulin.

  6. An Exploratory Study of Critical Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Sorting Techniques (Shell, Heap and Treap)

    CERN Document Server

    Folorunso, Olusegun; Salako, Oluwatimilehin

    2012-01-01

    The efficiency of sorting techniques has a significant impact on the overall efficiency of a program. The efficiency of Shell, Heap and Treap sorting techniques in terms of both running time and memory usage was studied, experiments conducted and results subjected to factor analysis by SPSS. The study revealed the main factor affecting these sorting techniques was time taken to sort.

  7. Stigmergy, self-organization, and sorting in collective robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, O; Melhuish, C

    1999-01-01

    Many structures built by social insects are the outcome of a process of self-organization, in which the repeated actions of the insects interact over time with the changing physical environment to produce a characteristic end state. A major mediating factor is stigmergy, the elicitation of specific environment-changing behaviors by the sensory effects of local environmental changes produced by previous behavior. A typical task involving stigmergic self-organization is brood sorting: Many ant species sort their brood so that items at similar stages of development are grouped together and separated from items at different stages of development. This article examines the operation of stigmergy and self-organization in a homogeneous group of physical robots, in the context of the task of clustering and sorting Frisbees of two different types. Using a behavioral rule set simpler than any yet proposed for ant sorting, and having no capacity for spatial orientation or memory, the robots are able to achieve effective clustering and sorting showing all the signs of self-organization. It is argued that the success of this demonstration is crucially dependent on the exploitation of real-world physics, and that the use of simulation alone to investigate stigmergy may fail to reveal its power as an evolutionary option for collective life forms.

  8. A Sort-Last Rendering System over an Optical Backplane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kirihata

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Sort-Last is a computer graphics technique for rendering extremely large data sets on clusters of computers. Sort-Last works by dividing the data set into even-sized chunks for parallel rendering and then composing the images to form the final result. Since sort-last rendering requires the movement of large amounts of image data among cluster nodes, the network interconnecting the nodes becomes a major bottleneck. In this paper, we describe a sort-last rendering system implemented on a cluster of computers whose nodes are connected by an all-optical switch. The rendering system introduces the notion of the Photonic Computing Engine, a computing system built dynamically by using the optical switch to create dedicated network connections among cluster nodes. The sort-last volume rendering algorithm was implemented on the Photonic Computing Engine, and its performance is evaluated. Prelimi- nary experiments show that performance is affected by the image composition time and average payload size. In an attempt to stabilize the performance of the system, we have designed a flow control mechanism that uses feedback messages to dynamically adjust the data flow rate within the computing engine.

  9. Mechanically robust microfluidics and bulk wave acoustics to sort microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauson, Erin R.; Gregory, Kelvin B.; Greve, David W.; Healy, Gregory P.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    2016-04-01

    Sorting microparticles (or cells, or bacteria) is significant for scientific, medical and industrial purposes. Research groups have used lithium niobate SAW devices to produce standing waves, and then to align microparticles at the node lines in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, silicone) microfluidic channels. The "tilted angle" (skewed) configuration is a recent breakthrough producing particle trajectories that cross multiple node lines, making it practical to sort particles. However, lithium niobate wafers and PDMS microfluidic channels are not mechanically robust. We demonstrate "tilted angle" microparticle sorting in novel devices that are robust, rapidly prototyped, and manufacturable. We form our microfluidic system in a rigid polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic) prism, sandwiched by lead-zirconium-titanate (PZT) wafers, operating in through-thickness mode with inertial backing, that produce standing bulk waves. The overall configuration is compact and mechanically robust, and actuating PZT wafers in through-thickness mode is highly efficient. Moving to this novel configuration introduced new acoustics questions involving internal reflections, but we show experimental images confirming the intended nodal geometry. Microparticles in "tilted angle" devices display undulating trajectories, where deviation from the straight path increases with particle diameter and with excitation voltage to create the mechanism by which particles are sorted. We show a simplified analytical model by which a "phase space" is constructed to characterize effective particle sorting, and we compare our experimental data to the predictions from that simplified model; precise correlation is not expected and is not observed, but the important physical trends from the model are paralleled in the measured particle trajectories.

  10. Endocytosis of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Lai Kuan

    2013-01-01

    Endocytosis is the major regulator of signaling from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). The canonical model of RTK endocytosis involves rapid internalization of an RTK activated by ligand binding at the cell surface and subsequent sorting of internalized ligand-RTK complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Activation of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity of RTKs results in autophosphorylation, which is mechanistically coupled to the recruitment of adaptor proteins and conjugation of ubiquitin to RTKs. Ubiquitination serves to mediate interactions of RTKs with sorting machineries both at the cell surface and on endosomes. The pathways and kinetics of RTK endocytic trafficking, molecular mechanisms underlying sorting processes, and examples of deviations from the standard trafficking itinerary in the RTK family are discussed in this work. PMID:23637288

  11. A microfluidic device to sort capsules by deformability

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, L; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Guided by extensive numerical simulations, we propose a microfluidic device that can sort elastic capsules by their deformability. The device consists of a duct embedded with a semi-cylindrical obstacle, and a diffuser which further enhances the sorting capability. We demonstrate that the device can operate reasonably well under changes in the initial position of the the capsule. The efficiency of the device remains essentially unaltered under small changes of the obstacle shape (from semi-circular to semi-elliptic cross-section). Confinement along the direction perpendicular to the plane of the device increases its efficiency. This work is the first numerical study of cell sorting by a realistic microfluidic device.

  12. System for sorting microscopic objects using electromagnetic radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    There is presented a system 10,100 for sorting microscopic objects 76, 78, 80, where the system comprises a fluid channel 66 with an inlet 68 and an outlet 70, where the fluid channel is arranged for allowing the fluid flow to be laminar. The system furthermore comprises a detection system 52 which...... enables detecting microscopic objects in the fluid channel and furthermore enables determining their position. The system furthermore comprises a controller 67, such as a computer, which receives the positions and accordingly controls a source of light beams so as to "shoot" light beams towards selected...... microscopic objects so as to "push" them into a new position. The system thereby enables sorting the selected microscopic objects. In more specific embodiments, the detection system furthermore assigns different categories to different microscopic objects, so as to enable sorting based on multiple categories....

  13. Efficient searching and sorting applications using an associative array processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, W.; Quinn, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a method of searching and sorting data by using some of the unique capabilities of an associative array processor. To understand the application, the associative array processor is described in detail. In particular, the content addressable memory and flip network are discussed because these two unique elements give the associative array processor the power to rapidly sort and search. A simple alphanumeric sorting example is explained in hardware and software terms. The hardware used to explain the application is the STARAN (Goodyear Aerospace Corporation) associative array processor. The software used is the APPLE (Array Processor Programming Language) programming language. Some applications of the array processor are discussed. This summary tries to differentiate between the techniques of the sequential machine and the associative array processor.

  14. A Novel Auto-Sorting System for Chinese Cabbage Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Yi Huang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel machine vision-based auto-sorting system for Chinese cabbage seeds. The system comprises an inlet-outlet mechanism, machine vision hardware and software, and control system for sorting seed quality. The proposed method can estimate the shape, color, and textural features of seeds that are provided as input neurons of neural networks in order to classify seeds as “good” and “not good” (NG. The results show the accuracies of classification to be 91.53% and 88.95% for good and NG seeds, respectively. The experimental results indicate that Chinese cabbage seeds can be sorted efficiently using the developed system.

  15. Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble. PMID:26958103

  16. Sorting, Searching, and Simulation in the MapReduce Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodrich, Michael T.; Sitchinava, Nodari; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    usefulness of our approach by designing and analyzing efficient MapReduce algorithms for fundamental sorting, searching, and simulation problems. This study is motivated by a goal of ultimately putting the MapReduce framework on an equal theoretical footing with the well-known PRAM and BSP parallel...... models, which would benefit both the theory and practice of MapReduce algorithms. We describe efficient MapReduce algorithms for sorting, multi-searching, and simulations of parallel algorithms specified in the BSP and CRCW PRAM models. We also provide some applications of these results to problems...... in parallel computational geometry for the MapReduce framework, which result in efficient MapReduce algorithms for sorting, 2- and 3-dimensional convex hulls, and fixed-dimensional linear programming. For the case when mappers and reducers have a memory/message-I/O size of M = (N), for a small constant > 0...

  17. Sorting of bending magnets for the SSRF booster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jie; LIU Gui-Min; LI Hao-Hu; ZHANG Man-Zhou

    2008-01-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility(SSRF)booster ring,a full energy injector for the storage ring,is deigned to accelerate the electron beam energy from 150MeV to 3.5GeV that demands high extraction efficiency at the extraction energy with low beam loss rate when electrons are ramping.Closed orbit distortion(COD)caused by bending magnet field uniformity errors which affects the machine performance harmfully could be effectively reduced by bending magnet location sorting.Considering the affections of random errors in measurement,both ideal sorting and realistic sorting are studied based on measured bending magnet field uniformity errors and one reasonable combination of bending magnets which can reduce the horizontal COD by a factor of 5is given as the final installation sequence of the booster bending magnets in this paper.

  18. Sorting of bending magnets for the SSRF booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Liu, Gui-Min; Li, Hao-Hu; Zhang, Man-Zhou

    2008-04-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF)booster ring, a full energy injector for the storage ring, is deigned to accelerate the electron beam energy from 150 MeV to 3.5 GeV that demands high extraction efficiency at the extraction energy with low beam loss rate when electrons are ramping. Closed orbit distortion (COD) caused by bending magnet field uniformity errors which affects the machine performance harmfully could be effectively reduced by bending magnet location sorting. Considering the affections of random errors in measurement, both ideal sorting and realistic sorting are studied based on measured bending magnet field uniformity errors and one reasonable combination of bending magnets which can reduce the horizontal COD by a factor of 5 is given as the final installation sequence of the booster bending magnets in this paper. Supported by SSRF Project

  19. Scalable orbital-angular-momentum sorting without destroying photon states

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fang-Xiang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Single photons with orbital angular momentum (OAM) have attracted substantial attention from researchers. A single photon can carry infinite OAM values theoretically. Thus, OAM photon states have been widely used in quantum information and fundamental quantum mechanics. Although there have been many methods for sorting quantum states with different OAM values, the nondestructive and efficient sorter of high-dimensional OAM remains a fundamental challenge. Here, we propose a scalable OAM sorter which can categorize different OAM states simultaneously, meanwhile, preserving both OAM and spin angular momentum. Fundamental elements of the sorter are composed of symmetric multiport beam splitters (BSs) and Dove prisms with cascading structure, which in principle can be flexibly and effectively combined to sort arbitrarily high-dimensional OAM photons. The scalable structures proposed here greatly reduce the number of BSs required for sorting high-dimensional OAMstates. In view of the nondestructive and extensible ...

  20. Cholesterol-induced protein sorting: an analysis of energetic feasibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, J A; Andersen, O S; Werge, T;

    2003-01-01

    transmembrane domain (TMD). M. S. Bretscher and S. Munro (SCIENCE: 261:1280-1281, 1993) therefore proposed a physical sorting mechanism based on the hydrophobic match between the proteins' TMD and the bilayer thickness, in which cholesterol would regulate protein sorting by increasing the lipid bilayer...... thickness. In this model, Golgi proteins with short TMDs would be excluded from cholesterol-enriched domains (lipid rafts) that are incorporated into transport vesicles destined for the plasma membrane. Although attractive, this model remains unproven. We therefore evaluated the energetic feasibility...... thickness per se, however, have only a modest effect on sorting; the major effect arises because cholesterol changes also the bilayer material properties, which augments the energetic penalty for incorporating short TMDs into cholesterol-enriched domains. We conclude that cholesterol-induced changes...

  1. Cognitive impairments of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Glöckner-Rist, A; Lutz, M; Maier, T; Meier, E

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of earlier experiments showing a differential deficit of aphasics in picture sorting and matching tasks, two experiments were conducted to test the conjecture of a specific deficit of aphasics in the analytical appraisal of individual features. Broca's and Wernicke's aphasics--according to clinical diagnoses and the Aachener Aphasie Test--were compared with patients having right-hemisphere lesions or left-hemisphere lesions without aphasia. Both groups of aphasics differed from the control groups in the sorting task, irrespective of the sorting criterion, but the differences were small. The picture matching task did not discriminate between groups. Obviously, the basic assumption has to be modified with respect to specific conditions of task requirements. The experimental literature is reviewed.

  2. "Clothed in triple blues": sorting out the Italian blues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bimler, David; Uusküla, Mari

    2014-04-01

    Cross-cultural comparisons of color perception and cognition often feature versions of the "similarity sorting" procedure. By interpreting the assignment of two color samples to different groups as an indication that the dissimilarity between them exceeds some threshold, sorting data can be regarded as low-resolution similarity judgments. Here we analyze sorting data from speakers of Italian, Russian, and English, applying multidimensional scaling to delineate the boundaries between perceptual categories while highlighting differences between the three populations. Stimuli were 55 color swatches, predominantly from the blue region. Results suggest that at least two Italian words for "blue" are basic, a similar situation to Russian, in contrast to English where a single "blue" term is basic.

  3. Particle migration and sorting in microbubble streaming flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thameem, Raqeeb; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonic driving of semicylindrical microbubbles generates strong streaming flows that are robust over a wide range of driving frequencies. We show that in microchannels, these streaming flow patterns can be combined with Poiseuille flows to achieve two distinctive, highly tunable methods for size-sensitive sorting and trapping of particles much smaller than the bubble itself. This method allows higher throughput than typical passive sorting techniques, since it does not require the inclusion of device features on the order of the particle size. We propose a simple mechanism, based on channel and flow geometry, which reliably describes and predicts the sorting behavior observed in experiment. It is also shown that an asymptotic theory that incorporates the device geometry and superimposed channel flow accurately models key flow features such as peak speeds and particle trajectories, provided it is appropriately modified to account for 3D effects caused by the axial confinement of the bubble.

  4. Basic Study on Color Sorting of Fresh Market Tomatoes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohri, Kentaro; UMEDA, Shigeo; TSURUMI, Gaku

    1987-01-01

    The surface colors of tomatoes are one of decision factor for the ripeness rate of fruits, and that is mainly graded by the human sense in fact. The color sorting based on the surface colors of tomatoes was attemped by using an opto-electronic system consisting of the color sensors. The sample tomatoes of each ripeness rate were prepared and tested by the color sorting system. As the ripeness rate of tomatoes develops from unripe to ripe, the surface colors change from green to pink or red. W...

  5. Decision trees with minimum average depth for sorting eight elements

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan

    2015-11-19

    We prove that the minimum average depth of a decision tree for sorting 8 pairwise different elements is equal to 620160/8!. We show also that each decision tree for sorting 8 elements, which has minimum average depth (the number of such trees is approximately equal to 8.548×10^326365), has also minimum depth. Both problems were considered by Knuth (1998). To obtain these results, we use tools based on extensions of dynamic programming which allow us to make sequential optimization of decision trees relative to depth and average depth, and to count the number of decision trees with minimum average depth.

  6. A full parallel radix sorting algorithm for multicore processors

    OpenAIRE

    Maus, Arne

    2011-01-01

    The problem addressed in this paper is that we want to sort an integer array a [] of length n on a multi core machine with k cores. Amdahl’s law tells us that the inherent sequential part of any algorithm will in the end dominate and limit the speedup we get from parallelisation of that algorithm. This paper introduces PARL, a parallel left radix sorting algorithm for use on ordinary shared memory multi core machines, that has just one simple statement in its sequential part. It can be seen a...

  7. A Novel Auto-Sorting System for Chinese Cabbage Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo-Yi Huang; Jian-Feng Cheng

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a novel machine vision-based auto-sorting system for Chinese cabbage seeds. The system comprises an inlet-outlet mechanism, machine vision hardware and software, and control system for sorting seed quality. The proposed method can estimate the shape, color, and textural features of seeds that are provided as input neurons of neural networks in order to classify seeds as “good” and “not good” (NG). The results show the accuracies of classification to be 91.53% and 88.95% fo...

  8. Excitation-energy sorting in superfluid fission dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt K.-H.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that at moderate excitation energies the nucleus temperature does not vary with increasing excitation energy. We show that, as a consequence, two nuclei with different temperatures brought into contact show a rather surprising energy-sorting mechanism where the hotter nucleus transfers all its excitation energy to the colder one. The scission configuration of the fission process offers a unique possibility to observe this phenomenon. The energy-sorting mechanism is clearly reflected by the mean number of prompt neutrons as a function of the fragment mass and by the dependence of the local even-odd effect with mass asymmetry.

  9. FPGA-based implementation of sorting networks in MMC applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricco, Mattia; Máthé, Lászlo; Teodorescu, Remus

    2016-01-01

    , and they are usually implemented in microcontrollers or DSPs. However, they are not convenient for hardware implementation due to their inherent sequential operation. Instead, the proposed SNs, are suitable for FPGA devices thanks to their fixed parallel structure that allows improving the timing performance......In this paper an implementation technique for Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices of two Sorting Networks (SNs) used for control of Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) is presented. In such applications, the classical sorting algorithms are based on repetitive/recursive loops...

  10. Faster magnet sorting with a threshold acceptance algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidia, Steve; Carr, Roger

    1995-02-01

    We introduce here a new technique for sorting magnets to minimize the field errors in permanent magnet insertion devices. Simulated annealing has been used in this role, but we find the technique of threshold acceptance produces results of equal quality in less computer time. Threshold accepting would be of special value in designing very long insertion devices, such as long free electron lasers (FELs). Our application of threshold acceptance to magnet sorting showed that it converged to equivalently low values of the cost function, but that it converged significantly faster. We present typical cases showing time to convergence for various error tolerances, magnet numbers, and temperature schedules.

  11. Characterization of color texture: color texture based sorting of tiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourada, Y.; Lafon, Dominique; Eterradossi, O.

    1998-09-01

    Many materials used by the building industry show a color texture which affects the product commercial value. This texture can be seen as the spatial arrangement of regions of acceptable color differences. This work describes an appearance based automated sorting via color texture analysis, using ceramic tiles as example. Textural analysis of the tiles digital images expressed in CIEL*a*b* color system is performed through the analysis of intrinsic features of each region and relationships between regions. Results obtained through the automated process are compared to a visual sorting which leads to calculation of application dependant color and texture tolerances.

  12. Finding all sorting tandem duplication random loss operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernt, Matthias; Chen, Kuan Yu; Chen, Ming Chiang

    2011-01-01

    A tandem duplication random loss (TDRL) operation duplicates a contiguous segment of genes, followed by the random loss of one copy of each of the duplicated genes. Although the importance of this operation is founded by several recent biological studies, it has been investigated only rarely from...... a theoretical point of view. Of particular interest are sorting TDRLs which are TDRLs that, when applied to a permutation representing a genome, reduce the distance towards another given permutation. The identification of sorting genome rearrangement operations in general is a key ingredient of many algorithms...

  13. Wisconsin card sorting test: a new global score, with Italian norms, and its relationship with the Weigl sorting test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laiacona, M; Inzaghi, M G; De Tanti, A; Capitani, E

    2000-10-01

    The Wisconsin card sorting test and the Weigl test are two neuropsychological tools widely used in clinical practice to assess frontal lobe functions. In this study we present norms useful for Italian subjects aged from 15 to 85 years, with 5-17 years of education. Concerning the Wisconsin card sorting test, a new measure of global efficiency (global score) is proposed as well as norms for some well known qualitative aspects of the performance, i.e. perseverative responses, failure to maintain the set and non-perseverative errors. In setting normative values, we followed a statistical methodology (equivalent scores) employed in Italy for other neuropsychological tests, in order to favour the possibility of comparison among these tests. A correlation study between the global score of the Wisconsin card sorting test and the score on the Weigl test was carried out and it emerges that some cognitive aspects are not overlapping in these two measures.

  14. The RCP–Rab11 Complex Regulates Endocytic Protein SortingD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden, Andrew A.; Schonteich, Eric; Chun, John; Junutula, Jagath R.; Scheller, Richard H.; Prekeris, Rytis

    2004-01-01

    Rab 11 GTPase is an important regulator of endocytic membrane traffic. Recently, we and others have identified a novel family of Rab11 binding proteins, known as Rab11-family interacting proteins (FIPs). One of the family members, Rab coupling protein (RCP), was identified as a protein binding to both Rab4 and Rab11 GTPases. RCP was therefore suggested to serve a dual function as Rab4 and Rab11 binding protein. In this study, we characterized the cellular functions of RCP and mapped its interactions with Rab4 and Rab11. Our data show that RCP interacts only weakly with Rab4 in vitro and does not play the role of coupling Rab11 and Rab4 in vivo. Furthermore, our data indicate that the RCP–Rab11 complex regulates the sorting of transferrin receptors from the degradative to the recycling pathway. We therefore propose that RCP functions primarily as a Rab11 binding protein that regulates protein sorting in tubular endosomes. PMID:15181150

  15. Continuous high throughput molecular adhesion based cell sorting using ridged microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasadduq, Bushra; Wang, Gonghao; Alexeev, Alexander; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Sulchek, Todd

    2016-11-01

    Cell molecular interactions govern important physiological processes such as stem cell homing, inflammation and cancer metastasis. But due to a lack of effective separation technologies selective to these interactions it is challenging to specifically sort cells. Other label free separation techniques based on size, stiffness and shape do not provide enough specificity to cell type, and correlation to clinical condition. We propose a novel microfluidic device capable of high throughput molecule dependent separation of cells by flowing them through a microchannel decorated with molecule specific coated ridges. The unique aspect of this sorting design is the use of optimized gap size which is small enough to lightly squeeze the cells while flowing under the ridged part of the channel to increase the surface area for interaction between the ligand on cell surface and coated receptor molecule but large enough so that biomechanical markers, stiffness and viscoelasticity, do not dominate the cell separation mechanism. We are able to separate Jurkat cells based on its expression of PSGL-1ligand using ridged channel coated with P selectin at a flow rate of 0.045ml/min and achieve 2-fold and 5-fold enrichment of PSGL-1 positive and negative Jurkat cells respectively.

  16. Evidence for a Golgi-to-endosome protein sorting pathway in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilla Krai

    Full Text Available During the asexual intraerythrocytic stage, the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum must traffic newly-synthesized proteins to a broad array of destinations within and beyond the parasite's plasma membrane. In this study, we have localized two well-conserved protein components of eukaryotic endosomes, the retromer complex and the small GTPase Rab7, to define a previously-undescribed endosomal compartment in P. falciparum. Retromer and Rab7 co-localized to a small number of punctate structures within parasites. These structures, which we refer to as endosomes, lie in close proximity to the Golgi apparatus and, like the Golgi apparatus, are inherited by daughter merozoites. However, the endosome is clearly distinct from the Golgi apparatus as neither retromer nor Rab7 redistributed to the endoplasmic reticulum upon brefeldin A treatment. Nascent rhoptries (specialized secretory organelles required for invasion developed adjacent to endosomes, an observation that suggests a role for the endosome in rhoptry biogenesis. A P. falciparum homolog of the sortilin family of protein sorting receptors (PfSortilin was localized to the Golgi apparatus. Together, these results elaborate a putative Golgi-to-endosome protein sorting pathway in asexual blood stage parasites and suggest that one role of retromer is to mediate the retrograde transport of PfSortilin from the endosome to the Golgi apparatus.

  17. Topographic control of sorted circle morphology on Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Joana; Hauber, Ernst; Reiss, Dennis; Hiesinger, Harald; Johnsson, Andreas; van Gasselt, Stephan; Balme, Matt; Head, Jim; de Verra, Jean-Pierre; Steinbrügge, Gregor; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Patterned ground is a typical phenomenon in polar, subpolar and alpine regions [1]. As it is commonly (but not necessarily!) related to freeze-thaw cycles, its presence on Mars could possibly point to locations and periods where and when liquid water existed in the recent past [2]. Sorted circles are a class of patterned ground that was tentatively identified in Elysium Planitia (Mars) [3], but this interpretation has been challenged on the basis of physical considerations [4]. Without direct access to potential patterned ground on Mars, the analysis of terrestrial analogues can inform the interpretation of Martian landforms. Svalbard (Norway) offers a wide variety of permafrost features that are morphologically analogous to Martian cold-climate landforms [5]. It hosts some of the best examples of sorted circles on Earth, which are located on the westernmost tip of Brøgger peninsula, on a broad strand flat that is characterized by a series of postglacial beach ridges [6]. Here we report on our analysis of sorted circle morphology (especially their plan-view shape, i.e. their "roundness" or ellipticity) and its correlation with local topography (slopes, curvature). Sorted circle morphology was determined from HRSC-AX images (for details on the flight campaign and image properties see ref [5]) and through field work. Topographic information comes from a 50 cm gridded DEM derived from HRSC-AX stereo images. We measured sorted circle morphology (ellipticity, azimuth of major axis) along a WNW-ESE traverse that runs from the inland towards the sea and is oriented perpendicular to the local beach ridge trend. Selected areas with homogeneous sorted circle appearance were visually mapped, and compared to the average slope, aspect, and the calculated topographic wetness index (TWI). Furthermore the whole traverse was classified into four different morphologies of the sorted patterned ground (sorted circles, sorted "ellipses", sorted nets and areas without patterned ground

  18. Development of a novel cell sorting method that samples population diversity in flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Geoffrey W; Andersen, Stacey B; Battye, Francis L

    2015-11-01

    Flow cytometry based electrostatic cell sorting is an important tool in the separation of cell populations. Existing instruments can sort single cells into multi-well collection plates, and keep track of cell of origin and sorted well location. However currently single sorted cell results reflect the population distribution and fail to capture the population diversity. Software was designed that implements a novel sorting approach, "Slice and Dice Sorting," that links a graphical representation of a multi-well plate to logic that ensures that single cells are sampled and sorted from all areas defined by the sort region/s. Therefore the diversity of the total population is captured, and the more frequently occurring or rarer cell types are all sampled. The sorting approach was tested computationally, and using functional cell based assays. Computationally we demonstrate that conventional single cell sorting can sample as little as 50% of the population diversity dependant on the population distribution, and that Slice and Dice sorting samples much more of the variety present within a cell population. We then show by sorting single cells into wells using the Slice and Dice sorting method that there are cells sorted using this method that would be either rarely sorted, or not sorted at all using conventional single cell sorting approaches. The present study demonstrates a novel single cell sorting method that samples much more of the population diversity than current methods. It has implications in clonal selection, stem cell sorting, single cell sequencing and any areas where population heterogeneity is of importance.

  19. Protein sorting by lipid phase-like domains supports emergent signaling function in B lymphocyte plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Núñez, Marcos F; Wisser, Kathleen; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-02-01

    Diverse cellular signaling events, including B cell receptor (BCR) activation, are hypothesized to be facilitated by domains enriched in specific plasma membrane lipids and proteins that resemble liquid-ordered phase-separated domains in model membranes. This concept remains controversial and lacks direct experimental support in intact cells. Here, we visualize ordered and disordered domains in mouse B lymphoma cell membranes using super-resolution fluorescence localization microscopy, demonstrate that clustered BCR resides within ordered phase-like domains capable of sorting key regulators of BCR activation, and present a minimal, predictive model where clustering receptors leads to their collective activation by stabilizing an extended ordered domain. These results provide evidence for the role of membrane domains in BCR signaling and a plausible mechanism of BCR activation via receptor clustering that could be generalized to other signaling pathways. Overall, these studies demonstrate that lipid mediated forces can bias biochemical networks in ways that broadly impact signal transduction.

  20. Magnetic cell sorting and flow cytometry sorting methods for the isolation and function analysis of mouse CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In this paper we compared the two methods of cell sorting (magnetic cell sorting and flow cytometry sorting) for the isolation and function analysis of mouse CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, in order to inform further studies in Treg cell function. Methods: We separately used magnetic cell sorting and flow cytometry sorting to identify CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells. After magnetic cell separation, we further used flow cytometry to analyze the purity of CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells, trypan bl...

  1. Avian polyomavirus infection of a fledgling budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and differential diagnoses of viral inclusions in psittacine birds--case report and mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Vanessa; König, Anett; Seehusen, Frauke; Wohlsein, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A two-week-old budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) of an outdoor aviary died suddenly and was submitted for determination the cause of illness and death. Macroscopically, the sparsely feathered animal was in a poor body condition. Histopathological examination revealed in various mesenchymal and epithelial tissues, numerous up to 15 microm in diameter large intranuclear, amphophilic to basophilic inclusion bodies with a clearing of the centre. Additionally, a feather dysplasia and retention hyperkeratosis of feather follicles was found. Ultrastructurally, viral particles of approximately 35 nm in diameter were detected in the feather follicle epithelium. A PCR for Avian Polyomavirus on fresh skin samples was negative whereas on formalin-fixed kidney samples with a high amount of viral inclusion bodies yielded a positive result. In addition, viral inclusion body diseases, like Avian Poxvirus, Psittacine Beak and Feather disease virus, Avian Adenovirus, Psittacine Herpesvirus and papillomavirus of psittacines are summarized and compared in the present article.

  2. No association between Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome skin fibrofolliculomas and the first 10 described human polyomaviruses or human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Maria; Nordfors, Cecilia; Vlastos, Andrea; Ferrara, Giovanni; Ramqvist, Torbjörn; Dalianis, Tina

    2014-11-01

    The rare autosomal dominant condition Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is attributed to mutations on chromosome 17 in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, but not always diagnosed due to lack of, or a variety of symptoms such as fibrofolliculomas, lung cystic lesions, spontaneous pneumothorax and renal cancer. We hypothesized that the lack of or variability in symptoms could be due to BHD patients potentially being abnormally susceptible to infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) or human polyomavirus (HPyV), which can be associated with skin lesions or latency in the kidneys. Seven fibrofolliculoma skin lesions, one renal cancer and one lung cyst from nine patients with BHD treated at the Karolinska University Hospital were therefore analyzed for cutaneous and mucosal HPV types and 10 HPyVs by bead based multiplex assays or by PCR. All samples were negative for viral DNA. In conclusion, the data suggest that HPV and HPyVs do not contribute to BHD pathology.

  3. Peptide Immunization Elicits Polyomavirus-Specific MHC Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells in MHC Class Ia Allogeneic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unlike the polymorphic MHC class Ia molecules, MHC class Ib molecules are oligomorphic or nonpolymorphic. We recently discovered a protective CD8 T cell response to mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) in H-2b haplotype mice that is restricted by H2-Q9, a member of the Qa-2 MHC class Ib family. Here, we demonstrate that immunization with a peptide corresponding to a virus capsid-derived peptide presented by Q9 also elicits MHC class Ib-restricted MPyV-specific CD8 T cells in mice of H-2s and H-2g7 strains. These findings support the concept that immunization with a single MHC class Ib-restricted peptide can expand CD8 T cells in MHC class Ia allogeneic hosts. PMID:23374150

  4. Incentives versus sorting in tournaments: evidence from a field experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.; Sonnemans, J.; van der Klaauw, B.

    2011-01-01

    Existing field evidence on rank-order tournaments typically does not allow disentangling incentive and sorting effects. We conduct a field experiment illustrating the confounding effect. Students in an introductory microeconomics course selected themselves into tournaments with low, medium, or high

  5. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W;

    2011-01-01

    a complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...... feature of vesicles carrying PM cargo and suggests a common lipid-based mechanism for their formation....

  6. Parallel particle identification and separation for active optical sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Palima, Darwin; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    2009-01-01

    matched with a rapidly reconfigurable optical sorting field. We demonstrate the potential of such a system using colloidal polystyrene microspheres. By combining machine vision with a parallel add-on optical manipulation scheme, we were able to move identified particles over a distance of several hundred...

  7. An Empirical Model of Wage Dispersion with Sorting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Jesper; Lentz, Rasmus

    This paper studies wage dispersion in an equilibrium on-the-job-search model with endogenous search intensity. Workers differ in their permanent skill level and firms differ with respect to productivity. Positive (negative) sorting results if the match production function is supermodular...

  8. Mineral-PET Kimberlite sorting by nuclear-medical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, S; Cafferty, L; Caveney, R; Connell, SH; Cook, M; Dalton, M; Gopal, H; Ives, N; Lee, C A; Mampe, W; Phoku, M; Roodt, A; Sibande, W; Sellschop, J P F; Topkin, J; Unwucholaa, D A

    2010-01-01

    A revolutionary new technology for diamond bearing rock sorting which has its roots in medical-nuclear physics has been taken through a substantial part of the R&D phase. This has led to the construction of the technology demonstrator. Experiments using the technology demonstrator and experiments at a hospital have established the scientific and technological viability of the project.

  9. Tunable Superomniphobic Surfaces for Sorting Droplets by Surface Tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movafaghi, Sanli; Wang, Wei; Metzger, Ari; Williams, Desiree; Williams, John; Kota, Arun

    2016-11-01

    Manipulation of liquid droplets on super-repellent surfaces (i.e., surfaces that are extremely repellent to liquids) has been widely studied because droplets exhibit high mobility on these surfaces due to the ultra-low adhesion, which leads to minimal sample loss and contamination. Although droplet manipulation has been demonstrated using electric fields, magnetic fields, guiding tracks and wettability gradients, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports of droplet manipulation methods that can sort droplets by surface tension on super-repellent surfaces. In this work, we utilized tunable superomniphobic surfaces (i.e., surfaces that are extremely repellent to virtually all liquids) to develop a simple device with precisely tailored solid surface energy domains that, for the first time, can sort droplets by surface tension. Droplet sorting occurs on our device entirely due to a balance between the work done by gravity and the work expended due to adhesion, without the need for any external energy input. Our device can be fabricated easily in a short time and is particularly useful for in-the-field and on-the-go operations, where complex analysis equipment is unavailable. We envision that our methodology for droplet sorting will enable inexpensive and energy-efficient analytical devices for personalized point-of-care diagnostic platforms and lab-on-a-chip systems.

  10. Support for designing waste sorting systems: A mini review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousta, Kamran; Ordoñez, Isabel; Bolton, Kim; Dahlén, Lisa

    2017-08-01

    This article presents a mini review of research aimed at understanding material recovery from municipal solid waste. It focuses on two areas, waste sorting behaviour and collection systems, so that research on the link between these areas could be identified and evaluated. The main results presented and the methods used in the articles are categorised and appraised. The mini review reveals that most of the work that offered design guidelines for waste management systems was based on optimising technical aspects only. In contrast, most of the work that focused on user involvement did not consider developing the technical aspects of the system, but was limited to studies of user behaviour. The only clear consensus among the articles that link user involvement with the technical system is that convenient waste collection infrastructure is crucial for supporting source separation. This mini review reveals that even though the connection between sorting behaviour and technical infrastructure has been explored and described in some articles, there is still a gap when using this knowledge to design waste sorting systems. Future research in this field would benefit from being multidisciplinary and from using complementary methods, so that holistic solutions for material recirculation can be identified. It would be beneficial to actively involve users when developing sorting infrastructures, to be sure to provide a waste management system that will be properly used by them.

  11. Digoxin in clinical practice: sorting out the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, S A; Landless, P N

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this review is to sort out from the huge amount of facts related to digoxin in the literature those pertinent to current clinical practice. Seven aspects of digoxin are discussed: its mechanism of action, therapeutic controversy, clinical efficacy, avoidance of toxicity, manifestations of toxicity, indications, and its use in coronary artery disease.

  12. Udpegning af potentielle sorte pletter via floating car data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Splid Svendsen, Martin; Tradisauskas, Nerius; Lahrmann, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Formålet med dette paper er at undersøge, om det er muligt at udpege potentielle sorte pletter via floating car data. Der er i projektet udført teoretiske litteraturstudier for at skabe et grundlag for det senere analysearbejde, som danner baggrund for analysearbejdet. Dataene stammer fra Aalborg...

  13. Do not trash the incentive! Monetary incentives and waste sorting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucciol, A.; Montinari, N.; Piovesan, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines whether monetary incentives are an effective tool for increasing domestic waste sorting. We exploit the exogenous variation in the pricing systems experienced during the 1999-2008 decade by the 95 municipalities in the district of Treviso (Italy). We estimate with a panel

  14. Local Residential Sorting and Public Goods Provision: A Classroom Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouhle, Keith; Corrigan, Jay; Croson, Rachel; Farnham, Martin; Garip, Selhan; Habodaszova, Luba; Johnson, Laurie Tipton; Johnson, Martin; Reiley, David

    2005-01-01

    This classroom exercise illustrates the Tiebout (1956) hypothesis that residential sorting across multiple jurisdictions leads to a more efficient allocation of local public goods. The exercise places students with heterogeneous preferences over a public good into a single classroom community. A simple voting mechanism determines the level of…

  15. Sorting Recycled Trash: An Activity for Earth Day 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mary E.; Harris, Harold H.

    2007-01-01

    Middle or high school students celebrate Earth Day on April 22, 2007 by participating in the activity to separate commingled recyclable trash to simulate sorting in a recycling center. Students would gain an appreciation for recyclable trash, after it is taken to a recycling center and learn about properties of recyclables.

  16. Insight into economies of scale for waste packaging sorting plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimpan, Ciprian; Wenzel, Henrik; Maul, Anja

    2015-01-01

    This contribution presents the results of a techno-economic analysis performed for German Materials Recovery Facilities (MRFs) which sort commingled lightweight packaging waste (consisting of plastics, metals, beverage cartons and other composite packaging). The study addressed the importance...... material streams....

  17. Ultrasonic Inspection of Wooden Pallet Parts for Grading and Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel L. Schmoldt; Michael Morrone; John C. Duke

    1994-01-01

    Wooden pallets are the largest single use of sawn hardwood logs in the USA. Unfortunately, millions of pallets are discarded into landfills annually. High quality wooden pallets, on the other hand, promote longevity and re-use. To build durable pallets requires high quality parts. Manual grading and sorting of pallet parts is not feasible, however, so we are developing...

  18. Spectrometry: photon sorting at the speed of light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, H.J.P.; Day, J.P.R.; Volatier, J.B.C.G.; Nijkerk, M.D.

    2015-01-01

    The fact that every spectrometer can sort light by wavelength at the speed of light is intriguing. The field of spectrometry is a long-existing and ever-changing one. The application areas extend from optical communication to possible extraterrestrial life detection, health monitoring, environmental

  19. Sorting and the output loss due to search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier; C.N. Teulings

    2015-01-01

    We analyze a general search model with on-the-job search (OJS) and sorting of heterogeneous workers into heterogeneous jobs. For given values of non-market time, the relative efciency of OJS, and the amount of search frictions, we derive a simple relationship between the unemployment rate, mismatch

  20. Microbiological air quality at municipal waste sorting plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulski Karol

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Municipal waste plants can be a source of biological contamination of the environment, depending on the method of operation and the type of collected waste. The aim of this study was the quantitative characteristics of airborne microorganisms at the Barycz municipal waste sorting plant in Cracow. Bioaerosol measurements of indoor and outdoor air of the municipal waste sorting plant were performed during the summer season using a six-stage Andersen cascade impactor. The highest concentration of bacterial and fungal aerosol was observed in the medium fraction sorting room (129.02×103 cfu·m-3 and 116.21×103 cfu·m-3, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in the concentrations of bacterial and fungal aerosol between indoor and outdoor air. The calculations showed a significant correlation between the concentration of bioaerosol and particulate matter. Based on the analysis of bioaerosol particle size distribution, it was found that the concentration of bacteria and fungi has a maximum value in the diameter range 3.3-7.0 μm. The study confirmed that the municipal waste sorting plants can be causing exposure to microbiological agents.

  1. A methodical approach for the assessment of waste sorting plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, Alexander; Pretz, Thomas; Vitz, Philipp; Thoden van Velzen, Ulphard

    2017-01-01

    A techno-economical evaluation of the processing result of waste sorting plants should at least provide a realistic assessment of the recovery yields of valuable materials and of the qualities of the obtained products. This practical data is generated by weighing all the output products and sampl

  2. WHAT DETERMINES WISCONSIN CARD SORTING PERFORMANCE IN SCHIZOPHRENIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERDOES, AJW; VANDENBOSCH, RJ

    1992-01-01

    Deficient performance on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) by patients with schizophrenia is a consistent finding. Although the test has been found sensitive to frontal lobe damage in neurological patients, it is not certain whether WCST performance in schizophrenia is caused by a structural ab

  3. A methodical approach for the assessment of waste sorting plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, Alexander; Pretz, Thomas; Vitz, Philipp; Thoden van Velzen, Ulphard

    2017-01-01

    A techno-economical evaluation of the processing result of waste sorting plants should at least provide a realistic assessment of the recovery yields of valuable materials and of the qualities of the obtained products. This practical data is generated by weighing all the output products and

  4. Effektive ledergrupper eller sorte huller fra top til front

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Molly-Søholm, Thorkil

    2015-01-01

    Effektive ledergrupper Ledergrupper er centrum for organisationers struktur og praksis, men ledergrupper kan også udvikle sig til ’sorte huller’, som driver al energi, effektivitet og trivsel ud af ikke bare den enkelte leder, men ud af hele organisationen. En ny undersøgelse blandt 76 danske led...

  5. An efficient non-dominated sorting method for evolutionary algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hongbing; Wang, Qian; Tu, Yi-Cheng; Horstemeyer, Mark F

    2008-01-01

    We present a new non-dominated sorting algorithm to generate the non-dominated fronts in multi-objective optimization with evolutionary algorithms, particularly the NSGA-II. The non-dominated sorting algorithm used by NSGA-II has a time complexity of O(MN(2)) in generating non-dominated fronts in one generation (iteration) for a population size N and M objective functions. Since generating non-dominated fronts takes the majority of total computational time (excluding the cost of fitness evaluations) of NSGA-II, making this algorithm faster will significantly improve the overall efficiency of NSGA-II and other genetic algorithms using non-dominated sorting. The new non-dominated sorting algorithm proposed in this study reduces the number of redundant comparisons existing in the algorithm of NSGA-II by recording the dominance information among solutions from their first comparisons. By utilizing a new data structure called the dominance tree and the divide-and-conquer mechanism, the new algorithm is faster than NSGA-II for different numbers of objective functions. Although the number of solution comparisons by the proposed algorithm is close to that of NSGA-II when the number of objectives becomes large, the total computational time shows that the proposed algorithm still has better efficiency because of the adoption of the dominance tree structure and the divide-and-conquer mechanism.

  6. Prediction of N-terminal protein sorting signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claros, Manuel G.; Brunak, Søren; von Heijne, Gunnar

    1997-01-01

    Recently, neural networks have been applied to a widening range of problems in molecular biology. An area particularly suited to neural-network methods is the identification of protein sorting signals and the prediction of their cleavage sites, as these functional units are encoded by local, linear...

  7. Lgr5 positive stem cells sorted from small intestines of diabetic mice differentiate into higher proportion of absorptive cells and Paneth cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xian-Yang; Yu, Tao; Zhong, Wa; Li, Jie-Yao; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Yuan, Yu-Hong; Yu, Zhong; Chen, Qi-Kui

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) can differentiate into all types of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is a marker for IESC. Previous studies reported enhanced proliferation of IECs in diabetic mice. In this study, the in vitro differentiation of Lgr5 positive IESCs sorted from diabetic mice was further investigated. The diabetic mouse model was induced by streptozotocin (STZ), and crypt IECs were isolated from small intestines. Subsequently, Lgr5 positive IESCs were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) and sorted by magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS). Differentiation of the sorted IESCs was investigated by detecting the IEC markers in the diabetic mice using immunostaining, quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and Western blot analysis, which was compared with normal mice. We found that the proportion of Lgr5 positive cells in the crypt IECs of diabetic mice was higher than that of control mice (P absorptive cell marker sucrase-isomaltase (SI) and the Paneth cell marker lysozyme 1 (Lyz1) were more highly expressed in the differentiated cells derived from Lgr5 positive IESCs of diabetic mice in vitro (P small intestines of STZ-induced diabetic mice. Lgr5 positive IESCs sorted from the diabetic mice can differentiate into a higher proportion of absorptive cells and Paneth cells in vitro. We characterized the expression of Lgr5 in the small intestine of diabetic mice, and sorted Lgr5 positive intestinal epithelial stem cells (IESCs) for investigating their differentiation in vitro. We proved that the quantity of Lgr5 positive IESCs was significantly increased in the small intestines of diabetic mice. IESCs sorted from the diabetic mice can differentiate into a higher proportion of absorptive cells and Paneth cells in vitro.

  8. Detection of Merkel cell polyomavirus in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue of Merkel cell carcinoma and correlation with prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andea, Aleodor A; Patel, Raj; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan; Isayeva, Tatyana; Kumar, Sanjay; Siegal, Gene P

    2014-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare, but highly aggressive primary cutaneous malignancy, showing neuroendocrine differentiation. In 2008, a novel member of the polyomavirus family, named Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) was identified in the genome of MCC tumors raising the possibility of an involvement in its pathogenesis. Due to the rarity of this tumor and current pathology practices, the most readily available tissue is archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) material. In this study, we evaluated the presence of MCPyV in FFPE tissue and correlated its presence with tumor progression. Representative FFPE specimens from 18 tumors belonging to 14 patients with a diagnosis of MCC spanning the period from 2003 to 2008 were retrieved. Following DNA extraction, we performed PCR amplification and sequencing with four different MCPyV-specific primer pairs mapping within the T antigen and VP1 region. Overall, we detected MCPyV amplicons in 8/18 (44.4%) analyzed tumors from 7/14 (50%) cases. Two-year survival rate and median survival for the MCPyV-positive MCCs were 48% and 22.5 months, respectively and for the negative ones 69% and 51.3 months, respectively; however, the difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.8). There was no significant correlation between the presence of the virus and the stage at presentation; however, tumors in the head and neck area had a lower frequency of viral positivity compared to those arising in the extremities suggesting a MCPyV-independent oncogenetic pathway perhaps, dependent on UV exposure, in a subset of these cases.

  9. BK polyomavirus with archetypal and rearranged non-coding control regions is present in cerebrospinal fluids from patients with neurological complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárcena-Panero, Ana; Echevarría, Juan E; Van Ghelue, Marijke; Fedele, Giovanni; Royuela, Enrique; Gerits, Nancy; Moens, Ugo

    2012-08-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) has recently been postulated as an emerging opportunistic pathogen of the human central nervous system (CNS), but it is not known whether specific strains are associated with the neurotropic character of BKPyV. The presence of BKPyV large T-antigen DNA was examined in 2406 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from neurological patients with suspected JC polyomavirus infection. Twenty patients had a large T-antigen DNA-positive specimen. The non-coding control region (NCCR) of the BKPyV strains amplified from CSF from these 20 patients, strains circulating in renal and bone marrow transplant recipients and from healthy pregnant women was sequenced. The archetypal conformation was the most prevalent in all groups and 14 of the neurological patients harboured archetypal strains, while the remaining six patients possessed BKPyV with rearranged NCCR similar to previously reported variants from non-neurological patients. Transfection studies in Vero cells revealed that five of six early and four of six late rearranged promoters of these CSF isolates showed significantly higher activity than the corresponding archetypal promoter. From seven of the neurological patients with BKPyV DNA-positive CSF, paired serum samples were available. Five of them were negative for BKPyV DNA, while serum from the remaining two patients harboured BKPyV strains with archetypal NCCR that differed from those present in their CSF. Our results suggest that NCCR rearrangements are not a hallmark for BKPyV neurotropism and the dissemination of a rearranged NCCR from the blood may not be the origin of BKPyV CNS infection.

  10. Parallel sort with a ranged, partitioned key-value store in a high perfomance computing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary; Torres, Aaron; Poole, Stephen W.

    2016-01-26

    Improved sorting techniques are provided that perform a parallel sort using a ranged, partitioned key-value store in a high performance computing (HPC) environment. A plurality of input data files comprising unsorted key-value data in a partitioned key-value store are sorted. The partitioned key-value store comprises a range server for each of a plurality of ranges. Each input data file has an associated reader thread. Each reader thread reads the unsorted key-value data in the corresponding input data file and performs a local sort of the unsorted key-value data to generate sorted key-value data. A plurality of sorted, ranged subsets of each of the sorted key-value data are generated based on the plurality of ranges. Each sorted, ranged subset corresponds to a given one of the ranges and is provided to one of the range servers corresponding to the range of the sorted, ranged subset. Each range server sorts the received sorted, ranged subsets and provides a sorted range. A plurality of the sorted ranges are concatenated to obtain a globally sorted result.

  11. Suffix-Sorting via Shannon-Fano-Elias Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Adjeroh

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Given a sequence T = t0t1 . . . tn-1 of size n = |T|, with symbols from a fixed alphabet Σ, (|Σ| ≤ n, the suffix array provides a listing of all the suffixes of T in a lexicographic order. Given T, the suffix sorting problem is to construct its suffix array. The direct suffix sorting problem is to construct the suffix array of T directly without using the suffix tree data structure. While algorithims for linear time, linear space direct suffix sorting have been proposed, the actual constant in the linear space is still a major concern, given that the applications of suffix trees and suffix arrays (such as in whole-genome analysis often involve huge data sets. In this work, we reduce the gap between current results and the minimal space requirement. We introduce an algorithm for the direct suffix sorting problem with worst case time complexity in O(n, requiring only (1 2/3 n log n ¡ n log |Σ| + O(1 bits in memory space. This implies 5 2/3 n+O(1 bytes for total space requirment, (including space for both the output suffix array and the input sequence T assuming n ≤ 232, |Σ| ≤ 256, and 4 bytes per integer. The basis of our algorithm is an extension of Shannon-Fano-Elias codes used in source coding and information theory. This is the first time information-theoretic methods have been used as the basis for solving the suffix sorting problem.

  12. Waste Sorting Habits by the Community of Kaunas University of Technology, Reasons and Influencing Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Adomavičiūtė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the waste management system at Kaunas University of Technology, surveys the waste sorting habits of its community, both students and employees, and analyses the reasons and factors influencing waste sorting and non-sorting. The introduction of a separate paper waste collection system has made it possible to reduce the amount of mixed waste by 25% during the first three months of its functioning. 58% of employees and 45% of students sort some of their waste partly, 23% of employees and 11% of students sort all their waste. 8% of employees and 19% of students sort their waste sometimes. 8% of employees and 24% of students do not sort waste at all. 77% of employees and 66% of students think that the main problem caused by waste generation is pollution of the environment. Therefore willingness to reduce an impact on it is the main reason for sorting, while a lack of conditions to keep separated recyclable refuse and a lack of nearby containers are main factors that are distracting people from source-sorting. Growth of environmental awareness and formation of sorting habits that are transmitted to family members are identified as the strengths. Lack of conditions for sorting (e.g. no place to keep sorted waste at home, insufficiently developed waste collection infrastructure, mistrust in a sorted waste collection system (e.g. belief that sorted waste goes to a landfill, and lack of information are the weaknesses. The opportunities comprise development of a convenient waste collection infrastructure, introduction of economic incentives and rise of further awareness. Identified threats for sorting at the source that discourage source sorting are the following: a developed infrastructure will not satisfy real needs; sorting will not become financially rewarding; improper decisions about a waste management system and waste treatment practices made at the state level, no real use of sorting.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.62.4.2954

  13. Detection of novel polyomaviruses, TSPyV, HPyV6, HPyV7, HPyV9 and MWPyV in feces, urine, blood, respiratory swabs and cerebrospinal fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca J Rockett

    Full Text Available Eight novel human polyomaviruses have been discovered since 2007. Prevalence rates and tissue tropism for the most recent members HPyV 6, 7, 9, TSPyV and MWPyV are largely unknown. We used real-time PCR to determine the presence of HPyV 6, 7, 9, TSPyV and MWPyV in feces (n = 263, urine (n = 189, blood (n = 161, respiratory swabs (n = 1385 and cerebrospinal fluid (n = 171 from both healthy control children and children and adults undergoing diagnostic testing. Whole genome sequencing was able to be performed on 9 MWPyV positive specimens. Novel polyomaviruses were only detected in respiratory swabs and feces, with no detections of HPyV 9 in any sample type. MWPyV was found to be the most prevalent novel polyomavirus, being detected in 18 (1.5% respiratory specimens from symptomatic patients, 16 (9.8% respiratory sample from healthy control children, 11 (5.9% fecal specimens from patient suffering gastrointestinal illness, and in 13 (15.3% of feces from healthy control children. MWPyV was found only in respiratory and fecal specimens from children, the oldest being 9 years old. HPyV 6, 7, 9 and TSPyV were also detected in respiratory specimens and fecal specimens at low prevalence (<1.3%. The majority of these detections were found in immunocompromised patients. Our findings suggest that MWPyV can result in a subclinical infection, persistent or intermittent shedding, particularly in young children. The other novel polyomaviruses were also found in respiratory and fecal specimens, but at lower prevalence and most commonly in immunocompromised individuals.

  14. Effect of Wildfire on Sediment Sorting in a Steep Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, J. L.; Chin, A.; O'Hirok, L.; Storesund, R.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfire is an external forcing factor in the landscape. In chaparral environments, wildfire initiates transport of well-sorted fine sediment through dry-ravel processes on hillslopes and facilitates delivery of sediment to stream channels. In turn, this periodic post-fire sediment influx governs sorting of channel-bed material during subsequent floods that mobilize and transport the sediment downstream. We investigated the effects of the May 2013 Springs Wildfire in the Santa Monica Mountains in semi-arid southern California with field measurements and terrestrial LiDAR scanning. Before the fire, sediment sorting within the heterogeneous bed material present in Big Sycamore Creek was controlled by organized step-pool bedforms. Boulders formed steps with relatively finer cobbles, gravel, and sand filling the pools. Before the fire, the grain size distribution present in the substrate between boulder steps was relatively coarse (D84 = 250 mm), in contrast to that in the influx of sediment contributed by post-fire dry-ravel processes deposited at channel margins (D84 = 8 mm). Flow shear stress during one small flood in 2014 (post-fire) was adequate to mobilize fine dry ravel- related sediment. Transport capacity was sufficient to mobilize and transport this sediment within a study reach; however, it was not adequate to flush the fine material downstream. Shear stress required to mobilize sediment contributed by dry ravel was substantially less than that required to transport the substrate material present before the wildfire. The small flood deposited fine sediment (D84 = 16 mm) as flow lost capacity. Resulting deposition buried bedforms, changing the step-pool profile to a plane bed. The relatively poorly sorted, coarse, rough bed changed to a well sorted, fine, smooth, bed. These changes have implications for sediment transport dynamics and aquatic ecology. In steep, semi-arid, chaparral fluvial systems, sediment derived from dry-ravel processes influences the

  15. Buoyancy-activated cell sorting using targeted biotinylated albumin microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ren Liou

    Full Text Available Cell analysis often requires the isolation of certain cell types. Various isolation methods have been applied to cell sorting, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting and magnetic-activated cell sorting. However, these conventional approaches involve exerting mechanical forces on the cells, thus risking cell damage. In this study we applied a novel isolation method called buoyancy-activated cell sorting, which involves using biotinylated albumin microbubbles (biotin-MBs conjugated with antibodies (i.e., targeted biotin-MBs. Albumin MBs are widely used as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging due to their good biocompatibility and stability. For conjugating antibodies, biotin is conjugated onto the albumin MB shell via covalent bonds and the biotinylated antibodies are conjugated using an avidin-biotin system. The albumin microbubbles had a mean diameter of 2 μm with a polydispersity index of 0.16. For cell separation, the MDA-MB-231 cells are incubated with the targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 for 10 min, centrifuged at 10 g for 1 min, and then allowed 1 hour at 4 °C for separation. The results indicate that targeted biotin-MBs conjugated with anti-CD44 antibodies can be used to separate MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells; more than 90% of the cells were collected in the MB layer when the ratio of the MBs to cells was higher than 70:1. Furthermore, we found that the separating efficiency was higher for targeted biotin-MBs than for targeted avidin-incorporated albumin MBs (avidin-MBs, which is the most common way to make targeted albumin MBs. We also demonstrated that the recovery rate of targeted biotin-MBs was up to 88% and the sorting purity was higher than 84% for a a heterogenous cell population containing MDA-MB-231 cells (CD44(+ and MDA-MB-453 cells (CD44-, which are classified as basal-like breast cancer cells and luminal breast cancer cells, respectively. Knowing that the CD44(+ is a commonly used cancer

  16. Performance evaluation of firefly algorithm with variation in sorting for non-linear benchmark problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbarkar, A. J.; Balande, U. T.; Seth, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    The field of nature inspired computing and optimization techniques have evolved to solve difficult optimization problems in diverse fields of engineering, science and technology. The firefly attraction process is mimicked in the algorithm for solving optimization problems. In Firefly Algorithm (FA) sorting of fireflies is done by using sorting algorithm. The original FA is proposed with bubble sort for ranking the fireflies. In this paper, the quick sort replaces bubble sort to decrease the time complexity of FA. The dataset used is unconstrained benchmark functions from CEC 2005 [22]. The comparison of FA using bubble sort and FA using quick sort is performed with respect to best, worst, mean, standard deviation, number of comparisons and execution time. The experimental result shows that FA using quick sort requires less number of comparisons but requires more execution time. The increased number of fireflies helps to converge into optimal solution whereas by varying dimension for algorithm performed better at a lower dimension than higher dimension.

  17. Constant-time parallel sorting algorithm and its optical implementation using smart pixels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louri, Ahmed; Hatch, James A., Jr.; Na, Jongwhoa

    1995-06-01

    Sorting is a fundamental operation that has important implications in a vast number of areas. For instance, sorting is heavily utilized in applications such as database machines, in which hashing techniques are used to accelerate data-processing algorithms. It is also the basis for interprocessor message routing and has strong implications in video telecommunications. However, high-speed electronic sorting networks are difficult to implement with VLSI technology because of the dense, global connectivity required. Optics eliminates this bottleneck by offering global interconnects, massive parallelism, and noninterfering communications. We present a parallel sorting algorithm and its efficient optical implementation. The algorithm sorts n data elements in few steps, independent of the number of elements to be sorted. Thus it is a constant-time sorting algorithm [i.e., O(1) time]. We also estimate the system's performance to show that the proposed sorting algorithm can provide at least 2 orders of magnitude improvement in execution time over conventional electronic algorithms.

  18. A High Performance FPGA-Based Sorting Accelerator with a Data Compression Mechanism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOBAYASHI, Ryohei; KISE, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    ... performance machines like embedded systems. In this paper, we present an FPGA-based sorting accelerator combining Sorting Network and Merge Sorter Tree, which is customizable by means of tuning design parameters...

  19. Design of monitoring system for mail-sorting based on the Profibus S7 series PLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W.; Jia, S. H.; Wang, Y. H.; Liu, H.; Tang, G. C.

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of the postal express, the workload of mail sorting is increasing, but the automatic technology of mail sorting is not mature enough. In view of this, the system uses Siemens S7-300 PLC as the main station controller, PLC of Siemens S7-200/400 is from the station controller, through the man-machine interface configuration software MCGS, PROFIBUS-DP communication, RFID technology and mechanical sorting hand achieve mail classification sorting monitoring. Among them, distinguish mail-sorting by scanning RFID posted in the mail electronic bar code (fixed code), the system uses the corresponding controller on the acquisition of information processing, the processed information transmit to the sorting manipulator by PROFIBUS-DP. The system can realize accurate and efficient mail sorting, which will promote the development of mail sorting technology.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Deterministic Sorting Algorithms based on Runtime and Count of Various Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyha Verma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sorting algorithms find its application in many practical fields of Computer Science. Efficient solving of sorting problem has attracted a great deal of research as it optimizes other algorithms also. The main factor which is taken into consideration while determining the efficiency of a sorting algorithm is the time complexity. Mostly the execution time of algorithms is investigated and compared for analyzing time complexity. This paper presents a comparative analysis of deterministic sorting algorithms. Time complexity of six different algorithms namely, Selection sort, Bubble sort, Insertion sort, Quicksort, Heapsort and Mergesort is determined in terms of number of comparisons, swaps and assignment operations in addition to average execution time. Also, the performance of these algorithms on fully and almost sorted lists was also analyzed. The study indicates that determining the operation’s count is essential for analyzing time complexity especially when algorithms are theoretically analyzed.

  1. Improved Sorting-Based Procedure for Integer Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantchev, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Recently, Cornuéjols and Dawande have considered a special class of 0-1 programs that turns out to be hard for existing IP solvers. One of them is a sorting-based algorithm, based on an idea of Wolsey. In this paper, we show how to improve both the running time and the space requirements of this ......Recently, Cornuéjols and Dawande have considered a special class of 0-1 programs that turns out to be hard for existing IP solvers. One of them is a sorting-based algorithm, based on an idea of Wolsey. In this paper, we show how to improve both the running time and the space requirements...... of this algorithm. The drastic reduction of space needed allows us to solve much larger instances than was possible before using this technique....

  2. Constructing Efficient Dictionaries in Close to Sorting Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzic, Milan

    2008-01-01

    -case cost of construction of the structures is proportional to only loglogn times the cost of sorting the input. Our claimed performance bounds are obtained in the word RAM model and in the external memory models; only the involved sorting procedures in the algorithms need to be changed between the models.......The dictionary problem is among the oldest problems in computer science. Yet our understanding of the complexity of the dictionary problem in realistic models of computation has been far from complete. Designing highly efficient dictionaries without resorting to use of randomness appeared...... to be a particularly challenging task. We present solutions to the static dictionary problem that significantly improve the previously known upper bounds and bring them close to obvious lower bounds. Our dictionaries have a constant lookup cost and use linear space, which was known to be possible, but the worst...

  3. Sorting and Manipulation of Magnetic Droplets in Continuous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hetlani, Entesar; Hatt, Oliver J.; Vojtíšek, Martin; Tarn, Mark D.; Iles, Alexander; Pamme, Nicole

    2010-12-01

    We report the rapid on-chip generation and subsequent manipulation of magnetic droplets in continuous flow. Magnetic droplets were formed using aqueous-based ferrofluid as the dispersed phase and fluorocarbon oil as the continuous phase. Droplet manipulation was demonstrated with simple permanent magnets using two microfluidic platforms: (i) flow focusing droplet generation followed by their splitting into daughter droplets containing different amounts of magnetic nanoparticles, and (ii) droplet generation at a T-junction and their downstream deflection across a chamber for sorting based on the applied magnetic field and magnetite loading of the droplet. Both systems show great potential for performing a wide range of high throughput continuous flow processes including sample dilution, cell sorting and screening, and microparticle fabrication.

  4. Neural Network Based Color Recognition for Bobbin Sorting Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Winding is a key process in the manufacturing process of textile industry. The normal and effective operation of winding process plays a very important role on the textiles’ quality and economic effects. At present, a large proportion of bobbins which collected from winder still have yarn left over. The bobbin recycling is severely limited and quick running of winder is seriously restricted, the invention of the the automatic bobbin sorting machine has solved this problem. The ability to distinguish bobbin which has yarn left over from the rest and the classification accuracy of color are the two important performance indicators for bobbin sorting machine. According to the development and application of the color recognition technology and the artificial intelligence method, this study proposes a novel color recognition method that based on BP neural networks. The result shows that the accuracy of color recognition reaches 98%.  

  5. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays.

  6. Gallium Nitride Electrical Characteristics Extraction and Uniformity Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyr-Long Jeng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the output electrical characteristics—current-voltage (I-V output, threshold voltage, and parasitic capacitance—of novel gallium nitride (GaN power transistors. Experimental measurements revealed that both enhanced- and depletion-mode GaN field-effect transistors (FETs containing different components of identical specifications yielded varied turn-off impedance; hence, the FET quality was inconsistent. Establishing standardized electrical measurements can provide necessary information for designers, and measuring transistor electrical characteristics establishes its equivalent-circuit model for circuit simulations. Moreover, high power output requires multiple parallel power transistors, and sorting the difference between similar electrical characteristics is critical in a power system. An isolated gate driver detection method is proposed for sorting the uniformity from the option of the turn-off characteristic. In addition, an equivalent-circuit model for GaN FETs is established on the basis of the measured electrical characteristics and verified experimentally.

  7. Armoring and vertical sorting in aeolian dune fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Narteau, Clément; Rozier, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Unlike ripples, there are only few numerical studies on grain-size segregation at the scale of dunes in aeolian environments. Here we use a cellular automaton model to analyze vertical sorting in granular mixtures under steady unidirectional flow conditions. We investigate the feedbacks between dune growth and the segregation mechanisms by varying the size of coarse grains and their proportion within the bed. We systematically observe the development of a horizontal layer of coarse grains at the top of which sorted bed forms may grow by amalgamation. The formation of such an armor layer controls the overall sediment transport and availability. The emergence of dunes and the transition from barchan to transverse dune fields depend only on the grain size distribution of the initial sediment layer. As confirmed by observation, this result indicates that armor layers should be present in most arid deserts, where they are likely to control dune morphodynamics.

  8. Particle sorting using a porous membrane in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huibin; Chueh, Bor-han; Wu, Huiling; Hall, Eric W; Li, Cheuk-wing; Schirhagl, Romana; Lin, Jin-Ming; Zare, Richard N

    2011-01-21

    Porous membranes have been fabricated based on the development of the perforated membrane mold [Y. Luo and R. N. Zare, Lab Chip, 2008, 8, 1688-1694] to create a single filter that contains multiple pore sizes ranging from 6.4 to 16.6 µm inside a monolithic three-dimensional poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic structure. By overlapping two filters we are able to achieve smaller pore size openings (2.5 to 3.3 µm). This filter operates without any detectable irreversible clogging, which is achieved using a cross-flow placed in front of each filtration section. The utility of a particle-sorting device that contains this filter is demonstrated by separating polystyrene beads of different diameters with an efficiency greater than 99.9%. Additionally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of this particle-sorting device by separating whole blood samples into white blood cells and red blood cells with platelets.

  9. Droplet sorting in a loop of flat microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Erfan; Herminghaus, Stephan; Brinkmann, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we numerically study the droplet traffic in microfluidic channels forming an asymmetric loop with a long and a short arm. The loop is connected to an inlet and an outlet channel by two right angled T-junctions. Assuming flat channels, we employ the boundary element method (BEM) to numerically solve the two-dimensional Darcy equation that governs two phase flow in the Hele-Shaw limit. The occurrence of different sorting regimes is summarized in sorting diagrams in terms of droplet size, distance between consecutive droplets in the inlet channel, and loop asymmetry for mobility ratios of the liquid phases larger and smaller than one. For large droplet distances, the traffic is regulated by the ratio of the total hydraulic resistances of the long and short arms. At high droplet densities and below a critical droplet size, droplet-droplet collisions are observed for both mobility ratios.

  10. Control of a brain-computer interface without spike sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, George W.; Chase, Steven M.; Whitford, Andrew; Schwartz, Andrew B.

    2009-10-01

    Two rhesus monkeys were trained to move a cursor using neural activity recorded with silicon arrays of 96 microelectrodes implanted in the primary motor cortex. We have developed a method to extract movement information from the recorded single and multi-unit activity in the absence of spike sorting. By setting a single threshold across all channels and fitting the resultant events with a spline tuning function, a control signal was extracted from this population using a Bayesian particle-filter extraction algorithm. The animals achieved high-quality control comparable to the performance of decoding schemes based on sorted spikes. Our results suggest that even the simplest signal processing is sufficient for high-quality neuroprosthetic control.

  11. What about inhibition in the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Houssemand, Claude

    2011-05-01

    The commercially available Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) is one of the most commonly used tests for assessing executive functions within clinical settings. Importantly, however, it remains relatively unclear exactly what processes are assessed by the test. Conceptually, increased perseverative errors in sorting cards are usually related to deficient inhibition processes. Empirically, evidence supporting this conclusion is limited. In a sample of 38 healthy adults we addressed the question to what extent inhibition mechanisms assessed by the go/no-go and the stop-signal paradigm are related to WCST performances. Inhibition-related scores were found to predict non-perseverative errors better than perseverative errors. Consequently we conclude that the non-perseverative errors score reflects processes that are partly dependent on inhibition functions.

  12. Spatial sorting promotes the spread of maladaptive hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Winsor H.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Allendorf, Fred W.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive hybridization is causing loss of biodiversity worldwide. The spread of such introgression can occur even when hybrids have reduced Darwinian fitness, which decreases the frequency of hybrids due to low survival or reproduction through time. This paradox can be partially explained by spatial sorting, where genotypes associated with dispersal increase in frequency at the edge of expansion, fueling further expansion and allowing invasive hybrids to increase in frequency through space rather than time. Furthermore, because all progeny of a hybrid will be hybrids (i.e., will possess genes from both parental taxa), nonnative admixture in invaded populations can increase even when most hybrid progeny do not survive. Broader understanding of spatial sorting is needed to protect native biodiversity.

  13. Automatic sorting of point pattern sets using Minkowski Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, Joshua; van de Raa, Matthias; van der Meer, Devaraj; Samelson, Lawrence E; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Point pattern sets arise in many different areas of physical, biological, and applied research, representing many random realizations of underlying pattern formation mechanisms. These pattern sets can be heterogeneous with respect to underlying spatial processes, which may not be visually distinguishable. This heterogeneity can be elucidated by looking at statistical measures of the patterns sets and using these measures to divide the pattern set into distinct groups representing like spatial processes. We introduce here a numerical procedure for sorting point pattern sets into spatially homogeneous groups using Functional Principal Component Analysis (FPCA) applied to the approximated Minkowski functionals of each pattern. We demonstrate that this procedure correctly sorts pattern sets into similar groups both when the patterns are drawn from similar processes and when the 2nd-order characteristics of the pattern are identical. We highlight this routine for distinguishing the molecular patterning of fluoresc...

  14. Selective Sorting of Cargo Proteins into Bacterial Membrane Vesicles*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haurat, M. Florencia; Aduse-Opoku, Joseph; Rangarajan, Minnie; Dorobantu, Loredana; Gray, Murray R.; Curtis, Michael A.; Feldman, Mario F.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the well established multiple cellular roles of membrane vesicles in eukaryotic cell biology, outer membrane vesicles (OMV) produced via blebbing of prokaryotic membranes have frequently been regarded as cell debris or microscopy artifacts. Increasingly, however, bacterial membrane vesicles are thought to play a role in microbial virulence, although it remains to be determined whether OMV result from a directed process or from passive disintegration of the outer membrane. Here we establish that the human oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis has a mechanism to selectively sort proteins into OMV, resulting in the preferential packaging of virulence factors into OMV and the exclusion of abundant outer membrane proteins from the protein cargo. Furthermore, we show a critical role for lipopolysaccharide in directing this sorting mechanism. The existence of a process to package specific virulence factors into OMV may significantly alter our current understanding of host-pathogen interactions. PMID:21056982

  15. Image coding based on energy-sorted wavelet packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lin-Wen; Lay, Kuen-Tsair

    1995-04-01

    The discrete wavelet transform performs multiresolution analysis, which effectively decomposes a digital image into components with different degrees of details. In practice, it is usually implemented in the form of filter banks. If the filter banks are cascaded and both the low-pass and the high-pass components are further decomposed, a wavelet packet is obtained. The coefficients of the wavelet packet effectively represent subimages in different resolution levels. In the energy-sorted wavelet- packet decomposition, all subimages in the packet are then sorted according to their energies. The most important subimages, as measured by the energy, are preserved and coded. By investigating the histogram of each subimage, it is found that the pixel values are well modelled by the Laplacian distribution. Therefore, the Laplacian quantization is applied to quantized the subimages. Experimental results show that the image coding scheme based on wavelet packets achieves high compression ratio while preserving satisfactory image quality.

  16. Sorting nexin 17 regulates ApoER2 recycling and reelin signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Sotelo

    Full Text Available ApoER2 is a member of the low density-lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R family. As a receptor for reelin, ApoER2 participates in neuronal migration during development as well as synaptic plasticity and survival in the adult brain. A previous yeast two-hybrid screen showed that ApoER2 is a binding partner of sorting nexin 17 (SNX17 - a cytosolic adaptor protein that regulates the trafficking of several membrane proteins in the endosomal pathway, including LRP1, P-selectin and integrins. However, no further studies have been performed to investigate the role of SNX17 in ApoER2 trafficking and function. In this study, we present evidence based on GST pull-down and inmunoprecipitation assays that the cytoplasmic NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2 interacts with the FERM domain of SNX17. SNX17 stimulates ApoER2 recycling in different cell lines including neurons without affecting its endocytic rate and also facilitates the transport of ApoER2 from the early endosomes to the recycling endosomes. The reduction of SNX17 was associated with accumulation of an ApoER2 carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF. In addition, in SNX17 knockdown cells, constitutive ApoER2 degradation was not modified, whereas reelin-induced ApoER2 degradation was increased, implying that SNX17 is a regulator of the receptor's half-life. Finally, in SNX17 silenced hippocampal and cortical neurons, we underscored a positive role of this endosomal protein in the development of the dendritic tree and reelin signaling. Overall, these results establish the role of SNX17 in ApoER2 trafficking and function and aid in identifying new links between endocytic trafficking and receptor signaling.

  17. Sorting nexin 17 regulates ApoER2 recycling and reelin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo, Pablo; Farfán, Pamela; Benitez, María Luisa; Bu, Guojun; Marzolo, María-Paz

    2014-01-01

    ApoER2 is a member of the low density-lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) family. As a receptor for reelin, ApoER2 participates in neuronal migration during development as well as synaptic plasticity and survival in the adult brain. A previous yeast two-hybrid screen showed that ApoER2 is a binding partner of sorting nexin 17 (SNX17) - a cytosolic adaptor protein that regulates the trafficking of several membrane proteins in the endosomal pathway, including LRP1, P-selectin and integrins. However, no further studies have been performed to investigate the role of SNX17 in ApoER2 trafficking and function. In this study, we present evidence based on GST pull-down and inmunoprecipitation assays that the cytoplasmic NPxY endocytosis motif of ApoER2 interacts with the FERM domain of SNX17. SNX17 stimulates ApoER2 recycling in different cell lines including neurons without affecting its endocytic rate and also facilitates the transport of ApoER2 from the early endosomes to the recycling endosomes. The reduction of SNX17 was associated with accumulation of an ApoER2 carboxy-terminal fragment (CTF). In addition, in SNX17 knockdown cells, constitutive ApoER2 degradation was not modified, whereas reelin-induced ApoER2 degradation was increased, implying that SNX17 is a regulator of the receptor's half-life. Finally, in SNX17 silenced hippocampal and cortical neurons, we underscored a positive role of this endosomal protein in the development of the dendritic tree and reelin signaling. Overall, these results establish the role of SNX17 in ApoER2 trafficking and function and aid in identifying new links between endocytic trafficking and receptor signaling.

  18. Sorting on Skills and Preferences: Tinbergen Meets Sattinger

    OpenAIRE

    Dupuy, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an assignment model where sorting occurs on attributes that are simultaneously a skill (Sattinger, 1979) and a preference (Tinbergen, 1956). The key feature of this model is that the wage function admits both jobs'' and workers'' attributes as arguments. Since this function is generically nonlinear (Ekeland et al., 2004), even under positive assortative matching, the correlation between the contribution of workers'' attributes to wages and that of jobs'' attributes can var...

  19. Incomplete Lineage Sorting: Consistent Phylogeny Estimation From Multiple Loci

    CERN Document Server

    Mossel, Elchanan

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simple algorithm for reconstructing phylogenies from multiple gene trees in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting, that is, when the topology of the gene trees may differ from that of the species tree. We show that our technique is statistically consistent under standard stochastic assumptions, that is, it returns the correct tree given sufficiently many unlinked loci. We also show that it can tolerate moderate estimation errors.

  20. Two-sorted Point-Interval Temporal Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balbiani, Philippe; Goranko, Valentin; Sciavicco, Guido

    2011-01-01

    There are two natural and well-studied approaches to temporal ontology and reasoning: point-based and interval-based. Usually, interval-based temporal reasoning deals with points as particular, duration-less intervals. Here we develop explicitly two-sorted point-interval temporal logical framework...... their expressiveness, comparative to interval-based logics, and the complexity of their satisfiability problems. In particular, we identify some previously not studied and potentially interesting interval logics. © 2011 Elsevier B.V....

  1. Sorting Through Affirmative Action: Two Field Experiments in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Affirmative action is a subject of intense debate. Supporters point to the increased representation of women and minority groups while critics contend that affirmative action can lead to inefficiencies. In this paper we present results from two field experiments that were designed to test how applicants sort in response to affirmative action rules that favor of women. Our results suggest that the criticism of affirmative action is misplaced. We find that affirmative action does not lead to lo...

  2. Are Korean Industry-Sorted Portfolios Mean Reverting?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongman Moon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper tests the weak-form efficient market hypothesis for Korean industry-sorted portfolios. Based on a panel variance ratio approach, we find significant mean reversion of stock returns over long horizons in the pre Asian currency crisis period but little evidence in the post-crisis period. Our empirical findings are consistent with the fact that Korea accelerated its integration with international financial market by implementing extensive capital liberalization since the crisis.

  3. Parallel Sorted Neighborhood Blocking with MapReduce

    OpenAIRE

    Kolb, Lars; Thor, Andreas; Rahm, Erhard

    2010-01-01

    Cloud infrastructures enable the efficient parallel execution of data-intensive tasks such as entity resolution on large datasets. We investigate challenges and possible solutions of using the MapReduce programming model for parallel entity resolution. In particular, we propose and evaluate two MapReduce-based implementations for Sorted Neighborhood blocking that either use multiple MapReduce jobs or apply a tailored data replication.

  4. Sorting, Searching, and Simulation in the MapReduce Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goodrich, Michael T.; Sitchinava, Nodar; Zhang, Qin

    2011-01-01

    We study the MapReduce framework from an algorithmic standpoint, providing a generalization of the previous algorithmic models for MapReduce. We present optimal solutions for the fundamental problems of all-prefix-sums, sorting and multi-searching. Additionally, we design optimal simulations...... of the the well-established PRAM and BSP models in MapReduce, immediately resulting in optimal solutions to the problems of computing fixed-dimensional linear programming and 2-D and 3-D convex hulls....

  5. MANNER OF STOCKS SORTING USING CLUSTER ANALYSIS METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Halčinová

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present article is to show the possibility of using the methods of cluster analysis in classification of stocks of finished products. Cluster analysis creates groups (clusters of finished products according to similarity in demand i.e. customer requirements for each product. Manner stocks sorting of finished products by clusters is described a practical example. The resultants clusters are incorporated into the draft layout of the distribution warehouse.

  6. Hierarchical structure of moral stages assessed by a sorting task

    OpenAIRE

    Van Boom, J; Brugman, D.; Heijden, P.G.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    Following criticism of Kohlberg’s theory of moral judgment, an empirical re-examination of hierarchical stage structure was desirable. Utilizing Piaget’s concept of reflective abstraction as a basis, the hierarchical stage structure was investigated using a new method. Study participants (553 Dutch university students and 196 Russian high school students) sorted statements in terms of moral sophistication. These statements were typical for the different stages of moral development as defined ...

  7. The Generation of a Sort of Fractal Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张钹; 张铃; 等

    1995-01-01

    We present an approach for generating a sort of fractal graphs by a simple probabilistic logic neuron network and show that the graphs can be represented by a set of compressed codings.An algorithm for quickly finding the codings,i.e.,recognizing the corresponding graphs,is given.The codings are shown to be optimal.The results above possibly give us the clue for studying image compression and pattern recognition.

  8. Liver 4DMRI: A retrospective image-based sorting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.paganelli@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Summers, Paul [Division of Radiology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano 20133 (Italy); Bellomi, Massimo [Division of Radiology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milano 20133, Italy and Department of Health Sciences, Università di Milano, Milano 20133 (Italy); Baroni, Guido; Riboldi, Marco [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Politecnico di Milano, Milano 20133, Italy and Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: Four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging (4DMRI) is an emerging technique in radiotherapy treatment planning for organ motion quantification. In this paper, the authors present a novel 4DMRI retrospective image-based sorting method, providing reduced motion artifacts than using a standard monodimensional external respiratory surrogate. Methods: Serial interleaved 2D multislice MRI data were acquired from 24 liver cases (6 volunteers + 18 patients) to test the proposed 4DMRI sorting. Image similarity based on mutual information was applied to automatically identify a stable reference phase and sort the image sequence retrospectively, without the use of additional image or surrogate data to describe breathing motion. Results: The image-based 4DMRI provided a smoother liver profile than that obtained from standard resorting based on an external surrogate. Reduced motion artifacts were observed in image-based 4DMRI datasets with a fitting error of the liver profile measuring 1.2 ± 0.9 mm (median ± interquartile range) vs 2.1 ± 1.7 mm of the standard method. Conclusions: The authors present a novel methodology to derive a patient-specific 4DMRI model to describe organ motion due to breathing, with improved image quality in 4D reconstruction.

  9. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naglaa M. Reda

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  10. Psychometric properties of the Arab Heritage Activity Card Sort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Razan; Holm, Margo B

    2013-03-01

    The Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable assessment tool that was created to assess Participation. It has been translated to several languages and adapted to different international cultures. The most recent version of this tool is the Arabic Heritage Activity Card Sort (A-ACS). The purpose of this study was to establish the psychometric properties of the new Arabic version in Jordanian adults. Forty three Jordanian patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and 62 healthy adults were recruited to test the psychometric properties of the tool. The A-ACS correlated moderately with the participation index of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (r = -0.458, p Heritage of the Activity Card Sort is a valid and reliable tool for Arabic-speaking occupational therapists to use when assessing participation in Jordanian patients with MS or healthy adults. Limitations of this study include using only one diagnostic group from Jordan and examining only the Recovery and Community Versions of the tool. Future studies are needed to examine further psychometric properties for patients with different diagnoses and from different countries in the Arabic region for all three versions of the A-ACS.

  11. Sort-Mid tasks scheduling algorithm in grid computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Naglaa M; Tawfik, A; Marzok, Mohamed A; Khamis, Soheir M

    2015-11-01

    Scheduling tasks on heterogeneous resources distributed over a grid computing system is an NP-complete problem. The main aim for several researchers is to develop variant scheduling algorithms for achieving optimality, and they have shown a good performance for tasks scheduling regarding resources selection. However, using of the full power of resources is still a challenge. In this paper, a new heuristic algorithm called Sort-Mid is proposed. It aims to maximizing the utilization and minimizing the makespan. The new strategy of Sort-Mid algorithm is to find appropriate resources. The base step is to get the average value via sorting list of completion time of each task. Then, the maximum average is obtained. Finally, the task has the maximum average is allocated to the machine that has the minimum completion time. The allocated task is deleted and then, these steps are repeated until all tasks are allocated. Experimental tests show that the proposed algorithm outperforms almost other algorithms in terms of resources utilization and makespan.

  12. Selective sorting of waste - not much effort needed, just willpower

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to keep as low as possible the cost of disposing of waste materials, CERN provides in the entrance to each building two types of recipient: a green plastic one for paper/cardboard and a metallic one for general refuse. For some time now, we have noticed, to our great regret, a growing neglect as far as the selective sorting is concerned, for example the green recipients being filled with a mixture of cardboard boxes full of polystyrene or of protective wrappers, plastic bottles, empty yogurts pots, etc …We have been able to ascertain, after carefully checking, that this haphazard mixing of waste cannot be attributed to the cleaning staff but rather to members of personnel who unscrupulously throw away their rubbish in a completely random manner. Waste non sorted entails heavy costs for CERN. For your information, once a non-compliant item is found in a green recipient, the entire contents are sent off for incineration rather than recycling… We are all concerned by selective sorting of waste mater...

  13. Towards high-throughput microfluidic Raman-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Peiran; Gou, Honglei; Mou, Chunbo; Huang, Wei E; Yang, Menglong; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2015-09-21

    Raman-activated cell sorting (RACS) is a promising single-cell analysis technology that is able to identify and isolate individual cells of targeted type, state or environment from an isogenic population or complex consortium of cells, in a label-free and non-invasive manner. However, compared with those widely used yet labeling-required or staining-dependent cell sorting technologies such as FACS and MACS, the weak Raman signal greatly limits the further development of the existing RACS systems to achieve higher throughput. Strategies that can tackle this bottleneck include, first, improvement of Raman-acquisition efficiency and quality based on advanced Raman spectrometers and enhanced Raman techniques; second, development of novel microfluidic devices for cell sorting followed by integration into a complete RACS system. Exploiting these strategies, prototypes for a new generation of RACS have been demonstrated, such as flow-based OT-RACS, DEP-RACS, and SERS/CARS flow cytometry. Such high-throughput microfluidic RACS can provide biologists with a powerful single-cell analysis tool to explore the scientific questions or applications that have been beyond the reach of FACS and MACS.

  14. Efficient Architecture for Spike Sorting in Reconfigurable Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Ying Lai

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel hardware architecture for fast spike sorting. The architecture is able to perform both the feature extraction and clustering in hardware. The generalized Hebbian algorithm (GHA and fuzzy C-means (FCM algorithm are used for feature extraction and clustering, respectively. The employment of GHA allows efficient computation of principal components for subsequent clustering operations. The FCM is able to achieve near optimal clustering for spike sorting. Its performance is insensitive to the selection of initial cluster centers. The hardware implementations of GHA and FCM feature low area costs and high throughput. In the GHA architecture, the computation of different weight vectors share the same circuit for lowering the area costs. Moreover, in the FCM hardware implementation, the usual iterative operations for updating the membership matrix and cluster centroid are merged into one single updating process to evade the large storage requirement. To show the effectiveness of the circuit, the proposed architecture is physically implemented by field programmable gate array (FPGA. It is embedded in a System-on-Chip (SOC platform for performance measurement. Experimental results show that the proposed architecture is an efficient spike sorting design for attaining high classification correct rate and high speed computation.

  15. Aqueous Self-Sorting in Extended Supramolecular Aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Fernández

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization and self-sorting processes are responsible for the regulation and control of the vast majority of biological processes that eventually sustain life on our planet. Attempts to unveil the complexity of these systems have been devoted to the investigation of the binding processes between artificial molecules, complexes or aggregates within multicomponent mixtures, which has facilitated the emergence of the field of self-sorting in the last decade. Since, artificial systems involving discrete supramolecular structures, extended supramolecular aggregates or gel-phase materials in organic solvents or—to a lesser extent—in water have been investigated. In this review, we have collected diverse strategies employed in recent years to construct extended supramolecular aggregates in water upon self-sorting of small synthetic molecules. We have made particular emphasis on co-assembly processes in binary mixtures leading to supramolecular structures of remarkable complexity and the influence of different external variables such as solvent and concentration to direct recognition or discrimination processes between these species. The comprehension of such recognition phenomena will be crucial for the organization and evolution of complex matter.

  16. Association Sorting Algorithm Design for Error Searching System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Dong, Zhenghong; Li, Mengwei

    2017-02-01

    For the searching results of error searching system for Integrated Decision Information System (IDIS), this paper proposed a method to carry out association sorting according to degree of association of searched results by keywords, which can priorily recommend user interested searching results. Errors of IDIS platform are occurred very often. Because those errors belong to different stages like setup, configuration, and operation, or those errors may occurred in different services, applications, or IP ports, or may be happened in different system software, different version of software, and those errors are also can be classified into different types. As there will be many error information are searched out, it is required to sort them according to degree of association, and provide user interested results. This paper proposed a method to carry out association sorting for the searching results according to the times of searched repeated results by keywords, which effectively put results with high degree of association in the front and increase the searching efficiency.

  17. Structural determinants allowing endolysosomal sorting and degradation of endosomal GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Ruth A; Oeste, Clara L; Stamatakis, Konstantinos; Ramos, Irene; Herrera, Mónica; Boya, Patricia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2010-09-01

    Rapid control of protein degradation is usually achieved through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. We recently found that the short-lived GTPase RhoB is degraded in lysosomes. Moreover, the fusion of the RhoB C-terminal sequence CINCCKVL, containing the isoprenylation and palmitoylation sites, to other proteins directs their sorting into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and rapid lysosomal degradation. Here, we show that this process is highly specific for RhoB. Alteration of late endosome lipid dynamics produced the accumulation of RhoB, but not of other endosomal GTPases, including Rab5, Rab7, Rab9 or Rab11, into enlarged MVB. Other isoprenylated and bipalmitoylated GTPases, such as H-Ras, Rap2A, Rap2B and TC10, were not accumulated into MVB and were stable. Remarkably, although TC10, which is highly homologous to RhoB, was stable, a sequence derived from its C-terminus (CINCCLIT) elicited MVB sorting and degradation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-chimeric protein. This led us to identify a cluster of basic amino acids (KKH) in the TC10 hypervariable region, constituting a secondary signal potentially involved in electrostatic interactions with membrane lipids. Mutation of this cluster allowed TC10 MVB sorting and degradation, whereas inserting it into RhoB hypervariable region rescued this protein from its lysosomal degradation pathway. These findings define a highly specific structural module for entering the MVB pathway and rapid lysosomal degradation.

  18. Exosome and Exosomal MicroRNA:Trafficking, Sorting, and Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Sha Li; Lu Li; Meng Li; Chongye Guo; Jun Yao; Shuangli Mi

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes are 40–100 nm nano-sized vesicles that are released from many cell types into the extracellular space. Such vesicles are widely distributed in various body fluids. Recently, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in exosomes, which can be taken up by neighboring or distant cells and subsequently modulate recipient cells. This suggests an active sort-ing mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, since the miRNA profiles of exosomes may differ from those of the parent cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in disease progression, and can stimu-late angiogenesis and facilitate metastasis in cancers. In this review, we will introduce the origin and the trafficking of exosomes between cells, display current research on the sorting mechanism of exo-somal miRNAs, and briefly describe how exosomes and their miRNAs function in recipient cells. Finally, we will discuss the potential applications of these miRNA-containing vesicles in clinical settings.

  19. Digestibility Improvement of Sorted Waste with Alkaline Hydrothermai Pretreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hao; WANG Hongtao; LU Wenjing; ZHAO Yan

    2009-01-01

    The digestibility of sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) is often limited by the high content of structured green waste. The objectives of this study are to investigate the effect of alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment on the anaerobic digestion of sorted waste and to analyze the biogas production of different parts of the waste. The waste was hydrothermally pretreated in a dilute alkali solution. The hydrolysis product was then incubated in a 500 mL saline bottle to determine the biochemical methane potential (BMP) under mesophilic anaerobic conditions. The optimum hydrothermal condition was 170℃ at 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. The concentration of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 13 936 mg/L and the methane yield was 164 mL/g volatile solid (VS) for 6 days incubation at the optimum conditions. The biogas production was increased more than 50% over the control, with the methane conversion ratio on a carbon basis enhanced to 30.6%. The organic part of the sorted waste was mainly kitchen garbage and leaves. Model kitchen garbage completely liquified at 130℃ for one hour had a methane yield of 276 mL/g VS. The alkali addition slightly enhanced the hydrolyzation rate and methane yield. The biogas potential of leaves was improved by pre-treatment at above 150℃ under alkaline conditions.

  20. Differential evolution enhanced with multiobjective sorting-based mutation operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahai; Liao, Jianjun; Zhou, Ying; Cai, Yiqiao

    2014-12-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a simple and powerful population-based evolutionary algorithm. The salient feature of DE lies in its mutation mechanism. Generally, the parents in the mutation operator of DE are randomly selected from the population. Hence, all vectors are equally likely to be selected as parents without selective pressure at all. Additionally, the diversity information is always ignored. In order to fully exploit the fitness and diversity information of the population, this paper presents a DE framework with multiobjective sorting-based mutation operator. In the proposed mutation operator, individuals in the current population are firstly sorted according to their fitness and diversity contribution by nondominated sorting. Then parents in the mutation operators are proportionally selected according to their rankings based on fitness and diversity, thus, the promising individuals with better fitness and diversity have more opportunity to be selected as parents. Since fitness and diversity information is simultaneously considered for parent selection, a good balance between exploration and exploitation can be achieved. The proposed operator is applied to original DE algorithms, as well as several advanced DE variants. Experimental results on 48 benchmark functions and 12 real-world application problems show that the proposed operator is an effective approach to enhance the performance of most DE algorithms studied.

  1. Thermochemical Pretreatment for Anaerobic Digestion of Sorted Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, W.; Hongtao, W.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of alkaline hydrothermal pre-treatment for anaerobic digestion of mechanically-sorted municipal solid waste (MSW) and source-sorted waste was studied. Waste was hydrothermally pre-treated in dilute alkali solution. Hydrolysis product was incubated in 500 ml saline bottle to determine methane potential (MP) under mesospheric anaerobic conditions. Optimum reaction condition obtained in the study is 170 °C at the dose of 4 g NaOH/100 g solid for one hour. Soluble COD was 13936 mg/L and methane yield was 164 ml/g VS for 6 days incubation at optimum conditions. More than 50% biogas increase was achieved over the control, and methane conversion ratio on carbon basis was enhanced to 30.6%. The digestion period was less than 6 days when pre-treatment temperature was above 130 °C. The organic part of sorted waste is mainly constituted of kitchen garbage and leaf. Model kitchen garbage was completely liquidized at 130 °C for one hour and the methane yield was 276 ml/g VS. Addition of alkali enhance hydroxylation rate and methane yield slightly. The biogas potential of leaf could be observed by pre-treatment above 150 °C under alkaline condition.

  2. Machine Vision System for Color Sorting Wood Edge-Glued Panel Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang Lu; S. Srikanteswara; W. King; T. Drayer; Richard Conners; D. Earl Kline; Philip A. Araman

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an automatic color sorting system for hardwood edge-glued panel parts. The color sorting system simultaneously examines both faces of a panel part and then determines which face has the "better" color given specified color uniformity and priority defined by management. The real-time color sorting system software and hardware are briefly...

  3. Enhancing the Executive Functions of 3-Year-Olds in the Dimensional Change Card Sort Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perone, Sammy; Molitor, Stephen J.; Buss, Aaron T.; Spencer, John P.; Samuelson, Larissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions enable flexible thinking, something young children are notoriously bad at. For instance, in the dimensional change card sort (DCCS) task, 3-year-olds can sort cards by one dimension (shape), but continue to sort by this dimension when asked to switch (to color). This study tests a prediction of a dynamic neural field model that…

  4. Lazarus's BASIC ID: Making Initial Client Assessments Using Q-Sorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Mark J.

    1987-01-01

    Presents overview of Lazarus's multimodal therapy model and the Q-sort, an observer-evaluation scoring instrument. Outlines feasibility of integrating Q-sort within multimodal model. Describes both a preliminary attempt using expert raters to categorize Q-sort cards within the model and a case study on how to assess client by incorporating Q-sort…

  5. Effects of Added Enzymes on Sorted, Unsorted and Sorted-Out Barley: A Model Study on Realtime Viscosity and Process Potentials Using Rapid Visco Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Radhakrishna; Zhuang, Shiwen; Olsen, Rasmus Lyngsø

    2017-01-01

    Barley sorting is an important step for selecting grain of required quality for malting prior to brewing. However, brewing with unmalted barley with added enzymes has been thoroughly proven, raising the question of whether traditional sorting for high quality malting-barley is still necessary...... but not in sorted-out barley. Consequently, we find that unsorted barley demonstrates great potential for brewing with added enzymes and its use may help to improve sustainability of the brewing process....

  6. Limiting Index Sort: A New Non-Dominated Sorting Algorithm and its Comparison to the State-of-the-Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    dominé (NSGA-II). Nous introduisons l’algorithme Limiting Index Sort (LIS) et démontrons sa supériorité pour le tri des données positivement corrélés ou...et démontrons sa supériorité pour le tri des données positivement corrélées ou décorrélées. LIS indexe les solutions individuelles sur la base de...Limiting Index Sort (LIS) et démontrons sa supériorité pour le tri des données positivement corrélés ou décorrélés. LIS indexe les solutions individuelles

  7. Experimental investigation of gravity effects on sediment sorting on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Nikolaus J.; Kuhn, Brigitte; Gartmann, Andres

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: Sorting of sedimentary rocks is a proxy for the environmental conditions at the time of deposition, in particular the runoff that moved and deposited the material forming the rocks. Settling of sediment in water is strongly influenced by the gravity of a planetary body. As a consequence, sorting of a sedimentary rock varies with gravity for a given depth and velocity of surface runoff. Theoretical considerations for spheres indicate that sorting is more uniform on Mars than on Earth for runoff of identical depth. In reality, such considerations have to be applied with great caution because the shape of a particle strongly influences drag. Drag itself can only be calculated directly for an irregularly shaped particle with great computational effort, if at all. Therefore, even for terrestrial applications, sediment settling velocities are often determined directly, e.g. by measurements using settling tubes. Experiments: In this study the results of settling tube tests conducted under reduced gravity during three Mars Sedimentation Experiment (MarsSedEx I, II and III) flights, conducted between 2012 and 2015, are presented. Ten types of sediment, ranging in size, shape and density were tested in custom-designed settling tubes during parabolas of Martian gravity lasting 20 to 25 seconds. Results: The experiments conducted during the MarsSedEx reduced gravity experiments showed that the violation of fluid dynamics caused by using empirical models and parameter values developed for sediment transport on Earth lead to significant miscalculations for Mars, specifically an underetsimation of settling velcoity because of an overestimation of turbulant drag. The error is caused by the flawed representation of particle drag on Mars. Drag coefficients are not a property of a sediment particle, but a property of the flow around the particle, and thus strongly affected by gravity. Conlcusions: The observed errors in settling velocity when using terrestrial models

  8. Bubble-sort图和Modified Bubble-sort图的自同构群%Automorphism Groups of Bubble-sort Graphs and Modified Bubble-sort Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张昭; 黄琼湘

    2005-01-01

    Bubble-sort graphs and modified bubble-sort graphs are two classes of Cayley graphs which are widely studied for their application in network construction. In this paper, we determine the full automorphism groups of bubble-sort graphs and modified bubble-sort graphs.%Bubble-Sort图和Modified Bubble-Sort图是两类特殊的Cayley图,由于其在网络构建中的应用而受到广泛关注.本文完全确定了这两类图的自同构群.

  9. Depth optimal sorting networks resistant to k passive faults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piotrow, M. [Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we study the problem of constructing a sorting network that is tolerant to faults and whose running time (i.e. depth) is as small as possible. We consider the scenario of worst-case comparator faults and follow the model of passive comparator failure proposed by Yao and Yao, in which a faulty comparator outputs directly its inputs without comparison. Our main result is the first construction of an N-input, k-fault-tolerant sorting network that is of an asymptotically optimal depth {theta}(log N+k). That improves over the recent result of Leighton and Ma, whose network is of depth O(log N + k log log N/log k). Actually, we present a fault-tolerant correction network that can be added after any N-input sorting network to correct its output in the presence of at most k faulty comparators. Since the depth of the network is O(log N + k) and the constants hidden behind the {open_quotes}O{close_quotes} notation are not big, the construction can be of practical use. Developing the techniques necessary to show the main result, we construct a fault-tolerant network for the insertion problem. As a by-product, we get an N-input, O(log N)-depth INSERT-network that is tolerant to random faults, thereby answering a question posed by Ma in his PhD thesis. The results are based on a new notion of constant delay comparator networks, that is, networks in which each register is used (compared) only in a period of time of a constant length. Copies of such networks can be put one after another with only a constant increase in depth per copy.

  10. Preliminary Results on Sediment Sorting Under Intense Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Vautin, D.; Mathews, S. L.; Kuprenas, R.; Viparelli, E.

    2014-12-01

    Previous experiments show that parallel-laminated deposits are emplaced under upper plane bed regime by the migration of small-amplitude, long-wavelength bedforms. The present research focuses on how sediment is sorted under upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes, and whether parallel-lamination is inhibited during sheet flow transport. The problem of studying the sorting of sediment under so intense transport conditions is plagued by the uncertainties related to flow resistances and bedload transport rates. We simplify the problem by first running the experiments with uniform sediment, to establish a baseline that will aid in the design of the experiments with poorly sorted material. We are running experiments at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, in a unidirectional sediment-feed flume, 9 meters long by 0.2 meters wide, of which 7 meters are used as test section. During the experiments, water surface and bed elevations are periodically measured to characterize the global parameters of the flow, e.g. mean flow velocity and bed shear stress. When the flow and the sediment transport reach conditions of mobile bed equilibrium, bed elevation fluctuations are measured with ultrasonic transducer systems at six fixed locations. Channel bed aggradation is then induced by slowly raising the tail gate of the flume such that there is no change in transport regime, as confirmed by additional measurements of water surface and bed elevation and bed elevation fluctuations. Preliminary observations under upper plane bed regime show the formation of the small-amplitude and long-wavelength bedforms, as well as hints of parallel lamination in the deposits. In the near future we aim to achieve sheet flow transport conditions with both uniform and non-uniform grain size distributions to look at the internal structure of the emplaced deposit.

  11. Numerical Model of Streaming DEP for Stem Cell Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucha Natu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells are of special interest due to their potential in neurogenesis to treat spinal cord injuries and other nervous disorders. Flow cytometry, a common technique used for cell sorting, is limited due to the lack of antigens and labels that are specific enough to stem cells of interest. Dielectrophoresis (DEP is a label-free separation technique that has been recently demonstrated for the enrichment of neural stem/progenitor cells. Here we use numerical simulation to investigate the use of streaming DEP for the continuous sorting of neural stem/progenitor cells. Streaming DEP refers to the focusing of cells into streams by equilibrating the dielectrophoresis and drag forces acting on them. The width of the stream should be maximized to increase throughput while the separation between streams must be widened to increase efficiency during retrieval. The aim is to understand how device geometry and experimental variables affect the throughput and efficiency of continuous sorting of SC27 stem cells, a neurogenic progenitor, from SC23 cells, an astrogenic progenitor. We define efficiency as the ratio between the number of SC27 cells over total number of cells retrieved in the streams, and throughput as the number of SC27 cells retrieved in the streams compared to their total number introduced to the device. The use of cylindrical electrodes as tall as the channel yields streams featuring >98% of SC27 cells and width up to 80 µm when using a flow rate of 10 µL/min and sample cell concentration up to 105 cells/mL.

  12. Consensus-Based Sorting of Neuronal Spike Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Julien; Mueller, Christian M.; Shein-Idelson, Mark; Hemberger, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Optimizing spike-sorting algorithms is difficult because sorted clusters can rarely be checked against independently obtained “ground truth” data. In most spike-sorting algorithms in use today, the optimality of a clustering solution is assessed relative to some assumption on the distribution of the spike shapes associated with a particular single unit (e.g., Gaussianity) and by visual inspection of the clustering solution followed by manual validation. When the spatiotemporal waveforms of spikes from different cells overlap, the decision as to whether two spikes should be assigned to the same source can be quite subjective, if it is not based on reliable quantitative measures. We propose a new approach, whereby spike clusters are identified from the most consensual partition across an ensemble of clustering solutions. Using the variability of the clustering solutions across successive iterations of the same clustering algorithm (template matching based on K-means clusters), we estimate the probability of spikes being clustered together and identify groups of spikes that are not statistically distinguishable from one another. Thus, we identify spikes that are most likely to be clustered together and therefore correspond to consistent spike clusters. This method has the potential advantage that it does not rely on any model of the spike shapes. It also provides estimates of the proportion of misclassified spikes for each of the identified clusters. We tested our algorithm on several datasets for which there exists a ground truth (simultaneous intracellular data), and show that it performs close to the optimum reached by a support vector machine trained on the ground truth. We also show that the estimated rate of misclassification matches the proportion of misclassified spikes measured from the ground truth data. PMID:27536990

  13. BSSSN: Bit String Swapping Sorting Network for Reversible Logic Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Md Saiful

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have introduced the notion of UselessGate and ReverseOperation. We have also given an algorithm to implement a sorting network for reversible logic synthesis based on swapping bit strings. The network is constructed in terms of n*n Toffoli Gates read from left to right and it has shown that there will be no more gates than the number of swappings the algorithm requires. The gate complexity of the network is O(n2). The number of gates in the network can be further reduced by template reduction technique and removing UselessGate from the network.

  14. Study for standardization of the lighting system in fruit sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J. F. S.; Baldner, F. O.; Costa, P. B.; Guedes, M. B.; Oliveira, I. A. A.; Leta, F. R.

    2016-07-01

    Sorting is a very important step in the fruit processing. The attributes definition and characterization are important for both marketing and end user, making it necessary to establish regulations for classification and standardization in order to unify the language of the market and enabling a more efficient market and also increase consumer awareness. For this end, it is necessary to standardize the technical criteria that can change the perception of the product. Studies have been developed in order to standardize a methodology to determine the subclass of fruit ripening, evaluating the influence of different light sources in the subclass evaluation.

  15. A Special Sort of Forgetting: Negation in Freud and Augustine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengart, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The development from a positive, dualistic theory of memory and forgetting to a concept of memory that includes forgetting as a variety of remembering is traced in two thinkers. Freud's concept of repression is discussed as a complex negation of both remembering and forgetting, and the development of this construct is shown in his letters to Wilhelm Fliess. A close reading of Augustine of Hippo's Confessions shows a similar concept of a special sort of forgetting, in which what is forgotten is remembered nonetheless. Finally, the limits of the comparison are discussed, and a reading of Freud's "Negation" reveals ways in which the unconscious is fundamentally unlike Augustine's interiority.

  16. Cholesterol-induced protein sorting: an analysis of energetic feasibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, J A; Andersen, O S; Werge, T

    2003-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying the sorting of integral membrane proteins between the Golgi complex and the plasma membrane remain uncertain because no specific Golgi retention signal has been found. Moreover one can alter a protein's eventual localization simply by altering the length of its...... thickness. In this model, Golgi proteins with short TMDs would be excluded from cholesterol-enriched domains (lipid rafts) that are incorporated into transport vesicles destined for the plasma membrane. Although attractive, this model remains unproven. We therefore evaluated the energetic feasibility...

  17. Size Sorting on the Rubble-Pile Asteroid Itokawa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Sabuwala, Tapan; Siu, Theo; Vivar Lazo, Miguel; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2017-03-17

    Photographs of the asteroid Itokawa reveal unexpectedly strong size segregation between lowlands populated almost entirely by small pebbles and highlands consisting of larger boulders. We propose that this segregation may be caused by a simple and unexplored effect: pebbles accreting onto the asteroid rebound from boulders, but sink into pebbly regions. By number, overwhelmingly more particles on Itokawa are pebbles, and collisions involving these pebbles must unavoidably cause pebbly regions to grow. We carry out experiments and simulations that demonstrate that this mechanism of size sorting based on simple counting of grains produces strong lateral segregation that reliably obeys an analytic formula.

  18. Shrink-induced sorting using integrated nanoscale magnetic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthi; Norouzi, Nazila; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Sharac, Nicholas; Grant, Ted; Chen, Aaron; Strayer, Scott; Ragan, Regina; Khine, Michelle

    2013-02-11

    We present a plastic microfluidic device with integrated nanoscale magnetic traps (NSMTs) that separates magnetic from non-magnetic beads with high purity and throughput, and unprecedented enrichments. Numerical simulations indicate significantly higher localized magnetic field gradients than previously reported. We demonstrated >20 000-fold enrichment for 0.001% magnetic bead mixtures. Since we achieve high purity at all flow-rates tested, this is a robust, rapid, portable, and simple solution to sort target species from small volumes amenable for point-of-care applications. We used the NSMT in a 96 well format to extract DNA from small sample volumes for quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR).

  19. Size Sorting on the Rubble-Pile Asteroid Itokawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Troy; Sabuwala, Tapan; Siu, Theo; Vivar Lazo, Miguel; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2017-03-01

    Photographs of the asteroid Itokawa reveal unexpectedly strong size segregation between lowlands populated almost entirely by small pebbles and highlands consisting of larger boulders. We propose that this segregation may be caused by a simple and unexplored effect: pebbles accreting onto the asteroid rebound from boulders, but sink into pebbly regions. By number, overwhelmingly more particles on Itokawa are pebbles, and collisions involving these pebbles must unavoidably cause pebbly regions to grow. We carry out experiments and simulations that demonstrate that this mechanism of size sorting based on simple counting of grains produces strong lateral segregation that reliably obeys an analytic formula.

  20. Airborne microorganisms associated with packaging glass sorting facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Marta Jorge de Vasconcelos; Veiga, José Miguel; Fernandes, Paulo; Ramos, Carla; Gonçalves, Sérgio; Velho, Maria Manuela Lemos Vaz; Guerreiro, Joana Santos

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have been undertaken to reduce the volume of residual waste through sorting and recycling. The waste management and recycling sector is thriving and the number of workers there is increasing. In this context, prior knowledge of the risks to which workers may be exposed is of crucial importance, and preventive measures need to be put in place to accurately identify and quantify those risks. This study aimed to assess occupational risk of exposure to biological agents (viable bacteria and fungi) in a Portuguese waste packaging glass sorting plant. Air samples were collected from selected locations in waste sorting cabins (critical area, CA), administrative services (noncritical area, NCA) and outdoors (control point, CP). Duplicate air samples were collected through an impaction method. The investigation was carried out over an 8-mo period with two collection periods, autumn/winter (AW) and spring/summer (SS), in order to access the influence of any seasonal variation. In the 36 air samples collected, 319 bacterial and 196 mold identifications were performed. Air samples revealed existence of high environmental contamination by bacteria (1.6 × 10(4) colony forming units [cfu]/m(3)) and fungi (1.5 × 10(4) cfu/m(3)). The predominant bacterial genus was Staphylococcus (coagulase negative) with values ranging from 29.6 to 60% of the total count of bacteria. Genera Bacillus, Micrococcus, and Staphylococcus (coagulase negative) were also present at all sampling sites, regardless of the season. However, the counts of these genera, in the CA, were higher in warmer seasons. The genus Penicillium was the most frequent genus present with an approximate value of 95% of total fungal count in the CA. Seasonal variation was a significant factor for total bacteria and fungi, except for NCA versus CP. Overall, the highest levels of bacterial and fungal species (10(4) cfu/m(3)) were found in the waste sorting cabin (CA). These results highlight the

  1. Increased Sorting and Wage Inequality in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Pytlikova, Mariola; Warzynski, Frederic

    In this paper, we look at the evolution of firms' wage structures using a linked employer-employee dataset, which has longitudinal information for firms and covers a large fraction of the Czech labor market during the period 1998-2006. We first look at the evolution of individual wage determination......, an increasingly decentralized wage bargaining, skill biased technological change and a changing educational composition of the workforce. We find some support for that all these factors have contributed to the changes in the Czech wage structure, and that increased sorting is strongly associated with the observed...

  2. Polyomavirus JC in the Context of Immunosuppression: A Series of Adaptive, DNA Replication-Driven Recombination Events in the Development of Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward M. Johnson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyomavirus JC (JCV is the etiological agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML, a demyelinating infection of oligodendrocytes in the brain. PML, a frequently fatal opportunistic infection in AIDS, has also emerged as a consequence of treatment with several new immunosuppressive therapeutic agents. Although nearly 80% of adults are seropositive, JCV attains an ability to infect glial cells in only a minority of people. Data suggest that JCV undergoes sequence alterations that accompany this ability, and these changes can be derived from an archetype strain by mutation, deletion, and duplication. While the introductory source and primary tissue reservoir of JCV remain unknown, lymphoid cells have been identified as potential intermediaries in progression of JCV to the brain. This review is focused on sequence changes in the noncoding control region (NCCR of the virus. We propose an adaptive mechanism that involves a sequential series of DNA replication-driven NCCR recombination events involving stalled DNA replication forks at NCCR palindromic secondary structures. We shall describe how the NCCR sequence changes point to a model in which viral DNA replication drives NCCR recombination, allowing JCV adaptation to different cell types in its progression to neurovirulence.

  3. Murine polyomavirus virus-like particles carrying full-length human PSA protect BALB/c mice from outgrowth of a PSA expressing tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilda Eriksson

    Full Text Available Virus-like particles (VLPs consist of capsid proteins from viruses and have been shown to be usable as carriers of protein and peptide antigens for immune therapy. In this study, we have produced and assayed murine polyomavirus (MPyV VLPs carrying the entire human Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA (PSA-MPyVLPs for their potential use for immune therapy in a mouse model system. BALB/c mice immunized with PSA-MPyVLPs were only marginally protected against outgrowth of a PSA-expressing tumor. To improve protection, PSA-MPyVLPs were co-injected with adjuvant CpG, either alone or loaded onto murine dendritic cells (DCs. Immunization with PSA-MPyVLPs loaded onto DCs in the presence of CpG was shown to efficiently protect mice from tumor outgrowth. In addition, cellular and humoral immune responses after immunization were examined. PSA-specific CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells were demonstrated, but no PSA-specific IgG antibodies. Vaccination with DCs loaded with PSA-MPyVLPs induced an eight-fold lower titre of anti-VLP antibodies than vaccination with PSA-MPyVLPs alone. In conclusion, immunization of BALB/c mice with PSA-MPyVLPs, loaded onto DCs and co-injected with CpG, induces an efficient PSA-specific tumor protective immune response, including both CD4(+ and CD8(+ cells with a low induction of anti-VLP antibodies.

  4. Design and construction of automatic sorting station with machine vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar D. Velasco-Delgado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the design, construction and testing of an automatic product sorting system in belt conveyor with machine vision that integrates Free and Open Source Software technology and Allen Bradley commercial equipment. Requirements are defined to determine features such as: mechanics of manufacturing station, an app of product sorting with machine vision and for automation system. For the app of machine vision a library is used for optical digital image processing Open CV, for the mechanical design of the manufacturing station is used the CAD tool Solid Edge and for the design and implementation of automation ISA standards are used along with an automation engineering project methodology integrating a PLC, an inverter, a Panel View and a DeviceNet Network. Performance tests are shown by classifying bottles and PVC pieces in four established types, the behavior of the integrated system is checked so as the efficiency of the same. The processing time on machine vision is 0.290 s on average for a piece of PVC, a capacity of 206 accessories per minute, for bottles was obtained a processing time of 0.267 s, a capacity of 224 bottles per minute. A maximum mechanical performance is obtained with 32 products per minute (1920 products/hour with the conveyor to 22 cm/s and 40 cm of distance between products obtaining an average error of 0.8%.

  5. Design of Slit between Micro Cylindrical Pillars for Cell Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Takahashi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Micro slits have been designed between micro cylindrical pillars to sort biological cells. Micro cylindrical pillars of 0.02 mm diameter and 0.055 mm height were fabricated on the glass plate using the photolithography technique. Variation was made on the gap between pillars: 0.01 mm, 0.02 mm, 0.03 mm, and 0.04 mm. The micro pillars are set in the flow path between parallel plates, of which dimension of the cross section is 5 mm width and 0.055 mm height. Three kinds of biological cells were used in the test alternatively: C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line originated with cross-striated muscle of C3H mouse, Hepa1-6 (mouse hepatoma cell line of C57L mouse, or swine red blood cell. The suspension of cells was introduced into the slits by the syringe pump at the flow rate between 0.4 and 500 cm3/hour. The deformation of the cell at the slit can be observed by the microscope. The experimental results show that the designed slit has capability for sorting cells according to the size and deformability of the cell.

  6. Devices for the production and sorting of microfluidic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Donald; Heyman, John; Agresti, Jeremy; Köster, Sarah; Weitz, David

    2010-03-01

    Droplets produced in microfluidic devices are a great set of tools for studying large cell populations and permutations of reactions. Sample populations of 10^6 - 10^7 can be studied with relative ease, as encapsulation and screening rates in the kHz range are accessible. Previous droplet work has shown encapsulation of cells in droplets allows individual cells and their products to be studied. Advantages include correlation between detected products and initial drop contents, as well as minimized sample cross-contamination. Most microfluidic-based biological assays rely on fluorescent labeling of cells or use of cellular products to initiate a fluorescence-producing reaction. Detection of the fluorescence provides a trigger for sorting those cells or cell-containing droplets away from the general population. Though this allows some cellular processes to be studied, detection and quantification of all products, not just those expressed to the cell surface or those that catalyze reactions, would impact development of better therapeutics. We are currently working to adapt benchtop biological assays that label and detect cellular products for use in a droplet-based system. The work presented here details the chain of modular microfluidic devices we use to encapsulate, incubate, interrogate, and sort a population of droplets containing a model system.

  7. Fast polyhedral cell sorting for interactive rendering of unstructured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combra, J; Klosowski, J T; Max, N; Silva, C T; Williams, P L

    1998-10-30

    Direct volume rendering based on projective methods works by projecting, in visibility order, the polyhedral cells of a mesh onto the image plane, and incrementally compositing the cell's color and opacity into the final image. Crucial to this method is the computation of a visibility ordering of the cells. If the mesh is ''well-behaved'' (acyclic and convex), then the MPVO method of Williams provides a very fast sorting algorithm; however, this method only computes an approximate ordering in general datasets, resulting in visual artifacts when rendered. A recent method of Silva et al. removed the assumption that the mesh is convex, by means of a sweep algorithm used in conjunction with the MPVO method; their algorithm is substantially faster than previous exact methods for general meshes. In this paper we propose a new technique, which we call BSP-XMPVO, which is based on a fast and simple way of using binary space partitions on the boundary elements of the mesh to augment the ordering produced by MPVO. Our results are shown to be orders of magnitude better than previous exact methods of sorting cells.

  8. A Microfluidic Chip for Liquid Metal Droplet Generation and Sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A liquid metal based microfluidic system was proposed and demonstrated for the generation and sorting of liquid metal droplets. This micro system utilized silicon oil as the continuous phase and Ga66In20.5Sn13.5 (66.0 wt % Ga, 20.5 wt % In, 13.5 wt % Sn, melting point: 10.6 °C as the dispersed phase to generate liquid metal droplets on a three-channel F-junction generator. The F-junction is an updated design similar to the classical T-junction, which has a special branch channel added to a T-junction for the supplement of 30 wt % aqueous NaOH solution. To perform active sorting of liquid metal droplets by dielectrophoresis (DEP, the micro system utilized liquid-metal-filled microchannels as noncontact electrodes to induce electrical fields through the droplet channel. The electrode channels were symmetrically located on both sides of the droplet channel in the same horizontal level. According to the results, the micro system can generate uniformly spherical liquid metal droplets, and control the flow direction of the liquid metal droplets. To better understand the control mechanism, a numerical simulation of the electrical field was performed in detail in this work.

  9. The Sorting Buffer Problem is NP-hard

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Ho-Leung; van Stee, Rob; Sitters, Rene

    2010-01-01

    We consider the offline sorting buffer problem. The input is a sequence of items of different types. All items must be processed one by one by a server. The server is equipped with a random-access buffer of limited capacity which can be used to rearrange items. The problem is to design a scheduling strategy that decides upon the order in which items from the buffer are sent to the server. Each type change incurs unit cost, and thus, the cost minimizing objective is to minimize the total number of type changes for serving the entire sequence. This problem is motivated by various applications in manufacturing processes and computer science, and it has attracted significant attention in the last few years. The main focus has been on online competitive algorithms. Surprisingly little is known on the basic offline problem. In this paper, we show that the sorting buffer problem with uniform cost is NP-hard and, thus, close one of the most fundamental questions for the offline problem. On the positive side, we give ...

  10. Custom-tailored spatial mode sorting by controlled random scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Ginoya, Manit; Boyd, Robert W.

    2017-04-01

    The need to increase data transfer rates constitutes a key challenge in modern information-driven societies. Taking advantage of the transverse spatial modes of light to encode more information is a promising avenue for both classical and quantum photonics. However, to ease access to the encoded information, it is essential to be able to sort spatial modes into different output channels. Here, we introduce a way to customize the sorting of arbitrary spatial light modes. Our method relies on the high degree of control over random scattering processes by preshaping of the phase structure of the incident light. We demonstrate experimentally that various sets of modes, irrespective of their specific modal structure, can be transformed to a broad range of output channel arrangements. Thus, our method enables full access to all of the information encoded in the transverse structure of the field; for example, azimuthal and radial modes. We also demonstrate that coherence is retained in this complex mode transformation, which opens up applications in quantum and classical information science.

  11. Exosome and exosomal microRNA: trafficking, sorting, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Sha; Li, Lu; Li, Meng; Guo, Chongye; Yao, Jun; Mi, Shuangli

    2015-02-01

    Exosomes are 40-100 nm nano-sized vesicles that are released from many cell types into the extracellular space. Such vesicles are widely distributed in various body fluids. Recently, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in exosomes, which can be taken up by neighboring or distant cells and subsequently modulate recipient cells. This suggests an active sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, since the miRNA profiles of exosomes may differ from those of the parent cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in disease progression, and can stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate metastasis in cancers. In this review, we will introduce the origin and the trafficking of exosomes between cells, display current research on the sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, and briefly describe how exosomes and their miRNAs function in recipient cells. Finally, we will discuss the potential applications of these miRNA-containing vesicles in clinical settings.

  12. Exosome and Exosomal MicroRNA: Trafficking, Sorting, and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are 40–100 nm nano-sized vesicles that are released from many cell types into the extracellular space. Such vesicles are widely distributed in various body fluids. Recently, mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs have been identified in exosomes, which can be taken up by neighboring or distant cells and subsequently modulate recipient cells. This suggests an active sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, since the miRNA profiles of exosomes may differ from those of the parent cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in disease progression, and can stimulate angiogenesis and facilitate metastasis in cancers. In this review, we will introduce the origin and the trafficking of exosomes between cells, display current research on the sorting mechanism of exosomal miRNAs, and briefly describe how exosomes and their miRNAs function in recipient cells. Finally, we will discuss the potential applications of these miRNA-containing vesicles in clinical settings.

  13. Boar sperm changes after sorting and encapsulation in barium alginate membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinaci, M; Bucci, D; Chlapanidas, T; Vallorani, C; Perteghella, S; Communod, R; Vigo, D; Tamanini, C; Galeati, G; Faustini, M; Torre, M L

    2013-09-15

    A routine use of boar-sexed semen is limited by the long sorting time necessary to obtain an adequate number of sexed spermatozoa for artificial insemination and by the high susceptibility of spermatozoa of this species to damages induced by sorting procedure and subsequent cryopreservation. The aim of this work was to study the impact of encapsulation in barium alginate membrane on sorted boar spermatozoa by evaluating membrane integrity, chlortetracycline staining patterns, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and Hsp70 immunolocalization during storage over 72 hours in liquid or encapsulated form. The encapsulation procedure significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the overall membrane integrity of control unsorted semen (81.8 vs. 57.4, CTR vs. CPS), but did not negatively affect the overall viability and the chlortetracycline staining patterns of sorted encapsulated cells. Moreover, encapsulation significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the overall phosphotyrosin A pattern cell percentage in unsorted (98.4 vs. 92.6, CTR vs. CPS) but not in sorted semen (64.0 vs. 74.2; SORT CTR vs. SORT CPS). As for Hsp70, the overall percentage of cells displaying the different patterns was significantly influenced (P < 0.05) by treatment but not by storage time. The sorting procedure seems to induce the major changes, whereas encapsulation tends to exert a protective effect on sorted semen by increasing the percentage of spermatozoa displaying the T pattern (2.8 vs. 24.3; SORT CTR vs. SORT CPS). In conclusion, our data confirm that the damaging impact of the encapsulation in barium alginate capsules seems to be limited when compared with that of the sorting procedure and, moreover, the association of the two procedures does not result in an algebraic sum of the negative effects. These results suggest the possibility of a future utilization of the encapsulation technology in order to store sorted spermatozoa and permit their controlled release in the female genital tract.

  14. The Cleveland Sorting Test: a preliminary study of an alternate form of the Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreh, Amir; Pastel, Dan; Miller, Ashley; Levin, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    During the past two decades, studies have repeatedly shown that the Wisconsin Card-Sorting Test (WCST) is not as sensitive to prefrontal-lobe functioning as was originally suspected. Specifically, both clinical and brain-imaging studies have shown that several distinct neural circuits contribute to one's ability to successfully complete different aspects of the test. Another limitation of the WCST is its length, which makes it difficult and frustrating for certain clinical populations. To address the above limitations, researchers have proposed the development of new indexes and the integration of an adaptive testing approach that will allow for the premature termination of the test. Unfortunately, given the proprietary nature of the WCST, none of the above recommendations have been adopted. The present preliminary study examined an alternate form of the 64-Item WCST (WCST-64), the Cleveland Sorting Test (CST-64). The normative data of the two measures as well as the total number of errors, perseverative responses, perseverative errors, and categories completed were compared using a repeated-measures design. Overall, the study supports psychometric approximation of the CST-64 and the WCST-64. Suggestions for future studies and modifications of the CST-64, including the use of recently proposed indexes and adaptive administration approaches, are provided.

  15. Leucine-based receptor sorting motifs are dependent on the spacing relative to the plasma membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Dietrich, J; Nielsen, B L;

    1998-01-01

    amino acid, is constitutively active. In this study, we have investigated how the spacing relative to the plasma membrane affects the function of both types of leucine-based motifs. For phosphorylation-dependent leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 7 residues between the plasma membrane...... and the phospho-acceptor was required for phosphorylation and thereby activation of the motifs. For constitutively active leucine-based motifs, a minimal spacing of 6 residues between the plasma membrane and the acidic residue was required for optimal activity of the motifs. In addition, we found that the acidic...

  16. Finite-size corrections to scaling behavior in sorted cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopper, A V; Krens, G; Grill, S W; Heisenberg, C-P

    2010-10-01

    Cell sorting is a widespread phenomenon pivotal to the early development of multicellular organisms. In vitro cell sorting studies have been instrumental in revealing the cellular properties driving this process. However, these studies have as yet been limited to two-dimensional analysis of three-dimensional cell sorting events. Here we describe a method to record the sorting of primary zebrafish ectoderm and mesoderm germ layer progenitor cells in three dimensions over time, and quantitatively analyze their sorting behavior using an order parameter related to heterotypic interface length. We investigate the cell population size dependence of sorted aggregates and find that the germ layer progenitor cells engulfed in the final configuration display a relationship between total interfacial length and system size according to a simple geometrical argument, subject to a finite-size effect.

  17. Online tomato sorting based on shape, maturity, size, and surface defects using machine vision

    OpenAIRE

    ARJENAKI, Omid Omidi; MOGHADDAM, Parviz Ahmadi; MOTLAGH, Asad Moddares

    2013-01-01

    Online sorting of tomatoes according to their features is an important postharvest procedure. The purpose of this research was to develop an efficient machine vision-based experimental sorting system for tomatoes. Relevant sorting parameters included shape (oblong and circular), size (small and large), maturity (color), and defects. The variables defining shape, maturity, and size of the tomatoes were eccentricity, average of color components, and 2-D pixel area, respectively. Tomato defects ...

  18. Automatic Color Sorting Machine Using TCS230 Color Sensor And PIC Microcontroller

    OpenAIRE

    Kunhimohammed C K; Muhammed Saifudeen K K; Sahna S; Gokul M S; Shaeez Usman Abdulla

    2015-01-01

    Sorting of products is a very difficult industrial process. Continuous manual sorting creates consistency issues. This paper describes a working prototype designed for automatic sorting of objects based on the color. TCS230 sensor was used to detect the color of the product and the PIC16F628A microcontroller was used to control the overall process. The identification of the color is based on the frequency analysis of the output of TCS230 sensor. Two conveyor belts were used, each ...

  19. Performance of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders on the Dimension-Change Card Sort Task

    OpenAIRE

    Dichter, Gabriel S.; Radonovich, Krestin J.; Turner-Brown, Lauren M.; LAM, KRISTEN S. L.; HOLTZCLAW, TIA N.; Bodfish, James W.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors in autism spectrum disorders have been conceptualized to reflect impaired executive functions. In the present study, we investigated the performance of 6–17-year-old children with and without an autism spectrum disorder on a dimension-change card sort task that explicitly indicated sorting rules on every trial. Diagnostic groups did not differ in speed of responses after the first rule switch or in speed or accuracy on blocks with mixed versus single sort r...

  20. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS): utility in assisted reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh K

    2008-07-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) have now been extensively incorporated in the management of infertile couples. But even after rapid methodological and technological advances the success rates of these procedures have been below expectations. This has led to development of many sperm preparation protocols to obtain an ideal semen sample for artificial reproduction. Sperm apoptosis has been heavily linked to failures in reproductive techniques. One of the earliest changes shown by apoptotic spermatozoa is externalization of phosphatidyl serine. Magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) is a novel sperm preparation technique that separates apoptotic and non-apoptotic spermatozoa based on the expression of phosphatidylserine. This has led to the incorporation of MACS as a sperm preparation technique. The review highlights the principle and mechanism of this novel technique and enumerates its advantages as a sperm preparation technique. Its utility in ART as an efficient tool for sperm recovery and its application in cryopreservation of semen samples is also explained.