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Sample records for receptor mediated innate

  1. Of pheromones and kairomones: what receptors mediate innate emotional responses?

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    Fortes-Marco, Lluis; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Some chemicals elicit innate emotionally laden behavioral responses. Pheromones mediate sexual attraction, parental care or agonistic confrontation, whereas predators' kairomones elicit defensive behaviors in their preys. This essay explores the hypothesis that the detection of these semiochemicals relies on highly specific olfactory and/or vomeronasal receptors. The V1R, V2R, and formyl-peptide vomeronasal receptors bind their ligands in highly specific and sensitive way, thus being good candidates for pheromone- or kairomone-detectors (e.g., secreted and excreted proteins, peptides and lipophilic volatiles). The olfactory epithelium also expresses specific receptors, for example trace amine-associated receptors (TAAR) and guanylyl cyclase receptors (GC-D and other types), some of which bind kairomones and putative pheromones. However, most of the olfactory neurons express canonical olfactory receptors (ORs) that bind many ligands with different affinity, being not suitable for mediating responses to pheromones and kairomones. In this respect, trimethylthiazoline (TMT) is considered a fox-derived kairomone for mice and rats, but it seems to be detected by canonical ORs. Therefore, we have reassessed the kairomonal nature of TMT by analyzing the behavioral responses of outbred (CD1) and inbred mice (C57BL/J6) to TMT. Our results confirm that both mouse strains avoid TMT, which increases immobility in C57BL/J6, but not CD1 mice. However, mice of both strains sniff at TMT throughout the test and show no trace of TMT-induced contextual conditioning (immobility or avoidance). This suggests that TMT is not a kairomone but, similar to a loud noise, in high concentrations it induces aversion and stress as unspecific responses to a strong olfactory stimulation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. DMPD: Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available e receptors: networks regulated byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive...ed byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. Authors Parker LC, Prince LR, Sabroe I. Publi...d byToll-like receptors mediate innate and adaptive immunity. Parker LC, Prince LR, Sabroe I. Clin Exp Immun...17223959 Translational mini-review series on Toll-like receptors: networks regulate

  3. The Innate Immune Receptor CD14 Mediates Lymphocyte Migration in EAE

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    Ramona Halmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis is the most common autoimmune disease of the central nervous system in young adults and histopathologically characterized by inflammation, demyelination and gliosis. It is considered as a CD4+ T cell-mediated disease, but also a disease-promoting role of the innate immune system has been proposed, based e.g. on the observation that innate immune receptors modulate disease severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Recent studies of our group provided first evidence for a key role of the innate immune LPS receptor (CD14 in pathophysiology of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. CD14-deficient experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice showed increased clinical symptoms and enhanced infiltration of monocytes and neutrophils in brain and spinal cord. Methods: In the current study, we further investigated the causes of the disease aggravation by CD14-deficiency and examined T cell activation, also focusing on the costimulatory molecules CTLA-4 and CD28, and T cell migration capacity over the blood brain barrier by FACS analysis, in vitro adhesion and transmigration assays. Results: In the results, we observed a significantly increased migration of CD14-deficient lymphocytes across an endothelial monolayer. In contrast, we did not see any differences in expression levels of TCR/CTLA-4 or TCR/CD28 and lymphocyte adhesion to endothelial cells from CD14-deficient compared to wildtype mice. Conclusion: The results demonstrate an important role of CD14 in migration of lymphocytes, and strengthen the importance of innate immune receptors in adaptive immune disorders, such as multiple sclerosis.

  4. P2X7 receptors mediate innate phagocytosis by human neural precursor cells and neuroblasts.

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    Lovelace, Michael D; Gu, Ben J; Eamegdool, Steven S; Weible, Michael W; Wiley, James S; Allen, David G; Chan-Ling, Tailoi

    2015-02-01

    During early human neurogenesis there is overproduction of neuroblasts and neurons accompanied by widespread programmed cell death (PCD). While it is understood that CD68(+) microglia and astrocytes mediate phagocytosis during target-dependent PCD, little is known of the cell identity or the scavenger molecules used to remove apoptotic corpses during the earliest stages of human neurogenesis. Using a combination of multiple-marker immunohistochemical staining, functional blocking antibodies and antagonists, we showed that human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and neuroblasts express functional P2X7 receptors. Furthermore, using live-cell imaging, flow cytometry, phagocytic assays, and siRNA knockdown, we showed that in a serum-free environment, doublecortin(+) (DCX) neuroblasts and hNPCs can clear apoptotic cells by innate phagocytosis mediated via P2X7. We found that both P2X7(high) DCX(low) hNPCs and P2X7(high) DCX(high) neuroblasts, derived from primary cultures of human fetal telencephalon, phagocytosed targets including latex beads, apoptotic ReNcells, and apoptotic hNPC/neuroblasts. Pretreatment of neuroblasts and hNPCs with 1 mM adenosine triphosphate (ATP), 100 µM OxATP (P2X7 antagonist), or siRNA knockdown of P2X7 inhibited phagocytosis of these targets. Our results show that P2X7 functions as a scavenger receptor under serum-free conditions resembling those in early neurogenesis. This is the first demonstration that hNPCs and neuroblasts may participate in clearance of apoptotic corpses during pre target-dependent neurogenesis and mediate phagocytosis using P2X7 as a scavenger receptor.

  5. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we have described studies that have demonstrated that mast cells can be activated as a consequence of adaptive and innate immune reactions and that these responses can be modified by ligands for other receptors expressed on the surface of mast cells. These various stimuli...

  6. Xenobiotic Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Intestinal Barrier Function and Innate Immunity

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    Harmit S. Ranhotra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The molecular basis for the regulation of the intestinal barrier is a very fertile research area. A growing body of knowledge supports the targeting of various components of intestinal barrier function as means to treat a variety of diseases, including the inflammatory bowel diseases. Herein, we will summarize the current state of knowledge of key xenobiotic receptor regulators of barrier function, highlighting recent advances, such that the field and its future are succinctly reviewed. We posit that these receptors confer an additional dimension of host-microbe interaction in the gut, by sensing and responding to metabolites released from the symbiotic microbiota, in innate immunity and also in host drug metabolism. The scientific evidence for involvement of the receptors and its molecular basis for the control of barrier function and innate immunity regulation would serve as a rationale towards development of non-toxic probes and ligands as drugs.

  7. Multigenic control of measles vaccine immunity mediated by polymorphisms in measles receptor, innate pathway, and cytokine genes.

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    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; O'Byrne, Megan M; Jacobson, Robert M; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2012-03-09

    Measles infection and vaccine response are complex biological processes that involve both viral and host genetic factors. We have previously investigated the influence of genetic polymorphisms on vaccine immune response, including measles vaccines, and have shown that polymorphisms in HLA, cytokine, cytokine receptor, and innate immune response genes are associated with variation in vaccine response but do not account for all of the inter-individual variance seen in vaccinated populations. In the current study we report the findings of a multigenic analysis of measles vaccine immunity, indicating a role for the measles virus receptor CD46, innate pattern-recognition receptors (DDX58, TLR2, 4, 5, 7 and 8) and intracellular signaling intermediates (MAP3K7, NFKBIA), and key antiviral molecules (VISA, OAS2, MX1, PKR) as well as cytokines (IFNA1, IL4, IL6, IL8, IL12B) and cytokine receptor genes (IL2RB, IL6R, IL8RA) in the genetic control of both humoral and cellular immune responses. This multivariate approach provided additional insights into the genetic control of measles vaccine responses over and above the information gained by our previous univariate SNP association analyses.

  8. Anoctamin 6 mediates effects essential for innate immunity downstream of P2X7 receptors in macrophages

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    Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kmit, Arthur; Romao, Ana M.; Jantarajit, Walailak; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) are fundamental to innate immune response. In macrophages, transient stimulation of P2X7R activates several transport mechanisms and induces the scrambling of phospholipids with subsequent membrane blebbing and apoptosis. These processes support phagocytosis and subsequent killing of phagocytosed bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the stimulation of P2X7 receptors activates anoctamin 6 (ANO6, TMEM16F), a protein that functions as Ca2+ dependent phospholipid scramblase and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. Inhibition or knockdown of ANO6 attenuates ATP-induced cell shrinkage, cell migration and phospholipid scrambling. In mouse macrophages, Ano6 produces large ion currents by stimulation of P2X7 receptors and contributes to ATP-induced membrane blebbing and apoptosis, which is largely reduced in macrophages from Ano6-/- mice. ANO6 supports bacterial phagocytosis and killing by mouse and human THP-1 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that anoctamin 6 is an essential component of the immune defense by macrophages.

  9. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Innate Immunity, Host Defense, and Immunopathology

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    Suresh, Rahul; Mosser, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic microbes initiates a set of complex interactions between the pathogen and the host mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune responses play direct roles in host defense during the early stages of infection, and they also exert a profound influence on the generation of the adaptive immune responses that ensue.…

  10. Innate immunity mediates myocardial preconditioning through Toll-like receptor 2 and TIRAP-dependent signaling pathways.

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    Dong, Jian-Wen; Vallejo, Jesus G; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Thomas, James A; Mann, Douglas L

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have implicated Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and TLR4 signaling in delimiting liver and brain injury following ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). To determine whether TLR2 and TLR4 conferred cytoprotection in the heart, we subjected hearts of wild-type (WT) mice and mice deficient in TLR2 (TLR2D), TLR4 (TLR4D), and TIR domain-containing adapter protein (TIRAP-D) to ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Langendorff-perfused hearts were subjected to 30 min ischemia and 60 min reperfusion with or without IPC. IPC resulted in a significant increase (P 0.05) in TIRAP-D mouse hearts (43.8 +/- 1.9%) after I/R injury. IPC also resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in I/R-induced creatine kinase release and Evans blue dye uptake in WT but not TIRAP-D hearts. Interestingly, IPC resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in %LVDP in TLR4-deficient hearts (52.7 +/- 3%) but not in TLR2D hearts (39.3 +/- 1.5%). Pretreatment with a specific TLR2 ligand (Pam3CSK) protected WT hearts against I/R-induced left ventricular dysfunction. The loss of IPC-induced cardioprotection in TIRAP-D mouse hearts was accompanied by a decreased translocation of protein kinase C-epsilon and decreased phosphorylation of GSK-3beta. Taken together, these data suggest that the cardioprotective effect of IPC is mediated, at least in part, through a TLR2-TIRAP-dependent pathway, suggesting that the modulation of this pathway represents a viable target for reducing I/R injury.

  11. Estrogen receptors regulate innate immune cells and signaling pathways.

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    Kovats, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Humans show strong sex differences in immunity to infection and autoimmunity, suggesting sex hormones modulate immune responses. Indeed, receptors for estrogens (ERs) regulate cells and pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, as well as immune cell development. ERs are ligand-dependent transcription factors that mediate long-range chromatin interactions and form complexes at gene regulatory elements, thus promoting epigenetic changes and transcription. ERs also participate in membrane-initiated steroid signaling to generate rapid responses. Estradiol and ER activity show profound dose- and context-dependent effects on innate immune signaling pathways and myeloid cell development. While estradiol most often promotes the production of type I interferon, innate pathways leading to pro-inflammatory cytokine production may be enhanced or dampened by ER activity. Regulation of innate immune cells and signaling by ERs may contribute to the reported sex differences in innate immune pathways. Here we review the recent literature and highlight several molecular mechanisms by which ERs regulate the development or functional responses of innate immune cells.

  12. Regulation of Toll-like receptor signaling in innate immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors sense invading pathogens by recognizing a wide variety of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns(PAMPs).The members of the TLR family selectively utilize adaptor proteins MyD88,TRIF,TIRAP and TRAM to activate overlapping but distinct signal transduction pathways which trigger production of different panels of mediators such as proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferon.These mediators not only control innate immunity but also direct subsequently developed adaptive immunity.TLR activation is strictly and finely regulated at multiple levels of the signal transduction pathways.

  13. Toll-like receptors in invertebrate innate immunity

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    L Zheng

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Among invertebrates, innate immunity is the only defense mechanism against harmful non-self agents.In response to recognition of microbial pattern molecules, Drosophila melanogaster activates either theToll or Imd pathway, leading to the translocation of NF-kB (or Rel transcription factors from the cytoplasmto the nucleus and the subsequent production of antimicrobial peptides, which provide systemic innateimmunity. Toll-like receptors (TLRs are characterized by an extracellular leucine rich repeat (LRRdomain and an intracellular Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain. TLRs are found from cnidarians tomammals. Here we argue that TLR mediated innate immunity developed during an early stage ofevolution when organisms acquired a body cavity. This is supported by the distributions of TLR and Relgenes in the animal kingdom. Further, TLR mediated immunity appears to have developed independentlyin invertebrates and vertebrates. Recent studies have shown that microbial molecules, with the potentialto signal through TLR, can be beneficial to host survival. Studies on this signaling pathway could opendoors to a better understanding of the origins of innate immunity in invertebrates and potentialtransmission blocking strategies aimed at ameliorating vector-borne diseases.

  14. Characteristic and functional analysis of toll-like receptors (TLRs in the lophotrocozoan, Crassostrea gigas, reveals ancient origin of TLR-mediated innate immunity.

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    Yang Zhang

    Full Text Available The evolution of TLR-mediated innate immunity is a fundamental question in immunology. Here, we report the characterization and functional analysis of four TLR members in the lophotrochozoans Crassostreagigas (CgTLRs. All CgTLRs bear a conserved domain organization and have a close relationship with TLRs in ancient non-vertebrate chordates. In HEK293 cells, every CgTLR could constitutively activate NF-κB responsive reporter, but none of the PAMPs tested could stimulate CgTLR-activated NF-κB induction. Subcellular localization showed that CgTLR members have similar and dual distribution on late endosomes and plasma membranes. Moreover, CgTLRs and CgMyD88 mRNA show a consistent response to multiple PAMP challenges in oyster hemocytes. As CgTLR-mediated NF-κB activation is dependent on CgMyD88, we designed a blocking peptide for CgTLR signaling that would inhibit CgTLR-CgMyD88 dependent NF-κB activation. This was used to demonstrate that a Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection-induced enhancement of degranulation and increase of cytokines TNF mRNA in hemocytes, could be inhibited by blocking CgTLR signaling. In summary, our study characterized the primitive TLRs in the lophotrocozoan C. gigas and demonstrated a fundamental role of TLR signaling in infection-induced hemocyte activation. This provides further evidence for an ancient origin of TLR-mediated innate immunity.

  15. Promising Targets for Cancer Immunotherapy: TLRs, RLRs, and STING-Mediated Innate Immune Pathways

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    Li, Kai; Qu, Shuai; Chen, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Shi, Ming

    2017-01-01

    Malignant cancers employ diverse and intricate immune evasion strategies, which lead to inadequately effective responses of many clinical cancer therapies. However, emerging data suggest that activation of the tolerant innate immune system in cancer patients is able, at least partially, to counteract tumor-induced immunosuppression, which indicates triggering of the innate immune response as a novel immunotherapeutic strategy may result in improved therapeutic outcomes for cancer patients. The promising innate immune targets include Toll-like Receptors (TLRs), RIG-I-like Receptors (RLRs), and Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING). This review discusses the antitumor properties of TLRs, RLRs, and STING-mediated innate immune pathways, as well as the promising innate immune targets for potential application in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28216575

  16. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A receptors in the dorsomedial hypothalamus connected to dorsal raphe nucleus inputs modulate defensive behaviours and mediate innate fear-induced antinociception.

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    Biagioni, Audrey Franceschi; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; da Silva, Juliana Almeida; dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Roncon, Camila Marroni; Corrado, Alexandre Pinto; Zangrossi, Hélio; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2016-03-01

    The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) is an important brainstem source of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), and 5-HT plays a key role in the regulation of panic attacks. The aim of the present study was to determine whether 5-HT1A receptor-containing neurons in the medial hypothalamus (MH) receive neural projections from DRN and to then determine the role of this neural substrate in defensive responses. The neurotracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) was iontophoretically microinjected into the DRN, and immunohistochemical approaches were then used to identify 5HT1A receptor-labelled neurons in the MH. Moreover, the effects of pre-treatment of the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) with 8-OH-DPAT and WAY-100635, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively, followed by local microinjections of bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, were investigated. We found that there are many projections from the DRN to the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) but also to DMH and ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, reaching 5HT1A receptor-labelled perikarya. DMH GABAA receptor blockade elicited defensive responses that were followed by antinociception. DMH treatment with 8-OH-DPAT decreased escape responses, which strongly suggests that the 5-HT1A receptor modulates the defensive responses. However, DMH treatment with WAY-100635 failed to alter bicuculline-induced defensive responses, suggesting that 5-HT exerts a phasic influence on 5-HT1A DMH neurons. The activation of the inhibitory 5-HT1A receptor had no effect on antinociception. However, blockade of the 5-HT1A receptor decreased fear-induced antinociception. The present data suggest that the ascending pathways from the DRN to the DMH modulate panic-like defensive behaviours and mediate antinociceptive phenomenon by recruiting 5-HT1A receptor in the MH.

  17. Novel positive regulatory role for the SPL6 transcription factor in the N TIR-NB-LRR receptor-mediated plant innate immunity.

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    Meenu S Padmanabhan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the recognition of pathogen-encoded effectors, plant TIR-NB-LRR immune receptors induce defense signaling by a largely unknown mechanism. We identify a novel and conserved role for the SQUAMOSA PROMOTER BINDING PROTEIN (SBP-domain transcription factor SPL6 in enabling the activation of the defense transcriptome following its association with a nuclear-localized immune receptor. During an active immune response, the Nicotiana TIR-NB-LRR N immune receptor associates with NbSPL6 within distinct nuclear compartments. NbSPL6 is essential for the N-mediated resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus. Similarly, the presumed Arabidopsis ortholog AtSPL6 is required for the resistance mediated by the TIR-NB-LRR RPS4 against Pseudomonas syringae carrying the avrRps4 effector. Transcriptome analysis indicates that AtSPL6 positively regulates a subset of defense genes. A pathogen-activated nuclear-localized TIR-NB-LRR like N can therefore regulate defense genes through SPL6 in a mechanism analogous to the induction of MHC genes by mammalian immune receptors like CIITA and NLRC5.

  18. Genetic variants of innate immune receptors and infections after liver transplantation.

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    Sanclemente, Gemma; Moreno, Asuncion; Navasa, Miquel; Lozano, Francisco; Cervera, Carlos

    2014-08-28

    Infection is the leading cause of complication after liver transplantation, causing morbidity and mortality in the first months after surgery. Allograft rejection is mediated through adaptive immunological responses, and thus immunosuppressive therapy is necessary after transplantation. In this setting, the presence of genetic variants of innate immunity receptors may increase the risk of post-transplant infection, in comparison with patients carrying wild-type alleles. Numerous studies have investigated the role of genetic variants of innate immune receptors and the risk of complication after liver transplantation, but their results are discordant. Toll-like receptors and mannose-binding lectin are arguably the most important studied molecules; however, many other receptors could increase the risk of infection after transplantation. In this article, we review the published studies analyzing the impact of genetic variants in the innate immune system on the development of infectious complications after liver transplantation.

  19. [Mechanisms underlying interferon-mediated host innate immunity during influenza A virus infection].

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    Chen, Chao; Chi, Xiaojuan; Bai, Qingling; Chen, Jilong

    2015-12-01

    Influenza A virus can create acute respiratory infection in humans and animals throughout the world, and it is still one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. Numerous studies have shown that influenza A virus infection induces rapidly host innate immune response. Influenza A virus triggers the activation of signaling pathways that are dependent on host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including toll like receptors (TLRs) and RIG-I like receptors (RLRs). Using a variety of regulatory mechanisms, these signaling pathways activate downstream transcript factors that control expression of various interferons and cytokines, such as type I and type III interferons. Thus, these interferons stimulate the transcript of relevant interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs) and expression of the antiviral proteins, which are critical components of host innate immunity. In this review, we will highlight the mechanisms by which influenza A virus infection induces the interferon-mediated host innate immunity.

  20. Adenovirus Vector-Derived VA-RNA-Mediated Innate Immune Responses

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    Hiroyuki Mizuguchi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The major limitation of the clinical use of replication-incompetent adenovirus (Ad vectors is the interference by innate immune responses, including induction of inflammatory cytokines and interferons (IFN, following in vivo application of Ad vectors. Ad vector-induced production of inflammatory cytokines and IFNs also results in severe organ damage and efficient induction of acquired immune responses against Ad proteins and transgene products. Ad vector-induced innate immune responses are triggered by the recognition of Ad components by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. In order to reduce the side effects by Ad vector-induced innate immune responses and to develop safer Ad vectors, it is crucial to clarify which PRRs and which Ad components are involved in Ad vector-induced innate immune responses. Our group previously demonstrated that myeloid differentiating factor 88 (MyD88 and toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 play crucial roles in the Ad vector-induced inflammatory cytokine production in mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Furthermore, our group recently found that virus associated-RNAs (VA-RNAs, which are about 160 nucleotide-long non-coding small RNAs encoded in the Ad genome, are involved in IFN production through the IFN-β promoter stimulator-1 (IPS-1-mediated signaling pathway following Ad vector transduction. The aim of this review is to highlight the Ad vector-induced innate immune responses following transduction, especially VA-RNA-mediated innate immune responses. Our findings on the mechanism of Ad vector-induced innate immune responses should make an important contribution to the development of safer Ad vectors, such as an Ad vector lacking expression of VA-RNAs.

  1. DMPD: IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17890055 IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. Gottipati S, Rao ...IRAK1: a critical signaling mediator of innate immunity. PubmedID 17890055 Title IRAK1: a critical signaling media

  2. Viral Inhibition of PRR-Mediated Innate Immune Response: Learning from KSHV Evasion Strategies.

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    Lee, Hye-Ra; Choi, Un Yung; Hwang, Sung-Woo; Kim, Stephanie; Jung, Jae U

    2016-11-30

    The innate immune system has evolved to detect and destroy invading pathogens before they can establish systemic infection. To successfully eradicate pathogens, including viruses, host innate immunity is activated through diverse pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) which detect conserved viral signatures and trigger the production of type I interferon (IFN) and pro-inflammatory cytokines to mediate viral clearance. Viral persistence requires that viruses co-opt cellular pathways and activities for their benefit. In particular, due to the potent antiviral activities of IFN and cytokines, viruses have developed various strategies to meticulously modulate intracellular innate immune sensing mechanisms to facilitate efficient viral replication and persistence. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of viral immune evasion strategies with a specific focus on how Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) effectively targets host PRR signaling pathways.

  3. Select Drosophila glomeruli mediate innate olfactory attraction and aversion.

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    Semmelhack, Julia L; Wang, Jing W

    2009-05-14

    Fruitflies show robust attraction to food odours, which usually excite several glomeruli. To understand how the representation of such odours leads to behaviour, we used genetic tools to dissect the contribution of each activated glomerulus. Apple cider vinegar triggers robust innate attraction at a relatively low concentration, which activates six glomeruli. By silencing individual glomeruli, here we show that the absence of activity in two glomeruli, DM1 and VA2, markedly reduces attraction. Conversely, when each of these two glomeruli was selectively activated, flies showed as robust an attraction to vinegar as wild-type flies. Notably, a higher concentration of vinegar excites an additional glomerulus and is less attractive to flies. We show that activation of the extra glomerulus is necessary and sufficient to mediate the behavioural switch. Together, these results indicate that individual glomeruli, rather than the entire pattern of active glomeruli, mediate innate behavioural output.

  4. SAP-independent and -dependent regulation of innate T cell development involving SLAMF receptors

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    Jaime eDe Calisto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM-associated protein (SAP plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive (DP thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8+ T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1+6]-/- and Slamf[1+5+6]-/- B6 mice have an approximately 70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type (WT B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8+ T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1+5+6]-/-, but not in the Slamf[1+6]-/- strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8+ T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5-/- B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8+ T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7-/- strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8+ T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3-/- BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic PLZFhi NKT cells and innate CD8+ T cells significatively increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8-/- BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8+ T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8+ T cells.

  5. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

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    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  6. Retinoid X receptor alpha controls innate inflammatory responses through the up-regulation of chemokine expression.

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    Núñez, Vanessa; Alameda, Daniel; Rico, Daniel; Mota, Rubén; Gonzalo, Pilar; Cedenilla, Marta; Fischer, Thierry; Boscá, Lisardo; Glass, Christopher K; Arroyo, Alicia G; Ricote, Mercedes

    2010-06-01

    The retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRalpha) plays a central role in the regulation of many intracellular receptor signaling pathways and can mediate ligand-dependent transcription by forming homodimers or heterodimers with other nuclear receptors. Although several members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily have emerged as important regulators of macrophage gene expression, the existence in vivo of an RXR signaling pathway in macrophages has not been established. Here, we provide evidence that RXRalpha regulates the transcription of the chemokines Ccl6 and Ccl9 in macrophages independently of heterodimeric partners. Mice lacking RXRalpha in myeloid cells exhibit reduced levels of CCL6 and CCL9, impaired recruitment of leukocytes to sites of inflammation, and lower susceptibility to sepsis. These studies demonstrate that macrophage RXRalpha plays key roles in the regulation of innate immunity and represents a potential target for immunotherapy of sepsis.

  7. The crosstalk of innate immune signaling mediated by different type of toll-like receptors(TLR)%Toll样受体(TLR)介导的天然免疫间的相互调节

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于莉莉; 韩代书

    2013-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR) play a central role in host cell recognition and responses to microbial pathogens. The best-characterized PRRs are Toll-like receptors (TLR) , which recognize numerous components of pathogens and initiate innate immune responses. The recent discovery of other types of PRR, such as C-type lectin receptors (CLR), NOD-like receptors (NLR), and RIG-I-like receptors (RLR), suggests that the innate immune responses are tightly controlled by multiple mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on the crosstalk between TLR- and other PRR-initiated signaling pathways.%模式识别受体(PRR)在宿主细胞识别与抵御微生物病原体中起到了重要作用.Toll样受体(TLR)是研究比较清楚的一类PRR,可以识别多种病原体成份,启动天然免疫反应.此外,近来发现了几类其他模式识别受体,如C型凝集素受体(CLR),核苷酸寡聚结合域(NOD)样受体(NLR)和视黄酸诱导基因I(RIG-I)样受体(RLR),表明机体的天然免疫反应受到多种机制的精密调控.本文着重综述TLR与其他PRR在识别病原体和介导天然免疫信号通路间的相互关系.

  8. Ly49 receptors: Innate and adaptive immune paradigms

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    Mir Munir A Rahim

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Ly49 receptors are type II C-type lectin-like membrane glycoproteins encoded by a family of highly polymorphic and polygenic genes within the mouse natural killer gene complex (NKC. This gene family is designated Klra, and includes genes that encode both inhibitory and activating Ly49 receptors in mice. Ly49 receptors recognize class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC-I and MHC-I-like proteins on normal as well as altered cells. Their functional homologs in humans are the killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which recognize HLA class I molecules as ligands. Classically, Ly49 receptors are described as being expressed on both the developing and mature natural killer (NK cells. The inhibitory Ly49 receptors are involved in NK cell education, a process in which NK cells acquire function and tolerance towards cells that express ‘self-MHC-I’. On the other hand, the activating Ly49 receptors recognize altered cells expressing activating ligands. New evidence shows a broader Ly49 expression pattern on both innate and adaptive immune cells. Ly49 receptors have been described on multiple NK cell subsets, such as uterine NK (uNK and memory NK cells, as well as NKT cells, dendritic cells (DC, plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC, macrophages, neutrophils and cells of the adaptive immune system, such as activated T cells and regulatory CD8+ T cells. In this review we discuss the expression pattern and proposed functions of Ly49 receptors on various immune cells and their contribution to immunity.

  9. HVEM: An unusual TNF receptor family member important for mucosal innate immune responses to microbes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Jr-Wen; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    The herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM or CD270) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), and therefore it is also known as TNFRSF14. We have recently provided evidence showing a novel signaling pathway downstream of HVEM leading to signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) activation in epithelial cells. As STAT3 regulates the expression of genes important for host defense in epithelial cells, as well as the differentiation of retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)γt+ Th17 and innate lymphoid cells (ILC), our finding that HVEM activates STAT3 has revealed fresh insights into the potential regulatory function of HVEM in different cellular contexts. Therefore, although further investigations will be required, HVEM is emerging as a major player in mucosal host defense, capable of regulating several cellular responses.

  10. Retinal Muller glia initiate innate response to infectious stimuli via toll-like receptor signaling.

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    Ashok Kumar

    Full Text Available Ocular surgeries and trauma predispose the eye to develop infectious endophthalmitis, which often leads to vision loss. The mechanisms of initiation of innate defense in this disease are not well understood but are presumed to involve retinal glial cells. We hypothesize that retinal Muller glia can recognize and respond to invading pathogens via TLRs, which are key regulators of the innate immune system. Using the mouse retinal sections, human retinal Muller cell line (MIO-M1, and primary mouse retinal Muller cells, we show that they express known human TLR1-10, adaptor molecules MyD88, TRIF, TRAM, and TRAF6, and co-receptors MD2 and CD14. Consistent with the gene expression, protein levels were also detected for the TLRs. Moreover, stimulation of the Muller glia with TLR 2, 3, 4, 5, 7 and 9 agonists resulted in an increased TLR expression as assayed by Western blot and flow cytometry. Furthermore, TLR agonists or live pathogen (S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, & C. albicans-challenged Muller glia produced significantly higher levels of inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, concomitantly with the activation of NF-κB, p38 and Erk signaling. This data suggests that Muller glia directly contributes to retinal innate defense by recognizing microbial patterns under infectious conditions; such as those in endophthalmitis.

  11. Biochemical and Functional Insights into the Integrated Regulation of Innate Immune Cell Responses by Teleost Leukocyte Immune-Type Receptors

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    Chenjie Fei

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Across vertebrates, innate immunity consists of a complex assortment of highly specialized cells capable of unleashing potent effector responses designed to destroy or mitigate foreign pathogens. The execution of various innate cellular behaviors such as phagocytosis, degranulation, or cell-mediated cytotoxicity are functionally indistinguishable when being performed by immune cells isolated from humans or teleost fishes; vertebrates that diverged from one another more than 450 million years ago. This suggests that vital components of the vertebrate innate defense machinery are conserved and investigating such processes in a range of model systems provides an important opportunity to identify fundamental features of vertebrate immunity. One characteristic that is highly conserved across vertebrate systems is that cellular immune responses are dependent on specialized immunoregulatory receptors that sense environmental stimuli and initiate intracellular cascades that can elicit appropriate effector responses. A wide variety of immunoregulatory receptor families have been extensively studied in mammals, and many have been identified as cell- and function-specific regulators of a range of innate responses. Although much less is known in fish, the growing database of genomic information has recently allowed for the identification of several immunoregulatory receptor gene families in teleosts. Many of these putative immunoregulatory receptors have yet to be assigned any specific role(s, and much of what is known has been based solely on structural and/or phylogenetic relationships with mammalian receptor families. As an attempt to address some of these shortcomings, this review will focus on our growing understanding of the functional roles played by specific members of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus leukocyte immune-type receptors (IpLITRs, which appear to be important regulators of several innate cellular responses via classical as well

  12. Another armament in gut immunity: lymphotoxin-mediated crosstalk between innate lymphoid and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spits, H

    2011-07-21

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria.

  13. Another Armament in Gut Immunity: Lymphotoxin-Mediated Crosstalk between Innate Lymphoid and Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Spits

    2011-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are novel players in innate immunity. Tumanov et al. (Tumanov et al., 2011) demonstrate that crosstalk between ILCs and dendritic cells involving membrane-bound lymphotoxin in ILCs and its receptor is critical for protection against colitogenic bacteria

  14. Regulation of DAF-16-mediated Innate Immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Aballay, Alejandro

    2009-12-18

    Activation of the innate immune system results in a rapid microbicidal response against microorganisms, which needs to be fine-tuned because uncontrolled immune responses can lead to infection and cancer, as well as conditions such as Crohn disease, atherosclerosis, and Alzheimer disease. Here we report that excessive activity of the conserved FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 enhances susceptibility to bacterial infections in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that increased temperature activates not only DAF-16 nuclear import but also a control mechanism involved in DAF-16 nuclear export. The nuclear export of DAF-16 requires heat shock transcription factor HSF-1 and Hsp70/HSP-1. Furthermore, we show that increased expression of the water channel Aquoporin-1 is responsible for the deleterious consequences of excessive DAF-16-mediated immune response. These studies reveal a stress-inducible mechanism involved in the regulation of DAF-16 and indicate that uncontrolled DAF-16 activity and water homeostasis are a cause of the deleterious effects of excessive immune responses.

  15. Bacterial and Fungal Pattern Recognition Receptors in Homologous Innate Signaling Pathways of Insects and Mammals

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    Bethany A Stokes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to bacterial and fungal infections in insects and mammals, distinct families of innate immune pattern recognition receptors initiate highly complex intracellular signaling cascades. Those cascades induce a variety of immune functions that restrain the spread of microbes in the host. Insect and mammalian innate immune receptors include molecules that recognize conserved microbial molecular patterns. Innate immune recognition leads to the recruitment of adaptor molecules forming multi-protein complexes that include kinases, transcription factors and other regulatory molecules. Innate immune signaling cascades induce the expression of genes encoding antimicrobial peptides and other key factors that mount and regulate the immune response against microbial challenge. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the bacterial and fungal pattern recognition receptors for homologous innate signaling pathways of insects and mammals in an effort to provide a framework for future studies.

  16. MECHANISMS OF ANTIINFECTIOUS FUNCTIONS OF INNATE IMMUNITY: ROLE OF TOLL-LIKE RECEPTORS

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    S. I. Suskov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the main role of toll-like receptors of innate immunity for pathogen recognition; signaling; production of inflammatory response. Also Interrelation of innate and adaptive Immunity in conditions of pathology and organ transplantation were considered. 

  17. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells mediate anti-inflammatory responses to a gut commensal molecule via both innate and adaptive mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Erturk-Hasdemir, Deniz; Ochoa-Reparaz, Javier; Reinecker, Hans-Christian; Kasper, Dennis L

    2014-04-09

    Polysaccharide A (PSA), the archetypical immunomodulatory molecule of the gut commensal Bacteroides fragilis, induces regulatory T cells to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). The cellular mediators of PSA's immunomodulatory properties are incompletely understood. In a mouse model of colitis, we find that PSA requires both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms to generate protection. Plasmacytoid DCs (PDCs) exposed to PSA do not produce proinflammatory cytokines, but instead they specifically stimulate IL-10 secretion by CD4+ T cells and efficiently mediate PSA-afforded immunoprotection. PSA induces and preferentially ligates Toll-like receptor 2 on PDCs but not on conventional DCs. Compared with other TLR2 ligands, PSA is better at enhancing PDC expression of costimulatory molecules required for protection against colitis. PDCs can thus orchestrate the beneficial immunoregulatory interaction of commensal microbial molecules, such as PSA, through both innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Toll-like receptors are part of the innate immune defense system of sponges (demospongiae: Porifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Matthias; Korzhev, Michael; Perovic-Ottstadt, Sanja; Luthringer, Bérengère; Brandt, David; Klein, Stefanie; Müller, Werner E G

    2007-03-01

    During evolution and with the emergence of multicellular animals, the need arose to ward off foreign organisms that threaten the integrity of the animal body. Among many different receptors that participate in the recognition of microbial invaders, toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an essential role in mediating the innate immune response. After binding distinct microbial components, TLRs activate intracellular signaling cascades that result in an induced expression of diverse antimicrobial molecules. Because sponges (phylum Porifera) are filter feeders, they are abundantly exposed to microorganisms that represent a potential threat. Here, we describe the identification, cloning, and deduced protein sequence from 3 major elements of the poriferan innate response (to bacterial lipopeptides): the TLR, the IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4-like protein (IRAK-4l), and a novel effector caspase from the demosponge Suberites domuncula. Each molecule shares significant sequence similarity with its homologues in higher Metazoa. Sequence homologies were found in particular within the family-specific domains toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance (TLR family), Ser/Thr/Tyr kinase domain (IRAK family), and CASc (caspase family). In addition, in situ hybridization and immunohistological analyses revealed an abundance of SDTLR (TLR) transcripts in epithelial layers of the sponge surface (exopinacoderm and endopinacoderm). Furthermore, it is shown that both SDTLR and SDIRAK-4 like (IRAK) are expressed constitutively, regardless of treatment with synthetic triacyl lipopeptide Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4). In contrast, SDCASL (caspase) expression is highly Pam(3)Cys-Ser-(Lys)(4) inducible. However, blocking of the lipopeptide with recombinant TLR prior to its application completely prevented the induced expression of this poriferan caspase. These results underscore that the phylogenetically oldest extant metazoan phylum is provided already with the signaling pathways of the antimicrobial

  19. PPARγ and the Innate Immune System Mediate the Resolution of Inflammation

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    Amanda Croasdell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of inflammation is an active and dynamic process, mediated in large part by the innate immune system. Resolution represents not only an increase in anti-inflammatory actions, but also a paradigm shift in immune cell function to restore homeostasis. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has long been studied for its anti-inflammatory actions, but an emerging body of literature is investigating the role of PPARγ and its ligands (including thiazolidinediones, prostaglandins, and oleanolic acids in all phases of resolution. PPARγ can shift production from pro- to anti-inflammatory mediators by neutrophils, platelets, and macrophages. PPARγ and its ligands further modulate platelet and neutrophil function, decreasing trafficking, promoting neutrophil apoptosis, and preventing platelet-leukocyte interactions. PPARγ alters macrophage trafficking, increases efferocytosis and phagocytosis, and promotes alternative M2 macrophage activation. There are also roles for this receptor in the adaptive immune response, particularly regarding B cells. These effects contribute towards the attenuation of multiple disease states, including COPD, colitis, Alzheimer’s disease, and obesity in animal models. Finally, novel specialized proresolving mediators—eicosanoids with critical roles in resolution—may act through PPARγ modulation to promote resolution, providing another exciting area of therapeutic potential for this receptor.

  20. Role of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells in the Activation of Innate Immunity

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    V. G. Matveyeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays a key role in triggering a systemic inflammatory response (SIR. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM-1, which is located on neutrophils and monocytes, is involved in SIR, by regulating the effector mechanisms of innate immunity. Hyperproduction of proinflammatory cytokines is a pathogenetic component of the hyperergic phase of acute systemic inflammation. The simultaneous activation of Toll-like receptors and TREM-1 increases the production of cytokines manifold. This is compensatory and adaptive, however, resulting in damage to organs and tissues during excessive production of cytokines. Key words: triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells, Toll-like receptors, cytokines, inflammation.

  1. Innate immune mediators in cancer: between defense and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berraondo, Pedro; Minute, Luna; Ajona, Daniel; Corrales, Leticia; Melero, Ignacio; Pio, Ruben

    2016-11-01

    Chronic inflammation in the tumor microenvironment and evasion of the antitumor effector immune response are two of the emerging hallmarks required for oncogenesis and cancer progression. The innate immune system not only plays a critical role in perpetuating these tumor-promoting hallmarks but also in developing antitumor adaptive immune responses. Thus, understanding the dual role of the innate system in cancer immunology is required for the design of combined immunotherapy strategies able to tackle established tumors. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the role of cell populations and soluble components of the innate immune system in cancer, with a focus on complement, the adapter molecule Stimulator of Interferon Genes, natural killer cells, myeloid cells, and B cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Axl Mediates ZIKA Virus Entry in Human Glial Cells and Modulates Innate Immune Responses

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    Laurent Meertens

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available ZIKA virus (ZIKV is an emerging pathogen responsible for neurological disorders and congenital microcephaly. However, the molecular basis for ZIKV neurotropism remains poorly understood. Here, we show that Axl is expressed in human microglia and astrocytes in the developing brain and that it mediates ZIKV infection of glial cells. Axl-mediated ZIKV entry requires the Axl ligand Gas6, which bridges ZIKV particles to glial cells. Following binding, ZIKV is internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis and traffics to Rab5+ endosomes to establish productive infection. During entry, the ZIKV/Gas6 complex activates Axl kinase activity, which downmodulates interferon signaling and facilitates infection. ZIKV infection of human glial cells is inhibited by MYD1, an engineered Axl decoy receptor, and by the Axl kinase inhibitor R428. Our results highlight the dual role of Axl during ZIKV infection of glial cells: promoting viral entry and modulating innate immune responses. Therefore, inhibiting Axl function may represent a potential target for future antiviral therapies.

  3. The cell surface receptor Slamf6 modulates innate immune responses during Citrobacter rodentium-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Driel, Boaz; Wang, Guoxing; Liao, Gongxian; Halibozek, Peter J; Keszei, Marton; O'Keeffe, Michael S; Bhan, Atul K; Wang, Ninghai; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-09-01

    The homophilic cell surface receptors CD150 (Slamf1) and CD352 (Slamf6) are known to modulate adaptive immune responses. Although the Th17 response was enhanced in Slamf6(-/-) C57BL/6 mice upon oral infection with Citrobacter rodentium, the pathologic consequences are indistinguishable from an infection of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Using a reporter-based binding assay, we show that Slamf6 can engage structures on the outer cell membrane of several Gram(-) bacteria. Therefore, we examined whether Slamf6, like Slamf1, is also involved in innate responses to bacteria and regulates peripheral inflammation by assessing the outcome of C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, the pathology and immune responses in the lamina propria of C. rodentium-infected Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice were markedly reduced as compared with those of Rag(-/-) mice. Infiltration of inflammatory phagocytes into the lamina propria was consistently lower in Slamf6(-/-) Rag(-/-) mice than in Rag(-/-) animals. Concomitant with the reduced systemic translocation of the bacteria was an enhanced production of IL-22, suggesting that Slamf6 suppresses a mucosal protective program. Furthermore, administering a mAb (330) that inhibits bacterial interactions with Slamf6 to Rag(-/-) mice ameliorated the infection compared with a control antibody. We conclude that Slamf6-mediated interactions of colonic innate immune cells with specific Gram(-) bacteria reduce mucosal protection and enhance inflammation, contributing to lethal colitis that is caused by C. rodentium infections in Rag(-/-) mice.

  4. Nonimmune Cells Contribute to Crosstalk between Immune Cells and Inflammatory Mediators in the Innate Response to Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

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    Maria Pilar Aoki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chagas myocarditis, which is caused by infection with the intracellular parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, remains the major infectious heart disease worldwide. Innate recognition through toll-like receptors (TLRs on immune cells has not only been revealed to be critical for defense against T. cruzi but has also been involved in triggering the pathology. Subsequent studies revealed that this parasite activates nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain- (NOD-like receptors and several particular transcription factors in TLR-independent manner. In addition to professional immune cells, T. cruzi infects and resides in different parenchyma cells. The innate receptors in nonimmune target tissues could also have an impact on host response. Thus, the outcome of the myocarditis or the inflamed liver relies on an intricate network of inflammatory mediators and signals given by immune and nonimmune cells. In this paper, we discuss the evidence of innate immunity to the parasite developed by the host, with emphasis on the crosstalk between immune and nonimmune cell responses.

  5. DMPD: Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15069387 Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch...te immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch. PubmedID 15069387 Title... Innate immunity and toll-like receptors: clinical implications of basic scienceresearch

  6. DMPD: Function of RIG-I-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17395582 Function of RIG-I-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity. Yoneyama M,...nction of RIG-I-like receptors in antiviral innate immunity. PubmedID 17395582 Title Function of RIG-I-like receptors in anti

  7. DMPD: Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18064347 Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immune responses. Aranc...Epub 2007 Nov 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors are key participants in innate immu...ne responses. PubmedID 18064347 Title Toll-like receptors are key participants in

  8. The role of CNS TLR2 activation in mediating innate versus adaptive neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Avital; Fainstein, Nina; Einstein, Ofira; Ben-Hur, Tamir

    2015-11-01

    Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is expressed on immune cells in the periphery and the CNS and mediates both innate and adaptive immune responses. Recent studies have implicated TLR2 in systemic pathogenesis of adaptive immunity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). In addition, TLR2 is expressed on oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and its activation inhibits their differentiation and myelination. We investigated the roles of CNS TLR2 activation in mediating neuro-inflammatory responses in intact versus EAE animals. We examined the effects of intra-cerebro-ventricular (ICV) injection of Zymosan, a TLR2 agonist, on naive versus EAE animals. The neuro-inflammatory response was characterized by immune-fluorescent staining for IBA-1+ microglia/macrophages and CD3+ T cells, and by semi-quantitative real time PCR for TLR2 and immune cytokines. The nature of the immune cells isolated from EAE brain tissue was assessed by their proliferative response to the PLP peptide autoantigen. Survival and clinical scores were monitored; demyelination and axonal loss were quantified by Gold-Black and Bielschowsky stains. Our findings showed that Zymosan injection in naïve mice induced a massive neuro-inflammatory response without any clinical manifestations. In EAE mice, ICV Zymosan induced a severe acute toxic response with 80% mortality. Surviving animals returned to pre-injection clinical score, and their course of disease was not altered as compared to control EAE group. Demyelination and axonal loss were not affected by ICV Zymosan injection. Quantification of immune response in the brain by real time PCR, immunofluorescent stains and proliferative response to PLP peptide suggested that TLR2 activation induces innate but not adaptive immune response. We conclude that EAE mice are hypersensitive to CNS TLR2 activation with a severe toxic response. This might represent the susceptibility of multiple sclerosis patients to even trivial infections. As CNS TLR2 activation

  9. Extremely sparse olfactory inputs are sufficient to mediate innate aversion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing J Gao

    Full Text Available Innate attraction and aversion to odorants are observed throughout the animal kingdom, but how olfactory circuits encode such valences is not well understood, despite extensive anatomical and functional knowledge. In Drosophila melanogaster, ~50 types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs each express a unique receptor gene, and relay information to a cognate type of projection neurons (PNs. To examine the extent to which the population activity of ORNs is required for olfactory behavior, we developed a genetic strategy to block all ORN outputs, and then to restore output in specific types. Unlike attraction, aversion was unaffected by simultaneous silencing of many ORNs, and even single ORN types previously shown to convey neutral valence sufficed to mediate aversion. Thus, aversion may rely on specific activity patterns in individual ORNs rather than the number or identity of activated ORNs. ORN activity is relayed into the brain by downstream circuits, with excitatory PNs (ePN representing a major output. We found that silencing the majority of ePNs did not affect aversion, even when ePNs directly downstream of single restored ORN types were silenced. Our data demonstrate the robustness of olfactory aversion, and suggest that its circuit mechanism is qualitatively different from attraction.

  10. Extremely sparse olfactory inputs are sufficient to mediate innate aversion in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaojing J; Clandinin, Thomas R; Luo, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Innate attraction and aversion to odorants are observed throughout the animal kingdom, but how olfactory circuits encode such valences is not well understood, despite extensive anatomical and functional knowledge. In Drosophila melanogaster, ~50 types of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) each express a unique receptor gene, and relay information to a cognate type of projection neurons (PNs). To examine the extent to which the population activity of ORNs is required for olfactory behavior, we developed a genetic strategy to block all ORN outputs, and then to restore output in specific types. Unlike attraction, aversion was unaffected by simultaneous silencing of many ORNs, and even single ORN types previously shown to convey neutral valence sufficed to mediate aversion. Thus, aversion may rely on specific activity patterns in individual ORNs rather than the number or identity of activated ORNs. ORN activity is relayed into the brain by downstream circuits, with excitatory PNs (ePN) representing a major output. We found that silencing the majority of ePNs did not affect aversion, even when ePNs directly downstream of single restored ORN types were silenced. Our data demonstrate the robustness of olfactory aversion, and suggest that its circuit mechanism is qualitatively different from attraction.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides as Mediators of Innate Immunity in Teleosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenback, Barbara A

    2015-09-25

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been identified throughout the metazoa suggesting their evolutionarily conserved nature and their presence in teleosts is no exception. AMPs are short (18-46 amino acids), usually cationic, amphipathic peptides. While AMPs are diverse in amino acid sequence, with no two AMPs being identical, they collectively appear to have conserved functions in the innate immunity of animals towards the pathogens they encounter in their environment. Fish AMPs are upregulated in response to pathogens and appear to have direct broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity towards both human and fish pathogens. However, an emerging role for AMPs as immunomodulatory molecules has become apparent-the ability of AMPs to activate the innate immune system sheds light onto the multifaceted capacity of these small peptides to combat pathogens through direct and indirect means. Herein, this review focuses on the role of teleost AMPs as modulators of the innate immune system and their regulation in response to pathogens or other exogenous molecules. The capacity to regulate AMP expression by exogenous factors may prove useful in modulating AMP expression in fish to prevent disease, particularly in aquaculture settings where crowded conditions and environmental stress pre-dispose these fish to infection.

  12. Role of LysM receptors in chitin-triggered plant innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kiwamu; Nguyen, Cuong T; Liang, Yan; Cao, Yangrong; Stacey, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Recent research findings clearly indicate that lysin motif (LysM)-containing cell surface receptors are involved in the recognition of specific oligosaccharide elicitors (chitin and peptidoglycan), which trigger an innate immunity response in plants. These receptors are either LysM-containing receptor-like kinases (LYKs) or LysM-containing receptor proteins (LYPs). In Arabidopsis, five LYKs (AtCERK1/AtLYK1 and AtLYK2-5) and three LYPs (AtLYP1-3) are likely expressed on the plasma membrane. In this review, we summarize recent research results on the role of these receptors in plant innate immunity, including the recent structural characterization of AtCERK1 and composition of the various receptor complexes in Arabidopsis.

  13. Autoubiquitination of TRIM26 links TBK1 to NEMO in RLR-mediated innate antiviral immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yong; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Li-Li; Pan, Zhao-Yi; Nie, Ying; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Wang, Yan-Yi

    2016-02-01

    The transcription factors IRF3 and NF-κB are required for the expression of many genes involved in antiviral innate immune response, including type I interferons (IFNs) and proinflammatory cytokines. It is well established that TBK1 is an essential kinase engaged downstream of multiple pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) to mediate IRF3 phosphorylation and activation, whereas the precise mechanisms of TBK1 activation have not been fully elucidated yet. Here, we identified tripartite motif 26 (TRIM26) as an important regulator for RNA virus-triggered innate immune response. Knockdown of TRIM26 impaired virus-triggered IRF3, NF-κB activation, IFN-β induction, and cellular antiviral response. TRIM26 was physically associated with TBK1 independent of viral infection. As an E3 ligase, TRIM26 underwent autoubiquitination upon viral infection. Ubiquitinated TRIM26 subsequently associated with NEMO, thus bridging TBK1-NEMO interaction, which is critical for the recruitment of TBK1 to the VISA signalsome and activation of TBK1. Our findings suggest that TRIM26 is an important regulator of innate immune responses against RNA viruses, which functions by bridging TBK1 to NEMO and mediating the activation of TBK1.

  14. Interleukin-7 receptor blockade suppresses adaptive and innate inflammatory responses in experimental colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis Cynthia R

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-7 (IL-7 acts primarily on T cells to promote their differentiation, survival, and homeostasis. Under disease conditions, IL-7 mediates inflammation through several mechanisms and cell types. In humans, IL-7 and its receptor (IL-7R are increased in diseases characterized by inflammation such as atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, and inflammatory bowel disease. In mice, overexpression of IL-7 results in chronic colitis, and T-cell adoptive transfer studies suggest that memory T cells expressing high amounts of IL-7R drive colitis and are maintained and expanded with IL-7. The studies presented here were undertaken to better understand the contribution of IL-7R in inflammatory bowel disease in which colitis was induced with a bacterial trigger rather than with adoptive transfer. Methods We examined the contribution of IL-7R on inflammation and disease development in two models of experimental colitis: Helicobacter bilis (Hb-induced colitis in immune-sufficient Mdr1a−/− mice and in T- and B-cell-deficient Rag2−/− mice. We used pharmacological blockade of IL-7R to understand the mechanisms involved in IL-7R-mediated inflammatory bowel disease by analyzing immune cell profiles, circulating and colon proteins, and colon gene expression. Results Treatment of mice with an anti-IL-7R antibody was effective in reducing colitis in Hb-infected Mdr1a−/− mice by reducing T-cell numbers as well as T-cell function. Down regulation of the innate immune response was also detected in Hb-infected Mdr1a−/− mice treated with an anti-IL-7R antibody. In Rag2−/− mice where colitis was triggered by Hb-infection, treatment with an anti-IL-7R antibody controlled innate inflammatory responses by reducing macrophage and dendritic cell numbers and their activity. Conclusions Results from our studies showed that inhibition of IL-7R successfully ameliorated inflammation and disease development

  15. Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasi Guido

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Besides few data concerning the antiseptic properties against a range of microbial agents and the anti-inflammatory potential both in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the influence of Eucalyptus oil (EO extract on the monocytic/macrophagic system, one of the primary cellular effectors of the immune response against pathogen attacks. The activities of this natural extract have mainly been recognized through clinical experience, but there have been relatively little scientific studies on its biological actions. Here we investigated whether EO extract is able to affect the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs in vitro and of rat peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes in vivo in absence or in presence of immuno-suppression induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. Methods Morphological activation of human MDMs was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Phagocytic activity was tested: i in vitro in EO treated and untreated MDMs, by confocal microscopy after fluorescent beads administration; ii in vivo in monocytes/granulocytes from peripheral blood of immuno-competent or 5-FU immuno-suppressed rats, after EO oral administration, by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labelled E. coli. Cytokine release by MDMs was determined using the BD Cytometric Bead Array human Th1/Th2 cytokine kit. Results EO is able to induce activation of MDMs, dramatically stimulating their phagocytic response. EO-stimulated internalization is coupled to low release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and requires integrity of the microtubule network, suggesting that EO may act by means of complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Implementation of innate cell-mediated immune response was also observed in vivo after EO administration, mainly involving the peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes. The 5-FU/EO combined treatment inhibited the 5-FU induced myelotoxicity and raised the phagocytic activity of the

  16. DMPD: Innate sensing of self and non-self RNAs by Toll-like receptors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16530484 Innate sensing of self and non-self RNAs by Toll-like receptors. Sioud M. ...Trends Mol Med. 2006 Apr;12(4):167-76. Epub 2006 Mar 10. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Innate sensing of self and non-self... RNAs by Toll-like receptors. PubmedID 16530484 Title Innate sensing of self and non-self

  17. Galectins as self/non-self recognition receptors in innate and adaptive immunity: An unresolved paradox

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo R. Vasta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Galectins are characterized by their binding affinity for ß-galactosides, a unique binding site sequence motif, and wide taxonomic distribution and structural conservation in vertebrates, invertebrates, protista, and fungi. Since their initial description, galectins were considered to bind endogenous (self glycans and mediate developmental processes and cancer. In the past few years, however, numerous studies have described the diverse effects of galectins on cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses, and the mechanistic aspects of their regulatory roles in immune homeostasis. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated to suggest that galectins also bind exogenous (non-self glycans on the surface of potentially pathogenic microbes, parasites, and fungi, suggesting that galectins can function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs in innate immunity. Thus, a perplexing paradox arises by the fact that galectins also recognize lactosamine-containing glycans on the host cell surface during developmental processes and regulation of immune responses. According to the currently accepted model for non-self recognition, PRRs recognize pathogens via highly conserved microbial surface molecules of wide distribution such as LPS or peptidoglycan (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; PAMPs, which are absent in the host. Hence, this would not apply to galectins, which apparently bind similar self/non-self molecular patterns on host and microbial cells. This paradox underscores first, an oversimplification in the use of the PRR/PAMP terminology. Second, and most importantly, it reveals significant gaps in our knowledge about the diversity of the host galectin repertoire, and the subcellular targeting, localization, and secretion. Furthermore, our knowledge about the structural and biophysical aspects of their interactions with the host and microbial carbohydrate moieties is fragmentary, and warrants further investigation.

  18. Galectins as self/non-self recognition receptors in innate and adaptive immunity: an unresolved paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, Gerardo R.; Ahmed, Hafiz; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Banerjee, Aditi; Pasek, Marta; Shridhar, Surekha; Guha, Prasun; Fernández-Robledo, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Galectins are characterized by their binding affinity for β-galactosides, a unique binding site sequence motif, and wide taxonomic distribution and structural conservation in vertebrates, invertebrates, protista, and fungi. Since their initial description, galectins were considered to bind endogenous (“self”) glycans and mediate developmental processes and cancer. In the past few years, however, numerous studies have described the diverse effects of galectins on cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses, and the mechanistic aspects of their regulatory roles in immune homeostasis. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated to suggest that galectins also bind exogenous (“non-self”) glycans on the surface of potentially pathogenic microbes, parasites, and fungi, suggesting that galectins can function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity. Thus, a perplexing paradox arises by the fact that galectins also recognize lactosamine-containing glycans on the host cell surface during developmental processes and regulation of immune responses. According to the currently accepted model for non-self recognition, PRRs recognize pathogens via highly conserved microbial surface molecules of wide distribution such as LPS or peptidoglycan (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; PAMPs), which are absent in the host. Hence, this would not apply to galectins, which apparently bind similar self/non-self molecular patterns on host and microbial cells. This paradox underscores first, an oversimplification in the use of the PRR/PAMP terminology. Second, and most importantly, it reveals significant gaps in our knowledge about the diversity of the host galectin repertoire, and the subcellular targeting, localization, and secretion. Furthermore, our knowledge about the structural and biophysical aspects of their interactions with the host and microbial carbohydrate moieties is fragmentary, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22811679

  19. Receptor-Like Kinases in Plant Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Wu; Jian-Min Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Plants employ a highly effective surveillance system to detect potential pathogens, which is critical for the success of land plants in an environment surrounded by numerous microbes. Recent efforts have led to the identification of a number of immune receptors and components of immune receptor complexes. It is now clear that receptor-like kinases (RLKs) and receptor-like proteins (RLPs) are key pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) for microbe- and plant-derived molecular patterns that are associated with pathogen invasion. RLKs and RLPs involved in immune signaling belong to large gene families in plants and have undergone lineage specific expansion. Molecular evolution and population studies on phytopathogenic molecular signatures and their receptors have provided crucial insight into the co-evolution between plants and pathogens.

  20. Bacterial d-amino acids suppress sinonasal innate immunity through sweet taste receptors in solitary chemosensory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert J; Hariri, Benjamin M; McMahon, Derek B; Chen, Bei; Doghramji, Laurel; Adappa, Nithin D; Palmer, James N; Kennedy, David W; Jiang, Peihua; Margolskee, Robert F; Cohen, Noam A

    2017-09-05

    In the upper respiratory epithelium, bitter and sweet taste receptors present in solitary chemosensory cells influence antimicrobial innate immune defense responses. Whereas activation of bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) stimulates surrounding epithelial cells to release antimicrobial peptides, activation of the sweet taste receptor (T1R) in the same cells inhibits this response. This mechanism is thought to control the magnitude of antimicrobial peptide release based on the sugar content of airway surface liquid. We hypothesized that d-amino acids, which are produced by various bacteria and activate T1R in taste receptor cells in the mouth, may also activate T1R in the airway. We showed that both the T1R2 and T1R3 subunits of the sweet taste receptor (T1R2/3) were present in the same chemosensory cells of primary human sinonasal epithelial cultures. Respiratory isolates of Staphylococcus species, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa, produced at least two d-amino acids that activate the sweet taste receptor. In addition to inhibiting P. aeruginosa biofilm formation, d-amino acids derived from Staphylococcus inhibited T2R-mediated signaling and defensin secretion in sinonasal cells by activating T1R2/3. d-Amino acid-mediated activation of T1R2/3 also enhanced epithelial cell death during challenge with Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of the bitter receptor-activating compound denatonium benzoate. These data establish a potential mechanism for interkingdom signaling in the airway mediated by bacterial d-amino acids and the mammalian sweet taste receptor in airway chemosensory cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. Mesenchymal stromal cells engage complement and complement receptor bearing innate effector cells to modulate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Moll

    Full Text Available Infusion of human third-party mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs appears to be a promising therapy for acute graft-versus-host disease (aGvHD. To date, little is known about how MSCs interact with the body's innate immune system after clinical infusion. This study shows, that exposure of MSCs to blood type ABO-matched human blood activates the complement system, which triggers complement-mediated lymphoid and myeloid effector cell activation in blood. We found deposition of complement component C3-derived fragments iC3b and C3dg on MSCs and fluid-phase generation of the chemotactic anaphylatoxins C3a and C5a. MSCs bound low amounts of immunoglobulins and lacked expression of complement regulatory proteins MCP (CD46 and DAF (CD55, but were protected from complement lysis via expression of protectin (CD59. Cell-surface-opsonization and anaphylatoxin-formation triggered complement receptor 3 (CD11b/CD18-mediated effector cell activation in blood. The complement-activating properties of individual MSCs were furthermore correlated with their potency to inhibit PBMC-proliferation in vitro, and both effector cell activation and the immunosuppressive effect could be blocked either by using complement inhibitor Compstatin or by depletion of CD14/CD11b-high myeloid effector cells from mixed lymphocyte reactions. Our study demonstrates for the first time a major role of the complement system in governing the immunomodulatory activity of MSCs and elucidates how complement activation mediates the interaction with other immune cells.

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 signaling in response to brain injury: an innate bridge to neuroinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia; Wirenfeldt, Martin; Holm, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Reactive gliosis is a prominent feature of neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disease in the CNS, yet the stimuli that drive this response are not known. There is growing appreciation that signaling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which is key to generating innate responses to infection,...... to neuroinflammation. Udgivelsesdato: Dec-6...

  3. Viral infection and innate pattern recognition receptors in induction of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Kazuki; Takahashi, Yurie; Mori, Kouki

    2011-12-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis, a common organ-specific autoimmune disease, is multifactorial in which both genetic susceptibility and environmental factors including infection play a critical role in its pathogenesis. Viral infection activates both the innate and adaptive immunity and is implicated as a trigger of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Candidate viruses include hepatitis C virus and human parvovirus B19. Viral components, which are recognized by innate receptors including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are detected in thyroid tissues and sera of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While conflicting results have been obtained regarding the role of TLRs in autoimmune diseases, our preliminary study suggested a contribution of TLR2 and dectin-1 in combination, TLR4, or TLR7 to the production of anti-thyroglobulin antibody in nonobese diabetic mice, a mouse model of Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Despite interesting circumstantial evidence, however, whether viral infection and innate receptors are involved in the development of Hashimoto's thyroiditis remains largely unclear. In this review, we summarize our knowledge regarding the role of viral infection and innate receptors in the etiology of Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  4. Viral recognition by the innate immune system: the role of pattern recognition receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Torres Pedraza; Juan Guillermo Betancur; Silvio Urcuqui-Inchima

    2011-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors are the main sensors of the innate immune response. Their function is to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns, which are molecules essential for the survival of microbial pathogens, but are not produced by the host. The recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by pattern recognition receptors leads to the expression of cytokines, chemokines, and co-stimulatory molecules that eliminate pathogens, such as viruses, for the activation of anti...

  5. A novel assay to detect nucleotide receptor P2X7 genetic polymorphisms influencing numerous innate immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denlinger, Loren C; Schell, Kathleen; Angelini, Giuditta; Green, Dawn; Guadarrama, Arturo; Prabhu, Usha; Coursin, Douglas B; Hogan, Kirk; Bertics, Paul J

    2004-01-01

    The importance of accessory signaling pathways amplifying endotoxin responses has recently been highlighted by genetic studies describing LPS-hyporesponsive individuals despite carrying the common allele for TLR4. The nucleotide receptor P2X7 modulates the production of numerous LPS-stimulated inflammatory mediators. We have recently described the largest phenotypic screen known for genetic polymorphisms associated with the nucleotide receptor P2X7, a global regulator of leukocyte function. This required the development of a novel monocyte pore assay with numerous advantages over previous methods and with the potential to facilitate rapid (< 3 h), multiplex analysis of clinical samples. This paper addresses aspects pertinent to the development of the monocyte pore assay, briefly summarizes our results suggesting that P2X7 alleles modulate LPS-stimulated cytokine production, and discusses a model wherein P2X7 may serve as an amplification loop of innate immunity.

  6. Targeting innate receptors with MIS416 reshapes Th responses and suppresses CNS disease in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine White

    Full Text Available Modification of the innate immune cell environment has recently been recognized as a viable treatment strategy for reducing autoimmune disease pathology. MIS416 is a microparticulate immune response modifier that targets myeloid cells, activating cytosolic receptors NOD2 and TLR9, and has completed a phase 1b/2a trial for the treatment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis. Using a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, we are investigating the pathways by which activation of TLR9 and NOD2 may modify the innate immune environment and the subsequent T cell-mediated autoimmune responses. We have found that MIS416 has profound effects on the Th subset balance by depressing antigen-specific Th1, Th17, and Th2 development. These effects coincided with an expansion of specific myeloid subpopulations and increased levels of MIS416-stimulated IFN-γ by splenocytes. Additionally, systemic IFN-γ serum levels were enhanced and correlated strongly with disease reduction, and the protective effect of MIS416 was abrogated in IFN-γ-deficient animals. Finally, treatment of secondary progressive MS patients with MIS416 similarly elevated the levels of IFN-γ and IFN-γ-associated proteins in the serum. Together, these studies demonstrate that administration of MIS416, which targets innate cells, reshapes autoimmune T cell responses and leads to a significant reduction in CNS inflammation and disease.

  7. DNA-based vaccines activate innate and adaptive antitumor immunity by engaging the NKG2D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, He; Luo, Yunping; Lo, Jeng-fan; Kaplan, Charles D; Mizutani, Masato; Mizutani, Noriko; Lee, Jiing-Dwan; Primus, F James; Becker, Jürgen C; Xiang, Rong; Reisfeld, Ralph A

    2005-08-02

    The interaction of NKG2D, a stimulatory receptor expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and activated CD8(+) T cells, and its ligands mediates stimulatory and costimulatory signals to these cells. Here, we demonstrate that DNA-based vaccines, encoding syngeneic or allogeneic NKG2D ligands together with tumor antigens such as survivin or carcinoembryonic antigen, markedly activate both innate and adaptive antitumor immunity. Such vaccines result in highly effective, NK- and CD8(+) T cell-mediated protection against either breast or colon carcinoma cells in prophylactic and therapeutic settings. Notably, this protection was irrespective of the NKG2D ligand expression level of the tumor cells. Hence, this strategy has the potential to lead to widely applicable and possibly clinically useful DNA-based cancer vaccines.

  8. Pattern Recognition Receptors and the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Fitzgerald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs, the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  9. Pattern recognition receptors and the innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mikayla R; Kaminski, John J; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2011-06-01

    The innate immune response to viral pathogens is critical in order to mobilize protective immunity. Cells of the innate immune system detect viral infection largely through germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) present either on the cell surface or within distinct intracellular compartments. These include the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the retinoic acid-inducble gene I-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, also called NACHT, LRR and PYD domain proteins) and cytosolic DNA sensors. While in certain cases viral proteins are the trigger of these receptors, the predominant viral activators are nucleic acids. The presence of viral sensing PRRs in multiple cellular compartments allows innate cells to recognize and quickly respond to a broad range of viruses, which replicate in different cellular compartments. Here, we review the role of PRRs and associated signaling pathways in detecting viral pathogens in order to evoke production of interferons and cytokines. By highlighting recent progress in these areas, we hope to convey a greater understanding of how viruses activate PRR signaling and how this interaction shapes the anti-viral immune response.

  10. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greeff, Michael Christiaan; Roux, Milena Edna; Mundy, John;

    2012-01-01

    , the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern-triggered immunity (PTI). RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how......Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular...

  11. Receptor-like kinase complexes in plant innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiaan eGreeff

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-like kinases (RLKs are surface localized, transmembrane receptors comprising a large family of well-studied kinases. RLKs signal through their transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains with the aid of various interacting partners and downstream components. The N-terminal extracellular domain defines ligand specificity, and RLK families are sub-classed according to this domain. The most studied of these subfamilies include those with 1 leucine rich repeat (LRR domains, 2 LysM domains (LYM and 3 the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L domain. These proteins recognize distinct ligands of microbial origin or ligands derived from intracellular protein/carbohydrate signals. For example, the pattern recognition receptor (PRR AtFLS2 recognizes flg22 from flagellin, and the PRR AtEFR recognizes elf18 from elongation factor (EF-Tu. Upon binding of their cognate ligands, the aforementioned RLKs activate generic immune responses termed pattern triggered immunity (PTI. RLKs can form complexes with other family members and engage a variety of intracellular signaling components and regulatory pathways upon stimulation. This review focuses on interesting new data about how these receptors form protein complexes to exert their function.

  12. Innate immune receptors in carp: recognition of protozoan parasites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.

    2010-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on pattern recognition receptors involved in the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to two protozoan parasites Trypanoplasma borreli and Trypanosoma carassii. The immune responses of carp are fundamentally different when comparing these two extracellular blood

  13. LKB1 mediates the development of conventional and innate T cells via AMP-dependent kinase autonomous pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marouan Zarrouk

    Full Text Available The present study has examined the role of the serine/threonine kinase LKB1 in the survival and differentiation of CD4/8 double positive thymocytes. LKB1-null DPs can respond to signals from the mature α/β T-cell-antigen receptor and initiate positive selection. However, in the absence of LKB1, thymocytes fail to mature to conventional single positive cells causing severe lymphopenia in the peripheral lymphoid tissues. LKB1 thus appears to be dispensable for positive selection but important for the maturation of positively selected thymocytes. LKB1 also strikingly prevented the development of invariant Vα14 NKT cells and innate TCR αβ gut lymphocytes. Previous studies with gain of function mutants have suggested that the role of LKB1 in T cell development is mediated by its substrate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. The present study now analyses the impact of AMPK deletion in DP thymocytes and shows that the role of LKB1 during the development of both conventional and innate T cells is mediated by AMPK-independent pathways.

  14. A haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor conveys innate immunity to Trypanosoma brucei in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanhollebeke, Benoit; De Muylder, Géraldine; Nielsen, Marianne J

    2008-01-01

    binds the haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex with high affinity for the uptake and incorporation of heme into intracellular hemoproteins. In mice, this receptor was required for optimal parasite growth and the resistance of parasites to the oxidative burst by host macrophages. In humans, the trypanosome...... receptor also recognized the complex between hemoglobin and haptoglobin-related protein, which explains its ability to capture trypanolytic HDLs. Thus, in humans the presence of haptoglobin-related protein has diverted the function of the trypanosome haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor to elicit innate host...

  15. Gliadin-mediated proliferation and innate immune activation in celiac disease are due to alterations in vesicular trafficking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Vittoria Barone

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Damage to intestinal mucosa in celiac disease (CD is mediated both by inflammation due to adaptive and innate immune responses, with IL-15 as a major mediator of the innate immune response, and by proliferation of crypt enterocytes as an early alteration of CD mucosa causing crypts hyperplasia. We have previously shown that gliadin peptide P31-43 induces proliferation of cell lines and celiac enterocytes by delaying degradation of the active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR due to delayed maturation of endocytic vesicles. IL-15 is increased in the intestine of patients affected by CD and has pleiotropic activity that ultimately results in immunoregulatory cross-talk between cells belonging to the innate and adaptive branches of the immune response. Aims of this study were to investigate the role of P31-43 in the induction of cellular proliferation and innate immune activation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cell proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU incorporation both in CaCo-2 cells and in biopsies from active CD cases and controls. We used real-time PCR to evaluate IL-15 mRNA levels and FACS as well as ELISA and Western Blot (WB analysis to measure protein levels and distribution in CaCo-2 cells. Gliadin and P31-43 induce a proliferation of both CaCo-2 cells and CD crypt enterocytes that is dependent on both EGFR and IL-15 activity. In CaCo-2 cells, P31-43 increased IL-15 levels on the cell surface by altering intracellular trafficking. The increased IL-15 protein was bound to IL15 receptor (IL-15R alpha, did not require new protein synthesis and functioned as a growth factor. CONCLUSION: In this study, we have shown that P31-43 induces both increase of the trans-presented IL-15/IL5R alpha complex on cell surfaces by altering the trafficking of the vesicular compartments as well as proliferation of crypt enterocytes with consequent remodelling of CD mucosa due to a cooperation of IL-15 and EGFR.

  16. Gliadin-mediated proliferation and innate immune activation in celiac disease are due to alterations in vesicular trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, M Vittoria; Zanzi, Delia; Maglio, Mariantonia; Nanayakkara, Merlin; Santagata, Sara; Lania, Giuliana; Miele, Erasmo; Ribecco, Maria Teresa Silvia; Maurano, Francesco; Auricchio, Renata; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ferrini, Silvano; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore

    2011-02-25

    Damage to intestinal mucosa in celiac disease (CD) is mediated both by inflammation due to adaptive and innate immune responses, with IL-15 as a major mediator of the innate immune response, and by proliferation of crypt enterocytes as an early alteration of CD mucosa causing crypts hyperplasia. We have previously shown that gliadin peptide P31-43 induces proliferation of cell lines and celiac enterocytes by delaying degradation of the active epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) due to delayed maturation of endocytic vesicles. IL-15 is increased in the intestine of patients affected by CD and has pleiotropic activity that ultimately results in immunoregulatory cross-talk between cells belonging to the innate and adaptive branches of the immune response. Aims of this study were to investigate the role of P31-43 in the induction of cellular proliferation and innate immune activation. Cell proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation both in CaCo-2 cells and in biopsies from active CD cases and controls. We used real-time PCR to evaluate IL-15 mRNA levels and FACS as well as ELISA and Western Blot (WB) analysis to measure protein levels and distribution in CaCo-2 cells. Gliadin and P31-43 induce a proliferation of both CaCo-2 cells and CD crypt enterocytes that is dependent on both EGFR and IL-15 activity. In CaCo-2 cells, P31-43 increased IL-15 levels on the cell surface by altering intracellular trafficking. The increased IL-15 protein was bound to IL15 receptor (IL-15R) alpha, did not require new protein synthesis and functioned as a growth factor. In this study, we have shown that P31-43 induces both increase of the trans-presented IL-15/IL5R alpha complex on cell surfaces by altering the trafficking of the vesicular compartments as well as proliferation of crypt enterocytes with consequent remodelling of CD mucosa due to a cooperation of IL-15 and EGFR.

  17. Innate immune receptors in heart failure: Side effect or potential therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katharina; B; Wagner; Stephan; B; Felix; Alexander; Riad

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure(HF) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity in western countries and occasions major expenses for public health systems. Although optimal medical treatment is widely available according to current guidelines, the prognosis of patients with HF is still poor. Despite the etiology of the disease, increased systemic or cardiac activation of the innate immune system is well documented in several types of HF. In some cases there is evidence of an association between innate immune activation and clinical outcome of patients with this disease. However, the few large trials conducted with the use of anti-inflammatory medication in HF have not revealed its benefits. Thus, greater understanding of the relationship between alteration in the immune system and development and progression of HF is urgently necessary: prior to designing therapeutic interventions that target pathological inflammatory processes in preventing harmful cardiac effects of immune modulatory therapy. In this regard, relatively recently discovered receptors of the innate immune system, i.e., namely toll-like receptors(TLRs) and nodlike receptors(NLRs)-are the focus of intense cardiovascular research. These receptors are main up-stream regulators of cytokine activation. This review will focus on current knowledge of the role of TLRs and NLRs, as well as on downstream cytokine activation, and will discuss potential therapeutic implications.

  18. An Overview of Pathogen Recognition Receptors for Innate Immunity in Dental Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Hyun Jang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs are a class of germ line-encoded receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. The activation of PRRs is crucial for the initiation of innate immunity, which plays a key role in first-line defense until more specific adaptive immunity is developed. PRRs differ in the signaling cascades and host responses activated by their engagement and in their tissue distribution. Currently identified PRR families are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs, the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs, the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs, and the AIM2-like receptor (ALR. The environment of the dental pulp is substantially different from that of other tissues of the body. Dental pulp resides in a low compliance root canal system that limits the expansion of pulpal tissues during inflammatory processes. An understanding of the PRRs in dental pulp is important for immunomodulation and hence for developing therapeutic targets in the field of endodontics. Here we comprehensively review recent finding on the PRRs and the mechanisms by which innate immunity is activated. We focus on the PRRs expressed on dental pulp and periapical tissues and their role in dental pulp inflammation.

  19. An Overview of Pathogen Recognition Receptors for Innate Immunity in Dental Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Hee Woong; Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Kim, Eun-Cheol; Park, Sang Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) are a class of germ line-encoded receptors that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). The activation of PRRs is crucial for the initiation of innate immunity, which plays a key role in first-line defense until more specific adaptive immunity is developed. PRRs differ in the signaling cascades and host responses activated by their engagement and in their tissue distribution. Currently identified PRR families are the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), the C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), the retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors (RLRs), and the AIM2-like receptor (ALR). The environment of the dental pulp is substantially different from that of other tissues of the body. Dental pulp resides in a low compliance root canal system that limits the expansion of pulpal tissues during inflammatory processes. An understanding of the PRRs in dental pulp is important for immunomodulation and hence for developing therapeutic targets in the field of endodontics. Here we comprehensively review recent finding on the PRRs and the mechanisms by which innate immunity is activated. We focus on the PRRs expressed on dental pulp and periapical tissues and their role in dental pulp inflammation.

  20. Toll-like receptor 11-initiated innate immune response in male mouse germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Liu, Zhenghui; Yan, Keqin; Zhao, Shutao; Han, Daishu

    2014-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii and uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may infect the testis and impair testicular function. Mechanisms underlying testicular innate immune response to these two pathogens remain to be clarified. The present study examined the function of TLR11, which can be recognized by T. gondii-derived profilin and UPEC, in initiating innate immune response in male mouse germ cells. TLR11 is predominantly expressed in spermatids. Profilin and UPEC induced the expressions of different inflammatory cytokine profiles in the germ cells. In particular, profilin induced the expressions of macrophage chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1), interleukin 12 (IL12), and interferon gamma (IFNG) through nuclear factor KB (NFKB) activation. UPEC induced the expressions of MCP1, IL12, and IFNG, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFA), IL6, and IFNB, through the activation of NFKB, IFN regulatory factor 3, and mitogen-activated protein kinases. Evidence showed that profilin induced the innate response in male germ cells through TLR11 signaling, and UPEC triggered the response through TLR11 and other TLR-signaling pathways. We also provided evidence that local injection of profilin or UPEC induces the innate immune response in the germ cells. Data describe TLR11-mediated innate immune function of male germ cells in response to T. gondii profilin and UPEC stimulations. This system may play a role in testicular defense against T. gondii and UPEC infections in mice.

  1. Emerging complexity and new roles for the RIG-I-like receptors in innate antiviral immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John; S.Errett; Michael; Gale; Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is critical for the control of virus infection and operates to restrict viral susceptibility and direct antiviral immunity for protection from acute or chronic viral-associated diseases including cancer. RIG-I like receptors(RLRs) are cytosolic RNA helicases that function as pathogen recognition receptors to detect RNA pathogen associated molecular patterns(PAMPs) of virus infection. The RLRs include RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2. They function to recognize and bind to PAMP motifs within viral RNA in a process that directs the RLR to trigger downstream signaling cascades that induce innate immunity that controls viral replication and spread. Products of RLR signaling also serve to modulate the adaptive immune response to infection. Recent studies have additionally connected RLRs to signaling cascades that impart inflammatory and apoptotic responses to virus infection. Viral evasion of RLR signaling supports viral outgrowth and pathogenesis, including the onset of viral-associated cancer.

  2. The Enemy Within: Innate Surveillance-mediated Cell Death, the common mechanism of neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Ian Richards

    2016-05-01

    innate-mediated damage in neural tissues, and renders innate surveillance mediated cell death a plausible common pathogenic pathway responsible for neurodegenerative diseases, in both familial and sporadic forms. Here we have assembled evidence in favor of the hypothesis that neurodegenerative disease is the cumulative result of chronic activation of the innate surveillance pathway in a progressively expanding cascade.

  3. A tetrapod-like repertoire of innate immune receptors and effectors for coelacanths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinot, Pierre; Zou, Jun; Ota, Tatsuya; Buonocore, Francesco; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John; Litman, Gary; Hansen, John D

    2014-09-01

    The recent availability of both robust transcriptome and genome resources for coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) has led to unique discoveries for coelacanth immunity such as the lack of IgM, a central component of adaptive immunity. This study was designed to more precisely address the origins and evolution of gene families involved in the initial recognition and response to microbial pathogens, which effect innate immunity. Several multigene families involved in innate immunity are addressed, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoic acid inducible gene 1 (RIG1)-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLRs), diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing proteins (DICP) and modular domain immune-type receptors (MDIRs). Our analyses also include the tripartite motif-containing proteins (TRIM), which are involved in pathogen recognition as well as the positive regulation of antiviral immunity. Finally, this study addressed some of the downstream effectors of the antimicrobial response including IL-1 family members, type I and II interferons (IFN) and IFN-stimulated effectors (ISGs). Collectively, the genes and gene families in coelacanth that effect innate immune functions share characteristics both in content, structure and arrangement with those found in tetrapods but not in teleosts. The findings support the sister group relationship of coelacanth fish with tetrapods.

  4. A tetrapod-like repertoire of innate immune receptors and effectors for coelacanths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudinot, Pierre; Zou, Jun; Ota, Tatsuya; Buonocore, Francesco; Scapigliati, Giuseppe; Canapa, Adriana; Cannon, John; Litman, Gary; Hansen, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The recent availability of both robust transcriptome and genome resources for coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) has led to unique discoveries for coelacanth immunity such as the lack of IgM, a central component of adaptive immunity. This study was designed to more precisely address the origins and evolution of gene families involved in the initial recognition and response to microbial pathogens, which effect innate immunity. Several multigene families involved in innate immunity are addressed, including: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), retinoic acid inducible gene 1 (RIG1)-like receptors (RLRs), the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing proteins (NLRs), diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing proteins (DICP) and modular domain immune-type receptors (MDIRs). Our analyses also include the tripartite motif-containing proteins (TRIM), which are involved in pathogen recognition as well as the positive regulation of antiviral immunity. Finally, this study addressed some of the downstream effectors of the antimicrobial response including IL-1 family members, type I and II interferons (IFN) and IFN-stimulated effectors (ISGs). Collectively, the genes and gene families in coelacanth that effect innate immune functions share characteristics both in content, structure and arrangement with those found in tetrapods but not in teleosts. The findings support the sister group relationship of coelacanth fish with tetrapods.

  5. Innate immunity, Toll-like receptors, and atherosclerosis: mouse models and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and aberrant lipid metabolism represent hallmarks of atherosclerosis. Innate immunity critically depends upon Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. Recent data directly implicate signalling by TLR4 and TLR2 in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The role that TLRs play in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis can be assessed by using several animal models, which provide a double genetic deficiency in TLRs and molecules implicated in the lipid metabolism, such as ApoE or LDL receptor. Furthermore, a more recent technique, such as the bone marrow transplantation (BMT), can be a useful and straightforward method to elucidate the role of stromal versus hematopoietic cells in the acceleration of the atheroma.

  6. The long pentraxin PTX3 as a prototypic humoral pattern recognition receptor: interplay with cellular innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottazzi, Barbara; Garlanda, Cecilia; Cotena, Alessia; Moalli, Federica; Jaillon, Sebastien; Deban, Livija; Mantovani, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    The innate immune system consists of a cellular arm and a humoral arm. Components of humoral immunity include diverse molecular families, which represent functional ancestors of antibodies. They play a key role as effectors and modulators of innate resistance in animals and humans, interacting with cellular innate immunity. The prototypic long pentraxin, pentraxin 3 (PTX3), represents a case in point of this interplay. Gene targeting of this evolutionarily conserved long pentraxin has unequivocally defined its role at the crossroads of innate immunity, inflammation, matrix deposition, and female fertility. Phagocytes represent a key source of this fluid-phase pattern recognition receptor, which, in turn, facilitates microbial recognition by phagocytes acting as an opsonin. Moreover, PTX3 has modulatory functions on innate immunity and inflammation. Here, we review the studies on PTX3 which emphasize the complexity and complementarity of the crosstalk between the cellular and humoral arms of innate immunity.

  7. Modulation of Innate Immune Signalling by Lipid-Mediated MAVS Transmembrane Domain Oligomerization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Nobre

    Full Text Available RIG-I-like receptors detect viral RNA in infected cells and promote oligomerization of the outer mitochondrial membrane protein MAVS to induce innate immunity to viral infection through type I interferon production. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS have been shown to enhance anti-viral MAVS signalling, but the mechanisms have remained obscure. Using a biochemical oligomerization-reporter fused to the transmembrane domain of MAVS, we found that mROS inducers promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization in the plane of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These events were mirrored by Sendai virus infection, which similarly induced lipid peroxidation and promoted lipid-dependent MAVS transmembrane domain oligomerization. Our observations point to a role for mROS-induced changes in lipid bilayer properties in modulating antiviral innate signalling by favouring the oligomerization of MAVS transmembrane domain in the outer-mitochondrial membrane.

  8. HIF-mediated innate immune responses: cell signaling and therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris AJ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Alison J Harris, AA Roger Thompson, Moira KB Whyte, Sarah R Walmsley Academic Unit of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Infection and Immunity, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Abstract: Leukocytes recruited to infected, damaged, or inflamed tissues during an immune response must adapt to oxygen levels much lower than those in the circulation. Hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs are key mediators of cellular responses to hypoxia and, as in other cell types, HIFs are critical for the upregulation of glycolysis, which enables innate immune cells to produce adenosine triphosphate anaerobically. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that hypoxia also regulates many other innate immunological functions, including cell migration, apoptosis, phagocytosis of pathogens, antigen presentation and production of cytokines, chemokines, and angiogenic and antimicrobial factors. Many of these functions are mediated by HIFs, which are not only stabilized posttranslationally by hypoxia, but also transcriptionally upregulated by inflammatory signals. Here, we review the role of HIFs in the responses of innate immune cells to hypoxia, both in vitro and in vivo, with a particular focus on myeloid cells, on which the majority of studies have so far been carried out. Keywords: hypoxia, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages

  9. MITA/STING: a central and multifaceted mediator in innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Yong; Shu, Hong-Bing; Wang, Yan-Yi

    2014-12-01

    The recognition of nucleic acids is a general strategy used by the host to detect invading pathogens. Many studies have established that MITA/STING is a central component in the innate immune response to cytosolic DNA and RNA derived from pathogens. MITA can act both as a direct sensor of cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) and as an adaptor for the recruitment of downstream signaling components. In both roles, MITA is part of signaling cascades that orchestrate innate immune defenses against various pathogens, including viruses, bacteria and parasites. Here, we highlight recent studies that have uncovered the molecular mechanisms of MITA-mediated signal transduction and regulation, and discuss some notable issues that remain elusive.

  10. Interleukin-21 receptor signalling is important for innate immune protection against HSV-2 infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sine K Kratholm

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL -21 is produced by Natural Killer T (NKT cells and CD4(+ T cells and is produced in response to virus infections, where IL-21 has been shown to be essential in adaptive immune responses. Cells from the innate immune system such as Natural Killer (NK cells and macrophages are also important in immune protection against virus. These cells express the IL-21 receptor (IL-21R and respond to IL-21 with increased cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Currently, however it is not known whether IL-21 plays a significant role in innate immune responses to virus infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of IL-21 and IL-21R in the innate immune response to a virus infection. We used C57BL/6 wild type (WT and IL-21R knock out (KO mice in a murine vaginal Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2 infection model to show that IL-21 - IL-21R signalling is indeed important in innate immune responses against HSV-2. We found that the IL-21R was expressed in the vaginal epithelium in uninfected (u.i WT mice, and expression increased early after HSV-2 infection. IL-21R KO mice exhibited increased vaginal viral titers on day 2 and 3 post infection (p.i. and subsequently developed significantly higher disease scores and a lower survival rate compared to WT mice. In addition, WT mice infected with HSV-2 receiving intra-vaginal pre-treatment with murine recombinant IL-21 (mIL-21 had decreased vaginal viral titers on day 2 p.i., significantly lower disease scores, and a higher survival rate compared to infected untreated WT controls. Collectively our data demonstrate the novel finding that the IL-21R plays a critical role in regulating innate immune responses against HSV-2 infection.

  11. Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 plays a major role in innate resistance in the lung against murine Mycoplasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wees Love

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma lipoproteins are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLR, but TLRs' role in responses to infection are unknown. Mycoplasma pulmonis is a naturally occurring respiratory pathogen in mice. In the current study, we used TLR-transfected HEK cells and TLR2(-/- bone marrow-derived dendritic cells to demonstrate TLR2-mediated events are important in the initial host-mycoplasma interactions promoting cytokine responses. As we found alveolar macrophages expressed TLR1, TLR2 and TLR6 mRNAs, a role for TLR2 in innate immune clearance in lungs was examined. Three days post-infection, TLR2(-/- mice had higher M. pulmonis numbers in lungs, but not in nasal passages. However, TLR2(-/- mice had higher lung cytokine levels, indicating TLR2-independent mechanisms are also involved in host responses. Thus, TLR2 plays a critical role in the ability of innate immunity to determine M. pulmonis numbers in the lung, and it is likely that early after respiratory infection that TLR2 recognition of M. pulmonis triggers initial cytokine responses of host cells.

  12. The transcription factor ATF7 mediates lipopolysaccharide-induced epigenetic changes in macrophages involved in innate immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Keisuke; Maekawa, Toshio; Zhu, Yujuan; Renard-Guillet, Claire; Chatton, Bruno; Inoue, Kentaro; Uchiyama, Takeru; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yamada, Takuji; Ohno, Naohito; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2015-10-01

    Immunological memory is thought to be mediated exclusively by lymphocytes. However, enhanced innate immune responses caused by a previous infection increase protection against reinfection, which suggests the presence of innate immunological memory. Here we identified an important role for the stress-response transcription factor ATF7 in innate immunological memory. ATF7 suppressed a group of genes encoding factors involved in innate immunity in macrophages by recruiting the histone H3K9 dimethyltransferase G9a. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics bacterial infection, induced phosphorylation of ATF7 via the kinase p38, which led to the release of ATF7 from chromatin and a decrease in repressive histone H3K9me2 marks. A partially disrupted chromatin structure and increased basal expression of target genes were maintained for long periods, which enhanced resistance to pathogens. ATF7 might therefore be important in controlling memory in cells of the innate immune system.

  13. STING regulates intracellular DNA-mediated, type I interferon-dependent innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hiroki; Ma, Zhe; Barber, Glen N

    2009-10-08

    The innate immune system is critical for the early detection of invading pathogens and for initiating cellular host defence countermeasures, which include the production of type I interferon (IFN). However, little is known about how the innate immune system is galvanized to respond to DNA-based microbes. Here we show that STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is critical for the induction of IFN by non-CpG intracellular DNA species produced by various DNA pathogens after infection. Murine embryonic fibroblasts, as well as antigen presenting cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells (exposed to intracellular B-form DNA, the DNA virus herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) or bacteria Listeria monocytogenes), were found to require STING to initiate effective IFN production. Accordingly, Sting-knockout mice were susceptible to lethal infection after exposure to HSV-1. The importance of STING in facilitating DNA-mediated innate immune responses was further evident because cytotoxic T-cell responses induced by plasmid DNA vaccination were reduced in Sting-deficient animals. In the presence of intracellular DNA, STING relocalized with TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) from the endoplasmic reticulum to perinuclear vesicles containing the exocyst component Sec5 (also known as EXOC2). Collectively, our studies indicate that STING is essential for host defence against DNA pathogens such as HSV-1 and facilitates the adjuvant activity of DNA-based vaccines.

  14. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Odobasic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity.

  15. The Pathology of Orthopedic Implant Failure Is Mediated by Innate Immune System Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Landgraeber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All of the over 1 million total joint replacements implanted in the US each year are expected to eventually fail after 15–25 years of use, due to slow progressive subtle inflammation at the bone implant interface. This inflammatory disease state is caused by implant debris acting, primarily, on innate immune cells, that is, macrophages. This slow progressive pathological bone loss or “aseptic loosening” is a potentially life-threatening condition due to the serious complications in older people (>75 yrs of total joint replacement revision surgery. In some people implant debris (particles and ions from metals can influence the adaptive immune system as well, giving rise to the concept of metal sensitivity. However, a consensus of studies agrees that the dominant form of this response is due to innate reactivity by macrophages to implant debris where both danger (DAMP and pathogen (PAMP signalling elicit cytokine-based inflammatory responses. This paper discusses implant debris induced release of the cytokines and chemokines due to activation of the innate (and the adaptive immune system and the subsequent formation of osteolysis. Different mechanisms of implant-debris reactivity related to the innate immune system are detailed, for example, danger signalling (e.g., IL-1β, IL-18, IL-33, etc., toll-like receptor activation (e.g., IL-6, TNF-α, etc., apoptosis (e.g., caspases 3–9, bone catabolism (e.g., TRAP5b, and hypoxia responses (Hif1-α. Cytokine-based clinical and basic science studies are in progress to provide diagnosis and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  16. Biological interplay between proteoglycans and their innate immune receptors in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Helena; Schroeder, Nina; Manon-Jensen, Tina; Iozzo, Renato V; Schaefer, Liliana

    2013-05-01

    An emerging body of evidence indicates that secreted proteoglycans act as signaling molecules, in addition to their canonical function in maintaining and regulating the architecture of various extracellular matrices. Proteoglycans interact with a number of receptors that regulate growth, motility and immune response. In part, as a consequence of their complex structure, proteoglycans can induce crosstalk among various families of receptors and can also interact with natural receptor ligands, often blocking and sequestering their bioactivity. In their soluble form, originating from either partial proteolytic processing or through de novo synthesis by activated cells, some proteoglycans can become potent danger signals, denoting tissue stress and injury. Recently, it has been shown that proteoglycans, especially those belonging to the small leucine-rich and hyaluronan-binding gene families as well as the glycosaminoglycan hyaluronan, act as endogenous ligands of the toll-like receptors, a group of central receptors regulating innate immunity. Furthermore, proteoglycans can activate intracellular inflammasomes and trigger sterile inflammation. In this review, we critically assess the signaling events induced by the proteoglycans biglycan, decorin, lumican and versican as well as hyaluronan during inflammation. We discuss the intriguing emerging notion that, in spite of structural diversity of biglycan, decorin, versican and hyaluronan, all of them signal through the same toll-like receptors, albeit triggering differential responses and biological outcomes. Finally, we review the modes of action of these endogenous ligands of toll-like receptors and their ability to specifically modify the final signaling events and the inflammatory response.

  17. Human papillomavirus immunization is associated with increased expression of different innate immune regulatory receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, V; Noyola, D E; Monsiváis-Urenda, A; Salgado-Bustamante, M; Estrada-Capetillo, L; González-Amaro, R; Baranda, L

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is able to inhibit the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the expression of some immune innate cell receptors. Immunoglobulin-like transcript 2 (ILT2) is a regulatory receptor that seems to participate in the pathogenesis of viral infections. We have studied the expression and function of ILT2 and the expression of other NK cell receptors in 23 healthy women before and after immunization with the quadrivalent HPV (type 6/11/16/18) vaccine (Gardasil). Receptor expression was analyzed by flow cytometry in freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells as well as after in vitro stimulation with the quadrivalent HPV (type 6/11/16/18) vaccine. In addition, the regulatory function of ILT2 on cell proliferation and IFN-γ production was analyzed. We found a significant increase in the expression of ILT2 by NK and CD3(+) CD56(+) lymphocytes and monocytes after quadrivalent HPV (type 6/11/16/18) vaccine immunization. In addition, the in vitro stimulation with the quadrivalent HPV (type 6/11/16/18) vaccine also increased the proportion of CD3(-) CD56(+) ILT2(+) NK cells. Although the inhibitory function of ILT2 on cell proliferation was enhanced after HPV immunization, the in vitro engagement of this receptor did not affect the synthesis of IFN-γ induced by HPV. Finally, a significant increase in the expression of NKG2D, NKp30, and NKp46 by NK and CD3(+) CD56(+) lymphocytes was detected after quadrivalent HPV (type 6/11/16/18) vaccine immunization. Our data indicate that HPV immunization is associated with significant changes in the expression and function of different innate immune receptors, including ILT2, which may participate in the protective effect of HPV vaccines.

  18. The role of pattern recognition receptors in the innate recognition of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nan-Xin; Wang, Yan; Hu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Lan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is both a commensal microorganism in healthy individuals and a major fungal pathogen causing high mortality in immunocompromised patients. Yeast-hypha morphological transition is a well known virulence trait of C. albicans. Host innate immunity to C. albicans critically requires pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). In this review, we summarize the PRRs involved in the recognition of C. albicans in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and phagocytic cells separately. We figure out the differential recognition of yeasts and hyphae, the findings on PRR-deficient mice, and the discoveries on human PRR-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

  19. DMPD: Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate immuneresponse. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667934 Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate imm...g) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases and the antiviral innate immune...response. PubmedID 17667934 Title Toll-like receptors, RIG-I-like RNA helicases a

  20. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  1. Role of innate immune receptors in paradoxical caspofungin activity in vivo in preclinical aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Silvia; Bozza, Silvia; D'Angelo, Carmen; Casagrande, Andrea; Della Fazia, Maria Agnese; Pitzurra, Lucia; Romani, Luigina; Aversa, Franco

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the possible mechanisms underlying the paradoxical caspofungin activity in vivo in preclinical aspergillosis. We evaluated the activity of escalating doses of caspofungin in vivo in different preclinical models of invasive aspergillosis, including mice deficient for selected innate immune receptors. The therapeutic efficacy of caspofungin in experimental invasive aspergillosis was strictly dose dependent, being observed at doses of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg of body weight depending on the experimental models. Paradoxical increase in pulmonary fungal burden as well as inflammatory pathology was observed at the highest dose of caspofungin (5 mg/kg), occurred independently of the so-called Eagle effect and susceptibility to caspofungin in vitro, and was contingent upon the presence of TLR2, Dectin-1, and TLR9. Increased expression of Dectin-1 and TLR9 were observed upon exposure to caspofungin in vitro and in vivo. Together, these findings suggest that the net activity of caspofungin in vivo is orchestrated by the activation, directly or indirectly, of multiple innate immune receptors.

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors impair innate immune responses to Toll-like receptor agonists and to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Thierry; Lugrin, Jérôme; Le Roy, Didier; Goy, Geneviève; Mombelli, Matteo; Koessler, Thibaud; Ding, Xavier C; Chanson, Anne-Laure; Reymond, Marlies Knaup; Miconnet, Isabelle; Schrenzel, Jacques; François, Patrice; Calandra, Thierry

    2011-01-27

    Regulated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases (HDACs), histone acetylation is a key epigenetic mechanism controlling chromatin structure, DNA accessibility, and gene expression. HDAC inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis of tumor cells and are used as anticancer agents. Here we describe the effects of HDAC inhibitors on microbial sensing by macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and host defenses against infection in vivo. HDAC inhibitors down-regulated the expression of numerous host defense genes, including pattern recognition receptors, kinases, transcription regulators, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and costimulatory molecules as assessed by genome-wide microarray analyses or innate immune responses of macrophages and dendritic cells stimulated with Toll-like receptor agonists. HDAC inhibitors induced the expression of Mi-2β and enhanced the DNA-binding activity of the Mi-2/NuRD complex that acts as a transcriptional repressor of macrophage cytokine production. In vivo, HDAC inhibitors increased the susceptibility to bacterial and fungal infections but conferred protection against toxic and septic shock. Thus, these data identify an essential role for HDAC inhibitors in the regulation of the expression of innate immune genes and host defenses against microbial pathogens.

  3. The cells that mediate innate immune memory and their functional significance in inflammatory and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Clair M; Mills, Kingston H G

    2016-08-01

    Immunological memory mediated by antigen-specific T and B cells is the foundation of adaptive immunity and is fundamental to the heightened and rapid protective immune response induced by vaccination or following re-infection with the same pathogen. While the innate immune system has classically been considered to be non-specific and devoid of memory, it now appears that it can be trained following exposure to microbes or their products and that this may confer a form of memory on innate immune cells. The evidence for immunological memory outside of T and B cells has been best established for natural killer (NK) cells, where it has been known for decades that NK cells have heighten responses following immunological re-challenge. Furthermore, recent studies have demonstrated that monocyte/macrophages, and probably dendritic cells, can be re-programmed through epigenetic modification, following exposure to pathogens or their products, resulting in heighted responses following a second stimulation. Unlike antigen-specific memory of the adaptive immune system, the second stimulation does not have to be with the same pathogen or antigen. Indirect evidence for this comes from reports on the non-specific beneficial effect of certain live vaccines, such as Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) against unrelated childhood infectious diseases. It also appears that certain pathogen or pathogen-derived molecules can prime immune cells, especially macrophages, to secrete more anti-inflammatory and less pro-inflammatory cyokines, thus opening up the possibility of exploiting innate immune training as a new therapeutic approach for inflammatory diseases.

  4. Pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis is mediated in part via Toll-like receptor 2-induced inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Madrigal, Andres G; Liu, Xinyan; Ukai, Takashi; Goswami, Sulip; Gudino, Cynthia V; Gibson, Frank C; Genco, Caroline A

    2010-01-01

    Studies in humans have established that polymorphisms in genes encoding the innate immune Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are associated with inflammatory atherosclerosis. In hyperlipidemic mice, TLR2 and TLR4 have been reported to contribute to atherosclerosis progression. Human and mouse studies support a role for the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis in atherosclerosis, although the mechanisms by which this pathogen stimulates inflammatory atherosclerosis via innate immune system activation is not known. Using a genetically defined apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model we demonstrate that pathogen-mediated inflammatory atherosclerosis occurs via both TLR2-dependent and TLR2-independent mechanisms. P. gingivalis infection in mice possessing functional TLR2 induced the accumulation of macrophages as well as inflammatory mediators including CD40, IFN-gamma and the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1 beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in atherosclerotic lesions. The expression of these inflammatory mediators was reduced in atherosclerotic lesions from P. gingivalis-infected TLR2-deficient (TLR2(-/-)) mice. These studies provide a mechanistic link between an innate immune receptor and pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis by a clinically and biologically relevant bacterial pathogen.

  5. Phosphorylation-dependent differential regulation of plant growth, cell death, and innate immunity by the regulatory receptor-like kinase BAK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Roux, Milena; Kadota, Yasuhiro;

    2011-01-01

    Plants rely heavily on receptor-like kinases (RLKs) for perception and integration of external and internal stimuli. The Arabidopsis regulatory leucine-rich repeat RLK (LRR-RLK) BAK1 is involved in steroid hormone responses, innate immunity, and cell death control. Here, we describe the different......Plants rely heavily on receptor-like kinases (RLKs) for perception and integration of external and internal stimuli. The Arabidopsis regulatory leucine-rich repeat RLK (LRR-RLK) BAK1 is involved in steroid hormone responses, innate immunity, and cell death control. Here, we describe...... the differential regulation of three different BAK1-dependent signaling pathways by a novel allele of BAK1, bak1-5. Innate immune signaling mediated by the BAK1-dependent RKs FLS2 and EFR is severely compromised in bak1-5 mutant plants. However, bak1-5 mutants are not impaired in BR signaling or cell death control...... of FLS2 or EFR with BAK1 in planta, revealing another pathway specific mechanistic difference. The specific suppression of FLS2- and EFR-dependent signaling in bak1-5 is not due to a differential interaction of BAK1-5 with the respective ligand-binding RK but requires BAK1-5 kinase activity. Overall our...

  6. Inflammatory monocytes mediate early and organ-specific innate defense during systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Lisa Y; Kasahara, Shinji; Kumasaka, Debra K; Knoblaugh, Sue E; Jhingran, Anupam; Hohl, Tobias M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a commensal fungus that can cause systemic disease in patients with breaches in mucosal integrity, indwelling catheters, and defects in phagocyte function. Although circulating human and murine monocytes bind C. albicans and promote inflammation, it remains unclear whether C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)- and Ly6C-expressing inflammatory monocytes exert a protective or a deleterious function during systemic infection. During murine systemic candidiasis, interruption of CCR2-dependent inflammatory monocyte trafficking into infected kidneys impaired fungal clearance and decreased murine survival. Depletion of CCR2-expressing cells led to uncontrolled fungal growth in the kidneys and brain and demonstrated an essential antifungal role for inflammatory monocytes and their tissue-resident derivatives in the first 48 hours postinfection. Adoptive transfer of purified inflammatory monocytes in depleted hosts reversed the defect in fungal clearance to a substantial extent, indicating a compartmentally and temporally restricted protective function that can be transferred to enhance systemic innate antifungal immunity.

  7. TRICK or TRP? What Trpc2-/- Mice Tell Us about Vomeronasal Organ Mediated Innate Behaviors

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    C. Ron eYu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The vomeronasal organ (VNO plays an important role in mediating semiochemical communications and social behaviors in terrestrial species. Genetic knockout of individual components in the signaling pathways have been used to probe vomeronasal functions, and have provided much insights into how the VNO orchestrates innate behaviors. However, all data do not agree. In particular, knocking out Trpc2, a member of the TRP family of non-selective cationic channel thought to be the main transduction channel in the VNO, results in a number of fascinating behavioral phenotypes that have not been observed in other animals whose vomeronasal function is disrupted. Recent studies have identified signaling pathways that operate in parallel of Trpc2, raising the possibility that Trpc2 mutant animals may display neomorphic behaviors. In this article, I provide a critical analysis of emerging evidence to reconcile the discrepancies and discuss their implications.

  8. Activating transcription factor 4 underlies the pathogenesis of arsenic trioxide-mediated impairment of macrophage innate immune functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ritesh K; Li, Changzhao; Wang, Yong; Weng, Zhiping; Elmets, Craig A; Harrod, Kevin S; Deshane, Jessy S; Athar, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure to humans is considered immunosuppressive with augmented susceptibility to several infectious diseases. The exact molecular mechanisms, however, remain unknown. Earlier, we showed the involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling in arsenic-mediated impairment of macrophage functions. Here, we show that activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), a UPR transcription factor, regulates arsenic trioxide (ATO)-mediated dysregulation of macrophage functions. In ATO-treated ATF4(+/+) wild-type mice, a significant down-regulation of CD11b expression was associated with the reduced phagocytic functions of peritoneal and lung macrophages. This severe immuno-toxicity phenotype was not observed in ATO-treated ATF4(+/-) heterozygous mice. To confirm these observations, we demonstrated in Raw 264.7 cells that ATF4 knock-down rescues ATO-mediated impairment of macrophage functions including cytokine production, bacterial engulfment and clearance of engulfed bacteria. Sustained activation of ATF4 by ATO in macrophages induces apoptosis, while diminution of ATF4 expression protects against ATO-induced apoptotic cell death. Raw 264.7 cells treated with ATO also manifest dysregulated Ca(++) homeostasis. ATO induces Ca(++)-dependent calpain-1 and caspase-12 expression which together regulated macrophage apoptosis. Additionally, apoptosis was also induced by mitochondria-regulated pathway. Restoring ATO-impaired Ca(++) homeostasis in ER/mitochondria by treatments with the inhibitors of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) attenuate innate immune functions of macrophages. These studies identify a novel role for ATF4 in underlying pathogenesis of macrophage dysregulation and immuno-toxicity of arsenic.

  9. CD36 Is Essential for Regulation of the Host Innate Response to Staphylococcus aureus α-Toxin-Mediated Dermonecrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleman, Moriah J; Febbraio, Maria; Hall, Pamela R

    2015-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the primary cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSIs) in the United States. α-Hemolysin (Hla), a pore-forming toxin secreted by S. aureus and a major contributor to tissue necrosis, prompts recruitment of neutrophils critical for host defense against S. aureus infections. However, the failure to clear apoptotic neutrophils can result in damage to host tissues, suggesting that mechanisms of neutrophil clearance are essential to limiting Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. We hypothesized that CD36, a scavenger receptor which facilitates recognition of apoptosing cells, would play a significant role in regulating Hla-mediated inflammation and tissue injury during S. aureus SSSI. In this study, we show that CD36 on macrophages negatively regulates dermonecrosis caused by Hla-producing S. aureus. This regulation is independent of bacterial burden, as CD36 also limits dermonecrosis caused by intoxication with sterile bacterial supernatant or purified Hla. Dermonecrotic lesions of supernatant intoxicated CD36(-/-) mice are significantly larger, with increased neutrophil accumulation and IL-1β expression, compared with CD36(+/+) (wild-type) mice. Neutrophil depletion of CD36(-/-) mice prevents this phenotype, demonstrating the contribution of neutrophils to tissue injury in this model. Furthermore, administration of CD36(+/+) but not CD36(-/-) macrophages near the site of intoxication reduces dermonecrosis, IL-1β production and neutrophil accumulation to levels seen in wild-type mice. This therapeutic effect is reversed by inhibiting actin polymerization in the CD36(+/+) macrophages, supporting a mechanism of action whereby CD36-dependent macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils regulates Hla-mediated dermonecrosis. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD36 is essential for controlling the host innate response to S. aureus skin infection.

  10. Cyclosporine A impairs nucleotide binding oligomerization domain (Nod1-mediated innate antibacterial renal defenses in mice and human transplant recipients.

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    Emilie Tourneur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pyelonephritis (APN, which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC, is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA, decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1, neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs, also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by Cs

  11. Cyclosporine A Impairs Nucleotide Binding Oligomerization Domain (Nod1)-Mediated Innate Antibacterial Renal Defenses in Mice and Human Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourneur, Emilie; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Chassin, Cécilia; Bens, Marcelle; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Charles, Nicolas; Pellefigues, Christophe; Aloulou, Meryem; Hertig, Alexandre; Monteiro, Renato C.; Girardin, Stephen E.; Philpott, Dana J.; Rondeau, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Acute pyelonephritis (APN), which is mainly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), is the most common bacterial complication in renal transplant recipients receiving immunosuppressive treatment. However, it remains unclear how immunosuppressive drugs, such as the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA), decrease renal resistance to UPEC. Here, we investigated the effects of CsA in host defense against UPEC in an experimental model of APN. We show that CsA-treated mice exhibit impaired production of the chemoattractant chemokines CXCL2 and CXCL1, decreased intrarenal recruitment of neutrophils, and greater susceptibility to UPEC than vehicle-treated mice. Strikingly, renal expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (Tlr4) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1), neutrophil migration capacity, and phagocytic killing of E. coli were significantly reduced in CsA-treated mice. CsA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced, Tlr4-mediated production of CXCL2 by epithelial collecting duct cells. In addition, CsA markedly inhibited Nod1 expression in neutrophils, macrophages, and renal dendritic cells. CsA, acting through inhibition of the nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFATs), also markedly downregulated Nod1 in neutrophils and macrophages. Silencing the NFATc1 isoform mRNA, similar to CsA, downregulated Nod1 expression in macrophages, and administration of the 11R-VIVIT peptide inhibitor of NFATs to mice also reduced neutrophil bacterial phagocytosis and renal resistance to UPEC. Conversely, synthetic Nod1 stimulating agonists given to CsA-treated mice significantly increased renal resistance to UPEC. Renal transplant recipients receiving CsA exhibited similar decrease in NOD1 expression and neutrophil phagocytosis of E. coli. The findings suggest that such mechanism of NFATc1-dependent inhibition of Nod1-mediated innate immune response together with the decrease in Tlr4-mediated production of chemoattractant chemokines caused by CsA may

  12. Phylogeny of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling: Adapting the Innate Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Jeffrey M.; Racioppi, Luigi; Jones, Corbin D.; Masci, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptors represent a largely evolutionarily conserved pathogen recognition machinery responsible for recognition of bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and viral pathogen associated microbial patterns and initiation of inflammatory response. Structurally the Toll-like receptors are comprised of an extracellular leucine rich repeat domain and a cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor domain. Recognition takes place in the extracellular domain where as the cytoplasmic domain triggers a complex signal network required to sustain appropriate immune response. Signal transduction is regulated by the recruitment of different intracellular adaptors. The Toll-like receptors can be grouped depending on the usage of the adaptor, MyD88, into MyD88-dependent and MyD88 independent subsets. Herein, we present a unique phylogenetic analysis of domain regions of these receptors and their cognate signaling adaptor molecules. Although previously unclear from the phylogeny of full length receptors, these analyses indicate a separate evolutionary origin for the MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signaling pathway and provide evidence of a common ancestor for the vertebrate and invertebrate orthologs of the adaptor molecule MyD88. Together these observations suggest a very ancient origin of the MyD88-dependent pathway Additionally we show that early duplications gave rise to several adaptor molecule families. In some cases there is also strong pattern of parallel duplication between adaptor molecules and their corresponding TLR. Our results further support the hypothesis that phylogeny of specific domains involved in signaling pathway can shed light on key processes that link innate to adaptive immune response. PMID:23326591

  13. Modulation of Toll-like receptor signaling in innate immunity by natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luxi; Yu, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    For centuries, natural products and their derivatives have provided a rich source of compounds for the development of new immunotherapies in the treatment of human disease. Many of these compounds are currently undergoing clinical trials, particularly as anti-oxidative, anti-microbial, and anti-cancer agents. However, the function and mechanism of natural products in how they interact with our immune system has yet to be extensively explored. Natural immune modulators may provide the key to control and ultimately defeat disorders affecting the immune system. They can either up- or down-regulate the immune response with few undesired adverse effects. In this review, we summarize the recent advancements made in utilizing natural products for immunomodulation and their important molecular targets, members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, in the innate immune system.

  14. The innate immune system, toll-like receptors and dermal wound healing: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portou, M J; Baker, D; Abraham, D; Tsui, J

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is a complex physiological process comprised of discrete but inter-related and overlapping stages, requiring exact timing and regulation to successfully progress, yet occurs spontaneously in response to injury. It is characterised by four phases, coagulation, inflammation, proliferation and remodelling. Each phase is predominated by particular cell types, cytokines and chemokines. The innate immune system represents the first line of defence against invading microorganisms. It is entirely encoded with the genome, and comprised of a cellular response with specificity provided by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLRs are activated by exogenous microbial pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), initiating an immune response through the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and further specialist immune cell recruitment. TLRs are also activated by endogenous molecular patterns termed damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These ligands, usually shielded from the immune system, act as alarm signals alerting the immune system to damage and facilitate the normal wound healing process. TLRs are expressed by cells essential to wound healing such as keratinocytes and fibroblasts, however the specific role of TLRs in this process remains controversial. This article reviews the current knowledge on the potential role of TLRs in dermal wound healing where inflammation arising from pathogenic activation of these receptors appears to play a role in chronic ulceration associated with diabetes, scar hypertrophy and skin fibrosis. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Polymorphisms of innate pattern recognition receptors, response to interferon-beta and development of neutralizing antibodies in multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Christian; Oturai, Annette B; Sørensen, Per Soelberg;

    2010-01-01

    Interferon-beta therapy of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis involves repeated 'immunizations' with exogenous protein solutions. Innate pattern recognition receptors play an important role in immune responses towards foreign substances and may thus be related to treatment outcome....

  16. Receptor-Mediated Signalling in Aspergillus fumigatus

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    C. M Grice

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspergillus fumigatus is the most pathogenic species among the Aspergilli, and the major fungal agent of human pulmonary infection. To prosper in diverse ecological niches, Aspergilli have evolved numerous mechanisms for adaptive gene regulation, some of which are also crucial for mammalian infection. Among the molecules which govern such responses, integral membrane receptors are thought to be the most amenable to therapeutic modulation. This is due to the localisation of these molecular sensors at the periphery of the fungal cell, and to the prevalence of small molecules and licensed drugs which target receptor-mediated signalling in higher eukaryotic cells. In this review we highlight the progress made in characterising receptor-mediated environmental adaptation in A. fumigatus and its relevance for pathogenicity in mammals. By presenting a first genomic survey of integral membrane proteins in this organism, we highlight an abundance of putative 7TMD receptors, the majority of which remain uncharacterised. Given the dependency of A. fumigatus upon stress adaptation for colonisation and infection of mammalian hosts, and the merits of targeting receptor-mediated signalling as an antifungal strategy, a closer scrutiny of sensory perception and signal transduction in this organism is warranted.

  17. Impairment of adenosine A3 receptor activity disrupts neutrophil migratory capacity and impacts innate immune function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Matt; Sanmugalingam, Devika; Burton, Victoria J; Wilson, Tammy; Pearson, Ruth; Watson, Robert P; Smith, Philip; Parkinson, Scott J

    2012-12-01

    Adenosine possesses potent anti-inflammatory properties which are partly mediated by G(i) -coupled adenosine A3 receptors (A3Rs). A3R agonists have shown clinical benefit in a number of inflammatory conditions although some studies in A3R-deficient mice suggest a pro-inflammatory role. We hypothesised that, in addition to cell signalling effects, A3R compounds might inhibit neutrophil chemotaxis by disrupting the purinergic feedback loop controlling leukocyte migration. Human neutrophil activation triggered rapid upregulation of surface A3R expression which was disrupted by pre-treatment with either agonist (Cl-IB-MECA) or antagonist (MRS1220). Both compounds reduced migration velocity and neutrophil transmigration capacity without impacting the response to chemokines per se. Similar effects were observed in murine neutrophils, while cells from A3R-deficient mice displayed a constitutively impaired migratory phenotype indicating compound-induced desensitisation and genetic ablation had the same functional outcome. In a dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis model, A3R-deficient mice exhibited reduced colon pathology and decreased tissue myeloperoxidase levels at day 8 - consistent with reduced neutrophil recruitment. However, A3R-deficient mice were unable to resolve the dextran sodium sulphate-induced inflammation and had elevated numbers of tissue-associated bacteria by day 21. Our data indicate that A3Rs play a role in neutrophil migration and disrupting this function has the potential to adversely affect innate immune responses.

  18. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor-1 Antagonists as Modulators of Innate Immune Cell Function

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    A. J. Theron

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8+ cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1 antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5′-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies.

  19. BRCA1 Regulates IFI16 Mediated Nuclear Innate Sensing of Herpes Viral DNA and Subsequent Induction of the Innate Inflammasome and Interferon-β Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipanjan Dutta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system pattern recognition receptors (PRR are the first line of host defenses recognizing the various pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and eliciting defenses by regulating the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, IL-18 or interferon β (IFN-β. NOD-like receptors (NLRs and AIM2-like receptors (ALRs are cytoplasmic inflammasome sensors of foreign molecules, including DNA. IFI16, a sequence-independent nuclear innate sensor ALR, recognizes episomal dsDNA genomes of herpes viruses such as KSHV, EBV, and HSV-1 in the infected cell nuclei, forms an inflammasome complex with ASC and procaspase1, and relocates into the cytoplasm leading into Caspase-1 and IL-1β generation. IFI16 also induces IFN-β during HSV-1 infection via the cytoplasmic STING-TBK1-IRF3 pathway. Thus far, whether IFI16 recognizes foreign DNA directly or utilizes other host protein(s is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1, a DNA damage repair sensor and transcription regulator, is in complex with IFI16 in the host cell nucleus, and their association increases in the presence of nuclear viral genomes during de novo KSHV, EBV and HSV-1 infection, and in latent KSHV or EBV infection, but not by DNA damage responses (DDR induced by bleomycin and vaccinia virus cytoplasmic dsDNA. BRCA1 is a constituent of the triggered IFI16-inflammasome and is translocated into the cytoplasm after genome recognition along with the IFI16-inflammasome. The absence of BRCA1 abrogated IFI16-viral genome association, inflammasome assembly, IFI16 cytoplasmic localization, and Caspase-1 and IL-1β production. The absence of BRCA1 also abolished the cytoplasmic IFI16-STING interaction, downstream IRF3 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation of pIRF3 and IFN-β production during de novo KSHV and HSV-1 infection. These findings highlight that BRCA1 plays a hitherto unidentified innate immunomodulatory role by facilitating nuclear foreign DNA sensing by

  20. Characterization of rotavirus RNAs that activate innate immune signaling through the RIG-I-like receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Uzri

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, the first line of defense against viral pathogens is the innate immune response, which is characterized by induction of type I interferons (IFN and other pro-inflammatory cytokines that establish an antiviral milieu both in infected cells and in neighboring uninfected cells. Rotavirus, a double-stranded RNA virus of the Reoviridae family, is the primary etiological agent of severe diarrhea in young children worldwide. Previous studies demonstrated that rotavirus replication induces a MAVS-dependent type I IFN response that involves both RIG-I and MDA5, two cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors. This study reports the isolation and characterization of rotavirus RNAs that activate IFN signaling. Using an in vitro approach with purified rotavirus double-layer particles, nascent single-stranded RNA (ssRNA transcripts (termed in vitro ssRNA were found to be potent IFN inducers. In addition, large RNAs isolated from rotavirus-infected cells six hours post-infection (termed in vivo 6 hr large RNAs, also activated IFN signaling, whereas a comparable large RNA fraction isolated from cells infected for only one hour lacked this stimulatory activity. Experiments using knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts showed that RIG-I is required for and MDA5 partly contributes to innate immune signaling by both in vitro ssRNA and in vivo 6 hr large RNAs. Enzymatic studies demonstrated that in vitro ssRNA and in vivo 6 hr large RNA samples contain uncapped RNAs with exposed 5' phosphate groups. RNAs lacking 2'-O-methylated 5' cap structures were also detected in the in vivo 6 hr large RNA sample. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that the rotavirus VP3 enzyme, which encodes both guanylyltransferase and methyltransferase activities, is not completely efficient at either 5' capping or 2'-O-methylation of the 5' cap structures of viral transcripts, and in this way produces RNA patterns that activate innate immune signaling through the RIG

  1. THE ROLE OF ALLELIC POLYMORPHISM OF RECEPTOR GENES OF INNATE IMMUNITY IN THE PERSISTENCE OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS

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    O. P. Gumilevskaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The  development of a stable  immunoresistance against human papillomavirus occurs  largely due  to the reactions of the innate immune system, mediated through Toll-like receptors.  It is known, that  allelic  polymorphism of the  Toll-like receptors genes, associated with  single  nucleotide polymorphisms can influence on the sensitivity of reception and lead to disruption of pathogen recognition and,  thus  lead  to reduced susceptibility of the body to infectious agents. The aim of the study was to find  the association of polymorphisms T-1237S, A2848G of TLR 9 gene, Phe-412 Leu of TLR 3 gene and С-819 Т, G-1082 A of IL-10 gene  with  persistence of human papillomavirus infection of high oncogenic types.  There were examined 194 women aged  18–42 years  with  the  presence of HPV types  16 and  18. The material for laboratory  studies were  scraped from  the  mucosa of the  urogenital tract  and peripheral blood  of patients. Depending on the  presence of virus women were divided into two groups:  98 patients with persistent human papillomavirus infection and  96  women without it. As the result  after investigation some  significant differences in the distribution of variants of polymorphic loci (A2848G  TLR 9, (Phe412  Leu  TLR 3 and  (G-1082A  IL-10 were identified.

  2. Innate Immune Effectors in Mycobacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Saiga

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis, which is caused by infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, remains one of the major bacterial infections worldwide. Host defense against Mtb is mediated by a combination of innate and adaptive immune responses. In the last 15 years, the mechanisms for activation of innate immunity have been elucidated. Toll-like receptors (TLRs have been revealed to be critical for the recognition of pathogenic microorganisms including mycobacteria. Subsequent studies further revealed that NOD-like receptors and C-type lectin receptors are responsible for the TLR-independent recognition of mycobacteria. Several molecules, such as active vitamin D3, secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, and lipocalin 2, all of which are induced by TLR stimulation, have been shown to direct innate immune responses to mycobacteria. In addition, Irgm1-dependent autophagy has recently been demonstrated to eliminate intracellular mycobacteria. Thus, our understanding of the mechanisms for the innate immune response to mycobacteria is developing.

  3. Toll-like receptor 9 mediated responses in cardiac fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Kristine Ohm

    Full Text Available Altered cardiac Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9 signaling is important in several experimental cardiovascular disorders. These studies have predominantly focused on cardiac myocytes or the heart as a whole. Cardiac fibroblasts have recently been attributed increasing significance in mediating inflammatory signaling. However, putative TLR9-signaling through cardiac fibroblasts remains non-investigated. Thus, our aim was to explore TLR9-signaling in cardiac fibroblasts and investigate the consequence of such receptor activity on classical cardiac fibroblast cellular functions. Cultivated murine cardiac fibroblasts were stimulated with different TLR9 agonists (CpG A, B and C and assayed for the secretion of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα], CXCL2 and interferon α/β. Expression of functional cardiac fibroblast TLR9 was proven as stimulation with CpG B and -C caused significant CXCL2 and TNFα-release. These responses were TLR9-specific as complete inhibition of receptor-stimulated responses was achieved by co-treatment with a TLR9-antagonist (ODN 2088 or chloroquine diphosphate. TLR9-stimulated responses were also found more potent in cardiac fibroblasts when compared with classical innate immune cells. Stimulation of cardiac fibroblasts TLR9 was also found to attenuate migration and proliferation, but did not influence myofibroblast differentiation in vitro. Finally, results from in vivo TLR9-stimulation with subsequent fractionation of specific cardiac cell-types (cardiac myocytes, CD45+ cells, CD31+ cells and cardiac fibroblast-enriched cell-fractions corroborated our in vitro data and provided evidence of differentiated cell-specific cardiac responses. Thus, we conclude that cardiac fibroblast may constitute a significant TLR9 responder cell within the myocardium and, further, that such receptor activity may impact important cardiac fibroblast cellular functions.

  4. Innate Immunity in Systemic Sclerosis – Role of Toll-Like Receptors, Interferon, and the Potential Impact of Vitamin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Ionescu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is an autoimmune disease in which vascular damage and immune activation leads to excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix in the skin and internal organs. Although the focus has been on adaptive immunity in SSc, recent data suggest that innate immunity is critically important. The innate immune system, the first-line barrier against pathogens, modulates mechanisms which activate adaptive immunity. Dysregulation of the innate immune system and toll-like receptors (TLRs may link immune abnormalities and fibrosis in SSc. TLR signalling pathways might induce production of Type I interferon (IFN and other cytokines, and represent one of the mechanisms that initiate and develop autoimmunity and subsequent fibrosis. Vitamin D displays many immunomodulatory effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Active vitamin D will produce signals via vitamin D receptor and influences TLR stimulation, IFN response, and antimicrobial peptide production. Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with many autoimmune disorders, and can influence clinical phenotype and immune disorders in SSc patients.

  5. CD8αα⁺ innate-type lymphocytes in the intestinal epithelium mediate mucosal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kaer, Luc; Algood, Holly M Scott; Singh, Kshipra; Parekh, Vrajesh V; Greer, Michael J; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik; Matta, Pranathi; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T; Olivares-Villagómez, Danyvid

    2014-09-18

    Innate immune responses are critical for mucosal immunity. Here we describe an innate lymphocyte population, iCD8α cells, characterized by expression of CD8α homodimers. iCD8α cells exhibit innate functional characteristics such as the capacity to engulf and kill bacteria. Development of iCD8α cells depends on expression of interleukin-2 receptor γ chain (IL-2Rγc), IL-15, and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ib protein H2-T3, also known as the thymus leukemia antigen or TL. While lineage tracking experiments indicated that iCD8α cells have a lymphoid origin, their development was independent of the transcriptional suppressor Id2, suggesting that these cells do not belong to the family of innate lymphoid cells. Finally, we identified cells with a similar phenotype in humans, which were profoundly depleted in newborns with necrotizing enterocolitis. These findings suggest a critical role of iCD8α cells in immune responses associated with the intestinal epithelium.

  6. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph (Rutgers); (RWJ-Med); (UW-MED)

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including

  7. Neutrophil and Alveolar Macrophage-Mediated Innate Immune Control of Legionella pneumophila Lung Infection via TNF and ROS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Ziltener

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular bacterium that lives in aquatic environments where it parasitizes amoeba. However, upon inhalation of contaminated aerosols it can infect and replicate in human alveolar macrophages, which can result in Legionnaires' disease, a severe form of pneumonia. Upon experimental airway infection of mice, L. pneumophila is rapidly controlled by innate immune mechanisms. Here we identified, on a cell-type specific level, the key innate effector functions responsible for rapid control of infection. In addition to the well-characterized NLRC4-NAIP5 flagellin recognition pathway, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and reactive oxygen species (ROS are also essential for effective innate immune control of L. pneumophila. While ROS are essential for the bactericidal activity of neutrophils, alveolar macrophages (AM rely on neutrophil and monocyte-derived TNF signaling via TNFR1 to restrict bacterial replication. This TNF-mediated antibacterial mechanism depends on the acidification of lysosomes and their fusion with L. pneumophila containing vacuoles (LCVs, as well as caspases with a minor contribution from cysteine-type cathepsins or calpains, and is independent of NLRC4, caspase-1, caspase-11 and NOX2. This study highlights the differential utilization of innate effector pathways to curtail intracellular bacterial replication in specific host cells upon L. pneumophila airway infection.

  8. Activation of innate immunity in the CNS triggers neurodegeneration through a Toll-like receptor 4-dependent pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnardt, Seija; Massillon, Leon; Follett, Pamela; Jensen, Frances E.; Ratan, Rajiv; Rosenberg, Paul A.; Volpe, Joseph J.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2003-01-01

    Innate immunity is an evolutionarily ancient system that provides organisms with immediately available defense mechanisms through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. We show that in the CNS, specific activation of innate immunity through a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent pathway leads to neurodegeneration. We identify microglia as the major lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-responsive cell in the CNS. TLR4 activation leads to extensive neuronal death in vitro that depends on the presence of microglia. LPS leads to dramatic neuronal loss in cultures prepared from wild-type mice but does not induce neuronal injury in CNS cultures derived from tlr4 mutant mice. In an in vivo model of neurodegeneration, stimulating the innate immune response with LPS converts a subthreshold hypoxic-ischemic insult from no discernable neuronal injury to severe axonal and neuronal loss. In contrast, animals bearing a loss-of-function mutation in the tlr4 gene are resistant to neuronal injury in the same model. The present study demonstrates a mechanistic link among innate immunity, TLRs, and neurodegeneration. PMID:12824464

  9. Oviposition Site-Selection by Bactrocera dorsalis Is Mediated through an Innate Recognition Template Tuned to γ-Octalactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagadala Damodaram, Kamala Jayanthi; Kempraj, Vivek; Aurade, Ravindra Mahadappa; Venkataramanappa, Ravindra Kothapalli; Nandagopal, Bakthavatsalam; Verghese, Abraham; Bruce, Toby

    2014-01-01

    Innate recognition templates (IRTs) in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest. PMID:24465690

  10. Oviposition site-selection by Bactrocera dorsalis is mediated through an innate recognition template tuned to γ-octalactone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Jayanthi Pagadala Damodaram

    Full Text Available Innate recognition templates (IRTs in insects are developed through many years of evolution. Here we investigated olfactory cues mediating oviposition behavior in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis, and their role in triggering an IRT for oviposition site recognition. Behavioral assays with electrophysiologically active compounds from a preferred host, mango, revealed that one of the volatiles tested, γ-octalactone, had a powerful effect in eliciting oviposition by gravid B. dorsalis females. Electrophysiological responses were obtained and flies clearly differentiated between treated and untreated substrates over a wide range of concentrations of γ-octalactone. It triggered an innate response in flies, overriding inputs from other modalities required for oviposition site evaluation. A complex blend of mango volatiles not containing γ-octalactone elicited low levels of oviposition, whereas γ-octalactone alone elicited more oviposition response. Naïve flies with different rearing histories showed similar responses to γ-octalactone. Taken together, these results indicate that oviposition site selection in B. dorsalis is mediated through an IRT tuned to γ-octalactone. Our study provides empirical data on a cue underpinning innate behavior and may also find use in control operations against this invasive horticultural pest.

  11. RIG-I mediates innate immune response in mouse neurons following Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshed Nazmi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neuroinflammation associated with Japanese encephalitis (JE is mainly due to the activation of glial cells with subsequent release of proinflammatory mediators from them. The recognition of viral RNA, in part, by the pattern recognition receptor retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I has been indicated to have a role in such processes. Even though neurons are also known to express this receptor, its role after JE virus (JEV infections is yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Upon infecting murine neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with JEV the expression profile of key proinflammatory cyto/chemokines were analyzed by qRT-PCR and bead array, both before and after ablation of RIG-I. Immunoblotting was performed to evaluate the levels of key molecules downstream to RIG-I leading to production of proinflammatory mediators. Changes in the intracellular viral antigen expression were confirmed by intracellular staining and immunoblotting. JEV infection induced neuronal expression of IL-6, IL-12p70, MCP-1, IP-10 and TNF-α in a time-dependent manner, which showed significant reduction upon RIG-I ablation. Molecules downstream to RIG-I showed significant changes upon JEV-infection, that were modulated following RIG-I ablation. Ablation of RIG-I in neurons also increased their susceptibility to JEV. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study we propose that neurons are one of the potential sources of proinflammatory cyto/chemokines in JEV-infected brain that are produced via RIG-I dependent pathways. Ablation of RIG-I in neurons leads to increased viral load and reduced release of the cyto/chemokines.

  12. Toll-like receptor-3 is dispensable for the innate microRNA response to West Nile virus (WNV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline E Chugh

    Full Text Available The innate immune response to West Nile virus (WNV infection involves recognition through toll-like receptors (TLRs and RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, leading to establishment of an antiviral state. MiRNAs (miRNAs have been shown to be reliable biomarkers of TLR activation. Here, we sought to evaluate the contribution of TLR3 and miRNAs to the host response to WNV infection. We first analyzed HEK293-NULL and HEK293-TLR3 cells for changes in the innate immune response to infection. The presence of TLR3 did not seem to affect WNV load, infectivity or phosphorylation of IRF3. Analysis of experimentally validated NFκB-responsive genes revealed a WNV-induced signature largely independent of TLR3. Since miRNAs are involved in viral pathogenesis and the innate response to infection, we sought to identify changes in miRNA expression upon infection in the presence or absence of TLR3. MiRNA profiling revealed 70 miRNAs induced following WNV infection in a TLR3-independent manner. Further analysis of predicted gene targets of WNV signature miRNAs revealed genes highly associated with pathways regulating cell death, viral pathogenesis and immune cell trafficking.

  13. GPCRs in invertebrate innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Jerome; Ewbank, Jonathan J

    2016-08-15

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent a privileged point of contact between cells and their surrounding environment. They have been widely adopted in vertebrates as mediators of signals involved in both innate and adaptive immunity. Invertebrates rely on innate immune defences to resist infection. We review here evidence from a number of different species, principally the genetically tractable Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster that points to an important role for GPCRs in modulating innate immunity in invertebrates too. In addition to examples of GPCRs involved in regulating the expression of defence genes, we discuss studies in C. elegans addressing the role of GPCR signalling in pathogen aversive behaviour. Despite the many lacunae in our current knowledge, it is clear that GPCR signalling contributes to host defence across the animal kingdom.

  14. A TLR and non-TLR mediated innate response to lentiviruses restricts hepatocyte entry and can be ameliorated by pharmacological blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agudo, Judith; Ruzo, Albert; Kitur, Kipyegon; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Blander, J Magarian; Brown, Brian D

    2012-12-01

    Lentiviral vector (LV)-mediated gene transfer is a promising method of gene therapy. We previously reported that systemic injection of HIV-based LV triggers a transient inflammatory response. Here, we carried out studies to better characterize this response, and to develop a strategy to overcome the adverse effects of interferon (IFN) on LV-mediated gene transfer. We profiled gene expression in the liver after LV administration using deep-sequencing (RNA-seq), and identified several innate response pathways. We examined the response to LV in MyD88-TRIF knockout mice, which are incapable of toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling. Unexpectedly, the IFN response to LV was not reduced in the liver indicating that a non-TLR pathway can recognize LV in this organ. Indeed, blocking reverse transcription with azidothymidine (AZT) reduced the IFN response only in the liver, suggesting that proviral DNA can be a trigger. To block the inflammatory response, we pretreated mice with a short course of dexamethasone (Dex). At 4 hours post-treatment, all the IFN-induced genes were normalized. By blocking the inflammatory response, hepatocyte transduction was dramatically increased, which in turn doubled the level of human factor IX (FIX) produced by a hepatocyte-specific LV. Our studies uncover new insights into LV-induced immune responses in the liver, and provide a means to increase the safety and efficiency of LV-mediated gene transfer.

  15. Chitin receptor CERK1 links salt stress and chitin-triggered innate immunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Catherine; Liang, Yan; Stacey, Gary

    2017-03-01

    In nature, plants need to respond to multiple environmental stresses that require the involvement and fine-tuning of different stress signaling pathways. Cross-tolerance, in which plants pre-treated with chitin (a fungal microbe-associated molecular pattern) have improved salt tolerance, was observed in Arabidopsis, but is not well understood. Here, we show a unique link between chitin and salt signaling mediated by the chitin receptor CHITIN ELICITOR RECEPTOR KINASE 1 (CERK1). Transcriptome analysis revealed that salt stress-induced genes are highly correlated with chitin-induced genes, although this was not observed with other microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) or with other abiotic stresses. The cerk1 mutant was more susceptible to NaCl than was the wild type. cerk1 plants had an irregular increase of cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+) ]cyt ) after NaCl treatment. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that CERK1 physically interacts with ANNEXIN 1 (ANN1), which was reported to form a calcium-permeable channel that contributes to the NaCl-induced [Ca(2+) ]cyt signal. In turn, ann1 mutants showed elevated chitin-induced rapid responses. In short, molecular components previously shown to function in chitin or salt signaling physically interact and intimately link the downstream responses to fungal attack and salt stress.

  16. Hexokinase Is an Innate Immune Receptor for the Detection of Bacterial Peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrea J; Reyes, Christopher N; Liang, Wenbin; Becker, Courtney; Shimada, Kenichi; Wheeler, Matthew L; Cho, Hee Cheol; Popescu, Narcis I; Coggeshall, K Mark; Arditi, Moshe; Underhill, David M

    2016-07-28

    Degradation of Gram-positive bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan in macrophage and dendritic cell phagosomes leads to activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, a cytosolic complex that regulates processing and secretion of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. While many inflammatory responses to peptidoglycan are mediated by detection of its muramyl dipeptide component in the cytosol by NOD2, we report here that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is caused by release of N-acetylglucosamine that is detected in the cytosol by the glycolytic enzyme hexokinase. Inhibition of hexokinase by N-acetylglucosamine causes its dissociation from mitochondria outer membranes, and we found that this is sufficient to activate the NLRP3 inflammasome. In addition, we observed that glycolytic inhibitors and metabolic conditions affecting hexokinase function and localization induce inflammasome activation. While previous studies have demonstrated that signaling by pattern recognition receptors can regulate metabolic processes, this study shows that a metabolic enzyme can act as a pattern recognition receptor. PAPERCLIP.

  17. Toxin-mediated effects on the innate mucosal defenses: implications for enteric vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenn, Gregory M; Francis, David H; Danielsen, E Michael

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have confirmed older observations that the enterotoxins enhance enteric bacterial colonization and pathogenicity. How and why this happens remains unknown at this time. It appears that toxins such as the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli can help overcome the innate...

  18. Inflammasome-mediated activation of microglia : Tissue-specific features of innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burm, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease where lesions are found within the brain. Although the exact cause of MS is unknown, these lesions are characterized by activation of immune cells, including microglia and macrophages. Microglia are the resident innate immune cells of th

  19. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  20. Protease-activated receptor-2 regulates the innate immune response to viral infection in a coxsackievirus B3-induced myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weithauser, Alice; Bobbert, Peter; Antoniak, Silvio; Böhm, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H; Klingel, Karin; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kroemer, Heyo K; Tschope, Carsten; Stroux, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Poller, Wolfgang; Mackman, Nigel; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2013-11-05

    This study sought to evaluate the role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)-induced myocarditis. An infection with CVB3 leads to myocarditis. PAR2 modulates the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3) is crucial for the innate immune response by inducing the expression of the antiviral cytokine interferon-beta (IFNβ). To induce myocarditis, wild-type (wt) and PAR2 knockout (ko) mice were infected with 10(5) plaque-forming units CVB3. Mice underwent hemodynamic measurements with a 1.2-F microconductance catheter. Wt and PAR2ko hearts and cardiac cells were analyzed for viral replication and immune response with plaque assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Compared with wt mice, PAR2ko mice and cardiomyocytes exhibited a reduced viral load and developed no myocarditis after infection with CVB3. Hearts and cardiac fibroblasts from PAR2ko mice expressed higher basal levels of IFNβ than wt mice did. Treatment with CVB3 and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid led to higher IFNβ expression in PAR2ko than in wt fibroblasts and reduced virus replication in PAR2ko fibroblasts was abrogated by neutralizing IFNβ antibody. Overexpression of PAR2 reduced the basal IFNβ expression. Moreover, a direct interaction between PAR2 and Toll-like receptor 3 was observed. PAR2 expression in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy was positively correlated with myocardial inflammation and negatively with IFNβ expression and left ventricular ejection fraction. PAR2 negatively regulates the innate immune response to CVB3 infection and contributes to myocardial dysfunction. The antagonism of PAR2 is of therapeutic interest to strengthen the antiviral response after an infection with a cardiotropic virus. Copyright © 2013 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Oxidation-specific epitopes are danger-associated molecular patterns recognized by pattern recognition receptors of innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Yury I; Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp

    2011-01-01

    are a major target of innate immunity, recognized by a variety of "pattern recognition receptors" (PRRs). By analogy with microbial "pathogen-associated molecular patterns" (PAMPs), we postulate that host-derived, oxidation-specific epitopes can be considered to represent "danger (or damage......)-associated molecular patterns" (DAMPs). We also argue that oxidation-specific epitopes present on apoptotic cells and their cellular debris provided the primary evolutionary pressure for the selection of such PRRs. Furthermore, because many PAMPs on microbes share molecular identity and/or mimicry with oxidation...

  2. DMPD: Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens: bringingspecificity to the innate-immune system. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15075354 Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens: brin... the host defense against microbial pathogens: bringingspecificity to the innate-...immune system. PubmedID 15075354 Title Toll-like receptors and the host defense against microbial pathogens:

  3. 4T1 Murine Mammary Carcinoma Cells Enhance Macrophage-Mediated Innate Inflammatory Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Laurence Madera; Anna Greenshields; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Hoskin, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Tumor progression and the immune response are intricately linked. While it is known that cancers alter macrophage inflammatory responses to promote tumor progression, little is known regarding how cancers affect macrophage-dependent innate host defense. In this study, murine bone-marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) were exposed to murine carcinoma-conditioned media prior to assessment of the macrophage inflammatory response. BMDMs exposed to 4T1 mammary carcinoma-conditioned medium demonstrated...

  4. Hunting for clinical translation with innate-like immune cells and their receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, W; Gründer, C; Straetemans, T; Sebestyen, Z; Kuball, J

    2014-06-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has so far been the most effective immunotherapy for hematological malignancies. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the immunotherapeutic concepts underlying allo-SCT as well as the traditional dissection of the immune system into innate and adaptive arms need substantial refinement. More and more cell types migrate into the interface between innate and adaptive immunity, creating new terms such as innate-like lymphocytes. These innate-like cells, which include natural killer (NK) cells and γδT cells, could provide unique advantages to therapeutic interventions aimed at treating hematological malignancies, including protection against tumor relapse and viral infections without causing harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Recent molecular and conceptual insights into these subpopulations have opened new avenues to exploit their exciting features for the development of new compounds and to revisit current therapeutic standards in the treatment of hematological cancers. This review therefore aims to discuss the rapid progress in the understanding of molecular mechanisms by which NK cells and γδT cells recognize malignancies and viral infections, and the value of this increasing knowledge to complement the battle against life-threatening complications of current strategies to treat cancer.

  5. the relationship between major histocompatibility receptors and innate immunity in teleost fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dixon, B.; Stet, R.J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the innate immune system have recently shown that, in addition to its role in producing the primary response that slows down pathogens, it may also play an important role in initiating and directing the type of response that the adaptive immune system makes. These discoveries have shown a

  6. Loss of CARD9-mediated innate activation attenuates severe influenza pneumonia without compromising host viral immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Takayuki; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Kobayashi, Noritada; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2015-12-02

    Influenza virus (IFV) infection is a common cause of severe viral pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which is difficult to control with general immunosuppressive therapy including corticosteroids due to the unfavorable effect on viral replication. Studies have suggested that the excessive activation of the innate immunity by IFV is responsible for severe pathologies. In this study, we focused on CARD9, a signaling adaptor known to regulate innate immune activation through multiple innate sensor proteins, and investigated its role in anti-IFV defense and lung pathogenesis in a mouse model recapitulating severe influenza pneumonia with ARDS. We found that influenza pneumonia was dramatically attenuated in Card9-deficient mice, which showed improved mortality with reduced inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the infected lungs. However, viral clearance, type-I interferon production, and the development of anti-viral B and T cell immunity were not compromised by CARD9 deficiency. Syk or CARD9-deficient DCs but not macrophages showed impaired cytokine but not type-I interferon production in response to IFV in vitro, indicating a possible role for the Syk-CARD9 pathway in DCs in excessive inflammation of IFV-infected lungs. Therefore, inhibition of this pathway is an ideal therapeutic target for severe influenza pneumonia without affecting viral clearance.

  7. Coronavirus papain-like proteases negatively regulate antiviral innate immune response through disruption of STING-mediated signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Sun

    Full Text Available Viruses have evolved elaborate mechanisms to evade or inactivate the complex system of sensors and signaling molecules that make up the host innate immune response. Here we show that human coronavirus (HCoV NL63 and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS CoV papain-like proteases (PLP antagonize innate immune signaling mediated by STING (stimulator of interferon genes, also known as MITA/ERIS/MYPS. STING resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and upon activation, forms dimers which assemble with MAVS, TBK-1 and IKKε, leading to IRF-3 activation and subsequent induction of interferon (IFN. We found that expression of the membrane anchored PLP domain from human HCoV-NL63 (PLP2-TM or SARS-CoV (PLpro-TM inhibits STING-mediated activation of IRF-3 nuclear translocation and induction of IRF-3 dependent promoters. Both catalytically active and inactive forms of CoV PLPs co-immunoprecipitated with STING, and viral replicase proteins co-localize with STING in HCoV-NL63-infected cells. Ectopic expression of catalytically active PLP2-TM blocks STING dimer formation and negatively regulates assembly of STING-MAVS-TBK1/IKKε complexes required for activation of IRF-3. STING dimerization was also substantially reduced in cells infected with SARS-CoV. Furthermore, the level of ubiquitinated forms of STING, RIG-I, TBK1 and IRF-3 are reduced in cells expressing wild type or catalytic mutants of PLP2-TM, likely contributing to disruption of signaling required for IFN induction. These results describe a new mechanism used by CoVs in which CoV PLPs negatively regulate antiviral defenses by disrupting the STING-mediated IFN induction.

  8. The innate immune playbook for restricting West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quicke, Kendra M; Suthar, Mehul S

    2013-10-30

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes annual epidemics of encephalitic disease throughout the world. Despite the ongoing risk to public health, no approved vaccines or therapies exist for use in humans to prevent or combat WNV infection. The innate immune response is critical for controlling WNV replication, limiting virus-induced pathology, and programming protective humoral and cell-mediated immunity to WNV infection. The RIG-I like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and Nod-like receptors detect and respond to WNV by inducing a potent antiviral defense program, characterized by production of type I IFN, IL-1β and expression of antiviral effector genes. Recent research efforts have focused on uncovering the mechanisms of innate immune sensing, antiviral effector genes that inhibit WNV, and countermeasures employed by WNV to antagonize innate immune cellular defenses. In this review, we highlight the major research findings pertaining to innate immune regulation of WNV infection.

  9. Innate Immunity and Saliva in Candida albicans-mediated Oral Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, O; Puri, S; Tati, S; Edgerton, M

    2016-04-01

    The oral cavity is a unique niche where Candida albicans infections occur in immunocompetent as well as immunosuppressed individuals. Here we critically review the significance of human innate immune response in preventing oral candidiasis. One important line of defense against oropharyngeal candidiasis is the oral microbiota that prevents infection by competing for space and nutrients as well as by secreting antagonistic molecules and triggering local inflammatory responses. C. albicans is able to induce mucosal defenses through activation of immune cells and production of cytokines. Also, saliva contains various proteins that affect C. albicans growth positively by promoting mucosal adherence and negatively through immune exclusion and direct fungicidal activity. We further discuss the role of saliva in unifying host innate immune defenses against C. albicans as a communicating medium and how C. albicans overgrowth in the oral cavity may be a result of aberrations ranging from microbial dysbiosis and salivary dysfunction to epithelial damage. Last we underscore select oral diseases in which C. albicans is a contributory microorganism in immune-competent individuals.

  10. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to medi

  11. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163 functions as an innate immune sensor for bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fabriek, B.O.; van Bruggen, R.; Deng, D.M.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Nazmi, K.; Schornagel, K.; Vloet, R.P.M.; Dijkstra, C.D.; van den Berg, T.K.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane glycoprotein receptor CD163 is a member of the scavenger receptor cystein-rich (SRCR) superfamily class B that is highly expressed on resident tissue macrophages in vivo. Previously, the molecule has been shown to act as a receptor for hemoglobin-haptoglobin complexes and to medi

  12. Repertoire of Escherichia coli agonists sensed by innate immunity receptors of the bovine udder and mammary epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcherie Adeline

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Escherichia coli is a frequent cause of clinical mastitis in dairy cows. It has been shown that a prompt response of the mammary gland after E. coli entry into the lumen of the gland is required to control the infection, which means that the early detection of bacteria is of prime importance. Yet, apart from lipopolysaccharide (LPS, little is known of the bacterial components which are detected by the mammary innate immune system. We investigated the repertoire of potential bacterial agonists sensed by the udder and bovine mammary epithelial cells (bMEC during E. coli mastitis by using purified or synthetic molecular surrogates of bacterial agonists of identified pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs. The production of CXCL8 and the influx of leucocytes in milk were the readouts of reactivity of stimulated cultured bMEC and challenged udders, respectively. Quantitative PCR revealed that bMEC in culture expressed the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptors NOD1 and NOD2, along with the Toll-like receptors TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR6, but hardly TLR5. In line with expression data, bMEC proved to react to the cognate agonists C12-iE-DAP (NOD1, Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2, Pam2CSK4 (TLR2/6, pure LPS (TLR4, but not to flagellin (TLR5. As the udder reactivity to NOD1 and TLR5 agonists has never been reported, we tested whether the mammary gland reacted to intramammary infusion of C12-iE-DAP or flagellin. The udder reacted to C12-iE-DAP, but not to flagellin, in line with the reactivity of bMEC. These results extend our knowledge of the reactivity of the bovine mammary gland to bacterial agonists of the innate immune system, and suggest that E. coli can be recognized by several PRRs including NOD1, but unexpectedly not by TLR5. The way the mammary gland senses E. coli is likely to shape the innate immune response and finally the outcome of E. coli mastitis.

  13. Advance research in apoptosis mediating by death receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; LIU Hong-juan; JI Chen-feng; ZHANG He

    2008-01-01

    tissues, and is thought to play a role in tumor immune surveillance by NK, T cells and probably also cells of the innate immune system. The interaction between TNF and its ligand (TRAIL) recruits and activates caspases, TRAIL transmitting the signals through FADD, the probable mechanism is that:activated TRAIL combined with FADD through mutual recognition of Death domain, FADD combined MACH/FLICE(caspase-8), and then activates ICE/CED3 of caspase-8 and other proteins. The vast majority of cancer chemotherapy drug, mainly play a role through mitochondria-induced apoptosis pathway. TRAIL-induced apoptosis rely on the activation of caspase-8 and caspase-3. The mitochondrial membrane potential was reducted and the cytochrome C was released, leading to no damage of mitochondrial integrity after DNA cracking. Caspase is a specific type of acid cysteine protease, in apoptosis directly involved in the process of implementing the early start of apoptosis, signal transduction and apoptosis of late. Caspase-8 plays a key role in the death receptor-mediated apoptosis.

  14. Distribution of innate efflux-mediated aminoglycoside resistance among different Achromobacter species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bador

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Achromobacter spp. are emerging respiratory pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients. Since 2013 the genus Achromobacter includes 15 species for which innate antibiotic resistance is unknown. Previously the AxyXY-OprZ efflux system has been described to confer aminoglycoside (AG resistance in A. xylosoxidans. Nevertheless, some Achromobacter spp. strains are susceptible to AG. This study including 49 Achromobacter isolates reveals that AG resistance is correlated with different Achromobacter spp. It is noteworthy that the axyXY-oprZ operon is detected only in AG-resistant species, including the most frequently encountered in cystic fibrosis patients: A. xylosoxidans, A. ruhlandii, A. dolens and A. insuavis.

  15. Estrogen mediates innate and adaptive immune alterations to influenza infection in pregnant mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pazos

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a leading risk factor for severe complications during an influenza virus infection. Women infected during their second and third trimesters are at increased risk for severe cardiopulmonary complications, premature delivery, and death. Here, we establish a murine model of aerosolized influenza infection during pregnancy. We find significantly altered innate antiviral responses in pregnant mice, including decreased levels of IFN-β, IL-1α, and IFN-γ at early time points of infection. We also find reduced cytotoxic T cell activity and delayed viral clearance. We further demonstrate that pregnancy levels of the estrogen 17-β-estradiol are able to induce key anti-inflammatory phenotypes in immune responses to the virus independently of other hormones or pregnancy-related stressors. We conclude that elevated estrogen levels result in an attenuated anti-viral immune response, and that pregnancy-associated morbidities occur in the context of this anti-inflammatory phenotype.

  16. Bordetella pertussis infection exacerbates influenza virus infection through pertussis toxin-mediated suppression of innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I Ayala

    Full Text Available Pertussis (whooping cough is frequently complicated by concomitant infections with respiratory viruses. Here we report the effect of Bordetella pertussis infection on subsequent influenza virus (PR8 infection in mouse models and the role of pertussis toxin (PT in this effect. BALB/c mice infected with a wild-type strain of B. pertussis (WT and subsequently (up to 14 days later infected with PR8 had significantly increased pulmonary viral titers, lung pathology and mortality compared to mice similarly infected with a PT-deficient mutant strain (ΔPT and PR8. Substitution of WT infection by intranasal treatment with purified active PT was sufficient to replicate the exacerbating effects on PR8 infection in BALB/c and C57/BL6 mice, but the effects of PT were lost when toxin was administered 24 h after virus inoculation. PT had no effect on virus titers in primary cultures of murine tracheal epithelial cells (mTECs in vitro, suggesting the toxin targets an early immune response to increase viral titers in the mouse model. However, type I interferon responses were not affected by PT. Whole genome microarray analysis of gene expression in lung tissue from PT-treated and control PR8-infected mice at 12 and 36 h post-virus inoculation revealed that PT treatment suppressed numerous genes associated with communication between innate and adaptive immune responses. In mice depleted of alveolar macrophages, increase of pulmonary viral titers by PT treatment was lost. PT also suppressed levels of IL-1β, IL-12, IFN-γ, IL-6, KC, MCP-1 and TNF-α in the airways after PR8 infection. Furthermore PT treatment inhibited early recruitment of neutrophils and NK cells to the airways. Together these findings demonstrate that infection with B. pertussis through PT activity predisposes the host to exacerbated influenza infection by countering protective innate immune responses that control virus titers.

  17. Negative regulation of MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated innate antiviral signaling by the dihydroxyacetone kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Feici; Li, Shu; Tian, Yang; Zhang, Min; Xu, Liang-Guo; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Rui-Peng; Chen, Danying; Zhai, Zhonghe; Zhong, Bo; Tien, Po; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2007-07-10

    Viral infection leads to activation of the transcription factors interferon regulatory factor-3 and NF-kappaB, which collaborate to induce type I IFNs. The RNA helicase proteins RIG-I and MDA5 were recently identified as two cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that recognize different species of viral RNAs produced during viral replication. In this study, we identified DAK, a functionally unknown dihydroacetone kinase, as a specific MDA5-interacting protein. DAK was associated with MDA5, but not RIG-I, under physiological conditions. Overexpression of DAK inhibited MDA5- but not RIG-I- or TLR3-mediated IFN-beta induction. Overexpression of DAK also inhibited cytoplasmic dsRNA and SeV-induced activation of the IFN-beta promoter, whereas knockdown of endogenous DAK by RNAi activated the IFN-beta promoter, and increased cytoplasmic dsRNA- or SeV-triggered activation of the IFN-beta promoter. In addition, overexpression of DAK inhibited MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated antiviral activity, whereas DAK RNAi increased cytoplasmic dsRNA-triggered antiviral activity. These findings suggest that DAK is a physiological suppressor of MDA5 and specifically inhibits MDA5- but not RIG-I-mediated innate antiviral signaling.

  18. Stress and innate immunity in carp: corticosteroid receptors and pro-inflammatory cytokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, H.H.; Nabuurs, S.B.; Bury, N.R.; Sturm, A.; Flik, G.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Verburg-van Kemenade, B.M.L.

    2008-01-01

    The stress hormone cortisol is deeply involved in immune regulation in all vertebrates. Common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) express four corticoid receptors that may modulate immune responses: three glucocorticoid receptors (GR); GR1, with two splice variants (GR1a and GR1b), GR2 and a single mineraloc

  19. Multiple sclerosis and polymorphisms of innate pattern recognition receptors TLR1-10, NOD1-2, DDX58, and IFIH1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enevold, Christian; Oturai, Annette Bang; Sørensen, Per Soelberg

    2009-01-01

    Genetic factors are critical in multiple sclerosis (MS), and it is conceivable that the pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system are of pathogenic importance. We therefore developed two novel assays capable of analyzing 42 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the human genes encoding...

  20. Berberine is a dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor antagonist and ameliorates experimentally induced colitis by suppressing innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Masaaki; Takagi, Rie; Kaneko, Atsushi; Matsushita, Sho

    2015-12-15

    Berberine is an herbal alkaloid with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects. Here, we examined the effects of berberine on dopamine receptors and the ensuing anti-inflammatory responses. Berberine was found to be an antagonist at both dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors and ameliorates the development of experimentally induced colitis in mice. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated immune cells, berberine treatment modified cytokine levels, consistent with the effects of the dopamine receptor specific antagonists SCH23390 and L750667. Our findings indicate that dopamine receptor antagonists suppress innate and adaptive immune responses, providing a foundation for their use in combatting inflammatory diseases.

  1. Toll-like Receptors 4 and 5 Cooperatively Initiate the Innate Immune Responses to Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Infection in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijing; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Weiwei; Wu, Han; Wang, Qing; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Han, Daishu

    2016-03-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) may cause epididymitis and impair male fertility. The mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to UPEC infection in the epididymis are not fully understood. This study showed that UPEC induced innate immune responses in mouse epididymal epithelial cells (EECs) through the activation of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR5. Infection with UPEC significantly induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, in EECs through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B. Moreover, UPEC induced the production of type 1 interferons by EECs through the activation of interferon regulatory factor 3. The UPEC-induced innate immune responses were significantly reduced in the EECs of Tlr4 or Tlr5 knockout mice. The innate immune responses were further reduced in Tlr4 and Tlr5 double-knockout EECs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TLR4 and TLR5 cooperatively initiated the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection in vivo. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the epididymal innate immune responses to UPEC infection.

  2. Human respiratory syncytial virus nucleoprotein and inclusion bodies antagonize the innate immune response mediated by MDA5 and MAVS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifland, Aaron W; Jung, Jeenah; Alonas, Eric; Zurla, Chiara; Crowe, James E; Santangelo, Philip J

    2012-08-01

    Currently, the spatial distribution of human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) proteins and RNAs in infected cells is still under investigation, with many unanswered questions regarding the interaction of virus-induced structures and the innate immune system. Very few studies of hRSV have used subcellular imaging as a means to explore the changes in localization of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I)-like receptors or the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, in response to the infection and formation of viral structures. In this investigation, we found that both RIG-I and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) colocalized with viral genomic RNA and the nucleoprotein (N) as early as 6 h postinfection (hpi). By 12 hpi, MDA5 and MAVS were observed within large viral inclusion bodies (IB). We used a proximity ligation assay (PLA) and determined that the N protein was in close proximity to MDA5 and MAVS in IBs throughout the course of the infection. Similar results were found with the transient coexpression of N and the phosphoprotein (P). Additionally, we demonstrated that the localization of MDA5 and MAVS in IBs inhibited the expression of interferon β mRNA 27-fold following Newcastle disease virus infection. From these data, we concluded that the N likely interacts with MDA5, is in close proximity to MAVS, and localizes these molecules within IBs in order to attenuate the interferon response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a specific function for hRSV IBs and of the hRSV N protein as a modulator of the innate immune response.

  3. Cutting edge: Ly9 (CD229), a SLAM family receptor, negatively regulates the development of thymic innate memory-like CD8+ T and invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Bastos, Ricardo; Terhorst, Cox; Angulo, Ana; Engel, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family receptors and the specific adapter signaling lymphocytic activation molecule-associated protein modulate the development of innate-like lymphocytes. In this study, we show that the thymus of Ly9-deficient mice contains an expanded population of CD8 single-positive cells with the characteristic phenotype of innate memory-like CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, the proportion of these innate CD8(+) T cells increased dramatically postinfection with mouse CMV. Gene expression profiling of Ly9-deficient mice thymi showed a significant upregulation of IL-4 and promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger. Analyses of Ly9(-/-)IL4ra(-/-) double-deficient mice revealed that IL-4 was needed to generate the thymic innate CD8(+) T cell subset. Furthermore, increased numbers of invariant NKT cells were detected in Ly9-deficient thymi. In wild-type mice, IL-4 levels induced by α-galactosylceramide injection could be inhibited by a mAb against Ly9. Thus, Ly9 plays a unique role as an inhibitory cell surface receptor regulating the size of the thymic innate CD8(+) T cell pool and the development of invariant NKT cells.

  4. Ly9 (CD229), a SLAM family receptor, negatively regulates the development of thymic innate memory-like CD8+ T and iNKT cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, Jordi; Cuenca, Marta; Romero, Xavier; Bastos, Ricardo; Terhorst, Cox; Angulo, Ana; Engel, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule family (SLAMF) receptors and the specific adapter SLAM-associated protein (SAP) modulate the development of innate-like lymphocytes. Here, we show that the thymus of Ly9-deficient mice contains an expanded population of CD8 single-positive cells with the characteristic phenotype of innate memory-like CD8+ T-cells. Moreover, the proportion of these innate CD8+ T-cells increased dramatically after infection with mouse cytomegalovirus. Gene expression profiling of Ly9-deficient mice thymi showed a significant up-regulation of IL-4 and PLZF. Analyses of Ly9−/−IL4ra−/− double-deficient mice revealed that IL-4 was needed to generate the thymic innate CD8+ T-cell subset. Furthermore, increased numbers of iNKT cells were detected in Ly9-deficient thymi. In wild-type mice IL-4 levels induced by αGalCer injection could be inhibited by a monoclonal antibody against Ly9. Thus, Ly9 plays a unique role as an inhibitory cell-surface receptor regulating the size of the thymic innate CD8+ T-cell pool and the development of iNKT cells. PMID:23225888

  5. Pentraxin 3, a non-redundant soluble pattern recognition receptor involved in innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Alberto; Garlanda, Cecilia; Bottazzi, Barbara

    2003-06-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the first long pentraxin identified. Long pentraxins consist of a C-terminal pentraxin domain, which has sequence similarity to C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P (SAP) component (the classic short pentraxins), and of an unrelated N-terminal portion. PTX3 is made by diverse cell types, most prominently endothelial cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, in response to primary inflammatory signals (e.g. interleukin-1 (IL-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF), lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). It binds diverse ligands, including microbial moieties, C1q and apoptotic cells. Evidence suggests that PTX3 plays a role in the regulation of innate resistance to pathogens, inflammatory reactions, possibly clearance of self-components and female fertility.

  6. Toll-like receptor 4 agonistic antibody promotes innate immunity against severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Akitaka; Nakamura, Shigeki; Seki, Masafumi; Fukudome, Kenji; Iwanaga, Naoki; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Miyazaki, Taiga; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakeya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kohno, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Coinfection with bacteria is a major cause of mortality during influenza epidemics. Recently, Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists were shown to have immunomodulatory functions. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness and mechanisms of the new TLR4 agonistic monoclonal antibody UT12 against secondary pneumococcal pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus in a mouse model. Mice were intranasally inoculated with Streptococcus pneumoniae 2 days after influenza virus inoculation. UT12 was intraperitoneally administered 2 h before each inoculation. Survival rates were significantly increased and body weight loss was significantly decreased by UT12 administration. Additionally, the production of inflammatory mediators was significantly suppressed by the administration of UT12. In a histopathological study, pneumonia in UT12-treated mice was very mild compared to that in control mice. UT12 increased antimicrobial defense through the acceleration of macrophage recruitment into the lower respiratory tract induced by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) pathway-dependent monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) production. Collectively, these findings indicate that UT12 promoted pulmonary innate immunity and may reduce the severity of severe pneumonia induced by coinfection with influenza virus and S. pneumoniae. This immunomodulatory effect of UT12 improves the prognosis of secondary pneumococcal pneumonia and makes UT12 an attractive candidate for treating severe infectious diseases.

  7. Inhibition of NF-κB by a PXR-dependent pathway mediates counter-regulatory activities of rifaximin on innate immunity in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Renga, Barbara; Palladino, Giuseppe; Claudio, D'Amore; Ricci, Patrizia; Distrutti, Eleonora; Barbanti, Miriam; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2011-10-01

    A dysregulated interaction between intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and components of innate immunity is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel diseases. Rifaximin is a poorly absorbed oral antimicrobial agent increasingly used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases that has been demonstrated to act as a gut-specific ligand for the human nuclear receptor pregnane-X receptor (PXR). In the present study we investigated, whether activation of PXR in IEC by rifaximin, emanates counter-regulatory signals and modulates the expression of cytokines or chemokines mechanistically involved in dysregulated intestinal immune homeostasis documented in inflammatory bowel diseases. Our results demonstrate that primary IEC express PXR that regulate the pattern of cytokines and chemokines expressed. PXR silencing decreases TGF-β and IP-10 while increases the expression of TNF-α, IL-8, Rantes and increase the production of PGE2. This pattern is further exacerbated by treating anti-PXR siRNA cells with bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Exposure to rifaximin caused a robust attenuation of generation of inflammatory mediators caused by LPS and increased the generation of TGF-β. PXR silencing completely abrogated these anti-inflammatory effects of rifaximin. By Western blot analysis we found that rifaximin abrogates the binding of NF-κB caused by LPS. Finally, exposure of human colon biopsies from inflammatory bowel diseases patients to rifaximin reduced mRNA levels of IL-8, Rantes, MIP-3α and TNFα induced by LPS. Collectively, these data establish that rifaximin exerts counter-regulatory activities at the interface between enteric bacteria and intestinal epithelial cells. The ability of rifaximin to activate PXR contributes to the maintenance of the intestinal immune homeostasis.

  8. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor Nuclear Export by Ligand-Induced and p38-Mediated Receptor Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Heehyoung; Bai, Wenlong

    2002-01-01

    Estrogen receptors are phosphoproteins which can be activated by ligands, kinase activators, or phosphatase inhibitors. Our previous study showed that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase was involved in estrogen receptor activation by estrogens and MEKK1. Here, we report estrogen receptor-dependent p38 activation by estrogens in endometrial adenocarcinoma cells and in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor α mediated through p38. The phosphorylation site was identified as...

  9. Receptor-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems Targeting to Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioma has been considered to be the most frequent primary tumor within the central nervous system (CNS. The complexity of glioma, especially the existence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB, makes the survival and prognosis of glioma remain poor even after a standard treatment based on surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. This provides a rationale for the development of some novel therapeutic strategies. Among them, receptor-mediated drug delivery is a specific pattern taking advantage of differential expression of receptors between tumors and normal tissues. The strategy can actively transport drugs, such as small molecular drugs, gene medicines, and therapeutic proteins to glioma while minimizing adverse reactions. This review will summarize recent progress on receptor-mediated drug delivery systems targeting to glioma, and conclude the challenges and prospects of receptor-mediated glioma-targeted therapy for future applications.

  10. TLR4 links podocytes with the innate immune system to mediate glomerular injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Miriam C; Banas, Bernhard; Hudkins, Kelly L

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) classically recognize pathogen-associated danger signals but are also activated via endogenous ligands. For evaluation of their role in inflammatory kidney disease, the function of TLR was analyzed in two mouse models of cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative glomerulone......Toll-like receptors (TLR) classically recognize pathogen-associated danger signals but are also activated via endogenous ligands. For evaluation of their role in inflammatory kidney disease, the function of TLR was analyzed in two mouse models of cryoglobulinemic membranoproliferative...... localized TLR4 protein to podocytes. Cultured podocytes also expressed TLR4, and stimulation with TLR4-specific ligands resulted in a marked induction of chemokines; this was reduced by specific knockdown of TLR4 with siRNA. Fibrinogen, a potential endogenous TLR4 ligand, was shown to induce a similar...

  11. Zebrafish mast cells possess an FcɛRI-like receptor and participate in innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da'as, Sahar; Teh, Evelyn M; Dobson, J Tristan; Nasrallah, Gheyath K; McBride, Eileen R; Wang, Hao; Neuberg, Donna S; Marshall, Jean S; Lin, Tong-Jun; Berman, Jason N

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified a zebrafish mast cell (MC) lineage and now aim to determine if these cells function analogously in innate and adaptive immunity like their mammalian counterparts. Intraperitoneal (IP) injection of compound 48/80 or live Aeromonas salmonicida resulted in significant MC degranulation evident histologically and by increased plasma tryptase compared with saline-injected controls (p=0.0006, 0.005, respectively). Pre-treatment with ketotifen abrogated these responses (p=0.0004, 0.005, respectively). Cross-reactivity was observed in zebrafish to anti-human high-affinity IgE receptor gamma (FcɛRIγ) and IgE heavy chain-directed antibodies. Whole mount in situ hybridization on 7-day embryos demonstrated co-localization of cpa5, a MC-specific marker, with myd88, a toll-like receptor adaptor, and zebrafish FcɛRI subunit homologs. Zebrafish injected IP with matched dinitrophenyl-sensitized mouse (anti-DNP) IgE and DNP-BSA or trinitrophenyl-sensitized mouse (anti-TNP) IgE and TNP-BSA demonstrated increased plasma tryptase compared with mismatched controls (p=0.03, 0.010, respectively). These results confirm functional conservation and validate the zebrafish model as an in vivo screening tool for novel MC modulating agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional role of autophagy-mediated proteome remodeling in cell survival signaling and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Robin; Khor, Sinan; Hackett, Sean R; Rabinowitz, Joshua D; Perlman, David H; White, Eileen

    2014-09-18

    Ras-driven cancer cells upregulate basal autophagy that degrades and recycles intracellular proteins and organelles. Autophagy-mediated proteome degradation provides free amino acids to support metabolism and macromolecular synthesis, which confers a survival advantage in starvation and promotes tumorigenesis. While the degradation of isolated protein substrates by autophagy has been implicated in controlling cellular function, the extent and specificity by which autophagy remodels the cellular proteome and the underlying functional consequences were unknown. Here we compared the global proteome of autophagy-functional and -deficient Ras-driven cancer cells, finding that autophagy affects the majority of the proteome yet is highly selective. While levels of vesicle trafficking proteins important for autophagy are preserved during starvation-induced autophagy, deleterious inflammatory response pathway components are eliminated even under basal conditions, preventing cytokine-induced paracrine cell death. This reveals the global, functional impact of autophagy-mediated proteome remodeling on cell survival and identifies critical autophagy substrates that mediate this process.

  13. A rice lectin receptor-like kinase that is involved in innate immune responses also contributes to seed germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yan; Guo, Jianping; Du, Bo; Chen, Rongzhi; Zhu, Lili; He, Guangcun

    2013-11-01

    Seed germination and innate immunity both have significant effects on plant life spans because they control the plant's entry into the ecosystem and provide defenses against various external stresses, respectively. Much ecological evidence has shown that seeds with high vigor are generally more tolerant of various environmental stimuli in the field than those with low vigor. However, there is little genetic evidence linking germination and immunity in plants. Here, we show that the rice lectin receptor-like kinase OslecRK contributes to both seed germination and plant innate immunity. We demonstrate that knocking down the OslecRK gene depresses the expression of α-amylase genes, reducing seed viability and thereby decreasing the rate of seed germination. Moreover, it also inhibits the expression of defense genes, and so reduces the resistance of rice plants to fungal and bacterial pathogens as well as herbivorous insects. Yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that OslecRK interacts with an actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) in vivo via its kinase domain. Moreover, the rice adf mutant exhibited a reduced seed germination rate due to the suppression of α-amylase gene expression. This mutant also exhibited depressed immune responses and reduced resistance to biotic stresses. Our results thus provide direct genetic evidence for a common physiological pathway connecting germination and immunity in plants. They also partially explain the common observation that high-vigor seeds often perform well in the field. The dual effects of OslecRK may be indicative of progressive adaptive evolution in rice.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus large tegument protein BPLF1 contributes to innate immune evasion through interference with toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Gent

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infection triggers an early host response through activation of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLR. TLR signaling cascades induce production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines involved in establishing an anti-viral state as well as in orchestrating ensuing adaptive immunity. To allow infection, replication, and persistence, (herpesviruses employ ingenious strategies to evade host immunity. The human gamma-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a large, enveloped DNA virus persistently carried by more than 90% of adults worldwide. It is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several malignant tumors. EBV activates TLRs, including TLR2, TLR3, and TLR9. Interestingly, both the expression of and signaling by TLRs is attenuated during productive EBV infection. Ubiquitination plays an important role in regulating TLR signaling and is controlled by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs. The EBV genome encodes three proteins reported to exert in vitro deubiquitinase activity. Using active site-directed probes, we show that one of these putative DUBs, the conserved herpesvirus large tegument protein BPLF1, acts as a functional DUB in EBV-producing B cells. The BPLF1 enzyme is expressed during the late phase of lytic EBV infection and is incorporated into viral particles. The N-terminal part of the large BPLF1 protein contains the catalytic site for DUB activity and suppresses TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB at, or downstream of, the TRAF6 signaling intermediate. A catalytically inactive mutant of this EBV protein did not reduce NF-κB activation, indicating that DUB activity is essential for attenuating TLR signal transduction. Our combined results show that EBV employs deubiquitination of signaling intermediates in the TLR cascade as a mechanism to counteract innate anti-viral immunity of infected hosts.

  15. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    Certain pathogens deliver effectors into plant cells to modify host protein targets and thereby suppress immunity. These target modifications can be detected by intracellular immune receptors, or Resistance (R) proteins, that trigger strong immune responses including localized host cell death....... In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  16. Vaccine Adjuvants: Putting Innate Immunity to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Robert L.; Sher, Alan; Seder, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Adjuvants enhance immunity to vaccines and experimental antigens by a variety of mechanisms. In the past decade, many receptors and signaling pathways in the innate immune system have been defined and these innate responses strongly influence the adaptive immune response. The focus of this review is to delineate the innate mechanisms by which adjuvants mediate their effects. We highlight how adjuvants can be used to influence the magnitude and alter the quality of the adaptive response in order to provide maximum protection against specific pathogens. Despite the impressive success of currently approved adjuvants for generating immunity to viral and bacterial infections, there remains a need for improved adjuvants that enhance protective antibody responses, especially in populations that respond poorly to current vaccines. However, the larger challenge is to develop vaccines that generate strong T cell immunity with purified or recombinant vaccine antigens. PMID:21029960

  17. Type 3 innate lymphoid cell depletion is mediated by TLRs in lymphoid tissues of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S

    2015-12-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) type 3, also known as lymphoid tissue inducer cells, plays a major role in both the development and remodeling of organized lymphoid tissues and the maintenance of adaptive immune responses. HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection causes breakdown of intestinal barriers resulting in microbial translocation, leading to systemic immune activation and disease progression. However, the effects of HIV/SIV infection on ILC3 are unknown. Here, we analyzed ILC3 from mucosal and systemic lymphoid tissues in chronically SIV-infected macaques and uninfected controls. ILC3 cells were defined and identified in macaque lymphoid tissues as non-T, non-B (lineage-negative), c-Kit(+)IL-7Rα(+) (CD117(+)CD127(+)) cells. These ILC3 cells highly expressed CD90 (∼ 63%) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor and produced IL-17 (∼ 63%), IL-22 (∼ 36%), and TNF-α (∼ 72%) but did not coexpress CD4 or NK cell markers. The intestinal ILC3 cell loss correlated with the reduction of total CD4(+) T cells and T helper (Th)17 and Th22 cells in the gut during SIV infection (P lymphoid tissues in SIV-infected macaques, further contributing to the HIV-induced impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue structure and function, especially in mucosal tissues.

  18. Asialoglycoprotein receptor mediated hepatocyte targeting - strategies and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Anisha A; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-04-10

    Hepatocyte resident afflictions continue to affect the human population unabated. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) is primarily expressed on hepatocytes and minimally on extra-hepatic cells. This makes it specifically attractive for receptor-mediated drug delivery with minimum concerns of toxicity. ASGPR facilitates internalization by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and exhibits high affinity for carbohydrates specifically galactose, N-acetylgalactosamine and glucose. Isomeric forms of sugar, galactose density and branching, spatial geometry and galactose linkages are key factors influencing ligand-receptor binding. Popular ligands for ASGPR mediated targeting are carbohydrate polymers, arabinogalactan and pullulan. Other ligands include galactose-bearing glycoproteins, glycopeptides and galactose modified polymers and lipids. Drug-ligand conjugates provide a viable strategy; nevertheless ligand-anchored nanocarriers provide an attractive option for ASGPR targeted delivery and are widely explored. The present review details various ligands and nanocarriers exploited for ASGPR mediated delivery of drugs to hepatocytes. Nanocarrier properties affecting ASGPR mediated uptake are discussed at length. The review also highlights the clinical relevance of ASGPR mediated targeting and applications in diagnostics. ASGPR mediated hepatocyte targeting provides great promise for improved therapy of hepatic afflictions.

  19. Type 2 innate lymphoid cells-new members of the "type 2 franchise" that mediate allergic airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mjösberg, Jenny; Spits, Hergen

    2012-05-01

    Type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are members of an ILC family, which contains NK cells and Rorγt(+) ILCs, the latter including lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells and ILCs producing IL-17 and IL-22. ILC2s are dedicated to the production of IL-5 and IL-13 and, as such, ILC2s provide an early and important source of type 2 cytokines critical for helminth expulsion in the gut. Several studies have also demonstrated a role for ILC2s in airway inflammation. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Klein Wolterink et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2012. 42: 1106-1116] show that ILC2s are instrumental in several models of experimental asthma where they significantly contribute to production of IL-5 and IL-13, key cytokines in airway inflammation. This study sheds light over the relative contribution of ILC2s versus T helper type 2 cells (Th2) in type 2 mediated allergen-specific inflammation in the airways as discussed in this commentary.

  20. P2X7 receptor-NADPH oxidase axis mediates protein radical formation and Kupffer cell activation in carbon tetrachloride-mediated steatohepatitis in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Saurabh; Rana, Ritu; Corbett, Jean; Kadiiska, Maria B; Goldstein, Joyce; Mason, Ronald P

    2012-05-01

    While some studies show that carbon tetrachloride-mediated metabolic oxidative stress exacerbates steatohepatitic-like lesions in obese mice, the redox mechanisms that trigger the innate immune system and accentuate the inflammatory cascade remain unclear. Here we have explored the role of the purinergic receptor P2X7-NADPH oxidase axis as a primary event in recognizing the heightened release of extracellular ATP from CCl(4)-treated hepatocytes and generating redox-mediated Kupffer cell activation in obese mice. We found that an underlying condition of obesity led to the formation of protein radicals and posttranslational nitration, primarily in Kupffer cells, at 24h post-CCl(4) administration. The free radical-mediated oxidation of cellular macromolecules, which was NADPH oxidase and P2X7 receptor-dependent, correlated well with the release of TNF-α and MCP-2 from Kupffer cells. The Kupffer cells in CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited increased expression of MHC Class II proteins and showed an activated phenotype. Increased expression of MHC Class II was inhibited by the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin , P2X7 receptor antagonist A438709 hydrochloride, and genetic deletions of the NADPH oxidase p47 phox subunit or the P2X7 receptor. The P2X7 receptor acted upstream of NADPH oxidase activation by up-regulating the expression of the p47 phox subunit and p47 phox binding to the membrane subunit, gp91 phox. We conclude that the P2X7 receptor is a primary mediator of oxidative stress-induced exacerbation of inflammatory liver injury in obese mice via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanisms.

  1. Regulation and ontogeny of subtypes of muscarinic receptors and muscarinic receptor-mediated

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.

    1989-01-01

    The densities of total and M1 muscarinic receptors were measured using the muscarinic receptor antagonists {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine, respectively. Thus, the difference between the density of {sup 3}H-quinuclidinyl benzilate and {sup 3}H-pirenzepine binding sites represents the density of M2 sites. In addition, there is no observable change in either acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown (suggested to be an M1 receptor-mediated response) or in carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation (suggested to be an M2 receptor-mediated response) in slices of cortex+dorsal hippocampus following chronic atropine administration. In other experiments, it has been shown that the M1 and M2 receptors in rat cortex have different ontogenetic profiles. The M2 receptor is present at adult levels at birth, while the M1 receptor develops slowly from low levels at postnatal week 1 to adult levels at postnatal week 3. The expression of acetylcholine-stimulated phosphoinositide breakdown parallels the development of M1 receptors, while the development of carbachol-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation occurs abruptly between weeks 2 and 3 postnatally.

  2. Innate Immunity and Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Shastri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  3. Innate immunity and neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Abhishek; Bonifati, Domenico Marco; Kishore, Uday

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation of central nervous system (CNS) is usually associated with trauma and infection. Neuroinflammation occurs in close relation to trauma, infection, and neurodegenerative diseases. Low-level neuroinflammation is considered to have beneficial effects whereas chronic neuroinflammation can be harmful. Innate immune system consisting of pattern-recognition receptors, macrophages, and complement system plays a key role in CNS homeostasis following injury and infection. Here, we discuss how innate immune components can also contribute to neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration.

  4. Dysbiosis caused by vitamin D receptor deficiency confers colonization resistance to Citrobacter rodentium through modulation of innate lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Waddell, A; Lin, Y-D; Cantorna, M T

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) knockout (KO) mice had fewer Citrobacter rodentium in the feces than wild-type (WT) mice and the kinetics of clearance was faster in VDR KO than WT mice. VDR KO mice had more interleukin-22 (IL-22)-producing innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and more antibacterial peptides than WT mice. The increased ILCs in the VDR KO mice was a cell-autonomous effect of VDR deficiency on ILC frequencies. Bone marrow (BM) transplantation from VDR KO mice into WT resulted in higher ILCs and colonization resistance of the WT mice. Disruption of the gut microbiota using antibiotics in VDR KO mice reversed colonization resistance to C. rodentium infection. Confirming the role of the microbiota in the colonization resistance of VDR KO mice, transfer of the VDR KO microbiota to WT germ-free mice resulted in colonization resistance. Once colonization resistance was overcome, VDR KO mice had increased susceptibility to C. rodentium. VDR expression is a regulator of ILC frequencies, IL-22, dysbiosis, and C. rodentium susceptibility.

  5. Telmisartan ameliorates lipopolysaccharide-induced innate immune response through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation in human monocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tao; Benicky, Julius; Wang, Juan; Orecna, Martina; Sanchez-Lemus, Enrique; Saavedra, Juan M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1) blockers (ARBs) reduce the bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced innate immune response in human circulating monocytes expressing few AT1. To clarify the mechanisms of anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs with different peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ)-activating potencies, we focused our study on telmisartan, an ARB with the highest PPARγ-stimulating activity. Methods Human circulating monocytes and monocytic THP-1 (human acute monocytic leukemia cell line) cells were exposed to 50 ng/ml LPS with or without pre-incubation with telmisartan. AT1 mRNA and protein expressions were determined by real-time PCR and membrane receptor binding assay, respectively. The expression of pro-inflammatory factors was determined by real-time PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA. PPARγ activation was measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and its role was determined by pharmacological inhibition and PPARγ gene silencing. Results In human monocytes, telmisartan significantly attenuated the LPS-induced expression of pro-inflammatory factors, the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2, nuclear factor-κB activation and reactive oxygen species formation. In THP-1 cells, telmisartan significantly reduced LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-α, inhibitor of κB-α, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 gene expression and MCP-1-directed migration. Telmisartan also stimulated the expression of the PPARγ target genes cluster of differentiation 36 and ATP-binding cassette subfamily G member 1 in monocytes. The anti-inflammatory effects of telmisartan were prevented by both PPARγ antagonism and PPARγ gene silencing. Anti-inflammatory effects of ARBs correlated with their PPARγ agonist potency. Conclusion Our observations demonstrate that in human monocytes, ARBs inhibit the LPS-induced pro-inflammatory response to a

  6. The receptor for advanced glycation end products in ventilator-induced lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Maria T; Aslami, Hamid; Tuinman, Pieter Roel; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M; Jongsma, Geartsje; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Roelofs, Joris Jth; Bresser, Paul; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation (MV) can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The innate immune response mediates this iatrogenic inflammatory condition. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that can amplify immune and inflammatory responses.

  7. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins resulting from receptor mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Kuester, Katharina; Kloft, Charlotte; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2009-06-01

    Receptor mediated endocytosis (RME) plays a major role in the disposition of therapeutic protein drugs in the body. It is suspected to be a major source of nonlinear pharmacokinetic behavior observed in clinical pharmacokinetic data. So far, mostly empirical or semi-mechanistic approaches have been used to represent RME. A thorough understanding of the impact of the properties of the drug and of the receptor system on the resulting nonlinear disposition is still missing, as is how to best represent RME in pharmacokinetic models. In this article, we present a detailed mechanistic model of RME that explicitly takes into account receptor binding and trafficking inside the cell and that is used to derive reduced models of RME which retain a mechanistic interpretation. We find that RME can be described by an extended Michaelis-Menten model that accounts for both the distribution and the elimination aspect of RME. If the amount of drug in the receptor system is negligible a standard Michaelis-Menten model is capable of describing the elimination by RME. Notably, a receptor system can efficiently eliminate drug from the extracellular space even if the total number of receptors is small. We find that drug elimination by RME can result in substantial nonlinear pharmacokinetics. The extent of nonlinearity is higher for drug/receptor systems with higher receptor availability at the membrane, or faster internalization and degradation of extracellular drug. Our approach is exemplified for the epidermal growth factor receptor system.

  8. Targeting Toll-like receptor 4 prevents cobalt-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Helen; Mawdesley, Amy Elizabeth; Holland, James Patrick; Kirby, John Andrew; Deehan, David John; Tyson-Capper, Alison Jane

    2016-02-16

    Cobalt-chrome alloy is a widely used biomaterial in joint replacements, dental implants and spinal rods. Although it is an effective and biocompatible material, adverse reactions to metal debris (ARMD) have arisen in a minority of patients, particularly in those with metal-on-metal bearing hip replacements. There is currently no treatment for ARMD and once progressive, early revision surgery of the implant is necessary. Therapeutic agents to prevent, halt or reverse ARMD would therefore be advantageous. Cobalt ions activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), an innate immune receptor responsible for inflammatory responses to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulting in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. We hypothesised that anti-TLR4 neutralising antibodies, reported to inhibit TLR4-mediated inflammation, could prevent the inflammatory response to cobalt ions in an in vitro macrophage cell culture model. This study shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody inhibited cobalt-mediated increases in pro-inflammatory IL8, CCL20 and IL1A expression, as well as IL-8 secretion. In contrast, a polyclonal antibody did not prevent the effect of cobalt ions on either IL-8 or IL1A expression, although it did have a small effect on the CCL20 response. Interestingly, both antibodies inhibited cobalt-mediated neutrophil migration although the greater effect was observed with the monoclonal antibody. In summary our data shows that a monoclonal anti-TLR4 antibody can inhibit cobalt-mediated inflammatory responses while a polyclonal antibody only inhibits the effect of specific cytokines. Anti-TLR4 antibodies have therapeutic potential in ARMD although careful antibody design is required to ensure that the LPS response is preserved.

  9. Nuclear receptors : mediators and modifiers of inflammation-induced cholestasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Jaap; Karpen, Saul J.; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Inflammation-induced cholestasis (IIC) is a frequently occurring phenomenon. A central role in its pathogenesis is played by nuclear receptors (NRs). These ligand-activated transcription factors not only regulate basal expression of hepatobiliary transport systems, but also mediate adaptive response

  10. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2017-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL) improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body. PMID:28218655

  11. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Douglas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body.

  12. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer E; Cohen, Noam A

    2017-02-17

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL) improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body.

  13. Innate and adaptive immune responses in allergic contact dermatitis and autoimmune skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edele, Fanny; Esser, Philipp R; Lass, Christian; Laszczyk, Melanie N; Oswald, Eva; Strüh, Christian M; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Martin, Stefan F

    2007-12-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is induced by chemicals or metal ions. A hallmark of this T cell mediated skin disease is the activation of the innate immune system by contact allergens. This immune response results in inflammation and is a prerequisite for the activation of the adaptive immune system with tissue-specific migration of effector and regulatory T cells. Recent studies have begun to address in detail the innate immune cells as well as the innate receptors on these cells and the associated signaling pathways which lead to skin inflammation. We review here recent findings regarding innate and adaptive immune responses and immune regulation of contact dermatitis and other skin diseases as well as recent developments towards an in vitro assessment of the allergenic potential of chemicals. The elucidation of the innate inflammatory pathways, cellular components and mediators will help to identify new drug targets for more efficient treatment of allergic contact dermatitis and hopefully also for its prevention.

  14. DC-SIGN activation mediates the differential effects of SAP and CRP on the innate immune system and inhibits fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nehemiah; Pilling, Darrell; Gomer, Richard H

    2015-07-07

    Fibrosis is caused by scar tissue formation in internal organs and is associated with 45% of deaths in the United States. Two closely related human serum proteins, serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP), strongly affect fibrosis. In multiple animal models, and in Phase 1 and Phase 2 clinical trials, SAP affects several aspects of the innate immune system to reduce fibrosis, whereas CRP appears to potentiate fibrosis. However, SAP and CRP bind the same Fcγ receptors (FcγR) with similar affinities, and why SAP and CRP have opposing effects is unknown. Here, we report that SAP but not CRP binds the receptor DC-SIGN (SIGN-R1) to affect the innate immune system, and that FcγR are not necessary for SAP function. A polycyclic aminothiazole DC-SIGN ligand and anti-DC-SIGN antibodies mimic SAP effects in vitro. In mice, the aminothiazole reduces neutrophil accumulation in a model of acute lung inflammation and, at 0.001 mg/kg, alleviates pulmonary fibrosis by increasing levels of the immunosuppressant IL-10. DC-SIGN (SIGN-R1) is present on mouse lung epithelial cells, and SAP and the aminothiazole potentiate IL-10 production from these cells. Our data suggest that SAP activates DC-SIGN to regulate the innate immune system differently from CRP, and that DC-SIGN is a target for antifibrotics.

  15. NOD1 cooperates with TLR2 to enhance T cell receptor-mediated activation in CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine C Mercier

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRR, like Toll-like receptors (TLR and NOD-like receptors (NLR, are involved in the detection of microbial infections and tissue damage by cells of the innate immune system. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that TLR2 can additionally function as a costimulatory receptor on CD8 T cells. Here, we establish that the intracytosolic receptor NOD1 is expressed and functional in CD8 T cells. We show that C12-iEDAP, a synthetic ligand for NOD1, has a direct impact on both murine and human CD8 T cells, increasing proliferation and effector functions of cells activated via their T cell receptor (TCR. This effect is dependent on the adaptor molecule RIP2 and is associated with an increased activation of the NF-κB, JNK and p38 signaling pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrate that NOD1 stimulation can cooperate with TLR2 engagement on CD8 T cells to enhance TCR-mediated activation. Altogether our results indicate that NOD1 might function as an alternative costimulatory receptor in CD8 T cells. Our study provides new insights into the function of NLR in T cells and extends to NOD1 the recent concept that PRR stimulation can directly control T cell functions.

  16. Glutamate receptor-mediated toxicity in optic nerve oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Carlos; Sánchez-Gómez, M. Victoria; Martínez-Millán, Luis; Miledi, Ricardo

    1997-01-01

    In cultured oligodendrocytes isolated from perinatal rat optic nerves, we have analyzed the expression of ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits as well as the effect of the activation of these receptors on oligodendrocyte viability. Reverse transcription–PCR, in combination with immunocytochemistry, demonstrated that most oligodendrocytes differentiated in vitro express the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR3 and GluR4 and the kainate receptor subunits GluR6, GluR7, KA1 and KA2. Acute and chronic exposure to kainate caused extensive oligodendrocyte death in culture. This effect was partially prevented by the AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and was completely abolished by the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), suggesting that both AMPA and kainate receptors mediate the observed kainate toxicity. Furthermore, chronic application of kainate to optic nerves in vivo resulted in massive oligodendrocyte death which, as in vitro, could be prevented by coinfusion of the toxin with CNQX. These findings suggest that excessive activation of the ionotropic glutamate receptors expressed by oligodendrocytes may act as a negative regulator of the size of this cell population. PMID:9238063

  17. Patterns of oligonucleotide sequences in viral and host cell RNA identify mediators of the host innate immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Greenbaum

    Full Text Available The innate immune response provides a first line of defense against pathogens by targeting generic differential features that are present in foreign organisms but not in the host. These innate responses generate selection forces acting both in pathogens and hosts that further determine their co-evolution. Here we analyze the nucleic acid sequence fingerprints of these selection forces acting in parallel on both host innate immune genes and ssRNA viral genomes. We do this by identifying dinucleotide biases in the coding regions of innate immune response genes in plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and then use this signal to identify other significant host innate immune genes. The persistence of these biases in the orthologous groups of genes in humans and chickens is also examined. We then compare the significant motifs in highly expressed genes of the innate immune system to those in ssRNA viruses and study the evolution of these motifs in the H1N1 influenza genome. We argue that the significant under-represented motif pattern of CpG in an AU context--which is found in both the ssRNA viruses and innate genes, and has decreased throughout the history of H1N1 influenza replication in humans--is immunostimulatory and has been selected against during the co-evolution of viruses and host innate immune genes. This shows how differences in host immune biology can drive the evolution of viruses that jump into species with different immune priorities than the original host.

  18. Age-dependent maturation of Toll-like receptor-mediated cytokine responses in Gambian infants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Burl

    Full Text Available The global burden of neonatal and infant mortality due to infection is staggering, particularly in resource-poor settings. Early childhood vaccination is one of the major interventions that can reduce this burden, but there are specific limitations to inducing effective immunity in early life, including impaired neonatal leukocyte production of Th1-polarizing cytokines to many stimuli. Characterizing the ontogeny of Toll-like receptor (TLR-mediated innate immune responses in infants may shed light on susceptibility to infection in this vulnerable age group, and provide insights into TLR agonists as candidate adjuvants for improved neonatal vaccines. As little is known about the leukocyte responses of infants in resource-poor settings, we characterized production of Th1-, Th2-, and anti-inflammatory-cytokines in response to agonists of TLRs 1-9 in whole blood from 120 Gambian infants ranging from newborns (cord blood to 12 months of age. Most of the TLR agonists induced TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 in cord blood. The greatest TNFα responses were observed for TLR4, -5, and -8 agonists, the highest being the thiazoloquinoline CLO75 (TLR7/8 that also uniquely induced cord blood IFNγ production. For most agonists, TLR-mediated TNFα and IFNγ responses increased from birth to 1 month of age. TLR8 agonists also induced the greatest production of the Th1-polarizing cytokines TNFα and IFNγ throughout the first year of life, although the relative responses to the single TLR8 agonist and the combined TLR7/8 agonist changed with age. In contrast, IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10 responses to most agonists were robust at birth and remained stable through 12 months of age. These observations provide fresh insights into the ontogeny of innate immunity in African children, and may inform development of age-specific adjuvanted vaccine formulations important for global health.

  19. [Innate immunity against viruses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drutskaia, M S; Belousov, P V; Nedospasov, S A

    2011-01-01

    Viruses are obligate parasites which are able to infect cells of all living organisms. Multiple antiviral defense mechanisms have appeared early in evolution of the immune system. Higher vertebrates have the most complex antiviral immunity which is based on both innate and adoptive immune responses. However, majority of living organisms, including plants and invertebrates, rely exclusively on innate immune mechanisms for protection against viral infections. There are some striking similarities in several components of the innate immune recognition between mammals, plants and insects, rendering these signaling cascades as highly conserved in the evolution of the immune system. This review summarizes recent advances in the field of innate immune recognition of viruses, with particular interest on pattern-recognition receptors.

  20. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  1. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR) in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, C.M.S.; Raes, G.; Ghassabeh, G.H.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.; Pontes, M.J.S.L.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of

  2. Cannabinoids and Innate Immunity: Taking a Toll on Neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Downer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The biologically active components of cannabis have therapeutic potential in neuroinflammatory disorders due to their anti-inflammatory propensity. Cannabinoids influence immune function in both the peripheral and the central nervous system (CNS, and the components of the cannabinoid system, the cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids, have been detected on immune cells as well as in brain glia. Neuroinflammation is the complex innate immune response of neural tissue to control infection and eliminate pathogens, and Toll-like receptors (TLRs, a major family of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that mediate innate immunity, have emerged as players in the neuroinflammatory processes underpinning various CNS diseases. This review will highlight evidence that cannabinoids interact with the immune system by impacting TLR-mediated signaling events, which may provide cues for devising novel therapeutic approaches for cannabinoid ligands.

  3. Toll-like receptor 8 ligands activate a vitamin D mediated autophagic response that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grant R; Spector, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are important in recognizing microbial pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy, and in the mediation of immune activation during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV) infection. We report here that TLR8 activation in human macrophages induces the expression of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP), the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP27B1), which 1α-hydroxylates the inactive form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, into its biologically active metabolite. Moreover, we demonstrate using RNA interference, chemical inhibitors and vitamin D deficient media that TLR8 agonists inhibit HIV through a vitamin D and CAMP dependent autophagic mechanism. These data support an important role for vitamin D in the control of HIV infection, and provide a biological explanation for the benefits of vitamin D. These findings also provide new insights into potential novel targets to prevent and treat HIV infection.

  4. Fcγ receptor-mediated inflammation inhibits axon regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Anti-glycan/ganglioside antibodies are the most common immune effectors found in patients with Guillain-Barré Syndrome, which is a peripheral autoimmune neuropathy. We previously reported that disease-relevant anti-glycan autoantibodies inhibited axon regeneration, which echo the clinical association of these antibodies and poor recovery in Guillain-Barré Syndrome. However, the specific molecular and cellular elements involved in this antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration are not previously defined. This study examined the role of Fcγ receptors and macrophages in the antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration. A well characterized antibody passive transfer sciatic nerve crush and transplant models were used to study the anti-ganglioside antibody-mediated inhibition of axon regeneration in wild type and various mutant and transgenic mice with altered expression of specific Fcγ receptors and macrophage/microglia populations. Outcome measures included behavior, electrophysiology, morphometry, immunocytochemistry, quantitative real-time PCR, and western blotting. We demonstrate that the presence of autoantibodies, directed against neuronal/axonal cell surface gangliosides, in the injured mammalian peripheral nerves switch the proregenerative inflammatory environment to growth inhibitory milieu by engaging specific activating Fcγ receptors on recruited monocyte-derived macrophages to cause severe inhibition of axon regeneration. Our data demonstrate that the antibody orchestrated Fcγ receptor-mediated switch in inflammation is one mechanism underlying inhibition of axon regeneration. These findings have clinical implications for nerve repair and recovery in antibody-mediated immune neuropathies. Our results add to the complexity of axon regeneration in injured peripheral and central nervous systems as adverse effects of B cells and autoantibodies on neural injury and repair are increasingly recognized.

  5. The immunobiology of Campylobacter jejuni: Innate immunity and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phongsisay, Vongsavanh

    2016-04-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Campylobacter jejuni causes gastroenteritis and Guillain-Barré syndrome in humans. Recent advances in the immunobiology of C. jejuni have been made. This review summarizes C. jejuni-binding innate receptors and highlights the role of innate immunity in autoimmune diseases. This human pathogen produces a variety of glycoconjugates, including human ganglioside-like determinants and multiple activators of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Furthermore, C. jejuni targets MyD88, NLRP3 inflammasome, TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF), sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (Siglecs), macrophage galactose-type lectin (MGL), and immunoglobulin-like receptors (TREM2, LMIR5/CD300b). The roles of these innate receptors and signaling molecules have been extensively studied. MyD88-mediated TLR activation or inflammasome-dependent IL-1β secretion is essential for autoimmune induction. TRIF mediates the production of type I interferons that promote humoral immune responses and immunoglobulin class-switching. Siglec-1 and Siglec-7 interact directly with gangliosides. Siglec-1 activation enhances phagocytosis and inflammatory responses. MGL internalizes GalNAc-containing glycoconjugates. TREM2 is well-known for its role in phagocytosis. LMIR5 recognizes C. jejuni components and endogenous sulfoglycolipids. Several lines of evidence from animal models of autoimmune diseases suggest that simultaneous activation of innate immunity in the presence of autoreactive lymphocytes or antigen mimicry may link C. jejuni to immunopathology.

  6. The E3-ligase TRIM family of proteins regulates signaling pathways triggered by innate immune pattern-recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, Gijs A; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Sánchez-Aparicio, Maria Teresa; Maestre, Ana M; Valdiviezo, Julio; Shi, Mude; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Jung, Jae; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-02-21

    Innate immunity conferred by the type I interferon is critical for antiviral defense. To date only a limited number of tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in modulation of innate immunity and anti-microbial activity. Here we report the complementary DNA cloning and systematic analysis of all known 75 human TRIMs. We demonstrate that roughly half of the 75 TRIM-family members enhanced the innate immune response and that they do this at multiple levels in signaling pathways. Moreover, messenger RNA levels and localization of most of these TRIMs were found to be altered during viral infection, suggesting that their regulatory activities are highly controlled at both pre- and posttranscriptional levels. Taken together, our data demonstrate a very considerable dedication of this large protein family to the positive regulation of the antiviral response, which supports the notion that this family of proteins evolved as a component of innate immunity.

  7. Scavenger Receptor Mediates Systemic RNA Interference in Ticks

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaw Min Aung; Damdinsuren Boldbaatar; Rika Umemiya-Shirafuji; Min Liao; Xuan Xuenan; Hiroshi Suzuki; Remil Linggatong Galay; Tetsuya Tanaka; Kozo Fujisaki

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference is an efficient method to silence gene and protein expressions. Here, the class B scavenger receptor CD36 (SRB) mediated the uptake of exogenous dsRNAs in the induction of the RNAi responses in ticks. Unfed female Haemaphysalis longicornis ticks were injected with a single or a combination of H. longicornis SRB (HlSRB) dsRNA, vitellogenin-1 (HlVg-1) dsRNA, and vitellogenin receptor (HlVgR) dsRNA. We found that specific and systemic silencing of the HlSRB, HlVg-1, and HlVgR ge...

  8. Inhibition of toll-like receptor 3-4 with ethanolic extract of propolis on innate immunity in diabetes mellitus mice (Mus musculus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristiwanto, Bambang; Soewondo, A.; Sumitro, Sutiman B.; Rifa'i, Muhaimin

    2017-05-01

    One of the most significant problems today is to treat the effects of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. Thus, this study evaluated the ability of an ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) to reduce inflammation in diabetes treatment. The used mice with STZ-induced diabetes mellitus (SID) and the expression of Toll-Like Receptor 3-4 was analyzed in their innate immunity cells. The SID mice had a higher TLR 3-4 expression compared with the healthy control group. Treatment of EEP in SID using three different doses significantly decreased the number of B cells with TLR 3-4 expression. This suggesting that EEP treatment decreases TLR3 & TLR4 expression on innate immunity (especially B cells) from over expression in SID which can affect the acute inflammatory and aggravate the diabetes condition. Even relatively low doses of propolis extract can decrease TLR3 and TLR4 expressed by B cell.

  9. Innate immune functions of microglia isolated from human glioma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimm Elizabeth

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Innate immunity is considered the first line of host defense and microglia presumably play a critical role in mediating potent innate immune responses to traumatic and infectious challenges in the human brain. Fundamental impairments of the adaptive immune system in glioma patients have been investigated; however, it is unknown whether microglia are capable of innate immunity and subsequent adaptive anti-tumor immune responses within the immunosuppressive tumor micro-environment of human glioma patients. We therefore undertook a novel characterization of the innate immune phenotype and function of freshly isolated human glioma-infiltrating microglia (GIM. Methods GIM were isolated by sequential Percoll purification from patient tumors immediately after surgical resection. Flow cytometry, phagocytosis and tumor cytotoxicity assays were used to analyze the phenotype and function of these cells. Results GIM expressed significant levels of Toll-like receptors (TLRs, however they do not secrete any of the cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α critical in developing effective innate immune responses. Similar to innate macrophage functions, GIM can mediate phagocytosis and non-MHC restricted cytotoxicity. However, they were statistically less able to mediate tumor cytotoxicity compared to microglia isolated from normal brain. In addition, the expression of Fas ligand (FasL was low to absent, indicating that apoptosis of the incoming lymphocyte population may not be a predominant mode of immunosuppression by microglia. Conclusion We show for the first time that despite the immunosuppressive environment of human gliomas, GIM are capable of innate immune responses such as phagocytosis, cytotoxicity and TLR expression but yet are not competent in secreting key cytokines. Further understanding of these innate immune functions could play a critical role in understanding and developing effective immunotherapies to malignant human gliomas.

  10. The Receptors that Mediate the Direct Lethality of Anthrax Toxin

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    Stephen H. Leppla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor endothelium marker-8 (TEM8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2 are the two well-characterized anthrax toxin receptors, each containing a von Willebrand factor A (vWA domain responsible for anthrax protective antigen (PA binding. Recently, a cell-based analysis was used to implicate another vWA domain-containing protein, integrin β1 as a third anthrax toxin receptor. To explore whether proteins other than TEM8 and CMG2 function as anthrax toxin receptors in vivo, we challenged mice lacking TEM8 and/or CMG2. Specifically, we used as an effector protein the fusion protein FP59, a fusion between the PA-binding domain of anthrax lethal factor (LF and the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A. FP59 is at least 50-fold more potent than LF in the presence of PA, with 2 μg PA + 2 μg FP59 being sufficient to kill a mouse. While TEM8−/− and wild type control mice succumbed to a 5 μg PA + 5 μg FP59 challenge, CMG2−/− mice were completely resistant to this dose, confirming that CMG2 is the major anthrax toxin receptor in vivo. To detect whether any toxic effects are mediated by TEM8 or other putative receptors such as integrin β1, CMG2−/−/TEM8−/− mice were challenged with as many as five doses of 50 μg PA + 50 μg FP59. Strikingly, the CMG2−/−/TEM8−/− mice were completely resistant to the 5-dose challenge. These results strongly suggest that TEM8 is the only minor anthrax toxin receptor mediating direct lethality in vivo and that other proteins implicated as receptors do not play this role.

  11. The genetics of the bitter taste receptor T2R38 in upper airway innate immunity and implications for chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Noam A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) refractory to therapeutic intervention may involve a particularly resistant infection known as a bacterial biofilm. Critical to biofilm formation is the microbial process of quorum sensing whereby microbes secrete factors that regulate the expression of microbial genes involved in biofilm formation, persistence, and virulence. Here, we review recent work demonstrating that the bitter taste receptor T2R38, expressed on the apical surface of the sinonasal epithelium, serves a sentinel role in eavesdropping on microbial quorum-sensing communications and regulates localized innate biocidal defenses. Furthermore, studies investigating whether cilia are necessary for T2R38 expression and function in the upper airway are presented. Primary human sinonasal air-liquid interface cultures were used to elucidate cellular pathways responsive to quorum-sensing molecules, whereas clinical studies investigated the contribution of T2R38 polymorphisms to recalcitrant chronic rhinosinusitis. T2R38 is stimulated by acyl-homoserine lactones, gram-negative quorum-sensing molecules, and subsequently activates nitric oxide-dependent innate immune responses. The formation of mature cilia is necessary for T2R38 expression and function, and polymorphisms that underlie T2R38 functionality appear to be involved in susceptibility to upper respiratory infection and recalcitrant CRS. Taste receptors are emerging as critical components of early-phase respiratory innate immunity, detecting molecules used by microbes to communicate and stimulating localized host defenses. Genetic polymorphisms are very common within the taste receptors, and recent linkage studies have demonstrated associations of taste receptor genetics with CRS. Lastly, ciliogenesis, which is often impacted in CRS, is critical for the functional expression of T2R38. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:44-51, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Receptor tyrosine phosphatase R-PTP-kappa mediates homophilic binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Jiang, Y P; Friedlander, D

    1994-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine phosphatases (R-PTPases) feature PTPase domains in the context of a receptor-like transmembrane topology. The R-PTPase R-PTP-kappa displays an extracellular domain composed of fibronectin type III motifs, a single immunoglobulin domain, as well as a recently defined MAM domain (Y.......-P. Jiang, H. Wang, P. D'Eustachio, J.M. Musacchio, J. Schlessinger, and J. Sap, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2942-2951, 1993). We report here that R-PTP-kappa can mediate homophilic intercellular interaction. Inducible expression of the R-PTP-kappa protein in heterologous cells results in formation of stable...... cellular aggregates strictly consisting of R-PTP-kappa-expressing cells. Moreover, the purified extracellular domain of R-PTP-kappa functions as a substrate for adhesion by cells expressing R-PTP-kappa and induces aggregation of coated synthetic beads. R-PTP-kappa-mediated intercellular adhesion does...

  13. NMDA and AMPA/kainate glutamatergic receptors in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex modulate the elaborated defensive behavior and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Medeiros, Priscila; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-proprionate (AMPA)/kainate receptors of the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) on the panic attack-like reactions evoked by γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus (MH). Rats were pretreated with NaCl 0.9%, LY235959 (NMDA receptor antagonist), and NBQX (AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist) in the PL at 3 different concentrations. Ten minutes later, the MH was treated with bicuculline, and the defensive responses were recorded for 10 min. The antagonism of NMDA receptors in the PL decreased the frequency and duration of all defensive behaviors evoked by the stimulation of the MH and reduced the innate fear-induced antinociception. However, the pretreatment of the PL cortex with NBQX was able to decrease only part of defensive responses and innate fear-induced antinociception. The present findings suggest that the NMDA-glutamatergic system of the PL is critically involved in panic-like responses and innate fear-induced antinociception and those AMPA/kainate receptors are also recruited during the elaboration of fear-induced antinociception and in panic attack-related response. The activation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission of PL division of the MPFC during the elaboration of oriented behavioral reactions elicited by the chemical stimulation of the MH recruits mainly NMDA receptors in comparison with AMPA/kainate receptors.

  14. Cerebellar vermis H₂ receptors mediate fear memory consolidation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianlorenço, A C L; Riboldi, A M; Silva-Marques, B; Mattioli, R

    2015-02-01

    Histaminergic fibers are present in the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum and have a high density in the vermis and flocullus. Evidence supports that the cerebellar histaminergic system is involved in memory consolidation. Our recent study showed that histamine injections facilitate the retention of an inhibitory avoidance task, which was abolished by pretreatment with an H2 receptor antagonist. In the present study, we investigated the effects of intracerebellar post training injections of H1 and H2 receptor antagonists as well as the selective H2 receptor agonist on fear memory consolidation. The cerebellar vermi of male mice were implanted with guide cannulae, and after three days of recovery, the inhibitory avoidance test was performed. Immediately after a training session, animals received a microinjection of the following histaminergic drugs: experiment 1, saline or chlorpheniramine (0.016, 0.052 or 0.16 nmol); experiment 2, saline or ranitidine (0.57, 2.85 or 5.07 nmol); and experiment 3, saline or dimaprit (1, 2 or 4 nmol). Twenty-four hours later, a retention test was performed. The data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests. Animals microinjected with chlorpheniramine did not show any behavioral effects at the doses that we used. Intra-cerebellar injection of the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine inhibited, while the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit facilitated, memory consolidation, suggesting that H2 receptors mediate memory consolidation in the inhibitory avoidance task in mice.

  15. A distinct role of Riplet-mediated K63-Linked polyubiquitination of the RIG-I repressor domain in human antiviral innate immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Oshiumi

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is essential for controlling viral infections, but several viruses have evolved strategies to escape innate immunity. RIG-I is a cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor that triggers the signal to induce type I interferon production in response to viral infection. RIG-I activation is regulated by the K63-linked polyubiquitin chain mediated by Riplet and TRIM25 ubiquitin ligases. TRIM25 is required for RIG-I oligomerization and interaction with the IPS-1 adaptor molecule. A knockout study revealed that Riplet was essential for RIG-I activation. However the molecular mechanism underlying RIG-I activation by Riplet remains unclear, and the functional differences between Riplet and TRIM25 are also unknown. A genetic study and a pull-down assay indicated that Riplet was dispensable for RIG-I RNA binding activity but required for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I. Mutational analysis demonstrated that Lys-788 within the RIG-I repressor domain was critical for Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination and that Riplet was required for the release of RIG-I autorepression of its N-terminal CARDs, which leads to the association of RIG-I with TRIM25 ubiquitin ligase and TBK1 protein kinase. Our data indicate that Riplet is a prerequisite for TRIM25 to activate RIG-I signaling. We investigated the biological importance of this mechanism in human cells and found that hepatitis C virus (HCV abrogated this mechanism. Interestingly, HCV NS3-4A proteases targeted the Riplet protein and abrogated endogenous RIG-I polyubiquitination and association with TRIM25 and TBK1, emphasizing the biological importance of this mechanism in human antiviral innate immunity. In conclusion, our results establish that Riplet-mediated K63-linked polyubiquitination released RIG-I RD autorepression, which allowed the access of positive factors to the RIG-I protein.

  16. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

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    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  17. Receptor-mediated choreography of life and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anjana; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2003-09-01

    The cytokine tumor necrosis factor was originally identified as a protein that kills tumor cells. So far, 18 distinct members of this family have been identified. All of them regulate cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, and cell death, also called apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by TNF, and other members of the family, for example, FasL, VEGI, and TRAIL is mediated through death receptors. The apoptotic signals by these cytokines are transduced by eight different death domain- (DD) containing receptors (TNFR1, also called DR1; Fas, also called DR2; DR3, DR4, DR5, DR6, NGFR, and EDAR). The intracellular portion of all these receptors contains a region approximately 80 amino acids long referred to as the "death domain." Upon activation by its ligand, the DD recruits various proteins that mediate both death and proliferation of the cells. These proteins in turn recruit other proteins via their DDs or death effector domains. The actual destruction of the cell, however, is accomplished by serial activation of a family of proteases referred to as caspases. Cell death is negatively regulated by a family of proteins that includes decoy receptors, silencer of DD, sentrin, cellular FLICE inhibitory protein, cellular inhibitors of apoptosis, and survivin. This review is an attempt to describe how these negative and positive players of cell death perform a harmonious dance with each other.

  18. Transitions in oral and intestinal microflora composition and innate immune receptor-dependent stimulation during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Osaka, Toshifumi; Tawaratsumida, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Chen, Grace Y; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2010-02-01

    Commensal bacteria possess immunostimulatory activities that can modulate host responses to affect development and homeostasis in the intestine. However, how different populations of resident bacteria stimulate the immune system remains largely unknown. We characterized here the ability of intestinal and oral microflora to stimulate individual pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in bone marrow-derived macrophages and mesothelial cells. The intestinal but not oral microflora elicited age- and cell type-specific immunostimulation. The immunostimulatory activity of the intestinal microflora varied among individual mice but was largely mediated via Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) during breast-feeding, whereas it became TLR4 independent after weaning. This transition was associated with a change from a microflora rich in TLR4-stimulatory proteobacteria to one dominated by Bacteroidales and/or Clostridiales that poorly stimulate TLR4. The major stimulatory activity of the intestinal microflora was still intact in NOD1-, NOD2-, TLR2-, TLR4-, TLR5-, TLR9-, TLR11-, ASC-, or RICK-deficient cells but still relied on the adaptor MyD88. These studies demonstrate a transition in the intestinal microflora accompanied by a dynamic change of its ability to stimulate different PRRs which control intestinal homeostasis.

  19. Enhancement of innate immune system in monocot rice by transferring the dicotyledonous elongation factor Tu receptor EFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen Lu; Huiqin Wang; Shanzhi Wang; Wendi Jiang; Changlin Shan; Bin Li; Jun Yang; Shiyong Zhang; Wenxian Sun

    2015-01-01

    The elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu) receptor (EFR) in cruciferous plants specifical y recognizes the N-terminal acetylated elf18 region of bacterial EF-Tu and thereby activates plant immunity. It has been demonstrated that Arabidopsis EFR confers broad-spectrum bacterial resistance in the EFR transgenic solanaceous plants. Here, the transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica cv. Zhonghua 17) and cel cultures with constitutive expression of AtEFR were developed to investigate whether AtEFR senses EF-Tu and thus enhances bacterial resistance in the monocot plants. We demonstrated that the Xanthomonas oryzae-derived elf18 peptide induced oxidative burst and mitogen-activated protein kinase activa-tion in the AtEFR transgenic rice cel s and plants, respectively. Pathogenesis-related genes, such as OsPBZ1, were upregulated dramatical y in transgenic rice plant and cel lines in response to elf18 stimulation. Importantly, pretreatment with elf18 trig-gered strong resistance to X. oryzae pv. oryzae in the transgenic plants, which was largely dependent on the AtEFR expression level. These plants also exhibited enhanced resistance to rice bacterial brown stripe, but not to rice fungal blast. Col ectively, the results indicate that the rice plants with heterologous expression of AtEFR recognize bacterial EF-Tu and exhibit enhanced broad-spectrum bacterial disease resistance and that pattern recognition receptor-mediated immunity may be manipulated across the two plant classes, dicots and monocots.

  20. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors

  1. Lactobacillus reuteri Surface Mucus Adhesins Upregulate Inflammatory Responses Through Interactions With Innate C-Type Lectin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bene, Krisztián P; Kavanaugh, Devon W; Leclaire, Charlotte; Gunning, Allan P; MacKenzie, Donald A; Wittmann, Alexandra; Young, Ian D; Kawasaki, Norihito; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Juge, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    The vertebrate gut symbiont Lactobacillus reuteri exhibits strain-specific adhesion and health-promoting properties. Here, we investigated the role of the mucus adhesins, CmbA and MUB, upon interaction of L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 strains with human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We showed that mucus adhesins increased the capacity of L. reuteri strains to interact with moDCs and promoted phagocytosis. Our data also indicated that mucus adhesins mediate anti- and pro-inflammatory effects by the induction of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 cytokines. L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 and ATCC 53608 were exclusively able to induce moDC-mediated Th1 and Th17 immune responses. We further showed that purified MUB activates moDCs and induces Th1 polarized immune responses associated with increased IFNγ production. MUB appeared to mediate these effects via binding to C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), as shown using cell reporter assays. Blocking moDCs with antibodies against DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) or Dectin-2 did not affect the uptake of the MUB-expressing strain, but reduced the production of TNF-α and IL-6 by moDCs significantly, in line with the Th1 polarizing capacity of moDCs. The direct interaction between MUB and CLRs was further confirmed by atomic force spectroscopy. Taken together these data suggest that mucus adhesins expressed at the cell surface of L. reuteri strains may exert immunoregulatory effects in the gut through modulating the Th1-promoting capacity of DCs upon interaction with C-type lectins.

  2. Protease-Activated Receptor-2 Regulates the Innate Immune Response to Viral Infection in a Coxsackievirus B3–Induced Myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weithauser, Alice; Bobbert, Peter; Antoniak, Silvio; Böhm, Andreas; Rauch, Bernhard H.; Klingel, Karin; Savvatis, Konstantinos; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Tschope, Carsten; Stroux, Andrea; Zeichhardt, Heinz; Poller, Wolfgang; Mackman, Nigel; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Rauch, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study sought to evaluate the role of protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) in coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3)–induced myocarditis. Background An infection with CVB3 leads to myocarditis. PAR2 modulates the innate immune response. Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR3) is crucial for the innate immune response by inducing the expression of the antiviral cytokine interferon-beta (IFNβ). Methods To induce myocarditis, wild-type (wt) and PAR2 knockout (ko) mice were infected with 105 plaque-forming units CVB3. Mice underwent hemodynamic measurements with a 1.2-F microconductance catheter. Wt and PAR2ko hearts and cardiac cells were analyzed for viral replication and immune response with plaque assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Results Compared with wt mice, PAR2ko mice and cardiomyocytes exhibited a reduced viral load and developed no myocarditis after infection with CVB3. Hearts and cardiac fibroblasts from PAR2ko mice expressed higher basal levels of IFNβ than wt mice did. Treatment with CVB3 and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid led to higher IFNβ expression in PAR2ko than in wt fibroblasts and reduced virus replication in PAR2ko fibroblasts was abrogated by neutralizing IFNβ antibody. Overexpression of PAR2 reduced the basal IFNβ expression. Moreover, a direct interaction between PAR2 and Toll-like receptor 3 was observed. PAR2 expression in endomyocardial biopsies of patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy was positively correlated with myocardial inflammation and negatively with IFNβ expression and left ventricular ejection fraction. Conclusions PAR2 negatively regulates the innate immune response to CVB3 infection and contributes to myocardial dysfunction. The antagonism of PAR2 is of therapeutic interest to strengthen the antiviral response after an infection with a cardiotropic virus. PMID:23871888

  3. Orchestrating an immune response against cancer with engineered immune cells expressing αβTCRs, CARs, and innate immune receptors: an immunological and regulatory challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Moniek A; Kierkels, Guido J J; Straetemans, Trudy; Britten, Cedrik M; Kuball, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Over half a century ago, the first allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) initiated cellular immunotherapy. For several decades, little progress was made, and toxicity of allo-SCT remained a major challenge. However, recent breakthroughs have opened new avenues to further develop this modality and to provide less toxic and equally efficient interventions for patients suffering from hematological or solid malignancies. Current novel cellular immune interventions include ex vivo expansion and adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating immune cells or administration of drugs which antagonize tolerizing mechanisms. Alternatively, transfer of immune cells engineered to express defined T cell receptors (TCRs) and chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown its potential. A valuable addition to 'engineered' adaptive immunity has emerged recently through the improved understanding of how innate immune cells can attack cancer cells without substantial side effects. This has enabled the development of transplantation platforms with limited side effects allowing early immune interventions as well as the design of engineered immune cells expressing innate immune receptors. Here, we focus on innate immune interventions and their orchestration with TCR- and CAR-engineered immune cells. In addition, we discuss how the exploitation of the full potential of cellular immune interventions is influenced by regulatory frameworks. Finally, we highlight and discuss substantial differences in the current landscape of clinical trials in Europe as compared to the USA. The aim is to stimulate international efforts to support regulatory authorities and funding agencies, especially in Europe, to create an environment that will endorse the development of engineered immune cells for the benefit of patients.

  4. Induction of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated and estrogen receptor-mediated activities, and modulation of cell proliferation by dinaphthofurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vondrácek, Jan; Chramostová, Katerina; Plísková, Martina; Bláha, Ludek; Brack, Werner; Kozubík, Alois; Machala, Miroslav

    2004-09-01

    A group of heterocyclic aromatic compounds, dinaphthofurans (DNFs), recently have been identified as potentially significant contaminants in freshwater sediments. In the present study, a battery of in vitro assays was used for detection of toxic effects of DNFs that are potentially associated with endocrine disruption and tumor promotion. Dinaphthofurans were found to act as relatively potent inducers of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity in the chemical-activated luciferase reporter gene expression DR-CALUX assay. The relative AhR-inducing potencies of DNFs were similar or even higher than relative potencies of unsubstituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), with dinaphtho[1,2-b;2'3'-d]furan being the most potent AhR agonist. Two compounds, dinaphtho[2,1-b;2'3'-d]furan and dinaphtho[1,2-b;1'2'-d]furan, induced estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated activity in the estrogen receptor-mediated CALUX (the ER-CALUX) assay. Two types of potential tumor-promoting effects of DNFs were investigated, using in vitro bioassays for detection of inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication and detection of a release from contact inhibition. Although the acute inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication was not observed, all six tested DNFs were able to release rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells from contact inhibition at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In summary, the present study indicated that DNFs can exert multiple biological effects in vitro, including induction of the AhR-mediated activity, release of cells from contact inhibition, and induction of ER-mediated activity.

  5. PGE2 Modulates GABAA Receptors via an EP1 Receptor-Mediated Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aims: PGE2 is one of the most abundant prostanoids in mammalian tissues, but its effect on neuronal receptors has not been well investigated. This study examines the effect of PGE2 on GABAA receptor currents in rat cerebellar granule neurons. Methods: GABAA currents were recorded using a patch-clamp technique. Cell surface and total protein of GABAA β1/2/3 subunits was carried out by Western blot analysis. Results: Upon incubation of neurons with PGE2 (1 µM for 60 minutes, GABAA currents were significantly potentiated. This PGE2-driven effect could be blocked by PKC or CaMKII inhibitors as well as EP1 receptor antagonist, and mimicked by PMA or EP1 receptor agonist. Furthermore, Western blot data showed that PGE2 did not increase the total expression level of GABAA receptors, but significantly increased surface levels of GABAA β1/2/3 subunits after 1 h of treatment. Consistently, both PKC and CaMKII inhibitors were able to reduce PGE2-induced increases in cell surface expression of GABAA receptors. Conclusion: Activation of either the PKC or CaMKII pathways by EP1 receptors mediates the PGE2-induced increase in GABAA currents. This suggests that upregulation of postsynaptic GABAA receptors by PGE2 may have profound effects on cerebellar functioning under physiological and pathological conditions.

  6. Receptor- and reactive intermediate-mediated mechanisms of teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Peter G; Lee, Crystal J J; McCallum, Gordon P; Perstin, Julia; Harper, Patricia A

    2010-01-01

    Drugs and environmental chemicals can adversely alter the development of the fetus at critical periods during pregnancy, resulting in death, or in structural and functional birth defects in the surviving offspring. This process of teratogenesis may not be evident until a decade or more after birth. Postnatal functional abnormalities include deficits in brain function, a variety of metabolic diseases, and cancer. Due to the high degree of fetal cellular division and differentiation, and to differences from the adult in many biochemical pathways, the fetus is highly susceptible to teratogens, typically at low exposure levels that do not harm the mother. Insights into the mechanisms of teratogenesis come primarily from animal models and in vitro systems, and involve either receptor-mediated or reactive intermediate-mediated processes. Receptor-mediated mechanisms involving the reversible binding of xenobiotic substrates to a specific receptor are exemplified herein by the interaction of the environmental chemical 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD or "dioxin") with the cytosolic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), which translocates to the nucleus and, in association with other proteins, binds to AH-responsive elements (AHREs) in numerous genes, initiating changes in gene transcription that can perturb development. Alternatively, many xenobiotics are bioactivated by fetal enzymes like the cytochromes P450 (CYPs) and prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) to highly unstable electrophilic or free radical reactive intermediates. Electrophilic reactive intermediates can covalently (irreversibly) bind to and alter the function of essential cellular macromolecules (proteins, DNA), causing developmental anomalies. Free radical reactive intermediates can enhance the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in oxidative damage to cellular macromolecules and/or altered signal transduction. The teratogenicity of reactive intermediates is determined to a large extent

  7. Menthol inhibits 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashoor, Abrar; Nordman, Jacob C; Veltri, Daniel; Yang, Keun-Hang Susan; Shuba, Yaroslav; Al Kury, Lina; Sadek, Bassem; Howarth, Frank C; Shehu, Amarda; Kabbani, Nadine; Oz, Murat

    2013-11-01

    The effects of alcohol monoterpene menthol, a major active ingredient of the peppermint plant, were tested on the function of human 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 (5-HT3) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. 5-HT (1 μM)-evoked currents recorded by two-electrode voltage-clamp technique were reversibly inhibited by menthol in a concentration-dependent (IC50 = 163 μM) manner. The effects of menthol developed gradually, reaching a steady-state level within 10-15 minutes and did not involve G-proteins, since GTPγS activity remained unaltered and the effect of menthol was not sensitive to pertussis toxin pretreatment. The actions of menthol were not stereoselective as (-), (+), and racemic menthol inhibited 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents to the same extent. Menthol inhibition was not altered by intracellular 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid injections and transmembrane potential changes. The maximum inhibition observed for menthol was not reversed by increasing concentrations of 5-HT. Furthermore, specific binding of the 5-HT3 antagonist [(3)H]GR65630 was not altered in the presence of menthol (up to 1 mM), indicating that menthol acts as a noncompetitive antagonist of the 5-HT3 receptor. Finally, 5-HT3 receptor-mediated currents in acutely dissociated nodose ganglion neurons were also inhibited by menthol (100 μM). These data demonstrate that menthol, at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, is an allosteric inhibitor of 5-HT3 receptors.

  8. P2X7 receptors mediate ischemic damage to oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domercq, Maria; Perez-Samartin, Alberto; Aparicio, David; Alberdi, Elena; Pampliega, Olatz; Matute, Carlos

    2010-04-15

    Brain ischemia leading to stroke is a major cause of disability in developed countries. Therapeutic strategies have most commonly focused on protecting neurons from ischemic damage. However, ischemic damage to white matter causes oligodendrocyte death, myelin disruption, and axon dysfunction, and it is partially mediated by glutamate excitotoxicity. We have previously demonstrated that oligodendrocytes express ionotropic purinergic receptors. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of purinergic signaling in white matter ischemia. We show that, in addition to glutamate, enhanced ATP signaling during ischemia is also deleterious to oligodendrocytes and myelin, and impairs white matter function. Thus, ischemic oligodendrocytes in culture display an inward current and cytosolic Ca(2+) overload, which is partially mediated by P2X7 receptors. Indeed, oligodendrocytes release ATP after oxygen and glucose deprivation through the opening of pannexin hemichannels. Consistently, ischemia-induced mitochondrial depolarization as well as oxidative stress culminating in cell death are partially reversed by P2X7 receptor antagonists, by the ATP degrading enzyme apyrase and by blockers of pannexin hemichannels. In turn, ischemic damage in isolated optic nerves, which share the properties of brain white matter, is greatly attenuated by all these drugs. Ultrastructural analysis and electrophysiological recordings demonstrated that P2X7 antagonists prevent ischemic damage to oligodendrocytes and myelin, and improved action potential recovery after ischemia. These data indicate that ATP released during ischemia and the subsequent activation of P2X7 receptor is critical to white matter demise during stroke and point to this receptor type as a therapeutic target to limit tissue damage in cerebrovascular diseases.

  9. Loss of Jak2 selectively suppresses DC-mediated innate immune response and protects mice from lethal dose of LPS-induced septic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixin Zhong

    Full Text Available Given the importance of Jak2 in cell signaling, a critical role for Jak2 in immune cells especially dendritic cells (DCs has long been proposed. The exact function for Jak2 in DCs, however, remained poorly understood as Jak2 deficiency leads to embryonic lethality. Here we established Jak2 deficiency in adult Cre(+/+Jak2(fl/fl mice by tamoxifen induction. Loss of Jak2 significantly impaired DC development as manifested by reduced BMDC yield, smaller spleen size and reduced percentage of DCs in total splenocytes. Jak2 was also crucial for the capacity of DCs to mediate innate immune response. Jak2(-/- DCs were less potent in response to inflammatory stimuli and showed reduced capacity to secrete proinflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha and IL-12. As a result, Jak2(-/- mice were defective for the early clearance of Listeria after infection. However, their potency to mediate adaptive immune response was not affected. Unlike DCs, Jak2(-/- macrophages showed similar capacity secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that Jak2 selectively modulates innate immune response in a DC-dependent manner. Consistent with these results, Jak2(-/- mice were remarkably resistant to lethal dose of LPS-induced septic shock, a deadly sepsis characterized by the excessive innate immune response, and adoptive transfer of normal DCs restored their susceptibility to LPS-induced septic shock. Mechanistic studies revealed that Jak2/SATA5 signaling is pivotal for DC development and maturation, while the capacity for DCs secretion of proinflammatory cytokines is regulated by both Jak2/STAT5 and Jak2/STAT6 signaling.

  10. Quantitation of the Contractile Response Mediated by Two Receptors: M2 and M3 Muscarinic Receptor-Mediated Contractions of Human Gastroesophageal Smooth MuscleS⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S.; Miller, Larry S.; Vegesna, Anil K.; Tiwana, Mansoor I.; Tallarida, Ronald J.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M2 receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M3 density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M2 and M3 receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M2 and M3 receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M2 muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M3 receptor predominantly mediates contraction. PMID:19126780

  11. Quantitation of the contractile response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor-mediated contractions of human gastroesophageal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Miller, Larry S; Vegesna, Anil K; Tiwana, Mansoor I; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2009-04-01

    Although muscarinic receptors are known to mediate tonic contraction of human gastrointestinal tract smooth muscle, the receptor subtypes that mediate the tonic contractions are not entirely clear. Whole human stomachs with attached esophagus were procured from organ transplant donors. Cholinergic contractile responses of clasp, sling, lower esophageal circular (LEC), midesophageal circular (MEC), and midesophageal longitudinal (MEL) muscle strips were determined. Sling fibers contracted greater than the other fibers. Total, M(2) and M(3) muscarinic receptor density was determined for each of these dissections by immunoprecipitation. M(2) receptor density is greatest in the sling fibers, followed by clasp, LEC, MEC, and then MEL, whereas M(3) density is greatest in LEC, followed by MEL, MEC, sling, and then clasp. The potency of subtype-selective antagonists to inhibit bethanechol-induced contraction was calculated by Schild analysis to determine which muscarinic receptor subtypes contribute to contraction. The results suggest both M(2) and M(3) receptors mediate contraction in clasp and sling fibers. Thus, this type of analysis in which multiple receptors mediate the contractile response is inappropriate, and an analysis method relating dual occupation of M(2) and M(3) receptors to contraction is presented. Using this new method of analysis, it was found that the M(2) muscarinic receptor plays a greater role in mediating contraction of clasp and sling fibers than in LEC, MEC, and MEL muscles in which the M(3) receptor predominantly mediates contraction.

  12. Innate immune memory: towards a better understanding of host defense mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintin, Jessica; Cheng, Shih-Chin; van der Meer, Jos W M; Netea, Mihai G

    2014-08-01

    Innate immunity is classically defined as unable to build up immunological memory. Recently however, the assumption of the lack of immunological memory within innate immune responses has been reconsidered. Plants and invertebrates lacking adaptive immune system can be protected against secondary infections. It has been shown that mammals can build cross-protection to secondary infections independently of T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that innate immune cells such as NK cells and monocytes can display adaptive characteristics, a novel concept for which the term trained immunity has been proposed. Several mechanisms are involved in mediating innate immune memory, among which epigenetic histone modifications and modulation of recognition receptors on the surface of innate immune cells are likely to play a central role. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Commensal-epithelial signaling mediated via formyl peptide receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Christy C; Jones, Rheinallt M; Kwon, Young Man; Nusrat, Asma; Neish, Andrew S

    2010-12-01

    Commensal bacteria and/or their products engender beneficial effects to the mammalian gut, including stimulating physiological cellular turnover and enhancing wound healing, without activating overt inflammation. In the present study, we observed commensal bacteria-mediated activation of the noninflammatory extracellular signal-regulated kinase[ERK]/mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt signaling pathways in gut epithelial cells and delineated a mechanism for this bacterially activated signaling. All tested strains of commensal bacteria induced ERK phosphorylation without stimulating pro-inflammatory phospho-IκB or pro-apoptotic phospho-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, with Lactobacillus species being most potent. This pattern of signaling activation was recapitulated using the peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe, a bacterial product known to stimulate signaling events in mammalian phagocytes. Sensing of N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe by gut epithelial cells occurs via recently characterized formyl peptide receptors located in the plasma membrane. Both commensal bacteria and N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe application to the apical surface of polarized gut epithelial cells resulted in specific formyl peptide receptor activation. In addition, pretreatment of model epithelia and murine colon with Boc2 (a specific peptide antagonist) or pertussis toxin (a G(i)-protein inhibitor) abolished commensal-mediated ERK phosphorylation. Taken together, these data show that commensal bacteria specifically activate the ERK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in an formyl peptide receptor-dependent manner, delineating a mechanism by which commensal bacteria contribute to cellular signaling in gut epithelia.

  14. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DamoXu; HaiyingLiu; MousaKomai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of naive T cells towards either Thl or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  15. Direct and Indirect Role of Toll-Like Receptors in T Cell Mediated Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Damo Xu; Haiying Liu; Mousa Komai-Koma

    2004-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) recognition receptors that play an important role in protective immunity against infection and inflammation. They act as central integrators of a wide variety of signals, responding to diverse agonists of microbial products. Stimulation of Toll-like receptors by microbial products leads to signaling pathways that activate not only innate, but also adaptive immunity by APC dependent or independent mechanisms. Recent evidence revealed that TLR signals played a determining role in the skewing of na(i)ve T cells towards either Th1 or Th2 responses. Activation of Toll-like receptors also directly or indirectly influences regulatory T cell functions. Therefore, TLRs are required in both immune activation and immune regulation. Study of TLRs has significantly enhanced our understanding of innate and adaptive immune responses and provides novel therapeutic approaches against infectious and inflammatory diseases.

  16. Attenuation of pattern recognition receptor signaling is mediated by a MAP kinase kinase kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mithoe, S.C.; Ludwig, C.; Pel, M.J.C.; Cucinotta, M.; Casartelli, A.; Mbengue, M.; Sklenar, J.; Derbyshire, P.; Robatzek, S.; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Aebersold, R.; Menke, F.L.H.

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) play a key role in plant and animal innate immunity. PRR binding of their cognate ligand triggers a signaling network and activates an immune response. Activation of PRR signaling must be controlled prior to ligand binding to prevent spurious signaling and immune

  17. Conserved natural IgM antibodies mediate innate and adaptive immunity against the opportunistic fungus Pneumocystis murina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapaka, Rekha R; Ricks, David M; Alcorn, John F; Chen, Kong; Khader, Shabaana A; Zheng, Mingquan; Plevy, Scott; Bengtén, Eva; Kolls, Jay K

    2010-12-20

    Host defense against opportunistic fungi requires coordination between innate and adaptive immunity for resolution of infection. Antibodies generated in mice vaccinated with the fungus Pneumocystis prevent growth of Pneumocystis organisms within the lungs, but the mechanisms whereby antibodies enhance antifungal host defense are poorly defined. Nearly all species of fungi contain the conserved carbohydrates β-glucan and chitin within their cell walls, which may be targets of innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we show that natural IgM antibodies targeting these fungal cell wall carbohydrates are conserved across many species, including fish and mammals. Natural antibodies bind fungal organisms and enhance host defense against Pneumocystis in early stages of infection. IgM antibodies influence recognition of fungal antigen by dendritic cells, increasing their migration to draining pulmonary lymph nodes. IgM antibodies are required for adaptive T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 cell differentiation and guide B cell isotype class-switch recombination during host defense against Pneumocystis. These experiments suggest a novel role for the IgM isotype in shaping the earliest steps in recognition and clearance of this fungus. We outline a mechanism whereby serum IgM, containing ancient specificities against conserved fungal antigens, bridges innate and adaptive immunity against fungal organisms.

  18. Ovariectomy and subsequent treatment with estrogen receptor agonists tune the innate immune system of the hippocampus in middle-aged female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sárvári, Miklós; Kalló, Imre; Hrabovszky, Erik; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune system including microglia has a major contribution to maintenance of the physiological functions of the hippocampus by permanent monitoring of the neural milieu and elimination of tissue-damaging threats. The hippocampus is vulnerable to age-related changes ranging from gene expression to network connectivity. The risk of hippocampal deterioration increases with the decline of gonadal hormone supply. To explore the impact of hormone milieu on the function of the innate immune system in middle-aged female rats, we compared mRNA expression in the hippocampus after gonadal hormone withdrawal, with or without subsequent estrogen replacement using estradiol and isotype-selective estrogen receptor (ER) agonists. Targeted profiling assessed the status of the innate immune system (macrophage-associated receptors, complement, inhibitory neuronal ligands), local estradiol synthesis (P450 aromatase) and estrogen reception (ER). Results established upregulation of macrophage-associated (Cd45, Iba1, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd18, Fcgr1a, Fcgr2b) and complement (C3, factor B, properdin) genes in response to ovariectomy. Ovariectomy upregulated Cd22 and downregulated semaphorin3A (Sema3a) expression, indicating altered neuronal regulation of microglia. Ovariectomy also led to downregulation of aromatase and upregulation of ERα gene. Of note, analogous changes were observed in the hippocampus of postmenopausal women. In ovariectomized rats, estradiol replacement attenuated Iba1, Cd11b, Fcgr1a, C3, increased mannose receptor Mrc1, Cd163 and reversed Sema3a expression. In contrast, reduced expression of aromatase was not reversed by estradiol. While the effects of ERα agonist closely resembled those of estradiol, ERβ agonist was also capable of attenuating the expression of several macrophage-associated and complement genes. These data together indicate that the innate immune system of the aging hippocampus is highly responsive to the gonadal hormone milieu. In

  19. Ovariectomy and subsequent treatment with estrogen receptor agonists tune the innate immune system of the hippocampus in middle-aged female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Sárvári

    Full Text Available The innate immune system including microglia has a major contribution to maintenance of the physiological functions of the hippocampus by permanent monitoring of the neural milieu and elimination of tissue-damaging threats. The hippocampus is vulnerable to age-related changes ranging from gene expression to network connectivity. The risk of hippocampal deterioration increases with the decline of gonadal hormone supply. To explore the impact of hormone milieu on the function of the innate immune system in middle-aged female rats, we compared mRNA expression in the hippocampus after gonadal hormone withdrawal, with or without subsequent estrogen replacement using estradiol and isotype-selective estrogen receptor (ER agonists. Targeted profiling assessed the status of the innate immune system (macrophage-associated receptors, complement, inhibitory neuronal ligands, local estradiol synthesis (P450 aromatase and estrogen reception (ER. Results established upregulation of macrophage-associated (Cd45, Iba1, Cd68, Cd11b, Cd18, Fcgr1a, Fcgr2b and complement (C3, factor B, properdin genes in response to ovariectomy. Ovariectomy upregulated Cd22 and downregulated semaphorin3A (Sema3a expression, indicating altered neuronal regulation of microglia. Ovariectomy also led to downregulation of aromatase and upregulation of ERα gene. Of note, analogous changes were observed in the hippocampus of postmenopausal women. In ovariectomized rats, estradiol replacement attenuated Iba1, Cd11b, Fcgr1a, C3, increased mannose receptor Mrc1, Cd163 and reversed Sema3a expression. In contrast, reduced expression of aromatase was not reversed by estradiol. While the effects of ERα agonist closely resembled those of estradiol, ERβ agonist was also capable of attenuating the expression of several macrophage-associated and complement genes. These data together indicate that the innate immune system of the aging hippocampus is highly responsive to the gonadal hormone milieu

  20. 17β-estradiol dysregulates innate immune responses to Pseudomonas aeruginosa respiratory infection and is modulated by estrogen receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shadaan; Xie, ShangKui; Bose, Moumita; Shaul, Philip W; Terada, Lance S; Brody, Steven L; Thomas, Philip J; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Kim, Sung Hoon; Greenberg, David E; Jain, Raksha

    2017-08-07

    Rationale: Females have a more severe clinical course than males in several inflammatory lung conditions. Notably, females with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer worse outcomes, particularly in the setting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Sex hormones are implicated in experimental and clinical studies, however immune mechanisms responsible for this sex-based disparity are unknown and the specific sex hormone target for therapeutic manipulation has not been identified.Objectives: Assess mechanisms behind the impact of female sex hormones on host immune responses to P.aeruginosa.Methods: Wild type and CF mice, hormone manipulated and inoculated with P. aeruginosa, were examined for outcomes and inflammatory responses. Neutrophils isolated from mice and human subjects were tested for responses to P. aeruginosaResults: Female mice inoculated with P. aeruginosa died earlier and showed slower bacterial clearance than males (p < 0.0001). Ovariectomized females supplemented with 17β-estradiol succumbed to P. aeruginosa challenge earlier than progesterone- or vehicle-supplemented mice (p = 0.0003). 17β-estradiol-treated ovariectomized female mice demonstrated increased lung levels of inflammatory cytokines, and when rendered neutropenic, the mortality difference was abrogated. Neutrophils treated with 17β-estradiol demonstrated an enhanced oxidative burst, but decreased P. aeruginosa killing and earlier cell necrosis. The estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI 182,780, improved survival in female mice infected with P. aeruginosa and restored neutrophil function.Conclusions: ER antagonism rescues estrogen-mediated neutrophil dysfunction and improves survival in response to P. aeruginosa. ER-mediated processes may explain the sex-based mortality gap in CF and other inflammatory lung illnesses, and ER blockade represents a rationale therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  1. Role of desensitization and subunit expression for kainate receptor-mediated neurotoxicity in murine neocortical cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S

    1999-01-01

    ) toxicity mediated by alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors, and (3) toxicity that can be mediated by kainate receptors when desensitization of the receptors is blocked. The indirect action at NMDA receptors was discovered because (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H...... nedioxy-5H-2,3-benzodiazepine (GYKI 53655), a selective AMPA receptor antagonist, abolished the remaining toxicity. These results indicated that kainate- and domoate-mediated toxicity involves both the NMDA and the AMPA receptors. Pretreatment of the cultures with concanavalin A to prevent desensitization...

  2. Tyrosine-610 in the receptor kinase BAK1 does not play a major role in brassinosteroid signaling or innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1) functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR) receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING ...

  3. Grancalcin (GCA) modulates Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) mediated signaling through its direct interaction with TLR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Whan; Hong, Seunghee; Talukder, Amjad H; Pascual, Virginia; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2016-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are playing important roles in stimulating the innate immune response and intensifying adaptive immune response against invading pathogens. Appropriate regulation of TLR activation is important to maintain a balance between preventing tumor activation and inhibiting autoimmunity. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) senses microbial DNA in the endosomes of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and triggers myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) dependent nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways and type I interferon (IFN) responses. However, mechanisms of how TLR9 signals are mediated and which molecules are involved in controlling TLR9 functions remain poorly understood. Here, we report that penta EF-hand protein grancalcin (GCA) interacts and binds with TLR9 in a yeast two-hybrid system and an overexpression system. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown experiments, we also revealed that GCA positively regulates type I IFN production, cytokine/chemokine production through nuclear localization of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), NF-κB activation, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation in plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Our results indicate that heterodimerization of GCA and TLR9 is important for TLR9-mediated downstream signaling and might serve to fine tune processes against viral infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  5. Crosstalk between purinergic receptors and lipid mediators in leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Mariana M; Canetti, Cláudio; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2016-09-05

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease affecting millions of people around the world caused by organisms of the genus Leishmania. Parasite escape mechanisms of the immune system confer the possibility of resistance and dissemination of the disease. A group of molecules that has become a target for Leishmania survival strategies are lipid mediators. Among them, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) has been described as a pro-inflammatory molecule capable of activating cells of the immune system to combat Leishmania. In an opposite way, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a lipid mediator described as a deactivator of macrophages and neutrophils. The balance of these two molecules can be generated by extracellular nucleotides, such as adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine (Ado), which activate the purinergic receptors system. Herein, we discuss the role of extracellular nucleotides and the resulting balance of LTB4 and PGE2 in Leishmania fate, survival or death.

  6. Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins in regulation of inflammation and innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune B; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads

    2011-01-01

    as important regulators of innate immune signaling downstream of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1) and NOD2 receptors, and the retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I receptor. Recent evidence suggests that cIAP1, cIAP2......, and XIAP facilitate ubiquitin-dependent signaling activated by these PRRs and mediate activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) transcription factors as well as the MAP kinases p38 and JNK. Here, we review the current understanding of IAP-mediated PRR signaling and how IAP proteins might present...

  7. MTMR3 risk allele enhances innate receptor-induced signaling and cytokines by decreasing autophagy and increasing caspase-1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Amit; Hedl, Matija; Abraham, Clara

    2015-08-18

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by dysregulated host:microbial interactions and cytokine production. Host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are critical in regulating these interactions. Multiple genetic loci are associated with IBD, but altered functions for most, including in the rs713875 MTMR3/HORMAD2/LIF/OSM region, are unknown. We identified a previously undefined role for myotubularin-related protein 3 (MTMR3) in amplifying PRR-induced cytokine secretion in human macrophages and defined MTMR3-initiated mechanisms contributing to this amplification. MTMR3 decreased PRR-induced phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns3P) and autophagy levels, thereby increasing PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, autocrine IL-1β secretion, NFκB signaling, and, ultimately, overall cytokine secretion. This MTMR3-mediated regulation required the N-terminal pleckstrin homology-GRAM domain and Cys413 within the phosphatase domain of MTMR3. In MTMR3-deficient macrophages, reducing the enhanced autophagy or restoring NFκB signaling rescued PRR-induced cytokines. Macrophages from rs713875 CC IBD risk carriers demonstrated increased MTMR3 expression and, in turn, decreased PRR-induced PtdIns3P and autophagy and increased PRR-induced caspase-1 activation, signaling, and cytokine secretion. Thus, the rs713875 IBD risk polymorphism increases MTMR3 expression, which modulates PRR-induced outcomes, ultimately leading to enhanced PRR-induced cytokines.

  8. Innate Memory T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  9. Innate immune interferon responses to human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rose; Towers, Greg; Noursadeghi, Mahdad

    2012-07-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) responses represent the canonical host innate immune response to viruses, which serves to upregulate expression of antiviral restriction factors and augment adaptive immune defences. There is clear evidence for type I IFN activity in both acute and chronic HIV-1 infection in vivo, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells have been identified as one important source for these responses, through innate immune detection of viral RNA by Toll-like receptor 7. In addition, new insights into the molecular mechanisms that trigger induction of type I IFNs suggest innate immune receptors for viral DNA may also mediate these responses. It is widely recognised that HIV-1 restriction factors share the characteristic of IFN-inducible expression, and that the virus has evolved to counteract these antiviral mechanisms. However, in some target cells, such as macrophages, IFN can still effectively restrict virus. In this context, HIV-1 shows the ability to evade innate immune recognition and thereby avoid induction of type I IFN in order to successfully establish productive infection. The relative importance of evasion of innate immune detection and evasion of IFN-inducible restriction in the natural history of HIV-1 infection is not known, and the data suggest that type I IFN responses may play a role in both viral control and in the immunopathogenesis of progressive disease. Further study of the relationship between HIV-1 infection and type I IFN responses is required to unravel these issues and inform the development of novel therapeutics or vaccine strategies.

  10. Convergence of the innate and adaptive immunity during human aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branca Isabel Pereira

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with profound changes in the human immune system, a phenomenon referred to as immunosenescence. This complex immune remodeling affects the adaptive immune system and the CD8+ T cell compartment in particular, leading to the accumulation of terminally differentiated T cells, which can rapidly exert their effector functions at the expenses of a limited proliferative potential. In this review we will discuss evidence suggesting that senescent αβCD8+ T cells acquire the hallmarks of innate-like T cells and use recently acquired NK cell receptors as an alternative mechanism to mediate rapid effector functions. These cells concomitantly lose expression of co-stimulatory receptors and exhibit decreased TCR signaling suggesting a functional shift away from antigen specific activation. The convergence of innate and adaptive features in senescent T cells challenges the classic division between innate and adaptive immune systems. Innate-like T cells are particularly important for stress and tumor surveillance and we propose a new role for these cells in aging, where the acquisition of innate-like functions may represent a beneficial adaptation to an increased burden of malignancy with age, although it may also pose a higher risk of autoimmune disorders.

  11. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor- mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol- equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyp 1a1-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O- depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal- tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic response in vivo.

  12. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R.

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind to the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol-equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyplal-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal-tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic responses in vivo.

  13. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçpunar, Habibe K.; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly’s high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans. PMID:27145030

  14. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiq Hussain

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs, IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly's high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans.

  15. Ionotropic Chemosensory Receptors Mediate the Taste and Smell of Polyamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ashiq; Zhang, Mo; Üçpunar, Habibe K; Svensson, Thomas; Quillery, Elsa; Gompel, Nicolas; Ignell, Rickard; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C

    2016-05-01

    The ability to find and consume nutrient-rich diets for successful reproduction and survival is fundamental to animal life. Among the nutrients important for all animals are polyamines, a class of pungent smelling compounds required in numerous cellular and organismic processes. Polyamine deficiency or excess has detrimental effects on health, cognitive function, reproduction, and lifespan. Here, we show that a diet high in polyamine is beneficial and increases reproductive success of flies, and we unravel the sensory mechanisms that attract Drosophila to polyamine-rich food and egg-laying substrates. Using a combination of behavioral genetics and in vivo calcium imaging, we demonstrate that Drosophila uses multisensory detection to find and evaluate polyamines present in overripe and fermenting fruit, their favored feeding and egg-laying substrate. In the olfactory system, two coexpressed ionotropic receptors (IRs), IR76b and IR41a, mediate the long-range attraction to the odor. In the gustatory system, multimodal taste sensation by IR76b receptor and GR66a bitter receptor neurons is used to evaluate quality and valence of the polyamine providing a mechanism for the fly's high attraction to polyamine-rich and sweet decaying fruit. Given their universal and highly conserved biological roles, we propose that the ability to evaluate food for polyamine content may impact health and reproductive success also of other animals including humans.

  16. Comparative Geometrical Analysis of Leucine-Rich Repeat Structures in the Nod-Like and Toll-Like Receptors in Vertebrate Innate Immunity

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    Norio Matsushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The NOD-like receptors (NLRs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that are involved in the innate, pathogen pattern recognition system. The TLR and NLR receptors contain leucine-rich repeats (LRRs that are responsible for ligand interactions. In LRRs short β-strands stack parallel and then the LRRs form a super helical arrangement of repeating structural units (called a coil of solenoids. The structures of the LRR domains of NLRC4, NLRP1, and NLRX1 in NLRs and of TLR1-5, TLR6, TLR8, TLR9 in TLRs have been determined. Here we report nine geometrical parameters that characterize the LRR domains; these include four helical parameters from HELFIT analysis. These nine parameters characterize well the LRR structures in NLRs and TLRs; the LRRs of NLR adopts a right-handed helix. In contrast, the TLR LRRs adopt either a left-handed helix or are nearly flat; RP105 and CD14 also adopt a left-handed helix. This geometrical analysis subdivides TLRs into four groups consisting of TLR3/TLR8/TLR9, TLR1/TLR2/TRR6, TLR4, and TLR5; these correspond to the phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences. In the TLRs an ascending lateral surface that consists of loops connecting the β-strand at the C-terminal side is involved in protein, protein/ligand interactions, but not the descending lateral surface on the opposite side.

  17. Intranasal vaccination with γ-irradiated Streptococcus pneumoniae whole-cell vaccine provides serotype-independent protection mediated by B-cells and innate IL-17 responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Rachelle; Chen, Austen; Hirst, Timothy R; Kara, Ervin E; McColl, Shaun R; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D; Paton, James C; Alsharifi, Mohammed

    2016-05-01

    Generating a pneumococcal vaccine that is serotype independent and cost effective remains a global challenge. γ-Irradiation has been used widely to sterilize biological products. It can also be utilized as an inactivation technique to generate whole-cell bacterial and viral vaccines with minimal impact on pathogen structure and antigenic determinants. In the present study, we utilized γ-irradiation to inactivate an un-encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae strain Rx1 with an unmarked deletion of the autolysin gene lytA and with the pneumolysin gene ply replaced with an allele encoding a non-toxic pneumolysoid (PdT) (designated γ-PN vaccine). Intranasal vaccination of C57BL/6 mice with γ-PN was shown to elicit serotype-independent protection in lethal challenge models of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. Vaccine efficacy was shown to be reliant on B-cells and interleukin (IL)-17A responses. Interestingly, immunization promoted IL-17 production by innate cells not T helper 17 (Th17) cells. These data are the first to report the development of a non-adjuvanted intranasal γ-irradiated pneumococcal vaccine that generates effective serotype-independent protection, which is mediated by both humoral and innate IL-17 responses.

  18. Innate immunity mediated longevity and longevity induced by germ cell removal converge on the C-type lectin domain protein IRG-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunger, Elad; Safra, Modi; Levi-Ferber, Mor; Haviv-Chesner, Anat

    2017-01-01

    In C. elegans, removal of the germline triggers molecular events in the neighboring intestine, which sends an anti-aging signal to the rest of the animal. In this study, we identified an innate immunity related gene, named irg-7, as a novel mediator of longevity in germlineless animals. We consider irg-7 to be an integral downstream component of the germline longevity pathway because its expression increases upon germ cell removal and its depletion interferes with the activation of the longevity-promoting transcription factors DAF-16 and DAF-12 in germlineless animals. Furthermore, irg-7 activation by itself sensitizes the animals' innate immune response and extends the lifespan of animals exposed to live bacteria. This lifespan-extending pathogen resistance relies on the somatic gonad as well as on many genes previously associated with the reproductive longevity pathway. This suggests that these genes are also relevant in animals with an intact gonad, and can affect their resistance to pathogens. Altogether, this study demonstrates the tight association between germline homeostasis and the immune response of animals, and raises the possibility that the reproductive system can act as a signaling center to divert resources towards defending against putative pathogen attacks. PMID:28196094

  19. The type I interleukin-1 receptor mediates fever in the rat as shown by interleukin-1 receptor subtype selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowsky, D; Chai, Z; Bristulf, J; Simoncsits, A; Bartfai, T

    1995-12-01

    The interleukin-1 (IL-1) system possesses two distinct receptors (type I and type II) which, together with the accessory protein, mediate a multitude of responses to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, including fever. So far, no receptor subtype-specific ligands have been described. Since both types of IL-1 receptors occur in the thermoregulatory areas it was unclear which IL-1 receptor type mediates fever. We report here that for a series of deletion mutants of human recombinant IL-1 beta (hrIL-1 beta), the affinity of these ligands for the type I IL-1 receptor correlates with their efficacy to evoke the fever response (hrIL-1 beta > des-SND52-54 > des-QGE48-50 > des-I56). Thus, the results suggest that agonist occupancy of the type I IL-1 receptor is essential for IL-1 beta-mediated fever.

  20. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea-Jessica Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone.

  1. The Innate Immune Playbook for Restricting West Nile Virus Infection

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    Kendra M. Quicke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes annual epidemics of encephalitic disease throughout the world. Despite the ongoing risk to public health, no approved vaccines or therapies exist for use in humans to prevent or combat WNV infection. The innate immune response is critical for controlling WNV replication, limiting virus-induced pathology, and programming protective humoral and cell-mediated immunity to WNV infection. The RIG-I like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and Nod-like receptors detect and respond to WNV by inducing a potent antiviral defense program, characterized by production of type I IFN, IL-1β and expression of antiviral effector genes. Recent research efforts have focused on uncovering the mechanisms of innate immune sensing, antiviral effector genes that inhibit WNV, and countermeasures employed by WNV to antagonize innate immune cellular defenses. In this review, we highlight the major research findings pertaining to innate immune regulation of WNV infection.

  2. Cytotoxicity mediated by human Fc receptors for IgG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, M W; Shen, L; Graziano, R F; Guyre, P M

    1989-03-01

    The Fc receptors for IgG(Fc gamma R) play a major role in the removal of antibody-coated infectious agents and may be important molecules for triggering cytotoxicity of tumor cells; they may also serve as an entry for infection of Fc gamma R-bearing cells by viral (including HIV and Dengue), and perhaps other infectious agents. Although central to immune defense, an understanding of the role of these Fc gamma R in cytotoxicity has been complicated in part by the presence of several biochemically distinct types of receptor that have different distributions, specificities, affinities and modes of activation for killing. The development of monoclonal antibodies specific for Fc gamma R on human leukocytes has established the existence of three distinct Fc gamma R and furthermore has helped clarify the function of each of these receptors. In this review, Michael Fanger and colleagues discuss the use of Fc gamma R-specific mAb and the hybridoma cell lines that produce them in examining the ability of each of these unique receptors to mediate killing of tumor and red cell targets. In particular, the use of self-directed hybridoma cells as a model of tumor-cell killing and of bi-specific antibodies to link target cells to effector cells through the different Fc gamma R is discussed. The results of these studies suggest that the ability of a given Fc gamma R to trigger killing is sometimes dependent on the type of Fc gamma R, but is also markedly influenced by the type of target cell and by the nature and state of activation of the effector cell.

  3. Innate immune response of alveolar macrophage to house dust mite allergen is mediated through TLR2/-4 co-activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Fang Liu

    Full Text Available House dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p, is one of the major allergens responsible for allergic asthma. However, the putative receptors involved in the signalization of Der p to the innate immune cells are still poorly defined as well as the impact of their activation on the outcome of the allergen-induced cell response. We previously reported that the HDM activation of mouse alveolar macrophages (AM involves the TLR4/CD14 cell surface receptor complex. Here using a TLR ligand screening essay, we demonstrate that HDM protein extract engages the TLR2, in addition to the TLR4, in engineered TLR-transfected HEK cells but also in the MH-S mouse alveolar macrophage cell line model. Moreover we found that the concomitant recruitment of the MH-S cell's TLR2 and TLR4 receptors by the HDM extract activates the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway and leads to the secretion of the NF-κB regulated pro-inflammatory factors NO and TNF-α. However unlike with the canonical TLR4 ligand (i.e. the bacterial LPS mobilization of TLR4 by the HDM extract induces a reduced production of the IL-12 pro-inflammatory cytokine and fails to trigger the expression of the T-bet transcription factor. Finally we demonstrated that HDM extract down-regulates LPS induced IL-12 and T-bet expression through a TLR2 dependent mechanism. Therefore, we propose that the simultaneous engagement of the TLR2 and TLR4 receptors by the HDM extract results in a cross regulated original activation pattern of the AM which may contribute to the Th2 polarization of the allergen-induced immune response. The deciphering of these cross-regulation networks is of prime importance to open the way for original therapeutic strategies taking advantage of these receptors and their associated signaling pathways to treat allergic asthma.

  4. Ligand Receptor-Mediated Regulation of Growth in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Miyoshi; Sussman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Growth and development of multicellular organisms are coordinately regulated by various signaling pathways involving the communication of inter- and intracellular components. To form the appropriate body patterns, cellular growth and development are modulated by either stimulating or inhibiting these pathways. Hormones and second messengers help to mediate the initiation and/or interaction of the various signaling pathways in all complex multicellular eukaryotes. In plants, hormones include small organic molecules, as well as larger peptides and small proteins, which, as in animals, act as ligands and interact with receptor proteins to trigger rapid biochemical changes and induce the intracellular transcriptional and long-term physiological responses. During the past two decades, the availability of genetic and genomic resources in the model plant species, Arabidopsis thaliana, has greatly helped in the discovery of plant hormone receptors and the components of signal transduction pathways and mechanisms used by these immobile but highly complex organisms. Recently, it has been shown that two of the most important plant hormones, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA), act through signaling pathways that have not yet been recognized in animals. For example, auxins stimulate cell elongation by bringing negatively acting transcriptional repressor proteins to the proteasome to be degraded, thus unleashing the gene expression program required for increasing cell size. The "dormancy" inducing hormone, ABA, binds to soluble receptor proteins and inhibits a specific class of protein phosphatases (PP2C), which activates phosphorylation signaling leading to transcriptional changes needed for the desiccation of the seeds prior to entering dormancy. While these two hormone receptors have no known animal counterparts, there are also many similarities between animal and plant signaling pathways. For example, in plants, the largest single gene family in the genome is the protein kinase

  5. Differential innate immune cell signatures and effects regulated by toll-like receptor 4 during murine lung tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Carla-Maria; Xiong, Ka-Na; Velmurugan, Kalpana; Xiong, Julie; Osgood, Ross S.; Bauer, Alison K.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor promotion is an early and critical stage during lung adenocarcinoma (ADC). We previously demonstrated that Tlr4 mutant mice were more susceptible to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT)-induced pulmonary inflammation and tumor promotion in comparison to Tlr4-sufficient mice. Our study objective was to elucidate the underlying differences in Tlr4 mutant mice in innate immune cell populations, their functional responses, and the influence of these cellular differences on ADC progenitor (type II) cells following BHT-treatment. BALB (Tlr4-sufficient) and C.C3-Tlr4Lps-d/J (BALBLpsd; Tlr4 mutant) mice were treated with BHT (promoter) followed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and flow cytometry processing on the lungs. ELISAs, Club cell enrichment, macrophage function and RNA isolation were also performed. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) co-cultured with a type II cell line were used for wound healing assays. Innate immune cells significantly increased in whole lung in BHT treated BALBLpsd mice compared to BALB mice. BHT treated BALBLpsd mice demonstrated enhanced macrophage functionality, increased epithelial wound closure via BMDMs, and increased Club cell number in BALBLpsd mice, all compared to BALB BHT-treated mice. Cytokine/chemokine (Kc, Mcp1) and growth factor (Igf1) levels also significantly differed among the strains and within macrophages, gene expression and cell surface markers collectively demonstrated a more plastic phenotype in BALBLpsd mice. Therefore, these correlative studies suggest that distinct innate immune cell populations are associated with the differences observed in the Tlr4-mutant model. Future studies will investigate the macrophage origins and the utility of the pathways identified herein as indicators of immune system deficiencies and lung tumorigenesis. PMID:27093379

  6. Toll-like receptor 8 agonist and bacteria trigger potent activation of innate immune cells in human liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juandy Jo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of innate immune cells to sense and respond to impending danger varies by anatomical location. The liver is considered tolerogenic but is still capable of mounting a successful immune response to clear various infections. To understand whether hepatic immune cells tune their response to different infectious challenges, we probed mononuclear cells purified from human healthy and diseased livers with distinct pathogen-associated molecules. We discovered that only the TLR8 agonist ssRNA40 selectively activated liver-resident innate immune cells to produce substantial quantities of IFN-γ. We identified CD161(Bright mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT and CD56(Bright NK cells as the responding liver-resident innate immune cells. Their activation was not directly induced by the TLR8 agonist but was dependent on IL-12 and IL-18 production by ssRNA40-activated intrahepatic monocytes. Importantly, the ssRNA40-induced cytokine-dependent activation of MAIT cells mirrored responses induced by bacteria, i.e., generating a selective production of high levels of IFN-γ, without the concomitant production of TNF-α or IL-17A. The intrahepatic IFN-γ production could be detected not only in healthy livers, but also in HBV- or HCV-infected livers. In conclusion, the human liver harbors a network of immune cells able to modulate their immunological responses to different pathogen-associated molecules. Their ability to generate a strong production of IFN-γ upon stimulation with TLR8 agonist opens new therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of diverse liver pathologies.

  7. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  8. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Huda Ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D; McGiff, John C; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca(2+) (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca(2+) were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  9. Identification and Validation of Ifit1 as an Important Innate Immune Bottleneck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, Jason E.; Vartanian, Keri B.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Stevens, S.L.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Stenzel-Poore, Mary

    2012-06-20

    The innate immune system plays important roles in a number of disparate processes. Foremost, innate immunity is a first responder to invasion by pathogens and triggers early defensive responses and recruits the adaptive immune system. The innate immune system also responds to endogenous damage signals that arise from tissue injury. Recently it has been found that innate immunity plays an important role in neuroprotection against ischemic stroke through the activation of the primary innate immune receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Using several large-scale transcriptomic data sets from mouse and mouse macrophage studies we identified targets predicted to be important in controlling innate immune processes initiated by TLR activation. Targets were identified as genes with high betweenness centrality, so-called bottlenecks, in networks inferred from statistical associations between gene expression patterns. A small set of putative bottlenecks were identified in each of the data sets investigated including interferon-stimulated genes (Ifit1, Ifi47, Tgtp and Oasl2) as well as genes uncharacterized in immune responses (Axud1 and Ppp1r15a). We further validated one of these targets, Ifit1, in mouse macrophages by showing that silencing it suppresses induction of predicted downstream genes by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated TLR4 activation through an unknown direct or indirect mechanism. Our study demonstrates the utility of network analysis for identification of interesting targets related to innate immune function, and highlights that Ifit1 can exert a positive regulatory effect on downstream genes.

  10. Identification and validation of Ifit1 as an important innate immune bottleneck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E McDermott

    Full Text Available The innate immune system plays important roles in a number of disparate processes. Foremost, innate immunity is a first responder to invasion by pathogens and triggers early defensive responses and recruits the adaptive immune system. The innate immune system also responds to endogenous damage signals that arise from tissue injury. Recently it has been found that innate immunity plays an important role in neuroprotection against ischemic stroke through the activation of the primary innate immune receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs. Using several large-scale transcriptomic data sets from mouse and mouse macrophage studies we identified targets predicted to be important in controlling innate immune processes initiated by TLR activation. Targets were identified as genes with high betweenness centrality, so-called bottlenecks, in networks inferred from statistical associations between gene expression patterns. A small set of putative bottlenecks were identified in each of the data sets investigated including interferon-stimulated genes (Ifit1, Ifi47, Tgtp and Oasl2 as well as genes uncharacterized in immune responses (Axud1 and Ppp1r15a. We further validated one of these targets, Ifit1, in mouse macrophages by showing that silencing it suppresses induction of predicted downstream genes by lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated TLR4 activation through an unknown direct or indirect mechanism. Our study demonstrates the utility of network analysis for identification of interesting targets related to innate immune function, and highlights that Ifit1 can exert a positive regulatory effect on downstream genes.

  11. Group 3 innate lymphoid cells mediate intestinal selection of commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R.; Fung, Thomas C.; Masur, Samuel H.; Kelsen, Judith R.; McConnell, Fiona M.; Dubrot, Juan; Withers, David R.; Hugues, Stephanie; Farrar, Michael A.; Reith, Walter; Eberl, Gerard; Baldassano, Robert N.; Laufer, Terri M.; Elson, Charles O.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory CD4+ T cell responses to self or commensal bacteria underlie the pathogenesis of autoimmunity and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), respectively. While selection of self-specific T cells in the thymus limits responses to tissue antigens, the mechanisms that control selection of commensal bacteria-specific T cells remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that group 3 innate lymphoid cell (ILC3)-intrinsic expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) is regulated similarly to thymic epithelial cells, and that MHCII+ ILC3s directly induce cell death of activated commensal bacteria-specific T cells. Further, MHCII on human colonic ILC3s was reduced in pediatric IBD patients. Collectively, these results define a selection pathway for commensal bacteria-specific CD4+ T cells in the intestine, and suggest that this process is dysregulated in human IBD. PMID:25908663

  12. Interleukin-22-Induced Antimicrobial Phospholipase A2 Group IIA Mediates Protective Innate Immunity of Nonhematopoietic Cells against Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Yamato; Shiono, Takeru; Yahagi, Ayano; Hamada, Satoru; Umemura, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Goro

    2015-12-07

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterial pathogen which establishes intracellular parasitism in various cells, including macrophages and nonhematopoietic cells, such as hepatocytes. It has been reported that several proinflammatory cytokines have pivotal roles in innate protection against L. monocytogenes infection. We found that a proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin 22 (IL-22), was expressed by CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection in mice. To assess the influence of IL-22 on L. monocytogenes infection in hepatocytes, cells of a human hepatocellular carcinoma line, HepG2, were treated with IL-22 before L. monocytogenes infection in vitro. Gene expression analysis of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells identified phospholipase A2 group IIA (PLA2G2A) as an upregulated antimicrobial molecule. Addition of recombinant PLA2G2A to the HepG2 culture significantly suppressed L. monocytogenes infection. Culture supernatant of the IL-22-treated HepG2 cells contained bactericidal activity against L. monocytogenes, and the activity was abrogated by a specific PLA2G2A inhibitor, demonstrating that HepG2 cells secreted PLA2G2A, which killed extracellular L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, colocalization of PLA2G2A and L. monocytogenes was detected in the IL-22-treated infected HepG2 cells, which suggests involvement of PLA2G2A in the mechanism of intracellular killing of L. monocytogenes by HepG2 cells. These results suggest that IL-22 induced at an early stage of L. monocytogenes infection enhances innate immunity against L. monocytogenes in the liver by stimulating hepatocytes to produce an antimicrobial molecule, PLA2G2A.

  13. Role of innate signalling pathways in the immunogenicity of alphaviral replicon-based vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alphaviral replicon-based vectors induce potent immune responses both when given as viral particles (VREP or as DNA (DREP. It has been suggested that the strong immune stimulatory effect induced by these types of vectors is mediated by induction of danger signals and activation of innate signalling pathways due to the replicase activity. To investigate the innate signalling pathways involved, mice deficient in either toll-like receptors or downstream innate signalling molecules were immunized with DREP or VREP. Results We show that the induction of a CD8+ T cell response did not require functional TLR3 or MyD88 signalling. However, IRF3, converging several innate signalling pathways and important for generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs, was needed for obtaining a robust primary immune response. Interestingly, type I interferon (IFN, induced by most innate signalling pathways, had a suppressing effect on both the primary and memory T cell responses after DREP and VREP immunization. Conclusions We show that alphaviral replicon-based vectors activate multiple innate signalling pathways, which both activate and restrict the induced immune response. These results further show that there is a delicate balance in the strength of innate signalling and induction of adaptive immune responses that should be taken into consideration when innate signalling molecules, such as type I IFNs, are used as vaccine adjuvant.

  14. Innate antiviral immune signaling, viral evasion and modulation by HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, Arjun; Gale, Michael

    2014-03-20

    The intracellular innate antiviral response in human cells is an essential component of immunity against virus infection. As obligate intracellular parasites, all viruses must evade the actions of the host cell's innate immune response in order to replicate and persist. Innate immunity is induced when pathogen recognition receptors of the host cell sense viral products including nucleic acid as "non-self". This process induces downstream signaling through adaptor proteins to activate latent transcription factors that drive the expression of genes encoding antiviral and immune modulatory effector proteins that restrict virus replication and regulate adaptive immunity. The interferon regulatory factors (IRFs) are transcription factors that play major roles in innate immunity. In particular, IRF3 is activated in response to infection by a range of viruses including RNA viruses, DNA viruses and retroviruses. Among these viruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remains a major global health problem mediating chronic infection in millions of people wherein recent studies show that viral persistence is linked with the ability of the virus to dysregulate and evade the innate immune response. In this review, we discuss viral pathogen sensing, innate immune signaling pathways and effectors that respond to viral infection, the role of IRF3 in these processes and how it is regulated by pathogenic viruses. We present a contemporary overview of the interplay between HIV-1 and innate immunity, with a focus on understanding how innate immune control impacts infection outcome and disease.

  15. Neurokinin 1 receptor mediates membrane blebbing and sheer stress-induced microparticle formation in HEK293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panpan Chen

    Full Text Available Cell-derived microparticles participate in intercellular communication similar to the classical messenger systems of small and macro-molecules that bind to specialized membrane receptors. Microparticles have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of complex physiopathologic processes, such as thrombosis, the control of innate and adaptive immunity, and cancer. The neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R is a Gq-coupled receptor present on the membrane of a variety of tissues, including neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system, immune cells, endocrine and exocrine glands, and smooth muscle. The endogenous agonist of NK1R is the undecapeptide substance P (SP. We have previously described intracellular signaling mechanisms that regulate NK1R-mediated rapid cell shape changes in HEK293 cells and U373MG cells. In the present study, we show that the activation of NK1R in HEK293 cells, but not in U373MG cells, leads to formation of sheer-stress induced microparticles that stain positive with the membrane-selective fluorescent dye FM 2-10. SP-induced microparticle formation is independent of elevated intracellular calcium concentrations and activation of NK1R present on HEK293-derived microparticles triggers detectable calcium increase in SP-induced microparticles. The ROCK inhibitor Y27632 and the dynamin inhibitor dynasore inhibited membrane blebbing and microparticle formation in HEK293 cells, strongly suggesting that microparticle formation in this cell type is dependent on membrane blebbing.

  16. Mefloquine neurotoxicity is mediated by non-receptor tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milatovic, Dejan; Jenkins, Jerry W; Hood, Jonathan E; Yu, Yingchun; Rongzhu, Lu; Aschner, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Among several available antimalarial drugs, mefloquine has proven to be effective against drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and remains the drug of choice for both therapy and chemoprophylaxis. However, mefloquine is known to cause adverse neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms, which offset its therapeutic advantage. The exact mechanisms leading to the adverse neurological effects of mefloquine are poorly defined. Alterations in neurotransmitter release and calcium homeostasis, the inhibition of cholinesterases and the interaction with adenosine A(2A) receptors have been hypothesized to play prominent roles in mediating the deleterious effects of this drug. Our recent data have established that mefloquine can also trigger oxidative damage and subsequent neurodegeneration in rat cortical primary neurons. Furthermore, we have utilized a system biology-centered approach and have constructed a pathway model of cellular responses to mefloquine, identifying non-receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) as a critical target in mediating mefloquine neurotoxicity. In this study, we sought to establish an experimental validation of Pyk2 using gene-silencing techniques (siRNA). We have examined whether the downregulation of Pyk2 in primary rat cortical neurons alters mefloquine neurotoxicity by evaluating cell viability, apoptosis and oxidative stress. Results from our study have confirmed that mefloquine neurotoxicity is associated with apoptotic response and oxidative injury, and we have demonstrated that mefloquine affects primary rat cortical neurons, at least in part, via Pyk2. The implication of these findings may prove beneficial in suppressing the neurological side effects of mefloquine and developing effective therapeutic modalities to offset its adverse effects.

  17. The Innate Immune Receptor NLRX1 Functions as a Tumor Suppressor by Reducing Colon Tumorigenesis and Key Tumor-Promoting Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alicia Koblansky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptor (NLR proteins are intracellular innate immune sensors/receptors that regulate immunity. This work shows that NLRX1 serves as a tumor suppressor in colitis-associated cancer (CAC and sporadic colon cancer by keeping key tumor promoting pathways in check. Nlrx1−/− mice were highly susceptible to CAC, showing increases in key cancer-promoting pathways including nuclear factor κB (NF-κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, and interleukin 6 (IL-6. The tumor-suppressive function of NLRX1 originated primarily from the non-hematopoietic compartment. This prompted an analysis of NLRX1 function in the Apcmin/+ genetic model of sporadic gastrointestinal cancer. NLRX1 attenuated Apcmin/+ colon tumorigenesis, cellular proliferation, NF-κB, MAPK, STAT3 activation, and IL-6 levels. Application of anti-interleukin 6 receptor (IL6R antibody therapy reduced tumor burden, increased survival, and reduced STAT3 activation in Nlrx1−/−Apcmin/+ mice. As an important clinical correlate, human colon cancer samples expressed lower levels of NLRX1 than healthy controls in multiple patient cohorts. These data implicate anti-IL6R as a potential personalized therapy for colon cancers with reduced NLRX1.

  18. Vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D3] Differentially Regulates Human Innate Cytokine Responses to Bacterial versus Viral Pattern Recognition Receptor Stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Natascha; Becker, Allan B; HayGlass, Kent T

    2016-04-01

    Vitamin D plays multiple roles in regulation of protective and maladaptive immunity. Although epidemiologic studies link poor in vivo 25(OH)D status to increased viral respiratory infections, we poorly understand how vitamin D affects viral pattern recognition receptor (PRR)-driven cytokine production. In this study, we hypothesized that the biologically active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D3, inhibits human proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory innate cytokine responses stimulated by representative bacterial or viral PRR ligands. Fresh PBMCs or CD14(+) monocytes were stimulated with TLR4, TLR7/8-selective ligands, or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) ± 1,25(OH)2D3. Proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses resulting from TLR4 stimulation were inhibited ∼50% in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D3. Conversely, its usage at physiologic through pharmacologic concentrations inhibited neither proinflammatory nor anti-inflammatory responses evoked by viral PRR ligands or infectious RSV. This differential responsiveness was attributed to the finding that TLR7/8, but not TLR4, stimulation markedly inhibited vitamin D receptor mRNA and protein expression, selectively reducing the sensitivity of viral PRR responses to modulation. 1,25(OH)2D3 also enhanced expression of IkBa, a potent negative regulator of NF-κB and cytokine production, in TLR4-stimulated monocytes while not doing so upon TLR7/8 stimulation. Thus, 1,25(OH)2D3 inhibits both proinflammatory and a broad panel of anti-inflammatory responses elicited by TLR4 stimulation, arguing that the common view of it as an anti-inflammatory immune response modifier is an oversimplification. In viral responses, it consistently fails to modify TLR7/8- or RSV-stimulated innate cytokine production, even at supraphysiologic concentrations. Collectively, the data call into question the rationale for increasingly widespread self-medication with vitamin D supplements.

  19. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

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    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  20. Retromer-Mediated Trafficking of Transmembrane Receptors and Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine C. Klinger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Transport between the endoplasmatic reticulum, the Golgi-network, the endo-lysosomal system and the cell surface can be categorized as anterograde or retrograde, describing traffic that goes forward or backward, respectively. Traffic going from the plasma membrane to endosomes and lysosomes or the trans-Golgi network (TGN constitutes the major retrograde transport routes. Several transmembrane proteins undergo retrograde transport as part of a recycling mechanism that contributes to reutilization and maintenance of a steady-state protein localization. In addition, some receptors are hijacked by exotoxins and used for entry and intracellular transport. The physiological relevance of retrograde transport cannot be overstated. Retrograde trafficking of the amyloid precursor protein determines the distribution between organelles, and hence the possibility of cleavage by γ-secretase. Right balancing of the pathways is critical for protection against Alzheimer’s disease. During embryonic development, retrograde transport of Wntless to the TGN is essential for the following release of Wnt from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpression of Wntless has been linked to oncogenesis. Here, we review relevant aspects of the retrograde trafficking of mammalian transmembrane receptors and transporters, with focus on the retromer-mediated transport between endosomes and the TGN.

  1. Interleukin-6, A Cytokine Critical to Mediation of Inflammation, Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection: Therapeutic Implications of IL-6 Receptor Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stanley C; Choi, Jua; Kim, Irene; Wu, Gordon; Toyoda, Mieko; Shin, Bonga; Vo, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    The success of kidney transplants is limited by the lack of robust improvements in long-term survival. It is now recognized that alloimmune responses are responsible for the majority of allograft failures. Development of novel therapies to decrease allosensitization is critical. The lack of new drug development in kidney transplantation necessitated repurposing drugs initially developed in oncology and autoimmunity. Among these is tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor [IL-6R]) which holds promise for modulating multiple immune pathways responsible for allograft injury and loss. Interleukin-6 is a cytokine critical to proinflammatory and immune regulatory cascades. Emerging data have identified important roles for IL-6 in innate immune responses and adaptive immunity. Excessive IL-6 production is associated with activation of T-helper 17 cell and inhibition of regulatory T cell with attendant inflammation. Plasmablast production of IL-6 is critical for initiation of T follicular helper cells and production of high-affinity IgG. Tocilizumab is the first-in-class drug developed to treat diseases mediated by IL-6. Data are emerging from animal and human studies indicating a critical role for IL-6 in mediation of cell-mediated rejection, antibody-mediated rejection, and chronic allograft vasculopathy. This suggests that anti-IL-6/IL-6R blockade could be effective in modifying T- and B-cell responses to allografts. Initial data from our group suggest anti-IL-6R therapy is of value in desensitization and prevention and treatment of antibody-mediated rejection. In addition, human trials have shown benefits in treatment of graft versus host disease in matched or mismatched stem cell transplants. Here, we explore the biology of IL-6/IL-6R interactions and the evidence for an important role of IL-6 in mediating allograft rejection.

  2. Inhibition of Toll-like receptor 2-mediated interleukin-8 production in Cystic Fibrosis airway epithelial cells via the alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2010-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is an inherited disorder characterised by chronic inflammation of the airways. The lung manifestations of CF include colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus leading to neutrophil-dominated airway inflammation and tissue damage. Inflammation in the CF lung is initiated by microbial components which activate the innate immune response via Toll-like receptors (TLRs), increasing airway epithelial cell production of proinflammatory mediators such as the neutrophil chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8). Thus modulation of TLR function represents a therapeutic approach for CF. Nicotine is a naturally occurring plant alkaloid. Although it is negatively associated with cigarette smoking and cardiovascular damage, nicotine also has anti-inflammatory properties. Here we investigate the inhibitory capacity of nicotine against TLR2- and TLR4-induced IL-8 production by CFTE29o- airway epithelial cells, determine the role of alpha7-nAChR (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor) in these events, and provide data to support the potential use of safe nicotine analogues as anti-inflammatories for CF.

  3. Heme on innate immunity and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabianno Ferreira Dutra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heme is an essential molecule expressed ubiquitously all through our tissues. Heme plays major functions in cellular physiology and metabolism as the prostetic group of diverse proteins. Once released from cells and from hemeproteins free heme causes oxidative damage and inflammation, thus acting as a prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern. In this context, free heme is a critical component of the pathological process of sterile and infectious hemolytic conditions including malaria, hemolytic anemias, ischemia-reperfusion and hemorrhage. The plasma scavanger proteins hemopexin and albumin reduce heme toxicity and are responsible for transporting free heme to intracellular compartments where it is catabolized by heme-oxygenase enzymes. Upon hemolysis or severe cellular damage the serum capacity to scavange heme may saturate and increase free heme to sufficient amounts to cause tissue damage in various organs. The mechanism by which heme causes reactive oxygen generation, activation of cells of the innate immune system and cell death are not fully understood. Although heme can directly promote lipid peroxidation by its iron atom, heme can also induce ROS generation and production of inflammatory mediators through the activation of selective signaling pathways. Heme activates innate immune cells such as macrophages and neutrophils through activation of innate immune receptors. The importance of these events has been demonstrated in infectious and non-infectious diseases models. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms behind heme-induced citotoxicity and inflammation and the consequences of these events on different tissues and diseases.

  4. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity.

  5. Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0314 TITLE: Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro-Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis ...19 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Glucocorticoid Receptor-Mediated Repression of Pro- Inflammatory Genes in Rheumatoid Arthritis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... arthritis (RA) patients rely on glucocorticoids (GCs) at some point during the disease. GCs signal through the GC receptor (GR), a transcription factor that

  6. DMPD: Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15662540 Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. Li X, Qin J....iated signaling. PubmedID 15662540 Title Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor media... J Mol Med. 2005 Apr;83(4):258-66. Epub 2005 Jan 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor med

  7. Secretory phospholipase A2-mediated neuronal cell death involves glutamate ionotropic receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils Henrik; Bazan, Nicolas G

    2002-01-01

    To define the significance of glutamate ionotropic receptors in sPLA -mediated neuronal cell death we used the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 and the AMPA receptor antagonist PNQX. In primary neuronal cell cultures both MK-801 and PNQX inhibited sPLA - and glutamate-induced neuronal death. [ H]A...

  8. Neurotensin receptor-1 inducible palmitoylation is required for efficient receptor-mediated mitogenic-signaling within structured membrane microdomains

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Neurotensin receptor-1 (NTSR-1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that has been recently identified as a mediator of cancer progression. NTSR-1 and its endogenous ligand, neurotensin (NTS), are co-expressed in several breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tumor samples. Based on our previously published study demonstrating that intact structured membrane microdomains (SMDs) are required for NTSR-1 mitogenic signaling, we hypothesized that regulated receptor palmitoylation is respons...

  9. Galanin subtype 1 and subtype 2 receptors mediate opposite anxiety-like effects in the rat dorsal raphe nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, J S; Souza, M M; Campanha, T M N; Muller, C J T; Bittencourt, A S; Bortoli, V C; Schenberg, L C; Beijamini, V

    2016-11-01

    About 40% of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) neurons co-express serotonin (5-HT) and galanin. Serotonergic pathways from the DRN to the amygdala facilitate learned anxiety, while those from the DRN to the dorsal periaqueductal grey matter (DPAG) impair innate anxiety. Previously, we showed that galanin infusion in the DRN of rats induces anxiolytic effect by impairing inhibitory avoidance without changing escape behaviour in the elevated T-maze (ETM). Here, we evaluated: (1) which galanin receptors would be involved in the anxiolytic effect of galanin in the DRN of rats tested in the ETM; (2) the effects of galanin intra-DRN on panic-like behaviours evoked by electrical stimulation of the DPAG. The activation of DRN GAL1 receptors by M617 (1.0 and 3.0nmol) facilitated inhibitory avoidance, whereas the activation of GAL2 receptors by AR-M1896 (3.0nmol) impaired the inhibitory avoidance in the ETM, suggesting an anxiogenic and an anxiolytic-like effect respectively. Both agonists did not change escape behaviour in the ETM or locomotor activity in the open field. The anxiolytic effect of AR-M1896 was attenuated by the prior administration of WAY100635 (0.18nmol), a 5-HT1A antagonist. Galanin (0.3nmol) administered in the DRN increased discreetly flight behaviours induced by electrical stimulation of the DPAG, suggesting a panicolytic effect. Together, our results showed that galanin mediates opposite anxiety responses in the DRN by activation of GAL1 and GAL2 receptors. The anxiolytic effect induced by activation of Gal2 receptors may depend on serotonergic tone. Finally, the role of galanin in panic related behaviours remains uncertain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Regulation of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy by IL-9 Producing Mucosal Mast Cells and Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-08-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence and number of life-threatening cases, food allergy has emerged as a major health concern. The classic immune response seen during food allergy is allergen-specific IgE sensitization and hypersensitivity reactions to foods occur in the effector phase with often severe and deleterious outcomes. Recent research has advanced understanding of the immunological mechanisms occurring during the effector phase of allergic reactions to ingested food. Therefore, this review will not only cover the mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract and the immunological mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated food allergy, but will also introduce cells recently identified to have a role in the hypersensitivity reaction to food allergens. These include IL-9 producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). The involvement of these cell types in potentiating the type 2 immune response and developing the anaphylactic response to food allergens will be discussed. In addition, it has become apparent that there is a collaboration between these cells that contributes to an individual's susceptibility to IgE-mediated food allergy.

  11. Regulation of Toll-like receptor 4-mediated immune responses through Pasteurella multocida toxin-induced G protein signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hildebrand Dagmar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipopolysaccharide (LPS-triggered Toll-like receptor (TLR 4-signalling belongs to the key innate defence mechanisms upon infection with Gram-negative bacteria and triggers the subsequent activation of adaptive immunity. There is an active crosstalk between TLR4-mediated and other signalling cascades to secure an effective immune response, but also to prevent excessive inflammation. Many pathogens induce signalling cascades via secreted factors that interfere with TLR signalling to modify and presumably escape the host response. In this context heterotrimeric G proteins and their coupled receptors have been recognized as major cellular targets. Toxigenic strains of Gram-negative Pasteurella multocida produce a toxin (PMT that constitutively activates the heterotrimeric G proteins Gαq, Gα13 and Gαi independently of G protein-coupled receptors through deamidation. PMT is known to induce signalling events involved in cell proliferation, cell survival and cytoskeleton rearrangement. Results Here we show that the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins through PMT suppresses LPS-stimulated IL-12p40 production and eventually impairs the T cell-activating ability of LPS-treated monocytes. This inhibition of TLR4-induced IL-12p40 expression is mediated by Gαi-triggered signalling as well as by Gβγ-dependent activation of PI3kinase and JNK. Taken together we propose the following model: LPS stimulates TLR4-mediated activation of the NFĸB-pathway and thereby the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40. PMT inhibits the production of IL-12p40 by Gαi-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and cAMP accumulation and by Gβγ-mediated activation of PI3kinase and JNK activation. Conclusions On the basis of the experiments with PMT this study gives an example of a pathogen-induced interaction between G protein-mediated and TLR4-triggered signalling and illustrates how a bacterial toxin is able to interfere with the host’s immune

  12. Innate immune responses to systemic Acinetobacter baumannii infection in mice: neutrophils, but not interleukin-17, mediate host resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Jessica M; Meissler, Joseph J; Hartzell, Rebecca R; Spence, Phillip B; Truant, Allan; Gaughan, John; Eisenstein, Toby K

    2011-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a nosocomial pathogen with a high prevalence of multiple-drug-resistant strains, causing pneumonia and sepsis. The current studies further develop a systemic mouse model of this infection and characterize selected innate immune responses to the organism. Five clinical isolates, with various degrees of antibiotic resistance, were assessed for virulence in two mouse strains, and between male and female mice, using intraperitoneal infection. A nearly 1,000-fold difference in virulence was found between bacterial strains, but no significant differences between sexes or mouse strains were observed. It was found that microbes disseminated rapidly from the peritoneal cavity to the lung and spleen, where they replicated. A persistent septic state was observed. The infection progressed rapidly, with mortality between 36 and 48 h. Depletion of neutrophils with antibody to Ly-6G decreased mean time to death and increased mortality. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) promotes the response of neutrophils by inducing production of the chemokine keratinocyte-derived chemoattractant (KC/CXCL1), the mouse homolog of human IL-8. Acinetobacter infection resulted in biphasic increases in both IL-17 and KC/CXCL1. Depletion of neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1, using specific antibodies, resulted in a difference in bacterial burdens in organs of infected mice at 10 h postinfection. Comparison of bacterial burdens between IL-17a(-/-) and wild-type mice confirmed that the absence of this cytokine did not sensitize mice to Acinetobacter infection. These studies definitely demonstrate the importance of neutrophils in resistance to systemic Acinetobacter infection. However, neither IL-17 nor KC/CXCL1 alone is required for effective host defense to systemic infection with this organism.

  13. Reclassifying Anaphylaxis to Neuromuscular Blocking Agents Based on the Presumed Patho-Mechanism: IgE-Mediated, Pharmacological Adverse Reaction or “Innate Hypersensitivity”?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Spoerl

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 60% of perioperative anaphylactic reactions are thought to be immunoglobulin IgE mediated, whereas 40% are thought to be non-IgE mediated hypersensitivity reactions (both considered non-dose-related type B adverse drug reactions. In both cases, symptoms are elicited by mast cell degranulation. Also, pharmacological reactions to drugs (type A, dose-related may sometimes mimic symptoms triggered by mast cell degranulation. In case of hypotension, bronchospasm, or urticarial rash due to mast cell degranulation, identification of the responsible mechanism is complicated. However, determination of the type of the underlying adverse drug reaction is of paramount interest for the decision of whether the culprit drug may be re-administered. Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA are among the most frequent cause of perioperative anaphylaxis. Recently, it has been shown that NMBA may activate mast cells independently from IgE antibodies via the human Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptor member X2 (MRGPRX2. In light of this new insight into the patho-mechanism of pseudo-allergic adverse drug reactions, in which as drug-receptor interaction results in anaphylaxis like symptoms, we critically reviewed the literature on NMBA-induced perioperative anaphylaxis. We challenge the dogma that NMBA mainly cause IgE-mediated anaphylaxis via an IgE-mediated mechanism, which is based on studies that consider positive skin test to be specific for IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Finally, we discuss the question whether MRGPRX2 mediated pseudo-allergic reactions should be re-classified as type A adverse reactions.

  14. Innate immune interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 exacerbates viral myocarditis by reducing CCR5(+) CD11b(+) monocyte migration and impairing interferon production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaperti, Alan; Nishii, Mototsugu; Liu, Youan; Naito, Kotaro; Chan, Megan; Zhang, Liyong; Skurk, Carsten; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Wells, George A; Eriksson, Urs; Liu, Peter P

    2013-10-01

    Viral myocarditis follows a fatal course in ≈30% of patients. Interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK4), a major nodal signal transducer in innate immunity, can play a pivotal role in host inflammatory response. We sought to determine how IRAK4 modulates inflammation and outcome in a mouse model of viral myocarditis. Myocarditis was induced after intraperitoneal inoculation of coxsackievirus B3 into C57Bl/6 IRAK4-deficient mice and their littermate controls. Mortality and viral proliferation were markedly reduced in IRAK4(-/-) mice compared with their IRAK4(+/+) littermates. Disease resistance of IRAK4(-/-) mice paralleled increased amounts of protective heart-infiltrating CCR5(+) monocytes/macrophages and enhanced interferon-α and interferon-γ production 2 days after infection. Competitive bone marrow chimera demonstrated that intact IRAK4 function inhibited heart-specific migration of bone marrow-derived CCR5(+) cells. Mechanistically, lack of IRAK4 resulted in interferon regulatory factor 5 homodimerization via reduced melanoma differentiation-associated protein 5 degradation and enhanced Stat1 and Stat5 phosphorylation. Consequently, antiviral interferon-α and interferon-γ production, as well as CCR5(+) cell recruitment, increased, whereas the overall proinflammatory response was drastically reduced in the absence of IRAK4. Innate immunity signal transducer IRAK4 exacerbates viral myocarditis through inhibition of interferon production and reduced mobilization of protective CCR5(+) monocytes/macrophages to the heart. The combination of IRAK4 inhibitors and antiviral adjuvants may become an attractive therapeutic approach against viral myocarditis in the future.

  15. Innate immune memory in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Michalski, Eva-Maria; Conrath, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    The plant innate immune system comprises local and systemic immune responses. Systemic plant immunity develops after foliar infection by microbial pathogens, upon root colonization by certain microbes, or in response to physical injury. The systemic plant immune response to localized foliar infection is associated with elevated levels of pattern-recognition receptors, accumulation of dormant signaling enzymes, and alterations in chromatin state. Together, these systemic responses provide a memory to the initial infection by priming the remote leaves for enhanced defense and immunity to reinfection. The plant innate immune system thus builds immunological memory by utilizing mechanisms and components that are similar to those employed in the trained innate immune response of jawed vertebrates. Therefore, there seems to be conservation, or convergence, in the evolution of innate immune memory in plants and vertebrates.

  16. Thyrotropin modulates receptor-mediated processing of the atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in cultured thyroid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Y.L.; Burman, K.D.; Lahiri, S.; Abdelrahim, M.M.; D' Avis, J.C.; Wartofsky, L. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-03-01

    In a prior study of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding to cultured thyroid cells, we reported that at 4 C, more than 95% of bound ANP is recovered on cell membranes, with negligible ANP internalization observed. Since ANP binding was inhibited by TSH, we have further studied TSH effects on postbinding ANP processing to determine whether this phenomenon reflects enhanced endocytosis of the ANP-receptor complex. An ANP chase study was initiated by binding (125I) ANP to thyroid cells at 4 C for 2 h, followed by incubation at 37 C. ANP processing was then traced by following 125I activity at various time intervals in three fractions: cell surface membranes, incubation medium, and inside the cells. Radioactivity released into medium represented processed ANP rather than ANP dissociated from surface membranes, since prebound (125I)ANP could not be competitively dissociated by a high concentration of ANP (1 mumol/L) at 37 C. Chase study results showed that prebound ANP quickly disappeared from cell membranes down to 34% by 30 min. Internalized ANP peaked at 10 min, with 21% of initial prebound ANP found inside the cells. At the same time, radioactivity recovered in incubation medium sharply increased between 10-30 min from 8% to 52%. Preincubation of cells with chloroquine (which blocks degradation of the ANP-receptor complex by inhibiting lysosomal hydrolase) caused a 146% increase in internalized (125I)ANP by 30 min (39% compared to 15% control), while medium radioactivity decreased from 52% to 16%, suggesting that processing of the receptor complex is mediated via lysosomal enzymes. In chase studies employing cells pretreated with chloroquine, TSH stimulated the internalization rate of ANP-receptor complex. By 30 min, TSH significantly reduced the membrane-bound ANP, and the decrease was inversely correlated to the increase in internalized radioactivity.

  17. The growth-defense pivot: Crisis management in plants mediated by LRR-RK surface receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkhadir, Youssef; Yang, Li; Hetzel, Jonathan; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Chory, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Plants must adapt to their environment and require mechanisms for sensing their surroundings and responding appropriately. An expanded family of greater than 200 leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) transduces fluctuating and often contradictory signals from the environment into changes in nuclear gene expression. Two LRR-RKs, BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1), a steroid receptor, and FLAGELLIN-SENSITIVE 2 (FLS2), an innate immune receptor that recognizes bacterial flagellin, act cooperatively to partition necessary growth-defense tradeoffs. BRI1 and FLS2 share common signaling components and slightly different activation mechanisms. BRI1 and FLS2 are paradigms for understanding signaling mechanisms of LRR-containing receptors in plants. PMID:25089011

  18. Toll-like receptor 8 ligands activate a vitamin D mediated autophagic response that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant R Campbell

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptors (TLR are important in recognizing microbial pathogens and triggering host innate immune responses, including autophagy, and in the mediation of immune activation during human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV infection. We report here that TLR8 activation in human macrophages induces the expression of the human cathelicidin microbial peptide (CAMP, the vitamin D receptor (VDR and cytochrome P450, family 27, subfamily B, polypeptide 1 (CYP27B1, which 1α-hydroxylates the inactive form of vitamin D, 25-hydroxycholecalciferol, into its biologically active metabolite. Moreover, we demonstrate using RNA interference, chemical inhibitors and vitamin D deficient media that TLR8 agonists inhibit HIV through a vitamin D and CAMP dependent autophagic mechanism. These data support an important role for vitamin D in the control of HIV infection, and provide a biological explanation for the benefits of vitamin D. These findings also provide new insights into potential novel targets to prevent and treat HIV infection.

  19. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Marc A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ. Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848, respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs.

  20. Effects of Air Pollutants on Innate Immunity: The Role of Toll-like receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interactions between exposure to ambient air pollutants and respiratory pathogens have been shown to modify respiratory immune responses. Emerging data suggest key roles for toll-like receptor (TLR) and NOD-like receptor (NLR) signaling in pathogen-induced immune responses. Simil...

  1. Anti-nociception mediated by a κ opioid receptor agonist is blocked by a δ receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A M W; Roberts, K W; Pradhan, A A; Akbari, H A; Walwyn, W; Lutfy, K; Carroll, F I; Cahill, C M; Evans, C J

    2015-01-01

    The opioid receptor family comprises four structurally homologous but functionally distinct sub-groups, the μ (MOP), δ (DOP), κ (KOP) and nociceptin (NOP) receptors. As most opioid agonists are selective but not specific, a broad spectrum of behaviours due to activation of different opioid receptors is expected. In this study, we examine whether other opioid receptor systems influenced KOP-mediated antinociception. We used a tail withdrawal assay in C57Bl/6 mice to assay the antinociceptive effect of systemically administered opioid agonists with varying selectivity at KOP receptors. Pharmacological and genetic approaches were used to analyse the interactions of the other opioid receptors in modulating KOP-mediated antinociception. Etorphine, a potent agonist at all four opioid receptors, was not anti-nociceptive in MOP knockout (KO) mice, although etorphine is an efficacious KOP receptor agonist and specific KOP receptor agonists remain analgesic in MOP KO mice. As KOP receptor agonists are aversive, we considered KOP-mediated antinociception might be a form of stress-induced analgesia that is blocked by the anxiolytic effects of DOP receptor agonists. In support of this hypothesis, pretreatment with the DOP antagonist, naltrindole (10 mg·kg(-1) ), unmasked etorphine (3 mg·kg(-1) ) antinociception in MOP KO mice. Further, in wild-type mice, KOP-mediated antinociception by systemic U50,488H (10 mg·kg(-1) ) was blocked by pretreatment with the DOP agonist SNC80 (5 mg·kg(-1) ) and diazepam (1 mg·kg(-1) ). Systemic DOP receptor agonists blocked systemic KOP antinociception, and these results identify DOP receptor agonists as potential agents for reversing stress-driven addictive and depressive behaviours mediated through KOP receptor activation. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The

  2. RIOK3-mediated phosphorylation of MDA5 interferes with its assembly and attenuates the innate immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Ken; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Hiromi; Matsumoto, Misako; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-04-14

    MDA5 is a cytoplasmic viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) sensor and triggers type I interferon (IFN) production. MDA5 assembles along viral dsRNA, leading to the formation of an MDA5 filament required for activating the MAVS adaptor. A recent study has revealed that PP1α and PP1γ phosphatases are responsible for dephosphorylating MDA5 and are essential for its activation. Here, we identified RIO kinase 3 (RIOK3) as a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 C-terminal region. RIOK3 knockout strongly enhanced type I IFN and IFN-inducible gene expression following measles virus infection. Conversely, the ectopic expression of RIOK3 or a phosphomimetic MDA5-S828D mutation attenuated MDA5-mediated signaling. Moreover, RIOK3-mediated MDA5 phosphorylation impaired MDA5 multimer formation, indicating that MDA5 C-terminal phosphorylation interferes with MDA5 filament formation and suppresses its signaling. Our data revealed a regulatory mechanism underlying the activation of the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor MDA5 in both uninfected and virus-infected cells.

  3. RIOK3-Mediated Phosphorylation of MDA5 Interferes with Its Assembly and Attenuates the Innate Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Takashima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available MDA5 is a cytoplasmic viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA sensor and triggers type I interferon (IFN production. MDA5 assembles along viral dsRNA, leading to the formation of an MDA5 filament required for activating the MAVS adaptor. A recent study has revealed that PP1α and PP1γ phosphatases are responsible for dephosphorylating MDA5 and are essential for its activation. Here, we identified RIO kinase 3 (RIOK3 as a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 C-terminal region. RIOK3 knockout strongly enhanced type I IFN and IFN-inducible gene expression following measles virus infection. Conversely, the ectopic expression of RIOK3 or a phosphomimetic MDA5-S828D mutation attenuated MDA5-mediated signaling. Moreover, RIOK3-mediated MDA5 phosphorylation impaired MDA5 multimer formation, indicating that MDA5 C-terminal phosphorylation interferes with MDA5 filament formation and suppresses its signaling. Our data revealed a regulatory mechanism underlying the activation of the cytoplasmic viral RNA sensor MDA5 in both uninfected and virus-infected cells.

  4. Anaesthetic impairment of immune function is mediated via GABA(A receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Wheeler

    Full Text Available GABA(A receptors are members of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter receptors, proteins which are responsible for fast synaptic transmission, and are the site of action of wide range of drugs. Recent work has shown that Cys-loop receptors are present on immune cells, but their physiological roles and the effects of drugs that modify their function in the innate immune system are currently unclear. We are interested in how and why anaesthetics increase infections in intensive care patients; a serious problem as more than 50% of patients with severe sepsis will die. As many anaesthetics act via GABA(A receptors, the aim of this study was to determine if these receptors are present on immune cells, and could play a role in immunocompromising patients.We demonstrate, using RT-PCR, that monocytes express GABA(A receptors constructed of α1, α4, β2, γ1 and/or δ subunits. Whole cell patch clamp electrophysiological studies show that GABA can activate these receptors, resulting in the opening of a chloride-selective channel; activation is inhibited by the GABA(A receptor antagonists bicuculline and picrotoxin, but not enhanced by the positive modulator diazepam. The anaesthetic drugs propofol and thiopental, which can act via GABA(A receptors, impaired monocyte function in classic immunological chemotaxis and phagocytosis assays, an effect reversed by bicuculline and picrotoxin.Our results show that functional GABA(A receptors are present on monocytes with properties similar to CNS GABA(A receptors. The functional data provide a possible explanation as to why chronic propofol and thiopental administration can increase the risk of infection in critically ill patients: their action on GABA(A receptors inhibits normal monocyte behaviour. The data also suggest a potential solution: monocyte GABA(A receptors are insensitive to diazepam, thus the use of benzodiazepines as an alternative anesthetising agent may be advantageous where infection is a life

  5. Transitions in Oral and Intestinal Microflora Composition and Innate Immune Receptor-Dependent Stimulation during Mouse Development▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Hasegawa, Mizuho; Osaka, Toshifumi; Tawaratsumida, Kazuki; Yamazaki, Takashi; Tada, Hiroyuki; Chen, Grace Y; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Núñez, Gabriel; Inohara, Naohiro

    2009-01-01

    Commensal bacteria possess immunostimulatory activities that can modulate host responses to affect development and homeostasis in the intestine. However, how different populations of resident bacteria stimulate the immune system remains largely unknown. We characterized here the ability of intestinal and oral microflora to stimulate individual pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in bone marrow-derived macrophages and mesothelial cells. The intestinal but not oral microflora elicited age- and...

  6. Mincle, an Innate Immune Receptor, Is Expressed in Urothelial Cancer Cells of Papillomavirus-Associated Urothelial Tumors of Cattle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sante Roperto

    Full Text Available Mincle, macrophage-inducible C-type lectin, is a member of C-type lectin receptors. It plays an important role in anti-mycobacterial and anti-fungal immunity. Furthermore it senses dead cells through its primary ligand SAP130.We examined ten urothelial tumors of the urinary bladder of cattle. Eight of them expressed E5 cDNA of bovine papillomaviruses type 2 (BPV-2 and type 13 (BPV-13 that belong to Deltapapillomavirus genus. Two of them were not examined for detection of E5 cDNA. Mincle expression appeared to occur in urothelial neoplastic cells only. No mincle expression was detected in urothelial cells from healthy cattle. Mincle expression was characterized by a membranous pattern in papillary urothelial cancers; isolated and/or clustered urothelial cells showing a strong cytoplasmic immunoreactivity were primarily seen in invasive urothelial cancers.This is the first study about the expression of mincle in veterinary oncology and the first report which describes the expression of functional mincle receptor in neoplastic cells in medical literature. As it has been shown that urothelial cancer cells have the ability to function as antigen-presenting cells (APCs, it is conceivable that mincle expression is involved in the presentation of cancer cell antigens to cells of the immune system. Furthermore, since expression of mincle contributes to the control of Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection, this study has exciting clinical implications in comparative medicine keeping in mind that Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG immunotherapy is currently the most effective treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer in man. Mincle expression in urothelial tumor cells warrants further study to better understand the role, if any, of this receptor in bladder cancer. Future studies will provide insights in the role of mincle receptor of urothelial cancer cells in antitumor immunotherapy.

  7. Tyrosine-610 in the Receptor Kinase BAK1 Does Not Play a Major Role in Brassinosteroid Signaling or Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayata Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The plasma membrane-localized BRI1-ASSOCIATED KINASE1 (BAK1 functions as a co-receptor with several receptor kinases including the brassinosteroid (BR receptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1, which is involved in growth, and the receptors for bacterial flagellin and EF-Tu, FLAGELLIN-SENSING 2 (FLS2 and EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR, respectively, which are involved in immunity. BAK1 is a dual specificity protein kinase that can autophosphorylate on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues. It was previously reported that phosphorylation of Tyr-610 in the carboxy-terminal domain of BAK1 is required for its function in BR signaling and immunity. However, the functional role of Tyr-610 in vivo has recently come under scrutiny. Therefore, we have generated new BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants for functional studies. We first produced transgenic Arabidopsis lines expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag in the homozygous bak1-4 bkk1-1 double null background. In a complementary approach, we expressed untagged BAK1 and BAK1 (Y610F in the bak1-4 null mutant. Neither BAK1 (Y610F transgenic line had any obvious growth phenotype when compared to wild-type BAK1 expressed in the same background. In addition, the BAK1 (Y610F-Flag plants responded similarly to plants expressing BAK1-Flag in terms of brassinolide (BL inhibition of root elongation, and there were only minor changes in gene expression between the two transgenic lines as monitored by microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. In terms of plant immunity, there were no significant differences between plants expressing BAK1 (Y610F-Flag and BAK1-Flag in the growth of the non-pathogenic hrpA- mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000. Furthermore, untagged BAK1 (Y610F transgenic plants were as responsive as plants expressing BAK1 (in the bak1-4 background and wild-type Col-0 plants toward treatment with the EF-Tu- and flagellin-derived peptide epitopes elf18- and flg22, respectively, as measured by reactive

  8. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A; Bailey, Dalan

    2017-04-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule F1 (SLAMF1) is both a microbial sensor and entry receptor for measles virus (MeV). Herein, we describe a new role for SLAMF1 to mediate MeV endocytosis that is in contrast with the alternative, and generally accepted, model that MeV genome enters cells only after fusion at the cell surface. We demonstrated that MeV engagement of SLAMF1 induces dramatic but transient morphological changes, most prominently in the formation of membrane blebs, which were shown to colocalize with incoming viral particles, and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in infected cells. MeV infection was dependent on these dynamic cytoskeletal changes as well as fluid uptake through a macropinocytosis-like pathway as chemical inhibition of these processes inhibited entry. Moreover, we identified a role for the RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling axis in this MeV internalization process, highlighting a novel role for this recently characterized pathway in virus entry. Our study shows that MeV can hijack a microbial sensor normally involved in bacterial phagocytosis to drive endocytosis using a complex pathway that shares features with canonical viral macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and mechanotransduction. This uptake pathway is specific to SLAMF1-positive cells and occurs within 60 min of viral attachment. Measles virus remains a significant cause of mortality in human populations, and this research sheds new light on the very first steps of infection of this important pathogen.IMPORTANCE Measles is a significant disease in humans and is estimated to have killed over 200 million people since records began. According to current World Health Organization statistics, it still kills over 100,000 people a year, mostly children in the developing world. The causative agent, measles virus, is a small enveloped RNA virus that infects a broad range of cells during infection. In particular, immune cells are infected via interactions between glycoproteins found

  9. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule F1 (SLAMF1) is both a microbial sensor and entry receptor for measles virus (MeV). Herein, we describe a new role for SLAMF1 to mediate MeV endocytosis that is in contrast with the alternative, and generally accepted, model that MeV genome enters cells only after fusion at the cell surface. We demonstrated that MeV engagement of SLAMF1 induces dramatic but transient morphological changes, most prominently in the formation of membrane blebs, which were shown to colocalize with incoming viral particles, and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in infected cells. MeV infection was dependent on these dynamic cytoskeletal changes as well as fluid uptake through a macropinocytosis-like pathway as chemical inhibition of these processes inhibited entry. Moreover, we identified a role for the RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling axis in this MeV internalization process, highlighting a novel role for this recently characterized pathway in virus entry. Our study shows that MeV can hijack a microbial sensor normally involved in bacterial phagocytosis to drive endocytosis using a complex pathway that shares features with canonical viral macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and mechanotransduction. This uptake pathway is specific to SLAMF1-positive cells and occurs within 60 min of viral attachment. Measles virus remains a significant cause of mortality in human populations, and this research sheds new light on the very first steps of infection of this important pathogen. IMPORTANCE Measles is a significant disease in humans and is estimated to have killed over 200 million people since records began. According to current World Health Organization statistics, it still kills over 100,000 people a year, mostly children in the developing world. The causative agent, measles virus, is a small enveloped RNA virus that infects a broad range of cells during infection. In particular, immune cells are infected via interactions between

  10. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  11. Arc/Arg3.1 Mediates Homeostatic Synaptic Scaling of AMPA Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shepherd, Jason D; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Wu, Jing; Chowdhury, Shoaib; Plath, Niels; Kuhl, Dietmar; Huganir, Richard L; Worley, Paul F

    2006-01-01

    .... Here, we demonstrate that Arc/Arg3.1, an immediate-early gene (IEG) that is rapidly induced by neuronal activity associated with information encoding in the brain, mediates homeostatic synaptic scaling of AMPA type glutamate receptors (AMPARs...

  12. UNC93B1 mediates innate inflammation and antiviral defense in the liver during acute murine cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith J Crane

    Full Text Available Antiviral defense in the liver during acute infection with the hepatotropic virus murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV involves complex cytokine and cellular interactions. However, the mechanism of viral sensing in the liver that promotes these cytokine and cellular responses has remained unclear. Studies here were undertaken to investigate the role of nucleic acid-sensing Toll-like receptors (TLRs in initiating antiviral immunity in the liver during infection with MCMV. We examined the host response of UNC93B1 mutant mice, which do not signal properly through TLR3, TLR7 and TLR9, to acute MCMV infection to determine whether liver antiviral defense depends on signaling through these molecules. Infection of UNC93B1 mutant mice revealed reduced production of systemic and liver proinflammatory cytokines including IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-12 and TNF-α when compared to wild-type. UNC93B1 deficiency also contributed to a transient hepatitis later in acute infection, evidenced by augmented liver pathology and elevated systemic alanine aminotransferase levels. Moreover, viral clearance was impaired in UNC93B1 mutant mice, despite intact virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses in the liver. Altogether, these results suggest a combined role for nucleic acid-sensing TLRs in promoting early liver antiviral defense during MCMV infection.

  13. Identification of a ferritin-like protein of Listeria monocytogenes as a mediator of β-lactam tolerance and innate resistance to cephalosporins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk-Balska Agata

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis. The β-lactam antibiotics penicillin G and ampicillin are the current drugs of choice for the treatment of listerial infections. While isolates of L. monocytogenes are susceptible to these antibiotics, their action is only bacteriostatic and consequently, this bacterium is regarded as tolerant to β-lactams. In addition, L. monocytogenes has a high level of innate resistance to the cephalosporin family of β-lactams frequently used to treat sepsis of unknown etiology. Given the high mortality rate of listeriosis despite rational antibiotic therapy, it is important to identify genes that play a role in the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams. Results The hly-based promoter trap system was applied to identify penicillin G-inducible genes of L. monocytogenes. The results of reporter system studies, verified by transcriptional analysis, identified ten penicillin G-inducible genes. The contribution of three of these genes, encoding a ferritin-like protein (fri, a two-component phosphate-response regulator (phoP and an AraC/XylS family transcriptional regulator (axyR, to the susceptibility and tolerance of L. monocytogenes to β-lactams was examined by analysis of nonpolar deletion mutants. The absence of PhoP or AxyR resulted in more rapid growth of the strains in the presence of sublethal concentration of β-lactams, but had no effect on the MIC values or the ability to survive a lethal dose of these antibiotics. However, the Δfri strain showed impaired growth in the presence of sublethal concentrations of penicillin G and ampicillin and a significantly reduced ability to survive lethal concentrations of these β-lactams. A lack of Fri also caused a 2-fold increase in the sensitivity of L. monocytogenes to cefalotin and cephradine. Conclusions The present study has identified Fri as an important mediator of

  14. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    BRAVERMAN, ALAN S.; TALLARIDA, RONALD J.; RUGGIERI, MICHAEL R.

    2012-01-01

    M3 muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M2 receptors participate in contraction because M3-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M2-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M3 receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M2 receptor and one by the M3 receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M2 and M3 receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M2 and the M3 receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction. PMID:12185001

  15. Interaction between muscarinic receptor subtype signal transduction pathways mediating bladder contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2002-09-01

    M(3) muscarinic receptors mediate cholinergic-induced contraction in most smooth muscles. However, in the denervated rat bladder, M(2) receptors participate in contraction because M(3)-selective antagonists [para-fluoro-hexahydro-sila-diphenidol (p-F-HHSiD) and 4-DAMP] have low affinities. However, the affinity of the M(2)-selective antagonist methoctramine in the denervated bladder is consistent with M(3) receptor mediating contraction. It is possible that two pathways interact to mediate contraction: one mediated by the M(2) receptor and one by the M(3) receptor. To determine whether an interaction exists, the inhibitory potencies of combinations of methoctramine and p-F-HHSiD for reversing cholinergic contractions were measured. In normal bladders, all combinations gave additive effects. In denervated bladders, synergistic effects were seen with the 10:1 and 1:1 (methoctramine:p-F-HHSiD wt/wt) combinations. After application of the sarcoplasmic reticulum ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin to normal tissue, the 10:1 and 1:1 ratios became synergistic, mimicking denervated tissue. Thus in normal bladders both M(2) and M(3) receptors can induce contraction. In the denervated bladder, the M(2) and the M(3) receptors interact in a facilitatory manner to mediate contraction.

  16. Innate immune signalling of the zebrafish embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stockhammer, Oliver W.

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade the study of the innate immune system has gained renewed scientific momentum as a result of the discovery of essential receptor families, such as the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, that are required for pathogen recognition. These receptors detect specific molecular structures o

  17. Endolysosomal trafficking of viral G protein-coupled receptor functions in innate immunity and control of viral oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaonan; Cheng, Adam; Zou, Zhongju; Yang, Yih-Sheng; Sumpter, Rhea M; Huang, Chou-Long; Bhagat, Govind; Virgin, Herbert W; Lira, Sergio A; Levine, Beth

    2016-03-15

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system degrades viral oncoproteins and other microbial virulence factors; however, the role of endolysosomal degradation pathways in these processes is unclear. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, and a constitutively active viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR) contributes to the pathogenesis of KSHV-induced tumors. We report that a recently discovered autophagy-related protein, Beclin 2, interacts with KSHV GPCR, facilitates its endolysosomal degradation, and inhibits vGPCR-driven oncogenic signaling. Furthermore, monoallelic loss of Becn2 in mice accelerates the progression of vGPCR-induced lesions that resemble human Kaposi's sarcoma. Taken together, these findings indicate that Beclin 2 is a host antiviral molecule that protects against the pathogenic effects of KSHV GPCR by facilitating its endolysosomal degradation. More broadly, our data suggest a role for host endolysosomal trafficking pathways in regulating viral pathogenesis and oncogenic signaling.

  18. Opioid Receptors Mediate Direct Predictive Fear Learning: Evidence from One-Trial Blocking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including [mu]-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear…

  19. Inhibition of pattern recognition receptor-mediated inflammation by bioactive phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerging evidence reveals that pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain proteins (NODs) mediate both infection-induced and sterile inflammation by recognizing pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and endogenous molecules...

  20. Pharmacological significance of the interplay between angiotensin receptors: MAS receptors as putative final mediators of the effects elicited by angiotensin AT1 receptors antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernomian, Larissa; Pernomian, Laena; Gomes, Mayara S; da Silva, Carlos H T P

    2015-12-15

    The interplay between angiotensin AT1 receptors and MAS receptors relies on several inward regulatory mechanisms from renin-angiotensin system (RAS) including the functional crosstalk between angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-7), the competitive AT1 antagonism exhibited by angiotensin-(1-7), the antagonist feature assigned to AT1/MAS heterodimerization on AT1 signaling and the AT1-mediated downregulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Recently, such interplay has acquired an important significance to RAS Pharmacology since a few studies have supporting strong evidences that MAS receptors mediate the effects elicited by AT1 antagonists. The present Perspective provides an overview of the regulatory mechanisms involving AT1 and MAS receptors, their significance to RAS Pharmacology and the future directions on the interplay between angiotensin receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Innate immune response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Shohei; Ishii, Ken J; Coban, Cevayir; Akira, Shizuo

    2008-09-01

    In viral infections the host innate immune system is meant to act as a first line defense to prevent viral invasion or replication before more specific protection by the adaptive immune system is generated. In the innate immune response, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are engaged to detect specific viral components such as viral RNA or DNA or viral intermediate products and to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in the infected cells and other immune cells. Recently these innate immune receptors and their unique downstream pathways have been identified. Here, we summarize their roles in the innate immune response to virus infection, discrimination between self and viral nucleic acids and inhibition by virulent factors and provide some recent advances in the coordination between innate and adaptive immune activation.

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wang; Yi Liu; Ji-Min Cao

    2014-01-01

    Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G prot...

  3. Tracking Progesterone Receptor-Mediated Actions in Breast Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian steroid hormones contribute to breast cancer initiation and progression primarily through the actions of their nuclear transcription factors, the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and progesterone receptors (PRs). These receptors are important drivers of the luminal A and B subtypes of breast cancer, where estrogen-blocking drugs have been effective endocrine therapies for patients with these tumors. However, many patients do not respond, or become resistant to treatment. When endocrine t...

  4. Quantifying Rosette Formation Mediated by Receptor-ligand Interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionRosetting is a simple assay for specific cell-cell adhesion, in which receptor- (or ligand-) coated RBCs form the rosettes with ligand- (or receptor-) expressed nucleated cells~([1]). Although routinely used by immunologists to examine the functionality of the interacting receptors and ligands, however, it has not been regarded as a quantitative method, as the measured rosette fraction has not been quantitatively related to the underlying molecular properties.Recently, we have solved probabili...

  5. Deletion of the innate immune NLRP3 receptor abolishes cardiac ischemic preconditioning and is associated with decreased Il-6/STAT3 signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuurbier, C.J.; Jong, W.M.; Eerbeek, O.; Koeman, A.; Pulskens, W.P.; Butter, L.M.; Leemans, J.C.; Hollmann, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies indicate that the innate immune system is not only triggered by exogenous pathogens and pollutants, but also by endogenous danger signals released during ischemia and necrosis. As triggers for the innate immune NLRP3 inflammasome protein complex appear to overlap with those

  6. DEPENDENCE OF PPAR LIGAND-INDUCED MAPK SIGNALING ON EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR TRANSACTIVATION HEPARIN-BINDING EGF CLEAVAGE MEDIATES ZINC-INDUCED EGF RECEPTOR PHOSPHORYLATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that function as ligand-activated transcription factors regulating lipid metabolism and homeostasis. In addition to their ability to regulate PPAR-mediated gene transcription, PPARalpha and gamma li...

  7. Glutamate mediates the function of melanocortin receptor 4 on sim1 neurons in body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) is a well-established mediator of body weight homeostasis. However, the neurotransmitter(s) that mediate MC4R function remain largely unknown; as a result, little is known about the second-order neurons of the MC4R neural pathway. Single-minded 1 (Sim1)-expressing ...

  8. IgM-Dependent Phagocytosis in Microglia Is Mediated by Complement Receptor 3, Not Fcα/μ Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Jonathan R; Quan, Yi; Hanson, Josiah F; Colonna, Lucrezia; Iorga, Michael; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira; Elkon, Keith B; Möller, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Microglia play an important role in receptor-mediated phagocytosis in the CNS. In brain abscess and other CNS infections, invading bacteria undergo opsonization with Igs or complement. Microglia recognize these opsonized pathogens by Fc or complement receptors triggering phagocytosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Fcα/μR, the less-studied receptor for IgM and IgA, in microglial phagocytosis. We showed that primary microglia, as well as N9 microglial cells, express Fcα/μR. We also showed that anti-Staphylococcus aureus IgM markedly increased the rate of microglial S. aureus phagocytosis. To unequivocally test the role of Fcα/μR in IgM-mediated phagocytosis, we performed experiments in microglia from Fcα/μR(-/-) mice. Surprisingly, we found that IgM-dependent phagocytosis of S. aureus was similar in microglia derived from wild-type or Fcα/μR(-/-) mice. We hypothesized that IgM-dependent activation of complement receptors might contribute to the IgM-mediated increase in phagocytosis. To test this, we used immunologic and genetic inactivation of complement receptor 3 components (CD11b and CD18) as well as C3. IgM-, but not IgG-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus was reduced in wild-type microglia and macrophages following preincubation with an anti-CD11b blocking Ab. IgM-dependent phagocytosis of S. aureus was also reduced in microglia derived from CD18(-/-) and C3(-/-) mice. Taken together, our findings implicate complement receptor 3 and C3, but not Fcα/μR, in IgM-mediated phagocytosis of S. aureus by microglia.

  9. MAP Kinase Cascades in Plant Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Wohlfahrt Rasmussen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors (PRRs which trigger MAPK-dependent innate immune responses. In the model Arabidopsis, molecular genetic evidence implicates a number of MAPK cascade components in PAMP signaling, and in responses to immunity-related phytohormones such as ethylene, jasmonate and salicylate. In a few cases, cascade components have been directly linked to the transcription of target genes or to the regulation of phytohormone synthesis. Thus MAPKs are obvious targets for bacterial effector proteins and are likely guardees of resistance (R proteins, which mediate defense signaling in response to the action of effectors, or effector-triggered immunity (ETI. This mini-review discusses recent progress in this field with a focus on the Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3, 4, 6 and 11 in their apparent pathways.

  10. Osteopontin Bridging Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausicaa Clemente

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteopontin (OPN regulates the immune response at multiple levels. Physiologically, it regulates the host response to infections by driving T helper (Th polarization and acting on both innate and adaptive immunity; pathologically, it contributes to the development of immune-mediated and inflammatory diseases. In some cases, the mechanisms of these effects have been described, but many aspects of the OPN function remain elusive. This is in part ascribable to the fact that OPN is a complex molecule with several posttranslational modifications and it may act as either an immobilized protein of the extracellular matrix or a soluble cytokine or an intracytoplasmic molecule by binding to a wide variety of molecules including crystals of calcium phosphate, several cell surface receptors, and intracytoplasmic molecules. This review describes the OPN structure, isoforms, and functions and its role in regulating the crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity in autoimmune diseases.

  11. Melanocortin MC(4) receptor-mediated feeding and grooming in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, Joram D; Spruijt, Berry M; Brakkee, Jan H; Adan, Roger A H

    2013-11-01

    Decades ago it was recognized that the pharmacological profile of melanocortin ligands that stimulated grooming behavior in rats was strikingly similar to that of Xenopus laevis melanophore pigment dispersion. After cloning of the melanocortin MC1 receptor, expressed in melanocytes, and the melanocortin MC4 receptor, expressed mainly in brain, the pharmacological profiles of these receptors appeared to be very similar and it was demonstrated that these receptors mediate melanocortin-induced pigmentation and grooming respectively. Grooming is a low priority behavior that is concerned with care of body surface. Activation of central melanocortin MC4 receptors is also associated with meal termination, and continued postprandial stimulation of melanocortin MC4 receptors may stimulate natural postprandial grooming behavior as part of the behavioral satiety sequence. Indeed, melanocortins fail to suppress food intake or induce grooming behavior in melanocortin MC4 receptor-deficient rats. This review will focus on how melanocortins affect grooming behavior through the melanocortin MC4 receptor, and how melanocortin MC4 receptors mediate feeding behavior. This review also illustrates how melanocortins were the most likely candidates to mediate grooming and feeding based on the natural behaviors they induced.

  12. Innate immunity in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Cheryl M

    2011-12-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disorder. T helper(h)1 and Th17 lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis through the release of inflammatory cytokines that promote further recruitment of immune cells, keratinocyte proliferation and sustained inflammation. The innate immune system is the first line of defence against infection and plays a crucial role in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. The presence of innate immune cells and their products in psoriatic skin plaques suggests a role for innate immunity in this disease. In addition, the innate immune system can direct the development of pathogenic Th cells in psoriasis. In this article, we will summarise the role of the innate immune system in psoriasis with particular emphasis on the role of cytokines, signalling pathways and cells of the innate immune system.

  13. Heat Shock Proteins: Stimulators of Innate and Acquired Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Colaco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants were reintroduced into modern immunology as the dirty little secret of immunologists by Janeway and thus began the molecular definition of innate immunity. It is now clear that the binding of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs on antigen presenting cells (APCs activates the innate immune response and provides the host with a rapid mechanism for detecting infection by pathogens and initiates adaptive immunity. Ironically, in addition to advancing the basic science of immunology, Janeway’s revelation on induction of the adaptive system has also spurred an era of rational vaccine design that exploits PRRs. Thus, defined PAMPs that bind to known PRRs are being specifically coupled to antigens to improve their immunogenicity. However, while PAMPs efficiently activate the innate immune response, they do not mediate the capture of antigen that is required to elicit the specific responses of the acquired immune system. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are molecular chaperones that are found complexed to client polypeptides and have been studied as potential cancer vaccines. In addition to binding PRRs and activating the innate immune response, HSPs have been shown to both induce the maturation of APCs and provide chaperoned polypeptides for specific triggering of the acquired immune response.

  14. Dental metal-induced innate reactivity in keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Buskermolen, Jeroen K; Scheper, Rik J; Gibbs, Susan; von Blomberg, B Mary E; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2015-12-25

    Gold, nickel, copper and mercury, i.e. four metals frequently used in dental applications, were explored for their capacity to induce innate immune activation in keratinocytes (KC). Due to their anatomical location the latter epithelial cells are key in primary local irritative responses of skin and mucosa. Fresh foreskin-derived keratinocytes and skin and gingiva KC cell lines were studied for IL-8 release as a most sensitive parameter for NF-kB activation. First, we verified that viral-defense mediating TLR3 is a key innate immune receptor in both skin- and mucosa derived keratinocytes. Second, we found that, in line with our earlier finding that ionized gold can mimic viral dsRNA in triggering TLR3, gold is very effective in KC activation. It would appear that epithelial TLR3 can play a key role in both skin- and mucosa localized irritation reactivities to gold. Subsequently we found that not only gold, but also nickel, copper and mercury salts can activate innate immune reactivity in keratinocytes, although the pathways involved remain unclear. Although current alloys have been optimized for minimal leakage of metal ions, secondary factors such as mechanical friction and acidity may still facilitate such leakage. Subsequently, these metal ions may create local irritation, itching and swelling by triggering innate immune reactions, potentially also facilitating the development of metal specific adaptive immunity.

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediates benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung-Il; Hirabayashi, Yoko; Kawasaki, Yasushi; Kodama, Yukio; Kaneko, Toyozo; Kanno, Jun; Kim, Dae-Yong; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Tohru

    2002-11-01

    Benzene can induce hematotoxicity and leukemia in humans and mice. Since a review of the literature shows that the CYP2E1 knockout mouse is not known to possess any benzene toxicity, the metabolism of benzene by CYP2E1 in the liver is regarded to be prerequisite for its cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, although the mechanism is not fully understood yet. Because it was found some years ago that benzene was also a substrate for CYP1A1, we investigated the involvement of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in benzene hematotoxicity using AhR wild-type (AhR(+/+)), heterozygous (AhR(+/-)), and homozygous (AhR(-/-)) male mice. Interestingly, following a 2-week inhalation of 300 ppm benzene (a potent dose for leukemogenicity), no hematotoxicity was induced in AhR(-/-) mice. Further, there were no changes in cellularity of peripheral blood and bone marrow (BM), nor in levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units in BM. This lack of hematotoxicity was associated with the lack of p21 overexpression, which was regularly seen in the wild-type mice following benzene inhalation. Combined treatment with two major benzene metabolites, phenol and hydroquinone, induced hemopoietic toxicity, although it was not known whether this happened due to a surprising lack of expression of CYP2E1 by AhR knockout, or due to a lack of other AhR-mediated CYP enzymes, including 1A1 (i.e., a possible alternative pathway of benzene metabolism). The former possibility, evaluated in the present study, failed to show a significant relationship between AhR and the expression of CYP2E1. Furthermore, a subsequent evaluation of AhR expression after benzene inhalation tended to show higher but less significant expression in the liver, and none in the BM, compared with sham control. Although this study failed to identify the more likely of the above-mentioned two possibilities, the study using AhR knockout mice on benzene inhalation presents the unique possibility that the benzene toxicity may be

  16. Buprenorphine-induced antinociception is mediated by mu-opioid receptors and compromised by concomitant activation of opioid receptor-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfy, Kabirullah; Eitan, Shoshana; Bryant, Camron D; Yang, Yu C; Saliminejad, Nazli; Walwyn, Wendy; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Carroll, F Ivy; Maidment, Nigel T; Evans, Christopher J

    2003-11-12

    Buprenorphine is a mixed opioid receptor agonist-antagonist used clinically for maintenance therapy in opiate addicts and pain management. Dose-response curves for buprenorphine-induced antinociception display ceiling effects or are bell shaped, which have been attributed to the partial agonist activity of buprenorphine at opioid receptors. Recently, buprenorphine has been shown to activate opioid receptor-like (ORL-1) receptors, also known as OP4 receptors. Here we demonstrate that buprenorphine, but not morphine, activates mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt via ORL-1 receptors. Because the ORL-1 receptor agonist orphanin FQ/nociceptin blocks opioid-induced antinociception, we tested the hypothesis that buprenorphine-induced antinociception might be compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors. In support of this hypothesis, the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine, but not morphine, was markedly enhanced in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors using the tail-flick assay. Additional support for a modulatory role for ORL-1 receptors in buprenorphine-induced antinociception was that coadministration of J-113397, an ORL-1 receptor antagonist, enhanced the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking ORL-1 receptors. The ORL-1 antagonist also eliminated the bell-shaped dose-response curve for buprenorphine-induced antinociception in wild-type mice. Although buprenorphine has been shown to interact with multiple opioid receptors, mice lacking micro-opioid receptors failed to exhibit antinociception after buprenorphine administration. Our results indicate that the antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine in mice is micro-opioid receptor-mediated yet severely compromised by concomitant activation of ORL-1 receptors.

  17. Cryptochromes mediate rhythmic repression of the glucocorticoid receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamia, Katja A.; Papp, Stephanie J.; Yu, Ruth T.; Barish, Grant D.; Uhlenhaut, N. Henriette; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian metabolism is highly circadian and major hormonal circuits involving nuclear hormone receptors display interlinked diurnal cycling(1,2). However, mechanisms that logically explain the coordination of nuclear hormone receptors and the clock are poorly understood. Here we show that two circa

  18. Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 partially mediates brain cryoinjury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian DING; San-hua FANG; Yu ZHOU; Li-hui ZHANG; Wei-ping ZHANG; Zhong CHEN; Er-qing WEI

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 (CysLT1 receptor) modulates brain cryoinjury and whether the CysLT1 receptor antagonist pranlukast exerts a time-dependent protective effect on cryoinjury in mice. Methods: Brain cryoinjury was induced by applying a liquid nitrogen-cooled metal probe to the surface of the skull for 30 s. Brain lesion, neuron density, and endogenous IgG exudation were observed 24 h after cryoinjury. Transcription and the expression of the CysLT1 receptor were detected by RT-PCR and immunoblotting, and the localization of the receptor protein by double immunofluorescence. Results: The mRNA and protein expressions of the CysLT1 receptor were upregulated in the brain 6-24 h after cryoinjury, and the CysLT1 receptor protein was primarily local-ized in the neurons, not in the astrocytes or microglia. Pre-injury treatments with multi-doses and a single dose of pranlukast (0.1 mg/kg) attenuated cryoinjury; postinjury single dose (0.1 mg/kg) at 30 min (not 1 h) after cryoinjury was also effective. Conclusion: The CysLT1 receptor modulates cryoinjury in mice at least partly, and postinjury treatment with its antagonist pranlukast exerts the protec-tive effect with a therapeutic window of 30 min.

  19. Legume LysM receptors mediate symbiotic and pathogenic signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Simon; Radutoiu, Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    2017-10-01

    Legume-rhizobia symbiosis is coordinated through the production and perception of signal molecules by both partners with legume LysM receptor kinases performing a central role in this process. Receptor complex formation and signalling outputs derived from these are regulated through ligand binding and further modulated by a diverse variety of interactors. The challenge now is to understand the molecular mechanisms of these reported interactors. Recently attributed roles of LysM receptors in the perception of rhizobial exopolysaccharide, distinguishing between pathogens and symbionts, and assembly of root and rhizosphere communities expand on the importance of these receptors. These studies also highlight challenges, such as identification of cognate ligands, formation of responsive receptor complexes and separation of downstream signal transduction pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppression of the inflammatory response in experimental arthritis is mediated via estrogen receptor alpha but not estrogen receptor beta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulos, John; Vijn, Peter; van Doorn, Cindy; Hofstra, Claudia L.; Veening-Griffioen, Desiree; de Graaf, Jan; Dijcks, Fred A.; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The immune modulatory role of estrogens in inflammation is complex. Both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of estrogens have been described. Estrogens bind both estrogen receptor (ER)alpha and beta. The contribution of ER alpha and ER beta to ER-mediated immune modulation was studied

  1. Downregulation of adenosine and P2X receptor-mediated cardiovascular responses in heart failure rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xin; Sun, X Y; Erlinge, D;

    2000-01-01

    Neurohormonal changes in congestive heart failure (CHF) include an enhanced peripheral sympathetic nerve activity which results in increased release of noradrenaline, neuropeptide Y and ATP. To examine if such changes in CHF would modulate peripheral pre- and postsynaptic receptors of ATP and its...... effects mediated by the endothelial P2Y receptors are unaffected in CHF. Moreover, the adenosine-mediated inhibitory effects on heart rate and blood pressure were also attenuated in the CHF rats. The most important changes in adenosine and P2-receptor function induced by ischaemic CHF were the reduced...... pressor effect mediated by the P2X receptor and the increased heart rate due to an attenuated inhibitory effect of adenosine....

  2. Receptor mechanisms of PAF mediated lymphatic constriction in the canine forelimb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Dobbins

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activating factor (PAF is a potent inflammatory lipid. In this study we assessed the ability of PAF to impact lymphatic vessel function by altering prenodal lymphatic resistance. Intralymphatic PAF (7.47 × 10−6, 7.47 × 10−5 and 7.47 × 10−4 M increased lymphatic perfusion pressure at the two highest infusion rates. PAF mediated lymphatic constriction was not altered by the intra-arterial infusion of phentolamine but was blocked by the intra-arterial infusion of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170. These data indicate that in addition to PAF's effects on microvascular permeability, this agent may also impact the ability of the lymphatics to transport fluid through alterations in lymphatic smooth muscle tone. PAF mediated lymphatic constriction is not mediated by α-receptors but rather through PAF receptor mediated mechanism.

  3. Innate immune receptors in human airway smooth muscle cells: activation by TLR1/2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1 agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Månsson Kvarnhammar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs, NOD-like receptors (NLRs and RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, recognize microbial components and trigger a host defense response. Respiratory tract infections are common causes of asthma exacerbations, suggesting a role for PRRs in this process. The present study aimed to examine the expression and function of PRRs on human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs. METHODS: Expression of TLR, NLR and RLR mRNA and proteins was determined using real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The functional responses to ligand stimulation were investigated in terms of cytokine and chemokine release, cell surface marker expression, proliferation and proteins regulating the contractile state. RESULTS: HASMCs expressed functional TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1. Stimulation with the corresponding agonists Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C, LPS, R-837 and iE-DAP, respectively, induced IL-6, IL-8 and GM-CSF release and up-regulation of ICAM-1 and HLA-DR, while poly(I:C also affected the release of eotaxin and RANTES. The proliferative response was slightly increased by LPS. Stimulation, most prominently with poly(I:C, down-regulated myosin light chain kinase and cysteinyl leukotriene 1 receptor expression and up-regulated β2-adrenoceptor expression. No effects were seen for agonist to TLR2/6, TLR5, TLR8, TLR9, NOD2 or RIG-I/MDA-5. CONCLUSION: Activation of TLR2, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and NOD1 favors a synthetic phenotype, characterized by an increased ability to release inflammatory mediators, acquire immunomodulatory properties by recruiting and interacting with other cells, and reduce the contractile state. The PRRs might therefore be of therapeutic use in the management of asthma and infection-induced disease exacerbations.

  4. Interleukin-8-mediated heterologous receptor internalization provides resistance to HIV-1 infectivity. Role of signal strength and receptor desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ricardo M; Tokunaga, Kenzo; Marjoram, Robin; Sata, Tetsutaro; Snyderman, Ralph

    2003-05-02

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry into CD4(+) cells requires the chemokine receptors CCR5 or CXCR4 as co-fusion receptors. We have previously demonstrated that chemokine receptors are capable of cross-regulating the functions of each other and, thus, affecting cellular responsiveness at the site of infection. To investigate the effects of chemokine receptor cross-regulation in HIV-1 infection, monocytes and MAGIC5 and rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cell lines co-expressing the interleukin-8 (IL-8 or CXCL8) receptor CXCR1 and either CCR5 (ACCR5) or CXCR4 (ACXCR4) were generated. IL-8 activation of CXCR1, but not the IL-8 receptor CXCR2, cross-phosphorylated CCR5 and CXCR4 and cross-desensitized their responsiveness to RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted) (CCL5) and stromal derived factor (SDF-1 or CXCL12), respectively. CXCR1 activation internalized CCR5 but not CXCR4 despite cross-phosphorylation of both. IL-8 pretreatment also inhibited CCR5- but not CXCR4-mediated virus entry into MAGIC5 cells. A tail-deleted mutant of CXCR1, DeltaCXCR1, produced greater signals upon activation (Ca(2+) mobilization and phosphoinositide hydrolysis) and cross-internalized CXCR4, inhibiting HIV-1 entry. The protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine prevented phosphorylation and internalization of the receptors by CXCR1 activation. Taken together, these results indicate that chemokine receptor-mediated HIV-1 cell infection is blocked by receptor internalization but not desensitization alone. Thus, activation of chemokine receptors unrelated to CCR5 and CXCR4 may play a cross-regulatory role in the infection and propagation of HIV-1. Since DeltaCXCR1, but not CXCR1, cross-internalized and cross-inhibited HIV-1 infection to CXCR4, the data indicate the importance of the signal strength of a receptor and, as a consequence, protein kinase C activation in the suppression of HIV-1 infection by cross-receptor-mediated internalization.

  5. Nicotine impairs cyclooxygenase-2-dependent kinin-receptor-mediated murine airway relaxations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yuan, E-mail: yuan.xu@ki.se; Cardell, Lars-Olaf

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Cigarette smoke induces local inflammation and airway hyperreactivity. In asthmatics, it worsens the symptoms and increases the risk for exacerbation. The present study investigates the effects of nicotine on airway relaxations in isolated murine tracheal segments. Methods: Segments were cultured for 24 h in the presence of vehicle, nicotine (10 μM) and/or dexamethasone (1 μM). Airway relaxations were assessed in myographs after pre-contraction with carbachol (1 μM). Kinin receptors, cyclooxygenase (COX) and inflammatory mediator expressions were assessed by real-time PCR and confocal-microscopy-based immunohistochemistry. Results: The organ culture procedure markedly increased bradykinin- (selective B{sub 2} receptor agonist) and des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin- (selective B{sub 1} receptor agonist) induced relaxations, and slightly increased relaxation induced by isoprenaline, but not that induced by PGE{sub 2}. The kinin receptor mediated relaxations were epithelium-, COX-2- and EP2-receptor-dependent and accompanied by drastically enhanced mRNA levels of kinin receptors, as well as inflammatory mediators MCP-1 and iNOS. Increase in COX-2 and mPGES-1 was verified both at mRNA and protein levels. Nicotine selectively suppressed the organ-culture-enhanced relaxations induced by des-Arg{sup 9}-bradykinin and bradykinin, at the same time reducing mPGES-1 mRNA and protein expressions. α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor inhibitors α-bungarotoxin and MG624 both blocked the nicotine effects on kinin B{sub 2} receptors, but not those on B{sub 1}. Dexamethasone completely abolished kinin-induced relaxations. Conclusion: It is tempting to conclude that a local inflammatory process per se could have a bronchoprotective component by increasing COX-2 mediated airway relaxations and that nicotine could impede this safety mechanism. Dexamethasone further reduced airway inflammation together with relaxations. This might contribute to the steroid resistance seen in

  6. Drosophila Lipophorin Receptors Recruit the Lipoprotein LTP to the Plasma Membrane to Mediate Lipid Uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Rodríguez-Vázquez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipophorin, the main Drosophila lipoprotein, circulates in the hemolymph transporting lipids between organs following routes that must adapt to changing physiological requirements. Lipophorin receptors expressed in developmentally dynamic patterns in tissues such as imaginal discs, oenocytes and ovaries control the timing and tissular distribution of lipid uptake. Using an affinity purification strategy, we identified a novel ligand for the lipophorin receptors, the circulating lipoprotein Lipid Transfer Particle (LTP. We show that specific isoforms of the lipophorin receptors mediate the extracellular accumulation of LTP in imaginal discs and ovaries. The interaction requires the LA-1 module in the lipophorin receptors and is strengthened by a contiguous region of 16 conserved amino acids. Lipophorin receptor variants that do not interact with LTP cannot mediate lipid uptake, revealing an essential role of LTP in the process. In addition, we show that lipophorin associates with the lipophorin receptors and with the extracellular matrix through weak interactions. However, during lipophorin receptor-mediated lipid uptake, LTP is required for a transient stabilization of lipophorin in the basolateral plasma membrane of imaginal disc cells. Together, our data suggests a molecular mechanism by which the lipophorin receptors tether LTP to the plasma membrane in lipid acceptor tissues. LTP would interact with lipophorin particles adsorbed to the extracellular matrix and with the plasma membrane, catalyzing the exchange of lipids between them.

  7. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  8. Toward understanding of rice innate immunity against Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, P; Rafii, M Y; Abdullah, S N A; Nejat, N; Maziah, M; Hanafi, M M; Latif, M A; Sahebi, M

    2016-01-01

    The blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, causes serious disease on a wide variety of grasses including rice, wheat and barley. The recognition of pathogens is an amazing ability of plants including strategies for displacing virulence effectors through the adaption of both conserved and variable pathogen elicitors. The pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) were reported as two main innate immune responses in plants, where PTI gives basal resistance and ETI confers durable resistance. The PTI consists of extracellular surface receptors that are able to recognize PAMPs. PAMPs detect microbial features such as fungal chitin that complete a vital function during the organism's life. In contrast, ETI is mediated by intracellular receptor molecules containing nucleotide-binding (NB) and leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains that specifically recognize effector proteins produced by the pathogen. To enhance crop resistance, understanding the host resistance mechanisms against pathogen infection strategies and having a deeper knowledge of innate immunity system are essential. This review summarizes the recent advances on the molecular mechanism of innate immunity systems of rice against M. oryzae. The discussion will be centered on the latest success reported in plant-pathogen interactions and integrated defense responses in rice.

  9. Noncoding RNA danger motifs bridge innate and adaptive immunity and are potent adjuvants for vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lilin; Smith, Dan; Bot, Simona; Dellamary, Luis; Bloom, Amy; Bot, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    The adaptive immune response is triggered by recognition of T and B cell epitopes and is influenced by “danger” motifs that act via innate immune receptors. This study shows that motifs associated with noncoding RNA are essential features in the immune response reminiscent of viral infection, mediating rapid induction of proinflammatory chemokine expression, recruitment and activation of antigen-presenting cells, modulation of regulatory cytokines, subsequent differentiation of Th1 cells, iso...

  10. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseva, Daria; Wirth, Alexander; Ponimaskin, Evgeni

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  11. Cellular mechanisms of the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eGuseva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is an important neurotransmitter regulating a wide range of physiological and pathological functions via activation of heterogeneously expressed 5-HT receptors. The 5-HT7 receptor is one of the most recently described members of the 5-HT receptor family. Functionally, 5-HT7 receptor is associated with a number of physiological and pathological responses, including serotonin-induced phase shifting of the circadian rhythm, control of memory as well as locomotor and exploratory activity. A large body of evidence indicates involvement of the 5-HT7 receptor in anxiety and depression, and recent studies suggest that 5-HT7 receptor can be highly relevant for the treatment of major depressive disorders. The 5-HT7 receptor is coupled to the stimulatory Gs-protein, and receptor stimulation results in activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC leading to a rise of cAMP concentration. In addition, this receptor is coupled to the G12-protein to activate small GTPases of the Rho family. This review focuses on molecular mechanisms responsible for the 5-HT7 receptor-mediated signaling. We provide detailed overview of signaling cascades controlled and regulated by the 5-HT7 receptor and discuss the functional impact of 5-HT7 receptor for the regulation of different cellular and subcellular processes.

  12. A novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in teleost fish: carp SITR is involved in the nitric oxide-mediated response to a protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M S Ribeiro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The innate immune system relies upon a wide range of germ-line encoded receptors including a large number of immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF receptors. Different Ig-like immune receptor families have been reported in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish. Most innate immune receptors of the IgSF are type I transmembrane proteins containing one or more extracellular Ig-like domains and their regulation of effector functions is mediated intracellularly by distinct stimulatory or inhibitory pathways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Carp SITR was found in a substracted cDNA repertoire from carp macrophages, enriched for genes up-regulated in response to the protozoan parasite Trypanoplasma borreli. Carp SITR is a type I protein with two extracellular Ig domains in a unique organisation of a N-proximal V/C2 (or I- type and a C-proximal V-type Ig domain, devoid of a transmembrane domain or any intracytoplasmic signalling motif. The carp SITR C-proximal V-type Ig domain, in particular, has a close sequence similarity and conserved structural characteristics to the mammalian CD300 molecules. By generating an anti-SITR antibody we could show that SITR protein expression was restricted to cells of the myeloid lineage. Carp SITR is abundantly expressed in macrophages and is secreted upon in vitro stimulation with the protozoan parasite T. borreli. Secretion of SITR protein during in vivo T. borreli infection suggests a role for this IgSF receptor in the host response to this protozoan parasite. Overexpression of carp SITR in mouse macrophages and knock-down of SITR protein expression in carp macrophages, using morpholino antisense technology, provided evidence for the involvement of carp SITR in the parasite-induced NO production. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the structural and functional characterization of a novel soluble immune-type receptor (SITR in a teleost fish and propose a role for carp SITR in the NO-mediated response to a

  13. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2, receptors of innate immunity and receptor for advanced glycation end-products in human viral meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslinska, Danuta; Laure-Kamionowska, Milena; Maslinski, Sławomir

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a normal host defense reaction to infections and tissue injury. In pathology, the process of inflammation is deregulated by various environmental factors, prolonged activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), induction of epigenetic machinery or expression of receptors for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE). In the present study, we examined immunoexpression of proteins participating in the above-mentioned mechanisms, in the brain of patients with viral meningoencephalitis. The results showed that depending on the period of the disease, the process of inflammation is deregulated in different ways. In an early period of viral meningoencephalitis, we found numerous so-called microglial nodules which were strongly immunopositive to methyl-CpG protein 2 (MeCP2). This protein is an epigenetic factor important for methylation of DNA; therefore, our results suggest that cells collected in the nodules may participate in modification of the host defense reaction. Moreover, in the early period of viral meningoencephalitis, we found that Purkinje cells of the cerebellum contain TLR3 or TLR9 receptors that can recognize viral pathogens and may activate a self-destructive mechanism in these neurons. In the later (advanced) period of viral meningoencephalitis, despite some of the above observations, RAGE protein was detected in the brain of adult and aging patients. It means that in this period of the disease, the inflammatory process may be deregulated by numerous post-translationally modified proteins that are transported to the brain after binding with activated RAGE. In addition, young patients appeared more susceptible to viral infections than adult and aging patients, because most of them died during the early period of meningoencephalitis.

  14. SAP is required for the development of innate phenotype in H2-M3-restricted CD8+ T cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, Yaw; Bian, Yao; Zhang, Hong; Cho, Hoonsik; Stein, Paul L.; Wang, Chyung-Ru

    2012-01-01

    H2-M3-restricted T cells have a pre-activated surface phenotype, rapidly expand and produce cytokines upon stimulation and as such, are classified as innate T cells. Unlike most innate T cells, M3-restricted T cells also express CD8αβ co-receptors and a diverse TCR repertoire: hallmarks of conventional MHC Ia-restricted CD8+ T cells. Although iNKT cells are also innate lymphocytes, they are selected exclusively on hematopoietic cells (HC), while M3-restricted T cells can be selected on either hematopoietic or thymic epithelial cells (TEC). Moreover, their phenotypes differ depending on what cells mediate their selection. Though there is a clear correlation between selection on HC and development of innate phenotype, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. SAP is required for the development of iNKT cells and mediates signals from SLAM receptors that are exclusively expressed on HC. Based on their dual selection pathway, M3-restricted T cells present a unique model for studying the development of innate T cell phenotype. Using both polyclonal and transgenic mouse models we demonstrate that while M3-restricted T cells are capable of developing in the absence of SAP, SAP is required for HC-mediated selection, development of pre-activated phenotype and heightened effector functions of M3-restricted T cells. These findings are significant because they directly demonstrate the need for SAP in HC-mediated acquisition of innate T cell phenotype and suggest that due to their SAP-dependent HC-mediated selection, M3-restricted T cells develop a pre-activated phenotype and an intrinsic ability to proliferate faster upon stimulation, allowing for an important role in the early response to infection. PMID:23041566

  15. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30 for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9 for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid, the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs’ interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs.

  16. EP3 receptors mediate PGE2-induced hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus excitation and sympathetic activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Nakamura, Yoshiko; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an important mediator of the inflammatory response, acts centrally to elicit sympathetic excitation. PGE2 acts on at least four E-class prostanoid (EP) receptors known as EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. Since PGE2 production within the brain is ubiquitous, the different functions of PGE2 depend on the expression of these prostanoid receptors in specific brain areas. The type(s) and location(s) of the EP receptors that mediate sympathetic responses to central PGE2 remain unknown. We examined this question using PGE2, the relatively selective EP receptor agonists misoprostol and sulprostone, and the available selective antagonists for EP1, EP3, and EP4. In urethane-anesthetized rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of PGE2, sulprostone or misoprostol increased renal sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure, and heart rate. These responses were significantly reduced by ICV pretreatment with the EP3 receptor antagonist; the EP1 and EP4 receptor antagonists had little or no effect. ICV PGE2 or misoprostol increased the discharge of neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). ICV misoprostol increased the c-Fos immunoreactivity of PVN neurons, an effect that was substantially reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. Real-time PCR detected EP3 receptor mRNA in PVN, and immunohistochemical studies revealed sparsely distributed EP3 receptors localized in GABAergic terminals and on a few PVN neurons. Direct bilateral PVN microinjections of PGE2 or sulprostone elicited sympathoexcitatory responses that were significantly reduced by the EP3 receptor antagonist. These data suggest that EP3 receptors mediate the central excitatory effects of PGE2 on PVN neurons and sympathetic discharge. PMID:21803943

  17. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    .... To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD...

  18. EP2 receptor mediates PGE2-induced cystogenesis of human renal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elberg, Gerard; Elberg, Dorit; Lewis, Teresa V; Guruswamy, Suresh; Chen, Lijuan; Logan, Charlotte J; Chan, Michael D; Turman, Martin A

    2007-11-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by formation of cysts from tubular epithelial cells. Previous studies indicate that secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) into cyst fluid and production of cAMP underlie cyst expansion. However, the mechanism by which PGE2 directly stimulates cAMP formation and modulates cystogenesis is still unclear, because the particular E-prostanoid (EP) receptor mediating the PGE2 effect has not been characterized. Our goal is to define the PGE2 receptor subtype involved in ADPKD. We used a three-dimensional cell-culture system of human epithelial cells from normal and ADPKD kidneys in primary cultures to demonstrate that PGE2 induces cyst formation. Biochemical evidence gathered by using real-time RT-PCR mRNA analysis and immunodetection indicate the presence of EP2 receptor in cystic epithelial cells in ADPKD kidney. Pharmacological evidence obtained by using PGE2-selective analogs further demonstrates that EP2 mediates cAMP formation and cystogenesis. Functional evidence for a role of EP2 receptor in mediating cAMP signaling was also provided by inhibiting EP2 receptor expression with transfection of small interfering RNA in cystic epithelial cells. Our results indicate that PGE2 produced in cyst fluid binds to adjacent EP2 receptors located on the apical side of cysts and stimulates EP2 receptor expression. PGE2 binding to EP2 receptor leads to cAMP signaling and cystogenesis by a mechanism that involves protection of cystic epithelial cells from apoptosis. The role of EP2 receptor in mediating the PGE2 effect on stimulating cyst formation may have direct pharmacological implications for the treatment of polycystic kidney disease.

  19. Agonist-mediated assembly of the crustacean methyl farnesoate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaley, Elizabeth K. Medlock; Wang, Helen Y.; LeBlanc, Gerald A.

    2017-01-01

    The methyl farnesoate receptor (MfR) orchestrates aspects of reproduction and development such as male sex determination in branchiopod crustaceans. Phenotypic endpoints regulated by the receptor have been well-documented, but molecular interactions involved in receptor activation remain elusive. We hypothesized that the MfR subunits, methoprene-tolerant transcription factor (Met) and steroid receptor coactivator (SRC), would be expressed coincident with the timing of sex programming of developing oocytes by methyl farnesoate in daphnids. We also hypothesized that methyl farnesoate activates MfR assembly. Met mRNA was expressed rhythmically during the reproductive cycle, with peak mRNA accumulation just prior period of oocytes programming of sex. Further, we revealed evidence that Met proteins self-associate in the absence of methyl farnesoate, and that the presence of methyl farnesoate stimulates dissociation of Met multimers with subsequent association with SRC. Results demonstrated that the Met subunit is highly dynamic in controlling the action of methyl farnesoate through temporal variation in its expression and availability for receptor assembly.

  20. An intracellular traffic jam: Fc receptor-mediated transport of immunoglobulin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesar, Devin B; Björkman, Pamela J

    2010-04-01

    Recent advances in imaging techniques along with more powerful in vitro and in vivo models of receptor-mediated ligand transport are facilitating advances in our understanding of how cells efficiently direct receptors and their cargo to target destinations within the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. Specifically, light and 3D electron microscopy studies examining the trafficking behavior of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), a transport receptor for immunoglobulin G (IgG), have given us new insights into the dynamic interplay between the structural components of the cytosolic trafficking machinery, its protein regulators, and the receptors it directs to various locations within the cell. These studies build upon previous biochemical characterizations of FcRn transport and are allowing us to begin formulation of a more complete model for the intracellular trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes.

  1. Cannabinoid receptor type 1- and 2-mediated increase in cyclic AMP inhibits T cell receptor-triggered signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Börner, Christine; Smida, Michal; Höllt, Volker; Schraven, Burkhart; Kraus, Jürgen

    2009-12-18

    The aim of this study was to characterize inhibitory mechanisms on T cell receptor signaling mediated by the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Both receptors are coupled to G(i/o) proteins, which are associated with inhibition of cyclic AMP formation. In human primary and Jurkat T lymphocytes, activation of CB1 by R(+)-methanandamide, CB2 by JWH015, and both by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol induced a short decrease in cyclic AMP lasting less than 1 h. However, this decrease was followed by a massive (up to 10-fold) and sustained (at least up to 48 h) increase in cyclic AMP. Mediated by the cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase A and C-terminal Src kinase, the cannabinoids induced a stable phosphorylation of the inhibitory Tyr-505 of the leukocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck). By thus arresting Lck in its inhibited form, the cannabinoids prevented the dephosphorylation of Lck at Tyr-505 in response to T cell receptor activation, which is necessary for the subsequent initiation of T cell receptor signaling. In this way the cannabinoids inhibited the T cell receptor-triggered signaling, i.e. the activation of the zeta-chain-associated protein kinase of 70 kDa, the linker for activation of T cells, MAPK, the induction of interleukin-2, and T cell proliferation. All of the effects of the cannabinoids were blocked by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists AM281 and AM630. These findings help to better understand the immunosuppressive effects of cannabinoids and explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in the treatment of T cell-mediated autoimmune disorders like multiple sclerosis.

  2. CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1) is a novel surface receptor for extracellular double-stranded RNA to mediate cellular inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Liao, Jieying; Aloor, Jim; Nie, Hui; Wilson, Belinda C; Fessler, Michael B; Gao, Hui-Ming; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    During viral infection, extracellular dsRNA is a potent signaling molecule that activates many innate immune cells, including macrophages. TLR3 is a well-known receptor for extracellular dsRNA, and internalization of extracellular dsRNA is required for endosomal TLR3 activation. Preserved inflammatory responses of TLR3-deficient macrophages to extracellular dsRNA strongly support a TLR3-independent mechanism in dsRNA-mediated immune responses. The present study demonstrated that CD11b/CD18 (Mac-1 [macrophage-1 Ag]), a surface integrin receptor, recognized extracellular dsRNA and induced macrophage immune responses. CD11b deficiency reduced inflammatory cytokine induction elicited by polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C; a synthetic dsRNA) in mouse sera and livers, as well as in cultured peritoneal macrophages. dsRNA-binding assay and confocal immunofluorescence showed that Mac-1, especially the CD11b subunit, interacted and colocalized with poly I:C on the surface of macrophages. Further mechanistic studies revealed two distinct signaling events following dsRNA recognition by Mac-1. First, Mac-1 facilitated poly I:C internalization through the activation of PI3K signaling and enhanced TLR3-dependent activation of IRF3 in macrophages. Second, poly I:C induced activation of phagocyte NADPH oxidase in a TLR3-independent, but Mac-1-dependent, manner. Subsequently, phagocyte NADPH oxidase-derived intracellular reactive oxygen species activated MAPK and NF-κB pathways. Our results indicate that extracellular dsRNA activates Mac-1 to enhance TLR3-dependent signaling and to trigger TLR3-independent, but Mac-1-dependent, inflammatory oxidative signaling, identifying a novel mechanistic basis for macrophages to recognize extracellular dsRNA to regulate innate immune responses. This study identifies Mac-1 as a novel surface receptor for extracellular dsRNA and implicates it as a potential therapeutic target for virus-related inflammatory diseases.

  3. Nucleus accumbens μ-opioid receptors mediate social reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezza, Viviana; Damsteegt, Ruth; Achterberg, E J Marijke; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2011-04-27

    Positive social interactions are essential for emotional well-being and proper behavioral development of young individuals. Here, we studied the neural underpinnings of social reward by investigating the involvement of opioid neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in social play behavior, a highly rewarding social interaction in adolescent rats. Intra-NAc infusion of morphine (0.05-0.1 μg) increased pinning and pouncing, characteristic elements of social play behavior in rats, and blockade of NAc opioid receptors with naloxone (0.5 μg) prevented the play-enhancing effects of systemic morphine (1 mg/kg, s.c.) administration. Thus, stimulation of opioid receptors in the NAc was necessary and sufficient for morphine to increase social play. Intra-NAc treatment with the selective μ-opioid receptor agonist [D-Ala(2),N-MePhe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO) (0.1-10 ng) and the μ-opioid receptor antagonist Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (CTAP) (0.3-3 μg) increased and decreased social play, respectively. The δ-opioid receptor agonist DPDPE ([D-Pen(2),D-Pen(5)]-enkephalin) (0.3-3 μg) had no effects, whereas the κ-opioid receptor agonist U69593 (N-methyl-2-phenyl-N-[(5R,7S,8S)-7-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-oxaspiro[4.5]dec-8-yl]acetamide) (0.01-1 μg) decreased social play. Intra-NAc treatment with β-endorphin (0.01-1 μg) increased social play, but met-enkephalin (0.1-5 μg) and the enkephalinase inhibitor thiorphan (0.1-1 μg) were ineffective. DAMGO (0.1-10 ng) increased social play after infusion into both the shell and core subregions of the NAc. Last, intra-NAc infusion of CTAP (3 μg) prevented the development of social play-induced conditioned place preference. These findings identify NAc μ-opioid receptor stimulation as an important neural mechanism for the attribution of positive value to social interactions in adolescent rats. Altered NAc μ-opioid receptor function may underlie social impairments in psychiatric disorders such as autism

  4. Pharmacology and toxicology of fibrates as hypolipidemic drugs mediated by nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator—activated receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SugaT

    2002-01-01

    PPAR(peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor) is a family of nuclear receptor.In recent years,it has been focused for the discovery and development of new drugs which are mediated by PPARs.Fibrate hypolipidemic drugs are the specific and potent ligands to PPAR alpha and have been widely used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia.But these drugs induce hepatocarcinogenesis in rodent animals after the long-term administration.However,there are species differences on these phenomena which are not seen in mammals ioncluding human.To clarify the mechanism of carcinogenesis by these drugs in important for the evaluation of safety of these drugs in human.

  5. Upregulation of endothelin ETB receptor-mediated vasoconstriction in rat coronary artery after organ culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Karen; Edvinsson, Lars

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction occurred in isolated segments of rat coronary arteries during organ culture. Presence of contractile endothelin ET(B) receptors was studied by measuring the change in isometric tension in rings of left anterior...... descending coronary arteries isolated from hearts of rats as response to application of the selective endothelin ET(B) receptor agonist, Sarafotoxin 6c and endothelin-1. In segments cultured 1 day in serum free Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, Sarafotoxin 6c induced a concentration dependent contraction......(+)-solution was not modified after 1 day in culture medium. The experiments indicate that organ culture of rat coronary arteries upregulate endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction by inducing synthesis of new protein....

  6. Experimental Cannabinoid 2 Receptor-Mediated Immune Modulation in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sardinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sepsis is a complex condition that results from a dysregulated immune system in response to a systemic infection. Current treatments lack effectiveness in reducing the incidence and mortality associated with this disease. The endocannabinoid system offers great promise in managing sepsis pathogenesis due to its unique characteristics. The present study explored the effect of modulating the CB2 receptor pathway in an acute sepsis mouse model. Endotoxemia was induced by intravenous injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in mice and intestinal microcirculation was assessed through intravital microscopy. We found that HU308 (CB2 receptor agonist reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore muscular and mucosal villi FCD in endotoxemic mice. AM630 (CB2 receptor antagonist maintained the level of adherent leukocytes induced by LPS but further reduced muscular and mucosal villi FCD. URB597 (FAAH inhibitor and JZL184 (MAGL inhibitor both reduced the number of adherent leukocytes in submucosal venules but did not restore the mucosal villi FCD. Using various compounds we have shown different mechanisms of activating CB2 receptors to reduce leukocyte endothelial interactions in order to prevent further inflammatory damage during sepsis.

  7. Receptor targeting of hemoglobin mediated by the haptoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2009-01-01

    Haptoglobin, the haptoglobin-hemoglobin receptor CD163, and the heme oxygenase-1 are proteins with a well-established function in the clearance and metabolism of "free" hemoglobin released during intravascular hemolysis. This scavenging system counteracts the potentially harmful oxidative and NO-...

  8. 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptors differently modulate AMPA receptor-mediated hippocampal synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, L; Trovato, C; Musumeci, S A; Catania, M V; Ciranna, L

    2012-04-01

    We have studied the effects of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) serotonin receptor activation in hippocampal CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission using patch clamp on mouse brain slices. Application of either 5-HT or 8-OH DPAT, a mixed 5-HT(1A)/5-HT(7) receptor agonist, inhibited AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post synaptic currents (EPSCs); this effect was mimicked by the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist 8-OH PIPAT and blocked by the 5-HT(1A) antagonist NAN-190. 8-OH DPAT increased paired-pulse facilitation and reduced the frequency of mEPSCs, indicating a presynaptic reduction of glutamate release probability. In another group of neurons, 8-OH DPAT enhanced EPSC amplitude but did not alter paired-pulse facilitation, suggesting a postsynaptic action; this effect persisted in the presence of NAN-190 and was blocked by the 5-HT(7) receptor antagonist SB-269970. To confirm that EPSC enhancement was mediated by 5-HT(7) receptors, we used the compound LP-44, which is considered a selective 5-HT(7) agonist. However, LP-44 reduced EPSC amplitude in most cells and instead increased EPSC amplitude in a subset of neurons, similarly to 8-OH DPAT. These effects were respectively antagonized by NAN-190 and by SB-269970, indicating that under our experimental condition LP-44 behaved as a mixed agonist. 8-OH DPAT also modulated the current evoked by exogenously applied AMPA, inducing either a reduction or an increase of amplitude in distinct neurons; these effects were respectively blocked by 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(7) receptor antagonists, indicating that both receptors exert a postsynaptic action. Our results show that 5-HT(1A) receptors inhibit CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting both pre- and postsynaptically, whereas 5-HT(7) receptors enhance CA3-CA1 synaptic transmission acting exclusively at a postsynaptic site. We suggest that a selective pharmacological targeting of either subtype may be envisaged in pathological loss of hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. In this respect, we underline the

  9. Testin, a novel binding partner of the calcium-sensing receptor, enhances receptor-mediated Rho-kinase signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magno, Aaron L. [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ingley, Evan [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Brown, Suzanne J. [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Conigrave, Arthur D. [School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2000 (Australia); Ratajczak, Thomas [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Ward, Bryan K., E-mail: bryanw@cyllene.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research and Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia); Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Hospital Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009 (Australia)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} A yeast two-hybrid screen revealed testin bound to the calcium-sensing receptor. {yields} The second zinc finger of LIM domain 1 of testin is critical for interaction. {yields} Testin bound to a region of the receptor tail important for cell signalling. {yields} Testin and receptor interaction was confirmed in mammalian (HEK293) cells. {yields} Overexpression of testin enhanced receptor-mediated Rho signalling in HEK293 cells. -- Abstract: The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) plays an integral role in calcium homeostasis and the regulation of other cellular functions including cell proliferation and cytoskeletal organisation. The multifunctional nature of the CaR is manifested through ligand-dependent stimulation of different signalling pathways that are also regulated by partner binding proteins. Following a yeast two-hybrid library screen using the intracellular tail of the CaR as bait, we identified several novel binding partners including the focal adhesion protein, testin. Testin has not previously been shown to interact with cell surface receptors. The sites of interaction between the CaR and testin were mapped to the membrane proximal region of the receptor tail and the second zinc-finger of LIM domain 1 of testin, the integrity of which was found to be critical for the CaR-testin interaction. The CaR-testin association was confirmed in HEK293 cells by coimmunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy studies. Ectopic expression of testin in HEK293 cells stably expressing the CaR enhanced CaR-stimulated Rho activity but had no effect on CaR-stimulated ERK signalling. These results suggest an interplay between the CaR and testin in the regulation of CaR-mediated Rho signalling with possible effects on the cytoskeleton.

  10. Multiple Novel Signals Mediate Thyroid Hormone Receptor Nuclear Import and Export*

    OpenAIRE

    Mavinakere, Manohara S.; Powers, Jeremy M.; Subramanian, Kelly S.; Roggero, Vincent R.; Allison, Lizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that shuttles between the cytosol and nucleus. The fine balance between nuclear import and export of TR has emerged as a critical control point for modulating thyroid hormone-responsive gene expression; however, sequence motifs of TR that mediate shuttling are not fully defined. Here, we characterized multiple signals that direct TR shuttling. Along with the known nuclear localization signal in the hinge domain, we ...

  11. Muscarinic receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction is coupled to caveolae in murine airways

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenz, Heike; Kummer, Wolfgang; Jositsch, Gitte; Wess, Jürgen; Krasteva, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    Cholinergic bronchoconstriction is mediated by M2 and M3 muscarinic receptors (MR). In heart and urinary bladder, MR are linked to caveolin-1 or -3, the structural proteins of caveolae. Caveolae are cholesterol-rich, omega-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. They provide a scaffold for multiple G protein receptors and membrane-bound enzymes, thereby orchestrating signaling into the cell interior. Hence, we hypothesized that airway MR signaling pathways are coupled to caveolae as well...

  12. Innate immunity induced by fungal β-glucans via dectin-1 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hee; Kim, Ha Won

    2014-01-01

    Mushrooms are a highly valuable source of substances that possess unique biological properties and medicinal efficacy. Medicinal mushrooms traditionally have been used to treat cancer, fungal infections, hypertension, diabetes, inflammation, and renal disorders. Medicinal mushrooms produce high-molecular-weight β-glucans, which have antitumor and antifungal activities that stimulate innate immunity. Innate immune cells express pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) such as dectin-1, Toll-like receptors, and mannose receptors on their cell surfaces. These PRRs recognize pathogens by binding to highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns such as β-glucan, mannan, and lipopolysaccharide. The immunomodulating activities of innate immune cells are augmented by the binding of β-glucans to dectin-1 that is expressed by macrophages or dendritic cells. Upon binding β-glucan, innate immune cells activate adaptive immune cells such as B and T lymphocytes or natural killer cells by secreting various cytokines such as interleukins (IL-4, IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α. Water-insoluble β-glucans have stronger immunostimulating activities than their water-soluble counterparts. β-glucans have antifungal activity that is similar to their anticancer activities and is mediated by binding to dectin-1, albeit by an unknown mechanism. In this review we discuss recent progress in understanding the mechanisms responsible for the antitumor activities of fungal β-glucans that act through pathogen-associated molecular patterns and PRRs.

  13. Apoplastic venom allergen-like proteins of cyst nematodes modulate the activation of basal plant innate immunity by cell surface receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Wilbers, Ruud H P; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-12-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  14. Apoplastic venom allergen-like proteins of cyst nematodes modulate the activation of basal plant innate immunity by cell surface receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L Lozano-Torres

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes

  15. Self-consuming innate immunity in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Mundy, John; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-induced hypersensitive response (HR) is a hallmark of plant innate immunity. HR PCD is triggered upon recognition of pathogen effector molecules by host immune receptors either directly or indirectly via effector modulation of host targets....... However, it has been unclear by which molecular mechanisms plants execute PCD during innate immune responses. We recently examined HR PCD in autophagy-deficient Arabidopsis knockout mutants (atg) and find that PCD conditioned by one class of plant innate immune receptors is suppressed in atg mutants....... Intriguingly, HR triggered by another class of immune receptors with different genetic requirements is not compromised, indicating that only a specific subset of immune receptors engage the autophagy pathway for HR execution. Thus, our work provides a primary example of autophagic cell death associated...

  16. Alpha-synuclein promotes clathrin-mediated endocytosis of NMDA receptors in dopaminergic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun Yu; Furong Cheng; Xin Li; Yaohua Li; Tao Wang; Guangwei Liu; Andrius Baskys

    2012-01-01

    Loss of dopaminergic i a compensatory increase in nput to the striatum associated with Parkinson' s disease brings about glutamate release onto the dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc)[1] Glutamate over-activation of NMDA receptors on these cells can cause excitotoxicity and contribute to their further loss. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal death is reduced by group I mGluR-mediated up-regulation of endocytosis protein RAB5B[2.3] Among proteins shown to interact with RAB5 proteins is a-synuclein

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase in skeletal muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Stephen R.; Thomas, John W.; Banner, Carl; Vitkovic, Ljubisa; Konagaya, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    The regulation by glucocorticoids of glutamine synthetase in L6 muscle cells in culture is studied. Glutamine synthetase activity was strikingly enhanced by dexamethasone. The dexamethasone-mediated induction of glutamine synthetase activity was blocked by RU38486, a glucocorticoid antagonist, indicating the involvement of intracellular glucocorticoid receptors in the induction process. RU38486 alone was without effect. Northern blot analysis revealed that dexamethasone-mediated enhancement of glutamine synthetase activity involves increased levels of glutamine synthetase mRNA. Glucocorticoids regulate the expression of glutamine synthetase mRNA in cultured muscle cells via interaction with intracellular receptors. Such regulation may be relevant to control of glutamine production by muscle.

  18. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  19. The Arabidopsis leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases BAK1/SERK3 and BKK1/SERK4 are required for innate immunity to hemibiotrophic and biotrophic pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roux, Milena Edna; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Albrecht, Catherine;

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by surface-localized pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) constitutes an important layer of innate immunity in plants. The leucine-rich repeat (LRR) receptor kinases EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR) and FLAGELLIN SENSING2 (FLS2) are the PRRs...... and BKK1 cooperate genetically to achieve full signaling capability in response to elf18 and flg22 and to the damage-associated molecular pattern AtPep1. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BAK1 and BKK1 contribute to disease resistance against the hemibiotrophic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae...... and the obligate biotrophic oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. Our work reveals that the establishment of PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) relies on the rapid ligand-induced recruitment of multiple SERKs within PRR complexes and provides insight into the early PTI signaling events underlying this important...

  20. Effects of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors on muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus following facial nerve injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangfeng Jiang; Dawei Sun; Rui Zhou; Fugao Zhu; Yanqing Wang; Xiuming Wan; Banghua Liu

    2011-01-01

    Muscarinic receptors and nicotine receptors can increase free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus via different channels following facial nerve injury. In addition, γ-aminobutyric acid A (GABAA) receptors have been shown to negatively regulate free calcium ion levels in the facial nucleus by inhibiting nicotine receptors. The present study investigated the influence of GABAA, γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB) and C (GABAC) receptors on muscarinic receptors in rats with facial nerve injury by confocal laser microscopy. GABAA and GABAB receptors exhibited significant dose-dependent inhibitory effects on increased muscarinic receptor-mediated free calcium ion levels following facial nerve injury. Results showed that GABAA and GABAB receptors negatively regulate muscarinic receptor effects and interplay with cholinergic receptors to regulate free calcium ion levels for facial neural regeneration.

  1. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  2. Innate immunity in vertebrates: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riera Romo, Mario; Pérez-Martínez, Dayana; Castillo Ferrer, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity is a semi-specific and widely distributed form of immunity, which represents the first line of defence against pathogens. This type of immunity is critical to maintain homeostasis and prevent microbe invasion, eliminating a great variety of pathogens and contributing with the activation of the adaptive immune response. The components of innate immunity include physical and chemical barriers, humoral and cell-mediated components, which are present in all jawed vertebrates. The understanding of innate defence mechanisms in non-mammalian vertebrates is the key to comprehend the general picture of vertebrate innate immunity and its evolutionary history. This is also essential for the identification of new molecules with applications in immunopharmacology and immunotherapy. In this review, we describe and discuss the main elements of vertebrate innate immunity, presenting core findings in this field and identifying areas that need further investigation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Retinoid-X-receptors (α/β) in melanocytes modulate innate immune responses and differentially regulate cell survival following UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Daniel J; Garcia, Gloria; Hyter, Stephen; Jang, Hyo Sang; Chagani, Sharmeen; Liang, Xiaobo; Larue, Lionel; Ganguli-Indra, Gitali; Indra, Arup K

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV) induced melanoma formation is becoming crucial with more reported cases each year. Expression of type II nuclear receptor Retinoid-X-Receptor α (RXRα) is lost during melanoma progression in humans. Here, we observed that in mice with melanocyte-specific ablation of RXRα and RXRβ, melanocytes attract fewer IFN-γ secreting immune cells than in wild-type mice following acute UVR exposure, via altered expression of several chemoattractive and chemorepulsive chemokines/cytokines. Reduced IFN-γ in the microenvironment alters UVR-induced apoptosis, and due to this, the survival of surrounding dermal fibroblasts is significantly decreased in mice lacking RXRα/β. Interestingly, post-UVR survival of the melanocytes themselves is enhanced in the absence of RXRα/β. Loss of RXRs α/β specifically in the melanocytes results in an endogenous shift in homeostasis of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in these cells and enhances their survival compared to the wild type melanocytes. Therefore, RXRs modulate post-UVR survival of dermal fibroblasts in a "non-cell autonomous" manner, underscoring their role in immune surveillance, while independently mediating post-UVR melanocyte survival in a "cell autonomous" manner. Our results emphasize a novel immunomodulatory role of melanocytes in controlling survival of neighboring cell types besides controlling their own, and identifies RXRs as potential targets for therapy against UV induced melanoma.

  4. Retinoid-X-receptors (α/β in melanocytes modulate innate immune responses and differentially regulate cell survival following UV irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Coleman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular mechanisms of ultraviolet (UV induced melanoma formation is becoming crucial with more reported cases each year. Expression of type II nuclear receptor Retinoid-X-Receptor α (RXRα is lost during melanoma progression in humans. Here, we observed that in mice with melanocyte-specific ablation of RXRα and RXRβ, melanocytes attract fewer IFN-γ secreting immune cells than in wild-type mice following acute UVR exposure, via altered expression of several chemoattractive and chemorepulsive chemokines/cytokines. Reduced IFN-γ in the microenvironment alters UVR-induced apoptosis, and due to this, the survival of surrounding dermal fibroblasts is significantly decreased in mice lacking RXRα/β. Interestingly, post-UVR survival of the melanocytes themselves is enhanced in the absence of RXRα/β. Loss of RXRs α/β specifically in the melanocytes results in an endogenous shift in homeostasis of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in these cells and enhances their survival compared to the wild type melanocytes. Therefore, RXRs modulate post-UVR survival of dermal fibroblasts in a "non-cell autonomous" manner, underscoring their role in immune surveillance, while independently mediating post-UVR melanocyte survival in a "cell autonomous" manner. Our results emphasize a novel immunomodulatory role of melanocytes in controlling survival of neighboring cell types besides controlling their own, and identifies RXRs as potential targets for therapy against UV induced melanoma.

  5. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2010-03-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of mast cells to the extracellular ATP release and to the maintenance of extracellular nucleotides pool. Recent publications highlight the importance of purinergic signaling for the pathogenesis of chronic airway inflammation. Therefore, the role of ATP and P2 receptors in allergic inflammation with focus on mast cells was analyzed. Finally, ATP functions as mast cell autocrine/paracrine factor and as messenger in intercellular communication between mast cells, nerves, and glia in the central nervous system.

  6. P2 receptor-mediated signaling in mast cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Bulanova, Elena; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2009-01-01

    Mast cells are widely recognized as effector cells of allergic inflammatory reactions. They contribute to the pathogenesis of different chronic inflammatory diseases, wound healing, fibrosis, thrombosis/fibrinolysis, and anti-tumor immune responses. In this paper, we summarized the role of P2X and P2Y receptors in mast cell activation and effector functions. Mast cells are an abundant source of ATP which is stored in their granules and secreted upon activation. We discuss the contribution of ...

  7. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    of CAG repeats in the Machado-Joseph disease , spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and androgen receptor genes. Hum. Mol. Genet. 4, 1585-1590. Rundlett, S . E... diseases such as Huntington disease and spinal and bulbar muscular atro- phy, which is commonly called Kennedy’s disease . This finding has been attributed...STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and

  8. Glucocorticoid hormone resistance during primate evolution: receptor-mediated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrousos, G P; Renquist, D; Brandon, D; Eil, C; Pugeat, M; Vigersky, R; Cutler, G B; Loriaux, D L; Lipsett, M B

    1982-03-01

    The concentrations of total and protein-unbound plasma cortisol of New World monkeys are higher than those of Old World primates and prosimians. The urinary free-cortisol excretion also is increased markedly. However, there is no physiologic evidence of increased cortisol effect. These findings suggest end-organ resistance to glucocorticoids. This was confirmed by showing that the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis is resistant to suppression by dexamethasone. To study this phenomenon, glucocorticoid receptors were examined in circulating mononuclear leukocytes and cultured skin fibroblasts from both New and Old World species. The receptor content is the same in all species, but the New World monkeys have a markedly decreased binding affinity for dexamethasone. Thus, the resistance of these species to the action of cortisol is due to the decreased binding affinity of the glucocorticoid receptor. This presumed mutation must have occurred after the bifurcation of Old and New World primates (approximately 60 x 10(6) yr ago) and before the diversion of the New World primates from each other (approximately 15 x 10(6) yr ago).

  9. Neurotransmitter receptor-mediated signaling pathways as modulators of carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, Hildegard M

    2007-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system with its two antagonistic branches, the sympathicus and the parasympathicus, regulates the activities of all body functions that are not under voluntary control. While the autonomic regulation of organ functions has been extensively studied, little attention has been given to the potential role of neurohumoral transmission at the cellular level in the development of cancer. Studies conducted by our laboratory first showed that binding of the parasympathetic neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, as well as nicotine or its nitrosated cancer-causing derivative, NNK, to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors comprised of alpha7 subunits activated a mitogenic signal transduction pathway in normal and neoplastic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells. On the other hand, beta-adrenergic receptors (Beta-ARs), which transmit signals initiated by binding of the catecholamine neurotransmitters of the sympathicus, were identified by our laboratory as important regulators of cell proliferation in cell lines derived from human adenocarcinomas of the lungs, pancreas, and breast. The tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK bound with high affinity to Beta1- and Beta2-ARs, thus activating cAMP, protein kinase A, and the transcription factor CREB. Collectively, neurotransmitter receptors of the nicotinic and Beta-adrenergic families appear to regulate cellular functions essential for the development and survival of the most common human cancers.

  10. Glucocorticoid-mediated repression of T-cell receptor signalling is impaired in glucocorticoid receptor exon 2-disrupted mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddicoat, Douglas R; Purton, Jared F; Cole, Timothy J; Godfrey, Dale I

    2014-02-01

    Studies using glucocorticoid receptor exon 2-disrupted knockout (GR2KO) mice provided strong evidence against an obligatory role for glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signalling in T-cell selection. These mice express a truncated form of the GR that is incapable of transmitting a range of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced signals, including GC-induced thymocyte death. However, one study that suggested that truncated GR function is preserved in the context of GR-mediated repression of T-cell activation-induced genes, challenged earlier conclusions derived from the use of these mice. Because GR versus T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling cross-talk is the means by which GCs are hypothesized to have a role in T-cell selection, we reassessed the utility of GR2KO mice to study the role of the GR in this process. Here, we show that GR-mediated repression of TCR signalling is impaired in GR2KO T cells in terms of TCR-induced activation, proliferation and cytokine production. GC-induced apoptosis was largely abolished in peripheral T cells, and induction of the GC-responsive molecule, interleukin-7 receptor, was also severely reduced in GR2KO thymocytes. Together, these data strongly re-affirm conclusions derived from earlier studies of these mice that the GR is not obligatory for normal T-cell selection.

  11. Isolated NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses express both LTP and LTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, X; Berger, T W; Barrionuevo, G

    1992-04-01

    1. The possibility of use-dependent, long-lasting modifications of pharmacologically isolated N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission was examined by intracellular recordings from granule cells of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in vitro. In the presence of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinaxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX, 10 microM) robust, long-term potentiation (LTP) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials was induced by brief, high (50 Hz) and lower (10 Hz) frequency tetanic stimuli of glutamatergic afferents (60 +/- 6%, n = 8, P less than 0.001 and 43 +/- 12%, n = 3, P less than 0.05, respectively). 2. Hyperpolarization of granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 50-Hz tetanic stimuli reversibly blocked the induction of LTP (-6 +/- 2%, n = 6, P greater than 0.05) indicating that simultaneous activation of pre- and postsynaptic elements is a prerequisite for potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. In contrast, hyperpolarization of the granule cell membrane potential to -100 mV during 10-Hz tetanic stimuli resulted in long-term depression (LTD) of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic potentials (-34 +/- 8%, n = 8, P less than 0.01). 3. We also studied the role of [Ca2+]i in the induction of LTP and LTD of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses. Before tetanization, [Ca2+]i was buffered by iontophoretic injections of bis-(o-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). BAPTA completely blocked the induction of LTP (3 +/- 5%, n = 13) and partially blocked LTD (-14.8 +/- 6%, n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. (-)-Stepholodine induced enhancement of cardiac muscle contractions mediated by D1 receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Shu-yuan; LIU Zheng; HU Hui-sheng; SHI Zhen; CHEN Long

    2008-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) on enhancing D1 receptor mediated contraction of cardiac muscle in isolated rat heart and to examine whether SPD has a direct effect on the heart dopamine D1 receptors. SPD an active ingredient of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia, binds to dopamine D1 and D2 like receptors. Biochemical, electrophysiological and behavioural experiments have provided strong evidence that SPD is both a D(1/5) agonist and a D(2/4) antagonist, which could indicate unique antipsychotic properties. Methods Normal adult rat working hearts were isolated by Langendorff technique. Results SPD significantly increased the cardiac muscle contraction in a dose-dependent manner. The selective D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (1 μM) blocked the SPD induced heart contraction, however, neither the β-receptor antagonist propranolol (1 μM) nor the α1-receptor antagonist prazosin (1 μM) had any effect on blocking SPD induced heart contractions. Moreover, the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor nimodipine (1 μM) completely blocked the effect of SPD on cardiac muscle contraction. Conclusions SPD show the effect on enhancing contraction of isolated rat heart through activating L-type Ca2+ channel mediated by heart D1 receptors.

  13. Possible Implication of Fcγ Receptor-Mediated Trogocytosis in Susceptibility to Systemic Autoimmune Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko Masuda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytes can “gnaw away” the plasma membrane of other cells. This phenomenon, called trogocytosis, occurs subsequent to cell-to-cell adhesion. Currently, two mechanisms of trogocytosis, adhesion molecule-mediated trogocytosis and Fcγ receptor-(FcγR- mediated trogocytosis, have been identified. In our earlier study, we established an in vitro model of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis, namely, CD8 translocation model from T cells to neutrophils. By using this model, we demonstrated that the molecules transferred to neutrophils via FcγR-mediated trogocytosis were taken into the cytoplasm immediately. This result suggests that the chance of molecules transferred via FcγR-mediated trogocytosis to play a role on the cell surface could be time-limited. Thus, we consider the physiological role of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis as a means to remove antibodies (Abs that bind with self-molecules rather than to extract molecules from other cells. This concept means that FcγR-mediated trogocytosis can be a defense mechanism to Ab-mediated autoimmune response. Moreover, the activity of FcγR-mediated trogocytosis was revealed to be parallel to the endocytotic activity of neutrophils, which was critically related to the susceptibility to systemic autoimmune diseases. The collective findings suggest that FcγR-mediated trogocytosis could physiologically play a role in removal of Abs bound to self-antigens and prevent autoimmune diseases.

  14. Cutting Edge: LL-37-Mediated Formyl Peptide Receptor-2 Signaling in Follicular Dendritic Cells Contributes to B Cell Activation in Peyer's Patch Germinal Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Kim, Yu Na; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2017-01-15

    Peyer's patches (PPs) are the major mucosal immune-inductive site, and germinal centers (GCs) in PPs determine the quality of the Abs produced. PP GCs are continuously induced by the gut microbiota, and their maintenance contributes to the induction of strong IgA responses to Ags. In this study, we investigated the role of formyl peptide receptor (FPR)-mediated signaling in the maintenance of PP GCs, because FPRs recognize the microbiota and initiate an innate immune response by chemotaxis. We found that follicular dendritic cells (FDCs), a key organizer of B cell follicles and GCs in mucosal immunity, express Fpr2. Additionally, Fpr2-mediated signaling in PP FDCs promoted Cxcl13 and B cell activating factor expression, as well as B cell proliferation and activation. Therefore, we suggest that Fpr2-mediated signaling in FDCs plays a key role in GC maintenance in PPs and results in an Ag-specific IgA response in the gut mucosal immune compartment. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Extranuclear Signaling Effects Mediated by the Estrogen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Examination of the αCaMKII amino acid sequence revealed that it contains a nuclear receptor interaction motif, or NR box, within the CaM-binding region...inhibition of Pyk2 with salicylate disrupted the ability of E2 to induce the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting αCaMKII activity (data not...Bottner, M, Rune, GM (2006) Oestrogen synthesis in the hippocampus: role in axon outgrowth. J Neuroendocrinol 18:847-856. 14 Walf A, Frye CA (2007

  16. MicroRNA-219 modulates NMDA receptor-mediated neurobehavioral dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Lopez-Toledano, Miguel A

    2009-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors are regulators of fast neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity in the brain. Disruption of NMDA-mediated glutamate signaling has been linked to behavioral deficits displayed in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. Recently, noncoding RNA m...

  17. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...

  18. Lysosphingolipid receptor-mediated diuresis and natriuresis in anaesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, A; Meyer Zu Heringdorf, D; Jakobs, K H; Michel, M C

    2001-04-01

    Lysosphingolipids such as sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPPC) can act on specific G-protein-coupled receptors. Since SPP and SPPC cause renal vasoconstriction, we have investigated their effects on urine and electrolyte excretion in anaesthetized rats. Infusion of SPP (1 - 30 microg kg(-1) min(-1)) for up to 120 min dose-dependently but transiently (peak after 15 min, disappearance after 60 min) reduced renal blood flow without altering endogenous creatinine clearance. Nevertheless, infusion of SPP increased diuresis, natriuresis and calciuresis and, to a lesser extent, kaliuresis. These tubular lysosphingolipid effects developed more slowly (maximum after 60 - 90 min) and also abated more slowly upon lysosphingolipid washout than the renovascular effects. Infusion of SPPC, sphingosine and glucopsychosine (3 - 30 microg kg(-1) min(-1) each) caused little if any alterations in renal blood flow but also increased diuresis, natriuresis and calciuresis and, to a lesser extent, kaliuresis. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin (10 microg kg(-1) 3 days before the acute experiment) abolished the renovascular and tubular effects of 30 microg kg(-1) min(-1) SPP. These findings suggest that lysosphingolipids are a hitherto unrecognized class of endogenous modulators of renal function. SPP affects renovascular tone and tubular function via receptors coupled to G(i)-type G-proteins. SPPC, sphingosine and glucopsychosine mimic only the tubular effects of SPP, and hence may act on distinct sites.

  19. Nuclear receptor corepressor-dependent repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor delta-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Nielsen, Curt A F; Neve, Søren

    2002-01-01

    delta-RXR alpha heterodimer bound to an acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO)-type peroxisome-proliferator response element recruited a glutathione S-transferase-NCoR fusion protein in a ligand-independent manner. Contrasting with most other nuclear receptors, PPAR delta was found to interact equally well......The nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) was isolated as a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. NCoR interacted strongly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR delta, whereas interactions with the ligand-binding domains...

  20. Nuclear receptor corepressor-dependent repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor delta-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Nielsen, Curt A F; Neve, Søren

    2002-01-01

    delta-RXR alpha heterodimer bound to an acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO)-type peroxisome-proliferator response element recruited a glutathione S-transferase-NCoR fusion protein in a ligand-independent manner. Contrasting with most other nuclear receptors, PPAR delta was found to interact equally well......The nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) was isolated as a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. NCoR interacted strongly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR delta, whereas interactions with the ligand-binding domains...

  1. Chicken NK cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Sperling, Beatrice; Windau, Katharina; Zechmann, Maria; Jansen, Christine A; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2013-11-01

    Natural killer cells are innate immune cells that destroy virally infected or transformed cells. They recognize these altered cells by a plethora of diverse receptors and thereby differ from other lymphocytes that use clonally distributed antigen receptors. To date, several receptor families that play a role in either activating or inhibiting NK cells have been identified in mammals. In the chicken, NK cells have been functionally and morphologically defined, however, a conclusive analysis of receptors involved in NK cell mediated functions has not been available. This is partly due to the low frequencies of NK cells in blood or spleen that has hampered their intensive characterization. Here we will review recent progress regarding the diverse NK cell receptor families, with special emphasis on novel families identified in the chicken genome with potential as chicken NK cell receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. McDonald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1, a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor, but not mineralocorticoid receptor, mediates cortisol regulation of epidermal ionocyte development and ion transport in zebrafish (danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Abad Cruz

    Full Text Available Cortisol is the major endogenous glucocorticoid (GC both in human and fish, mediated by corticosteroid receptors. Due to the absence of aldosterone production in teleost fish, cortisol is also traditionally accepted to function as mineralocorticoid (MC; but whether it acts through the glucocorticoid receptor (GR or the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR remains a subject of debate. Here, we used loss-of-function and rescue assays to determine whether cortisol affects zebrafish epidermal ionocyte development and function via the GR and/or the MR. GR knockdown morphants displayed a significant decrease in the major ionocytes, namely Na(+-K(+-ATPase-rich cells (NaRCs and H(+-ATPase-rich cells (HRCs, as well as other cells, including epidermal stem cells (ESCs, keratinocytes, and mucus cells; conversely, cell numbers were unaffected in MR knockdown morphants. In agreement, GR morphants, but not MR morphants, exhibited decreased NaRC-mediated Ca(2+ uptake and HRC-mediated H(+ secretion. Rescue via GR capped mRNA injection or exogenous cortisol incubation normalized the number of epidermal ionocytes in GR morphants. We also provide evidence for GR localization in epidermal cells. At the transcript level, GR mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in gill sections and present in both NaRCs and HRCs, supporting the knockdown and functional assay results in embryo. Altogether, we have provided solid molecular evidence that GR is indeed present on ionocytes, where it mediates the effects of cortisol on ionocyte development and function. Hence, cortisol-GR axis performs the roles of both GC and MC in zebrafish skin and gills.

  4. Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaochen; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Park, Seung Bum; Jeong, Won-Il; Kim, Seong Heon; Lee, In-Kyu; Lee, Chul-Ho; Chiang, John Y L; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2015-09-01

    Bile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ-mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ-binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ, GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptor-mediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.

  5. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Enhances Innate Immune Responses of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells that are Triggered by Toll-like Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2D3) has been found to play an important role in the bovine innate immune response. 1,25(OH)2D3 is the active vitamin D metabolite and is produced from the major circulating metabolite, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, by the enzyme 1alpha-hydroxylase (1alpha-OHase)...

  6. Alteration of airway responsiveness mediated by receptors in ovalbumin-induced asthmatic E3 rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-wen LONG; Xu-dong YANG; Lei CAO; She-min LU; Yong-xiao CAO

    2009-01-01

    Aim:Airway hyperresponsiveness is a constant feature of asthma.The aim of the present study was to investigate airway hyperreactivity mediated by contractile and dilative receptors in an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced model of rat asthma.Methods:Asthmatic E3 rats were prepared by intraperitoneal injection with OVA/aluminum hydroxide and then challenged with intranasal instillation of OVA-PBS two weeks later.The myograph method was used to measure the responses of constriction and dilatation in the trachea,main bronchi and lobar bronchi.Results:In asthmatic E3 rata,β2 adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation of airway smooth muscle pre-contracted with 5-HT was inhibited,and there were no obvious difference in relaxation compared with normal E3 rats.Contraction of lobar bronchi mediated by 5-HT and sarafotoxin 6c was more potent than in the trachea or main bronchi.Airway contractions mediated by the endothelin (ET)A receptor,ETB receptor and M3 muscarinic receptor were augmented,and the augmented contraction was most obvious in lobar bronchi.The order of efficacy of contraction for lobar bronchi induced by agonists was ET-1,sarafotoxin 6c>ACh>5-HT.OX8 (an antibody against CD8+ T cells) strongly shifted and 0X35 (an antibody against CD4+ T cells) modestly shifted isoprenaline-induced concentration-relaxation curves in a nonparallel fashion to the left with an increased Rmax in asthmatic rats and sarafotoxin 6c-induced concentration-contractile curves to the right with a decreased Emax.Conclusion:The inhibition of airway relaxation and the augmentation of contraction mediated by receptors contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and involve CD8+ and CD4+ T cells.

  7. The receptor for advanced glycation end products in ventilator-induced lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Maria T; Aslami, Hamid; Tuinman, Pieter Roel; Tuip-de Boer, Anita M; Jongsma, Geartsje; van der Sluijs, Koenraad F; Choi, Goda; Wolthuis, Esther K; Roelofs, Joris Jth; Bresser, Paul; Schultz, Marcus J; van der Poll, Tom; Wieland, Catharina W

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mechanical ventilation (MV) can cause ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). The innate immune response mediates this iatrogenic inflammatory condition. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor that can amplify immune and inflammatory responses. W

  8. Involvement of lipopolysaccharide binding protein, CD14, and Toll-like receptors in the initiation of innate immune responses by Treponema glycolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, N W; Opitz, B; Lamping, N; Michelsen, K S; Zähringer, U; Göbel, U B; Schumann, R R

    2000-09-01

    Culture supernatants from Treponema maltophilum associated with periodontitis in humans and Treponema brennaborense found in a bovine cattle disease accompanied with cachexia caused a dose-dependent TNF-alpha synthesis in human monocytes increasing with culture time. This activity could be reduced significantly by blocking the CD14-part of the LPS receptor using the My 4 mAb and by polymyxin B. In the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7, Treponema culture supernatants induced TNF-alpha secretion in a LPS binding protein (LBP)-dependent fashion. To enrich for active compounds, supernatants were extracted with butanol, while whole cells were extracted using a phenol/water method resulting in recovery of material exhibiting a similar activity profile. An LPS-LBP binding competition assay revealed an interaction of the treponeme phenol/water extracts with LBP, while precipitation studies implied an affinity to polymyxin B and endotoxin neutralizing protein. Macrophages obtained from C3H/HeJ mice carrying a Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 mutation were stimulated with treponeme extracts for NO release to assess the role of TLRs in cell activation. Furthermore, NF-kappaB translocation in TLR-2-negative Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was studied. We found that phenol/water-extracts of the two strains use TLRs differently with T. brennaborense-stimulating cells in a TLR-4-dependent fashion, while T. maltophilum-mediated activation apparently involved TLR-2. These results indicate the presence of a novel class of glycolipids in Treponema initiating inflammatory responses involving LBP, CD14, and TLRs.

  9. Intracellular Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors contributes to AMPA receptor-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress in oligodendrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, A; Matute, C; Alberdi, E

    2010-01-01

    Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in oligodendrocytes induces cytosolic Ca2+ overload and excitotoxic death, a process that contributes to demyelination and multiple sclerosis. Excitotoxic insults cause well-characterized mitochondrial alterations and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction, which is not fully understood. In this study, we analyzed the contribution of ER-Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) to excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes in vitro. First, we observed that oligodendrocytes express all previously characterized RyRs and IP3Rs. Blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release by TMB-8 following α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate (AMPA) receptor-mediated insults attenuated both oligodendrocyte death and cytosolic Ca2+ overload. In turn, RyR inhibition by ryanodine reduced as well the Ca2+ overload whereas IP3R inhibition was ineffective. Furthermore, AMPA-triggered mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxidative stress and activation of caspase-3, which in all instances was diminished by RyR inhibition. In addition, we observed that AMPA induced an ER stress response as revealed by α subunit of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α phosphorylation, overexpression of GRP chaperones and RyR-dependent cleavage of caspase-12. Finally, attenuating ER stress with salubrinal protected oligodendrocytes from AMPA excitotoxicity. Together, these results show that Ca2+ release through RyRs contributes to cytosolic Ca2+ overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, ER stress and cell death following AMPA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity in oligodendrocytes. PMID:21364659

  10. Defective renal dopamine D1 receptor function contributes to hyperinsulinemia-mediated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad Banday, Anees; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2006-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is reported to play a role in hypertension, as abnormalities in blood pressure regulation and sodium handling exist in diabetes mellitus. Kidney dopamine promotes sodium excretion via the activation of renal D1 receptors. Because there is a close relationship between renal D1 receptor function and sodium excretion, it is hypothesized that a defect in this mechanism may contribute to decreased sodium excretion and hypertension during hyperinsulinemia. Renal D1 receptor function was studied in insulin-induced hypertension in male Sprague Dawley rats. Insulin pellets were implanted subcutaneously for controlled insulin release for three weeks; sham rats served as a control. Compared to control rats, insulin pellets increased plasma insulin levels by eight fold and decreased blood glucose by 40%. Insulin also caused a 22 mmHg increase in mean arterial blood pressure compared to control animals. The intravenous infusion of SKF-38393, a D1 receptor agonist, increased sodium excretion in control rats, but SKF-38393 failed to produce natriuresis in hyperinsulinemic animals. Renal proximal tubules from hyperinsulinemic rats had a reduced D1 receptor number, defective receptor-G protein coupling, and blunted SKF-38393 induced Na, K-ATPase inhibition. Insulin seems to reduce D1 receptor expression and coupling to the G-protein, leading to a reduced D1 receptor-mediated Na, K-ATPase inhibition, and a diminished natriuretic response to SKF-38393. These phenomena could account for sodium retention and hypertension associated with hyperinsulinemia.

  11. Transmembrane α-Helix 2 and 7 Are Important for Small Molecule-Mediated Activation of the GLP-1 Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Christina Rye; Møller Knudsen, Sanne; Schjellerup Wulff, Birgitte;

    2011-01-01

    , the structurally related small molecule, compound 3, stimulated cAMP production from GLP-1R, but not from the homologous glucagon receptor (GluR). The receptor selectivity encouraged a chimeric receptor approach to identify domains important for compound 3-mediated activation of GLP-1R. A subsegment of the GLP-1R...

  12. Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis acd11 Is Mediated by Epigenetic Regulation of an Immune Receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palma, K.; Thorgrimsen, S.; Malinovsky, F.G.;

    2010-01-01

    . In a screen for lazarus (laz) mutants that suppress acd11 death we identified two genes, LAZ2 and LAZ5. LAZ2 encodes the histone lysine methyltransferase SDG8, previously shown to epigenetically regulate flowering time via modification of histone 3 (H3). LAZ5 encodes an RPS4-like R-protein, defined by several...... dominant negative alleles. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses showed that LAZ2/SDG8 is required for LAZ5 expression and H3 lysine 36 trimethylation at LAZ5 chromatin to maintain a transcriptionally active state. We hypothesize that LAZ5 triggers cell death in the absence of ACD11......, and that cell death in other lesion mimic mutants may also be caused by inappropriate activation of R genes. Moreover, SDG8 is required for basal and R protein-mediated pathogen resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing the importance of chromatin remodeling as a key process in plant innate immunity....

  13. Allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhuang; Li, Linlang; Zheng, Long-Tai; Xu, Zhihong; Guo, Lin; Zhen, Xuechu

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that sigma-1 receptor orthodox agonists can inhibit neuroinflammation. SKF83959 (3-methyl-6-chloro-7,8-hydroxy-1-[3-methylphenyl]-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine), an atypical dopamine receptor-1 agonist, has been recently identified as a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Here, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of SKF83959 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglia. Our results indicated that SKF83959 significantly suppressed the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species. All of these responses were blocked by selective sigma-1 receptor antagonists (BD1047 or BD1063) and by ketoconazole (an inhibitor of enzyme cytochrome c17 to inhibit the synthesis of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA). Additionally, we found that SKF83959 promoted the binding activity of DHEA with sigma-1 receptors, and enhanced the inhibitory effects of DHEA on LPS-induced microglia activation in a synergic manner. Furthermore, in a microglia-conditioned media system, SKF83959 inhibited the cytotoxicity of conditioned medium generated by LPS-activated microglia toward HT-22 neuroblastoma cells. Taken together, our study provides the first evidence that allosteric modulation of sigma-1 receptors by SKF83959 inhibits microglia-mediated inflammation. SKF83959 is a potent allosteric modulator of sigma-1 receptor. Our results indicated that SKF83959 enhanced the activity of endogenous dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in a synergic manner, and inhibited the activation of BV2 microglia and the expression/release of the pro-inflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS).

  14. Fine-Tuning of the RIG-I-Like Receptor/Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Dependent Antiviral Innate Immune Response by the Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3/β-Catenin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Kashif Aziz; Dô, Florence; Marineau, Alexandre; Doyon, Priscilla; Clément, Jean-François; Woodgett, James R; Doble, Bradley W; Servant, Marc J

    2015-09-01

    Induction of an antiviral innate immune response relies on pattern recognition receptors, including retinoic acid-inducible gene 1-like receptors (RLR), to detect invading pathogens, resulting in the activation of multiple latent transcription factors, including interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Upon sensing of viral RNA and DNA, IRF3 is phosphorylated and recruits coactivators to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and selected sets of IRF3-regulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) such as those for ISG54 (Ifit2), ISG56 (Ifit1), and viperin (Rsad2). Here, we used wild-type, glycogen synthase kinase 3α knockout (GSK-3α(-/-)), GSK-3β(-/-), and GSK-3α/β double-knockout (DKO) embryonic stem (ES) cells, as well as GSK-3β(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in which GSK-3α was knocked down to demonstrate that both isoforms of GSK-3, GSK-3α and GSK-3β, are required for this antiviral immune response. Moreover, the use of two selective small-molecule GSK-3 inhibitors (CHIR99021 and BIO-acetoxime) or ES cells reconstituted with the catalytically inactive versions of GSK-3 isoforms showed that GSK-3 activity is required for optimal induction of antiviral innate immunity. Mechanistically, GSK-3 isoform activation following Sendai virus infection results in phosphorylation of β-catenin at S33/S37/T41, promoting IRF3 DNA binding and activation of IRF3-regulated ISGs. This study identifies the role of a GSK-3/β-catenin axis in antiviral innate immunity.

  15. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  16. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  17. The use of occupation isoboles for analysis of a response mediated by two receptors: M2 and M3 muscarinic receptor subtype-induced mouse stomach contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braverman, Alan S; Tallarida, Ronald J; Ruggieri, Michael R

    2008-06-01

    Smooth muscle contains multiple muscarinic receptor subtypes, including M2 and M3. M2 receptors outnumber M3 receptors. Based on the potency of subtype selective anticholinergics, contraction is mediated by the M3 subtype. However, results from knockout (KO) mice show that the M2 receptor mediates approximately 45% of the contractile response produced by the M3 receptor. The traditional theory of one receptor mediating a response does not allow assessment of interactions between receptors when more than one receptor participates in a response. Our study was performed using a novel analysis method based on dual receptor occupancy to determine how M2 and M3 receptor subtypes interact to mediate contraction in mouse stomach. Cumulative carbachol concentration contractile responses were determined for wild-type, M2-KO, and M3-KO stomach body smooth muscle. Using affinity constants for carbachol at M2 and M3 cholinergic receptors, the concentration values were converted to fractional receptor occupation. The resulting occupation-effect relations showed maximum effects for the M2 and M3 subtypes, respectively. These occupation-effect relations allow determination of the additive (expected) isobole based on this dual occupancy, thereby providing a curve (mathematically derived) for comparison against the experimentally derived value in wild type. The actual values determined experimentally in the wild type were not statistically significantly different from that predicted by the isobole. This confirms that the interaction between these mutually occupied receptors is additive. The new method of analysis also expands the traditional Schild theory that was based on a single receptor type to which the agonist and antagonist bind.

  18. Recognition of tumors by the innate immune system and natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Assaf; Gowen, Benjamin G; Thompson, Thornton W; Iannello, Alexandre; Ardolino, Michele; Deng, Weiwen; Wang, Lin; Shifrin, Nataliya; Raulet, David H

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, roles of the immune system in immune surveillance of cancer have been explored using a variety of approaches. The roles of the adaptive immune system have been a major emphasis, but increasing evidence supports a role for innate immune effector cells such as natural killer (NK) cells in tumor surveillance. Here, we discuss some of the evidence for roles in tumor surveillance of innate immune cells. In particular, we focus on NK cells and other immune cells that express germline-encoded receptors, often labeled NK receptors. The impact of these receptors and the cells that express them on tumor suppression is summarized. We discuss in detail some of the pathways and events in tumor cells that induce or upregulate cell-surface expression of the ligands for these receptors, and the logic of how those pathways serve to identify malignant, or potentially malignant cells. How tumors often evade tumor suppression mediated by innate killer cells is another major subject of the review. We end with a discussion on some of the implications of the various findings with respect to possible therapeutic approaches. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. M2-like macrophages are responsible for collagen degradation through a mannose receptor-mediated pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Daniel H; Leonard, Daniel; Masedunskas, Andrius

    2013-01-01

    of the collagen receptors mannose receptor (Mrc1) and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-associated protein (Endo180 and Mrc2) impaired this intracellular collagen degradation pathway. This study demonstrates the importance of receptor-mediated cellular uptake to collagen turnover in vivo and identifies......Tissue remodeling processes critically depend on the timely removal and remodeling of preexisting collagen scaffolds. Nevertheless, many aspects related to the turnover of this abundant extracellular matrix component in vivo are still incompletely understood. We therefore took advantage of recent...... advances in optical imaging to develop an assay to visualize collagen turnover in situ and identify cell types and molecules involved in this process. Collagen introduced into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis in a partially matrix metalloproteinase-dependent manner and was subsequently...

  20. Constitutively active CCR5 chemokine receptors differ in mediating HIV envelope-dependent fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voux, Alex; Chan, Mei-Chi; Folefoc, Asongna T; Madziva, Michael T; Flanagan, Colleen A

    2013-01-01

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the effects of pro-inflammatory β-chemokines. CCR5 is also the major co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into human cells. G protein-coupled receptors exist in ensembles of active and inactive conformations. Active receptor conformations can be stabilized by mutations. Although binding of the HIV envelope protein to CCR5 stimulates cellular signaling, the CCR5 conformation that induces fusion of the viral membrane with cellular membranes is not known. We mutated conserved amino acids to generate constitutively active CCR5 receptors, which are stabilized in active conformations, and tested the ability of constitutively active CCR5 receptors to mediate HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion. Mutation of the Asp³·⁴⁹(¹²⁵) and Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵) residues of CCR5 did not cause constitutive activity, but Lys or Pro substitutions for Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²), in the TxP motif, caused high basal inositol phosphate signaling. Signaling did not increase in response to MIP-1β, suggesting that the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²) mutants were fully stabilized in active conformations. The Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys mutation severely decreased cell surface CCR5 expression. Combining the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys mutation with an Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵)Gln mutation partially reversed the decrease in expression. Mutants with Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²)Lys substitutions were poor mediators of HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion, but mutants with the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Pro substitution exhibited full co-receptor function. Our results suggest that the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Lys and Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²)Pro mutations stabilize distinct constitutively active CCR5 conformations. Lys in position 2.65(82) stabilizes activated receptor conformations that appear to be constitutively internalized and do not induce envelope-dependent membrane fusion, whereas Pro stabilizes activated conformations

  1. Constitutively active CCR5 chemokine receptors differ in mediating HIV envelope-dependent fusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex de Voux

    Full Text Available The CCR5 chemokine receptor is a rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor that mediates the effects of pro-inflammatory β-chemokines. CCR5 is also the major co-receptor for entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV into human cells. G protein-coupled receptors exist in ensembles of active and inactive conformations. Active receptor conformations can be stabilized by mutations. Although binding of the HIV envelope protein to CCR5 stimulates cellular signaling, the CCR5 conformation that induces fusion of the viral membrane with cellular membranes is not known. We mutated conserved amino acids to generate constitutively active CCR5 receptors, which are stabilized in active conformations, and tested the ability of constitutively active CCR5 receptors to mediate HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion. Mutation of the Asp³·⁴⁹(¹²⁵ and Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵ residues of CCR5 did not cause constitutive activity, but Lys or Pro substitutions for Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸², in the TxP motif, caused high basal inositol phosphate signaling. Signaling did not increase in response to MIP-1β, suggesting that the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸² mutants were fully stabilized in active conformations. The Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys mutation severely decreased cell surface CCR5 expression. Combining the Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys mutation with an Arg⁶·³²(²²⁵Gln mutation partially reversed the decrease in expression. Mutants with Thr²·⁵⁶(⁸²Lys substitutions were poor mediators of HIV envelope-directed membrane fusion, but mutants with the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Pro substitution exhibited full co-receptor function. Our results suggest that the Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Lys and Thr²·⁶⁵(⁸²Pro mutations stabilize distinct constitutively active CCR5 conformations. Lys in position 2.65(82 stabilizes activated receptor conformations that appear to be constitutively internalized and do not induce envelope-dependent membrane fusion, whereas Pro stabilizes activated

  2. Innate immune recognition and regulation in liver injury: A brief report from a series of studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN ZhiGang

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of innate immune receptors and the emergence of liver Immunology (high content of NK and NKT cells in liver) led to the second research summit in innate immunity since the finding of NK cells in the middle 1970s. Liver disease is one of the most dangerous threats to humans, and the pro-gress in innate immunology and liver immunology made it possible to re-explain the cellular end too-lecular immune mechanisms of liver disease. In the past ten years, we have found that innate recogni-tion of hepatic NK and NKT subsets were involved in murine liver injury. We established a novel NK cell-dependent acute murine hepatitis model by activating Toll-like receptor-3 (TLR-3) with an injection of poly I:C, which may mimic mild viral hepatitis (such as Chronic Hepatitis B). We observed that a network of innate immune cells including NK, NKT and Kupffer cells is involved in liver immune injury in our established NK cell-dependent murine model. We noted that TLR-3 on Kupffer ceils activated by pretreatment with poly I:C might protect against bacterial toxin (LPS)-induced fuIminant hepatitis by down-regulating TLR-4 function, while TLR-3 pre-activation of NK cells might reduce Con A-induced NKT cell-mediated fulminant hepatitis by blocking NKT cell recruitment to the liver. We also found that the oversensitivity to injury by immune stimulation in HBV (hepatitis B virus) transgenic mice (full HBV gene-tg or HBs-tg) correlated to the over-expression of Real, an NKG2D (natural killer cell group 2D) ligand of NK cells or CDld, a ligand of TCR-V14 of NKT cells, on HBV+ hepatocytes, which leads to an innate immune response against hepatocytes and is critical in liver immune injury and regeneration.

  3. Bile acid-induced arrhythmia is mediated by muscarinic M2 receptors in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti H Sheikh Abdul Kadir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP is a common disease affecting up to 5% of pregnancies and which can cause fetal arrhythmia and sudden intrauterine death. We previously demonstrated that bile acid taurocholate (TC, which is raised in the bloodstream of ICP, can acutely alter the rate and rhythm of contraction and induce abnormal calcium destabilization in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCM. Apart from their hepatic functions bile acids are ubiquitous signalling molecules with diverse systemic effects mediated by either the nuclear receptor FXR or by a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor TGR5. We aim to investigate the mechanism of bile-acid induced arrhythmogenic effects in an in-vitro model of the fetal heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: Levels of bile acid transporters and nuclear receptor FXR were studied by quantitative real time PCR, western blot and immunostaining, which showed low levels of expression. We did not observe functional involvement of the canonical receptors FXR and TGR5. Instead, we found that TC binds to the muscarinic M(2 receptor in NRCM and serves as a partial agonist of this receptor in terms of inhibitory effect on intracellular cAMP and negative chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA-knockdown of the M(2 receptor completely abolished the negative effect of TC on contraction, calcium transient amplitude and synchronisation in NRCM clusters. CONCLUSION: We conclude that in NRCM the TC-induced arrhythmia is mediated by the partial agonism at the M(2 receptor. This mechanism might serve as a promising new therapeutic target for fetal arrhythmia.

  4. TRPC Channels Mediate a Muscarinic Receptor-Induced Afterdepolarization in Cerebral Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Dun; Villalobos, Claudio; Andrade, Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors on pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex induces the appearance of a slow afterdepolarization that can sustain autonomous spiking after a brief excitatory stimulus. Accordingly, this phenomenon has been hypothesized to allow for the transient storage of memory traces in neuronal networks. Here we investigated the molecular basis underlying the muscarinic receptor-induced afterdepolarization using molecular biological and electrophysiological strategies. We find that the ability of muscarinic receptors to induce the inward aftercurrent underlying the slow afterdepolarization is inhibited by expression of a Gαq-11 dominant negative and is also markedly reduced in a phospholipase C β1 (PLCβ1) knock-out mouse. Furthermore, we show, using a genetically encoded biosensor, that activation of muscarinic receptor induces the breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in pyramidal cells. These results indicate that the Gαq-11/PLCβ1 cascade plays a key role in the ability of muscarinic receptors to signal the inward aftercurrent. We have shown previously that the muscarinic afterdepolarization is mediated by a calcium-activated nonselective cation current, suggesting the possible involvement of TRPC channels. We find that expression of a TRPC dominant negative inhibits, and overexpression of wild-type TRPC5 or TRPC6 enhances, the amplitude of the muscarinic receptor-induced inward aftercurrent. Furthermore, we find that coexpression of TRPC5 and T-type calcium channels is sufficient to reconstitute a muscarinic receptor-activated inward aftercurrent in human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells. These results indicate that TRPC channels mediate the muscarinic receptor-induced slow afterdepolarization seen in pyramidal cells of the cerebral cortex and suggest a possible role for TRPC channels in mnemonic processes. PMID:19675237

  5. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred eOswald

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarisation (AHP underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD of postsynaptic potentials (PSP in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg2+-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg2+-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission.

  6. Immune cell regulation and cardiovascular effects of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor agonists in rodents are mediated via distinct receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, M; Sun, S-Y; Hajdu, R; Bergstrom, J; Card, D; Doherty, G; Hale, J; Keohane, C; Meyers, C; Milligan, J; Mills, S; Nomura, N; Rosen, H; Rosenbach, M; Shei, G-J; Singer, I I; Tian, M; West, S; White, V; Xie, J; Proia, R L; Mandala, S

    2004-05-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive lysolipid with pleiotropic functions mediated through a family of G protein-coupled receptors, S1P(1,2,3,4,5). Physiological effects of S1P receptor agonists include regulation of cardiovascular function and immunosuppression via redistribution of lymphocytes from blood to secondary lymphoid organs. The phosphorylated metabolite of the immunosuppressant agent FTY720 (2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol) and other phosphonate analogs with differential receptor selectivity were investigated. No significant species differences in compound potency or rank order of activity on receptors cloned from human, murine, and rat sources were observed. All synthetic analogs were high-affinity agonists on S1P(1), with IC(50) values for ligand binding between 0.3 and 14 nM. The correlation between S1P(1) receptor activation and the ED(50) for lymphocyte reduction was highly significant (p effects on lymphocyte recirculation, three lines of evidence link S1P(3) receptor activity with acute toxicity and cardiovascular regulation: compound potency on S1P(3) correlated with toxicity and bradycardia; the shift in potency of phosphorylated-FTY720 for inducing lymphopenia versus bradycardia and hypertension was consistent with affinity for S1P(1) relative to S1P(3); and toxicity, bradycardia, and hypertension were absent in S1P(3)(-/-) mice. Blood pressure effects of agonists in anesthetized rats were complex, whereas hypertension was the predominant effect in conscious rats and mice. Immunolocalization of S1P(3) in rodent heart revealed abundant expression on myocytes and perivascular smooth muscle cells consistent with regulation of bradycardia and hypertension, whereas S1P(1) expression was restricted to the vascular endothelium.

  7. Expression of folate receptors in nasopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma and folate receptor-mediated endocytosis by molecular targeted nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie M

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available M Xie, H Zhang, Y Xu, T Liu, S Chen, J Wang, T ZhangDepartment of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Immunohistochemistry and an immunofluorescence technique was used to detect folate receptor expression in tissue samples and cell lines of head and neck squamous carcinoma, including 20 tissue samples of nasopharyngeal carcinoma, 16 tissue samples of laryngeal carcinoma, and HNE-1, HNE-2, CNE-1, CNE-2, SUNE-1, 5-8F, and Hep-2 cell lines. Iron staining, electron microscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging were used to observe endocytosis of folate-conjugated cisplatin-loaded magnetic nanoparticles (CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP in cultured cells and transplanted tumors. As shown by immunohistochemistry, 83.3% (30/36 of the head and neck squamous carcinomas expressed the folate receptor versus none in the control group (0/24. Only the HNE-1 and Hep-2 cell lines expressed the folate receptor, and the other five cell lines did not. Endocytosis of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP was seen in HNE-1 and Hep-2 cells by iron staining and electron microscopy. A similar result was seen in transplanted tumors in nude mice. Magnetic resonance imaging showed low signal intensity of HNE-1 cells and HNE-1 transplanted tumors on T2-weighted images after uptake of CDDP-FA-ASA-MNP, and this was not seen in CNE-2 transplanted tumors. In conclusion, head and neck squamous carcinoma cell strongly expressed the folate receptor, while normal tissue did not. The folate receptor can mediate endocytosis of folate-conjugated anticancer nanomedicines, and lays the foundation for molecular targeted treatment of cancer.Keywords: nasopharyngeal carcinoma, laryngeal carcinoma, folate receptor, molecular targeting, cisplatin, nanomedicine

  8. Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors are essential mediators of eyelid closure during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Deron R; Lee, Chang-Wook; Wang, Wei; Ware, Adam; Rivera, Richard; Chun, Jerold

    2013-10-11

    The fetal development of the mammalian eyelid involves the expansion of the epithelium over the developing cornea, fusion into a continuous sheet covering the eye, and a splitting event several weeks later that results in the formation of the upper and lower eyelids. Recent studies have revealed a significant number of molecular signaling components that are essential mediators of eyelid development. Receptor-mediated sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling is known to influence diverse biological processes, but its involvement in eyelid development has not been reported. Here, we show that two S1P receptors, S1P2 and S1P3, are collectively essential mediators of eyelid closure during murine development. Homozygous deletion of the gene encoding either receptor has no apparent effect on eyelid development, but double-null embryos are born with an "eyes open at birth" defect due to a delay in epithelial sheet extension. Both receptors are expressed in the advancing epithelial sheet during the critical period of extension. Fibroblasts derived from double-null embryos have a deficient response to epidermal growth factor, suggesting that S1P2 and S1P3 modulate this essential signaling pathway during eyelid closure.

  9. Extracellular acidosis impairs P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling and migration of microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langfelder, Antonia; Okonji, Emeka; Deca, Diana; Wei, Wei-Chun; Glitsch, Maike D

    2015-04-01

    Microglia are the resident macrophage and immune cell of the brain and are critically involved in combating disease and assaults on the brain. Virtually all brain pathologies are accompanied by acidosis of the interstitial fluid, meaning that microglia are exposed to an acidic environment. However, little is known about how extracellular acidosis impacts on microglial function. The activity of microglia is tightly controlled by 'on' and 'off' signals, the presence or absence of which results in generation of distinct phenotypes in microglia. Activation of G protein coupled purinergic (P2Y) receptors triggers a number of distinct behaviours in microglia, including activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Using pharmacological tools and fluorescence imaging of the murine cerebellar microglia cell line C8B4, we show that extracellular acidosis interferes with P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling in these cells. Distinct P2Y receptors give rise to signature intracellular Ca(2+) signals, and Ca(2+) release from stores and Ca(2+) influx are differentially affected by acidotic conditions: Ca(2+) release is virtually unaffected, whereas Ca(2+) influx, mediated at least in part by store-operated Ca(2+) channels, is profoundly inhibited. Furthermore, P2Y1 and P2Y6-mediated stimulation of migration is inhibited under conditions of extracellular acidosis, whereas basal migration independent of P2Y receptor activation is not. Taken together, our results demonstrate that an acidic microenvironment impacts on P2Y receptor-mediated Ca(2+) signalling, thereby influencing microglial responses and responsiveness to extracellular signals. This may result in altered behaviour of microglia under pathological conditions compared with microglial responses in healthy tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane E; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S; Padilla, Benjamin E; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J; Bunnett, Nigel W; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK(1)R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK(1)R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca(2+) signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK(1)R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK(1)R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK(1)R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK(1)R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK(1)R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK(1)R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs.

  11. P2X receptor-mediated ATP purinergic signaling in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Hua JiangSchool of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United KingdomAbstract: Purinergic P2X receptors are plasma membrane proteins present in a wide range of mammalian cells where they act as a cellular sensor, enabling cells to detect and respond to extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP, an important signaling molecule. P2X receptors function as ligand-gated Ca2+-permeable cationic channels that open upon ATP binding to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and cause membrane depolarization. In response to sustained activation, P2X receptors induce formation of a pore permeable to large molecules. P2X receptors also interact with distinct functional proteins and membrane lipids to form specialized signaling complexes. Studies have provided compelling evidence to show that such P2X receptor-mediated ATP-signaling mechanisms determine and regulate a growing number and diversity of important physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and cytokine release. There is accumulating evidence to support strong causative relationships of altered receptor expression and function with chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, cancers, and other pathologies or diseases. Numerous high throughput screening drug discovery programs and preclinical studies have thus far demonstrated the proof of concepts that the P2X receptors are druggable targets and selective receptor antagonism is a promising therapeutics approach. This review will discuss the recent progress in understanding the mammalian P2X receptors with respect to the ATP-signaling mechanisms, physiological and pathophysiological roles, and development and preclinical studies of receptor antagonists.Keywords: extracellular ATP, ion channel, large pore, signaling complex, chronic pain, inflammatory diseases

  12. Kainate receptors mediate signaling in both transient and sustained OFF bipolar cell pathways in mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghuis, Bart G; Looger, Loren L; Tomita, Susumu; Demb, Jonathan B

    2014-04-30

    A fundamental question in sensory neuroscience is how parallel processing is implemented at the level of molecular and circuit mechanisms. In the retina, it has been proposed that distinct OFF cone bipolar cell types generate fast/transient and slow/sustained pathways by the differential expression of AMPA- and kainate-type glutamate receptors, respectively. However, the functional significance of these receptors in the intact circuit during light stimulation remains unclear. Here, we measured glutamate release from mouse bipolar cells by two-photon imaging of a glutamate sensor (iGluSnFR) expressed on postsynaptic amacrine and ganglion cell dendrites. In both transient and sustained OFF layers, cone-driven glutamate release from bipolar cells was blocked by antagonists to kainate receptors but not AMPA receptors. Electrophysiological recordings from bipolar and ganglion cells confirmed the essential role of kainate receptors for signaling in both transient and sustained OFF pathways. Kainate receptors mediated responses to contrast modulation up to 20 Hz. Light-evoked responses in all mouse OFF bipolar pathways depend on kainate, not AMPA, receptors.

  13. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  14. Brain delta2 opioid receptors mediate SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Scott Manning; Hewson, Jennifer Marie; Inan, Saadet; Cowan, Alan

    2005-07-05

    Despite insights into an increasingly significant role for delta opioid receptors in thermoregulation, it is unclear whether delta receptors located in the brain or periphery play the more critical role in body temperature regulation. Moreover, it is not entirely clear which delta receptor phenotype, delta1 or delta2, mediates the hypothermic actions of delta agonists. Because SNC-80 distributes into central and peripheral compartments and produces rapid hypothermia following systemic injection, the nonpeptide delta agonist is particularly useful in discriminating the site of action of delta receptor-mediated hypothermia. To determine the locus and phenotype of delta receptor which mediates SNC-80-induced hypothermia, we injected SNC-80 and phenotype selective delta antagonists to male Sprague-Dawley rats. SNC-80 (10-50 mg/kg, im) evoked hypothermia that peaked 30 min post-injection. Naltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), an opioid antagonist, or naltrindole (5 mg/kg, sc), a delta antagonist, blocked the hypothermic response to SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im). The hypothermia caused by SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) was blocked by a delta2 antagonist, naltriben (2.5 mg/kg, sc), but was not affected by BNTX (5 and 10 mg/kg, sc), a delta1 antagonist. The administration of naltriben (10 microg/rat, icv) 30 min before SNC-80 (35 mg/kg, im) prevented SNC-80-evoked hypothermia. In contrast, methylnaltrexone (5 mg/kg, sc), a peripherally restricted opioid antagonist, did not affect the hypothermia caused by SNC-80. The present data demonstrate that selective activation of brain delta2 receptors is a major mechanism of SNC-80-evoked hypothermia in rats.

  15. Cholangiopathy with Respect to Biliary Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Harada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biliary innate immunity is involved in the pathogenesis of cholangiopathies in cases of biliary disease. Cholangiocytes possess Toll-like receptors (TLRs which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and play a pivotal role in the innate immune response. Tolerance to bacterial PAMPs such as lipopolysaccharides is also important to maintain homeostasis in the biliary tree, but tolerance to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA is not found. Moreover, in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC and biliary atresia, biliary innate immunity is closely associated with the dysregulation of the periductal cytokine milieu and the induction of biliary apoptosis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, forming in disease-specific cholangiopathy. Biliary innate immunity is associated with the pathogenesis of various cholangiopathies in biliary diseases as well as biliary defense systems.

  16. AMPA receptor mediated excitotoxicity in neocortical neurons is developmentally regulated and dependent upon receptor desensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Schousboe, A; Pickering, D S;

    1998-01-01

    was blocked was seen as early as 5 DIV since 10 microM MK-801 did not completely block the response whereas 10 microM NBQX did. The 2,3-benzodiazepine GYKI compounds, which have been reported to be selective non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonists, were here observed to block the AMPA toxicity...

  17. Interaction between Cannabinoid System and Toll-Like Receptors Controls Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen L. McCoy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of the endocannabinoid system consisting of cannabinoid receptors, endogenous ligands, and biosynthetic and metabolizing enzymes, interest has been renewed in investigating the promise of cannabinoids as therapeutic agents. Abundant evidence indicates that cannabinoids modulate immune responses. An inflammatory response is triggered when innate immune cells receive a danger signal provided by pathogen- or damage-associated molecular patterns engaging pattern-recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor family members are prominent pattern-recognition receptors expressed on innate immune cells. Cannabinoids suppress Toll-like receptor-mediated inflammatory responses. However, the relationship between the endocannabinoid system and innate immune system may not be one-sided. Innate immune cells express cannabinoid receptors and produce endogenous cannabinoids. Hence, innate immune cells may play a role in regulating endocannabinoid homeostasis, and, in turn, the endocannabinoid system modulates local inflammatory responses. Studies designed to probe the interaction between the innate immune system and the endocannabinoid system may identify new potential molecular targets in developing therapeutic strategies for chronic inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the endocannabinoid system and Toll-like receptor family and evaluates the interaction between them.

  18. Pyrimidine-based compounds modulate CXCR2-mediated signaling and receptor turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Helen; Neamati, Nouri

    2014-07-07

    Chemokine receptor CXCR2 is expressed on various immune cells and is essential for neutrophil recruitment and angiogenesis at sites of acute and chronic inflammation caused by tissue injury or infection. Because of its role in inflammation, it has been implicated in a number of immune-mediated inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, arthritis, COPD, cystic fibrosis, asthma, and various types of cancer. CXCR2 and its ligands are up-regulated in cancer cells as well as the tumor microenvironment, promoting tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. Although pharmaceutical companies have pursued the development of CXCR2-specific small-molecule inhibitors as anti-inflammatory agents within the last decades, there are currently no clinically approved CXCR2 inhibitors. Using a high-throughput, cell-based assay specific for CXCR2, we screened an in-house library of structurally diverse compounds and identified a class of pyrimidine-based compounds that alter CXCR2-mediated second messenger signaling. Our lead compound, CX797, inhibited IL8-mediated cAMP signaling and receptor degradation while specifically up-regulating IL8-mediated β-arrestin-2 recruitment. CX797 also inhibited IL8-mediated cell migration. Mechanistic comparison of CX797 and a previously reported CXCR2 inhibitor, SB265610, show these two classes of compounds have a distinct mechanism of action on CXCR2.

  19. Pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production by reovirus treated melanoma cells is PKR/NF-κB mediated and supports innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Lynette; Errington, Fiona; Prestwich, Robin; Ilett, Elizabeth; Harrington, Kevin; Pandha, Hardev; Coffey, Matt; Selby, Peter; Vile, Richard; Melcher, Alan

    2011-02-21

    As well as inducing direct oncolysis, reovirus treatment of melanoma is associated with activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses. Here we characterise the effects of conditioned media from reovirus-infected, dying human melanoma cells (reoTCM), in the absence of live virus, to address the immune bystander potential of reovirus therapy. In addition to RANTES, IL-8, MIP-1α and MIP-1β, reovirus-infected melanoma cells secreted eotaxin, IP-10 and the type 1 interferon IFN-β. To address the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory composition of reoTCM, we show that IL-8 and IFN-β secretion by reovirus-infected melanoma cells was associated with activation of NF-κB and decreased by pre-treatment with small molecule inhibitors of NF-κB and PKR; specific siRNA-mediated knockdown further confirmed a role for PKR. This pro-inflammatory milieu induced a chemotactic response in isolated natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC) and anti-melanoma cytotoxic T cells (CTL). Following culture in reoTCM, NK cells upregulated CD69 expression and acquired greater lytic potential against tumour targets. Furthermore, melanoma cell-loaded DC cultured in reoTCM were more effective at priming adaptive anti-tumour immunity. These data demonstrate that the PKR- and NF-κB-dependent induction of pro-inflammatory molecules that accompanies reovirus-mediated killing can recruit and activate innate and adaptive effector cells, thus potentially altering the tumour microenvironment to support bystander immune-mediated therapy as well as direct viral oncolysis.

  20. Pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production by reovirus treated melanoma cells is PKR/NF-κB mediated and supports innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune priming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coffey Matt

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As well as inducing direct oncolysis, reovirus treatment of melanoma is associated with activation of innate and adaptive anti-tumour immune responses. Results Here we characterise the effects of conditioned media from reovirus-infected, dying human melanoma cells (reoTCM, in the absence of live virus, to address the immune bystander potential of reovirus therapy. In addition to RANTES, IL-8, MIP-1α and MIP-1β, reovirus-infected melanoma cells secreted eotaxin, IP-10 and the type 1 interferon IFN-β. To address the mechanisms responsible for the inflammatory composition of reoTCM, we show that IL-8 and IFN-β secretion by reovirus-infected melanoma cells was associated with activation of NF-κB and decreased by pre-treatment with small molecule inhibitors of NF-κB and PKR; specific siRNA-mediated knockdown further confirmed a role for PKR. This pro-inflammatory milieu induced a chemotactic response in isolated natural killer (NK cells, dendritic cells (DC and anti-melanoma cytotoxic T cells (CTL. Following culture in reoTCM, NK cells upregulated CD69 expression and acquired greater lytic potential against tumour targets. Furthermore, melanoma cell-loaded DC cultured in reoTCM were more effective at priming adaptive anti-tumour immunity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the PKR- and NF-κB-dependent induction of pro-inflammatory molecules that accompanies reovirus-mediated killing can recruit and activate innate and adaptive effector cells, thus potentially altering the tumour microenvironment to support bystander immune-mediated therapy as well as direct viral oncolysis.

  1. Innate immunity to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kiyoura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is not a pathogen in healthy individuals, but can cause severe systemic candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has various virulence factors and activates the innate immune system. Specifically, C. albicans induces proinflammatory cytokine production in various cell types via many receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. This microorganism also promotes phagocytosis via CLRs on macrophages. In a previous study, we found that C. albicans induces the production of galectin-3, which is a known CLR that kills C. albicans. This review indicates that the use of mouthwash containing an antimicrobial peptide or protein might be a useful new oral care method for the prevention of oral candidiasis.

  2. Role of IL-33 and Its Receptor in T Cell-Mediated Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-33 (IL-33 is a new cytokine of interleukin-1 family, whose specific receptor is ST2. IL-33 exerts its functions via its target cells and plays different roles in diseases. ST2 deletion and exclusion of IL-33/ST2 axis are accompanied by enhanced susceptibility to dominantly T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune diseases. It has been reported that IL-33/ST2 pathway plays a key role in host defense and immune regulation in inflammatory and infectious diseases. This review focuses on new findings in the roles of IL-33 and ST2 in several kinds of T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases.

  3. Enhanced Early Innate and T Cell-mediated Responses in Subjects Immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909)

    OpenAIRE

    Minang, Jacob T.; Inglefield, Jon R.; Harris, Andrea M.; Lathey, Janet L.; Alleva, David G.; Sweeney, Diane L.; Hopkins, Robert J.; Lacy, Michael J.; Bernton, Edward W.

    2014-01-01

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a Phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax® (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24 to 48 hours...

  4. Interaction of medullary P2 and glutamate receptors mediates the vasodilation in the hindlimb of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, Willian Seiji; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Pedrino, Gustavo R; Pilowsky, Paul M; Cravo, Sergio L

    2012-12-01

    In the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of rats, blockade of extracellular ATP breakdown to adenosine reduces arterial blood pressure (AP) increases that follow stimulation of the hypothalamic defense area (HDA). The effects of ATP on NTS P2 receptors, during stimulation of the HDA, are still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of P2 receptors in the NTS mediates cardiovascular responses to HDA stimulation. Further investigation was taken to establish if changes in hindlimb vascular conductance (HVC) elicited by electrical stimulation of the HDA, or activation of P2 receptors in the NTS, are relayed in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM); and if those responses depend on glutamate release by ATP acting on presynaptic terminals. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, electrical stimulation of the HDA increased AP and HVC. Blockade of P2 or glutamate receptors in the NTS, with bilateral microinjections of suramin (10 mM) or kynurenate (50 mM) reduced only the evoked increase in HVC by 75 % or more. Similar results were obtained with the blockade combining both antagonists. Blockade of P2 and glutamate receptors in the RVLM also reduced the increases in HVC to stimulation of the HDA by up to 75 %. Bilateral microinjections of kynurenate in the RVLM abolished changes in AP and HVC to injections of the P2 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (20 mM) into the NTS. The findings suggest that HDA-NTS-RVLM pathways in control of HVC are mediated by activation of P2 and glutamate receptors in the brainstem in alerting-defense reactions.

  5. Innate immune pattern recognition: a cell biological perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brubaker, Sky W; Bonham, Kevin S; Zanoni, Ivan; Kagan, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Receptors of the innate immune system detect conserved determinants of microbial and viral origin. Activation of these receptors initiates signaling events that culminate in an effective immune response. Recently, the view that innate immune signaling events rely on and operate within a complex cellular infrastructure has become an important framework for understanding the regulation of innate immunity. Compartmentalization within this infrastructure provides the cell with the ability to assign spatial information to microbial detection and regulate immune responses. Several cell biological processes play a role in the regulation of innate signaling responses; at the same time, innate signaling can engage cellular processes as a form of defense or to promote immunological memory. In this review, we highlight these aspects of cell biology in pattern-recognition receptor signaling by focusing on signals that originate from the cell surface, from endosomal compartments, and from within the cytosol.

  6. Vascular endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction requires phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guogang; Jamali, Roya; Cao, Yong-Xiao;

    2006-01-01

    RNA and protein expressions. The endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction was associated with increase in phosphorylation of extracellular regulation kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) proteins and elevated levels of intracellular calcium. The elevation curve of intracellular calcium consisted of two phases: one rapid...... and one sustained. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by SB386023 or blockage of calcium channels by nifedipine significantly reduced the endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction (P..., phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins and elevation of intracellular calcium level are required for endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction in rat mesenteric artery....

  7. DMPD: Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotranscriptional regulations in innate immunity. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16930560 Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotr...2-13. Epub 2006 Aug 22. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new...6930560 Title Toll-like receptors: from the discovery of NFkappaB to new insights intotranscriptional regula

  8. AT1 receptor in rostral ventrolateral medulla mediating blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ya GAO; Feng ZHANG; Ying HAN; Han-jun WANG; Ying ZHANG; Rui GUO; Guo-qing ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of AT1 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mediating the blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). METHODS: Intravenous injections of graded doses of phenylephrine (1, 5, 10, 20, and 40 μg/kg) increased the blood pressure to elicit the baroreceptor reflex in both SHR and normotensive Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. The baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined before and after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ, losartan, or AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides into the RVLM. AT1 receptor protein level in the RVLM was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The BRS was significantly decreased in SHR compared with normal rats. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (250 nmol/h) into the RVLM partly reversed the blunted BRS in SHR, but had no significant effect on the BRS in normal rats. Ang Ⅱ (1.5 nmol/h) significantly inhibited the BRS in normal rats, which was completely abolished by pretreatment with losartan. However, no significant change in the BRS was observed after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ into the RVLM in SHR. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides(ASODN) into the RVLM partially recovered the blunted BRS in SHR after 3 h, but no significant change in the BRS was observed in normal rats. The AT1 receptor protein level significantly decreased after administration of ASODN.CONCLUSION: Blockage of AT1 receptor or inhibition of AT1 receptor protein synthesis in the RVLM enhanced the BRS in SHR, suggesting that the enhanced activities of AT1 receptor in the RVLM contribute to the blunted BRS in SHR.

  9. AT1 receptor in rostral ventrolateral medulla mediating blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yaGAO; FengZHANG; YingHAN; Han-junWANG; YingZHANG; RuiGUO; Guo-qingZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the role of AT1 receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mediating the blunted baroreceptor reflex in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). METHODS: Intravenous injections of graded doses of phenylephrine (1, 5, 10, 20, and 40μg/kg) increased the blood pressure to elicit the baroreceptor reflex in both SHR and normotensive Wistar rats anesthetized with urethane. The baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS) was determined before and after microinjection of Ang II, losartan, or AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides into the RVLM. AT1 receptor protein level in the RVLM was measured by Western blotting. RESULTS: The BRS was significantly decreased in SHR compared with normal rats. Bilateral microinjection of AT~ receptor antagonist losartan (250 nmol/h) into the RVLM partly reversed the blunted BRS in SHR, but had no significant effect on the BRS in normal rats. Ang II (1.5 nmol/h) significantly inhibited the BRS in normal rats, which was completely abolished by pretreatment with losartan. However, no significant change in the BRS was observed after microinjection of Ang Ⅱ into the RVLM in SHR. Bilateral microinjection of AT1 receptor antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ASODN) into the RVLM partially recovered the blunted BRS in SHR after 3 h, but no significant change in the BRS was observed in normal rats. The AT1 receptor protein level significantly decreased after administration of ASODN. CONCLUSION: Blockage of AT1 receptor or inhibition of AT1 receptor protein synthesis in the RVLM enhanced the BRS in SHR, suggesting that the enhanced activities of AT1 receptor in the RVLM contribute to the blunted BRS in SHR.

  10. Skin innate immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berna Aksoy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available All multicellular organisms protect themselves from external universe and microorganisms by innate immune sytem that is constitutively present. Skin innate immune system has several different components composed of epithelial barriers, humoral factors and cellular part. In this review information about skin innate immune system and its components are presented to the reader. Innate immunity, which wasn’t adequately interested in previously, is proven to provide a powerfull early protection system, control many infections before the acquired immunity starts and directs acquired immunity to develop optimally

  11. Activation of cortical 5-HT3 receptor-expressing interneurons induces NO mediated vasodilatations and NPY mediated vasoconstrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin ePerrenoud

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneurons are local integrators of cortical activity that have been reported to be involved in the control of cerebral blood flow through their ability to produce vasoactive molecules and their rich innervation of neighboring blood vessels. They form a highly diverse population among which the serotonin 5-hydroxytryptamine 3A receptor (5-HT3A-expressing interneurons share a common developmental origin, in addition to the responsiveness to serotonergic ascending pathway. We have recently shown that these neurons regroup two distinct subpopulations within the somatosensory cortex: Neuropeptide Y (NPY-expressing interneurons, displaying morphological properties similar to those of neurogliaform cells, and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP-expressing bipolar/bitufted interneurons. The aim of the present study was to determine the role of these neuronal populations in the control of vascular tone by monitoring blood vessels diameter changes, using infrared videomicroscopy in mouse neocortical slices. Bath applications of 1-(3-Chlorophenylbiguanide hydrochloride (mCPBG, a 5-HT3R agonist, induced both constrictions (30% and dilations (70% of penetrating arterioles within supragranular layers. All vasoconstrictions were abolished in the presence of the NPY receptor antagonist (BIBP 3226, suggesting that they were elicited by NPY release. Vasodilations persisted in the presence of the VIP receptor antagonist VPAC1 (PG-97-269, whereas they were blocked in the presence of the neuronal Nitric Oxide (NO Synthase (nNOS inhibitor, L-NNA. Altogether, these results strongly suggest that activation of neocortical 5-HT3A-expressing interneurons by serotoninergic input could induces NO mediated vasodilatations and NPY mediated vasoconstrictions.

  12. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    , hippocampal or hypothalamic slices were used instead of cortical slices. The Ca2+-induced tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine (in the presence of ranitidine); this effect was abolished by clobenpropit. In slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, impromidine failed to facilitate the Ca2+-evoked tritium overflow. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in mouse brain cortex slices was inhibited by histamine by about 60% (both in the absence or presence of ranitidine). The inhibitory effect of histamine was abolished (but not reversed) by clobenpropit. In conclusion, noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain cortex is inhibited via presynaptic H3 receptors and facilitated via H2 receptors not located presynaptically. In the mouse brain cortex, only inhibitory H3 receptors occur. The extent of the H3 receptor-mediated effect is more marked in the mouse than in the guinea-pig brain cortex.

  13. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated signaling dampens the HPA axis response to restraint stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanson, Nathan K; Herman, James P

    2015-10-15

    Glutamate is an important neurotransmitter in the regulation of the neural portion of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, and signals through ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. In the current studies we investigated the role of hypothalamic paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in the regulation of the HPA axis response to restraint stress in rats. Direct injection of the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) into the PVN prior to restraint leads to blunting of the HPA axis response in awake animals. Consistent with this result, infusion of the group I receptor antagonist hexyl-homoibotenic acid (HIBO) potentiates the HPA axis response to restraint. The excitatory effect of blocking paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate signaling is blocked by co-administration of dexamethasone into the PVN. However, the inhibitory effect of DHPG is not affected by co-administration of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM-251 into the PVN. Together, these results suggest that paraventricular group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling acts to dampen HPA axis reactivity. This effect appears to be similar to the rapid inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids at the PVN, but is not mediated by endocannabinoid signaling.

  15. New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinnosuke Yahiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces VacA, a vacuolating cytotoxin associated with gastric inflammation and ulceration. The C-terminal domain of VacA plays a crucial role in receptor recognition on target cells. We have previously identified three proteins (i.e., RPTPα, RPTPβ, and LRP1 that serve as VacA receptors. These receptors contribute to the internalization of VacA into epithelial cells, activate signal transduction pathways, and contribute to cell death and gastric ulceration. In addition, other factors (e.g., CD18, sphingomyelin have also been identified as cell-surface, VacA-binding proteins. Since we believe that, following interactions with its host cell receptors, VacA participates in events leading to disease, a better understanding of the cellular function of VacA receptors may provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of VacA and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-mediated disease. In this review, we focus on VacA receptors and their role in events leading to cell damage.

  16. Enterotoxin preconditioning restores calcium-sensing receptor-mediated cytostasis in colon cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pitari, Giovanni M.; Lin, Jieru E.; Shah, Fawad J.; Lubbe, Wilhelm J.; Zuzga, David S.; Li, Peng; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A.

    2008-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC), the receptor for diarrheagenic bacterial heat-stable enterotoxins (STs), inhibits colorectal cancer cell proliferation by co-opting Ca2+ as the intracellular messenger. Similarly, extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+o) opposes proliferation and induces terminal differentiation in intestinal epithelial cells. In that context, human colon cancer cells develop a phenotype characterized by insensitivity to cytostasis imposed by Ca2+o. Here, preconditioning with ST, mediated by GCC s...

  17. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor-Mediated Long-Term Depression: Molecular Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Gladding, Clare M.; Fitzjohn, Stephen M; Molnár, Elek

    2009-01-01

    The ability to modify synaptic transmission between neurons is a fundamental process of the nervous system that is involved in development, learning, and disease. Thus, synaptic plasticity is the ability to bidirectionally modify transmission, where long-term potentiation and long-term depression (LTD) represent the best characterized forms of plasticity. In the hippocampus, two main forms of LTD coexist that are mediated by activation of either N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) or ...

  18. THIP, a hypnotic and antinociceptive drug, enhances a tonic GABAA receptor mediated conductance in mouse neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun; Jensen, Kimmo

    2006-01-01

    its cellular actions in the neocortex are uncertain, we studied the effects of THIP on neurons in slices of frontoparietal neocortex of 13- to 19-day-old (P13-19) mice. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that the clinically relevant THIP concentration of 1 μM induced a robust tonic GABA...... suggest that THIP activates an extrasynaptic GABA(A) receptor-mediated conductance in the neocortex, which may alter the cortical network activity....

  19. MAMPs/PAMPs - elicitors of innate immunity in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erbs, Gitte; Newman, Mari-Anne

    2009-01-01

    Patterns (MAMPs or PAMPs), are recognised by the plant innate immune systems Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs). General bacterial elicitors, like lipopolysaccharides (LPS), flagellin (Flg), elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), cold shock protein (CSP), peptidoglycan (PGN) and the enzyme superoxide dismutase...... elicitors have, in recent years, been identified. Here, the current knowledge regarding bacterial elicitors of innate immunity in plants is presented...

  20. Innate immunological function of TH2 cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Th2 cells produce IL-13 when stimulated by papain or house dust mites (HDM) and induce eosinophilic inflammation. This innate response of cells of the adaptive immune system is dependent on IL-33-, not T cell receptor-, based stimulation. While type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) are the dominant ...

  1. Engagement of specific innate immune signaling pathways during Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frank C; Ukai, Takashi; Genco, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a group of pathogen-associated molecular pattern receptors, which play an important role in innate immune signaling in response to microbial infection. It has been demonstrated that TLRs are differentially up regulated in response to microbial infection and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The expression of TLRs are markedly augmented in human atherosclerotic lesions and this occurs preferentially by endothelial cells and macrophages in areas infiltrated with inflammatory cells. Furthermore polymorphisms in the human gene encoding one TLR receptor (TLR4) which attenuates receptor signaling and diminishes the inflammatory response to gram-negative pathogens, is associated with low levels of certain circulating mediators of inflammation and a decreased risk for atherosclerosis in humans. Recent advances have established a fundamental role for inflammation in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. However, the triggers that initiate and sustain the inflammatory process have not been definitively identified. Although definitive proof of a role of infection contributing to atherogenesis is lacking, multiple investigations have demonstrated that infectious agents evoke cellular and molecular changes supportive of such a role. Evidence in humans suggesting that periodontal infection predisposes to atherosclerosis is derived from studies demonstrating that the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis resides in the wall of atherosclerotic vessels and seroepidemiological studies demonstrating an association between pathogen-specific IgG antibodies and atherosclerosis. Our recent work with P. gingivalis has demonstrated the effectiveness of specific intervention strategies (immunization) in the prevention of pathogen-accelerated atherosclerosis. We have also established that the inflammatory signaling pathways that P. gingivalis utilizes is dependent on the cell type and this specificity clearly influences innate

  2. The miR-199-dynamin regulatory axis controls receptor-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Juan F; Canfrán-Duque, Alberto; Goedeke, Leigh; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (microRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression that modulate many physiological processes; however, their role in regulating intracellular transport remains largely unknown. Intriguingly, we found that the dynamin (DNM) genes, a GTPase family of proteins responsible for endocytosis in eukaryotic cells, encode the conserved miR-199a and miR-199b family of miRNAs within their intronic sequences. Here, we demonstrate that miR-199a and miR-199b regulate endocytic transport by controlling the expression of important mediators of endocytosis such as clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), Rab5A, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). Importantly, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p overexpression markedly inhibits CLTC, Rab5A, LDLR and Cav-1 expression, thus preventing receptor-mediated endocytosis in human cell lines (Huh7 and HeLa). Of note, miR-199a-5p inhibition increases target gene expression and receptor-mediated endocytosis. Taken together, our work identifies a new mechanism by which microRNAs regulate intracellular trafficking. In particular, we demonstrate that the DNM, miR-199a-5p and miR-199b-5p genes act as a bifunctional locus that regulates endocytosis, thus adding an unexpected layer of complexity in the regulation of intracellular trafficking.

  3. Slit2 involvement in glioma cell migration is mediated by Robo1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertsch, Sonja; Schmitz, Nicole; Jeibmann, Astrid; Geng, Jian-Guo; Paulus, Werner; Senner, Volker

    2008-03-01

    Slit and Robo proteins are evolutionarily conserved molecules whose interaction underlies axon guidance and neuronal precursor cell migration. During development secreted Slit proteins mediate chemorepulsive signals on cells expressing Robo receptors. Because similar molecular mechanisms may be utilized in glioma cell invasion and neuroblast migration, we studied the expression of Slit2 and its transmembrane receptor Robo1 as well as their functional role in migration in glioma cells. qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of human specimens revealed that Slit2 was distinctly expressed by non-neoplastic neurons, but at only very low levels in fibrillary astrocytoma and glioblastoma. Robo1 also was mainly restricted to neurons in the normal brain, whereas astrocytic tumor cells in situ as well as glioblastoma cell lines overexpressed Robo1 at mRNA and protein levels. Recombinant human Slit2 in a concentration of 0.45 nM was repulsive for glioma cell lines in a modified Boyden chamber assay. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Robo1 in glioma cell lines neutralized the repulsive effect of Slit2, demonstrating that Robo1 served as the major Slit2 receptor. Our findings suggest that a chemorepulsive effect mediated by interaction of Slit2 and Robo1 participates in glioma cell guidance in the brain.

  4. Matrix metalloprotease 9 mediates neutrophil migration into the airways in response to influenza virus-induced toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M Bradley

    Full Text Available The early inflammatory response to influenza virus infection contributes to severe lung disease and continues to pose a serious threat to human health. The mechanisms by which neutrophils gain entry to the respiratory tract and their role during pathogenesis remain unclear. Here, we report that neutrophils significantly contributed to morbidity in a pathological mouse model of influenza virus infection. Using extensive immunohistochemistry, bone marrow transfers, and depletion studies, we identified neutrophils as the predominant pulmonary cellular source of the gelatinase matrix metalloprotease (MMP 9, which is capable of digesting the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, infection of MMP9-deficient mice showed that MMP9 was functionally required for neutrophil migration and control of viral replication in the respiratory tract. Although MMP9 release was toll-like receptor (TLR signaling-dependent, MyD88-mediated signals in non-hematopoietic cells, rather than neutrophil TLRs themselves, were important for neutrophil migration. These results were extended using multiplex analyses of inflammatory mediators to show that neutrophil chemotactic factor, CCL3, and TNFα were reduced in the Myd88⁻/⁻ airways. Furthermore, TNFα induced MMP9 secretion by neutrophils and blocking TNFα in vivo reduced neutrophil recruitment after infection. Innate recognition of influenza virus therefore provides the mechanisms to induce recruitment of neutrophils through chemokines and to enable their motility within the tissue via MMP9-mediated cleavage of the basement membrane. Our results demonstrate a previously unknown contribution of MMP9 to influenza virus pathogenesis by mediating excessive neutrophil migration into the respiratory tract in response to viral replication that could be exploited for therapeutic purposes.

  5. Silver Nanoparticle-Directed Mast Cell Degranulation Is Mediated through Calcium and PI3K Signaling Independent of the High Affinity IgE Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaleh, Nasser B; Persaud, Indushekhar; Brown, Jared M

    2016-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterial (ENM)-mediated toxicity often involves triggering immune responses. Mast cells can regulate both innate and adaptive immune responses and are key effectors in allergic diseases and inflammation. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most prevalent nanomaterials used in consumer products due to their antimicrobial properties. We have previously shown that AgNPs induce mast cell degranulation that was dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. Furthermore, we identified a role for scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1) in AgNP-mediated mast cell degranulation. However, it is completely unknown how SR-B1 mediates mast cell degranulation and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. In the current study, we hypothesized that SR-B1 interaction with AgNPs directs mast cell degranulation through activation of signal transduction pathways that culminate in an increase in intracellular calcium signal leading to mast cell degranulation. For these studies, we utilized bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) isolated from C57Bl/6 mice and RBL-2H3 cells (rat basophilic leukemia cell line). Our data support our hypothesis and show that AgNP-directed mast cell degranulation involves activation of PI3K, PLCγ and an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Moreover, we found that influx of extracellular calcium is required for the cells to degranulate in response to AgNP exposure and is mediated at least partially via the CRAC channels. Taken together, our results provide new insights into AgNP-induced mast cell activation that are key for designing novel ENMs that are devoid of immune system activation.

  6. AB318. SPR-45 Decentralization reduces nicotinic receptor-mediated canine bladder contractions in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadeo, Danielle M.; Frara, Nagat; Braverman, Alan S.; Barbe, Mary F.; Ruggieri, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    had no significant inhibitory effect on DMPP, epibatidine or nicotine-induced contraction in any group. Conclusions Nicotinic receptors mediate contraction in sham, reinnervated and decentralized bladders. This nicotinic receptor-mediated contraction is decreased after decentralization. TTX does not block nicotinic receptor-mediated contractions, indicating that action potentials are not required to induce contraction. In sham-operated dog bladders, the nicotine-induced contraction is blocked by ATR, suggesting that these nicotinic receptors are located on cholinergic nerve terminals and induce the release of acetylcholine, which activates muscarinic receptors on the smooth muscle. Funding Source(s) NIH-NINDS NS070267

  7. Inflammatory Mediators and Insulin Resistance in Obesity: Role of Nuclear Receptor Signaling in Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Fuentes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Visceral obesity is coupled to a general low-grade chronic inflammatory state characterized by macrophage activation and inflammatory cytokine production, leading to insulin resistance (IR. The balance between proinflammatory M1 and antiinflammatory M2 macrophage phenotypes within visceral adipose tissue appears to be crucially involved in the development of obesity-associated IR and consequent metabolic abnormalities. The ligand-dependent transcription factors peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs have recently been implicated in the determination of the M1/M2 phenotype. Liver X receptors (LXRs, which form another subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily, are also important regulators of proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages. Disregulation of macrophage-mediated inflammation by PPARs and LXRs therefore underlies the development of IR. This review summarizes the role of PPAR and LXR signaling in macrophages and current knowledge about the impact of these actions in the manifestation of IR and obesity comorbidities such as liver steatosis and diabetic osteopenia.

  8. Structure and antagonism of the receptor complex mediated by human TSLP in allergy and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraete, Kenneth; Peelman, Frank; Braun, Harald; Lopez, Juan; Van Rompaey, Dries; Dansercoer, Ann; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Pauwels, Kris; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Winter, Hans; Beyaert, Rudi; Lippens, Guy; Savvides, Savvas N

    2017-04-03

    The pro-inflammatory cytokine thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is pivotal to the pathophysiology of widespread allergic diseases mediated by type 2 helper T cell (Th2) responses, including asthma and atopic dermatitis. The emergence of human TSLP as a clinical target against asthma calls for maximally harnessing its therapeutic potential via structural and mechanistic considerations. Here we employ an integrative experimental approach focusing on productive and antagonized TSLP complexes and free cytokine. We reveal how cognate receptor TSLPR allosterically activates TSLP to potentiate the recruitment of the shared interleukin 7 receptor α-chain (IL-7Rα) by leveraging the flexibility, conformational heterogeneity and electrostatics of the cytokine. We further show that the monoclonal antibody Tezepelumab partly exploits these principles to neutralize TSLP activity. Finally, we introduce a fusion protein comprising a tandem of the TSLPR and IL-7Rα extracellular domains, which harnesses the mechanistic intricacies of the TSLP-driven receptor complex to manifest high antagonistic potency.

  9. PAR1- and PAR2-induced innate immune markers are negatively regulated by PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in oral keratinocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale Beverly A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protease-Activated Receptors (PARs, members of G-protein-coupled receptors, are activated by proteolytic activity of various proteases. Activation of PAR1 and PAR2 triggers innate immune responses in human oral keratinocytes (HOKs, but the signaling pathways downstream of PAR activation in HOKs have not been clearly defined. In this study, we aimed to determine if PAR1- and PAR2-mediated signaling differs in the induction of innate immune markers CXCL3, CXCL5 and CCL20 via ERK, p38 and PI3K/Akt. Results Our data show the induction of innate immunity by PAR1 requires both p38 and ERK MAP kinases, while PAR2 prominently signals via p38. However, inhibition of PI3K enhances expression of innate immune markers predominantly via suppressing p38 phosphorylation signaled by PAR activation. Conclusion Our data indicate that proteases mediating PAR1 and PAR2 activation differentially signal via MAP kinase cascades. In addition, the production of chemokines induced by PAR1 and PAR2 is suppressed by PI3K/Akt, thus keeping the innate immune responses of HOK in balance. The results of our study provide a novel insight into signaling pathways involved in PAR activation.

  10. Protein kinase Czeta mediates micro-opioid receptor-induced cross-desensitization of chemokine receptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Changcheng; Rahim, Rahil T; Davey, Penelope C; Bednar, Filip; Bardi, Giuseppe; Zhang, Lily; Zhang, Ning; Oppenheim, Joost J; Rogers, Thomas J

    2011-06-10

    We have previously shown that the μ-opioid receptor (MOR) is capable of mediating cross-desensitization of several chemokine receptors including CCR5, but the biochemical mechanism of this process has not been fully elucidated. We have carried out a series of functional and biochemical studies and found that the mechanism of MOR-induced cross-desensitization of CCR5 involves the activation of PKCζ. Inhibition of PKCζ by its pseudosubstrate inhibitor, or its siRNA, or dominant negative mutants suppresses the cross-desensitization of CCR5. Our results further indicate that the activation of PKCζ is mediated through a pathway involving phosphoinositol-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1). In addition, activation of MOR elevates the phosphorylation level and kinase activity of PKCζ. The phosphorylation of PKCζ can be suppressed by a dominant negative mutant of PDK1. We observed that following MOR activation, the interaction between PKCζ and PDK1 is immediately increased based on the analysis of fluorescent resonance energy transfer in cells with the expression of PKCζ-YFP and PDK1-CFP. In addition, cells expressing PKCζ kinase motif mutants (Lys-281, Thr-410, Thr-560) fail to exhibit full MOR-induced desensitization of CCR5 activity. Taken together, we propose that upon DAMGO treatment, MOR activates PKCζ through a PDK1-dependent signaling pathway to induce CCR5 phosphorylation and desensitization. Because CCR5 is a highly proinflammatory receptor, and a critical coreceptor for HIV-1, these results may provide a novel approach for the development of specific therapeutic agents to treat patients with certain inflammatory diseases or AIDS.

  11. IL-6 Overexpression in ERG-Positive Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by Prostaglandin Receptor EP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Constanze; von Mässenhausen, Anne; Queisser, Angela; Vogel, Wenzel; Andrén, Ove; Kirfel, Jutta; Duensing, Stefan; Perner, Sven; Nowak, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed cancer in men and multiple risk factors and genetic alterations have been described. The TMPRSS2-ERG fusion event and the overexpression of the transcription factor ERG are present in approximately 50% of all prostate cancer patients, however, the clinical outcome is still controversial. Prostate tumors produce various soluble factors, including the pleiotropic cytokine IL-6, regulating cellular processes such as proliferation and metastatic segregation. Here, we used prostatectomy samples in a tissue microarray format and analyzed the co-expression and the clinicopathologic data of ERG and IL-6 using immunohistochemical double staining and correlated the read-out with clinicopathologic data. Expression of ERG and IL-6 correlated strongly in prostate tissue samples. Forced expression of ERG in prostate tumor cell lines resulted in significantly increased secretion of IL-6, whereas the down-regulation of ERG decreased IL-6 secretion. By dissecting the underlying mechanism in prostate tumor cell lines we show the ERG-mediated up-regulation of the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP3. The prostanoid receptor EP2 was overexpressed in human prostate cancer tissue. Furthermore, the proliferation rate and IL-6 secretion in DU145 cells was reduced after treatment with EP2-receptor antagonist. Collectively, our study shows that the expression of ERG in prostate cancer is linked to the expression of IL-6 mediated by the prostanoid receptor EP2.

  12. Evidence that the anorexia induced by lipopolysaccharide is mediated by the 5-HT2C receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Meyenburg, Claudia; Langhans, Wolfgang; Hrupka, Brian J

    2003-01-01

    Rats consistently reduce their food intake following injections of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Because inhibition of serotonergic (5-HT) activity by 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT(1A) activation) attenuates LPS-induced anorexia, we conducted a series of studies to examine whether other 5-HT-receptors are involved in the mediation of peripheral LPS-induced anorexia. In all experiments, rats were injected with LPS (100 microg/kg body weight [BW] ip) at lights out (hour 0). Antagonists were administered peripherally at hour 4, shortly after the onset of anorexia, which presumably follows the enhanced cytokine production after LPS. Food intake was then recorded during the subsequent 2 h or longer. 5-HT receptor antagonists cyanopindolol and SB 224289 (5-HT(1B)), ketanserin (5-HT(2A)), RS-102221 (5-HT(2C)), and metoclopramide (5-HT(3)) failed to attenuate LPS-induced anorexia. In contrast, both ritanserin (5-HT(2A/C)-receptor antagonist) (0.5 mg/kg BW) and SB 242084 (5-HT(2C)) (0.3 mg/kg BW) attenuated LPS-induced anorexia at doses that did not alter food intake in non-LPS-treated rats (all Panorexia following peripheral LPS administration is mediated through an enhanced 5-HT-ergic activity and the 5-HT(2C) receptor.

  13. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  14. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex.

  15. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated transactivation of the EGF receptor produces a neuroprotective effect on cortical neurons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-qiang XIE; Li-min ZHANG; Yan CAO; Jun ZHU; Lin-yin FENG

    2009-01-01

    Aim:To understand the mechanism of the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mediated by the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R).Methods:Primary cultured rat cortical neurons subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and HEK293/A1R cells were treated with the A1R-specific agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA).Phospho-EGFR,Akt,and ERK1/2 were observed by Western blot.An interaction between EGFR and AIR was detected using immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry.Results:The A1R agonist CPA causes protein kinase B (Akt) activation and protects primary cortical neurons from oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) insult.A1R and EGFR co-localize in the membranes of neurons and form an immunocomplex.A1R stimulation induces significant EGFR phosphorylation via a P13K and Src kinase signaling pathway;this stimulation provides a neuroprotective effect in cortical neurons.CPA leads to sustained phosphorylation of extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in cortical neurons,but only to transient phosphorylation in HEK 293/A1R cells.The response to the AtR agonist is mediated primarily through EGFR trans-activation that is dependent on pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G1 protein and metalloproteases in HEK 293/A1R.Conclusion:A1R-mediated EGFR transactivation confers a neuroprotective effect in primary cortical neurons.P13 kinase and Src kinase play pivotal roles in this response.

  16. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  17. Interferon and IL-27 antagonize the function of group 2 innate lymphoid cells and type 2 innate immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Kazuyo; Kabata, Hiroki; Tanabe, Masanobu; Koga, Satoshi; Takeno, Natsuki; Mochizuki, Miho; Fukunaga, Koichi; Asano, Koichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Koyasu, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 cells) are type 2 cytokine-producing cells of the innate immune system with important roles in helminth infection and allergic inflammation. Here we found that tissue-resident ILC2 cells proliferated in situ without migrating during inflammatory responses. Both type I and type II interferons and interleukin 27 (IL-27) suppressed ILC2 function in a manner dependent on the transcription factor STAT1. ILC2-mediated lung inflammation was enhanced in the absence of the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) receptor on ILC2 cells in vivo. IFN-γ effectively suppressed the function of tissue-resident ILC2 cells but not that of inflammatory ILC2 cells, and IL-27 suppressed tissue-resident ILC2 cells but not tissue-resident TH2 cells during lung inflammation induced by Alternaria alternata. Our results demonstrate that suppression mediated by interferon and IL-27 is a negative feedback mechanism for ILC2 function in vivo.

  18. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-08-15

    Immunodeficient hosts exhibit high acceptance of xenogeneic or neoplastic cells mainly due to lack of adaptive immunity, although it still remains to be elucidated how innate response affects the engraftment. IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγc) signaling is required for development of NK cells and a subset of dendritic cells producing IFN-γ. To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc (null) (NOG) hosts. The intravital microscopic imaging of livers in the hosts depleted of NK cells and/or macrophages revealed that IL-2Rγc function critically contributes to elimination of cancer cells without the need for NK cells and macrophages. In the absence of IL-2Rγc, macrophages play a role in the defense against tumors despite the NOD Sirpa allele, which allows human CD47 to bind to the encoded signal regulatory protein α to inhibit macrophage phagocytosis of human cells. Analogous experiments using human pancreas cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells provided f