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Sample records for receptor identification annual

  1. Molecular identification of the first SIFamide receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars M; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    , an impressive sequence conservation (67-77% amino acid sequence identities between the seven-transmembrane areas; 82-87% sequence similarities). The identification of well-conserved SIFamide receptor orthologues in all other insects with a sequenced genome, suggests that the SIFamide/receptor couple must have...... an essential function in arthropods. This paper is the first report on the identification of a SIFamide receptor....

  2. Identification of a receptor for extracellular renalase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    Full Text Available An increased risk for developing essential hypertension, stroke and diabetes is associated with single nucleotide gene polymorphisms in renalase, a newly described secreted flavoprotein with oxidoreductase activity. Gene deletion causes hypertension, and aggravates acute ischemic kidney (AKI and cardiac injury. Independent of its intrinsic enzymatic activities, extracellular renalase activates MAPK signaling and prevents acute kidney injury (AKI in wild type (WT mice. Therefore, we sought to identity the receptor for extracellular renalase.RP-220 is a previously identified, 20 amino acids long renalase peptide that is devoid of any intrinsic enzymatic activity, but it is equally effective as full-length recombinant renalase at protecting against toxic and ischemic injury. Using biotin transfer studies with RP-220 in the human proximal tubular cell line HK-2 and protein identification by mass spectrometry, we identified PMCA4b as a renalase binding protein. This previously characterized plasma membrane ATPase is involved in cell signaling and cardiac hypertrophy. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-immunolocalization confirmed protein-protein interaction between endogenous renalase and PMCA4b. Down-regulation of endogenous PMCA4b expression by siRNA transfection, or inhibition of its enzymatic activity by the specific peptide inhibitor caloxin1b each abrogated RP-220 dependent MAPK signaling and cytoprotection. In control studies, these maneuvers had no effect on epidermal growth factor mediated signaling, confirming specificity of the interaction between PMCA4b and renalase.PMCA4b functions as a renalase receptor, and a key mediator of renalase dependent MAPK signaling.

  3. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectoromics-based identification of cell surface receptors in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Domazakis, Emmanouil; Lin, Xiao; Aguilera-Galvez, Carolina; Wouters, Doret; Bijsterbosch, Gerard; Wolters, Pieter J.; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A.

    2017-01-01

    In modern resistance breeding, effectors have emerged as tools for accelerating and improving the identification of immune receptors. Effector-assisted breeding was pioneered for identifying resistance genes (R genes) against Phytophthora infestans in potato (Solanum tuberosum). Here we show that

  6. Regional issue identification and assessment: study methodology. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    The overall assessment methodologies and models utilized for the first project under the Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA) program are described. Detailed descriptions are given of the methodologies used by lead laboratories for the quantification of the impacts of an energy scenario on one or more media (e.g., air, water, land, human and ecology), and by all laboratories to assess the regional impacts on all media. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by the following national laboratories: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This report contains five chapters. Chapter 1 briefly describes the overall study methodology and introduces the technical participants. Chapter 2 is a summary of the energy policy scenario selected for the RIIA I study and Chapter 3 describes how this scenario was translated into a county-level siting pattern of energy development. The fourth chapter is a detailed description of the individual methodologies used to quantify the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of the scenario while Chapter 5 describes how these impacts were translated into comprehensive regional assessments for each Federal Region.

  7. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  8. Molecular identification of a myosuppressin receptor from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schöller, Susanne; Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2005-01-01

    The insect myosuppressins (X1DVX2HX3FLRFamide) are neuropeptides that generally block insect muscle activities. We have used the genomic sequence information from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae Genome Project to clone a G protein-coupled receptor that was closely related to the two...... previously cloned and characterized myosuppressin receptors from Drosophila [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 100 (2003) 9808]. The mosquito receptor cDNA was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and was found to be activated by low concentrations of Anopheles myosuppressin (TDVDHVFLRFamide; EC50, 1.6 x 10...... identification of a mosquito neuropeptide receptor....

  9. Molecular identification of the insect adipokinetic hormone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staubli, Frank; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    identified the first insect AKH receptors, namely those from the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the silkworm Bombyx mori. These results represent a breakthrough for insect molecular endocrinology, because it will lead to the cloning of all AKH receptors from all model insects used in AKH research, and...

  10. Identification of the receptor scavenging hemopexin-heme complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Maniecki, Maciej B; Jacobsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    and is suggested to facilitate cellular heme metabolism. Using a ligand-affinity approach, we purified the human hemopexin-heme receptor and identified it as the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP)/CD91, a receptor expressed in several cell types including macrophages, hepatocytes, neurons......, and syncytiotrophoblasts. Binding experiments, including Biacore analysis, showed that hemopexin-heme complex formation elicits the high receptor affinity. Uptake studies of radio-labeled hemopexin-heme complex in LRP/CD91-expressing COS cells and confocal microscopy of the cellular processing of fluorescent hemopexin......-heme complexes are removed by a receptor-mediated pathway showing striking similarities to the CD163-mediated haptoglobin-hemoglobin clearance in macrophages. Furthermore, the data indicate a hitherto unknown role of LRP/CD91 in inflammation....

  11. A highly sensitive quantitative cytosensor technique for the identification of receptor ligands in tissue extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenkei, Z; Beaudet, A; Chartrel, N; De Mota, N; Irinopoulou, T; Braun, B; Vaudry, H; Llorens-Cortes, C

    2000-11-01

    Because G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute excellent putative therapeutic targets, functional characterization of orphan GPCRs through identification of their endogenous ligands has great potential for drug discovery. We propose here a novel single cell-based assay for identification of these ligands. This assay involves (a) fluorescent tagging of the GPCR, (b) expression of the tagged receptor in a heterologous expression system, (c) incubation of the transfected cells with fractions purified from tissue extracts, and (d) imaging of ligand-induced receptor internalization by confocal microscopy coupled to digital image quantification. We tested this approach in CHO cells stably expressing the NT1 neurotensin receptor fused to EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein), in which neurotensin promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor in a dose-dependent fashion (EC(50) = 0.98 nM). Similarly, four of 120 consecutive reversed-phase HPLC fractions of frog brain extracts promoted internalization of the NT1-EGFP receptor. The same four fractions selectively contained neurotensin, an endogenous ligand of the NT1 receptor, as detected by radioimmunoassay and inositol phosphate production. The present internalization assay provides a highly specific quantitative cytosensor technique with sensitivity in the nanomolar range that should prove useful for the identification of putative natural and synthetic ligands for GPCRs.

  12. Identification of an estrogenic hormone receptor in Caenorhabditis elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimoto, Ai; Fujii, Madoka; Usami, Makoto; Shimamura, Maki; Hirabayashi, Naoko; Kaneko, Takako; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-01-01

    Changes in both behavior and gene expression occur in Caenorhabditis elegans following exposure to sex hormones such as estrogen and progesterone, and to bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine-disrupting compound. However, only one steroid hormone receptor has been identified. Of the 284 known nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) in C. elegans, we selected nhr-14, nhr-69, and nhr-121 for analysis as potential estrogenic hormone receptors, because they share sequence similarity with the human estrogen receptor. First, the genes were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and then the affinity of each protein for estrogen was determined using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. All three NHRs bound estrogen in a dose-dependent fashion. To evaluate the specificity of the binding, we performed a solution competition assay using an SPR biosensor. According to our results, only NHR-14 was able to interact with estrogen. Therefore, we next examined whether nhr-14 regulates estrogen signaling in vivo. To investigate whether these interactions actually control the response of C. elegans to hormones, we investigated the expression of vitellogenin, an estrogen responsive gene, in an nhr-14 mutant. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed that vitellogenin expression was significantly reduced in the mutant. This suggests that NHR-14 is a C. elegans estrogenic hormone receptor and that it controls gene expression in response to estrogen

  13. Identification of functional VEGF receptors on human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selheim, Frode; Holmsen, Holm; Vassbotn, Flemming S

    2002-02-13

    Platelets secrete platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon stimulation. We have demonstrated that platelets have functionally active PDGF alpha-receptors, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase involved in negative feedback regulation. Here we demonstrate the presence of the related VEGF receptors fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and kinase-insert domain region on human platelets. VEGF itself did not cause platelet aggregation. However, addition of exogenous VEGF to SFRLLN or thrombin-stimulated platelets potentiated platelet aggregation. Moreover, thrombin-induced phosphoinositide 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity were enhanced in the presence of VEGF.

  14. Identification of potent, nonabsorbable agonists of the calcium-sensing receptor for GI-specific administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Steven M; Spearing, Paul K; Diaz, Caroline J; Cowan, David J; Jayawickreme, Channa; Chen, Grace; Rimele, Thomas J; Generaux, Claudia; Harston, Lindsey T; Roller, Shane G

    2017-10-15

    Modulation of gastrointestinal nutrient sensing pathways provides a promising a new approach for the treatment of metabolic diseases including diabetes and obesity. The calcium-sensing receptor has been identified as a key receptor involved in mineral and amino acid nutrient sensing and thus is an attractive target for modulation in the intestine. Herein we describe the optimization of gastrointestinally restricted calcium-sensing receptor agonists starting from a 3-aminopyrrolidine-containing template leading to the identification of GI-restricted agonist 19 (GSK3004774). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of agonists for a group of human odorant receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela eGonzalez-Kristeller

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Olfaction plays a critical role in several aspects of the human life. Odorants are detected by hundreds of odorant receptors (ORs which belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are expressed in the olfactory sensory neurons of the nose. The information provided by the activation of different combinations of ORs in the nose is transmitted to the brain, leading to odorant perception and emotional and behavioral responses. There are ~400 intact human ORs, and to date only a small percentage of these receptors (~10% have known agonists. The determination of the specificity of the human ORs will contribute to a better understanding of how odorants are discriminated by the olfactory system. In this work, we aimed to identify human specific ORs, that is, ORs that are present in humans but absent from other species, and their corresponding agonists. To do this, we first selected 22 OR gene sequences from the human genome with no counterparts in the mouse, rat or dog genomes. Then we used a heterologous expression system to screen a subset of these human ORs against a panel of odorants of biological relevance, including foodborne aroma volatiles. We found that different types of odorants are able to activate some of these previously uncharacterized human ORs.

  16. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R.

    2010-01-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action. PMID:20457145

  17. Identification of rat brain opioid (enkephalin) receptor by photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeung, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    A photoreactive, radioactive enkephalin derivative was prepared and purified by high performance liquid chromatography. Rat brain and spinal cord plasma membranes were incubated with this radioiodinated photoprobe and were subsequently photolysed. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of the solubilized and reduced membranes showed that a protein having an apparent molecular weight of 46,000 daltons was specifically labeled, suggesting that this protein may be the opioid (enkephalin) receptor

  18. Human platelet vasopressin receptor identification by direct ultraviolet photoaffinity labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thibonnier, M.

    1987-01-01

    Tritiated vasopressin ([ 3 H]AVP) was directly crosslinked to its human platelet receptor by using an ultraviolet irradiation procedure. After preincubation with [ 3 H]AVP, the hydrodynamic parameters of the hormone-receptor complexes solubilized with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propane sulfonate were derived from Sephacryl S-300 superfine gel filtration and from sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation experiments. The following values were obtained: Stoke's radius = 5.48 +/- 0.1 nm, apparent sedimentation coefficient = 5.55 +/- 0.1 S, and calculated molecular weight = 132,000. On sodium dodecyl sulfate-8% polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions, [ 3 H]AVP preferentially and specifically labeled a 125,000-dalton protein. The labeling of this protein was suppressed by addition of excess cold vasopressin, whereas angiotensin II did not inhibit incorporation of tritiated vasopressin in this protein. These results suggest that direct UV-photoaffinity labelling with [ 3 H]AVP is a suitable tool for the purification of the human platelet vasopressin receptor

  19. Identification of steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites within the glucocorticoid receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.I.

    1989-01-01

    The primary goal of these studies was to localize the steroid-binding and phosphorylated sites of the glucocorticoid receptor. The synthetic steroid, dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) forms a covalent thioether bond via the sulfhydryl group of a cysteine residue in the receptor. To determine the covalent site of attachment of this ligand, receptors in WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells were labeled with [ 3 H]DM and purified with a monoclonal antibody. The receptor was completely digested with trypsin and a single peptide covalently labeled with steroid identified by reversed-phase HPLC. This peptide was analyzed by automated Edman degradation to determine the location of the steroid-labeled residue. A similar analysis was performed on an overlapping peptide produced by Staphylococcus aureus protease digestion. Analysis of tryptic peptides from receptors labeled with both [ 3 H]DM and L-[ 35 S]methionine indicated that this peptide contained methionine. These analyses, coupled with the published amino acid sequence of the receptor, identified Cysteine-644 in the steroid-binding domain of the mouse glucocorticoid receptor as the residue involved in covalent steroid-binding. A synthetic peptide representing amino acids 640-650 of the mouse receptor was prepared and analyzed to confirm the identification. These biochemical studies represent a direct demonstration of an amino acid important in receptor function. It has been proposed that the receptor functions through a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle to explain the dependence of hormone binding capacity upon cellular ATP. The glucocorticoid receptor has been shown to be a phosphoprotein. As an initial step to identifying a role of phosphorylation in receptor action, phosphorylated sites within the functional domains of the protein were identified

  20. Identification of Molecular Receptors for Therapeutic Targeting in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    proteins linking integrin and tyrosine kinase receptors to the c-Jun N-terminal kinase /stress-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. J Biol Chem...of its SH domains. First, they contain important protein-protein interaction modules; and secondly they are non-catalytic regulators of kinase ...transcriptional reporter assay the SH2 , the N-terminal SH3 (SH3-N) and the C-terminal SH3 (SH3-C) domains of CRKL. We found that all three SH domains were

  1. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  2. Identification of receptors of main sex-pheromone components of three Lepidopteran species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Murai, Masatoshi; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Kugimiya, Soichi; Ozawa, Rika; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Takabayashi, Junji; Miyoshi, Hideto; Nishioka, Takaaki

    2008-09-01

    Male moths discriminate conspecific female-emitted sex pheromones. Although the chemical components of sex pheromones have been identified in more than 500 moth species, only three components in Bombyx mori and Heliothis virescens have had their receptors identified. Here we report the identification of receptors for the main sex-pheromone components in three moth species, Plutella xylostella, Mythimna separata and Diaphania indica. We cloned putative sex-pheromone receptor genes PxOR1, MsOR1 and DiOR1 from P. xylostella, M. separata and D. indica, respectively. Each of the three genes was exclusively expressed with an Or83b orthologous gene in male olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) that are surrounded by supporting cells expressing pheromone-binding-protein (PBP) genes. By two-electrode voltage-clamp recording, we tested the ligand specificity of Xenopus oocytes co-expressing PxOR1, MsOR1 or DiOR1 with an OR83b family protein. Among the seven sex-pheromone components of the three moth species, the oocytes dose-dependently responded only to the main sex-pheromone component of the corresponding moth species. In our study, PBPs were not essential for ligand specificity of the receptors. On the phylogenetic tree of insect olfactory receptors, the six sex-pheromone receptors identified in the present and previous studies are grouped in the same subfamily but have no relation with the taxonomy of moths. It is most likely that sex-pheromone receptors have randomly evolved from ancestral sex-pheromone receptors before the speciation of moths and that their ligand specificity was modified by mutations of local amino acid sequences after speciation.

  3. Identification of chemosensory receptor genes in Manduca sexta and knockdown by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howlett Natalie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects detect environmental chemicals via a large and rapidly evolving family of chemosensory receptor proteins. Although our understanding of the molecular genetic basis for Drosophila chemoreception has increased enormously in the last decade, similar understanding in other insects remains limited. The tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, has long been an important model for insect chemosensation, particularly from ecological, behavioral, and physiological standpoints. It is also a major agricultural pest on solanaceous crops. However, little sequence information and lack of genetic tools has prevented molecular genetic analysis in this species. The ability to connect molecular genetic mechanisms, including potential lineage-specific changes in chemosensory genes, to ecologically relevant behaviors and specializations in M. sexta would be greatly beneficial. Results Here, we sequenced transcriptomes from adult and larval chemosensory tissues and identified chemosensory genes based on sequence homology. We also used dsRNA feeding as a method to induce RNA interference in larval chemosensory tissues. Conclusions We report identification of new chemosensory receptor genes including 17 novel odorant receptors and one novel gustatory receptor. Further, we demonstrate that systemic RNA interference can be used in larval olfactory neurons to reduce expression of chemosensory receptor transcripts. Together, our results further the development of M. sexta as a model for functional analysis of insect chemosensation.

  4. Identification of the hemoglobin scavenger receptor/CD163 as a natural soluble protein in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Holger Jon; Peterslund, Niels Anker; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov

    2002-01-01

    enabled identification of a soluble plasma form of HbSR (sHbSR) having an electrophoretic mobility equal to that of recombinant HbSR consisting of the extracellular domain (scavenger receptor cysteine-rich 1-9). A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was established and used to measure the s...... a level of sHbSR above the range of healthy persons. Patients with myelomonocytic leukemias and pneumonia/sepsis exhibited the highest levels (up to 67.3 mg/L). In conclusion, sHbSR is an abundant plasma protein potentially valuable in monitoring patients with infections and myelomonocytic leukemia....

  5. Genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha-binding sites in mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Hui; Fält, Susann; Sandelin, Albin

    2007-01-01

    We report the genome-wide identification of estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha)-binding regions in mouse liver using a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation and tiled microarrays that cover all nonrepetitive sequences in the mouse genome. This analysis identified 5568 ERalpha-binding regions...... genes. The majority of ERalpha-binding regions lie in regions that are evolutionarily conserved between human and mouse. Motif-finding algorithms identified the estrogen response element, and variants thereof, together with binding sites for activator protein 1, basic-helix-loop-helix proteins, ETS...... signaling in mouse liver, by characterizing the first step in this signaling cascade, the binding of ERalpha to DNA in intact chromatin....

  6. Identification of a murine cysteinyl leukotriene receptor by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jens; Jørgensen, Sune T.; Hougaard, Charlotte

    2001-01-01

    We report the identification of an EST encoding a murine cysteinyl leukotriene (mCysLT) receptor. LTD4, LTC4 and LTE4 but not LTB4 or various nucleotides activated Ca2+-evoked Cl- currents in mCysLT1 expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. The response to LTD4 was blocked by MK-571, reduced by pretrea...... by pretreatment with pertussis toxin (PTX), and was partly dependent on extracellular Ca2+. The identified murine CysLT1 receptor differs from the hCysLT1 receptor with regard to PTX sensitivity, receptor-mediated Ca2+ influx, and antagonist sensitivity....

  7. Identification of a tetramerization domain in the C terminus of the vanilloid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sanz, Nuria; Fernández-Carvajal, Asia; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Planells-Cases, Rosa; Fajardo-Sánchez, Emmanuel; Fernández-Ballester, Gregorio; Ferrer-Montiel, Antonio

    2004-06-09

    TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype 1) is a member of the TRP channel family gated by vanilloids, protons, and heat. Structurally, TRPV1 appears to be a tetramer formed by the assembly of four identical subunits around a central aqueous pore. The molecular determinants that govern its subunit oligomerization remain elusive. Here, we report the identification of a segment comprising 684Glu-721Arg (referred to as the TRP-like domain) in the C terminus of TRPV1 as an association domain (AD) of the protein. Purified recombinant C terminus of TRPV1 (TRPV1-C) formed discrete and stable multimers in vitro. Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays showed that self-association of the TRPV1-C is blocked when segment 684Glu-721Arg is deleted. Biochemical and immunological analysis indicate that removal of the AD from full-length TRPV1 monomers blocks the formation of stable heteromeric assemblies with wild-type TRPV1 subunits. Deletion of the AD in a poreless TRPV1 subunit suppressed its robust dominant-negative phenotype. Together, these findings are consistent with the tenet that the TRP-like domain in TRPV1 is a molecular determinant of the tetramerization of receptor subunits into functional channels. Our observations suggest that the homologous TRP domain in the TRP protein family may function as a general, evolutionary conserved AD involved in subunit multimerization.

  8. Identification and characterization of small molecule modulators of the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessier, Francois; Preuss, Inga; Yin, Hong

    2014-01-01

    immune response and has been genetically linked to autoimmune diseases such as type I diabetes ( Nature 2010 , 467 , 460 ). Here we describe the isolation of a potent small molecule antagonist for the EBI2 receptor. First, we identified a small molecule agonist NIBR51 (1), which enabled identification...

  9. Three-Step Test System for the Identification of Novel GABAA Receptor Modulating Food Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Sümeyye; Eulenburg, Volker; Kreis, Wolfgang; Villmann, Carmen; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2016-12-01

    Potentiation of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-induced GABA A receptor (GABA A R) activation is a common pathway to achieve sedative, sleep-enhancing, anxiolytic, and antidepressant effects. Presently, a three-component test system was established for the identification of novel GABA A R modulating food plants. In the first step, potentiation of GABA-induced response of the GABA A R was analysed by two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) for activity on human α1β2-GABA A R expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Positively tested food plants were then subjected to quantification of GABA content by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) to exclude test foods, which evoke a TEVC-response by endogenous GABA. In the third step, specificity of GABA A -modulating activity was assessed by TEVC analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing the homologous glycine receptor (GlyR). The three-component test was then applied to screen 10 aqueous extracts of food plants for their GABA A R activity. Thus, hop cones (Humulus lupulus) and Sideritis sipylea were identified as the most potent specific GABA A R modulators eliciting significant potentiation of the current by 182 ± 27 and 172 ± 19 %, respectively, at the lowest concentration of 0.5 μg/mL. The extracts can now be further evaluated by in vivo studies and by structural evaluation of the active components.

  10. Identification of Human P2X1 Receptor-interacting Proteins Reveals a Role of the Cytoskeleton in Receptor Regulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalo, Ulyana; Roberts, Jonathan A.; Evans, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    P2X1 receptors are ATP-gated ion channels expressed by smooth muscle and blood cells. Carboxyl-terminally His-FLAG-tagged human P2X1 receptors were stably expressed in HEK293 cells and co-purified with cytoskeletal proteins including actin. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D inhibited P2X1 receptor currents with no effect on the time course of the response or surface expression of the receptor. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide had no effect on P2X1 receptor currents but decreased receptor mobility. P2X2 receptor currents were unaffected by cytochalasin, and P2X1/2 receptor chimeras were used to identify the molecular basis of actin sensitivity. These studies showed that the intracellular amino terminus accounts for the inhibitory effects of cytoskeletal disruption similar to that shown for lipid raft/cholesterol sensitivity. Stabilization of the cytoskeleton with jasplakinolide abolished the inhibitory effects of cholesterol depletion on P2X1 receptor currents, suggesting that lipid rafts may regulate the receptor through stabilization of the cytoskeleton. These studies show that the cytoskeleton plays an important role in P2X1 receptor regulation. PMID:21757694

  11. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  12. Human myometrial adrenergic receptors during pregnancy: identification of the alpha-adrenergic receptor by [3H] dihydroergocryptine binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, M.M.; Hayashida, D.; Roberts, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive alpha-adrenergic antagonist [ 3 H] dihydroergocryptine binds to particulate preparations of term pregnant human myometrium in a manner compatible with binding to the alpha-adrenergic receptor (alpha-receptor). [ 3 H] Dihydroergocryptine binds with high affinity (KD = 2 nmol/L and low capacity (receptor concentration = 100 fmol/mg of protein). Adrenergic agonists compete for [ 3 H] dihydroergocryptine binding sites stereo-selectively ([-]-norepinephrine is 100 times as potent as [+]-norepinephrine) and in a manner compatible with alpha-adrenergic potencies (epinephrine approximately equal to norepinephrine much greater than isoproterenol). Studies in which prazosin, an alpha 1-antagonist, and yohimbine, and alpha 2-antagonist, competed for [ 3 H] dihydroergocryptine binding sites in human myometrium indicated that approximately 70% are alpha 2-receptors and that 30% are alpha 1-receptors. [ 3 H] dihydroergocryptine binding to human myometrial membrane particulate provides an important tool with which to study the molecular mechanisms of uterine alpha-adrenergic response

  13. Identification of Complete Repertoire of Apis florea Odorant Receptors Reveals Complex Orthologous Relationships with Apis mellifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpe, Snehal D.; Jain, Rikesh; Brockmann, Axel; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We developed a computational pipeline for homology based identification of the complete repertoire of olfactory receptor (OR) genes in the Asian honey bee species, Apis florea. Apis florea is phylogenetically the most basal honey bee species and also the most distant sister species to the Western honey bee Apis mellifera, for which all OR genes had been identified before. Using our pipeline, we identified 180 OR genes in A. florea, which is very similar to the number of ORs identified in A. mellifera (177 ORs). Many characteristics of the ORs including gene structure, synteny of tandemly repeated ORs and basic phylogenetic clustering are highly conserved. The composite phylogenetic tree of A. florea and A. mellifera ORs could be divided into 21 clades which are in harmony with the existing Hymenopteran tree. However, we found a few nonorthologous OR relationships between both species as well as independent pseudogenization of ORs suggesting separate evolutionary changes. Particularly, a subgroup of the OR gene clade XI, which had been hypothesized to code cuticular hydrocarbon receptors showed a high number of species-specific ORs. RNAseq analysis detected a total number of 145 OR transcripts in male and 162 in female antennae. Most of the OR genes were highly expressed on the female antennae. However, we detected five distinct male-biased OR genes, out of which three genes (AfOr11, AfOr18, AfOr170P) were shown to be male-biased in A. mellifera, too, thus corroborating a behavioral function in sex-pheromone communication. PMID:27540087

  14. Identification of chimeric antigen receptors that mediate constitutive or inducible proliferation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Basil, Maria Ciocca; Carpenito, Carmine; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Scholler, John; Kawalekar, Omkar U; Guedan, Sonia; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Ang, Sonny; Cooper, Laurence J N; Platt, Jesse M; Johnson, F Brad; Paulos, Chrystal M; Zhao, Yangbing; Kalos, Michael; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2015-04-01

    This study compared second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) encoding signaling domains composed of CD28, ICOS, and 4-1BB (TNFRSF9). Here, we report that certain CARs endow T cells with the ability to undergo long-term autonomous proliferation. Transduction of primary human T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding some of the CARs resulted in sustained proliferation for up to 3 months following a single stimulation through the T-cell receptor (TCR). Sustained numeric expansion was independent of cognate antigen and did not require the addition of exogenous cytokines or feeder cells after a single stimulation of the TCR and CD28. Results from gene array and functional assays linked sustained cytokine secretion and expression of T-bet (TBX21), EOMES, and GATA-3 to the effect. Sustained expression of the endogenous IL2 locus has not been reported in primary T cells. Sustained proliferation was dependent on CAR structure and high expression, the latter of which was necessary but not sufficient. The mechanism involves constitutive signaling through NF-κB, AKT, ERK, and NFAT. The propagated CAR T cells retained a diverse TCR repertoire, and cellular transformation was not observed. The CARs with a constitutive growth phenotype displayed inferior antitumor effects and engraftment in vivo. Therefore, the design of CARs that have a nonconstitutive growth phenotype may be a strategy to improve efficacy and engraftment of CAR T cells. The identification of CARs that confer constitutive or nonconstitutive growth patterns may explain observations that CAR T cells have differential survival patterns in clinical trials. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Genome-based identification and analysis of ionotropic receptors in Spodoptera litura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jia-Ying; Xu, Zhi-Wen; Zhang, Xin-Min; Liu, Nai-Yong

    2018-06-01

    The ability to sense and recognize various classes of compounds is of particular importance for survival and reproduction of insects. Ionotropic receptor (IR), a sub-family of the ionotropic glutamate receptor family, has been identified as one of crucial chemoreceptor super-families, which mediates the sensing of odors and/or tastants, and serves as non-chemosensory functions. Yet, little is known about IR characteristics, evolution, and functions in Lepidoptera. Here, we identify the IR gene repertoire from a destructive polyphagous pest, Spodoptera litura. The exhaustive analyses with genome and transcriptome data lead to the identification of 45 IR genes, comprising 17 antennal IRs (A-IRs), 8 Lepidoptera-specific IRs (LS-IRs), and 20 divergent IRs (D-IRs). Phylogenetic analysis reveals that S. litura A-IRs generally retain a strict single copy within each orthologous group, and two lineage expansions are observed in the D-IR sub-family including IR100d-h and 100i-o, likely attributed to gene duplications. Results of gene structure analysis classify the SlitIRs into four types: I (intronless), II (1-3 introns), III (5-9 introns), and IV (10-18 introns). Extensive expression profiles demonstrate that the majority of SlitIRs (28/43) are enriched in adult antennae, and some are detected in gustatory-associated tissues like proboscises and legs as well as non-chemosensory organs like abdomens and reproductive tissues of both sexes. These results indicate that SlitIRs have diverse functional roles in olfaction, taste, and reproduction. Together, our study has complemented the information on chemoreceptor genes in S. litura, and meanwhile allows for target experiments to identify potential IR candidates for the control of this pest.

  16. Identification of an Activating Chicken Ig-like Receptor Recognizing Avian Influenza Viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Christine A; van Haarlem, Daphne A; Sperling, Beatrice; van Kooten, Peter J; de Vries, Erik; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Vervelde, Lonneke; Göbel, Thomas W

    2016-01-01

    Chicken Ig-like receptors (CHIRs) represent a multigene family encoded by the leukocyte receptor complex that encodes a variety of receptors that are subdivided into activating CHIR-A, inhibitory CHIR-B, and bifunctional CHIR-AB. Apart from CHIR-AB, which functions as an Fc receptor, CHIR ligands

  17. Identification and Characterization of Pheromone Receptors and Interplay between Receptors and Pheromone Binding Proteins in the Diamondback Moth, Plutella xyllostella

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Mengjing; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Lin, Kejian; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Zhou, Jingjiang; Wang, Guirong

    2013-01-01

    Moths depend on olfactory cues such as sex pheromones to find and recognize mating partners. Pheromone receptors (PRs) and Pheromone binding proteins (PBPs) are thought to be associated with olfactory signal transduction of pheromonal compounds in peripheral olfactory reception. Here six candidate pheromone receptor genes in the diamondback moth, Plutella xyllostella were identified and cloned. All of the six candidate PR genes display male-biased expression, which is a typical characteristic...

  18. Ghrelin receptor inverse agonists: identification of an active peptide core and its interaction epitopes on the receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Lang, Manja; Brandt, Erik

    2006-01-01

    [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]Substance P functions as a low-potency antagonist but a high-potency full inverse agonist on the ghrelin receptor. Through a systematic deletion and substitution analysis of this peptide, the C-terminal carboxyamidated pentapeptide wFwLX was identified as the core...... structure, which itself displayed relatively low inverse agonist potency. Mutational analysis at 17 selected positions in the main ligand-binding crevice of the ghrelin receptor demonstrated that ghrelin apparently interacts only with residues in the middle part of the pocket [i.e., between transmembrane...... upon both AspII:20 and GluIII:09. The identified pharmacophore can possibly serve as the basis for targeted discovery of also nonpeptide inverse agonists for the ghrelin receptor....

  19. Identification of novel peptide ligands for the cancer-specific receptor mutation EFGRvIII using a mixture-based synthetic combinatorial library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denholt, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2009-01-01

    We report here, the design and synthesis of a positional scanning synthetic combinatorial library for the identification of novel peptide ligands targeted against the cancer-specific epidermal growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor mutation variant III (EGFRvIII). This receptor is expressed in se...

  20. Identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences. Annual performance report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, C.A.

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this project is the development of practical software to automate the identification of genes in anonymous DNA sequences from the human, and other higher eukaryotic genomes. A software system for automated sequence analysis, gm (gene modeler) has been designed, implemented, tested, and distributed to several dozen laboratories worldwide. A significantly faster, more robust, and more flexible version of this software, gm 2.0 has now been completed, and is being tested by operational use to analyze human cosmid sequence data. A range of efforts to further understand the features of eukaryoyic gene sequences are also underway. This progress report also contains papers coming out of the project including the following: gm: a Tool for Exploratory Analysis of DNA Sequence Data; The Human THE-LTR(O) and MstII Interspersed Repeats are subfamilies of a single widely distruted highly variable repeat family; Information contents and dinucleotide compostions of plant intron sequences vary with evolutionary origin; Splicing signals in Drosophila: intron size, information content, and consensus sequences; Integration of automated sequence analysis into mapping and sequencing projects; Software for the C. elegans genome project.

  1. Human myometrial adrenergic receptors: identification of the beta-adrenergic receptor by [3H]dihydroalprenolol binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, D.N.; Leung, R.; Goldfien, A.; Roberts, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    The radioactive beta-adrenergic antagonist [ 3 H] dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binds to particulate preparations of human myometrium in a manner compatible with binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor. The binding of DHA is rapid (attaining equilibrium in 12 minutes), readily reversible (half time = 16 minutes), high affinity (K/sub D/ = 0.50 nM), low capacity (Bmax = 70 fmoles/mg of protein), and stereoselective ([-]-propranolol is 100 times as potent as [+] -propranolol in inhibiting DHA binding). Adrenergic agonists competed for DHA binding sites in a manner compatible with beta-adrenergic interactions and mirrored β 2 pharmacologic potencies: isoproterenol > epinephrine >> norepinephrine. Studies in which zinterol, a β 2 -adrenergic agonist, competed for DHA binding sites in human myometrial particulate indicated that at least 87% of the beta-adrenergic receptors present are β 2 -adrenergic receptors. Binding of DHA to human myometrial beta-adrenergic receptors provides a tool which may be used in the examination of gonadal hormonal modification of adrenergic response in human uterus as well as in the analysis of beta-adrenergic agents as potentially useful tocolytic agents

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel outer membrane protein receptor required for hemin utilization in Vibrio vulnificus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, the cause of septicemia and serious wound infection in humans and fishes, require iron for its pathogenesis. Hemin uptake through the outer membrane receptor, HupA, is one of its many mechanisms by which it acquires iron. We report here the identification of an additional TonB-dependent hemin receptor HvtA, that is needed in conjunction with the HupA protein for optimal hemin utilization. The HvtA protein is significantly homologous to other outer membrane hemin receptors and its expression in trans restored the uptake of hemin and hemoglobin, the latter to a weaker extent, in a mutant strain that was defective in both receptors. Quantitative RT-PCR suggested that transcription of the hvtA gene was iron regulated. The operon containing the hvtA gene is homologous to the operon in V. cholerae containing the hemin receptor gene hutR suggesting a vertical transmission of the hvtA cluster from V. cholerae to V. vulnificus. PMID:22015545

  3. Molecular identification of a Drosophila G protein-coupled receptor specific for crustacean cardioactive peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Hauser, Frank; Kobberup, Sune

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila Genome Project website (www.flybase.org) contains the sequence of an annotated gene (CG6111) expected to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We have cloned this receptor and found that its gene was not correctly predicted, because an annotated neighbouring gene (CG14547) was also...... part of the receptor gene. DNA corresponding to the corrected gene CG6111 was expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, where it was found to code for a receptor that could be activated by low concentrations of crustacean cardioactive peptide, which is a neuropeptide also known to occur in Drosophila...... and other insects (EC(50), 5.4 x 10(-10)M). Other known Drosophila neuropeptides, such as adipokinetic hormone, did not activate the receptor. The receptor is expressed in all developmental stages from Drosophila, but only very weakly in larvae. In adult flies, the receptor is mainly expressed in the head...

  4. Identification of novel selective V2 receptor non-peptide agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tredici, Andria L; Vanover, Kim E; Knapp, Anne E; Bertozzi, Sine M; Nash, Norman R; Burstein, Ethan S; Lameh, Jelveh; Currier, Erika A; Davis, Robert E; Brann, Mark R; Mohell, Nina; Olsson, Roger; Piu, Fabrice

    2008-10-30

    Peptides with agonist activity at the vasopressin V(2) receptor are used clinically to treat fluid homeostasis disorders such as polyuria and central diabetes insipidus. Of these peptides, the most commonly used is desmopressin, which displays poor bioavailability as well as potent activity at the V(1b) receptor, with possible stress-related adverse effects. Thus, there is a strong need for the development of small molecule chemistries with selective V(2) receptor agonist activity. Using the functional cell-based assay Receptor Selection and Amplification Technology (R-SAT((R))), a screening effort identified three small molecule chemotypes (AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484) with selective agonist activity at the V(2) receptor. One of these compounds, AC-94544, displayed over 180-fold selectivity at the V(2) receptor compared to related vasopressin and oxytocin receptors and no activity at 28 other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). All three compounds also showed partial agonist activity at the V(2) receptor in a cAMP accumulation assay. In addition, in a rat model of central diabetes insipidus, AC-94544 was able to significantly reduce urine output in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AC-94544, AC-88324, and AC-110484 represent novel opportunities for the treatment of disorders associated with V(2) receptor agonist deficiency.

  5. Identification of one capa and two pyrokinin receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stine S; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2007-01-01

    a considerable crosstalk between the capa, pyrokinin-1 and pyrokinin-2 systems. Gene structure and phylogenetic tree analyses showed that Ang-Capa-R was the orthologue of the Drosophila capa receptor CG14575, Ang-PK-1-R the orthologue of the Drosophila pyrokinin-1 receptor CG9918, and Ang-PK-2-R the orthologue...

  6. Identification of the Drosophila and Tribolium receptors for the recently discovered insect RYamide neuropeptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collin, Caitlin; Hauser, Frank; Krogh-Meyer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    are quite specific for activation by insect RYamides, and that the sequence FFXXXRYamide is needed for effective insect RYamide receptor activation. Phylogenetic tree analyses and other amino acid sequence comparisons show that the insect RYamide receptors are not closely related to any other known insect...

  7. Bioassay directed identification of natural aryl hydrocarbon-receptor agonists in marmalade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ede, van K.I.; Li, A.; Antunes Fernandes, E.C.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Peijnenburg, A.A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus fruit and citrus fruit products, like grapefruit, lemon and marmalade were shown to contain aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists, as detected with the DR CALUX® bioassay. This is of interest regarding the role of the Ah-receptor pathway in the adverse effects of dioxins, PCBs and other

  8. Immunoautoradiographic analysis of epidermal growth factor receptors: a sensitive method for the in situ identification of receptor proteins and for studying receptor specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Pol, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The use of an immunoautoradiographic system for the detection and analysis of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors in human epidermoid carcinoma A-431 cells is reported. By utilizing this technique, the interaction between EGF and its membrane receptor in A-431 cells can be rapidly visualized. The procedure is simple, rapid, and very sensitive, and it provides conclusive evidence that the 150K dalton protein is the receptor fo EGF in A-431 cells. In summary, the immunoautoradiographic procedure brings to the analysis of hormone rceptor proteins the power that the radioimmunoassay technique has brought to the analysis of hormones. Thus, this assay system is potentially applicable in a wide spectrum in many fields of nuclear medicine and biology

  9. Identification of four Drosophila allatostatins as the cognate ligands for the Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Hansen, G N

    2001-01-01

    The allatostatins are generally inhibitory insect neuropeptides. The Drosophila orphan receptor DAR-2 is a G-protein-coupled receptor, having 47% amino acid residue identity with another Drosophila receptor, DAR-1 (which is also called dros. GPCR, or DGR) that was previously shown...... to be the receptor for an intrinsic Drosophila A-type (cockroach-type) allatostatin. Here, we have permanently expressed DAR-2 in CHO cells and found that it is the cognate receptor for four Drosophila A-type allatostatins, the drostatins-A1 to -A4. Of all the drostatins, drostatin-A4 (Thr...... weakly in the brain. The Drosophila larval gut also contains about 20-30 endocrine cells, expressing the gene for the drostatins-A1 to -A4. We suggest, therefore, that DAR-2 mediates an allatostatin (drostatin)-induced inhibition of gut motility. This is the first report on the permanent and functional...

  10. Identification of a second putative receptor of platelet activating factor on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Due to multiple molecular species of platelet activating factor (PAF) and the existence of high affinity binding sites in a variety of cells and tissues, possible existence of PAF receptor subtypes has been suggested. This report shows differences between specific PAF receptors on human leukocytes and platelets. Human PMN leukocyte membranes showed high affinity binding sites for PAF with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 4.7 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -10 M. The maximal number (B/sub max/) of receptor sites was estimated to be 3.13 (+/- 1.4) x 10 -13 mol/mg protein. They compared the relative potencies of several PAF agonists and receptor antagonists between human platelet and human leukocyte membranes. One antagonist (Ono-6240) was found to be 8 times less potent at inhibiting the [ 3 H]PAF specific receptor binding to human leukocytes than to human platelets. Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ and K + ions potentiated the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding in both systems. Na + ions inhibited the [ 3 H]PAF specific binding to human platelets but showed no effects in human leukocytes. K + ions decreased the Mg 2+ -potentiated [ 3 H]PAF binding in human leukocytes but showed no effects in human platelets. These results suggest that the PAF specific receptors in human leukocytes are different structurally and possibly functionally from the receptors identified in human platelets

  11. Identification of a Novel Recycling Sequence in the C-tail of FPR2/ALX Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dawn; McArthur, Simon; Hislop, James N.; Flower, Roderick J.; Perretti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Formyl-peptide receptor type 2 (FPR2; also called ALX because it is the receptor for lipoxin A4) sustains a variety of biological responses relevant to the development and control of inflammation, yet the cellular regulation of this G-protein-coupled receptor remains unexplored. Here we report that, in response to peptide agonist activation, FPR2/ALX undergoes β-arrestin-mediated endocytosis followed by rapid recycling to the plasma membrane. We identify a transplantable recycling sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for efficient receptor recycling. Furthermore, removal of this C-terminal recycling sequence alters the endocytic fate of FPR2/ALX and evokes pro-apoptotic effects in response to agonist activation. This study demonstrates the importance of endocytic recycling in the anti-apoptotic properties of FPR2/ALX and identifies the molecular determinant required for modulation of this process fundamental for the control of inflammation. PMID:25326384

  12. Identification of neurons that express ghrelin receptors in autonomic pathways originating from the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furness, John B; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Hunne, Billie; Hirayama, Haruko; Callaghan, Brid P; Lomax, Alan E; Brock, James A

    2012-06-01

    Functional studies have shown that subsets of autonomic preganglionic neurons respond to ghrelin and ghrelin mimetics and in situ hybridisation has revealed receptor gene expression in the cell bodies of some preganglionic neurons. Our present goal has been to determine which preganglionic neurons express ghrelin receptors by using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter for the ghrelin receptor (also called growth hormone secretagogue receptor). The retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected into target organs of reporter mice under anaesthesia to identify specific functional subsets of postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Cryo-sections were immunohistochemically stained by using anti-EGFP and antibodies to neuronal markers. EGFP was detected in nerve terminal varicosities in all sympathetic chain, prevertebral and pelvic ganglia and in the adrenal medulla. Non-varicose fibres associated with the ganglia were also immunoreactive. No postganglionic cell bodies contained EGFP. In sympathetic chain ganglia, most neurons were surrounded by EGFP-positive terminals. In the stellate ganglion, neurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, some being sudomotor neurons, lacked surrounding ghrelin-receptor-expressing terminals, although these terminals were found around other neurons. In the superior cervical ganglion, the ghrelin receptor terminals innervated subgroups of neurons including neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons that projected to the anterior chamber of the eye. However, large NPY-negative neurons projecting to the acini of the submaxillary gland were not innervated by EGFP-positive varicosities. In the celiaco-superior mesenteric ganglion, almost all neurons were surrounded by positive terminals but the VIP-immunoreactive terminals of intestinofugal neurons were EGFP-negative. The pelvic ganglia contained groups of neurons without ghrelin receptor terminal innervation and other groups with

  13. Identification of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit by photoaffinity crosslinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, W.W.; Jacobson, K.A.; Hutchison, A.J.; Williams, M.; Stiles, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    A high-affinity iodinated agonist radioligand for the A2 adenosine receptor has been synthesized to facilitate studies of the A2 adenosine receptor binding subunit. The radioligand 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC (125I-labeled 2-[4-(2-[2-[(4- aminophenyl)methylcarbonylamino]ethylaminocarbonyl]- ethyl)phenyl]ethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) was synthesized and found to bind to the A2 adenosine receptor in bovine striatal membranes with high affinity (Kd = 1.5 nM) and A2 receptor selectivity. Competitive binding studies reveal the appropriate A2 receptor pharmacologic potency order with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA) greater than (-)-N6-[(R)-1-methyl- 2-phenylethyl]adenosine (R-PIA) greater than (+)-N6-[(S)-1-methyl-2- phenylethyl]adenosine (S-PIA). Adenylate cyclase assays, in human platelet membranes, demonstrate a dose-dependent stimulation of cAMP production. PAPA-APEC (1 microM) produces a 43% increase in cAMP production, which is essentially the same degree of increase produced by 5'-N- ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (the prototypic A2 receptor agonist). These findings combined with the observed guanine nucleotide-mediated decrease in binding suggest that PAPA-APEC is a full A2 agonist. The A2 receptor binding subunit was identified by photoaffinity-crosslinking studies using 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC and the heterobifunctional crosslinking agent N-succinimidyl 6-(4'-azido-2'-nitrophenylamino)hexanoate (SANPAH). After covalent incorporation, a single specifically radiolabeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa was observed on NaDodSO4/PAGE/autoradiography. Incorporation of 125I-labeled PAPA-APEC into this polypeptide is blocked by agonists and antagonists with the expected potency for A2 receptors and is decreased in the presence of 10(-4) M guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate

  14. Identification of a novel protein complex containing ASIC1a and GABAA receptors and their interregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongbo Zhao

    Full Text Available Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs belong to the family of the epithelial sodium channel/degenerin (ENaC/DEG and are activated by extracellular protons. They are widely distributed within both the central and peripheral nervous systems. ASICs were modified by the activation of γ-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA, a ligand-gated chloride channels, in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, the activity of GABAA receptors were also modulated by extracellular pH. However so far, the mechanisms underlying this intermodulation remain obscure. We hypothesized that these two receptors-GABAA receptors and ASICs channels might form a novel protein complex and functionally interact with each other. In the study reported here, we found that ASICs were modified by the activation of GABAA receptors either in HEK293 cells following transient co-transfection of GABAA and ASIC1a or in primary cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG neurons. Conversely, activation of ASIC1a also modifies the GABAA receptor-channel kinetics. Immunoassays showed that both GABAA and ASIC1a proteins were co-immunoprecipitated mutually either in HEK293 cells co-transfected with GABAA and ASIC1a or in primary cultured DRG neurons. Our results indicate that putative GABAA and ASIC1a channels functionally interact with each other, possibly via an inter-molecular association by forming a novel protein complex.

  15. Genome-wide identification of nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Bo-Young; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Min Chul; Kyung, Do-Hyun; Om, Ae-Son; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-18

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large superfamily of proteins defined by a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). They function as transcriptional regulators to control expression of genes involved in development, homeostasis, and metabolism. The number of NRs differs from species to species, because of gene duplications and/or lineage-specific gene losses during metazoan evolution. Many NRs in arthropods interact with the ecdysteroid hormone and are involved in ecdysone-mediated signaling in arthropods. The nuclear receptor superfamily complement has been reported in several arthropods, including crustaceans, but not in copepods. We identified the entire NR repertoire of the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, which is an important marine model species for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics. Using whole genome and transcriptome sequences, we identified a total of 31 nuclear receptors in the genome of T. japonicus. Nomenclature of the nuclear receptors was determined based on the sequence similarities of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD). The 7 subfamilies of NRs separate into five major clades (subfamilies NR1, NR2, NR3, NR4, and NR5/6). Although the repertoire of NR members in, T. japonicus was similar to that reported for other arthropods, there was an expansion of the NR1 subfamily in Tigriopus japonicus. The twelve unique nuclear receptors identified in T. japonicus are members of NR1L. This expansion may be a unique lineage-specific feature of crustaceans. Interestingly, E78 and HR83, which are present in other arthropods, were absent from the genomes of T. japonicus and two congeneric copepod species (T. japonicus and Tigriopus californicus), suggesting copepod lineage-specific gene loss. We identified all NR receptors present in the copepod, T. japonicus. Knowledge of the copepod nuclear receptor repertoire will contribute to a better understanding of copepod- and crustacean-specific NR evolution.

  16. Identification and characterization of insulin receptors in basolateral membranes of dog intestinal mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gingerich, R.L.; Gilbert, W.R.; Comens, P.G.; Gavin, J.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Little is known about hormonal regulation of substrate transport and metabolism in the mucosal lining of the small intestine. Because insulin regulates these functions in other tissues by binding to its receptor, we have investigated the presence of insulin receptors in canine small intestinal mucosa with basolateral membranes (BLM) and brush border membranes (BBM) prepared by sorbitol density centrifugation. A14-[ 125 I]iodoinsulin was used to study binding and structural characteristics of specific insulin receptors in BLM. Analysis of receptors in BLM identified binding sites with high affinity (Kd 88 pM) and low capacity (0.4 pmol/mg protein) as well as with low affinity (Kd 36 nM) and high capacity (4.7 pmol/mg protein). Binding was time, temperature, and pH dependent, and 125 I-labeled insulin dissociation was enhanced in the presence of unlabeled insulin. Cross-reactivity of these receptors to proinsulin, IGF-II, and IGF-I was 4, 1.8, and less than 1%, respectively. Covalent cross-linking of labeled insulin to BLM insulin receptors with disuccinimidyl suberate revealed a single 135,000-Mr band that was completely inhibited by unlabeled insulin. There was a 16-fold greater specific binding of insulin to BLM (39.0 +/- 2.4%) than to BBM (2.5 +/- 0.6%). These results demonstrate the presence of a highly specific receptor for insulin on the vascular, but not the luminal, surface of the small intestinal mucosa in dogs, and suggest that insulin may play an important role in the regulation of gastrointestinal physiology

  17. Identification of four areas each enriched in a unique muscarinic receptor subtype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoss, W.; Ellerbrock, B.R.; Goldman, P.S.; Collins, D.A.; Messer, W.S. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The affinities of muscarinic agonists and antagonists were determined by autoradiography and image analysis in selected areas of the rat brain. IC 50 values and Hill coefficients for the inhibition of the binding of 0.2 nM [ 3 H]-QNB to dentate gyrus, superior colliculus, rhomboid thalamus and substantia nigra were measured in coronal sections. Pirenzepine displayed a high affinity for receptors in the dentate gyrus and AF-DX 116, the superior colliculus. Both pirenzepine and AF-DX 116 had high affinities for the substantia nigra and low affinities for the rhomboid thalamus. Gallamine displayed a 50-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Amitriptyline was less selective, showing a modest preference for substantia nigra receptors and 4-DAMP was essentially nonselective. Carbachol was the most selective agonist with a 4000-fold preference for superior colliculus over dentate gyrus receptors. Other agonists except RS 86 were also selective for superior colliculus receptors in the order carbachol >> arecoline > bethanechol > McN A343 = oxotremorine = pilocarpine

  18. Identification and functional characterization of a sex pheromone receptor in the silkmoth Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Takeshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Mitsuno, Hidefumi; Mori, Hajime; Endo, Yasuhisa; Tanoue, Shintarou; Yasukochi, Yuji; Touhara, Kazushige; Nishioka, Takaaki

    2004-01-01

    Sex pheromones released by female moths are detected with high specificity and sensitivity in the olfactory sensilla of antennae of conspecific males. Bombykol in the silkmoth Bombyx mori was the first sex pheromone to be identified. Here we identify a male-specific G protein-coupled olfactory receptor gene, B. mori olfactory receptor 1 (BmOR-1), that appears to encode a bombykol receptor. The BmOR-1 gene is located on the Z sex chromosome, has an eight-exon/seven-intron structure, and exhibits male-specific expression in the pheromone receptor neurons of male moth antenna during late pupal and adult stages. Bombykol stimulation of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing BmOR-1 and BmGαq elicited robust dose-dependent inward currents on two-electrode voltage clamp recordings, demonstrating that the binding of bombykol to BmOR-1 leads to the activation of a BmGαq-mediated signaling cascade. Antennae of female moths infected with BmOR-1-recombinant baculovirus showed electrophysiological responses to bombykol but not to bombykal. These results provide evidence that BmOR-1 is a G protein-coupled sex pheromone receptor that recognizes bombykol. PMID:15545611

  19. Pharmacological identification of cholinergic receptor subtypes on Drosophila melanogaster larval heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Cole A; Ritter, Kyle; Robinson, Jonathan; English, Connor; Cooper, Robin L

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster heart is a popular model in which to study cardiac physiology and development. Progress has been made in understanding the role of endogenous compounds in regulating cardiac function in this model. It is well characterized that common neurotransmitters act on many peripheral and non-neuronal tissues as they flow through the hemolymph of insects. Many of these neuromodulators, including acetylcholine (ACh), have been shown to act directly on the D. melanogaster larval heart. ACh is a primary neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates and at the neuromuscular junctions on skeletal and cardiac tissue. In insects, ACh is the primary excitatory neurotransmitter of sensory neurons and is also prominent in the CNS. A full understanding regarding the regulation of the Drosophila cardiac physiology by the cholinergic system remains poorly understood. Here we use semi-intact D. melanogaster larvae to study the pharmacological profile of cholinergic receptor subtypes, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs), in modulating heart rate (HR). Cholinergic receptor agonists, nicotine and muscarine both increase HR, while nAChR agonist clothianidin exhibits no significant effect when exposed to an open preparation at concentrations as low as 100 nM. In addition, both nAChR and mAChR antagonists increase HR as well but also display capabilities of blocking agonist actions. These results provide evidence that both of these receptor subtypes display functional significance in regulating the larval heart's pacemaker activity.

  20. High constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor--identification of a potent inverse agonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Cygankiewicz, Adam; Jensen, Tine Halkjaer

    2003-01-01

    Ghrelin is a GH-releasing peptide that also has an important role as an orexigenic hormone-stimulating food intake. By measuring inositol phosphate turnover or by using a reporter assay for transcriptional activity controlled by cAMP-responsive elements, the ghrelin receptor showed strong, ligand......-independent signaling in transfected COS-7 or human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Ghrelin and a number of the known nonpeptide GH secretagogues acted as agonists stimulating inositol phosphate turnover further. In contrast, the low potency ghrelin antagonist, [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-substance P was surprisingly...... found to be a high potency (EC50 = 5.2 nm) full inverse agonist as it decreased the constitutive signaling of the ghrelin receptor down to that observed in untransfected cells. The homologous motilin receptor functioned as a negative control as it did not display any sign of constitutive activity...

  1. Identification of residues on human receptor DPP4 critical for MERS-CoV binding and entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Wenfei [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Ying [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang, Nianshuang; Wang, Dongli [Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Protein Science, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Guo, Jianying; Fu, Lili [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi, Xuanling, E-mail: shixuanlingsk@tsinghua.edu.cn [Comprehensive AIDS Research Center, Research Center for Public Health, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infects host cells through binding the receptor binding domain (RBD) on its spike glycoprotein to human receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (hDPP4). Here, we report identification of critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry through analysis of a panel of hDPP4 mutants. Based on the RBD–hDPP4 crystal structure we reported, the mutated residues were located at the interface between RBD and hDPP4, which potentially changed the polarity, hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of hDPP4, thereby interfering or disrupting their interaction with RBD. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues in hDPP4–RBD binding interface were important on hDPP4–RBD binding and viral entry. These results provide atomic insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and also provide potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection. - Highlights: • It has been demonstrated that MERS-CoV infects host cells through binding its envelope spike (S) glycoprotein to the host cellular receptor dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). • To identify the critical residues on hDPP4 for RBD binding and virus entry, we constructed a panel of hDPP4 mutants based on structure-guided mutagenesis. • Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding analysis and pseudovirus infection assay, we showed that several residues on hDPP4 had significant impacts on virus/receptor interactions and viral entry. • Our study has provided new insights into the features of interactions between hDPP4 and MERS-CoV RBD, and provides potential explanation for cellular and species tropism of MERS-CoV infection.

  2. Bacteriophage-resistant mutants in Yersinia pestis: identification of phage receptors and attenuation for mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Filippov

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacteriophages specific for Yersinia pestis are routinely used for plague diagnostics and could be an alternative to antibiotics in case of drug-resistant plague. A major concern of bacteriophage therapy is the emergence of phage-resistant mutants. The use of phage cocktails can overcome this problem but only if the phages exploit different receptors. Some phage-resistant mutants lose virulence and therefore should not complicate bacteriophage therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The purpose of this work was to identify Y. pestis phage receptors using site-directed mutagenesis and trans-complementation and to determine potential attenuation of phage-resistant mutants for mice. Six receptors for eight phages were found in different parts of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS inner and outer core. The receptor for R phage was localized beyond the LPS core. Most spontaneous and defined phage-resistant mutants of Y. pestis were attenuated, showing increase in LD₅₀ and time to death. The loss of different LPS core biosynthesis enzymes resulted in the reduction of Y. pestis virulence and there was a correlation between the degree of core truncation and the impact on virulence. The yrbH and waaA mutants completely lost their virulence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We identified Y. pestis receptors for eight bacteriophages. Nine phages together use at least seven different Y. pestis receptors that makes some of them promising for formulation of plague therapeutic cocktails. Most phage-resistant Y. pestis mutants become attenuated and thus should not pose a serious problem for bacteriophage therapy of plague. LPS is a critical virulence factor of Y. pestis.

  3. Identification of endogenous opioid receptor components in rat brain using a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bero, L.A.; Roy, S.; Lee, N.M.

    1988-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody generated against the tertiary structure of a partially purified opioid binding protein was used to probe the structure of the dynorphin and beta-endorphin receptors. The Fab fragment 3B4F11 inhibited completely the binding of 125I-beta-endorphin and (3H)dynorphin to rat brain P2 membranes with IC50 values of 26 ng/ml and 40 ng/ml, respectively. To explore further the interaction of 3B4F11 with the beta-endorphin receptor, the effect of the Fab fragment on 125I-beta-endorphin cross-linking to rat brain membranes was examined. 125I-beta-endorphin was covalently bound to three major species of approximate molecular weights 108,000, 73,000, and 49,000. The delta-selective ligand D-Pen2, D-pen5enkephalin was least effective at inhibiting the cross-linking of beta-endorphin, whereas the micro-selective ligand Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-NMe-Phe-Gly-ol and kappa-selective ligand U50488 inhibited beta-endorphin cross-linking to the 108,000 and 73,000 Da species. Both 3B4F11 and beta-endorphin prevented the covalent binding of 125I-beta-endorphin to all three labeled species. These findings suggest that micro and kappa receptor types might have some structural similarities, whereas the delta receptor type might differ in molecular size. In addition, the micro, kappa, and delta ligands might have different primary sequences, whereas their tertiary structures might share regions of molecular homology with all three receptor constituents labeled by 125I-beta-endorphin. 3B4F11 will be a valuable tool for the purification and isolation of the several components of the beta-endorphin receptor complex.

  4. Sorting through the chaff, nDNA gene trees for phylogenetic inference and hybrid identification of annual sunflowers (Helianthus sect. Helianthus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Michael L; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2012-07-01

    The annual sunflowers (Helianthus sect. Helianthus) present a formidable challenge for phylogenetic inference because of ancient hybrid speciation, recent introgression, and suspected issues with deep coalescence. Here we analyze sequence data from 11 nuclear DNA (nDNA) genes for multiple genotypes of species within the section to (1) reconstruct the phylogeny of this group, (2) explore the utility of nDNA gene trees for detecting hybrid speciation and introgression; and (3) test an empirical method of hybrid identification based on the phylogenetic congruence of nDNA gene trees from tightly linked genes. We uncovered considerable topological heterogeneity among gene trees with or without three previously identified hybrid species included in the analyses, as well as a general lack of reciprocal monophyly of species. Nonetheless, partitioned Bayesian analyses provided strong support for the reciprocal monophyly of all species except H. annuus (0.89 PP), the most widespread and abundant annual sunflower. Previous hypotheses of relationships among taxa were generally strongly supported (1.0 PP), except among taxa typically associated with H. annuus, apparently due to the paraphyly of the latter in all gene trees. While the individual nDNA gene trees provided a useful means for detecting recent hybridization, identification of ancient hybridization was problematic for all ancient hybrid species, even when linkage was considered. We discuss biological factors that affect the efficacy of phylogenetic methods for hybrid identification.

  5. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2017-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,4...

  6. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci...

  7. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milne, Roger L.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Lindström, Sara; Hui, Shirley; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Jiang, Xia; Rostamianfar, Asha; Finucane, Hilary K; Bolla, Manjeet K.; McGuffog, Lesley; Wang, Qin; Aalfs, Cora M.; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Allen, Jamie; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Amos, Christopher I; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Aronson, Kristan J; Auber, Bernd; Auer, Paul L.; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bacot, François; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrdahl, Myrto; Barnes, Daniel R; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Bignon, Yves Jean; Blazer, Kathleen R.; Blok, Marinus J.; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bobolis, Kristie; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Bozsik, Aniko; Bradbury, Angela R; Brand, Judith S.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S.; Byun, Jinyoung; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldés, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Canzian, Federico; Caron, Olivier; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, J Esteban; Castera, Laurent; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Chan, Salina B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Christiansen, Hans; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine L; Conner, Thomas; Conroy, Don M; Cook, Jackie; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Coupier, Isabelle; Cox, Angela; Cox, David G.; Cross, Simon S.; Cuk, Katarina; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; Davidson, Rosemarie; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Doheny, Kimberly F; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dubois, Stéphane; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B.; Eliassen, A. Heather; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fachal, Laura; Faivre, Laurence; Fasching, Peter A.; Faust, Ulrike; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Fritschi, Lin; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gaddam, Pragna; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Gerdes, Anne Marie; Giles, Graham G.; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Goodfellow, Paul; Greene, Mark H.; Alnæs, Grethe I Grenaker; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A.; Håkansson, Niclas; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Healey, Catherine S.; Hein, Alexander; Helbig, Sonja; Henderson, Alex; Heyworth, Jane S.; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley V.; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hoover, Bob; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Chunling; Huang, Guanmengqian; Hulick, Peter J; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Iwasaki, Motoki; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Janni, Wolfgang; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kast, Karin; Keeman, Renske; Kerin, Michael J.; Kets, Carolien M.; Keupers, Machteld; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N.; Kruse, Torben A.; Kwong, Ava; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Laitman, Yael; Lalloo, Fiona; Lambrechts, Diether; Landsman, Keren; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lecarpentier, Julie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Lesueur, Fabienne; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lincoln, Anne; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; So, Wing Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Loud, Jennifer T; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lush, Michael J.; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Malone, Kathleen E.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, Joann E.; Margolin, Sara; Martens, John W. M.; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mclean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Menéndez, Primitiva; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Austin; Miller, Nicola; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Nadesan, Sue; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nevelsteen, Ines; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Sune F.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Norman, Aaron; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; Ong, Kai Ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Pankratz, V Shane; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Lloyd, Rachel; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E.; Prentice, Ross L.; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofieva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Richardson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A.; Rudolph, Anja; Ruediger, Thomas; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sanders, Joyce; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Schwentner, Lukas; Scott, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J; Seal, Sheila; Senter, Leigha; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen Yang; Sheng, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Shrubsole, Martha J.; Shu, Xiao Ou; Side, Lucy E.; Singer, Christian F.; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C.; Spinelli, John J; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Surowy, Harald M.; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tan, Yen; Taylor, Jack A; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Tessier, Daniel C.; Teulé, Alex; Thöne, Kathrin; Thull, Darcy L; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E.; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Tranchant, Martine; Truong, Thérèse; Tucker, Kathy; Tung, Nadine; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J.; Van Den Berg, David; Van Den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Viel, Alessandra; Vijai, Joseph; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Walker, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wendt, Camilla; Wesseling, Jelle; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H.; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, B.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Zorn, Kristin K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Mannermaa, Arto; Olsson, Håkan; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Stone, Jennifer; Offit, Kenneth; Ottini, Laura; Park, Sue K.; Thomassen, Mads; Hall, Per; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Droit, Arnaud; Bader, Gary D.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Couch, Fergus J.; Easton, Douglas F.; Kraft, Peter; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Simard, Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414

  8. Identification of a carbohydrate-based endothelial ligand for a lymphocyte homing receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Y.; Singer, M.S.; Fennie, C.; Lasky, L.A.; Rosen, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    Lymphocyte attachment to high endothelial venules within lymph nodes is mediated by the peripheral lymph node homing receptor (pnHR), originally defined on mouse lymphocytes by the MEL-14 mAb. The pnHR is a calcium-dependent lectin-like receptor, a member of the LEC-CAM family of adhesion proteins. Here, using a soluble recombinant form of the homing receptor, we have identified an endothelial ligand for the pnHR as an ∼ 50-kD sulfated, fucosylated, and sialylated glycoprotein, which we designate Sgp50 (sulfated glycoprotein of 50 kD). Recombinant receptor binding to this lymph node-specific glycoprotein requires calcium and is inhibitable by specific carbohydrates and by MEL-14 mAb. Sialylation of the component is required for binding. Additionally, the glycoprotein is precipitated by MECA-79, an adhesion-blocking mAb reactive with lymph node HEV. A related glycoprotein of ∼ 90 kD (designated as Sgp90) is also identified

  9. Identification of the first surrogate agonists for the G protein-coupled receptor GPR132

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mohamed A.; Christensen, Hanna Belcik; Isberg, Vignir

    2015-01-01

    GPR132 is an orphan class A G protein-coupled receptor. It has been proposed to be activated by protons and to regulate apoptosis, atherosclerosis and inflammation, but these results are still preliminary. In the current work, we designed and screened a focused compound library using a β...

  10. Identification of adiponectin receptor agonist utilizing a fluorescence polarization based high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyi Sun

    Full Text Available Adiponectin, the adipose-derived hormone, plays an important role in the suppression of metabolic disorders that can result in type 2 diabetes, obesity, and atherosclerosis. It has been shown that up-regulation of adiponectin or adiponectin receptor has a number of therapeutic benefits. Given that it is hard to convert the full size adiponectin protein into a viable drug, adiponectin receptor agonists could be designed or identified using high-throughput screening. Here, we report on the development of a two-step screening process to identify adiponectin agonists. First step, we developed a high throughput screening assay based on fluorescence polarization to identify adiponectin ligands. The fluorescence polarization assay reported here could be adapted to screening against larger small molecular compound libraries. A natural product library containing 10,000 compounds was screened and 9 hits were selected for validation. These compounds have been taken for the second-step in vitro tests to confirm their agonistic activity. The most active adiponectin receptor 1 agonists are matairesinol, arctiin, (--arctigenin and gramine. The most active adiponectin receptor 2 agonists are parthenolide, taxifoliol, deoxyschizandrin, and syringin. These compounds may be useful drug candidates for hypoadiponectin related diseases.

  11. Identification of Odorant-Receptor Interactions by Global Mapping of the Human Odorome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Audouze, Karine Marie Laure; Tromelin, Anne; Le Bon, Anne Marie

    2014-01-01

    The human olfactory system recognizes a broad spectrum of odorants using approximately 400 different olfactory receptors ( hORs). Although significant improvements of heterologous expression systems used to study interactions between ORs and odorant molecules have been made, screening the olfacto...

  12. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); G.A. Mendoza-Fandino (Gustavo A.); S. Nord (Silje); J. Lilyquist (Janna); C. Olswold (Curtis); B. Hallberg (Boubou); S. Agata (Simona); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C.B. Ambrosone (Christine); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); V. Arndt (Volker); B.K. Arun (Banu); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Barile (Monica); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); L. Beckmann (Lars); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); J. Benítez (Javier); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); C. Blomqvist (Carl); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); S.S. Buys (Saundra S.); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M.A. Caligo (Maria); F. Canzian (Federico); T.A. Carpenter (Adrian); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); S.J. Chanock (Stephen J.); W.K. Chung (Wendy K.); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); J.M. Cunningham (Julie); K. Czene (Kamila); M.B. Daly (Mary B.); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); P. Devilee (Peter); O. Díez (Orland); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); S.M. Domchek (Susan); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); M. Dumont (Martine); A.M. Dunning (Alison); D. Eccles (Diana); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); A.B. Ekici (Arif); H. Eliassen (Heather); S.D. Ellis (Steve); P.A. Fasching (Peter); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); A. Försti (Asta); F. Fostira (Florentia); W.D. Foulkes (William); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); E. Friedman (Eitan); D. Frost (Debra); M. Gabrielson (Marike); M. Gammon (Marilie); P.A. Ganz (Patricia A.); S.M. Gapstur (Susan M.); J. Garber (Judy); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); S.A. Gayther (Simon); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); M. Ghoussaini (Maya); G.G. Giles (Graham); G. Glendon (Gord); A.K. Godwin (Andrew K.); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); D. Goldgar (David); A. González-Neira (Anna); M.H. Greene (Mark H.); J. Gronwald (Jacek); P. Guénel (Pascal); M.J. Gunter (Marc J.); L. Haeberle (Lothar); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); U. Hamann (Ute); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S. Hart (Stewart); S. Healey (Sue); T. Heikkinen (Tuomas); B.E. Henderson (Brian); J. Herzog (Josef); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); R.N. Hoover (Robert); J.L. Hopper (John); K. Humphreys (Keith); D. Hunter (David); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny N.); C. Isaacs (Claudine); A. Jakubowska (Anna); M. James (Margaret); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); U.B. Jensen; E.M. John (Esther); M. Jones (Michael); M. Kabisch (Maria); S. Kar (Siddhartha); B.Y. Karlan (Beth Y.); S. Khan (Sofia); K.T. Khaw; M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); J.A. Knight (Julia); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); V. Kristensen (Vessela); A. Kwong (Ava); Y. Laitman (Yael); D. Lambrechts (Diether); C. Lazaro (Conxi); E. Lee (Eunjung); L. Le Marchand (Loic); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); A. Lindblom (Annika); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); J. Liu (Jianjun); J. Long (Jirong); J. Lubinski (Jan); P.L. Mai (Phuong); E. Makalic (Enes); K.E. Malone (Kathleen E.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); S. Margolin (Sara); F. Marme (Federick); J.W.M. Martens (John); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Meindl (Alfons); A. Miller (Austin); R.L. Milne (Roger); P. Miron (Penelope); M. Montagna (Marco); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); A.-M. Mulligan (Anna-Marie); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); R. Nussbaum (Robert); K. Offit (Kenneth); E. Olah; O.I. Olopade (Olufunmilayo I.); J.E. Olson (Janet); A. Osorio (Ana); S.K. Park (Sue K.); P.H.M. Peeters; B. Peissel (Bernard); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); J. Peto (Julian); C. Phelan (Catherine); R. Pilarski (Robert); B. Poppe (Bruce); K. Pykäs (Katri); P. Radice (Paolo); N. Rahman (Nazneen); J. Rantala (Johanna); C. Rappaport (Christine); G. Rennert (Gad); A.L. Richardson (Andrea); M. Robson (Mark); I. Romieu (Isabelle); A. Rudolph (Anja); E.J.T. Rutgers (Emiel); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); R. Santella (Regina); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick); R.J. Scott (Rodney); L. Senter (Leigha); P. Sharma (Priyanka); J. Simard (Jacques); C.F. Singer (Christian); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); P. Soucy (Penny); M.C. Southey (Melissa); D. Steinemann (Doris); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (Marie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); C. Szabo (Csilla); R. Tamimi (Rulla); W. Tapper (William); P.J. Teixeira; S.-H. Teo (Soo-Hwang); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); M. Thomassen (Mads); D. Thompson (Deborah); L. Tihomirova (Laima); A.E. Toland (Amanda); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); T. Truong (Thérèse); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); A. Teulé (A.); R. Tumino (Rosario); N. Tung (Nadine); C. Turnbull (Clare); G. Ursin (Giski); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); E. Weiderpass (Elisabete); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); A.S. Whittemore (Alice S.); H. Wildiers (Hans); R. Winqvist (Robert); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong R.); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); S. Yao (Song); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); W. Zheng (Wei); P. Hall (Per); P. Kraft (Peter); C. Vachon (Celine); S. Slager (Susan); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.A.N. Monteiro (Alvaro A. N.); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractCommon variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10-8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative

  13. Identification of four novel susceptibility loci for oestrogen receptor negative breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Nord, Silje; Lilyquist, Janna; Olswold, Curtis; Hallberg, Emily; Agata, Simona; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Ambrosone, Christine; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Lars; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Blank, Stephanie V; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Canzian, Federico; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chung, Wendy K; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; de la Hoya, Miguel; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan C; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Eccles, Diana M; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ekici, Arif B; Eliassen, Heather; Ellis, Steve; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Försti, Asta; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friebel, Tara; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Gaudet, Mia M; Gayther, Simon A; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Gunter, Marc; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Healey, Sue; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Henderson, Brian E; Herzog, Josef; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Robert N; Hopper, John L; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kar, Siddhartha; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Knight, Julia A; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Lee, Eunjung; Le Marchand, Loic; Lester, Jenny; Lindblom, Annika; Lindor, Noralane; Lindstrom, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Long, Jirong; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Makalic, Enes; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Martens, John W M; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Miller, Austin; Milne, Roger L; Miron, Penelope; Montagna, Marco; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Mulligan, Anna M; Muranen, Taru A; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue K; Peeters, Petra H; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Phelan, Catherine M; Pilarski, Robert; Poppe, Bruce; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Richardson, Andrea; Robson, Mark; Romieu, Isabelle; Rudolph, Anja; Rutgers, Emiel J; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Santella, Regina M; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schumacher, Fredrick; Scott, Rodney; Senter, Leigha; Sharma, Priyanka; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla; Tapper, William; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary B; Thomassen, Mads; Thompson, Deborah; Tihomirova, Laima; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Truong, Thérèse; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teulé, Alex; Tumino, Rosario; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; Ursin, Giski; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yao, Song; Zamora, M Pilar; Zheng, Wei; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D P; Monteiro, Alvaro A N; García-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci,

  14. Identification of four evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belmont, Martin; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2006-01-01

    The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four evolutio......The mosquito Anopheles gambiae is an important vector for malaria, which is one of the most serious human parasitic diseases in the world, causing up to 2.7 million deaths yearly. To contribute to our understanding of A. gambiae and to the transmission of malaria, we have now cloned four...... evolutionarily related G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) from this mosquito and expressed them in Chinese hamster ovary cells. After screening of a library of thirty-three insect or other invertebrate neuropeptides and eight biogenic amines, we could identify (de-orphanize) three of these GPCRs as...... relationship to the A. gambiae and other insect AKH receptors suggested that it is a receptor for an AKH-like peptide. This is the first published report on evolutionarily related AKH, corazonin, and CCAP receptors in mosquitoes....

  15. Identification of a novel androgen receptor agonist (or “androgen mimic”) of environmental concern: spironolactone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spironolactone is a pharmaceutical that acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in humans to treat certain conditions such as hirsutism, various dermatologic afflictions, and female pattern hair loss. The drug is also used to treat hypertension as a diuretic. With this commo...

  16. Identification and characterisation of an androgen receptor from zebrafish Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Andersen, Ole; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2007-01-01

    ) and goldfish (Carassius auratus). Binding assays with zfAR demonstrated high affinity, saturable, single class binding site, with the characteristics of an androgen receptor. Saturation experiments along with subsequent Scatchard analysis determined that the Kd of the zfAR for 3H-testosterone was 2 n...

  17. Molecular identification of the mode of interaction of nitrous oxide with the opiate receptor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallar, D D

    1985-01-01

    The discovery of the opioid receptors in 1973 has led to a great deal of in vivo and in vitro research in order to understand the mechanism of binding of endogenous and synthetic opiate ligands. The use of nitrous oxide (N/sub 2/O) in anaesthesia is well documented. However, at lower concentrations N/sub 2/O produces analgesia. In 1976, it was reported that N/sub 2/O analgesia in man could be modified by the opiate antagonist naloxone. This clearly linked nitrous oxide analgesia to the opioid receptor system. It is the purpose of this dissertation to examine the molecular mechanism of action of N/sub 2/O at the opioid receptor through the use of in vitro binding studies. In addition, a model of the opioid receptor will be proposed. The following radiolabelled ligands were used in classical competitive binding assays to determine K (sub D),B(sub max), and IC/sub 50/ values in the presence of nitrous oxide and other control gases: dihydromorphine, N-allyl-N-normetazocine (SKF 10,047), and ethylketocyclazocine, for putative ..mu.., sigma and kappa opioid binding sites, respectively. All assays were performed using rat forebrain homogenates suspended in buffer previously saturated with the gas. Results indicate that N/sub 2/O differentially affects the binding kinetics of dihydromorphine. The binding kinetics of SKF 10,047 or ethylketocyclazocine were not altered significantly by N/sub 2/O indicating that N/sub 2/O is specific in its effects for the putative ..mu..-binding site. It is suggested that N/sub 2/O exerts its analgesic effects by perturbation of protein/lipid interactions within a multiple binding site opioid receptor complex.

  18. Identification of the Receptor-Binding Protein in Lytic Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides Bacteriophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kot, Witold Piotr; Hammer, Karin; Neve, Horst

    2013-01-01

    Two phages, P793 and ΦLN04, sharing 80.1% nucleotide sequence identity but having different strains of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides as hosts, were selected for identification of the host determinant gene. Construction of chimeric phages leading to the expected switch in host range identified t...

  19. Identification of potential regional sources of atmospheric total gaseous mercury in Windsor, Ontario, Canada using hybrid receptor modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Windsor (Ontario, Canada experiences trans-boundary air pollution as it is located on the border immediately downwind of industrialized regions of the United States of America. A study was conducted in 2007 to identify the potential regional sources of total gaseous mercury (TGM and investigate the effects of regional sources and other factors on seasonal variability of TGM concentrations in Windsor.

    TGM concentration was measured at the University of Windsor campus using a Tekran® 2537A Hg vapour analyzer. An annual mean of 2.02±1.63 ng/m3 was observed in 2007. The average TGM concentration was high in the summer (2.48±2.68 ng/m3 and winter (2.17±2.01 ng/m3, compared to spring (1.88±0.78 ng/m3 and fall (1.76±0.58 ng/m3. Hybrid receptor modeling potential source contribution function (PSCF was used by incorporating 72-h backward trajectories and measurements of TGM in Windsor. The results of PSCF were analyzed in conjunction with the Hg emissions inventory of North America (by state/province to identify regions affecting Windsor. In addition to annual modeling, seasonal PSCF modeling was also conducted. The potential source region was identified between 24–61° N and 51–143° W. Annual PSCF modeling identified major sources southwest of Windsor, stretching from Ohio to Texas. The emissions inventory also supported the findings, as Hg emissions were high in those regions. Results of seasonal PSCF modeling were analyzed to find the combined effects of regional sources, meteorological conditions, and surface re-emissions, on seasonal variability of Hg concentrations. It was found that the summer and winter highs of atmospheric Hg can be attributed to areas where large numbers of coal fired power plants are located in the USA. Weak atmospheric dispersion due to low winds and high re-emission from surfaces due to higher temperatures also contributed to high concentrations in

  20. Identification of Fc Gamma Receptor Glycoforms That Produce Differential Binding Kinetics for Rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jerrard M; Frostell, Asa; Karlsson, Robert; Müller, Steffen; Martín, Silvia Míllan; Pauers, Martin; Reuss, Franziska; Cosgrave, Eoin F; Anneren, Cecilia; Davey, Gavin P; Rudd, Pauline M

    2017-10-01

    Fc gamma receptors (FcγR) bind the Fc region of antibodies and therefore play a prominent role in antibody-dependent cell-based immune responses such as ADCC, CDC and ADCP. The immune effector cell activity is directly linked to a productive molecular engagement of FcγRs where both the protein and glycan moiety of antibody and receptor can affect the interaction and in the present study we focus on the role of the FcγR glycans in this interaction. We provide a complete description of the glycan composition of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expressed human Fcγ receptors RI (CD64), RIIa Arg131/His131 (CD32a), RIIb (CD32b) and RIIIa Phe158/Val158 (CD16a) and analyze the role of the glycans in the binding mechanism with IgG. The interactions of the monoclonal antibody rituximab with each FcγR were characterized and we discuss the CHO-FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 and CHO-FcγRI interactions and compare them to the equivalent interactions with human (HEK293) and murine (NS0) produced receptors. Our results reveal clear differences in the binding profiles of rituximab, which we attribute in each case to the differences in host cell-dependent FcγR glycosylation. The glycan profiles of CHO expressed FcγRI and FcγRIIIa Phe158/Val158 were compared with the glycan profiles of the receptors expressed in NS0 and HEK293 cells and we show that the glycan type and abundance differs significantly between the receptors and that these glycan differences lead to the observed differences in the respective FcγR binding patterns with rituximab. Oligomannose structures are prevalent on FcγRI from each source and likely contribute to the high affinity rituximab interaction through a stabilization effect. On FcγRI and FcγRIIIa large and sialylated glycans have a negative impact on rituximab binding, likely through destabilization of the interaction. In conclusion, the data show that the IgG1-FcγR binding kinetics differ depending on the glycosylation of the FcγR and further support a

  1. Historical evolution of sources identification by means of Receptor Modeling in the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R. M.; Andrade, M. D. F.; Marien, Y., Sr.

    2017-12-01

    The atmospheric aerosols sources have been identified in Sao Paulo since the 80´s with the use of receptor models. The Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP) is a megacity with a population of 21 million, corresponding to more than 11% of the total population of Brazil. The first results for the identification of sources of particles were obtained with the application of Absolute Principal Component Analysis, Factor Analysis and Chemical Mass Balance. More recently the Positive Matrix Factorization has been used in combination with the other receptor models. With the improvement of the aerosol composition analytical determination (more elements and better resolution) the source identification has became more accurate. But, in spite of that, the main sources are the same for fine particles: vehicular emission, secondary formation and biomass burning. The large amount of biofuels used in the MASP makes this region an important example of the atmospheric chemistry of fossil fuel and biofuel emissions. The 7 million vehicles can run on gasohol, ethanol (95% ethanol + 5% gasoline) and biodiesel (mostly for trucks and buses). We have considered the Black Carbon as the tracer for diesel engines and biomass burning, being this last source associated not only with burning of sugar cane plantation and forest fires, but also with wood and charcoal used in restaurant and domestic cooking and residues burning. The responsibility of the vehicular emission to the fine particles has been maintained in approximately 50% of the mass. The soil resuspension was associated with 8% of the fine particles origin. We are presenting the data obtained from experiments performed from 1983 to 2014, not continuously and mainly performed in the winter time. It is a long period of data that is going to be considered. The previous results obtained with the application of PCA were compared to that obtained with PMF applied to the historical data collected at MASP, showing the evolution of the

  2. Identification of "ever-cropped" land (1984-2010) using Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites: Southwestern Kansas case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Susan K; Sylvester, Kenneth M

    2012-06-01

    A time series of 230 intra- and inter-annual Landsat Thematic Mapper images was used to identify land that was ever cropped during the years 1984 through 2010 for a five county region in southwestern Kansas. Annual maximum Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) image composites (NDVI(ann-max)) were used to evaluate the inter-annual dynamics of cropped and non-cropped land. Three feature images were derived from the 27-year NDVI(ann-max) image time series and used in the classification: 1) maximum NDVI value that occurred over the entire 27 year time span (NDVI(max)), 2) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for all years (NDVI(sd)), and 3) standard deviation of the annual maximum NDVI values for years 1984-1986 (NDVI(sd84-86)) to improve Conservation Reserve Program land discrimination.Results of the classification were compared to three reference data sets: County-level USDA Census records (1982-2007) and two digital land cover maps (Kansas 2005 and USGS Trends Program maps (1986-2000)). Area of ever-cropped land for the five counties was on average 11.8 % higher than the area estimated from Census records. Overall agreement between the ever-cropped land map and the 2005 Kansas map was 91.9% and 97.2% for the Trends maps. Converting the intra-annual Landsat data set to a single annual maximum NDVI image composite considerably reduced the data set size, eliminated clouds and cloud-shadow affects, yet maintained information important for discriminating cropped land. Our results suggest that Landsat annual maximum NDVI image composites will be useful for characterizing land use and land cover change for many applications.

  3. Analysis of receptor signaling pathways by mass spectrometry: identification of vav-2 as a substrate of the epidermal and platelet-derived growth factor receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A; Podtelejnikov, A V; Blagoev, B

    2000-01-01

    Oligomerization of receptor protein tyrosine kinases such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by their cognate ligands leads to activation of the receptor. Transphosphorylation of the receptor subunits is followed by the recruitment of signaling molecules containing src homology 2 (SH2...

  4. Identification and characterization of insulin receptors on foetal-mouse brain-cortical cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Schravendijk, C F; Hooghe-Peters, E L; De Meyts, P; Pipeleers, D G

    1984-01-01

    The occurrence of insulin receptors was investigated in freshly dissociated brain-cortical cells from mouse embryos. By analogy with classical insulin-binding cell types, binding of 125I-insulin to foetal brain-cortical cells was time- and pH-dependent, only partially reversible, and competed for by unlabelled insulin and closely related peptides. Desalanine-desasparagine-insulin, pig proinsulin, hagfish insulin and turkey insulin were respectively 2%, 4%, 2% and 200% as potent as bovine insu...

  5. Identification of type II and type III pyoverdine receptors from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chial, Magaly; Ghysels, Bart; Beatson, Scott A; Geoffroy, Valérie; Meyer, Jean Marie; Pattery, Theresa; Baysse, Christine; Chablain, Patrice; Parsons, Yasmin N; Winstanley, Craig; Cordwell, Stuart J; Cornelis, Pierre

    2003-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces, under conditions of iron limitation, a high-affinity siderophore, pyoverdine (PVD), which is recognized at the level of the outer membrane by a specific TonB-dependent receptor, FpvA. So far, for P. aeruginosa, three different PVDs, differing in their peptide chain, have been described (types I-III), but only the FpvA receptor for type I is known. Two PVD-producing P. aeruginosa strains, one type II and one type III, were mutagenized by a mini-TnphoA3 transposon. In each case, one mutant unable to grow in the presence of the strong iron chelator ethylenediaminedihydroxyphenylacetic acid (EDDHA) and the cognate PVD was selected. The first mutant, which had an insertion in the pvdE gene, upstream of fpvA, was unable to take up type II PVD and showed resistance to pyocin S3, which is known to use type II FpvA as receptor. The second mutant was unable to take up type III PVD and had the transposon insertion in fpvA. Cosmid libraries of the respective type II and type III PVD wild-type strains were constructed and screened for clones restoring the capacity to grow in the presence of PVD. From the respective complementing genomic fragments, type II and type III fpvA sequences were determined. When in trans, type II and type III fpvA restored PVD production, uptake, growth in the presence of EDDHA and, in the case of type II fpvA, pyocin S3 sensitivity. Complementation of fpvA mutants obtained by allelic exchange was achieved by the presence of cognate fpvA in trans. All three receptors posses an N-terminal extension of about 70 amino acids, similar to FecA of Escherichia coli, but only FpvAI has a TAT export sequence at its N-terminal end.

  6. Identification of Aminopeptidase N as a Cellular Receptor for Human Coronavirus-229E

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-12

    hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (HEV), canine coronavirus (CCV), cat FIPV and feline enteric corona virus (FECV), human CVLPs, mouse...While the cat , dog and pig serve as natural hosts for the other coronavirus group 1 viruses , feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), canine...3 2 . Virus Receptors ••••••••.••••••.....•................ 20 3. Viruses Which Cause Common Colds

  7. Identification and characterization of a putative human platelet thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saussy, D.L. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The thromboxane A 2 (TXA 2 ) analog, 9,11-dimethylmethano-11,12-methano-16-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)-13,14-dihydro-13-aza-15αβ-omega-tetranor TXA 2 (I-PTA-OH) was characterized as a competitive antagonist of TXA 2 mimetic-induced platelet aggregation, with a K/sub d/ of 190 nM in platelet rich plasma. This antagonism was specific for the putative thromboxane A 2 /prostaglandin H 2 (TXA 2 /PGH 2 ) receptor, since I-PTA-OH had no inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation stimulated by agonists which act independently of TXA 2 /PGH 2 , and did not inhibit platelet TXA 2 synthesis. [ 125 I]-PTA-OH binding to a particulate fraction from human platelets was saturable, displaceable, and linear with protein concentration. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding revealed a single class of high affinity binding sites, with a K/sub d/ of 30 +/- 4 nM and a B/sub max/ of 1.8 +/- 0.3 pmol/mg protein. Kinetic analysis yielded a k 1 of 1.35 x 10 6 M -1 x min -1 and a k√ 1 of 0.032 min -1 , K/sub d/ = k√ 1 /k 1 = 24 nM. The subcellular localization of the putative TXA 2 /PGH 2 receptor was determined using [ 125 I]-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. [ 125 I]-PTA-OH binding as a marker for the receptor. [ 125 I]-PTA-OH binding, was coenriched with markers for plasma membranes and dense tubular system; but not with markers for cytoplasmic constituents, mitochondria, or granules

  8. Identification and analysis of novel flavonoid agonists and antagonists for the AH and estrogen receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B.; Nagy, S.; Rogers, J.; Denison, M. [Dept. of Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of California, Davis (United States); Nantz, M.; Kurth, M.; Springsteel, M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates many of the biological and toxicological effects in a diverse range of species, tissues, and cell types. The most studied effect is induction of gene expression, and, the majority of AhR responsive genes, such as cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), utilize AhR dependent mechanism of action. While halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the prototypical ligands of the Ah receptor, it has recently identified that the AhR is activated by a structurally diverse array of hydrophobic natural and synthetic chemicals. Given the structural diversity in AhR ligands, the physiochemical characteristics for high and low affinity ligands seems to be established. Environmental contaminants that can disrupt the endocrine homeostasis of an organism have also gained widespread attention in recent years and numerous chemicals have been identified as having either hormone or anti-hormone properties. However, like the AhR, the structural diversity and characteristics of endocrine disrupters that exert their action via nuclear receptors also seems to be depended on the estrogen receptor (ER). The flavonoids are a diverse family of chemicals commonly found in fruits and vegetables. Members of this family exert cytostatic, apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic activities. In addition, several flavonoids are potent modulators of both the expression and activities of specific cytochrome P450 genes/proteins and somel others have estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. Accordingly flavonoids have attracted attention as possible chemoprotective or chemotherapeutic agents. We have previously developed and analyzed a novel chemical library of flavonoids which contained {proportional_to}200 compounds. The ability of these compounds to activate and/or inhibit AhR- and ER- dependent gene expression was examined by using our recently developed AhR- and ER

  9. Identification and phylogeny of the tomato receptor-like proteins family

    OpenAIRE

    Ermis Yanes-Paz; Gioser María Ramos-Echazábal; Glay Chinea; Yanelis Capdesuñer Ruiz; Ramón Santos Bermúdez

    2017-01-01

    The receptor-like proteins (RLPs) play multiple roles in development and defense. In the current work 75 RLPs were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) using iterative BLAST searches and domain prediction. A phylogenetic tree including all the identified RLPs from tomato and some functionally characterized RLPs from other species was built to identify their putative homologues in tomato. We first tested whether C3-F-based phylogeny was a good indicator of functional relation between...

  10. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shuli; Goto, Kiminobu; Chen Guangchun; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Okabe, Taijiro; Nawata, Hajime; Yanase, Toshihiko

    2006-01-01

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling

  11. Identification of VDR Antagonists among Nuclear Receptor Ligands Using Virtual Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Teske

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we described the development of two virtual screens to identify new vitamin D receptor (VDR antagonists among nuclear receptor (NR ligands. Therefore, a database of 14330 nuclear receptor ligands and their NR affinities was assembled using the online available “Binding Database.” Two different virtual screens were carried out in conjunction with a reported VDR crystal structure applying a stringent and less stringent pharmacophore model to filter docked NR ligand conformations. The pharmacophore models were based on the spatial orientation of the hydroxyl functionalities of VDR's natural ligands 1,25(OH2D3 and 25(OH2D3. The first virtual screen identified 32 NR ligands with a calculated free energy of VDR binding of more than -6.0 kJ/mol. All but nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA are VDR ligands, which inhibited the interaction between VDR and coactivator peptide SRC2-3 with an IC50 value of 15.8 μM. The second screen identified 162 NR ligands with a calculated free energy of VDR binding of more than -6.0 kJ/mol. More than half of these ligands were developed to bind VDR followed by ERα/β ligands (26%, TRα/β ligands (7%, and LxRα/β ligands (7%. The binding between VDR and ERα ligand H6036 as well as TRα/β ligand triiodothyronine and a homoserine analog thereof was confirmed by fluorescence polarization.

  12. Identification of androgen receptor antagonists: In vitro investigation and classification methodology for flavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Doering, Jon A; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-09-01

    A tremendous gap exists between the number of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) possibly in the environment and the limitation of traditional regulatory testing. In this study, the anti-androgenic potencies of 21 flavonoids were analyzed in vitro, and another 32 flavonoids from the literature were selected as additional chemicals. Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to obtain four different separation approaches based on the different behaviors of ligands and receptors during the process of interaction. Specifically, ligand-receptor complex which highlighted the discriminating features of ligand escape or retention via "mousetrap" mechanism, hydrogen bonds formed during simulation times, ligand stability and the stability of the helix-12 of the receptor were investigated. Together, a methodology was generated that 87.5% of flavonoids could be discriminated as active versus inactive antagonists, and over 90% inactive antagonists could be filtered out before QSAR study. This methodology could be used as a "proof of concept" to identify inactive anti-androgenic flavonoids, as well could be beneficial for rapid risk assessment and regulation of multiple new chemicals for androgenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of Ebola virus entry by using pseudotyped viruses: identification of receptor-deficient cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wool-Lewis, R J; Bates, P

    1998-04-01

    Studies analyzing Ebola virus replication have been severely hampered by the extreme pathogenicity of this virus. To permit analysis of the host range and function of the Ebola virus glycoprotein (Ebo-GP), we have developed a system for pseudotyping these glycoproteins into murine leukemia virus (MLV). This pseudotyped virus, MLV(Ebola), can be readily concentrated to titers which exceed 5 x 10(6) infectious units/ml and is effectively neutralized by antibodies specific for Ebo-GP. Analysis of MLV(Ebola) infection revealed that the host range conferred by Ebo-GP is very broad, extending to cells of a variety of species. Notably, all lymphoid cell lines tested were completely resistant to infection; we speculate that this is due to the absence of a cellular receptor for Ebo-GP on B and T cells. The generation of high-titer MLV(Ebola) pseudotypes will be useful for the analysis of immune responses to Ebola virus infection, development of neutralizing antibodies, analysis of glycoprotein function, and isolation of the cellular receptor(s) for the Ebola virus.

  14. Identification of Histamine H3 Receptor Ligands Using a New Crystal Structure Fragment-based Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Ida Osborn; Boesgaard, Michael W; Fidom, Kimberley

    2017-01-01

    Virtual screening offers an efficient alternative to high-throughput screening in the identification of pharmacological tools and lead compounds. Virtual screening is typically based on the matching of target structures or ligand pharmacophores to commercial or in-house compound catalogues....... The complete pharmacophore fragment library is freely available through the GPCR database, GPCRdb, allowing the successful application herein to be repeated for most of the 285 class A GPCR targets. The method could also easily be adapted to other protein families....

  15. Identification of telmisartan as a unique angiotensin II receptor antagonist with selective PPARgamma-modulating activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Benson, S. C.; Pershadsingh, H. A.; Ho, C. I.; Chittiboyina, A.; Desai, P.; Pravenec, Michal; Qi, N.; Wang, J.; Avery, M. A.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2004), s. 993-1002 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/01/0278; GA MŠk LN00A079 Grant - others:NIH(US) 2R42AR44767-02A2; NIH(US) HL63709; NIH(US) TW01236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : receptors * insulin resistance * losartan Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.342, year: 2004

  16. Identification and characterization of a reptilian GnRH receptor from the leopard gecko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikemoto, T; Enomoto, M; Park, M K

    2004-02-12

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of reproductive functions through interactions with its specific receptor. We describe the first molecular cloning and characterization of a full-length GnRH receptor (GnRHR) from the leopard gecko Eublepharis macularius. It has a distinct genomic structure consisting of five exons and four introns, compared with all the other reported GnRHR genes. A native GnRH form, cGnRH-II, stimulated inositol phosphate (IP) production in COS-7 cells transiently transfected with the GnRHR, in a dose dependent manner. The mRNA was expressed in all the tissues and organs examined. Molecular phylogenetic analysis revealed that the cloned GnRHR belongs to the type 2/nonmammalian I GnRHR. Low-expression levels were observed from the pituitary glands of reproductively active leopard geckos, indicating the possibility that there is at least one more type of GnRHR highly expressed in the pituitary gland for the gonadotropin secretion in this reptile.

  17. Identification of potential pathway mediation targets in Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Li

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in reconstruction and analytical methods for signaling networks have spurred the development of large-scale models that incorporate fully functional and biologically relevant features. An extended reconstruction of the human Toll-like receptor signaling network is presented herein. This reconstruction contains an extensive complement of kinases, phosphatases, and other associated proteins that mediate the signaling cascade along with a delineation of their associated chemical reactions. A computational framework based on the methods of large-scale convex analysis was developed and applied to this network to characterize input-output relationships. The input-output relationships enabled significant modularization of the network into ten pathways. The analysis identified potential candidates for inhibitory mediation of TLR signaling with respect to their specificity and potency. Subsequently, we were able to identify eight novel inhibition targets through constraint-based modeling methods. The results of this study are expected to yield meaningful avenues for further research in the task of mediating the Toll-like receptor signaling network and its effects.

  18. Identification and super-resolution imaging of ligand-activated receptor dimers in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, Pascale; Lartigue, Lydia; Giannone, Gregory; de Giorgi, Francesca; Ichas, François; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2013-08-01

    Molecular interactions are key to many chemical and biological processes like protein function. In many signaling processes they occur in sub-cellular areas displaying nanoscale organizations and involving molecular assemblies. The nanometric dimensions and the dynamic nature of the interactions make their investigations complex in live cells. While super-resolution fluorescence microscopies offer live-cell molecular imaging with sub-wavelength resolutions, they lack specificity for distinguishing interacting molecule populations. Here we combine super-resolution microscopy and single-molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) to identify dimers of receptors induced by ligand binding and provide super-resolved images of their membrane distribution in live cells. By developing a two-color universal-Point-Accumulation-In-the-Nanoscale-Topography (uPAINT) method, dimers of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) activated by EGF are studied at ultra-high densities, revealing preferential cell-edge sub-localization. This methodology which is specifically devoted to the study of molecules in interaction, may find other applications in biological systems where understanding of molecular organization is crucial.

  19. Recycling of epidermal growth factor-receptor complexes in A431 cells: Identification of dual pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorkin, A.; Krolenko, S.; Kudrjavtceva, N.; Lazebnik, J.; Teslenko, L.; Soderquist, A.M.; Nikolsky, N.

    1991-01-01

    The intracellular sorting of EGF-receptor complexes (EGF-RC) has been studied in human epidermoid carcinoma A431 cells. Recycling of EGF was found to occur rapidly after internalization at 37 degrees C. The initial rate of EGF recycling was reduced at 18 degrees C. A significant pool of internalized EGF was incapable of recycling at 18 degrees C but began to recycle when cells were warmed to 37 degrees C. The relative rate of EGF outflow at 37 degrees C from cells exposed to an 18 degrees C temperature block was slower (t1/2 approximately 20 min) than the rate from cells not exposed to a temperature block (t1/2 approximately 5-7 min). These data suggest that there might be both short- and long-time cycles of EGF recycling in A431 cells. Examination of the intracellular EGF-RC dissociation and dynamics of short- and long-time recycling indicated that EGF recycled as EGF-RC. Moreover, EGF receptors that were covalently labeled with a photoactivatable derivative of 125 I-EGF recycled via the long-time pathway at a rate similar to that of 125 I-EGF. Since EGF-RC degradation was also blocked at 18 degrees C, we propose that sorting to the lysosomal and long-time recycling pathway may occur after a highly temperature-sensitive step, presumably in the late endosomes

  20. Identification and phylogeny of the tomato receptor-like proteins family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermis Yanes-Paz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The receptor-like proteins (RLPs play multiple roles in development and defense. In the current work 75 RLPs were identified in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. using iterative BLAST searches and domain prediction. A phylogenetic tree including all the identified RLPs from tomato and some functionally characterized RLPs from other species was built to identify their putative homologues in tomato. We first tested whether C3-F-based phylogeny was a good indicator of functional relation between related proteins of different species. Indeed, the functionally characterized CLAVATA2 (CLV2, the maize ortholog FASCIATED EAR2 (FEA2 and a putative tomato CLV2 described in Uniprot clustered together, which validates the approach. Using this approach Solyc12g042760.1.1 was identified as the putative tomato homologue of TOO MANY MOUTHS (TMM. It was shown that proteins in the same cluster of the phylogenetic tree share functional relations since several clusters of functionally related proteins i.e. the Ve cluster, the Cf cluster, and the Eix clade were formed.   Keywords: phylogeny, receptors, RLP, tomato

  1. Identification, characterization and potent antitumor activity of ECO-4601, a novel peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdeau, Henriette; McAlpine, James B; Ranger, Maxime; Simard, Bryan; Berger, Francois; Beaudry, Francis; Farnet, Chris M; Falardeau, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    ECO-4601 is a structurally novel farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone discovered through DECIPHER technology, Thallion's proprietary drug discovery platform. The compound was shown to have a broad cytotoxic activity in the low micromolar range when tested in the NCI 60 cell line panel. In the work presented here, ECO-4601 was further evaluated against brain tumor cell lines. Preliminary mechanistic studies as well as in vivo antitumor evaluation were performed. Since ECO-4601 has a benzodiazepinone moiety, we first investigated if it binds the central and/or peripheral benzodiazepine receptors. ECO-4601 was tested in radioligand binding assays on benzodiazepine receptors obtained from rat hearts. The ability of ECO-4601 to inhibit the growth of CNS cancers was evaluated on a panel of mouse, rat and human glioma cell lines using a standard MTT assay. Antitumor efficacy studies were performed on gliomas (rat and human), human breast and human prostate mouse tumor xenografts. Antitumor activity and pharmacokinetic analysis of ECO-4601 was evaluated following intravenous (i.v.), subcutaneous (s.c.), and intraperitoneal (i.p.) bolus administrations. ECO-4601 was shown to bind the peripheral but not the central benzodiazepine receptor and inhibited the growth of CNS tumor cell lines. Bolus s.c. and i.p. administration gave rise to low but sustained drug exposure, and resulted in moderate to significant antitumor activity at doses that were well tolerated. In a rat glioma (C6) xenograft model, ECO-4601 produced up to 70% tumor growth inhibition (TGI) while in a human glioma (U-87MG) xenograft, TGI was 34%. Antitumor activity was highly significant in both human hormone-independent breast (MDA-MB-231) and prostate (PC-3) xenografts, resulting in TGI of 72 and 100%, respectively. On the other hand, i.v. dosing was followed by rapid elimination of the drug and was ineffective. Antitumor efficacy of ECO-4601 appears to be associated with the exposure parameter AUC and/or sustained

  2. Identification of a bitter-taste receptor gene repertoire in different Lagomorphs species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The repertoires of bitter taste receptor (T2R gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, Lepus europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi and Sylvilagus floridanus, using Oryctolagus cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and DNA sequencing. We studied the identities of the DNA sequences and built the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Sequencing was successful for both subspecies of Oryctolagus cuniculus for all T2R genes studied, for five genes in Lepus, and for three genes in Romerolagus diazi and Sylvilagus floridanus. We describe for the first time the partial repertoires of T2R genes for Lagomorphs species, other than the common rabbit. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that sequence proximity levels follow the established taxonomic classification.

  3. Identification of the D-1 dopamine receptor subunit in rat striatum after photoaffinity labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuno, T; Tanaka, C [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1982-12-28

    When rat striatal membranes, photolabeled with (/sup 3/H)dopamine under assay conditions similar to those used for dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase, were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, several radioactively labeled bands appeared. Labeling of these bands was reduced in the presence of non-radioactive dopamine during photolysis, but was unaffected by the presence of sulpiride. Haloperidol preferentially reduced the labeling of the main band which had a molecular weight of about 57,000 rather than the other weakly labeled bands. Labeling of this 57,000 dalton protein was not apparent when rat cerebellar membranes were used and was markedly eliminated by kainic acid-induced lesions that destroyed the intrastriatal nerve cell bodies. These results indicate that this 57,000 dalton protein is the binding subunit of the D-1 dopamine receptor.

  4. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2017-01-01

    associations with ER-negative disease for 105 susceptibility variants identified by other studies. These 125 variants explain approximately 16% of the familial risk of this breast cancer subtype. There was high genetic correlation (0.72) between risk of ER-negative breast cancer and breast cancer risk for BRCA......Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9......1 mutation carriers. These findings may lead to improved risk prediction and inform further fine-mapping and functional work to better understand the biological basis of ER-negative breast cancer....

  5. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  6. Identification of amino acids involved in histamine potentiation of GABA(A receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike eThiel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Histamine is a neurotransmitter involved in a number of physiological and neuronal functions. In mammals, such as humans and rodents, the histaminergic neurons found in the tuberomamillary nucleus (TMN project widely throughout the central nervous system (CNS. Histamine acts as positive modulator of GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs and, in high concentrations (10 mM, as negative modulator of the strychnine-sensitive glycine receptor. However, the exact molecular mechanisms by which histamine acts on GABA(ARs are unknown. In our study, we aimed to identify amino acids potentially involved in the modulatory effect of histamine on GABA(ARs. We expressed GABA(ARs with 12 different point mutations in Xenopus laevis oocytes and characterized the effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. Our data demonstrate that the amino acid residues ß2(N265 and ß2(M286, which are important for modulation by propofol, are not involved in the action of histamine. However, we found that histamine modulation is dependent on the amino acid residues alpha1(R120, ß2(Y157, ß3(D163, ß3(V175 and ß3(Q185. We showed that the amino acid residues ß2(Y157 and ß3(Q185 mediate the positive modulatory effect of histamine on GABA-induced currents, whereas alpha1(R120 and ß2(D163 form a potential histamine interaction site in GABA(ARs.

  7. Identification and Structure-Function Analysis of Subfamily Selective G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homan, Kristoff T.; Larimore, Kelly M.; Elkins, Jonathan M.; Szklarz, Marta; Knapp, Stefan; Tesmer, John J.G. [Michigan; (Oxford)

    2015-02-13

    Selective inhibitors of individual subfamilies of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) would serve as useful chemical probes as well as leads for therapeutic applications ranging from heart failure to Parkinson’s disease. To identify such inhibitors, differential scanning fluorimetry was used to screen a collection of known protein kinase inhibitors that could increase the melting points of the two most ubiquitously expressed GRKs: GRK2 and GRK5. Enzymatic assays on 14 of the most stabilizing hits revealed that three exhibit nanomolar potency of inhibition for individual GRKs, some of which exhibiting orders of magnitude selectivity. Most of the identified compounds can be clustered into two chemical classes: indazole/dihydropyrimidine-containing compounds that are selective for GRK2 and pyrrolopyrimidine-containing compounds that potently inhibit GRK1 and GRK5 but with more modest selectivity. The two most potent inhibitors representing each class, GSK180736A and GSK2163632A, were cocrystallized with GRK2 and GRK1, and their atomic structures were determined to 2.6 and 1.85 Å spacings, respectively. GSK180736A, developed as a Rho-associated, coiled-coil-containing protein kinase inhibitor, binds to GRK2 in a manner analogous to that of paroxetine, whereas GSK2163632A, developed as an insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor inhibitor, occupies a novel region of the GRK active site cleft that could likely be exploited to achieve more selectivity. However, neither compound inhibits GRKs more potently than their initial targets. This data provides the foundation for future efforts to rationally design even more potent and selective GRK inhibitors.

  8. Identification of Glycyrrhiza as the rikkunshito constituent with the highest antagonistic potential on heterologously expressed 5HT3A receptors due to the action of flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin eHerbrechter

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The traditional Japanese phytomedicine rikkunshito is traditionally used for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders, cachexia and nausea. These effects indicate 5-HT3 receptor antagonism, due to the involvement of these receptors in such pathophysiological processes. E.g. setrons, specific 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are the strongest antiemetics, developed so far. Therefore, the antagonistic effects of the eight rikkunshito constituents at heterologously expressed 5-HT3A receptors were analyzed using the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. The results indicate that tinctures from Aurantii, Ginseng, Zingiberis, Atractylodis and Glycyrrhiza inhibited the 5-HT3A receptor response, whereas the tinctures of Poria cocos, Jujubae and Pinellia exhibited no effect. Surprisingly, the strongest antagonism was found for Glycyrrhiza, whereas the Zingiberis tincture, which is considered to be primarily responsible for the effect of rikkunshito, exhibited the weakest antagonist of 5-HT3A receptors. Rikkunshito contains various vanilloids, ginsenosides and flavonoids, a portion of which show an antagonistic effect on 5-HT3 receptors. A screening of the established ingredients of the active rikkunshito constituents and related substances lead to the identification of new antagonists within the class of flavonoids. The flavonoids (--liquiritigenin, glabridin and licochalcone A from Glycyrrhiza species were found to be the most effective inhibitors of the 5-HT-induced currents in the screening. The flavonoids (--liquiritigenin and hesperetin from Aurantii inhibited the receptor response in a non-competitive manner, whereas glabridin and licochalcone A exhibited a potential competitive antagonism. Furthermore, licochalcone A acts as a partial antagonist of 5-HT3A receptors. Thus, this study reveals new 5-HT3A receptor antagonists with the aid of increasing the comprehension of the complex effects of rikkunshito.

  9. Identification of pyrazolopyrimidine arylsulfonamides as CC-chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Afjal H; Champigny, Aurelie C; Graves, Rebecca H; Hodgson, Simon T; Percy, Jonathan M; Procopiou, Panayiotis A

    2017-10-15

    A novel 4-aminoindazole sulfonamide hit (13) was identified as a human CCR4 antagonists from testing a focussed library of compounds in the primary GTPγS assay. Replacing the indazole core with a pyrazolopyrimidine, and introduction of a methoxy group adjacent to the sulfonamide substituent, resulted in the identification of pyrazolopyrimidine 37a, which exhibited good binding affinity in the GTPγS assay (pIC 50 =7.2), low lipophilicity (clogP=2.2, chromlogD 7.4 =2.4), high LE (0.41), high solubility (CLND solubility ≥581µM), and an excellent PK profile in both the rat (F=62%) and the dog (F=100%). Further SAR investigation of the pyrazolopyrimidine suggested that substitution at N1 is tolerated, providing a suitable vector to modulate the properties, and increase the potency in a lead optimisation campaign. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The human pregnane X receptor: genomic structure and identification and functional characterization of natural allelic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Kuehl, P; Green, E D; Touchman, J W; Watkins, P B; Daly, A; Hall, S D; Maurel, P; Relling, M; Brimer, C; Yasuda, K; Wrighton, S A; Hancock, M; Kim, R B; Strom, S; Thummel, K; Russell, C G; Hudson, J R; Schuetz, E G; Boguski, M S

    2001-10-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR)/steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) transcriptionally activates cytochrome P4503A4 (CYP3A4) when ligand activated by endobiotics and xenobiotics. We cloned the human PXR gene and analysed the sequence in DNAs of individuals whose CYP3A phenotype was known. The PXR gene spans 35 kb, contains nine exons, and mapped to chromosome 13q11-13. Thirty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified including six SNPs in the coding region. Three of the coding SNPs are non-synonymous creating new PXR alleles [PXR*2, P27S (79C to T); PXR*3, G36R (106G to A); and PXR*4, R122Q (4321G to A)]. The frequency of PXR*2 was 0.20 in African Americans and was never found in Caucasians. Hepatic expression of CYP3A4 protein was not significantly different between African Americans homozygous for PXR*1 compared to those with one PXR*2 allele. PXR*4 was a rare variant found in only one Caucasian person. Homology modelling suggested that R122Q, (PXR*4) is a direct DNA contact site variation in the third alpha-helix in the DNA binding domain. Compared with PXR*1, and variants PXR*2 and PXR*3, only the variant PXR*4 protein had significantly decreased affinity for the PXR binding sequence in electromobility shift assays and attenuated ligand activation of the CYP3A4 reporter plasmids in transient transfection assays. However, the person heterozygous for PXR*4 is normal for CYP3A4 metabolism phenotype. The relevance of each of the 38 PXR SNPs identified in DNA of individuals whose CYP3A basal and rifampin-inducible CYP3A4 expression was determined in vivo and/or in vitro was demonstrated by univariate statistical analysis. Because ligand activation of PXR and upregulation of a system of drug detoxification genes are major determinants of drug interactions, it will now be useful to extend this work to determine the association of these common PXR SNPs to human variation in induction of other drug detoxification gene targets.

  11. Identification of novel peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) agonists using molecular modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Veronica M. W.; Wong, Fiona S. L.; Ramachandran, Lalitha; Sethi, Gautam; Kumar, Alan Prem; Yap, Chun Wei

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) plays a critical role in lipid and glucose homeostasis. It is the target of many drug discovery studies, because of its role in various disease states including diabetes and cancer. Thiazolidinediones, a synthetic class of agents that work by activation of PPARγ, have been used extensively as insulin-sensitizers for the management of type 2 diabetes. In this study, a combination of QSAR and docking methods were utilised to perform virtual screening of more than 25 million compounds in the ZINC library. The QSAR model was developed using 1,517 compounds and it identified 42,378 potential PPARγ agonists from the ZINC library, and 10,000 of these were selected for docking with PPARγ based on their diversity. Several steps were used to refine the docking results, and finally 30 potentially highly active ligands were identified. Four compounds were subsequently tested for their in vitro activity, and one compound was found to have a K i values of <5 μM.

  12. Identification of ten variants associated with risk of estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Roger L; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Kar, Siddhartha; Lindström, Sara; Hui, Shirley; Lemaçon, Audrey; Soucy, Penny; Dennis, Joe; Jiang, Xia; Rostamianfar, Asha; Finucane, Hilary; Bolla, Manjeet K; McGuffog, Lesley; Wang, Qin; Aalfs, Cora M; Adams, Marcia; Adlard, Julian; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Allen, Jamie; Ambrosone, Christine B; Amos, Christopher I; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arndt, Volker; Arnold, Norbert; Aronson, Kristan J; Auber, Bernd; Auer, Paul L; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Azzollini, Jacopo; Bacot, François; Balmaña, Judith; Barile, Monica; Barjhoux, Laure; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrdahl, Myrto; Barnes, Daniel; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Bernstein, Leslie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Blazer, Kathleen R; Blok, Marinus J; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bobolis, Kristie; Boeckx, Bram; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Bozsik, Aniko; Bradbury, Angela R; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte; Brewer, Carole; Brinton, Louise; Broberg, Per; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brunet, Joan; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Byun, Jinyoung; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldés, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Canzian, Federico; Caron, Olivier; Carracedo, Angel; Carter, Brian D; Castelao, J Esteban; Castera, Laurent; Caux-Moncoutier, Virginie; Chan, Salina B; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Christiansen, Hans; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine L; Conner, Thomas; Conroy, Don M; Cook, Jackie; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Cornelissen, Sten; Coupier, Isabelle; Cox, Angela; Cox, David G; Cross, Simon S; Cuk, Katarina; Cunningham, Julie M; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Darabi, Hatef; Davidson, Rosemarie; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Dicks, Ed; Diez, Orland; Ding, Yuan Chun; Ditsch, Nina; Doheny, Kimberly F; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dubois, Stéphane; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Dumont, Martine; Dunning, Alison M; Durcan, Lorraine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Eccles, Diana; Eeles, Ros; Ehrencrona, Hans; Eilber, Ursula; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ekici, Arif B; Engel, Christoph; Eriksson, Mikael; Fachal, Laura; Faivre, Laurence; Fasching, Peter A; Faust, Ulrike; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Fritschi, Lin; Frost, Debra; Gabrielson, Marike; Gaddam, Pragna; Gammon, Marilie D; Ganz, Patricia A; Gapstur, Susan M; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; García-Sáenz, José A; Gaudet, Mia M; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Georgoulias, Vassilios; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giles, Graham G; Glendon, Gord; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goodfellow, Paul; Greene, Mark H; Grip, Mervi; Gronwald, Jacek; Grundy, Anne; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Guénel, Pascal; Guo, Qi; Haeberle, Lothar; Hahnen, Eric; Haiman, Christopher A; Håkansson, Niclas; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hamel, Nathalie; Hankinson, Susan; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia; Hart, Steven N; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Healey, Catherine S; Hein, Alexander; Helbig, Sonja; Henderson, Alex; Heyworth, Jane; Hicks, Belynda; Hillemanns, Peter; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hooning, Maartje J; Hoover, Bob; Hopper, John L; Hu, Chunling; Huang, Guanmengqian; Hulick, Peter J; Humphreys, Keith; Hunter, David J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Iwasaki, Motoki; Izatt, Louise; Jakubowska, Anna; James, Paul; Janavicius, Ramunas; Janni, Wolfgang; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Jones, Kristine; Jones, Michael; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kabisch, Maria; Kaczmarek, Katarzyna; Kang, Daehee; Kast, Karin; Keeman, Renske; Kerin, Michael J; Kets, Carolien M; Keupers, Machteld; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Kiiski, Johanna I; Kim, Sung-Won; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela N; Kruse, Torben A; Kwong, Ava; Lænkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Laitman, Yael; Lalloo, Fiona; Lambrechts, Diether; Landsman, Keren; Lasset, Christine; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lecarpentier, Julie; Lee, Andrew; Lee, Eunjung; Lee, Jong Won; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Lesueur, Fabienne; Li, Jingmei; Lilyquist, Jenna; Lincoln, Anne; Lindblom, Annika; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lo, Wing-Yee; Loibl, Sibylle; Long, Jirong; Loud, Jennifer T; Lubinski, Jan; Luccarini, Craig; Lush, Michael; MacInnis, Robert J; Maishman, Tom; Makalic, Enes; Kostovska, Ivana Maleva; Malone, Kathleen E; Manoukian, Siranoush; Manson, JoAnn E; Margolin, Sara; Martens, John W M; Martinez, Maria Elena; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Menéndez, Primitiva; Meyer, Jeffery; Miao, Hui; Miller, Austin; Miller, Nicola; Mitchell, Gillian; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Mulot, Claire; Nadesan, Sue; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nevelsteen, Ines; Niederacher, Dieter; Nielsen, Sune F; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Norman, Aaron; Nussbaum, Robert L; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; Ong, Kai-ren; Oosterwijk, Jan C; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Pankratz, V Shane; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Lloyd, Rachel; Pedersen, Inge Søkilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peixoto, Ana; Perez, Jose I A; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Pinchev, Mila; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana; Poppe, Bruce; Porteous, Mary E; Prentice, Ross; Presneau, Nadege; Prokofieva, Darya; Pugh, Elizabeth; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Pylkäs, Katri; Rack, Brigitte; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Rantala, Johanna; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, Christine; Rennert, Gad; Rennert, Hedy S; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Richardson, Andrea; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Romero, Atocha; Romm, Jane; Rookus, Matti A; Rudolph, Anja; Ruediger, Thomas; Saloustros, Emmanouil; Sanders, Joyce; Sandler, Dale P; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Schürmann, Peter; Schwentner, Lukas; Scott, Christopher; Scott, Rodney J; Seal, Sheila; Senter, Leigha; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Sharma, Priyanka; Shen, Chen-Yang; Sheng, Xin; Shimelis, Hermela; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Side, Lucy E; Singer, Christian F; Sohn, Christof; Southey, Melissa C; Spinelli, John J; Spurdle, Amanda B; Stegmaier, Christa; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Surowy, Harald; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tamimi, Rulla M; Tan, Yen Y; Taylor, Jack A; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Tengström, Maria; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Mary B; Tessier, Daniel C; Teulé, Alex; Thöne, Kathrin; Thull, Darcy L; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Tomlinson, Ian; Tong, Ling; Torres, Diana; Tranchant, Martine; Truong, Thérèse; Tucker, Kathy; Tung, Nadine; Tyrer, Jonathan; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Vachon, Celine; van Asperen, Christi J; Van Den Berg, David; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vega, Ana; Viel, Alessandra; Vijai, Joseph; Vincent, Daniel; Vollenweider, Jason; Walker, Lisa; Wang, Zhaoming; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weinberg, Clarice R; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wendt, Camilla; Wesseling, Jelle; Whittemore, Alice S; Wijnen, Juul T; Willett, Walter; Winqvist, Robert; Wolk, Alicja; Wu, Anna H; Xia, Lucy; Yang, Xiaohong R; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Bin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ziv, Elad; Zorn, Kristin K; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Mannermaa, Arto; Olsson, Håkan; Teixeira, Manuel R; Stone, Jennifer; Offit, Kenneth; Ottini, Laura; Park, Sue K; Thomassen, Mads; Hall, Per; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Droit, Arnaud; Bader, Gary D; Pharoah, Paul D P; Couch, Fergus J; Easton, Douglas F; Kraft, Peter; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; García-Closas, Montserrat; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Antoniou, Antonis C; Simard, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Most common breast cancer susceptibility variants have been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of predominantly estrogen receptor (ER)-positive disease1. We conducted a GWAS using 21,468 ER-negative cases and 100,594 controls combined with 18,908 BRCA1 mutation carriers (9,414 with breast cancer), all of European origin. We identified independent associations at P < 5 × 10−8 with ten variants at nine new loci. At P < 0.05, we replicated associations with 10 of 11 variants previously reported in ER-negative disease or BRCA1 mutation carrier GWAS and observed consistent associations with ER-negative disease for 105 susceptibility variants identified by other studies. These 125 variants explain approximately 14% of the familial risk of this breast cancer subtype. There was high genetic correlation (0.72) between risk of ER-negative breast cancer and breast cancer risk for BRCA1 mutation carriers. These findings may lead to improved risk prediction and inform further fine-mapping and functional work to better understand the biological basis of ER-negative breast cancer. PMID:29058716

  13. Identification of a novel modulator of thyroid hormone receptor-mediated action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard G Baumgartner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diabetes is characterized by reduced thyroid function and altered myogenesis after muscle injury. Here we identify a novel component of thyroid hormone action that is repressed in diabetic rat muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have identified a gene, named DOR, abundantly expressed in insulin-sensitive tissues such as skeletal muscle and heart, whose expression is highly repressed in muscle from obese diabetic rats. DOR expression is up-regulated during muscle differentiation and its loss-of-function has a negative impact on gene expression programmes linked to myogenesis or driven by thyroid hormones. In agreement with this, DOR enhances the transcriptional activity of the thyroid hormone receptor TR(alpha1. This function is driven by the N-terminal part of the protein. Moreover, DOR physically interacts with TR( alpha1 and to T(3-responsive promoters, as shown by ChIP assays. T(3 stimulation also promotes the mobilization of DOR from its localization in nuclear PML bodies, thereby indicating that its nuclear localization and cellular function may be related. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that DOR modulates thyroid hormone function and controls myogenesis. DOR expression is down-regulated in skeletal muscle in diabetes. This finding may be of relevance for the alterations in muscle function associated with this disease.

  14. Identification of Natural Compound Carnosol as a Novel TRPA1 Receptor Agonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenxi Zhai

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1 cation channel is one of the well-known targets for pain therapy. Herbal medicine is a rich source for new drugs and potentially useful therapeutic agents. To discover novel natural TRPA1 agonists, compounds isolated from Chinese herbs were screened using a cell-based calcium mobilization assay. Out of the 158 natural compounds derived from traditional Chinese herbal medicines, carnosol was identified as a novel agonist of TRPA1 with an EC50 value of 12.46 µM. And the agonistic effect of carnosol on TRPA1 could be blocked by A-967079, a selective TRPA1 antagonist. Furthermore, the specificity of carnosol was verified as it showed no significant effects on two other typical targets of TRP family member: TRPM8 and TRPV3. Carnosol exhibited anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties; the activation of TRPA1 might be responsible for the modulation of inflammatory nociceptive transmission. Collectively, our findings indicate that carnosol is a new anti-nociceptive agent targeting TRPA1 that can be used to explore further biological role in pain therapy.

  15. Thiazide diuretic drug receptors in rat kidney: Identification with [3H]metolazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaumont, K.; Vaughn, D.A.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    Thiazides and related diuretics inhibit NaCl reabsorption in the distal tubule through an unknown mechanism. The authors report here that [ 3 H]metolazone, a diuretic with a thiazide-like mechanism of action, labels a site in rat kidney membranes that has characteristics of the thiazide-sensitive ion transporter. [ 3 H]Metolazone bound with high affinity to a site with a density of 0.717 pmol/mg of protein in kidney membranes. The binding site was localized to the renal cortex, with little or not binding in other kidney regions and 11 other tissues. The affinities of thiazide-type diuretics for this binding site were significantly correlated with their clinical potency. Halide anions specifically inhibited high-affinity binding of [ 3 H]metolazone to this site. [ 3 ]Metolazone also bound with lower affinity to sites present in kidney as well as in liver, testis, lung, brain, heart, and other tissues. Calcium antagonists and certain smooth muscle relaxants had K i values of 0.6-10 μM for these low-affinity sites, which were not inhibited by most of the thiazide diuretics tested. Properties of the high-affinity [ 3 H]metolazone binding site are consistent with its identity as the receptor for thiazide-type diuretics

  16. Identification of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Hexon Regions That Interact with Scavenger Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khare, Reeti; Reddy, Vijay S.; Nemerow, Glen R.; Barry, Michael A. (Scripps); (Mayo)

    2012-05-04

    Most of an intravenous dose of species C adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) is destroyed by liver Kupffer cells. In contrast, another species C virus, Ad6, evades these cells to mediate more efficient liver gene delivery. Given that this difference in Kupffer cell interaction is mediated by the hypervariable (HVR) loops of the virus hexon protein, we genetically modified each of the seven HVRs of Ad5 with a cysteine residue to enable conditional blocking of these sites with polyethylene glycol (PEG). We show that these modifications do not affect in vitro virus transduction. In contrast, after intravenous injection, targeted PEGylation at HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 increased viral liver transduction up to 20-fold. Elimination or saturation of liver Kupffer cells did not significantly affect this increase in the liver transduction. In vitro, PEGylation blocked uptake of viruses via the Kupffer cell scavenger receptor SRA-II. These data suggest that HVRs 1, 2, 5, and 7 of Ad5 may be involved in Kupffer cell recognition and subsequent destruction. These data also demonstrate that this conditional genetic-chemical mutation strategy is a useful tool for investigating the interactions of viruses with host tissues.

  17. Identification and characterization of the murine cell surface receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solberg, H; Løber, D; Eriksen, J

    1992-01-01

    -blotting analysis. Binding of mouse u-PA to its receptor showed species specificity in ligand-blotting analysis, since mouse u-PA did not bind to human u-PAR and human u-PA did not bind to mouse u-PAR. The apparent M(r) of mouse u-PAR varied between different mouse cell lines and ranged over M(r) 45......,000-60,000. In four of the cell lines, mouse u-PA bound to two mouse u-PAR variant proteins, whereas in the other two cell lines studied, there was only one mouse u-PA-binding protein. In the monocyte macrophage cell line P388D.1, trypsin-treatment of intact cells could remove only the large mouse u-PAR variant (M...... to the cell surface by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. Purification of the two mouse u-PAR variant proteins by diisopropylfluorophosphate-inactivated mouse u-PA-Sepharose affinity chromatography yielded two silver-stained bands when analysed by SDS/PAGE, corresponding in electrophoretic mobility to those seen...

  18. Identification of 5HT2-receptors on longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig ileum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, G.; Hoyer, D.; Kalkman, H.O.; Wick, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    In binding experiments with the radioligands [ 3 H]Ketanserin (HKet) and [ 125 I]LSD (ILSD) 21 compounds were investigated using rat brain cortex membranes. The pK/sub D/-values of the compounds were virtually independent of the radioligand used and their rank order was consistent with classification of the binding sites as being of the 5-HT 2 -type. In contrast, in the longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig ileum in the presence of 0.3 microM cinanserin, ILSD labelled sites which were quite different to those in the cortex. In a functional test antagonism of the 5HT induced contraction of the guinea-pig ileum was measured in the presence of 1 microM atropine. The pharmacological inhibition constants (IC 50 -values) of 8 compounds correlated well with the dissociation constants for HKet binding in the cortex and did not correlate with the data from ILSD binding in the guinea pig ileum. It is concluded that the ileum contains postjunctional 5HT 2 -receptors which mediate contraction. The nature of the ILSD binding sites in the ileum remains to be elucidated

  19. Identification and Characterization of Amlexanox as a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 5 Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristoff T. Homan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs have been implicated in human diseases ranging from heart failure to diabetes. Previous studies have identified several compounds that selectively inhibit GRK2, such as paroxetine and balanol. Far fewer selective inhibitors have been reported for GRK5, a target for the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy, and the mechanism of action of reported compounds is unknown. To identify novel scaffolds that selectively inhibit GRK5, a differential scanning fluorometry screen was used to probe a library of 4480 compounds. The best hit was amlexanox, an FDA-approved anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic immunomodulator. The crystal structure of amlexanox in complex with GRK1 demonstrates that its tricyclic aromatic ring system forms ATP-like interactions with the hinge of the kinase domain, which is likely similar to how this drug binds to IκB kinase ε (IKKε, another kinase known to be inhibited by this compound. Amlexanox was also able to inhibit myocyte enhancer factor 2 transcriptional activity in neonatal rat ventricular myocytes in a manner consistent with GRK5 inhibition. The GRK1 amlexanox structure thus serves as a springboard for the rational design of inhibitors with improved potency and selectivity for GRK5 and IKKε.

  20. Identification of the bioactive and consensus peptide motif from Momordica charantia insulin receptor-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Hsin-Yi; Li, Chia-Cheng; Ho, Tin-Yun; Hsiang, Chien-Yun

    2016-08-01

    Many food bioactive peptides with diverse functions have been discovered by studying plant proteins. We have previously identified a 68-residue insulin receptor (IR)-binding protein (mcIRBP) from Momordica charantia that exhibits hypoglycemic effects in mice via interaction with IR. By in vitro digestion, we found that mcIRBP-19, spanning residues 50-68 of mcIRBP, enhanced the binding of insulin to IR, stimulated the phosphorylation of PDK1 and Akt, induced the expression of glucose transporter 4, and stimulated both the uptake of glucose in cells and the clearance of glucose in diabetic mice. Furthermore, mcIRBP-19 homologs were present in various plants and shared similar β-hairpin structures and IR kinase-activating abilities to mcIRBP-19. In conclusion, our findings suggested that mcIRBP-19 is a blood glucose-lowering bioactive peptide that exhibits IR-binding potentials. Moreover, we newly identified novel IR-binding bioactive peptides in various plants which belonged to different taxonomic families. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of benzothiazole derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists present in tire extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guochun; Zhao, Bin; Denison, Michael S

    2011-08-01

    Leachate from rubber tire material contains a complex mixture of chemicals previously shown to produce toxic and biological effects in aquatic organisms. The ability of these leachates to induce Ah receptor (AhR)-dependent cytochrome P4501A1 expression in fish indicated the presence of AhR active chemicals, but the responsible chemicals and their direct interaction with the AhR signaling pathway were not examined. Using a combination of AhR-based bioassays, we have demonstrated the ability of tire extract to stimulate both AhR DNA binding and AhR-dependent gene expression and confirmed that the responsible chemicals were metabolically labile. The application of CALUX (chemical-activated luciferase gene expression) cell bioassay-driven toxicant identification evaluation not only revealed that tire extract contained a variety of known AhR-active polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons but also identified 2-methylthiobenzothiazole and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole as AhR agonists. Analysis of a structurally diverse series of benzothiazoles identified many that could directly stimulate AhR DNA binding and transiently activate the AhR signaling pathway and identified benzothiazoles as a new class of AhR agonists. In addition to these compounds, the relatively high AhR agonist activity of a large number of fractions strongly suggests that tire extract contains a large number of physiochemically diverse AhR agonists whose identities and toxicological/biological significances are unknown. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  2. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the α subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single β subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the α subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub sα/ relative to G/sub ichemical bond/ and G/sub ochemical bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with [ 125 I]protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the β subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the α subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium

  3. Identification of the interleukin 4 receptor alpha gene as a direct target for p73.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yasushi; Mita, Hiroaki; Toyota, Minoru; Ishida, Setsuko; Morimoto, Ichiro; Yamashita, Toshiharu; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Imai, Kohzoh; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tokino, Takashi

    2003-12-01

    p73 has a high degree of structural homology to p53 and can activate transcription of p53-responsive genes. However, analysis of p73-deficient mice revealed a marked divergence in the physiological activities of p53 family genes and distinguishes p73 from p53. Mice deficient for p73 exhibit profound defects, including hippocampal dysgenesis, chronic infection, and inflammation, as well as abnormalities in pheromone sensory pathways. p73 plays important roles in neurogenesis, sensory pathways, and homeostatic regulation. Here, we found that the interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Ralpha) gene is up-regulated by p73 but not significantly by p53 in several human cancer cell lines. IL-4Ralphatranscription is also activated in response to cisplatin, a DNA-damaging agent known to induce p73. By using small interference RNA designed to target p73, we demonstrated that silencing endogenous p73 abrogates the induction of the IL-4Ralpha gene after cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, we identified a p73-binding site in the first intron of the IL-4Ralpha gene that can directly interact with the p73 protein in vivo. This p73-binding site consists of eight copies of a 10-bp consensus p53-binding motif and is a functional response element that is relatively specific for p73 among the p53 family. p73beta promoted localized nucleosomal acetylation through recruitment of coactivator p300, indicating that p73 regulates transcription of IL-4Ralpha through the unique p73-binding site. We also found that p73beta-transfected tumor cells are sensitive to IL-4-mediated apoptosis. Our data suggest that IL-4Ralpha could mediate, in part, certain immune responses and p73-dependent cell death.

  4. Identification of hormone-interacting amino acid residues within the steroid-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor in relation to other steroid hormone receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlstedt-Duke, J.; Stroemstedt, P.E.; Persson, B.; Cederlund, E.; Gustafsson, J.A.; Joernvall, H.

    1988-01-01

    Purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor was covalently charged with [ 3 H]glucocorticoid by photoaffinity labeling (UV irradiation of [ 3 H]triamcinolone acetonide-glucocorticoid receptor) or affinity labeling (incubation with [ 3 H]dexamethasone mesylate). After labeling, separate samples of the denatured receptor were cleaved with trypsin (directly or after prior succinylation), chymotrypsin, and cyanogen bromide. Labeled residues in the peptides obtained were identified by radiosequence analysis. The peaks of radioactivity corresponded to Met-622 and Cys-754 after photoaffinity labeling with [ 3 H]triamcinolone acetonide and Cys-656 after affinity labeling with [ 3 H]dexamethasone mesylate. The labeled residues are all positioned within hydrophobic segments of the steroid-binding domain. The patterns of hydropathy and secondary structure for the glucocorticoid receptor are highly similar to those for the progestin receptor and similar but less so to those for the estrogen receptor and to those for c-erb A

  5. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1994-03-01

    This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  6. Identification of alternatively spliced isoforms of interleukin-2/15 receptor β chain in ducks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jipseol; Kim, Woo H; Yeo, Jaeseung; Fernandez, Cherry P; Kim, Suk; Lee, Youn-Jeong; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Min, Wongi

    2014-12-15

    Interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-15 receptor β (IL-2/15Rβ, CD122) play important roles in signal transduction for biological functions of IL-2 and IL-15. We found that ducks possess three different IL-2/15Rβ transcripts, a conventional form (duIL-2/15Rβ) and two variants. Comparisons between the cDNA and genomic sequences revealed that the two variants, duIL-2/15Rβ-d7 and duIL-2/15Rβ-d9, were novel spliced transcripts resulting from skipping exons 7 and 9, respectively. Expression profiles of duIL-2/15Rβ and its isoforms were examined in healthy tissues, concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated splenic lymphocytes and in livers and spleens of Riemerella anatipestifer-infected ducks using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Generally, duIL-2/15Rβ-d9 expression was undetectable in healthy tissues, ConA-activated samples, and R. anatipestifer-infected ducks. Expression levels of duIL-2/15Rβ transcript were relatively high to moderate in all healthy tissues tested, while duIL-2/15Rβ-d7 expression was low. Compared to untreated controls, expression levels of duIL-2/15Rβ were elevated in ConA-activated splenic lymphocytes and in livers on day 7 in R. anatipestifer-infected ducks, while duIL-2/15Rβ-d7 expression was unchanged. Additionally, COS-7 cells transfected with duIL-2/15Rβ, duIL-2/15Rβ-d7, or duIL-2/15Rβ-d9 constructs generated 73 kilodalton (kDa), 31kDa, and 40kDa proteins, respectively. This study identified three different IL-2/15Rβ transcripts, including two isoforms generated by alternative splicing and their gene expression patterns in stimulated conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of the Calmodulin-Binding Domains of Fas Death Receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bliss J Chang

    Full Text Available The extrinsic apoptotic pathway is initiated by binding of a Fas ligand to the ectodomain of the surface death receptor Fas protein. Subsequently, the intracellular death domain of Fas (FasDD and that of the Fas-associated protein (FADD interact to form the core of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC, a crucial step for activation of caspases that induce cell death. Previous studies have shown that calmodulin (CaM is recruited into the DISC in cholangiocarcinoma cells and specifically interacts with FasDD to regulate the apoptotic/survival signaling pathway. Inhibition of CaM activity in DISC stimulates apoptosis significantly. We have recently shown that CaM forms a ternary complex with FasDD (2:1 CaM:FasDD. However, the molecular mechanism by which CaM binds to two distinct FasDD motifs is not fully understood. Here, we employed mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, biophysical, and biochemical methods to identify the binding regions of FasDD and provide a molecular basis for the role of CaM in Fas-mediated apoptosis. Proteolytic digestion and mass spectrometry data revealed that peptides spanning residues 209-239 (Fas-Pep1 and 251-288 (Fas-Pep2 constitute the two CaM-binding regions of FasDD. To determine the molecular mechanism of interaction, we have characterized the binding of recombinant/synthetic Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 peptides with CaM. Our data show that both peptides engage the N- and C-terminal lobes of CaM simultaneously. Binding of Fas-Pep1 to CaM is entropically driven while that of Fas-Pep2 to CaM is enthalpically driven, indicating that a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic forces contribute to the stabilization of the FasDD-CaM complex. Our data suggest that because Fas-Pep1 and Fas-Pep2 are involved in extensive intermolecular contacts with the death domain of FADD, binding of CaM to these regions may hinder its ability to bind to FADD, thus greatly inhibiting the initiation of apoptotic signaling

  8. Investigation of triamterene as an inhibitor of the TGR5 receptor: identification in cells and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingxiao; Cheng, Kai Chun; Niu, Chiang-Shan; Lo, Shih-Hsiang; Cheng, Juei-Tang; Niu, Ho-Shan

    2017-01-01

    G-protein-coupled bile acid receptor 1 (GPBAR1, also known as TGR5) has been shown to participate in glucose homeostasis. In animal models, a TGR5 agonist increases incretin secretion to reduce hyperglycemia. Many agonists have been developed for clinical use. However, the effects of TGR5 blockade have not been studied extensively, with the exception of studies using TGR5 knockout mice. Therefore, we investigated the potential effect of triamterene on TGR5. We transfected the TGR5 gene into cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 cells) to express TGR5. Then, we applied a fluorescent indicator to examine the glucose uptake of these transfected cells. In addition, NCI-H716 cells that secrete incretin were also evaluated. Fura-2, a fluorescence indicator, was applied to determine the changes in calcium concentrations. The levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1) were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. Moreover, rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1-like diabetes were used to investigate the effects in vivo. Triamterene dose dependently inhibits the increase in glucose uptake induced by TGR5 agonists in CHO-K1 cells expressing the TGR5 gene. In cultured NCI-H716 cells, TGR5 activation also increases GLP-1 secretion by increasing calcium levels. Triamterene inhibits the increased calcium levels by TGR5 activation through competitive antagonism. Moreover, the GLP-1 secretion and increased cAMP levels induced by TGR5 activation are both dose dependently reduced by triamterene. However, treatment with KB-R7943 at a dose sufficient to block the Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger (NCX) failed to modify the responses to TGR5 activation in NCI-H716 cells or CHO-K1 cells expressing TGR5. Therefore, the inhibitory effects of triamterene on TGR5 activation do not appear to be related to NCX inhibition. Blockade of TGR5 activation by triamterene was further characterized in vivo using the STZ-induced diabetic rats

  9. Identification and expression analysis of cobia (Rachycentron canadum) Toll-like receptor 9 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byadgi, Omkar; Puteri, Dinda; Lee, Yan-Horn; Lee, Jai-Wei; Cheng, Ta-Chih

    2014-02-01

    Cobia culture is hindered by bacterial infection (Photobacterium damselae subsp. piscicida) and in order to study the effect of P. damselae subsp. piscicida challenge and CpG ODN stimulation on cobia Toll like receptor 9 (RCTLR9), we used PCR to clone RCTLR9 gene and qRT-PCR to quantify gene expression. The results indicated that RCTLR9 cDNA contains 3141 bp. It encodes 1047 amino acids containing 16 typical structures of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) including an LRRTYP, LRRCT and a motif involved in PAMP binding was identified at position 240-253 amino acid. Broad expression of RCTLR9 was found in larval, juvenile and adult stages irrespective of the tissues. In larval stage, RCTLR9 mRNA expression decreased at 5 d and then increased at 10 dph. At juvenile stage cobia, the expression was significantly high (p Cobia challenged with P. damselae subsp. piscicida showed significant increase in RCTLR9 expression at 24 h post challenge in intestine, spleen and liver, while in kidney the expression was peak at 12 h and later it decreased at 24 h. The highest expression was 40 fold increase in spleen and the lowest expression was ∼3.6 fold increase in liver. Cobia stimulated with CpG oligonucleotides showed that the induction of these genes was CpG ODN type and time dependent. In spleen and liver, CpG ODNs 1668 and 2006 injected group showed high expression of RCTLR9, IL-1β, chemokine CC compared to other groups. Meanwhile, CpG ODN 2006 has induced high expression of IgM. The CpG ODNs 2395 have induced significant high expression of Mx in spleen and liver. These results demonstrates the potential of using CpG ODN to enhance cobia resistance to P. damselae subsp. piscicida infection and use as an adjuvant in vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of Cell Type-Specific Differences in Erythropoietin Receptor Signaling in Primary Erythroid and Lung Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Merkle

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer, with its most prevalent form non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC, is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide, and is commonly treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin. Lung cancer patients frequently suffer from chemotherapy-induced anemia, which can be treated with erythropoietin (EPO. However, studies have indicated that EPO not only promotes erythropoiesis in hematopoietic cells, but may also enhance survival of NSCLC cells. Here, we verified that the NSCLC cell line H838 expresses functional erythropoietin receptors (EPOR and that treatment with EPO reduces cisplatin-induced apoptosis. To pinpoint differences in EPO-induced survival signaling in erythroid progenitor cells (CFU-E, colony forming unit-erythroid and H838 cells, we combined mathematical modeling with a method for feature selection, the L1 regularization. Utilizing an example model and simulated data, we demonstrated that this approach enables the accurate identification and quantification of cell type-specific parameters. We applied our strategy to quantitative time-resolved data of EPO-induced JAK/STAT signaling generated by quantitative immunoblotting, mass spectrometry and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR in CFU-E and H838 cells as well as H838 cells overexpressing human EPOR (H838-HA-hEPOR. The established parsimonious mathematical model was able to simultaneously describe the data sets of CFU-E, H838 and H838-HA-hEPOR cells. Seven cell type-specific parameters were identified that included for example parameters for nuclear translocation of STAT5 and target gene induction. Cell type-specific differences in target gene induction were experimentally validated by qRT-PCR experiments. The systematic identification of pathway differences and sensitivities of EPOR signaling in CFU-E and H838 cells revealed potential targets for intervention to selectively inhibit EPO-induced signaling in the tumor cells but leave the responses in

  11. Three nuclear and two membrane estrogen receptors in basal teleosts, Anguilla sp.: Identification, evolutionary history and differential expression regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafont, Anne Gaëlle; Rousseau, Karine; Tomkiewicz, Jonna

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens interact with classical intracellular nuclear receptors (ESR), and with G-coupled membrane receptors (GPER). In the eel, we identified three nuclear (ESR1, ESR2a, ESR2b) and two membrane (GPERa, GPERb) estrogen receptors. Duplicated ESR2 and GPER were also retrieved in most extant teleo...

  12. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. PMID:27519550

  13. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-11-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the promoter regions of its target genes. In this study, we showed that CINPA1 is converted to two main metabolites in human liver microsomes. By using cell-based reporter gene and biochemical coregulator recruitment assays, we showed that although metabolite 1 was very weak in inhibiting CAR function and disrupting CAR-coactivator interaction, metabolite 2 was inactive in this regard. Docking studies using the CAR ligand-binding domain structure showed that although CINPA1 and metabolite 1 can bind in the CAR ligand-binding pocket, metabolite 2 may be incapable of the molecular interactions required for binding. These results indicate that the metabolites of CINPA1 may not interfere with the action of CINPA1. We also used in vitro enzyme assays to identify the cytochrome P450 enzymes responsible for metabolizing CINPA1 in human liver microsomes and showed that CINPA1 was first converted to metabolite 1 by CYP3A4 and then further metabolized by CYP2D6 to metabolite 2. Identification and characterization of the metabolites of CINPA1 enabled structure-activity relationship studies of this family of small molecules and provided information to guide in vivo pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  14. Genetic variation of the growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene is associated with alcohol use disorders identification test scores and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchankova, Petra; Nilsson, Staffan; von der Pahlen, Bettina; Santtila, Pekka; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Johansson, Ada; Jern, Patrick; Engel, Jörgen A; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2016-03-01

    The multifaceted gut-brain peptide ghrelin and its receptor (GHSR-1a) are implicated in mechanisms regulating not only the energy balance but also the reward circuitry. In our pre-clinical models, we have shown that ghrelin increases whereas GHSR-1a antagonists decrease alcohol consumption and the motivation to consume alcohol in rodents. Moreover, ghrelin signaling is required for the rewarding properties of addictive drugs including alcohol and nicotine in rodents. Given the hereditary component underlying addictive behaviors and disorders, we sought to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in the pre-proghrelin gene (GHRL) and GHSR-1a gene (GHSR) are associated with alcohol use, measured by the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) and smoking. Two SNPs located in GHRL, rs4684677 (Gln90Leu) and rs696217 (Leu72Met), and one in GHSR, rs2948694, were genotyped in a subset (n = 4161) of a Finnish population-based cohort, the Genetics of Sexuality and Aggression project. The effect of these SNPs on AUDIT scores and smoking was investigated using linear and logistic regressions, respectively. We found that the minor allele of the rs2948694 SNP was nominally associated with higher AUDIT scores (P = 0.0204, recessive model) and smoking (P = 0.0002, dominant model). Furthermore, post hoc analyses showed that this risk allele was also associated with increased likelihood of having high level of alcohol problems as determined by AUDIT scores ≥ 16 (P = 0.0043, recessive model). These convergent findings lend further support for the hypothesized involvement of ghrelin signaling in addictive disorders. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  15. Identification of a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing molecule, STAM2, by mass spectrometry and its involvement in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pandey, A; Fernandez, M M; Steen, H

    2000-01-01

    In an effort to clone novel tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates of the epidermal growth factor receptor, we have initiated an approach coupling affinity purification using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to mass spectrometry-based identification. Here, we report the identification of a signaling m...

  16. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

    1996-08-01

    Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

  17. Direct labelling of the human P2X7 receptor and identification of positive and negative cooperativity of binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, A D; Chambers, L J; Clay, W C; Condreay, J P; Walter, D S; Chessell, I P

    2007-05-01

    The P2X(7) receptor exhibits complex pharmacological properties. In this study, binding of a [(3)H]-labelled P2X(7) receptor antagonist to human P2X(7) receptors has been examined to further understand ligand interactions with this receptor. The P2X(7) receptor antagonist, N-[2-({2-[(2-hydroxyethyl)amino]ethyl}amino)-5-quinolinyl]-2-tricyclo[3.3.1.1(3,7)]dec-1-ylacetamide (compound-17), was radiolabelled with tritium and binding studies were performed using membranes prepared from U-2 OS or HEK293 cells expressing human recombinant P2X(7) receptors. Binding of [(3)H]-compound-17 was higher in membranes prepared from cells expressing P2X(7) receptors than from control cells and was inhibited by ATP suggesting labelled sites represented human P2X(7) receptors. Binding was reversible, saturable and modulated by P2X(7) receptor ligands (Brilliant Blue G, KN62, ATP, decavanadate). Furthermore, ATP potency was reduced in the presence of divalent cations or NaCl. Radioligand binding exhibited both positive and negative cooperativity. Positive cooperativity was evident from bell shaped Scatchard plots, reduction in radioligand dissociation rate by unlabelled compound-17 and enhancement of radioligand binding by KN62 and unlabelled compound-17. ATP and decavanadate inhibited binding in a negative cooperative manner as they enhanced radioligand dissociation. These data demonstrate that human P2X(7) receptors can be directly labelled and provide novel insights into receptor function. The positive cooperativity observed suggests that binding of compound-17 to one subunit in the P2X(7) receptor complex enhances subsequent binding to other P2X(7) subunits in the same complex. The negative cooperative effects of ATP suggest that ATP and compound-17 bind at separate, interacting, sites on the P2X(7) receptor.

  18. High throughput mutagenesis for identification of residues regulating human prostacyclin (hIP receptor expression and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Bill

    Full Text Available The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP receptor is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR that plays a critical role in vascular smooth muscle relaxation and platelet aggregation. hIP receptor dysfunction has been implicated in numerous cardiovascular abnormalities, including myocardial infarction, hypertension, thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Genomic sequencing has discovered several genetic variations in the PTGIR gene coding for hIP receptor, however, its structure-function relationship has not been sufficiently explored. Here we set out to investigate the applicability of high throughput random mutagenesis to study the structure-function relationship of hIP receptor. While chemical mutagenesis was not suitable to generate a mutagenesis library with sufficient coverage, our data demonstrate error-prone PCR (epPCR mediated mutagenesis as a valuable method for the unbiased screening of residues regulating hIP receptor function and expression. Here we describe the generation and functional characterization of an epPCR derived mutagenesis library compromising >4000 mutants of the hIP receptor. We introduce next generation sequencing as a useful tool to validate the quality of mutagenesis libraries by providing information about the coverage, mutation rate and mutational bias. We identified 18 mutants of the hIP receptor that were expressed at the cell surface, but demonstrated impaired receptor function. A total of 38 non-synonymous mutations were identified within the coding region of the hIP receptor, mapping to 36 distinct residues, including several mutations previously reported to affect the signaling of the hIP receptor. Thus, our data demonstrates epPCR mediated random mutagenesis as a valuable and practical method to study the structure-function relationship of GPCRs.

  19. High throughput mutagenesis for identification of residues regulating human prostacyclin (hIP) receptor expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Anke; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M; Kent, Toby C; Fawcett, Lindsay; Burchell, Lynn; van Diepen, Michiel T; Marelli, Anthony; Batalov, Sergey; Miraglia, Loren; Orth, Anthony P; Renaud, Nicole A; Charlton, Steven J; Gosling, Martin; Gaither, L Alex; Groot-Kormelink, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    The human prostacyclin receptor (hIP receptor) is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that plays a critical role in vascular smooth muscle relaxation and platelet aggregation. hIP receptor dysfunction has been implicated in numerous cardiovascular abnormalities, including myocardial infarction, hypertension, thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Genomic sequencing has discovered several genetic variations in the PTGIR gene coding for hIP receptor, however, its structure-function relationship has not been sufficiently explored. Here we set out to investigate the applicability of high throughput random mutagenesis to study the structure-function relationship of hIP receptor. While chemical mutagenesis was not suitable to generate a mutagenesis library with sufficient coverage, our data demonstrate error-prone PCR (epPCR) mediated mutagenesis as a valuable method for the unbiased screening of residues regulating hIP receptor function and expression. Here we describe the generation and functional characterization of an epPCR derived mutagenesis library compromising >4000 mutants of the hIP receptor. We introduce next generation sequencing as a useful tool to validate the quality of mutagenesis libraries by providing information about the coverage, mutation rate and mutational bias. We identified 18 mutants of the hIP receptor that were expressed at the cell surface, but demonstrated impaired receptor function. A total of 38 non-synonymous mutations were identified within the coding region of the hIP receptor, mapping to 36 distinct residues, including several mutations previously reported to affect the signaling of the hIP receptor. Thus, our data demonstrates epPCR mediated random mutagenesis as a valuable and practical method to study the structure-function relationship of GPCRs.

  20. Identification of high- and low-affinity NGF receptors during development of the chicken central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escandon, E.; Chao, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    In order to study regulation of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor during embryogenesis in chick brain, we have used affinity crosslinking of tissues with 125 I-NGF. NGF interacts with high- and low-affinity receptors; high-affinity receptors are required for the majority of NGF's actions. Most measurements of receptor levels do not distinguish between high- and low-affinity forms of the receptor. We have used the lipophilic crosslinking agent HSAB to identify the high-affinity, functional receptor during development of the chicken central nervous system. A peak of expression during Embryonic Days 5-10 was detected in all regions of the chicken central nervous system, but, shortly after birth, only the cerebellar region displays significant levels of NGF receptor protein. The time course of expression confirms the dramatic regulation of the NGF receptor gene during defined embryonic periods. The detection of high-affinity NGF receptors in brain and neural retina provides strong evidence that NGF is involved in essential ontogenetic events in the development of the chicken central nervous system

  1. Molecular characterization of the gerbil C5a receptor and identification of a transmembrane domain V amino acid that is crucial for small molecule antagonist interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Stephen M; Brodbeck, Robbin M; Steflik, Jeremy; Yu, Jianying; Baltazar, Carolyn; Peck, Amy E; Severance, Daniel; Zhang, Lu Yan; Currie, Kevin; Chenard, Bertrand L; Hutchison, Alan J; Maynard, George; Krause, James E

    2005-12-09

    Anaphylatoxin C5a is a potent inflammatory mediator associated with pathogenesis and progression of several inflammation-associated disorders. Small molecule C5a receptor (C5aR) antagonist development is hampered by species-specific receptor biology and the associated inability to use standard rat and mouse in vivo models. Gerbil is one rodent species reportedly responsive to small molecule C5aR antagonists with human C5aR affinity. We report the identification of the gerbil C5aR cDNA using a degenerate primer PCR cloning strategy. The nucleotide sequence revealed an open reading frame encoding a 347-amino acid protein. The cloned receptor (expressed in Sf9 cells) bound recombinant human C5a with nanomolar affinity. Alignment of the gerbil C5aR sequence with those from other species showed that a Trp residue in transmembrane domain V is the only transmembrane domain amino acid unique to small molecule C5aR antagonist-responsive species (i.e. gerbil, human, and non-human primate). Site-directed mutagenesis was used to generate human and mouse C5aRs with a residue exchange of this Trp residue. Mutation of Trp to Leu in human C5aR completely eliminated small molecule antagonist-receptor interaction. In contrast, mutation of Leu to Trp in mouse C5aR enabled small molecule antagonist-receptor interaction. This crucial Trp residue is located deeper within transmembrane domain V than residues reportedly involved in C5a- and cyclic peptide C5a antagonist-receptor interaction, suggesting a novel interaction site(s) for small molecule antagonists. These data provide insight into the basis for small molecule antagonist species selectivity and further define sites critical for C5aR activation and function.

  2. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Zhu, Hao [The Rutgers Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Department of Chemistry, Rutgers University, Camden, NJ (United States); Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia [NovaMechanics Ltd., Nicosia (Cyprus); Rusyn, Ivan, E-mail: iir@unc.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Tropsha, Alexander, E-mail: alex_tropsha@unc.edu [Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R{sup 2} = 0.71, STL R{sup 2} = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R{sup 2} = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function.

  3. Identification of putative estrogen receptor-mediated endocrine disrupting chemicals using QSAR- and structure-based virtual screening approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liying; Sedykh, Alexander; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Zhu, Hao; Afantitis, Antreas; Mouchlis, Varnavas D.; Melagraki, Georgia; Rusyn, Ivan; Tropsha, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Identification of endocrine disrupting chemicals is one of the important goals of environmental chemical hazard screening. We report on the development of validated in silico predictors of chemicals likely to cause estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated endocrine disruption to facilitate their prioritization for future screening. A database of relative binding affinity of a large number of ERα and/or ERβ ligands was assembled (546 for ERα and 137 for ERβ). Both single-task learning (STL) and multi-task learning (MTL) continuous quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) models were developed for predicting ligand binding affinity to ERα or ERβ. High predictive accuracy was achieved for ERα binding affinity (MTL R 2 = 0.71, STL R 2 = 0.73). For ERβ binding affinity, MTL models were significantly more predictive (R 2 = 0.53, p < 0.05) than STL models. In addition, docking studies were performed on a set of ER agonists/antagonists (67 agonists and 39 antagonists for ERα, 48 agonists and 32 antagonists for ERβ, supplemented by putative decoys/non-binders) using the following ER structures (in complexes with respective ligands) retrieved from the Protein Data Bank: ERα agonist (PDB ID: 1L2I), ERα antagonist (PDB ID: 3DT3), ERβ agonist (PDB ID: 2NV7), and ERβ antagonist (PDB ID: 1L2J). We found that all four ER conformations discriminated their corresponding ligands from presumed non-binders. Finally, both QSAR models and ER structures were employed in parallel to virtually screen several large libraries of environmental chemicals to derive a ligand- and structure-based prioritized list of putative estrogenic compounds to be used for in vitro and in vivo experimental validation. - Highlights: • This is the largest curated dataset inclusive of ERα and β (the latter is unique). • New methodology that for the first time affords acceptable ERβ models. • A combination of QSAR and docking enables prediction of affinity and function. • The results

  4. Identification of biased sectors in emission data using a combination of chemical transport model and receptor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uranishi, Katsushige; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Nakatsubo, Ryohei; Shimadera, Hikari; Kondo, Akira; Kikutani, Yuki; Asano, Katsuyoshi; Sugata, Seiji

    2017-10-01

    This study presented a comparison approach with multiple source apportionment methods to identify which sectors of emission data have large biases. The source apportionment methods for the comparison approach included both receptor and chemical transport models, which are widely used to quantify the impacts of emission sources on fine particulate matter of less than 2.5 μm in diameter (PM2.5). We used daily chemical component concentration data in the year 2013, including data for water-soluble ions, elements, and carbonaceous species of PM2.5 at 11 sites in the Kinki-Tokai district in Japan in order to apply the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model for the source apportionment. Seven PMF factors of PM2.5 were identified with the temporal and spatial variation patterns and also retained features of the sites. These factors comprised two types of secondary sulfate, road transportation, heavy oil combustion by ships, biomass burning, secondary nitrate, and soil and industrial dust, accounting for 46%, 17%, 7%, 14%, 13%, and 3% of the PM2.5, respectively. The multiple-site data enabled a comprehensive identification of the PM2.5 sources. For the same period, source contributions were estimated by air quality simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) with the brute-force method (BFM) for four source categories. Both models provided consistent results for the following three of the four source categories: secondary sulfates, road transportation, and heavy oil combustion sources. For these three target categories, the models' agreement was supported by the small differences and high correlations between the CMAQ/BFM- and PMF-estimated source contributions to the concentrations of PM2.5, SO42-, and EC. In contrast, contributions of the biomass burning sources apportioned by CMAQ/BFM were much lower than and little correlated with those captured by the PMF model, indicating large uncertainties in the biomass burning emissions used in the

  5. Identification of a potent and selective free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1/GPR40) agonist with favorable physicochemical and in vitro ADME properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Elisabeth; Urban, Christian; Grundmann, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The free fatty acid receptor 1 (FFA1, also known as GPR40) enhances glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from pancreatic ß-cells and is recognized as an interesting new target for treatment of type 2 diabetes. Several series of selective FFA1 agonists are already known. Most of these are derived...... from free fatty acids (FFAs) or glitazones, and are relatively lipophilic. Aiming at the development of potent, selective and less lipophilic FFA1 agonists, the terminal phenyl of a known compound series was replaced by nitrogen containing heterocycles. This resulted in the identification of 37......, a selective FFA1 agonist with potent activity on recombinant human FFA1 receptors and on the rat insulinoma cell line INS-1E, optimal lipophilicity and excellent in vitro permeability and metabolic stability....

  6. Identification and characterization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the canine prostate using [125I]-Heat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepor, H.; Baumann, M.; Shapiro, E.

    1987-01-01

    We have recently utilized radioligand receptor binding methods to characterize muscarinic cholinergic and alpha adrenergic receptors in human prostate adenomas. The primary advantages of radioligand receptor binding methods are that neurotransmitter receptor density is quantitated, the affinity of unlabelled drugs for receptor sites is determined, and receptors can be localized using autoradiography on slide-mounted tissue sections. Recently, [ 125 I]-Heat, a selective and high affinity ligand with high specific activity (2200 Ci/mmole) has been used to characterize alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the brain. In this study alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the dog prostate were characterized using [ 125 I]-Heat. The Scatchard plots were linear indicating homogeneity of [ 125 I]-Heat binding sites. The mean alpha 1 adrenergic receptor density determined from these Scatchard plots was 0.61 +/- 0.07 fmol/mg. wet wt. +/- S.E.M. The binding of [ 125 I]-Heat to canine prostate alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was of high affinity (Kd = 86 +/- 19 pM). Steady state conditions were reached following an incubation interval of 30 minutes and specific binding and tissue concentration were linear within the range of tissue concentrations assayed. The specificity of [ 125 I]-Heat for alpha 1 adrenergic binding sites was confirmed by competitive displacement assays using unlabelled clonidine and prazosin. Retrospective analysis of the saturation experiments demonstrated that Bmax can be accurately calculated by determining specific [ 125 I]-Heat binding at a single ligand concentration. [ 125 I]-Heat is an ideal ligand for studying alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate and its favorable properties should facilitate the autoradiographic localization of alpha 1 adrenergic receptors in the prostate

  7. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas A Schober

    Full Text Available Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S. Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  8. Identification, expression and functional characterization of M4L, a muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor splice variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, Douglas A; Croy, Carrie H; Ruble, Cara L; Tao, Ran; Felder, Christian C

    2017-01-01

    Rodent genomic alignment sequences support a 2-exon model for muscarinic M4 receptor. Using this model a novel N-terminal extension was discovered in the human muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor. An open reading frame was discovered in the human, mouse and rat with a common ATG (methionine start codon) that extended the N-terminus of the muscarinic acetylcholine M4 receptor subtype by 155 amino acids resulting in a longer variant. Transcriptional evidence for this splice variant was confirmed by RNA-Seq and RT-PCR experiments performed from human donor brain prefrontal cortices. We detected a human upstream exon indicating the translation of the mature longer M4 receptor transcript. The predicted size for the longer two-exon M4 receptor splice variant with the additional 155 amino acid N-terminal extension, designated M4L is 69.7 kDa compared to the 53 kDa canonical single exon M4 receptor (M4S). Western blot analysis from a mammalian overexpression system, and saturation radioligand binding with [3H]-NMS (N-methyl-scopolamine) demonstrated the expression of this new splice variant. Comparative pharmacological characterization between the M4L and M4S receptors revealed that both the orthosteric and allosteric binding sites for both receptors were very similar despite the addition of an N-terminal extension.

  9. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Omori

    Full Text Available Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR, neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1, and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1, localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control.

  10. Identification of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Primary Cilia and Their Possible Involvement in Body Weight Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yoshihiro; Chaya, Taro; Yoshida, Satoyo; Irie, Shoichi; Tsujii, Toshinori; Furukawa, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Primary cilia are sensory organelles that harbor various receptors such as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We analyzed subcellular localization of 138 non-odorant GPCRs. We transfected GPCR expression vectors into NIH3T3 cells, induced ciliogenesis by serum starvation, and observed subcellular localization of GPCRs by immunofluorescent staining. We found that several GPCRs whose ligands are involved in feeding behavior, including prolactin-releasing hormone receptor (PRLHR), neuropeptide FF receptor 1 (NPFFR1), and neuromedin U receptor 1 (NMUR1), localized to the primary cilia. In addition, we found that a short form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2S) is efficiently transported to the primary cilia, while a long form of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2L) is rarely transported to the primary cilia. Using an anti-Prlhr antibody, we found that Prlhr localized to the cilia on the surface of the third ventricle in the vicinity of the hypothalamic periventricular nucleus. We generated the Npy2r-Cre transgenic mouse line in which Cre-recombinase is expressed under the control of the promoter of Npy2r encoding a ciliary GPCR. By mating Npy2r-Cre mice with Ift80 flox mice, we generated Ift80 conditional knockout (CKO) mice in which Npy2r-positive cilia were diminished in number. We found that Ift80 CKO mice exhibited a body weight increase. Our results suggest that Npy2r-positive cilia are important for body weight control.

  11. Identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Jacob Lauwring, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Schrøder, Tenna Juul; Christensen, Søren [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Strandbygård, Dorthe [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Pallesen, Lone Tjener [Aarhus University, Ole Worms Allé 3, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); García-Alai, Maria Marta [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Lindberg, Samsa; Langgård, Morten; Eskildsen, Jørgen Calí; David, Laurent; Tagmose, Lena; Simonsen, Klaus Baek; Maltas, Philip James; Rønn, Lars Christian Biilmann; Jong, Inge E. M. de; Malik, Ibrahim John; Egebjerg, Jan; Karlsson, Jens-Jacob [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Uppalanchi, Srinivas; Sakumudi, Durga Rao; Eradi, Pradheep [GVK BioScience, Plot No. 28 A, IDA Nacharam, Hyderabad 500 076 (India); Watson, Steven P., E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [H. Lundbeck A/S, Ottiliavej 9, 2500 Valby (Denmark); Thirup, Søren, E-mail: jla@mb.au.dk [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-02-01

    The identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex are reported. Sortilin is a type I membrane glycoprotein belonging to the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p) family of sorting receptors and is most abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. Sortilin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of neuronal viability and has been implicated as a possible therapeutic target in a range of disorders. Here, the identification of AF40431, the first reported small-molecule ligand of sortilin, is reported. Crystals of the sortilin–AF40431 complex were obtained by co-crystallization and the structure of the complex was solved to 2.7 Å resolution. AF40431 is bound in the neurotensin-binding site of sortilin, with the leucine moiety of AF40431 mimicking the binding mode of the C-terminal leucine of neurotensin and the 4-methylumbelliferone moiety of AF40431 forming π-stacking with a phenylalanine.

  12. Identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Jacob Lauwring; Schrøder, Tenna Juul; Christensen, Søren; Strandbygård, Dorthe; Pallesen, Lone Tjener; García-Alai, Maria Marta; Lindberg, Samsa; Langgård, Morten; Eskildsen, Jørgen Calí; David, Laurent; Tagmose, Lena; Simonsen, Klaus Baek; Maltas, Philip James; Rønn, Lars Christian Biilmann; Jong, Inge E. M. de; Malik, Ibrahim John; Egebjerg, Jan; Karlsson, Jens-Jacob; Uppalanchi, Srinivas; Sakumudi, Durga Rao; Eradi, Pradheep; Watson, Steven P.; Thirup, Søren

    2014-01-01

    The identification of the first small-molecule ligand of the neuronal receptor sortilin and structure determination of the receptor–ligand complex are reported. Sortilin is a type I membrane glycoprotein belonging to the vacuolar protein sorting 10 protein (Vps10p) family of sorting receptors and is most abundantly expressed in the central nervous system. Sortilin has emerged as a key player in the regulation of neuronal viability and has been implicated as a possible therapeutic target in a range of disorders. Here, the identification of AF40431, the first reported small-molecule ligand of sortilin, is reported. Crystals of the sortilin–AF40431 complex were obtained by co-crystallization and the structure of the complex was solved to 2.7 Å resolution. AF40431 is bound in the neurotensin-binding site of sortilin, with the leucine moiety of AF40431 mimicking the binding mode of the C-terminal leucine of neurotensin and the 4-methylumbelliferone moiety of AF40431 forming π-stacking with a phenylalanine

  13. Identification of G-Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    orphan GPCRs has been the difficulty in setting up screens for ligands, as the G protein coupling of an orphan may not be known; chimeric G proteins...G protein-coupled receptor quantification using peptide group-specific enrichment combined with internal peptide standard reporter cali- bration. J...novel peptides and their receptors. AAPS J 12:378–384. Pan W (2002) A comparative review of statistical methods for discovering differen- tially

  14. Identification and functional analysis of pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 mating locus of Pleurotus eryngii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency.

  15. Identification of endogenous surrogate ligands for human P2Y12 receptors by in silico and in vitro methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Yosuke; Hiramoto, Takeshi; Fujita, Norihisa

    2005-01-01

    Endogenous ligands acting on a human P2Y 12 receptor, one of the G-protein coupled receptors, were searched by in silico screening against our own database, which contains more than 500 animal metabolites. The in silico screening using the docking software AutoDock resulted in selection of cysteinylleukotrienes (CysLTs) and 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PRPP), with high free energy changes, in addition to the known P2Y 12 ligands such as 2MeSADP and ADP. These candidates were subjected to an in vitro Ca 2+ assay using the CHO cells stably expressing P2Y 12 -G 16 α fusion proteins. We found that CysLTE4 and PRPP acted on the P2Y 12 receptor as agonists with the EC 50 values of 1.3 and 7.8 nM, respectively. Furthermore, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the P2Y, P2Y-like, and CysLT receptors based on sequence alignment followed by evolutionary analyses. The analyses showed that the P2Y 12 , P2Y 13 , P2Y 14 , GPR87, CysLT-1, and CysLT-2 receptors formed a P2Y-related receptor subfamily with common sequence motifs in the transmembrane regions

  16. Identification and expression analysis of an atypical chemokine receptor-2 (ACKR2)/CC chemokine binding protein-2 (CCBP2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhitao; Jiang, Yousheng; Holland, Jason W; Nie, Pin; Secombes, Christopher J; Wang, Tiehui

    2015-06-01

    Atypical chemokine receptors (ACKRs) have emerged as key components of the chemokine system, with an essential regulatory function in innate and adaptive immune responses and inflammation. In mammals ACKR2 is a 'scavenging' receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines and plays a central role in the resolution of in vivo inflammatory responses. An ACKR2 like gene has been identified and cloned in rainbow trout (Teleostei) in the present study, enabling the further identification of this molecule in another group of ray-finned teleost fish (Holostei), in a lobe-finned fish (Sarcopterygii-coelacanth), and in reptiles. The identity of these ACKR2 molecules is supported by their conserved structure, and by phylogenetic tree and synteny analysis. Trout ACKR2 is highly expressed in spleen and head kidney, suggesting a homeostatic role of this receptor in limiting the availability of its potential ligands. Trout ACKR2 expression can be modulated in vivo by bacterial and parasitic infections, and in vitro by PAMPs (poly I:C and peptidoglycan) and cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-21) in a time dependent manner. These patterns of expression and modulation suggest that trout ACKR2 is regulated in a complex way and has an important role in control of the chemokine network in fish as in mammals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of putative agouti-related protein(87-132)-melanocortin-4 receptor interactions by homology molecular modeling and validation using chimeric peptide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczynski, Andrzej; Wang, Xiang S; Joseph, Christine G; Xiang, Zhimin; Bauzo, Rayna M; Scott, Joseph W; Sorensen, Nicholas B; Shaw, Amanda M; Millard, William J; Richards, Nigel G; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2004-04-22

    Agouti-related protein (AGRP) is one of only two naturally known antagonists of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) identified to date. Specifically, AGRP antagonizes the brain melanocortin-3 and -4 receptors involved in energy homeostasis. Alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) is one of the known endogenous agonists for these melanocortin receptors. Insight into putative interactions between the antagonist AGRP amino acids with the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) may be important for the design of unique ligands for the treatment of obesity related diseases and is currently lacking in the literature. A three-dimensional homology molecular model of the mouse MC4 receptor complex with the hAGRP(87-132) ligand docked into the receptor has been developed to identify putative antagonist ligand-receptor interactions. Key putative AGRP-MC4R interactions include the Arg111 of hAGRP(87-132) interacting in a negatively charged pocket located in a cavity formed by transmembrane spanning (TM) helices 1, 2, 3, and 7, capped by the acidic first extracellular loop (EL1) and specifically with the conserved melanocortin receptor residues mMC4R Glu92 (TM2), mMC4R Asp114 (TM3), and mMC4R Asp118 (TM3). Additionally, Phe112 and Phe113 of hAGRP(87-132) putatively interact with an aromatic hydrophobic pocket formed by the mMC4 receptor residues Phe176 (TM4), Phe193 (TM5), Phe253 (TM6), and Phe254 (TM6). To validate the AGRP-mMC4R model complex presented herein from a ligand perspective, we generated nine chimeric peptide ligands based on a modified antagonist template of the hAGRP(109-118) (Tyr-c[Asp-Arg-Phe-Phe-Asn-Ala-Phe-Dpr]-Tyr-NH(2)). In these chimeric ligands, the antagonist AGRP Arg-Phe-Phe residues were replaced by the melanocortin agonist His/D-Phe-Arg-Trp amino acids. These peptides resulted in agonist activity at the mouse melanocortin receptors (mMC1R and mMC3-5Rs). The most notable results include the identification of a novel subnanomolar melanocortin peptide

  18. Identification of transmembrane domain 6 & 7 residues that contribute to the binding pocket of the urotensin II receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleran, Brian J; Domazet, Ivana; Beaulieu, Marie-Eve; Yan, Li Ping; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre; Escher, Emanuel; Leduc, Richard

    2009-04-15

    Urotensin II (U-II), a cyclic undecapeptide, is the natural ligand of the urotensin II (UT) receptor, a G protein-coupled receptor. In the present study, we used the substituted-cysteine accessibility method to identify specific residues in transmembrane domains (TMDs) six and seven of the rat urotensin II receptor (rUT) that contribute to the formation of the binding pocket of the receptor. Each residue in the R256(6.32)-Q283(6.59) fragment of TMD6 and the A295(7.31)-T321(7.57) fragment of TMD7 was mutated, individually, to a cysteine. The resulting mutants were expressed in COS-7 cells, which were subsequently treated with the positively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylammonium (MTSEA) or the negatively charged methanethiosulfonate-ethylsulfonate (MTSES) sulfhydryl-specific alkylating agents. MTSEA treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of TMD6 mutants F268C(6.44) and W278C(6.54) and TMD7 mutants L298C(7.34), T302C(7.38), and T303C(7.39) to (125)I-U-II. MTSES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in the binding of two additional mutants, namely L282C(6.58) in TMD6 and Y300C(7.36) in TMD7. These results suggest that specific residues orient themselves within the water-accessible binding pocket of the rUT receptor. This approach, which allowed us to identify key determinants in TMD6 and TMD7 that contribute to the UT receptor binding pocket, enabled us to further refine our homology-based model of how U-II interacts with its cognate receptor.

  19. Identification of a sugar gustatory receptor and its effect on fecundity of the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Wen; Kang, Kui; Yang, Pan; Zhang, Wen-Qing

    2017-11-27

    In insects, the gustatory system plays a crucial role in multiple physiological behaviors, including feeding, toxin avoidance, courtship, mating and oviposition. Gustatory stimuli from the environment are recognized by gustatory receptors. To date, little is known about the function of gustatory receptors in agricultural pest insects. In this study, we cloned a sugar gustatory receptor gene, NlGr11, from the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), a serious pest of rice in Asia; we then identified its ligands, namely, fructose, galactose and arabinose, by calcium imaging assay. After injection of NlGr11 double-stranded RNA, we found that the number of eggs laid by BPH decreased. Moreover, we found that NlGr11 inhibited the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and promoted the phosphorylation of protein kinase B (AKT). These findings demonstrated that NlGr11 could accelerate the fecundity of BPH through AMPK- and AKT-mediated signaling pathways. This is the first report to indicate that a gustatory receptor modulates the fecundity of insects and that the receptor could be a potential target for pest control. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Serotoninergic receptors in brain tissue: properties and identification of various 3H-ligand binding sites in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leysen, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    In vitro binding studies to serotoninergic receptors were performed using 3 H-LSD, 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-spiperone. An overwiew is given on findings using these three ligands with respect to the following: localization of specific binding sites, in various animal species, the regional distribution in the brain and periphery, the subcellular and cellular distribution. Properties of the binding sites, influence of the composition of the assay medium, binding kinetic properties, receptor regulation in vivo. Identity of the binding sites, differences between site for various 3 H-ligands, pharmacological specificity of the membranous binding sites, chemical composition of the macromolecular complex constituting the binding site. Function of the receptor. Binding affinities of 44 compounds were measured in binding assays using 3 H-spiperone and 3 H-LSD with rat frontal cortex membrane preparations and using 3 H-5-HT and 3 H-LSD with rat hippocampal membrane preparations

  1. Identification and Functional Characterisation of Nod Factor Receptor (NFR) Paralogs in Lotus japonicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Gitte; Radutoiu, Elena Simona; Stougaard, Jens

    an important missing link in plant-bacterial communication. This picture changed with the cloning of LysM-domain containing receptor-like kinases (LysM-RLKs) in different legume species. In Lotus japonicus, two LysM-RLKs, Nod Factor Receptor 1 (NFR1) and Nod Factor Receptor 5 (NFR5), are believed to bind Nod...... using the sequences of NFR1 and NFR5. Microsattelite markers were developed from each TAC clone containing the LysM-RLK, permitting us to locate the genes on a genetic map of Lotus japonicus. In order to get more insight into the function of these genes an inverse genetic approach using RNAi has been...

  2. Identification, purification and partial characterisation of an oligonucleotide receptor in membranes of HepG2 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Diesbach, Philippe de; Berens, Catherine; N’Kuli, Francisca; Monsigny, Michel; Sonveaux, Etienne; Wattiez, Ruddy; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2000-01-01

    The low and unpredictable uptake and cytosolic transfer of oligonucleotides (ODN) is a major reason for their limited benefit. Improving the ODN potential for therapy and research requires a better understanding of their receptor-mediated endocytosis. We have undertaken to identify a membrane ODN receptor on HepG2 cells by ligand blotting of cell extracts with [(125)I]ODN and by photolabelling of living cells with a [(125)I]ODN-benzophenone conjugate. A major band at 66 kDa was identified by ...

  3. Identification of a novel mutation in the human growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennero, Isabelle; Edouard, Thomas; Rashad, Mona; Bieth, Eric; Conte-Aurio, Françoise; Marin, Françoise; Tauber, Maithé; Salles, Jean Pierre; El Kholy, Mohamed

    2007-07-01

    Deletions and mutations in the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene are the underlying etiology of Laron syndrome (LS) or growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), an autosomal recessive disease. Most patients are distributed in or originate from Mediterranean and Middle-Eastern countries. Sixty mutations have been described so far. We report a novel mutation in the GHR gene in a patient with LS. Genomic DNA sequencing of exon 5 revealed a TT insertion at nucleotide 422 after codon 122. The insertion resulted in a frameshift introducing a premature termination codon that led to a truncated receptor. We present clinical, biochemical and molecular evidence of LS as the result of this homozygous insertion.

  4. Identification of the reptilian prolactin and its receptor cDNAs in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Keisuke; Ikemoto, Tadahiro; Park, Min Kyun

    2005-02-14

    In spite of their physiological significance, there is no available information about the nucleotide sequences of prolactin (PRL) and its receptor in reptilian species. In order to fill this gap, PRL and its receptor cDNAs were identified in a reptilian species, the leopard gecko Eublepharis macularius. The deduced leopard gecko PRL polypeptide showed high identities with the corresponding polypeptides of other reptiles. The leopard gecko PRL receptor (PRLR) was estimated to have tandem repeated regions in its extracellular domain, which had been originally found in avian PRLR. Molecular phylogenetic analysis suggests that these tandem repeated regions were generated by the duplication of the extracellular region in the latest common ancestor among reptiles and birds. In addition, tissue distributions of PRL and PRLR in the leopard gecko were examined by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). PRLR mRNA was detected in all tissues examined and highly expressed in the whole brain, pituitary, intestine, kidney, ovary, oviduct and testis. Whereas, PRL mRNA was expressed in the whole brain, pituitary, ovary and testis. The co-expressions of PRL and its receptor in some extrapituitary organs suggest that PRL acts as an autocrine/paracrine factor in such organs of the leopard gecko.

  5. Identification of the molecular switch that regulates access of 5alpha-DHT to the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Trevor M; Bauman, David R; Jin, Yi; Rizner, Tea Lanisik

    2007-02-01

    Pairs of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) govern ligand access to steroid receptors in target tissues and act as molecular switches. By acting as reductases or oxidases, HSDs convert potent ligands into their cognate inactive metabolites or vice versa. This pre-receptor regulation of steroid hormone action may have profound effects on hormonal response. We have identified the HSDs responsible for regulating ligand access to the androgen receptor (AR) in human prostate. Type 3 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (aldo-keto reductase 1C2) acts solely as a reductase to convert 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a potent ligand for the AR (K(d)=10(-11)M for the AR), to the inactive androgen 3alpha-androstanediol (K(d)=10(-6)M for the AR); while RoDH like 3alpha-HSD (a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR)) acts solely as an oxidase to convert 3alpha-androstanediol back to 5alpha-DHT. Our studies suggest that aldo-keto reductase (AKRs) and SDRs function as reductases and oxidases, respectively, to control ligand access to nuclear receptors.

  6. Identification of G-Protein-Coupled-Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    muscle cells (PASMCs), G-protein- coupled receptors (GPCRs), cyclic AMP , hypoxia. 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals of the project? The 3 Aims...potentially important for the regulation of cells and tissues in health and disease. The results have impact on cell biology, biochemistry , physiology

  7. Identification of an efficacy switch region in the ghrelin receptor responsible for interchange between agonism and inverse agonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Lang, Manja

    2007-01-01

    The carboxyamidated wFwLL peptide was used as a core ligand to probe the structural basis for agonism versus inverse agonism in the constitutively active ghrelin receptor. In the ligand, an efficacy switch could be built at the N terminus, as exemplified by AwFwLL, which functioned as a high...

  8. GABAA receptor activity modulating piperine analogs: In vitro metabolic stability, metabolite identification, CYP450 reaction phenotyping, and protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabela, Volha; Hettich, Timm; Schlotterbeck, Götz; Wimmer, Laurin; Mihovilovic, Marko D; Guillet, Fabrice; Bouaita, Belkacem; Shevchenko, Bénédicte; Hamburger, Matthias; Oufir, Mouhssin

    2018-01-01

    In a screening of natural products for allosteric modulators of GABA A receptors (γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor), piperine was identified as a compound targeting a benzodiazepine-independent binding site. Given that piperine is also an activator of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1) receptors involved in pain signaling and thermoregulation, a series of piperine analogs were prepared in several cycles of structural optimization, with the aim of separating GABA A and TRPV1 activating properties. We here investigated the metabolism of piperine and selected analogs in view of further cycles of lead optimization. Metabolic stability of the compounds was evaluated by incubation with pooled human liver microsomes, and metabolites were analyzed by UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS. CYP450 isoenzymes involved in metabolism of compounds were identified by reaction phenotyping with Silensomes™. Unbound fraction in whole blood was determined by rapid equilibrium dialysis. Piperine was the metabolically most stable compound. Aliphatic hydroxylation, and N- and O-dealkylation were the major routes of oxidative metabolism. Piperine was exclusively metabolized by CYP1A2, whereas CYP2C9 contributed significantly in the oxidative metabolism of all analogs. Extensive binding to blood constituents was observed for all compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of amino acid residues in PEPHC1 important for binding to the tumor-specific receptor EGFRvIII

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Charlotte Lund; Hansen, Paul Robert; Pedersen, Nina

    2008-01-01

    to identify the amino acid residues important for binding of PEPHC1 to EGFRvIII. The results indicate that the amino acid residues at the N-terminus of PEPHC1 are essential for the binding to the mutated receptor. One analog, [Ala(12)]PEPHC1, showed higher selective binding to EGFRvIII than PEPHC1...

  10. Identification of a dopamine receptor-mediated opiate reward memory switch in the basolateral amygdala-nucleus accumbens circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintas, Alessandra; Chi, Ning; Lauzon, Nicole M; Bishop, Stephanie F; Gholizadeh, Shervin; Sun, Ninglei; Tan, Huibing; Laviolette, Steven R

    2011-08-03

    The basolateral amygdala (BLA), ventral tegmental area (VTA), and nucleus accumbens (NAc) play central roles in the processing of opiate-related associative reward learning and memory. The BLA receives innervation from dopaminergic fibers originating in the VTA, and both dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptors are expressed in this region. Using a combination of in vivo single-unit extracellular recording in the NAc combined with behavioral pharmacology studies, we have identified a double dissociation in the functional roles of DA D1 versus D2 receptor transmission in the BLA, which depends on opiate exposure state; thus, in previously opiate-naive rats, blockade of intra-BLA D1, but not D2, receptor transmission blocked the acquisition of associative opiate reward memory, measured in an unbiased conditioned place preference procedure. In direct contrast, in rats made opiate dependent and conditioned in a state of withdrawal, intra-BLA D2, but not D1, receptor blockade blocked opiate reward encoding. This functional switch was dependent on cAMP signaling as comodulation of intra-BLA cAMP levels reversed or replicated the functional effects of intra-BLA D1 or D2 transmission during opiate reward processing. Single-unit in vivo extracellular recordings performed in neurons of the NAc confirmed an opiate-state-dependent role for BLA D1/D2 transmission in NAc neuronal response patterns to morphine. Our results characterize and identify a novel opiate addiction switching mechanism directly in the BLA that can control the processing of opiate reward information as a direct function of opiate exposure state via D1 or D2 receptor signaling substrates.

  11. Identification of Noncanonical Wnt Receptors Required for Wnt-3a-Induced Early Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoa-Vergniory, Nora; Gorroño-Etxebarria, Irantzu; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Marra, Michele; Di Chiaro, Pierluigi; Kypta, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Wnt proteins preferentially activate either β-catenin-dependent or β-catenin-independent signals, but the activity of a particular Wnt also depends on cellular context and receptor availability. We previously reported that Wnt-3a induces neural differentiation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) in a β-catenin-independent manner by activating a signal involving JNK and the AP-1 family member ATF-2. Here, we report the results of a gene silencing approach to identify the Wnt receptors that mediate this response to Wnt-3a. Silencing of ROR2 increased neuronal differentiation, as measured by expression of the genes DCX, NEUROD1, and NGN1, suggesting ROR2 signals normally prevent differentiation. Silencing of the other Wnt receptors singly did not affect Wnt-3a-induced neuronal differentiation. However, pairwise silencing of ROR1 and FZD4 or FZD5 and of LRP6 and FZD4 or FZD5 inhibited neuronal differentiation, as detected by reductions in the expression of neuronal genes and immunocytochemical detection of DCX, NEUROD1 and DCX. Ectopic expression of these receptors in HEK 293 cells increased ATF2-dependent transcription. In addition, ROR1 coimmunoprecipitated with FZD4 and LRP6 in transfected HEK 293 cells and colocalized with FZD4 and with LRP6 at the cell surface of transfected L cells. Wnt-3a did not appear to affect these interactions but did alter the interactions between LRP6 and FZD4/5. Together, these observations highlight roles for ROR1, LRP6, FZD4, and FZD5 in neural stem cell differentiation and provide support for a model in which dynamic interactions among these receptors mediate Wnt-3a activation of ATF2 signaling.

  12. Identification and expression analysis of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors cDNA in a reptile, the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Keisuke; Oka, Yoshitaka; Park, Min Kyun

    2008-05-01

    Despite the physiological and evolutionary significance of lipid metabolism in amniotes, the molecular mechanisms involved have been unclear in reptiles. To elucidate this, we investigated peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPARs) in the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius). PPARs belong to a nuclear hormone-receptor family mainly involved in lipid metabolism. Although PPARs have been widely studied in mammals, little information about them is yet available from reptiles. We identified in the leopard gecko partial cDNA sequences of PPARalpha and beta, and full sequences of two isoforms of PPARgamma. This is the first report of reptilian PPARgamma mRNA isoforms. We also evaluated the organ distribution of expression of these genes by using RT-PCR and competitive PCR. The expression level of PPARalpha mRNA was highest in the large intestine, and moderate in the liver and kidney. The expression level of PPARbeta mRNA was highest in the kidney and large intestine, and moderate in the liver. Similarly to the expression of human PPARgamma isoforms, PPARgammaa was expressed ubiquitously, whereas the expression of PPARgammab was restricted. The highest levels of their expression, however, were observed in the large intestine, rather than in the adipose tissue as in mammals. Taken together, these results showed that the profile of PPARbeta mRNA expression in the leopard gecko is similar to that in mammals, and that those of PPAR alpha and gamma are species specific. This may reflect adaptation to annual changes in lipid storage due to seasonal food availability.

  13. Identification, characterisation and expression analysis of natural killer receptor genes in Chlamydia pecorum infected koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Katrina M; Mathew, Marina; Waugh, Courtney; Ujvari, Beata; Timms, Peter; Polkinghorne, Adam; Belov, Katherine

    2015-10-15

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), an iconic Australian marsupial, are being heavily impacted by the spread of Chlamydia pecorum, an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen. Koalas vary in their response to this pathogen, with some showing no symptoms, while others suffer severe symptoms leading to infertility, blindness or death. Little is known about the pathology of this disease and the immune response against it in this host. Studies have demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells, key components of the innate immune system, are involved in the immune response to chlamydial infections in humans. These cells can directly lyse cells infected by intracellular pathogens and their ability to recognise these infected cells is mediated through NK receptors on their surface. These are encoded in two regions of the genome, the leukocyte receptor complex (LRC) and the natural killer complex (NKC). These two families evolve rapidly and different repertoires of genes, which have evolved by gene duplication, are seen in different species. In this study we aimed to characterise genes belonging to the NK receptor clusters in the koala by searching available koala transcriptomes using a combination of search methods. We developed a qPCR assay to quantify relative expression of four genes, two encoded within the NK receptor cluster (CLEC1B, CLEC4E) and two known to play a role in NK response to Chalmydia in humans (NCR3, PRF1). We found that the NK receptor repertoire of the koala closely resembles that of the Tasmanian devil, with minimal genes in the NKC, but with lineage specific expansions in the LRC. Additional genes important for NK cell activity, NCR3 and PRF1, were also identified and characterised. In a preliminary study to investigate whether these genes are involved in the koala immune response to infection by its chlamydial pathogen, C. pecorum, we investigated the expression of four genes in koalas with active chlamydia infection, those with past infection and

  14. An ultra-HTS process for the identification of small molecule modulators of orphan G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacace, Angela; Banks, Martyn; Spicer, Timothy; Civoli, Francesca; Watson, John

    2003-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most successful target proteins for drug discovery research to date. More than 150 orphan GPCRs of potential therapeutic interest have been identified for which no activating ligands or biological functions are known. One of the greatest challenges in the pharmaceutical industry is to link these orphan GPCRs with human diseases. Highly automated parallel approaches that integrate ultra-high throughput and focused screening can be used to identify small molecule modulators of orphan GPCRs. These small molecules can then be employed as pharmacological tools to explore the function of orphan receptors in models of human disease. In this review, we describe methods that utilize powerful ultra-high-throughput screening technologies to identify surrogate ligands of orphan GPCRs.

  15. Identification of Novel G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 Ligands as Pharmacologic Tools for Investigating X-Linked Ocular Albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Manga, Prashiela; Schiedel, Anke C

    2017-06-01

    GPR143 regulates melanosome biogenesis and organelle size in pigment cells. The mechanisms underlying receptor function remain unclear. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are excellent pharmacologic targets; thus, we developed and applied a screening approach to identify potential GPR143 ligands and chemical modulators. GPR143 interacts with β-arrestin; we therefore established a β-arrestin recruitment assay to screen for compounds that modulate activity. Because GPR143 is localized intracellularly, screening with the wild-type receptor would be restricted to agents absorbed by the cell. For the screen we used a mutant receptor, which shows similar basal activity as the wild type but traffics to the plasma membrane. We tested two compound libraries and investigated validated hits for their effects on melanocyte pigmentation. GPR143, which showed high constitutive activity in the β-arrestin assay, was inhibited by several compounds. The three validated inhibitors (pimozide, niclosamide, and ethacridine lactate) were assessed for impact on melanocytes. Pigmentation and expression of tyrosinase, a key melanogenic enzyme, were reduced by all compounds. Because GPR143 appears to be constitutively active, these compounds may turn off its activity. X-linked ocular albinism type I, characterized by developmental eye defects, results from GPR143 mutations. Identifying pharmacologic agents that modulate GPR143 activity will contribute significantly to our understanding of its function and provide novel tools with which to study GPCRs in melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. Pimozide, one of three GPR143 inhibitors identified in this study, maybe be a good lead structure for development of more potent compounds and provide a platform for design of novel therapeutic agents.

  16. Identification and Characterization of CINPA1 Metabolites Facilitates Structure-Activity Studies of the Constitutive Androstane Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Cherian, Milu T.; Yang, Lei; Chai, Sergio C.; Lin, Wenwei; Chen, Taosheng

    2016-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) regulates the expression of genes involved in drug metabolism and other processes. A specific inhibitor of CAR is critical for modulating constitutive CAR activity. We recently described a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CAR, CINPA1 (ethyl (5-(diethylglycyl)-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-3-yl)carbamate), which is capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription by changing the coregulator recruitment pattern and reducing CAR occupancy at the...

  17. Identification and expression of the CCAP receptor in the Chagas' disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus, and its involvement in cardiac control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohee Lee

    Full Text Available Rhodnius prolixus is the vector of Chagas' disease, by virtue of transmitting the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. There is no cure for Chagas' disease and therefore controlling R. prolixus is currently the only method of prevention. Understanding the physiology of the disease vector is an important step in developing control measures. Crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP is an important neuropeptide in insects because it has multiple physiological roles such as controlling heart rate and modulating ecdysis behaviour. In this study, we have cloned the cDNA sequence of the CCAP receptor (RhoprCCAPR from 5(th instar R. prolixus and found it to be a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR. The spatial expression pattern in 5(th instars reveals that the RhoprCCAPR transcript levels are high in the central nervous system, hindgut and female reproductive systems, and lower in the salivary glands, male reproductive tissues and a pool of tissues including the dorsal vessel, trachea, and fat body. Interestingly, the RhoprCCAPR expression is increased prior to ecdysis and decreased post-ecdysis. A functional receptor expression assay confirms that the RhoprCCAPR is activated by CCAP (EC50 = 12 nM but not by adipokinetic hormone, corazonin or an extended FMRFamide. The involvement of CCAP in controlling heartbeat frequency was studied in vivo and in vitro by utilizing RNA interference. In vivo, the basal heartbeat frequency is decreased by 31% in bugs treated with dsCCAPR. Knocking down the receptor in dsCCAPR-treated bugs also resulted in loss of function of applied CCAP in vitro. This is the first report of a GPCR knock-down in R. prolixus and the first report showing that a reduction in CCAPR transcript levels leads to a reduction in cardiac output in any insect.

  18. Identification of an endogenous alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist: studies on its possible role in endocrine and cardiovascular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunbar, J.C.; Wider, M.; House, F.; Campbell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The concept of α and β adrenergic receptors that are regulated by epinephrine or norepinephrine (NE) is well established. The reported receptor antagonists have been synthetic. A peptide extracted from the duodenal mucosa with α-2 antagonist properties has been identified. It specifically inhibits 3 H-yohimbine binding (α-2) but not 3 H dihydroalprenolol (β) binding in whole brain membranes. Partially purified preparations of the alpha receptor binding inhibitor (ABI) were tested for endocrine pancreatic and cardiovascular effects. When isolated islets were incubated in the presence of ABI with and without NE, ABI along did not alter insulin secretion but completely reversed the NE suppression of glucose stimulated insulin release. Glucagon secretion by these same islets was enhanced by ABI and augmented the stimulatory effect of NE. Intravenous (I.V.) infusion of ABI increased serum insulin in the presence of NE and decreased the serum glucose response to a glucose load. Infusion of ABI into the 4th ventricle, or I.V. resulted in a decrease (50-60%) in systolic and diastolic blood pressure as well as a decrease (10-20%) in heart rate. From these studies the authors conclude that a duodenal peptide with the capacity to inhibit α-2 agonist binding may play a role in endocrine and cardiovascular functions

  19. Discovery of the elusive leptin in birds: identification of several 'missing links' in the evolution of leptin and its receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Prokop

    Full Text Available Leptin is a pleiotropic protein best known for regulation of appetite and fat storage in mammals. While many leptin orthologs have been identified among vertebrates, an authentic leptin in birds has remained elusive and controversial. Here we identify leptin sequence from the Peregrine falcon, Falco peregrinus (pfleptin, and identify sequences from two other birds (mallard and zebra finch, and 'missing' vertebrates (elephant shark, alligator, Indian python, Chinese soft-shelled turtle, and coelacanth. The pattern of genes surrounding leptin (snd1, rbm28 is syntenic between the falcon and mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic analysis of all known leptin protein sequences improves our understanding of leptin's evolution. Structural modeling of leptin orthologs highlights a highly conserved hydrophobic core in the four-helix cytokine packing domain. A docked model of leptin with the leptin receptor for Peregrine falcon reveals several conserved amino acids important for the interaction and possible coevolution of leptin with its receptor. We also show for the first time, an authentic avian leptin sequence that activates the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. These newly identified sequences, structures, and tools for avian leptin and its receptor will allow elucidation of the function of these proteins in feral and domestic birds.

  20. Partial purification and identification of the thrombozane A2/prostaglandin H2 receptor protein in human platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, C.T.; Kattelman, E.J.; Arora, S.K.; Venton, D.L.; Le Breton, G.C.

    1986-01-01

    The thromboxane A 2 /prostaglandin H 2 (TXA 2 /PGH 2 ) receptor antagonist [ 3 H]-13-azaprostanoic acid (13-APA) was used to identify and purify the platelet TXA 2 /PGH 2 receptor protein. Optimal solubilization of the 13-APA binding protein was achieved by extraction with 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethyl-ammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) detergent. Preliminary purification of the crude solubilized membrane fraction was performed by gel filtration chromatography using a Sepharose 4B column. Further purification was accomplished by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a Synchropak GPC-500 column. The HPLC protein profile revealed two protein peaks, only one of which was enriched in [ 3 H]-13-APA. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) of this peak revealed two bands with molecular weights of 65,000 and 60,000 daltons. In binding studies using the 60,000 dalton-enriched subfraction, unlabelled 13-APA, the TXA 2 /PGH 2 mimetic U46619 and the TXA 2 /PGH 2 antagonist SQ 29,548 all competed for [ 3 H]-13-APA binding whereas TXB 2 did not compete for binding. Heat denaturation of this subfraction resulted in a complete loss of binding activity. These findings indicate that a protein of approximately 60,000 daltons represents the human platelet TXA 2 /PGH 2 receptor

  1. Genome-wide identification of nuclear receptor (NR) genes and the evolutionary significance of the NR1O subfamily in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Duck-Hyun; Kim, Hui-Su; Hwang, Dae-Sik; Kim, Hee-Jin; Hagiwara, Atsushi; Lee, Jae-Seong; Jeong, Chang-Bum

    2017-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large family of transcription factors that are involved in many fundamental biological processes. NRs are considered to have originated from a common ancestor, and are highly conserved throughout the whole animal taxa. Therefore, the genome-wide identification of NR genes in an animal taxon can provide insight into the evolutionary tendencies of NRs. Here, we identified all the NR genes in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus spp., which are considered an ecologically key species due to their abundance and world-wide distribution. The NR family was composed of 40, 32, 29, and 32 genes in the genomes of the rotifers B. calyciflorus, B. koreanus, B. plicatilis, and B. rotundiformis, respectively, which were classified into seven distinct subfamilies. The composition of each subfamily was highly conserved between species, except for NR1O genes, suggesting that they have undergone sporadic evolutionary processes for adaptation to their different environmental pressures. In addition, despite the dynamics of NR evolution, the significance of the conserved endocrine system, particularly for estrogen receptor (ER)-signaling, in rotifers was discussed on the basis of phylogenetic analyses. The results of this study may help provide a better understanding the evolution of NRs, and expand our knowledge of rotifer endocrine systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of rice cornichon as a possible cargo receptor for the Golgi-localized sodium transporter OsHKT1;3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Santiago, Paul; Lagunas-Gómez, Daniel; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Lalonde, Sylvie; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B; Zimmermannova, Olga; Sychrová, Hana; Pantoja, Omar

    2015-05-01

    Membrane proteins are synthesized and folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and continue their path to their site of residence along the secretory pathway. The COPII system has been identified as a key player for selecting and directing the fate of membrane and secretory cargo proteins. Selection of cargo proteins within the COPII vesicles is achieved by cargo receptors. The cornichon cargo receptor belongs to a conserved protein family found in eukaryotes that has been demonstrated to participate in the selection of integral membrane proteins as cargo for their correct targeting. Here it is demonstrated at the cellular level that rice cornichon OsCNIH1 interacts with OsHKT1;3 and, in yeast cells, enables the expression of the sodium transporter to the Golgi apparatus. Physical and functional HKT-cornichon interactions are confirmed by the mating-based split ubiquitin system, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and Xenopus oocyte and yeast expression systems. The interaction between the two proteins occurs in the ER of plant cells and their co-expression in oocytes leads to the sequestration of the transporter in the ER. In the yeast cornichon mutant erv14, OsHKT1;3 is mistargeted, preventing the toxic effects of sodium transport in the cell observed in wild-type cells or in the erv14 mutant that co-expressed OsHKT1;3 with either OsCNIH1 or Erv14p. Identification and characterization of rice cornichon as a possible cargo receptor opens up the opportunity to improve our knowledge on membrane protein targeting in plant cells. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  3. Identification of rice cornichon as a possible cargo receptor for the Golgi-localized sodium transporter OsHKT1;3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Santiago, Paul; Lagunas-Gómez, Daniel; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Lalonde, Sylvie; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B.; Zimmermannova, Olga; Sychrová, Hana; Pantoja, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are synthesized and folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and continue their path to their site of residence along the secretory pathway. The COPII system has been identified as a key player for selecting and directing the fate of membrane and secretory cargo proteins. Selection of cargo proteins within the COPII vesicles is achieved by cargo receptors. The cornichon cargo receptor belongs to a conserved protein family found in eukaryotes that has been demonstrated to participate in the selection of integral membrane proteins as cargo for their correct targeting. Here it is demonstrated at the cellular level that rice cornichon OsCNIH1 interacts with OsHKT1;3 and, in yeast cells, enables the expression of the sodium transporter to the Golgi apparatus. Physical and functional HKT–cornichon interactions are confirmed by the mating-based split ubiquitin system, bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and Xenopus oocyte and yeast expression systems. The interaction between the two proteins occurs in the ER of plant cells and their co-expression in oocytes leads to the sequestration of the transporter in the ER. In the yeast cornichon mutant erv14, OsHKT1;3 is mistargeted, preventing the toxic effects of sodium transport in the cell observed in wild-type cells or in the erv14 mutant that co-expressed OsHKT1;3 with either OsCNIH1 or Erv14p. Identification and characterization of rice cornichon as a possible cargo receptor opens up the opportunity to improve our knowledge on membrane protein targeting in plant cells. PMID:25750424

  4. Assay for identification of heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphism (Ala67Thr in human poliovirus receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Sundar Nandi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A new SNP assay for detection of heterozygous Ala67Thr genotype was developed and validated by testing 150 DNA samples. Heterozygous CD155 was detected in 27.33 per cent (41/150 of DNA samples tested by both SNP detection assay and sequencing. Interpretation & conclusions: The SNP detection assay was successfully developed for identification of Ala67Thr polymorphism in human PVR/CD155 gene. The SNP assay will be useful for large scale screening of DNA samples.

  5. Receptor-based high-throughput screening and identification of estrogens in dietary supplements using bioaffinity liquid-chromatography ion mobility mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqai, Payam; Blesa, Natalia Gómez; Major, Hilary; Pedotti, Mattia; Varani, Luca; Ferrero, Valentina E V; Haasnoot, Willem; Nielen, Michel W F

    2013-11-01

    A high-throughput bioaffinity liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (BioMS) approach was developed and applied for the screening and identification of recombinant human estrogen receptor α (ERα) ligands in dietary supplements. For screening, a semi-automated mass spectrometric ligand binding assay was developed applying (13)C2, (15) N-tamoxifen as non-radioactive label and fast ultra-high-performance-liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-triple-quadrupole-MS (UPLC-QqQ-MS), operated in the single reaction monitoring mode, as a readout system. Binding of the label to ERα-coated paramagnetic microbeads was inhibited by competing estrogens in the sample extract yielding decreased levels of the label in UPLC-QqQ-MS. The label showed high ionisation efficiency in positive electrospray ionisation (ESI) mode, so the developed BioMS approach is able to screen for estrogens in dietary supplements despite their poor ionisation efficiency in both positive and negative ESI modes. The assay was performed in a 96-well plate, and all these wells could be measured within 3 h. Estrogens in suspect extracts were identified by full-scan accurate mass and collision-cross section (CCS) values from a UPLC-ion mobility-Q-time-of-flight-MS (UPLC-IM-Q-ToF-MS) equipped with a novel atmospheric pressure ionisation source. Thanks to the novel ion source, this instrument provided picogram sensitivity for estrogens in the negative ion mode and an additional identification point (experimental CCS values) next to retention time, accurate mass and tandem mass spectrometry data. The developed combination of bioaffinity screening with UPLC-QqQ-MS and identification with UPLC-IM-Q-ToF-MS provides an extremely powerful analytical tool for early warning of ERα bioactive compounds in dietary supplements as demonstrated by analysis of selected dietary supplements in which different estrogens were identified.

  6. Identification and transcriptional modulation of the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, vitellogenin receptor during oocyte development by insulin and sex steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Quattro, Joseph M; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Porak, Wesley F; Grier, Harry J; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L

    2012-09-01

    Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E(2) or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E(2) or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues.

  7. Identification and cloning of a gamma 3 subunit splice variant of the human GABA(A) receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, C F; Christjansen, K N; Hastrup, S; Hartvig, L

    2000-05-31

    cDNA sequences encoding two forms of the GABA(A) gamma 3 receptor subunit were cloned from human hippocampus. The nucleotide sequences differ by the absence (gamma 3S) or presence (gamma 3L) of 18 bp located in the presumed intracellular loop between transmembrane region (TM) III and IV. The extra 18 bp in the gamma 3L subunit generates a consensus site for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC). Analysis of human genomic DNA encoding the gamma 3 subunit reveals that the 18 bp insert is contiguous with the upstream proximal exon.

  8. Photoaffinity labeling of mammalian α1-adrenergic receptors: identification of the ligand binding subunit with a high affinity radioiodinated probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeb-Lundberg, L.M.F.; Dickinson, K.E.J.; Heald, S.L.

    1984-01-01

    A description is given of the synthesised and characterization of a novel high affinity radioiodinated α 1 -adrenergic receptor photoaffinity probe, 4-amino-6,7-dimethoxy-2-[4-[5-(4-azido-3-[ 125 I]iodophenyl)pentanoyl]-1-piperazinyl] quinazoline. In the absence of light, this ligand binds with high affinity (K/sub d/ = 130 pm) in a reverisble and saturable manner to sites in rat hepatic plasma membranes. The binding is stereoselective and competitively inhibited by adrenergic agonists and antagonists with an α 1 -adrenergic specificity. Upon photolysis, this ligand incorporates irreversibly into plasma membranes prepared from several mammalian tissues including rat liver, rat, guinea pig, and rabbit spleen, rabbit lung, and rabbit aorta vascular smooth muscle cells, also with typical α 1 -adrenergic specificity. Autoradiograms of such membrane samples subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveal a major specifically labeled polypeptide at M/sub 4/ = 78,000-85,000, depending on the tissue used, in addition to some lower molecular weight peptides. Protease inhibitors, in particular EDTA, a metalloprotease inhibitor, dramatically increases the predominance of the M/sub r/ = 78,000-85,000 polypeptide while attenuating the labeling of the lower molecular weight bands. This new high affinity radioiodinated photoaffinity probe should be of great value for the molecular characterization of the α 1 -adrenergic receptor

  9. Microbial receptor assay for rapid detection and identification of seven families of antimicrobial drugs in milk: collaborative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charm, S.E.; Chi, R.

    1988-01-01

    A microbial competitive receptor assay for detecting residues of antibiotic families in milk was studied collaboratively by 13 laboratories. In this method, microbial cells added to a milk sample provide specific binding sites for which 14 C or 3 H labeled drug competes with drug resides in the sample. The 14 C or 3 H binding to the specific binding sites is measured in a scintillation counter and compared with a zero standard milk. If the sample is statistically different from the zero standard, it is positive. The assay takes about 15 min. The binding reaction occurs between the receptor site and the drug functional group, so all members of a drug family are detected. In this case, beta-lactams, tetracyclines, macrolides, aminoglycosides, novobiocin, chloramphenicol, and sulfonamides, including p-amino-benzoic acid (PABA) and its other analogs, are detectable. The incidence of false negative determinations among samples is about 1%; the incidence of false positives is about 3%. For negative cases, the relative standard deviations for repeatability ranged from 0 to 5% and for reproducibility from 0 to 6%. For positive cases, relative standard deviations ranged from 0 to 13% for repeatability and from 0 to 14% for reproducibility. The method has been adopted official first action

  10. Identification of a novel antagonist of the ErbB1 receptor capable of inhibiting migration of human glioblastoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel; Riemer, Christian; Xu, Ruodan

    2013-01-01

    B1 targeting peptide, termed Herfin-1, was designed based on a model of the tertiary structure of the EGF-EGFR ternary complex. The binding kinetics of this peptide were determined employing surface plasmon resonance analyses. ErbB1-4 expression and phosphorylation in human glioblastoma cell lines U...... processing. RESULTS: The present study shows that Herfin-1 functions as an ErbB1 antagonist. It binds to the extracellular domain of ErbB1 with a KD value of 361 nM. In U87 and U118 cells, both expressing high levels of ErbB1, Herfin-1 inhibits EGF-induced ErbB1 phosphorylation and cell migration....... Additionally, Herfin-1 was found to increase neurite outgrowth in cerebellar granule neurons, likely through the inhibition of a sustained weak ErbB1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting the ErbB1 receptor dimerization interface is a promising strategy to inhibit receptor activation in ErbB1-expressing glioma...

  11. Identification of interacting proteins of retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Min Huang1,#, Jun Wu2,#, Zheng-Cai Jia1, Yi Tian1, Jun Tang3, Yan Tang1, Ying Wang2, Yu-Zhang Wu1,* & Bing Ni1,*

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The retinoid-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma (RORγplays critical roles in regulation of development, immunity andmetabolism. As transcription factor usually forms a proteincomplex to function, thus capturing and dissecting of theRORγ protein complex will be helpful for exploring themechanisms underlying those functions. After construction ofthe recombinant tandem affinity purification (TAP plasmid,pMSCVpuro RORγ-CTAP(SG, the nuclear localization ofRORγ-CTAP(SG fusion protein was verified. Followingisolation of RORγ protein complex by TAP strategy, sevencandidate interacting proteins were identified. Finally, the heatshock protein 90 (HSP90 and receptor-interacting protein 140(RIP140 were confirmed to interplay with RORγ byco-immunoprecipitation. Interference of HSP90 or/and RIP140genes resulted in dramatically decreased expression ofCYP2C8 gene, the RORγ target gene. Data from this studydemonstrate that HSP90 and RIP140 proteins interact withRORγ protein in a complex format and function asco-activators in the RORγ-mediated regulatory processes ofHepG2 cells.

  12. Frog secretions and hunting magic in the upper Amazon: identification of a peptide that interacts with an adenosine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J W; Caceres, J; Moni, R W; Gusovsky, F; Moos, M; Seamon, K B; Milton, K; Myers, C W

    1992-11-15

    A frog used for "hunting magic" by several groups of Panoan-speaking Indians in the borderline between Brazil and Peru is identified as Phyllomedusa bicolor. This frog's skin secretion, which the Indians introduce into the body through fresh burns, is rich in peptides. These include vasoactive peptides, opioid peptides, and a peptide that we have named adenoregulin, with the sequence GLWSKIKEVGKEAAKAAAKAAGKAALGAVSEAV as determined from mass spectrometry and Edman degradation. The natural peptide may contain a D amino acid residue, since it is not identical in chromatographic properties to the synthetic peptide. Adenoregulin enhances binding of agonists to A1 adenosine receptors; it is accompanied in the skin secretion by peptides that inhibit binding. The vasoactive peptide sauvagine, the opioid peptides, and adenoregulin and related peptides affect behavior in mice and presumably contribute to the behavioral sequelae observed in humans.

  13. Eel Kisspeptins: Identification, Functional Activity, and Inhibition on both Pituitary LH and GnRH Receptor Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy Pasquier

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The European eel (Anguilla anguilla presents a blockade of sexual maturation at a prepubertal stage due to a deficient production of gonadotropins. We previously initiated, in the eel, the investigation of the kisspeptin system, one of the major gatekeepers of puberty in mammals, and we predicted the sequence of two Kiss genes. In the present study, we cloned and sequenced Kiss1 and Kiss2 cDNAs from the eel brain. The tissue distributions of Kiss1 and Kiss2 transcripts, as investigated by quantitative real-time PCR, showed that both genes are primarily expressed in the eel brain and pituitary. The two 10-residue long sequences characteristic of kisspeptin, eel Kp1(10 and Kp2(10, as well as two longer sequences, predicted as mature peptides, eel Kp1(15 and Kp2(12, were synthesized and functionally analyzed. Using rat Kiss1 receptor-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells, we found that the four synthesized eel peptides were able to induce [Ca2+]i responses, indicating their ability to bind mammalian KissR-1 and to activate second messenger pathways. In primary culture of eel pituitary cells, all four peptides were able to specifically and dose-dependently inhibit lhβ expression, without any effect on fshβ, confirming our previous data with heterologous kisspeptins. Furthermore, in this eel in vitro system, all four peptides inhibited the expression of the type 2 GnRH receptor (gnrh-r2. Our data revealed a dual inhibitory effect of homologous kisspeptins on both pituitary lhβ and gnrh-r2 expression in the European eel.

  14. Murine interleukin 1 receptor. Direct identification by ligand blotting and purification to homogeneity of an interleukin 1-binding glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, T.A.; Gearing, A.J.; Saklatvala, J.

    1988-01-01

    Functional receptors (IL1-R) for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1 (IL1) were solubilized from plasma membranes of the NOB-1 subclone of murine EL4 6.1 thymoma cells using the zwitterionic detergent 3[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS). Membrane extracts were subjected to sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transferred to nitrocellulose membranes, and ligand blotted with 125 I-labeled recombinant human IL1 alpha in order to reveal proteins capable of specifically binding IL1. A single polydisperse polypeptide of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 was identified in this way, which bound IL1 alpha and IL1 beta with the same affinity as the IL1-R on intact NOB-1 cells (approximately equal to 10(-10) M). The IL1-binding polypeptide was only seen in membranes from IL1-R-bearing cells and did not react with interleukin 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, or interferon. IL1-R was purified to apparent homogeneity from solubilized NOB-1 membranes by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose and IL1 alpha-Sepharose. Gel electrophoresis and silver staining of purified preparations revealed a single protein of Mr approximately equal to 80,000 which reacted positively in the ligand-blotting procedure and which we identify as the ligand-binding moiety of the murine IL1-R. Purified IL1-R exhibited the same affinity and specificity as the receptor on intact cells. The relationship of this protein to proteins identified by covalent cross-linking studies is discussed

  15. Identification of estrogen receptor dimer selective ligands reveals growth-inhibitory effects on cells that co-express ERα and ERβ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Powell

    Full Text Available Estrogens play essential roles in the progression of mammary and prostatic diseases. The transcriptional effects of estrogens are transduced by two estrogen receptors, ERα and ERβ, which elicit opposing roles in regulating proliferation: ERα is proliferative while ERβ is anti-proliferative. Exogenous expression of ERβ in ERα-positive cancer cell lines inhibits cell proliferation in response to estrogen and reduces xenografted tumor growth in vivo, suggesting that ERβ might oppose ERα's proliferative effects via formation of ERα/β heterodimers. Despite biochemical and cellular evidence of ERα/β heterodimer formation in cells co-expressing both receptors, the biological roles of the ERα/β heterodimer remain to be elucidated. Here we report the identification of two phytoestrogens that selectively activate ERα/β heterodimers at specific concentrations using a cell-based, two-step high throughput small molecule screen for ER transcriptional activity and ER dimer selectivity. Using ERα/β heterodimer-selective ligands at defined concentrations, we demonstrate that ERα/β heterodimers are growth inhibitory in breast and prostate cells which co-express the two ER isoforms. Furthermore, using Automated Quantitative Analysis (AQUA to examine nuclear expression of ERα and ERβ in human breast tissue microarrays, we demonstrate that ERα and ERβ are co-expressed in the same cells in breast tumors. The co-expression of ERα and ERβ in the same cells supports the possibility of ERα/β heterodimer formation at physio- and pathological conditions, further suggesting that targeting ERα/β heterodimers might be a novel therapeutic approach to the treatment of cancers which co-express ERα and ERβ.

  16. Identification of an ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1/GRIA1 polymorphism in crossbred beef cows differing in fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, R A; Miles, J R; Rempel, L A; McDaneld, T G; Kuehn, L A; Chitko-McKown, C G; Nonneman, D; Echternkamp, S E

    2013-06-01

    A proposed functional polymorphism in the ionotropic glutamate receptor AMPA1 (GRIA1) has been reported to influence antral follicle numbers and fertility in cows. Repeat breeder cows that fail to produce a calf in multiple seasons have been reported to have reduced numbers of small (1 to 3 mm) antral follicles in their ovaries. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that this GRIA1 polymorphism was affecting antral follicle numbers in repeat breeder cows. Repeat breeder cows (n = 64) and control cows (n = 72) that had always produced a calf were housed in a dry lot and observed twice daily for behavioral estrus. Blood samples were collected, and cows were genotyped for this GRIA1 polymorphism and for a polymorphism in the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) that was proposed to influence age at puberty. On d 3 to 8 after estrus cows were slaughtered, and reproductive organs were collected to determine antral follicle count, ovary size, and uterine horn diameter. Repeat breeder cows were older at first calving than control cows (P = 0.006). The length (P = 0.03) and height (P = 0.02) of the ovary contralateral to the corpus luteum (CL) were greater in control cows than repeat breeder cows. The endometrial diameter in the horn ipsilateral to the CL was greater in the control cows than the repeat breeder cows. Repeat breeder cows had fewer small (1 to 5 mm) antral follicles than control cows (P = 0.003); however, there was no association between GRIA1 genotype and antral follicle number. The GnRHR polymorphism was associated with age at first calving because cows that were homozygous for the C allele had a greater age at first calving than heterozygous cows or cows that were homozygous for the T allele (P = 0.01). In the granulosa cells from small (1 to 5 mm) antral follicles, mRNA abundances of 2 markers of oocyte quality, anti-Müllerian hormone and pentraxin 3, did not differ between fertility groups (P ≥ 0.12). We conclude that this GRIA1 polymorphism exists in beef cows but

  17. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers according to IL-4 receptor α expression and IL-2 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutet, Michèle, E-mail: michele.goutet@inrs.fr; Pépin, Elsa; Langonné, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2012-04-15

    Identification of allergenic chemicals is an important occupational safety issue. While several methods exist to identify contact sensitizers, there is currently no validated model to predict the potential of chemicals to act as respiratory sensitizers. Previously, we reported that cytometry analysis of the local immune responses induced in mice dermally exposed to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA 10%) and contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB 1%) could identify divergent expression of several immune parameters. The present study confirms, first, that IgE-positive B cells, MHC class II molecules, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-4Rα can differentiate the allergic reactions caused by high doses of strong respiratory (TMA, phthalic anhydride and toluene diisocyanate) and contact sensitizers (DNCB, dinitrofluorobenzene and oxazolone). The second part of the study was designed to test the robustness of these markers when classing the weakly immunogenic chemicals most often encountered. Six respiratory allergens, including TMA (2.5%), five contact allergens, including DNCB (0.25%), and two irritants were compared at doses of equivalent immunogenicity. The results indicated that IL-4Rα and IL-2 can be reliably used to discriminate sensitizers. Respiratory sensitizers induced markedly higher IL-4Rα levels than contact allergens, while irritants had no effect on this parameter. Inversely, contact allergens tended to induce higher percentages of IL-2{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells than respiratory allergens. In contrast, the markers MHC-II, IgE and IL-4 were not able to classify chemicals with low immunogenic potential. In conclusion, IL-4Rα and IL-2 have the potential to be used in classifying a variety of chemical allergens. -- Highlights: ► Identification of chemical allergens is an important occupational safety issue. ► There is currently no model to predict the potential of chemicals to induce asthma. ► We analyze immune responses induced

  18. Identification of contact and respiratory sensitizers according to IL-4 receptor α expression and IL-2 production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutet, Michèle; Pépin, Elsa; Langonné, Isabelle; Huguet, Nelly; Ban, Masarin

    2012-01-01

    Identification of allergenic chemicals is an important occupational safety issue. While several methods exist to identify contact sensitizers, there is currently no validated model to predict the potential of chemicals to act as respiratory sensitizers. Previously, we reported that cytometry analysis of the local immune responses induced in mice dermally exposed to the respiratory sensitizer trimellitic anhydride (TMA 10%) and contact sensitizer dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB 1%) could identify divergent expression of several immune parameters. The present study confirms, first, that IgE-positive B cells, MHC class II molecules, interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4 and IL-4Rα can differentiate the allergic reactions caused by high doses of strong respiratory (TMA, phthalic anhydride and toluene diisocyanate) and contact sensitizers (DNCB, dinitrofluorobenzene and oxazolone). The second part of the study was designed to test the robustness of these markers when classing the weakly immunogenic chemicals most often encountered. Six respiratory allergens, including TMA (2.5%), five contact allergens, including DNCB (0.25%), and two irritants were compared at doses of equivalent immunogenicity. The results indicated that IL-4Rα and IL-2 can be reliably used to discriminate sensitizers. Respiratory sensitizers induced markedly higher IL-4Rα levels than contact allergens, while irritants had no effect on this parameter. Inversely, contact allergens tended to induce higher percentages of IL-2 + CD8 + cells than respiratory allergens. In contrast, the markers MHC-II, IgE and IL-4 were not able to classify chemicals with low immunogenic potential. In conclusion, IL-4Rα and IL-2 have the potential to be used in classifying a variety of chemical allergens. -- Highlights: ► Identification of chemical allergens is an important occupational safety issue. ► There is currently no model to predict the potential of chemicals to induce asthma. ► We analyze immune responses induced in mice

  19. Identification and characterization of toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the Chinese tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dandan; Wu, Yong; Xu, Ling; Fan, Yu; Peng, Li; Xu, Min; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-07-01

    In mammals, the toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a major role in initiating innate immune responses against pathogens. Comparison of the TLRs in different mammals may help in understanding the TLR-mediated responses and developing of animal models and efficient therapeutic measures for infectious diseases. The Chinese tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis), a small mammal with a close relationship to primates, is a viable experimental animal for studying viral and bacterial infections. In this study, we characterized the TLRs genes (tTLRs) in the Chinese tree shrew and identified 13 putative TLRs, which are orthologs of mammalian TLR1-TLR9 and TLR11-TLR13, and TLR10 was a pseudogene in tree shrew. Positive selection analyses using the Maximum likelihood (ML) method showed that tTLR8 and tTLR9 were under positive selection, which might be associated with the adaptation to the pathogen challenge. The mRNA expression levels of tTLRs presented an overall low and tissue-specific pattern, and were significantly upregulated upon Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. tTLR4 and tTLR9 underwent alternative splicing, which leads to different transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis and TLR structure prediction indicated that tTLRs were evolutionarily conserved, which might reflect an ancient mechanism and structure in the innate immune response system. Taken together, TLRs had both conserved and unique features in the Chinese tree shrew. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification of cinnabarinic acid as a novel endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand that drives IL-22 production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret M Lowe

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR binds to environmental toxicants including synthetic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and is involved in a diverse array of biological processes. Recently, the AHR was shown to control host immunity by affecting the balance between inflammatory T cells that produce IL-17 (Th17 and IL-22 versus regulatory T cells (Treg involved in tolerance. While environmental AHR ligands can mediate this effect, endogenous ligands are likely to be more relevant in host immune responses. We investigated downstream metabolites of tryptophan as potential AHR ligands because (1 tryptophan metabolites have been implicated in regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells and (2 many of the AHR ligands identified thus far are derivatives of tryptophan. We characterized the ability of tryptophan metabolites to bind and activate the AHR and to increase IL-22 production in human T cells. We report that the tryptophan metabolite, cinnabarinic acid (CA, is an AHR ligand that stimulates the differentiation of human and mouse T cells producing IL-22. We compare the IL-22-stimulating activity of CA to that of other tryptophan metabolites and define stimulation conditions that lead to CA production from immune cells. Our findings link tryptophan metabolism to AHR activation and define a novel endogenous AHR agonist with potentially broad biological functions.

  1. Identification of cinnabarinic acid as a novel endogenous aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligand that drives IL-22 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Margaret M; Mold, Jeff E; Kanwar, Bittoo; Huang, Yong; Louie, Alexander; Pollastri, Michael P; Wang, Cuihua; Patel, Gautam; Franks, Diana G; Schlezinger, Jennifer; Sherr, David H; Silverstone, Allen E; Hahn, Mark E; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) binds to environmental toxicants including synthetic halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons and is involved in a diverse array of biological processes. Recently, the AHR was shown to control host immunity by affecting the balance between inflammatory T cells that produce IL-17 (Th17) and IL-22 versus regulatory T cells (Treg) involved in tolerance. While environmental AHR ligands can mediate this effect, endogenous ligands are likely to be more relevant in host immune responses. We investigated downstream metabolites of tryptophan as potential AHR ligands because (1) tryptophan metabolites have been implicated in regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells and (2) many of the AHR ligands identified thus far are derivatives of tryptophan. We characterized the ability of tryptophan metabolites to bind and activate the AHR and to increase IL-22 production in human T cells. We report that the tryptophan metabolite, cinnabarinic acid (CA), is an AHR ligand that stimulates the differentiation of human and mouse T cells producing IL-22. We compare the IL-22-stimulating activity of CA to that of other tryptophan metabolites and define stimulation conditions that lead to CA production from immune cells. Our findings link tryptophan metabolism to AHR activation and define a novel endogenous AHR agonist with potentially broad biological functions.

  2. Identification of a novel receptor-like protein kinase that interacts with a geminivirus nuclear shuttle protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano, Andrea C.; Andrade, Maxuel O.; Santos, Anesia A.; Carolino, Sonia M.B.; Oliveira, Marli L.; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Brommonshenkel, Sergio H.; Fontes, Elizabeth P.B.

    2004-01-01

    Despite extensive studies in plant virus-host interactions, the molecular mechanisms of geminivirus movement and interactions with host components remain largely unknown. A tomato kinase protein and its soybean homolog were found to interact specifically with the nuclear shuttle protein (NSP) of Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV) and Tomato crinkle leaf yellows virus (TCrLYV) through yeast two-hybrid screening and in vitro protein binding assays. These proteins, designated LeNIK (Lycopersicon esculentum NSP-Interacting Kinase) and GmNIK (Glycine max NIK), belong to the LRR-RLK (leucine rich-repeat receptor-like kinase) family that is involved in plant developmental processes and/or resistance response. As such, NIK is structurally organized into characteristic domains, including a serine/threonine kinase domain with a nucleotide binding site at the C-terminal region, an internal transmembrane segment and leucine-rich repeats (LRR) at the N-terminal portion. The potential significance of the NSP-NIK interaction is discussed

  3. Identification and elucidation of anthropogenic source contribution in PM10 pollutant: Insight gain from dispersion and receptor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Debananda; Singh, Gurdeep; Yadav, Pankaj

    2016-10-01

    Source apportionment study of PM 10 (Particulate Matter) in a critically polluted area of Jharia coalfield, India has been carried out using Dispersion model, Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) techniques. Dispersion model Atmospheric Dispersion Model (AERMOD) was introduced to simplify the complexity of sources in Jharia coalfield. PCA and CMB analysis indicates that monitoring stations near the mining area were mainly affected by the emission from open coal mining and its associated activities such as coal transportation, loading and unloading of coal. Mine fire emission also contributed a considerable amount of particulate matters in monitoring stations. Locations in the city area were mostly affected by vehicular, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG) & Diesel Generator (DG) set emissions, residential, and commercial activities. The experimental data sampling and their analysis could aid understanding how dispersion based model technique along with receptor model based concept can be strategically used for quantitative analysis of Natural and Anthropogenic sources of PM 10 . Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Identification of Human Junctional Adhesion Molecule 1 as a Functional Receptor for the Hom-1 Calicivirus on Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav V. Sosnovtsev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hom-1 vesivirus was reported in 1998 following the inadvertent transmission of the animal calicivirus San Miguel sea lion virus to a human host in a laboratory. We characterized the Hom-1 strain and investigated the mechanism by which human cells could be infected. An expression library of 3,559 human plasma membrane proteins was screened for reactivity with Hom-1 virus-like particles, and a single interacting protein, human junctional adhesion molecule 1 (hJAM1, was identified. Transient expression of hJAM1 conferred susceptibility to Hom-1 infection on nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells. Virus infection was markedly inhibited when CHO cells stably expressing hJAM were pretreated with anti-hJAM1 monoclonal antibodies. Cell lines of human origin were tested for growth of Hom-1, and efficient replication was observed in HepG2, HuH7, and SK-CO15 cells. The three cell lines (of hepatic or intestinal origin were confirmed to express hJAM1 on their surface, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9-mediated knockout of the hJAM1 gene in each line abolished Hom-1 propagation. Taken together, our data indicate that entry of the Hom-1 vesivirus into these permissive human cell lines is mediated by the plasma membrane protein hJAM1 as a functional receptor.

  5. Identification and gene-silencing of a putative odorant receptor transcription factor in Varroa destructor: possible role in olfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N K; Eliash, N; Stein, I; Kamer, Y; Ilia, Z; Rafaeli, A; Soroker, V

    2016-04-01

    The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is one of the major threats to apiculture. Using a behavioural choice bioassay, we determined that phoretic mites were more successful in reaching a bee than reproductive mites, suggesting an energy trade-off between reproduction and host selection. We used both chemo-ecological and molecular strategies to identify the regulation of the olfactory machinery of Varroa and its association with reproduction. We focused on transcription regulation. Using primers designed to the conserved DNA binding region of transcription factors, we identified a gene transcript in V. destructor homologous to the pheromone receptor transcription factor (PRTF) gene of Pediculus humanus corporis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed that this PRTF-like gene transcript is expressed in the forelegs at higher levels than in the body devoid of forelegs. Subsequent comparative qPCR analysis showed that transcript expression was significantly higher in the phoretic as compared to the reproductive stage. Electrophysiological and behavioural studies revealed a reduction in the sensitivity of PRTF RNA interference-silenced mites to bee headspace, consistent with a reduction in the mites' ability to reach a host. In addition, vitellogenin expression was stimulated in PRTF-silenced mites to similar levels as found in reproductive mites. These data shed light upon the regulatory mechanism of host chemosensing in V. destructor. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  6. Identification of the cognate peptide-MHC target of T cell receptors using molecular modeling and force field scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanzarotti, Esteban; Marcatili, Paolo; Nielsen, Morten

    2018-01-01

    Interactions of T cell receptors (TCR) to peptides in complex with MHC (p:MHC) are key features that mediate cellular immune responses. While MHC binding is required for a peptide to be presented to T cells, not all MHC binders are immunogenic. The interaction of a TCR to the p:MHC complex holds...... terms. Building a benchmark of TCR:p:MHC complexes where epitopes and non-epitopes are modelled using state-of-the-art molecular modelling tools, scoring p:MHC to a given TCR using force-fields, optimized in a cross-validation setup to evaluate TCR inter atomic interactions involved with each p:MHC, we...... and model the TCR:p:MHC complex structure. In summary, we conclude that it is possible to identify the TCR cognate target among different candidate peptides by using a force-field based model, and believe this works could lay the foundation for future work within prediction of TCR:p:MHC interactions....

  7. Identification of the soluble form of tyrosine kinase receptor Axl as a potential biomarker for intracranial aneurysm rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Ma, Feiqiang; Yan, Wei; Qiao, Sen; Xu, Shengquan; Li, Yi; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Jianmin; Jin, Jinghua

    2015-03-05

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured intracranial aneurysm (RIA) is a devastating condition with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite the fact that RIAs can be prevented by microsurgical clipping or endovascular coiling, there are no reliable means of effectively predicting IA patients at risk for rupture. The purpose of our study was to discover differentially-expressed glycoproteins in IAs with or without rupture as potential biomarkers to predict rupture. Forty age/gender-matched patients with RIA, unruptured IA (UIA), healthy controls (HCs) and disease controls (DCs) (discovery cohort, n = 10 per group) were recruited and a multiplex quantitative proteomic method, iTRAQ (isobaric Tagging for Relative and Absolute protein Quantification), was used to quantify relative changes in the lectin-purified glycoproteins in CSF from RIAs and UIAs compared to HCs and DCs. Then we verified the proteomic results in an independent set of samples (validation cohort, n = 20 per group) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Finally, we evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of the candidate marker with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve methods. The proteomic findings identified 294 proteins, 40 of which displayed quantitative changes unique to RIA, 13 to UIA, and 20 to IA. One of these proteins, receptor tyrosine kinase Axl, was significantly increased in RIA, as confirmed in CSF from the discovery cohort as well as in CSF and plasma from the validation cohort (p IA.

  8. A targeted genotyping approach enhances identification of variants in taste receptor and appetite/reward genes of potential functional importance for obesity-related porcine traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, S; Clop, A; Jacobsen, M J; Guerin, M; Lesnik, P; Jørgensen, C B; Fredholm, M; Karlskov-Mortensen, P

    2018-04-01

    Taste receptors (TASRs) and appetite and reward (AR) mechanisms influence eating behaviour, which in turn affects food intake and risk of obesity. In a previous study, we used next generation sequencing to identify potentially functional mutations in TASR and AR genes and found indications for genetic associations between identified variants and growth and fat deposition in a subgroup of animals (n = 38) from the UNIK resource pig population. This population was created for studying obesity and obesity-related diseases. In the present study we validated results from our previous study by investigating genetic associations between 24 selected single nucleotide variants in TASR and AR gene variants and 35 phenotypes describing obesity and metabolism in the entire UNIK population (n = 564). Fifteen variants showed significant association with specific obesity-related phenotypes after Bonferroni correction. Six of the 15 genes, namely SIM1, FOS, TAS2R4, TAS2R9, MCHR2 and LEPR, showed good correlation between known biological function and associated phenotype. We verified a genetic association between potentially functional variants in TASR/AR genes and growth/obesity and conclude that the combination of identification of potentially functional variants by next generation sequencing followed by targeted genotyping and association studies is a powerful and cost-effective approach for increasing the power of genetic association studies. © 2018 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  9. Identification and Characterization of a Novel IL-4 Receptor α Chain (IL-4Rα Antagonist to Inhibit IL-4 Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyar Ahmed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In recent times, allergy has become a financial, physical and psychological burden to the society as a whole. In allergic cascades, cytokine IL-4 binds to IL-4 receptor (IL-4R, consequently producing allergen-specific IgE antibodies by B cells. In addition, among other functions, IL-4 is also responsible for B and T cell proliferation and differentiation. Hence, characterization of novel antagonists that inhibit IL-4 signalling forms the overall aim of this study. Methods: Phage display was used to screen a random 12-mer synthetic peptide library with a human IL-4Rα to identify peptide candidates. Once identified, the peptides were commercially synthesized and used for in vitro immunoassays. Results: We have successfully used phage display to identify M13 phage clones that demonstrated specific binding to IL-4Rα. The peptide N1 was synthesized for use in ELISA, demonstrating significant binding to IL-4Rα and inhibiting interaction with cytokine IL-4. Furthermore, the peptide was tested in a transfected HEK-Blue IL-4 reporter cell line model, which produces alkaline phosphatase (AP. QUANTI-Blue, a substrate, breaks down in the presence of AP producing a blue coloration. Using this colorimetric analysis, >50% inhibition of IL-4 signalling was achieved. Conclusion: We have successfully identified and characterised a synthetic peptide antagonist against IL-4Rα, which effectively inhibits IL-4 interaction with the IL-4Rα in vitro. Since IL-4 interaction with IL-4Rα is a common pathway for many allergies, a prophylactic treatment can be devised by inhibiting this interaction for future treatment of allergies.

  10. Label-Free Proteomic Identification of Endogenous, Insulin-Stimulated Interaction Partners of Insulin Receptor Substrate-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geetha, Thangiah; Langlais, Paul; Luo, Moulun; Mapes, Rebekka; Lefort, Natalie; Chen, Shu-Chuan; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Yi, Zhengping

    2011-03-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key to most cellular processes. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS)-based proteomics combined with co-immunoprecipitation (CO-IP) has emerged as a powerful approach for studying protein complexes. However, a majority of systematic proteomics studies on protein-protein interactions involve the use of protein overexpression and/or epitope-tagged bait proteins, which might affect binding stoichiometry and lead to higher false positives. Here, we report an application of a straightforward, label-free CO-IP-MS/MS method, without the use of protein overexpression or protein tags, to the investigation of changes in the abundance of endogenous proteins associated with a bait protein, which is in this case insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), under basal and insulin stimulated conditions. IRS-1 plays a central role in the insulin signaling cascade. Defects in the protein-protein interactions involving IRS-1 may lead to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analyses identified eleven novel endogenous insulin-stimulated IRS-1 interaction partners in L6 myotubes reproducibly, including proteins play an important role in protein dephosphorylation [protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A, (PPP1R12A)], muscle contraction and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and protein folding, as well as protein synthesis. This novel application of label-free CO-IP-MS/MS quantification to assess endogenous interaction partners of a specific protein will prove useful for understanding how various cell stimuli regulate insulin signal transduction.

  11. Identification of protective components that prevent the exacerbation of goose fatty liver: Characterization, expression and regulation of adiponectin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tuoyu; Yang, Biao; Li, Fuyuan; Xia, Lili; Wang, Qianqian; Zhao, Xing; Gong, Daoqing

    2016-01-01

    Fat accumulation in the liver is a natural process in goose, which prepares goose for long-distance migration. In contrast to mammalian fatty liver that usually progresses into an irreversible status, steatohepatitis, goose fatty liver can return to normal without obvious pathological damage, suggesting a protective system exists in goose liver. This study was to identify the components of this system. We first focused on goose adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 (Adipor1/2) as they have ceramidase activity, and can cleave ceramide, a group of proinflammatory signaling lipid species. Quantitative analysis indicated that tumor necrosis factor alpha (Tnfα), a key proinflammatory cytokine, was down-regulated in goose fatty liver by overfeeding. This inhibition of Tnfα was accompanied with reduced adiponectin and increased Adipor1/2 in the adipose tissues and in the livers of the overfed geese, respectively. To investigate the regulation of goose Adipor2 in the context of fatty liver, we treated goose primary hepatocytes with fatty liver associated factors. Data indicated that Adipor2 was upregulated by glucose and oleate but not palmitate. Its expression was even suppressed by high level of insulin. The regulation of Adipor1 by these factors was quite similar to that of Adipor2 except that glucose did not induce Adipor1. Together, these findings suggest the upregulation of Adipor1/2 may, at least partially, contribute to the inhibition of inflammation in goose fatty liver, and the expression of Adipor1/2 can be regulated by fatty liver-associated factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of phenylalanine 346 in the rat growth hormone receptor as being critical for ligand-mediated internalization and down-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allevato, G; Billestrup, N; Goujon, L

    1995-01-01

    The functional significance of growth hormone (GH) receptor (GHR) internalization is unknown; therefore, we have analyzed domains and individual amino acids in the cytoplasmic region of the rat GHR required for ligand-mediated receptor internalization, receptor down-regulation, and transcriptiona...

  13. Identification of tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of the growth hormone receptor required for transcriptional signaling and Stat5 activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Wang, X.; Kopchick, J J

    1996-01-01

    The binding of growth hormone (GH) to its receptor results in its dimerization followed by activation of Jak2 kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation of the GH receptor itself, as well as Jak2 and the transcription factors Stat1, -3, and -5. In order to study the role of GH receptor tyrosine phosphor...

  14. New screening strategy and analysis for identification of allosteric modulators for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor using GLP-1 (9-36) amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Atsushi; Gotoh, Yusuke; Ichihara, Junji; Nagata, Hidetaka

    2015-12-15

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is an important physiologic regulator of insulin secretion and a major therapeutic target for diabetes mellitus. GLP-1 (7-36) amide (active form of GLP-1) is truncated to GLP-1 (9-36) amide, which has been described as a weak agonist of GLP-1R and the major form of GLP-1 in the circulation. New classes of positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) for GLP-1R may offer improved therapeutic profiles. To identify these new classes, we developed novel and robust primary and secondary high-throughput screening (HTS) systems in which PAMs were identified to enhance the GLP-1R signaling induced by GLP-1 (9-36) amide. Screening enabled identification of two compounds, HIT-465 and HIT-736, which possessed new patterns of modulation of GLP-1R. We investigated the ability of these compounds to modify GLP-1R signaling enhanced GLP-1 (9-36) amide- and/or GLP-1 (7-36) amide-mediated cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. These compounds also had unique profiles with regard to allosteric modulation of multiple downstream signaling (PathHunter β-arrestin signaling, PathHunter internalization signaling, microscopy-based internalization assay). We found allosteric modulation patterns to be obviously different among HIT-465, HIT-736, and Novo Nordisk compound 2. This work may enable the design of new classes of drug candidates by targeting modulation of GLP-1 (7-36) amide and GLP-1 (9-36) amide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A new method for electrophysiological identification of antennal pH receptor cells in ground beetles: the example of Pterostichus aethiops (Panzer, 1796) (Coleoptera, Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Marit; Merivee, Enno; Williams, Ingrid; Luik, Anne; Mänd, Marika; Must, Anne

    2006-09-01

    The responses of antennal taste sensilla of the ground beetle Pterostichus aethiops to 100mM Na(+)-salts and their mixtures with 1 and 10mM NaOH were compared. An increase in pH by 0.3-0.6 units in 100mM Na(+)-salt solutions, caused by the content of 1mM NaOH, was too small, except for alkaline Na(2)HPO(4), to influence the firing rate of the cation cell and pH cell significantly. However, different sensitivity of the two cells to increased pH was clearly demonstrated when the concentration of NaOH in 100mM stimulating salt solutions was increased to 10mM. Increasing pH by 1.2-2 units caused the 1st s firing rate to increase by 140-1050% and 0-26% in the pH cell and cation cell, respectively. Compared to the buffer series method used for identification of the pH receptors in ground beetles earlier, considerably stronger responses of the pH cell to a similar increase in pH were observed when the NaOH method was used for testing. At the same time, undesirable changes in salt ions concentration that occur when stimulating solutions differing by 1-2 pH units are prepared were much smaller using the latter method. Behavioural and ecological relevance of the results is discussed.

  16. Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

    1993-07-01

    This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

  17. Identification of AICP as a GluN2C-Selective N-Methyl-d-Aspartate Receptor Superagonist at the GluN1 Glycine Site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Maja; Frederiksen, Kristen; Yi, Feng

    2017-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-type ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critically involved in brain function. NMDA receptors are also implicated in psychiatric and neurological disorders and have received considerable attention....../2A-D), in which DCS is a superagonist at GluN2C-containing receptors compared with glycine and a partial agonist at GluN2B-containing receptors. Here, we identify (R)-2-amino-3-(4-(2-ethylphenyl)-1H-indole-2-carboxamido)propanoic acid (AICP) as a glycine site agonist with unique GluN2-dependent...

  18. Identification of bioactive compounds from flowers of black elder (Sambucus nigra L.) that activate the human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kathrine B; Petersen, Rasmus K; Kristiansen, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is one of the predisposing factors for the development of overt Type 2 diabetes (T2D). T2D is caused by a combination of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure and can be treated with insulin sensitizing drugs that target the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (...

  19. Identification and characterization of a tandem repeat in exon III of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene in cetaceans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Line; Kinze, Carl Christian; Werge, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A large number of mammalian species harbor a tandem repeat in exon III of the gene encoding dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), a receptor associated with cognitive functions. In this study, a DRD4 gene exon III tandem repeat from the order Cetacea was identified and characterized. Included in our study...

  20. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  1. One step closer to an experimental infection system for Hepatitis B Virus? --- the identification of sodium taurocholate cotransporting peptide as a viral receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Pei-Jer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following the successful cloning of receptor for SARS coronavirus a few years ago, Dr. Wenhui Li and colleagues raised attention again by publishing a possible receptor for hepatitis B virus in eLife. We will briefly review the significance of this finding and the future prospects of hepatitis B research.

  2. Use of Dual Frequency Identification Sonar to Determine Adult Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Escapement in the Secesh River, Idaho ; Annual Report, January 2008 – December 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management

    2009-06-26

    Chinook salmon in the Snake River basin were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act in 1992 (NMFS 1992). The Secesh River represents the only stream in the Snake River basin where natural origin (wild) salmon escapement monitoring occurs at the population level, absent a supplementation program. As such the Secesh River has been identified as a long term salmon escapement and productivity monitoring site by the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management. Salmon managers will use this data for effective population management and evaluation of the effect of conservation actions on a natural origin salmon population. The Secesh River also acts as a reference stream for supplementation program comparison. Dual frequency identification sonar (DIDSON) was used to determine adult spring and summer Chinook salmon escapement in the Secesh River in 2008. DIDSON technology was selected because it provided a non-invasive method for escapement monitoring that avoided listed species trapping and handling incidental mortality, and fish impedance related concerns. The DIDSON monitoring site was operated continuously from June 13 to September 14. The first salmon passage was observed on July 3. DIDSON site total estimated salmon escapement, natural and hatchery fish, was 888 fish {+-} 65 fish (95% confidence interval). Coefficient of variation associated with the escapement estimate was 3.7%. The DIDSON unit was operational 98.1% of the salmon migration period. Adult salmon migration timing in the Secesh River occurred over 74 days from July 3 to September 14, with 5,262 total fish passages observed. The spawning migration had 10%, median, and 90% passage dates of July 8, July 16, and August 12, respectively. The maximum number of net upstream migrating salmon was above the DIDSON monitoring site on August 27. Validation monitoring of DIDSON target counts with underwater optical cameras occurred for species identification. A total of 860 optical

  3. Identification of rice cornichon as a possible cargo receptor for the Golgi-localized sodium transporter OsHKT1;3

    OpenAIRE

    Rosas-Santiago, Paul; Lagunas-G?mez, Daniel; Barkla, Bronwyn J.; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Lalonde, Sylvie; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B.; Zimmermannova, Olga; Sychrov?, Hana; Pantoja, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins are synthesized and folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and continue their path to their site of residence along the secretory pathway. The COPII system has been identified as a key player for selecting and directing the fate of membrane and secretory cargo proteins. Selection of cargo proteins within the COPII vesicles is achieved by cargo receptors. The cornichon cargo receptor belongs to a conserved protein family found in eukaryotes that has been demonstrated to pa...

  4. Identification and Transcriptional Modulation of the Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides, Vitellogenin Receptor During Oocyte Development by Insulin and Sex Steroids1

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Quattro, Joseph M.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Porak, Wesley F.; Grier, Harry J.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L.

    2012-01-01

    Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based o...

  5. Molecular modeling and docking studies of human 5-hydroxytryptamine 2A (5-HT2A) receptor for the identification of hotspots for ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagarajadurai, Karuppiah; Malini, Manoharan; Bhattacharya, Aditi; Panicker, Mitradas M; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2009-12-01

    The serotonergic system has been implicated in emotional and cognitive function. In particular, 5-HT(2A) (5-hydroxytrytamine receptor 2A) is attributed to a number of disorders like schizophrenia, depression, eating disorders and anxiety. 5-HT(2A), being a GPCR (G-protein coupled receptor), is important in the pharmaceutical industry as a proven target for these disorders. Despite their extensive clinical importance, the structural studies of this protein is lacking due to difficulties in determining its crystal structure. We have performed sequence analysis and molecular modeling of 5-HT(2A) that has revealed a set of conserved residues and motifs considered to play an important role in maintaining structural integrity and function of the receptor. The analysis also revealed a set of residues specific to the receptor which distinguishes them from other members of the subclass and their orthologs. Further, starting from the model structure of human 5-HT(2A) receptor, docking studies were attempted to envisage how it might interact with eight of its ligands (such as serotonin, dopamine, DOI, LSD, haloperidol, ketanserin, risperidone and clozapine). The binding studies of dopamine to 5-HT(2A) receptor can bring up better understanding in the etiology of a number of neurological disorders involving both these two receptors. Our sequence analysis and study of interactions of this receptor with other ligands reveal additional residue hotspots such as Asn 363 and Tyr 370. The function of these residues can be further analyzed by rational design of site-directed mutagenesis. Two distinct binding sites are identified which could play important roles in ligand binding and signaling.

  6. Identification of a new adapter protein that may link the common beta subunit of the receptor for granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-3, and IL-5 to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1995-11-17

    Binding of human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) to its receptor induces the rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI 3-kinase). As hGM-CSF receptor (hGMR) does not contain a consensus sequence for binding of PI 3-kinase, hGMR must use a distinct mechanism for its association with and activation of PI 3-kinase. Here, we describe the identification of a tyrosine-phosphorylated protein of 76-85 kDa (p80) that associates with the common beta subunit of hGMR and with the SH2 domains of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase in hGM-CSF-stimulated cells. Src/Yes and Lyn were tightly associated with the p80.PI 3-kinase complex, suggesting that p80 and other phosphotyrosyl proteins present in the complex were phosphorylated by Src family kinases. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p80 was only detected in hGM-CSF or human interleukin-3-stimulated cells, suggesting that activation of p80 might be specific for signaling via the common beta subunit. We postulate that p80 functions as an adapter protein that may participate in linking the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase signaling pathway.

  7. Identification of Tetrapeptides from a Mixture Based Positional Scanning Library That Can Restore nM Full Agonist Function of the L106P, I69T, I102S, A219V, C271Y, and C271R Human Melanocortin-4 Polymorphic Receptors (hMC4Rs)

    OpenAIRE

    Haslach, Erica M.; Huang, Huisuo; Dirain, Marvin; Debevec, Ginamarie; Geer, Phaedra; Santos, Radleigh G.; Giulianotti, Marc A.; Pinilla, Clemencia; Appel, Jon R.; Doering, Skye R.; Walters, Michael A.; Houghten, Richard A.; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    Human obesity has been linked to genetic factors and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) SNPs have been associated with up to 6% frequency in morbidly obese children and adults. A potential therapy for individuals possessing such genetic modifications is the identification of molecules that can restore proper receptor signaling and function. These compounds could serve as personalized medications improving quality of life issues as well as alleviating diseas...

  8. Use of SLAM and PVRL4 and identification of pro-HB-EGF as cell entry receptors for wild type phocine distemper virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M Melia

    Full Text Available Signalling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM has been identified as an immune cell receptor for the morbilliviruses, measles (MV, canine distemper (CDV, rinderpest and peste des petits ruminants (PPRV viruses, while CD46 is a receptor for vaccine strains of MV. More recently poliovirus like receptor 4 (PVRL4, also known as nectin 4, has been identified as a receptor for MV, CDV and PPRV on the basolateral surface of polarised epithelial cells. PVRL4 is also up-regulated by MV in human brain endothelial cells. Utilisation of PVRL4 as a receptor by phocine distemper virus (PDV remains to be demonstrated as well as confirmation of use of SLAM. We have observed that unlike wild type (wt MV or wtCDV, wtPDV strains replicate in African green monkey kidney Vero cells without prior adaptation, suggesting the use of a further receptor. We therefore examined candidate molecules, glycosaminoglycans (GAG and the tetraspan proteins, integrin β and the membrane bound form of heparin binding epithelial growth factor (proHB-EGF,for receptor usage by wtPDV in Vero cells. We show that wtPDV replicates in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cells expressing SLAM and PVRL4. Similar wtPDV titres are produced in Vero and VeroSLAM cells but more limited fusion occurs in the latter. Infection of Vero cells was not inhibited by anti-CD46 antibody. Removal/disruption of GAG decreased fusion but not the titre of virus. Treatment with anti-integrin β antibody increased rather than decreased infection of Vero cells by wtPDV. However, infection was inhibited by antibody to HB-EGF and the virus replicated in CHO-proHB-EGF cells, indicating use of this molecule as a receptor. Common use of SLAM and PVRL4 by morbilliviruses increases the possibility of cross-species infection. Lack of a requirement for wtPDV adaptation to Vero cells raises the possibility of usage of proHB-EGF as a receptor in vivo but requires further investigation.

  9. Identification of novel β-lactams and pyrrolidinone derivatives as selective Histamine-3 receptor (H3R) modulators as possible anti-obesity agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Anirban; Kumar, Ajeet; Yugandhar, Doddapaneni; Sona, Chandan; Kuriakose, Sunu; Nagesh, Kommu; Rashid, Mamunur; Singh, Sandeep K; Wahajuddin, Muhammad; Yadav, Prem N; Srivastava, Ajay K

    2018-05-25

    Four series of structurally related β-lactams, 2,5-pyrrolidinediones, azaspirodecatrienediones (ASDT) and dihydropyrroloquinoxalinetriones (DPQT) were synthesized by utilizing post-Ugi modifications in one-pot, and their activity towards human histamine-3 receptor (H3R) was evaluated. Out of 94 compounds, screened against histamine-3 receptor (H3R), 21 compounds showed high H3R selective agonist property with EC 50 values ranging from 187 nM to 0.1 nM, whereas none of the compound was found to have the affinity towards other receptors of histamine family such as histamine H1, H2, and H4 receptor. All active compounds have no assay interference activity as determined by in-silico analysis and receptor independent luciferase assay and cell cytotoxicity assay. Given the important role of H3R in hypophagia, we also evaluated the in vivo effect of the representative compound 6k on the cumulative food intake in diet induce obese C57BL6/J mice. Interestingly, we observed that single dose administration (20 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection) of 6k significantly suppressed cumulative food intake, while no significant effect was observed at 10 mg/kg. These results suggest that β-lactams, 2,5-pyrrolidinediones, azaspirodecatrienediones (ASDT) and dihydropyrroloquinoxalinetriones (DPQT) could be useful for the development of anti-obesity candidate drugs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  11. Identification of a truncated splice variant of IL-18 receptor alpha in the human and rat, with evidence of wider evolutionary conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris S. Booker

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-18 (IL-18 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine which stimulates activation of the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-κB pathway via interaction with the IL-18 receptor. The receptor itself is formed from a dimer of two subunits, with the ligand-binding IL-18Rα subunit being encoded by the IL18R1 gene. A splice variant of murine IL18r1, which has been previously described, is formed by transcription of an unspliced intron (forming a ‘type II’ IL18r1 transcript and is predicted to encode a receptor with a truncated intracellular domain lacking the capacity to generate downstream signalling. In order to examine the relevance of this finding to human IL-18 function, we assessed the presence of a homologous transcript by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR in the human and rat as another common laboratory animal. We present evidence for type II IL18R1 transcripts in both species. While the mouse and rat transcripts are predicted to encode a truncated receptor with a novel 5 amino acid C-terminal domain, the human sequence is predicted to encode a truncated protein with a novel 22 amino acid sequence bearing resemblance to the ‘Box 1’ motif of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain, in a similar fashion to the inhibitory interleukin-1 receptor 2. Given that transcripts from these three species are all formed by inclusion of homologous unspliced intronic regions, an analysis of homologous introns across a wider array of 33 species with available IL18R1 gene records was performed, which suggests similar transcripts may encode truncated type II IL-18Rα subunits in other species. This splice variant may represent a conserved evolutionary mechanism for regulating IL-18 activity.

  12. Identification and functional comparison of seven-transmembrane G-protein-coupled BILF1 receptors in recently discovered nonhuman primate lymphocryptoviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Fares, Suzan; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H

    2015-01-01

    Coevolution of herpesviruses with their respective host has resulted in a delicate balance between virus-encoded immune evasion mechanisms and host antiviral immunity. BILF1 encoded by human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) with multiple immuno...

  13. Structure-Activity Relationships and Identification of Optmized CC-Chemokine Receptor CCR1, 5, and 8 Metal-Ion Chelators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chalikiopoulos, Alexander; Thiele, Stefanie; Malmgaard-Clausen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are involved in trafficking of leukocytes and represent targets for autoimmune conditions, inflammatory diseases, viral infections, and cancer. We recently published CCR1, CCR8, and CCR5 agonists and positive modulators based on a three metal-ion chelator series: 2,2'-bipyridi...

  14. Structure-guided identification of a family of dual receptor-binding PfEMP1 that is associated with cerebral malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lennartz, Frank; Adams, Yvonne; Bengtsson, Anja

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral malaria is a deadly outcome of infection by Plasmodium falciparum, occurring when parasite-infected erythrocytes accumulate in the brain. These erythrocytes display parasite proteins of the PfEMP1 family that bind various endothelial receptors. Despite the importance of cerebral malaria...

  15. Identification in the mu-opioid receptor of cysteine residues responsible for inactivation of ligand binding by thiol alkylating and reducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaibelet, G; Capeyrou, R; Dietrich, G; Emorine, L J

    1997-05-19

    Inactivation by thiol reducing and alkylating agents of ligand binding to the human mu-opioid receptor was examined. Dithiothreitol reduced the number of [3H]diprenorphine binding sites. Replacement by seryl residues of either C142 or C219 in extracellular loops 1 and 2 of the mu receptor resulted in a complete loss of opioid binding. A disulfide bound linking C142 to C219 may thus be essential to maintain a functional conformation of the receptor. We also demonstrated that inactivation of ligand binding upon alkylation by N-ethylmaleimide occurred at two sites. Alteration of the more sensitive (IC50 = 20 microM) did not modify antagonists binding but decreased agonist affinity almost 10-fold. Modification of the less reactive site (IC50 = 2 mM) decreased the number of both agonist and antagonist binding sites. The alkylation site of higher sensitivity to N-ethylmaleimide was shown by mutagenesis experiments to be constituted of both C81 and C332 in transmembrane domains 1 and 7 of the mu-opioid receptor.

  16. Identification of plant extracts with potential antidiabetic properties: effect on human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), adipocyte differentiation and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kathrine B; Minet, Ariane; Svenstrup, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are insulin sensitizing drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes. The primary target of the TZDs is the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gamma, a key regulator of adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. Currently prescribed TZDs are full PPARgamma agonists, and...

  17. Selective orthosteric free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFA2) agonists: identification of the structural and chemical requirements for selective activation of FFA2 versus FFA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Johannes; Smith, Nicola J; Christiansen, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    given its size. Propionate, however, does not discriminate between FFA2 and the closely related receptor FFA3 (GPR41). To identify FFA2 selective ligands and understand the molecular basis for FFA2 selectivity, a targeted library of small carboxylic acids (SCAs) was examined using holistic, label...

  18. Zonula occludens toxin structure-function analysis. Identification of the fragment biologically active on tight junctions and of the zonulin receptor binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pierro, M; Lu, R; Uzzau, S; Wang, W; Margaretten, K; Pazzani, C; Maimone, F; Fasano, A

    2001-06-01

    Zonula occludens toxin (Zot) is an enterotoxin elaborated by Vibrio cholerae that increases intestinal permeability by interacting with a mammalian cell receptor with subsequent activation of intracellular signaling leading to the disassembly of the intercellular tight junctions. Zot localizes in the bacterial outer membrane of V. cholerae with subsequent cleavage and secretion of a carboxyl-terminal fragment in the host intestinal milieu. To identify the Zot domain(s) directly involved in the protein permeating effect, several zot gene deletion mutants were constructed and tested for their biological activity in the Ussing chamber assay and their ability to bind to the target receptor on intestinal epithelial cell cultures. The Zot biologically active domain was localized toward the carboxyl terminus of the protein and coincided with the predicted cleavage product generated by V. cholerae. This domain shared a putative receptor-binding motif with zonulin, the Zot mammalian analogue involved in tight junction modulation. Amino acid comparison between the Zot active fragment and zonulin, combined with site-directed mutagenesis experiments, confirmed the presence of an octapeptide receptor-binding domain toward the amino terminus of the processed Zot.

  19. Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Mutation in the Human Calcium-Sensing Receptor That Co-Segregates With Autosomal-Dominant Hypocalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Qvist Rasmussen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The human calcium-sensing receptor (CASR is the key controller of extracellular Cao2+ homeostasis, and different mutations in the CASR gene have been linked to different calcium diseases, such as familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia, severe hyperparathyroidism, autosomal-dominant hypocalcemia (ADH, and Bartter’s syndrome type V. In this study, two generations of a family with biochemically and clinically confirmed ADH who suffered severe muscle pain, arthralgia, tetany, abdominal pain, and fatigue were evaluated for mutations in the CASR gene. The study comprises genotyping of all family members, functional characterization of a potential mutant receptor by in vitro analysis related to the wild-type receptor to reveal an association between the genotype and phenotype in the affected family members. The in vitro analysis of functional characteristics includes measurements of inositol trisphosphate accumulation, Ca2+ mobilization in response to [Ca2+]o-stimulation and receptor expression. The results reveal a significant leftward shift of inositol trisphosphate accumulation as a result of the “gain-of-function” mutant receptor and surprisingly a normalization of the response in (Ca2+i release in the downstream pathway and additionally the maximal response of (Ca2+i release was significantly decreased compared to the wild type. However, no gross differences were seen in D126V and the D126V/WT CASR dimeric >250 kDa band expression compared to the WT receptor, however, the D126V and D126V/WT CASR immature ~140 kDa species appear to have reduced expression compared to the WT receptor. In conclusion, in this study, a family with a clinical diagnosis of ADH in two generations was evaluated to identify a mutation in the CASR gene and reveal an association between genotype and phenotype in the affected family members. The clinical condition was caused by a novel, activating, missense mutation (D126V in the CASR gene and the in vitro functional

  20. Identification of an estrogen receptor α non covalent ubiquitin-binding surface: role in 17β-estradiol-induced transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesiri, Valeria; La Rosa, Piergiorgio; Stano, Pasquale; Acconcia, Filippo

    2013-06-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-binding domains (UBDs) located in Ub receptors decode the ubiquitination signal by non-covalently engaging the Ub modification on their binding partners and transduce the Ub signalling through Ub-based molecular interactions. In this way, inducible protein ubiquitination regulates diverse biological processes. The estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates the pleiotropic effects of the sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2). Fine regulation of E2 pleiotropic actions depends on E2-dependent ERα association with a plethora of binding partners and/or on the E2 modulation of receptor ubiquitination. Indeed, E2-induced ERα polyubiquitination triggers receptor degradation and transcriptional activity, and E2-dependent reduction in ERα monoubiquitination is crucial for E2 signalling. Monoubiquitinated proteins often contain UBDs, but whether non-covalent Ub-ERα binding could occur and play a role in E2-ERα signalling is unknown. Here, we report an Ub-binding surface within the ERα ligand binding domain that directs in vitro the receptor interaction with both ubiquitinated proteins and recombinant Ub chains. Mutational analysis reveals that ERα residues leucine 429 and alanine 430 are involved in Ub binding. Moreover, impairment of ERα association to ubiquitinated species strongly affects E2-induced ERα transcriptional activity. Considering the importance of UBDs in the Ub-based signalling network and the central role of different ERα binding partners in the modulation of E2-dependent effects, our discoveries provide novel insights into ERα activity that could also be relevant for ERα-dependent diseases.

  1. Genetic Variability of the Heme Uptake System among Different Strains of the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum: Identification of a New Heme Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouriño, Susana; Rodríguez-Ares, Isabel; Osorio, Carlos R.; Lemos, Manuel L.

    2005-01-01

    The ability to utilize heme compounds as iron sources was investigated in Vibrio anguillarum strains belonging to serotypes O1 to O10. All strains, regardless of their serotype or isolation origin could utilize hemin and hemoglobin as sole iron sources. Similarly, all of the isolates could bind hemin and Congo red, and this binding was mediated by cell envelope proteins. PCR and Southern hybridization were used to assay the occurrence of heme transport genes huvABCD, which have been previously described in serotype O1. Of 23 strains studied, two serotype O3 isolates proved negative for all huvABCD genes, whereas nine strains included in serotypes O2, O3, O4, O6, O7, and O10 tested negative for the outer membrane heme receptor gene huvA. A gene coding for a novel outer membrane heme receptor was cloned and characterized in a V. anguillarum serotype O3 strain lacking huvA. The new heme receptor, named HuvS, showed significant similarity to other outer membrane heme receptors described in Vibrionaceae, but little homology (39%) to HuvA. This heme receptor was present in 9 out of 11 of the V. anguillarum strains that tested negative for HuvA. Furthermore, complementation experiments demonstrated that HuvS could substitute for the HuvA function in Escherichia coli and V. anguillarum mutants. The huvS and huvA sequences alignment, as well as the analysis of their respective upstream and downstream DNA sequences, suggest that horizontal transfer and recombination might be responsible for generating this genetic diversity. PMID:16332832

  2. NERSC 2001 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John

    2001-01-01

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005

  3. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into the diversity of NOD-like receptors: Identification and expression analysis of NLRC3, NLRC5 and NLRX1 in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Claudio A; Ramírez-Cepeda, Felipe; Santana, Paula; Torres, Elisa; Cortés, Jimena; Guzmán, Fanny; Schmitt, Paulina; Mercado, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are efficient soluble intracellular sensors that activate defense mechanisms against pathogens. In teleost fish, the involvement of NLRs in the immune response is not well understood. However, recent work has evidenced the expression of different NLRs in response to some pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). In the present work, the cDNA sequence encoding three new NOD-like receptors were identified in Oncorhynchus mykiss, namely OmNLRC3, OmNLRC5 and OmNLRX1. Results showed that their sequences coded for proteins of 1135, 836 and 1010 amino acids, respectively. The deduced protein sequences of all receptors showed characteristic domains of this receptor family, such as leucine rich repeats and NACHT domain. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a high degree of identity with other NOD-like receptors and they are clustered into different families. Transcript expression analysis indicated that OmNLRs are constitutively expressed in liver, spleen, intestine, gill, skin and brain. OmNLR expression was upregulated in kidney and gills from rainbow trout in response to LPS. In order to give new insights into the function of these new NLR members, an in vitro model of immune stimulation was established using the rainbow trout cell line RTgill-W1. Expression analysis revealed that RTgill-W1 overexpressed proinflammatory cytokines in response to LPS and poly I:C alongside with a differential overexpression of OmNLRC3, OmNLRC5 and OmNLRX1. The expression of OmNLRC5 was further verified at the protein level by immunofluorescence. Finally, the effect of the overexpressed cytokines on the OmNLR expression by RTgill-W1 cells was assessed, suggesting a regulatory mechanism on OmNLRC3 expression. Overall, results suggest that O. mykiss NOD-like receptors could play a key role in the defense mechanisms of teleost through PAMP recognition. Future studies will focus on gills which could be related with a key

  5. Identification of cysteine-644 as the covalent site of attachment of dexamethasone 21-mesylate to murine glucocorticoid receptors in WEHI-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.I.; Bodwell, J.E.; Mendel, D.B.; Ciardelli, T.; North, W.G.; Munck, A.

    1988-01-01

    Dexamethasone 21-mesylate is a highly specific synthetic glucocorticoid derivative that binds covalently to glucocorticoid receptors via sulfhydryl groups. The authors have identified the amino acid that reacts with the dexamethasone 21-mesylate by using enzymatic digestion and microsequencing for radiolabel. Nonactivated glucocorticoid receptors obtained from labeling intact WEHI-7 mouse thymoma cells with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate were immunopurified and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Trypsin digestion followed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (reversed-phase HPLC) produced a single [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled peptide. Automated Edman degradation of this peptide revealed that the [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate was located at position 5 from the amino terminus. Dual-isotope labeling studies with [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate and [ 35 S]methionine demonstrated that this peptide contained methionine. Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease digestion of [ 3 H]dexamethasone 21-mesylate labeled steroid-binding subunits generated a different radiolabeled peptide containing label at position 7 from the amino terminus. On the basis of the published amino acid sequence of the murine glucocorticoid receptor, their data clearly identify cysteine-644 as the single residue in the steroid-binding domain that covalently binds dexamethasone 21-mesylate. They have confirmed this finding by demonstrating that a synthetic peptide representing the amino acid sequence 640-650 of the murine glucocorticoid receptor behaves in an identical manner on reversed-phase HPLC as the trypsin-generated peptide from intact cells

  6. Identification and characterization of luekotriene C4 and D4 receptors on a cultured smooth muscle cell line, BC3H-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, N.; Agrawal, D.K.; Townley, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    The authors studied the characteristics of the leukotriene (LT) C 4 and D 4 receptors on a cultured smooth muscle cell line, BC3H-1. Specific [ 3 H]LTC 4 binding to the cell membrane was greater than 80% of total binding and saturable at a density of 3.96 +/- 0.39 pmol/mg protein, with an apparent dissociation constant(Kd) of 14.3 +/- 2.0 nM (n=9). The association and dissociation of [ 3 H]LTC 4 binding were rapid and apparent equilibrium conditions were established within 5 min. Calculated Kd value of [ 3 H]LTC binding from the kinetic analysis was 9.9 nM. From the competition analysis, calculated Ki value of unlabeled LTC 4 to compete for the specific binding of [ 3 H]LTC 4 was 9.2 nM and was in good agreement with the Kd value obtained from the Scatchard plots or kinetic analysis. The maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of [ 3 H]LTD 4 in the membrane of BC3H-1 cell line was about 11 times lower than that of the [ 3 H]LTC 4 . The calculated values of Kd and Bmax of [ 3 H]LTD 4 binding were 9.3 +/- 0.8 nM and 0.37 +/- 0.04 pmol/mg proteins, respectively (n=3). These findings demonstrate that BC3H-1 cell line possess both LTC 4 and LTD 4 receptors with a predominance of LTC 4 receptors. Thus, BC3H-1 cell line is a good model to study the regulation of LTC 4 and LTD 4 receptors. 34 references, 5 figures, 1 table

  7. Identification of urocortin III, an additional member of the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family with high affinity for the CRF2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, K; Li, C; Perrin, M H; Blount, A; Kunitake, K; Donaldson, C; Vaughan, J; Reyes, T M; Gulyas, J; Fischer, W; Bilezikjian, L; Rivier, J; Sawchenko, P E; Vale, W W

    2001-06-19

    The corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) family of neuropeptides includes the mammalian peptides CRF, urocortin, and urocortin II, as well as piscine urotensin I and frog sauvagine. The mammalian peptides signal through two G protein-coupled receptor types to modulate endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses to stress, as well as a range of peripheral (cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and immune) activities. The three previously known ligands are differentially distributed anatomically and have distinct specificities for the two major receptor types. Here we describe the characterization of an additional CRF-related peptide, urocortin III, in the human and mouse. In searching the public human genome databases we found a partial expressed sequence tagged (EST) clone with significant sequence identity to mammalian and fish urocortin-related peptides. By using primers based on the human EST sequence, a full-length human clone was isolated from genomic DNA that encodes a protein that includes a predicted putative 38-aa peptide structurally related to other known family members. With a human probe, we then cloned the mouse ortholog from a genomic library. Human and mouse urocortin III share 90% identity in the 38-aa putative mature peptide. In the peptide coding region, both human and mouse urocortin III are 76% identical to pufferfish urocortin-related peptide and more distantly related to urocortin II, CRF, and urocortin from other mammalian species. Mouse urocortin III mRNA expression is found in areas of the brain including the hypothalamus, amygdala, and brainstem, but is not evident in the cerebellum, pituitary, or cerebral cortex; it is also expressed peripherally in small intestine and skin. Urocortin III is selective for type 2 CRF receptors and thus represents another potential endogenous ligand for these receptors.

  8. Solution structure of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 SAM domain and identification of two distinct homotypic interaction sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Smalla, M.; Schmieder, P.; Kelly, M.; Ter Laak, A.; Krause, G.; Ball, L.; Wahl, M.; Bork, P.; Oschkinat, H.

    1999-01-01

    The sterile alpha motif (SAM) is a protein interaction domain of around 70 amino acids present predominantly in the N- and C-termini of more than 60 diverse proteins that participate in signal transduction and transcriptional repression. SAM domains have been shown to homo- and hetero-oligomerize and to mediate specific protein-protein interactions. A highly conserved subclass of SAM domains is present at the intracellular C-terminus of more than 40 Eph receptor tyrosine kinases that are invo...

  9. Identification of a cys-ser substitution in the 5-HT{sub 2C} (HTR2C) receptor gene and allelic association to violent behavior and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, J.; Ozaki, N.; Goldman, D. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain serotonergic functions, including behavioral and neurochemical responses to 5-HT{sub 2C} agonist, are abnormal in some individuals with alcoholism and aggressive behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify coding sequence variants in the human 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor gene which may cause abnormal or variant function of this receptor. Using SSCP analysis, a non-conservative cys-ser substitution was found in the 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (designated 5-HT{sub 2Ccys} and 5-HT{sub 2Cser}). The polymorphism was typed in CEPH families to genetically map the gene. To test for association of the variant to alcoholism, violent behavior and serotonin function, the 5-HT{sub 2C} genotypes of 151 non-related Finnish male alcoholic violent offenders and impulsive fire setters and 127 Finnish psychiatrically interviewed healthy male volunteers were determined. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were available for 74 alcoholic violent offenders and 25 healthy volunteers. Linkage analysis placed the 5-HT{sub 2C} gene on Xq21, a region that has been previously shown to contain genes for several mental retardation syndromes. The 5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} genotype frequencies in alcoholic violent offenders and controls differed significantly (0.90/0.10 and 0.82/0.18, respectively, P=0.048). The association was found to be strongest in the violent offenders who did not fulfill the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} 0.93/0.07, p=0.021). No association was found between CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and 5-HT{sub 2C} genotype. These results implicate a 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor amino acid substitution in predisposition to alcohol abuse and violent behavior in a subgroup of alcoholics.

  10. Identification and in vitro characterization of novel nanobodies against human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor to provide inhibition of G-CSF function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakherad, Hamid; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Aghamollaei, Hossein; Taheri, Ramezan Ali; Torshabi, Maryam; Yazdi, Mojtaba Tabatabaei; Ebrahimizadeh, Walead; Setayesh, Neda

    2017-09-01

    It has been shown that Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has a higher expression in malignant tumors, and anti-G-CSF therapy considerably decreases tumor growth, tumor vascularization and metastasis. Thus, blocking the signaling pathway of G-CSF could be beneficial in cancer therapy. This study is aimed at designing and producing a monoclonal nanobody that could act as an antagonist of G-CSF receptor. Nanobodies are the antigen binding fragments of camelid single-chain antibodies, also known as VHH. These fragments have exceptional properties which makes them ideal for tumor imaging and therapeutic applications. We have used our previously built nanobody phage libraries to isolate specific nanobodies to the G-CSF receptor. After a series of cross-reactivity and affinity experiments, two unique nanobodies were selected for functional analysis. Proliferation assay, real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize these nanobodies. Finally, VHH26 nanobody that was able to specifically bind G-CSF receptor (G-CSF-R) on the surface of NFS60 cells and efficiently block G-CSF-R downstream signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner was selected. This nanobody could be further developed into a valuable tool in tumor therapy and it forms a basis for additional studies in preclinical animal models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Identification of a negative allosteric site on human α4β2 and α3β4 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Pavlovicz

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine-based neurotransmission is regulated by cationic, ligand-gated ion channels called nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. These receptors have been linked to numerous neurological diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and nicotine addiction. Recently, a class of compounds has been discovered that antagonize nAChR function in an allosteric fashion. Models of human α4β2 and α3β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR extracellular domains have been developed to computationally explore the binding of these compounds, including the dynamics and free energy changes associated with ligand binding. Through a blind docking study to multiple receptor conformations, the models were used to determine a putative binding mode for the negative allosteric modulators. This mode, in close proximity to the agonist binding site, is presented in addition to a hypothetical mode of antagonism that involves obstruction of C loop closure. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM-PBSA free energy of binding calculations were used as computational validation of the predicted binding mode, while functional assays on wild-type and mutated receptors provided experimental support. Based on the proposed binding mode, two residues on the β2 subunit were independently mutated to the corresponding residues found on the β4 subunit. The T58K mutation resulted in an eight-fold decrease in the potency of KAB-18, a compound that exhibits preferential antagonism for human α4β2 over α3β4 nAChRs, while the F118L mutation resulted in a loss of inhibitory activity for KAB-18 at concentrations up to 100 µM. These results demonstrate the selectivity of KAB-18 for human α4β2 nAChRs and validate the methods used for identifying the nAChR modulator binding site. Exploitation of this site may lead to the development of more potent and subtype-selective nAChR antagonists which may be used in the treatment of a number of neurological

  12. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Stockley

    Full Text Available The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12 could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =, both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =. Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder.

  14. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-01-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ([3H]CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that [3H] CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for [3H] CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific [3H]CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid)

  15. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the thirty-ninth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The period covered by this report is the year ending March 31, 1986. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) was established in 1946, by the Atomic Energy Control Act (AEC Act), (Revised Statues of Canada (R.S.C.) 1970 cA19). It is a departmental corporation (Schedule B) within the meaning and purpose of the Financial Administration Act. The AECB controls the development, application and use of atomic energy in Canada, and participates on behalf of Canada in international measures of control. The AECB is also repsonsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, (R.S.C. 1970 c29 1st Supp) as amended, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. The AECB reports to Parliament through a designated Minister, currently the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources

  16. Identification and Transcriptional Modulation of the Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides, Vitellogenin Receptor During Oocyte Development by Insulin and Sex Steroids1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Quattro, Joseph M.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Porak, Wesley F.; Grier, Harry J.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E2 or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E2 or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues. PMID:22786822

  17. Panel of monoclonal antibodies to sperm surface proteins as a tool for monitoring localization and identification of sperm-zona pellucida receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zigo, Michal; Dorosh, Andriy; Pohlová, Alžběta; Jonáková, Věra; Šulc, Miroslav; Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla

    March, č. 359 (2015), s. 895-908 ISSN 0302-766X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05547S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : zona pellucida-binding receptors * monoclonal antibodies against sperm surface proteins * sperm surface proteins * RAB-2A * lactahedrin P47 Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.948, year: 2015

  18. Identification of Functionally Important Residues of the Rat P2X4 Receptor by Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of the Dorsal Fin and Left Flipper Domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Rokic, Milos Boro; Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2014), e112902 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 3446/11 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : purinergic receptor * P2X * ATP * binding pocket * gating * signal transmission * partial agonists Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  19. Identification of a point mutation in growth factor repeat C of the low density lipoprotein-receptor gene in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soutar, A.K.; Knight, B.L.; Patel, D.D.

    1989-01-01

    The coding region of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene from a patient (MM) with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been sequenced from six overlapping 500-base-pair amplified fragments of the cDNA from cultured skin fibroblasts. Two separate single nucleotide base changes from the normal sequence were detected. The first involved substitution of guanine for adenine in the third position of the codon for amino acid residue Cys-27 and did not affect the protein sequence. The second mutation was substitution of thymine for cytosine in the DNA for the codon for amino acid residue 664, changing the codon from CCG (proline) to CTG (leucine) and introducing a new site for the restriction enzyme PstI. MM is a true homozygote with two identical genes, and the mutation cosegregated with clinically diagnosed FH in his family in which first cousin marriages occurred frequently. LDL receptors in MM's skin fibroblasts bind less LDL than normal and with reduced affinity. Thus this naturally occurring single point mutation affects both intracellular transport of the protein and ligand binding and occurs in growth factor-like repeat C, a region that has not previously been found to influence LDL binding

  20. Identification of serine 348 on the apelin receptor as a novel regulatory phosphorylation site in apelin-13-induced G protein-independent biased signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Bai, Bo; Tian, Yanjun; Du, Hui; Chen, Jing

    2014-11-07

    Phosphorylation plays vital roles in the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) functions. The apelin and apelin receptor (APJ) system is involved in the regulation of cardiovascular function and central control of body homeostasis. Here, using tandem mass spectrometry, we first identified phosphorylated serine residues in the C terminus of APJ. To determine the role of phosphorylation sites in APJ-mediated G protein-dependent and -independent signaling and function, we induced a mutation in the C-terminal serine residues and examined their effects on the interaction between APJ with G protein or GRK/β-arrestin and their downstream signaling. Mutation of serine 348 led to an elimination of both GRK and β-arrestin recruitment to APJ induced by apelin-13. Moreover, APJ internalization and G protein-independent ERK signaling were also abolished by point mutation at serine 348. In contrast, this mutant at serine residues had no demonstrable impact on apelin-13-induced G protein activation and its intracellular signaling. These findings suggest that mutation of serine 348 resulted in inactive GRK/β-arrestin. However, there was no change in the active G protein thus, APJ conformation was biased. These results provide important information on the molecular interplay and impact of the APJ function, which may be extrapolated to design novel drugs for cardiac hypertrophy based on this biased signal pathway. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Identification of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Receptor (IGF-IR) Gene Promoter-Binding Proteins in Estrogen Receptor (ER)-Positive and ER-Depleted Breast Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfstein, Rive; Belfiore, Antonino; Werner, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) has been implicated in the etiology of breast cancer. Overexpression of the IGF-IR gene is a typical feature of most primary breast cancers, whereas low IGF-IR levels are seen at advanced stages. Hence, evaluation of IGF-IR levels might be important for assessing prognosis. In the present study, we employed a proteomic approach based on DNA affinity chromatography followed either by mass spectroscopy (MS) or Western blot analysis to identify transcription factors that may associate with the IGF-IR promoter in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells. A biotinylated IGF-IR promoter fragment was bound to streptavidin magnetic beads and incubated with nuclear extracts of breast cancer cells. IGF-IR promoter-binding proteins were eluted with high salt and analyzed by MS and Western blots. Among the proteins that were found to bind to the IGF-IR promoter we identified zinc finger transcription factors Sp1 and KLF6, ER-α, p53, c-jun, and poly (ADP-ribosylation) polymerase. Furthermore, chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed the direct in vivo binding of some of these transcription factors to IGF-IR promoter DNA. The functional relevance of binding data was assessed by cotransfection experiments with specific expression vectors along with an IGF-IR promoter reporter. In summary, we identified nuclear proteins that are potentially responsible for the differential expression of the IGF-IR gene in ER-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells

  2. Cloning, expression, cellular distribution, and role in chemotaxis of a C5a receptor in rainbow trout: the first identification of a C5a receptor in a nonmammalian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshra, Hani; Li, Jun; Peters, Rodney; Hansen, John; Matlapudi, Anjan; Sunyer, J. Oriol

    2004-01-01

    C3a, C4a, and C5a anaphylatoxins generated during complement activation play a key role in inflammation. C5a is the most potent of the three anaphylatoxins in eliciting biological responses. The effects of C5a are mediated by its binding to C5a receptor (C5aR, CD88). To date, C5aR has only been identified and cloned in mammalian species, and its evolutionary history remains ill-defined. To gain insights into the evolution, conserved structural domains, and functions of C5aR, we have cloned and characterized a C5aR in rainbow trout, a teleost fish. The isolated cDNA encoded a 350-aa protein that showed the highest sequence similarity to C5aR from other species. Genomic analysis revealed the presence of one continuous exon encoding the entire open reading frame. Northern blot analysis showed significant expression of the trout C5a receptor (TC5aR) message in PBLs and kidney. Flow cytometric analysis showed that two Abs generated against two different areas of the extracellular N-terminal region of TC5aR positively stained the same leukocyte populations from PBLs. B lymphocytes and granulocytes comprised the majority of cells recognized by the anti-TC5aR. More importantly, these Abs inhibited chemotaxis of PBLs toward a chemoattractant fraction purified from complement-activated trout serum. Our data suggest that the split between C5aR and C3aR from a common ancestral molecule occurred before the emergence of teleost fish. Moreover, we demonstrate that the overall structure of C5aR as well as its role in chemotaxis have remained conserved for >300 million years.

  3. Identification of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Receptor (IGF-IR) Gene Promoter-Binding Proteins in Estrogen Receptor (ER)-Positive and ER-Depleted Breast Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarfstein, Rive [Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Belfiore, Antonino [Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Catanzaro 88100 (Italy); Werner, Haim, E-mail: hwerner@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Human Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2010-03-25

    The insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) has been implicated in the etiology of breast cancer. Overexpression of the IGF-IR gene is a typical feature of most primary breast cancers, whereas low IGF-IR levels are seen at advanced stages. Hence, evaluation of IGF-IR levels might be important for assessing prognosis. In the present study, we employed a proteomic approach based on DNA affinity chromatography followed either by mass spectroscopy (MS) or Western blot analysis to identify transcription factors that may associate with the IGF-IR promoter in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells. A biotinylated IGF-IR promoter fragment was bound to streptavidin magnetic beads and incubated with nuclear extracts of breast cancer cells. IGF-IR promoter-binding proteins were eluted with high salt and analyzed by MS and Western blots. Among the proteins that were found to bind to the IGF-IR promoter we identified zinc finger transcription factors Sp1 and KLF6, ER-α, p53, c-jun, and poly (ADP-ribosylation) polymerase. Furthermore, chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed the direct in vivo binding of some of these transcription factors to IGF-IR promoter DNA. The functional relevance of binding data was assessed by cotransfection experiments with specific expression vectors along with an IGF-IR promoter reporter. In summary, we identified nuclear proteins that are potentially responsible for the differential expression of the IGF-IR gene in ER-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells.

  4. Genome-wide identification, characterization and classification of ionotropic glutamate receptor genes (iGluRs) in the malaria vector Anopheles sinensis (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Ting; Si, Feng-Ling; He, Zheng-Bo; Chen, Bin

    2018-01-15

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are conserved ligand-gated ion channel receptors, and ionotropic receptors (IRs) were revealed as a new family of iGluRs. Their subdivision was unsettled, and their characteristics are little known. Anopheles sinensis is a major malaria vector in eastern Asia, and its genome was recently well sequenced and annotated. We identified iGluR genes in the An. sinensis genome, analyzed their characteristics including gene structure, genome distribution, domains and specific sites by bioinformatic methods, and deduced phylogenetic relationships of all iGluRs in An. sinensis, Anopheles gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Based on the characteristics and phylogenetics, we generated the classification of iGluRs, and comparatively analyzed the intron number and selective pressure of three iGluRs subdivisions, iGluR group, Antenna IR and Divergent IR subfamily. A total of 56 iGluR genes were identified and named in the whole-genome of An. sinensis. These genes were located on 18 scaffolds, and 31 of them (29 being IRs) are distributed into 10 clusters that are suggested to form mainly from recent gene duplication. These iGluRs can be divided into four groups: NMDA, non-NMDA, Antenna IR and Divergent IR based on feature comparison and phylogenetic analysis. IR8a and IR25a were suggested to be monophyletic, named as Putative in the study, and moved from the Antenna subfamily in the IR family to the non-NMDA group as a sister of traditional non-NMDA. The generated iGluRs of genes (including NMDA and regenerated non-NMDA) are relatively conserved, and have a more complicated gene structure, smaller ω values and some specific functional sites. The iGluR genes in An. sinensis, An. gambiae and D. melanogaster have amino-terminal domain (ATD), ligand binding domain (LBD) and Lig_Chan domains, except for IR8a that only has the LBD and Lig_Chan domains. However, the new concept IR family of genes (including regenerated Antenna IR, and Divergent

  5. Functional characterization of a full length pregnane X receptor, expression in vivo, and identification of PXR alleles, in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainy, Afonso C.D. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Departamento de Bioquímica, CCB, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Kubota, Akira; Goldstone, Jared V. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Lille-Langøy, Roger [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Karchner, Sibel I. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Celander, Malin C. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg (Sweden); Hahn, Mark E. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Goksøyr, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Stegeman, John J., E-mail: jstegeman@whoi.edu [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Full-length pxr has been cloned from zebrafish. •Alleles of pxr were identified in zebrafish. •Full length Pxr was activated less strongly than ligand binding domain in cell-based reporter assays. •High levels of pxr expression were found in eye and brain as well as in liver. •TCPOBOP and PB did not significantly alter expression of pxr in liver. -- Abstract: The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (nuclear receptor NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor, mediating responses to diverse xenobiotic and endogenous chemicals. The properties of PXR in fish are not fully understood. Here we report on cloning and characterization of full-length PXR of zebrafish, Danio rerio, and pxr expression in vivo. Initial efforts gave a cDNA encoding a 430 amino acid protein identified as zebrafish pxr by phylogenetic and synteny analysis. The sequence of the cloned Pxr DNA binding domain (DBD) was highly conserved, with 74% identity to human PXR-DBD, while the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the cloned sequence was only 44% identical to human PXR-LBD. Sequence variation among clones in the initial effort prompted sequencing of multiple clones from a single fish. There were two prominent variants, one sequence with S183, Y218 and H383 and the other with I183, C218 and N383, which we designate as alleles pxr*1 (nr1i2*1) and pxr*2 (nr1i2*2), respectively. In COS-7 cells co-transfected with a PXR-responsive reporter gene, the full-length Pxr*1 (the more common variant) was activated by known PXR agonists clotrimazole and pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile but to a lesser extent than the full-length human PXR. Activation of full-length Pxr*1 was only 10% of that with the Pxr*1 LBD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of pxr in liver and eye, as well as brain and intestine of adult zebrafish. The pxr was expressed in heart and kidney at levels similar to that in intestine. The expression of pxr in liver was weakly induced by ligands for

  6. Identification of the subunit of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) that functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, K L; Kallipolitis, B H; Ebright, R H

    2000-01-01

    At promoters of the Escherichia coli CytR regulon, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) interacts with the repressor CytR to form transcriptionally inactive CRP-CytR-promoter or (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Here, using "oriented heterodimer" analysis, we show that only one subunit of the CRP dimer......, the subunit proximal to CytR, functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Our results provide information about the architecture of CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes and rule out the proposal that masking of activating region 2 of CRP...

  7. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... containing exclusively SRCR and SID domains that binds to S. mutans. To define more closely the S. mutans-binding domain, consensus-based peptides of the SRCR domains and SIDs were designed and synthesized. Only one of the SRCR peptides, designated SRCRP2, and none of the SID peptides bound to S. mutans....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate...

  8. A targeted genotyping approach enhances identification of variants in taste receptor and appetite/reward genes of potential functional importance for obesity-related porcine traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, S.; Clop, A.; Jacobsen, M. J.

    2018-01-01

    Taste receptors (TASRs) and appetite and reward (AR) mechanisms influence eating behaviour, which in turn affects food intake and risk of obesity. In a previous study, we used next generation sequencing to identify potentially functional mutations in TASR and AR genes and found indications...... for genetic associations between identified variants and growth and fat deposition in a subgroup of animals (n = 38) from the UNIK resource pig population. This population was created for studying obesity and obesity-related diseases. In the present study we validated results from our previous study...... by investigating genetic associations between 24 selected single nucleotide variants in TASR and AR gene variants and 35 phenotypes describing obesity and metabolism in the entire UNIK population (n = 564). Fifteen variants showed significant association with specific obesity-related phenotypes after Bonferroni...

  9. Identification and in Vivo Evaluation of Liver X Receptor β-Selective Agonists for the Potential Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stachel, Shawn J.; Zerbinatti, Celina; Rudd, Michael T.; Cosden, Mali; Suon, Sokreine; Nanda, Kausik K.; Wessner, Keith; DiMuzio, Jillian; Maxwell, Jill; Wu, Zhenhua; Uslaner, Jason M.; Michener, Maria S.; Szczerba, Peter; Brnardic, Edward; Rada, Vanessa; Kim, Yuntae; Meissner, Robert; Wuelfing, Peter; Yuan, Yang; Ballard, Jeanine; Holahan, Marie; Klein, Daniel J.; Lu, Jun; Fradera, Xavier; Parthasarathy, Gopal; Uebele, Victor N.; Chen, Zhongguo; Li, Yingjie; Li, Jian; Cooke, Andrew J.; Bennett, D. Jonathan; Bilodeau, Mark T.; Renger, John (Merck); (WuXi App Tec)

    2016-04-14

    Herein, we describe the development of a functionally selective liver X receptor β (LXRβ) agonist series optimized for Emax selectivity, solubility, and physical properties to allow efficacy and safety studies in vivo. Compound 9 showed central pharmacodynamic effects in rodent models, evidenced by statistically significant increases in apolipoprotein E (apoE) and ATP-binding cassette transporter levels in the brain, along with a greatly improved peripheral lipid safety profile when compared to those of full dual agonists. These findings were replicated by subchronic dosing studies in non-human primates, where cerebrospinal fluid levels of apoE and amyloid-β peptides were increased concomitantly with an improved peripheral lipid profile relative to that of nonselective compounds. These results suggest that optimization of LXR agonists for Emax selectivity may have the potential to circumvent the adverse lipid-related effects of hepatic LXR activity.

  10. Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP) genes from the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana: Identification and expression in response to water accommodated fractions (WAFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthumana, Jayesh; Lee, Min-Chul; Han, Jeonghoon; Kim, Hui-Su; Hwang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2017-02-01

    Ecdysteroid hormones are pivotal in the development, growth, and molting of arthropods, and the hormone pathway is triggered by binding ecdysteroid to a heterodimer of the two nuclear receptors; ecdysone receptors (EcR) and ultraspiracle (USP). We have characterized EcR and USP genes, and their 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) from the copepod Paracyclopina nana, and studied mRNA transcription levels in post-embryonic stages and in response to water accommodated fractions (WAFs) of crude oil. The open reading frames (ORF) of EcR and USP were 1470 and 1287bp that encoded 490 and 429 amino acids with molecular weight of 121.18 and 105.03kDa, respectively. Also, a well conserved DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD) were identified which confirmed by phylogenetic analysis. Messenger RNA transcriptional levels of EcR and USP were developmental stage-specific in early post-embryonic stages (N3-4). However, an evoked expression of USP was observed throughout copepodid stage and in adult females. WAFs (40 and 80%) were acted as an ecdysone agonist in P. nana, and elicited the mRNA transcription levels in adults. Developmental stage-specific transcriptional activation of EcR and USP in response to WAFs was observed. USP gene was down-regulated in the nauplius in response to WAF, whereas up-regulation of USP was observed in the adults. This study represents the first data of molecular elucidation of EcR and USP genes and their regulatory elements from P. nana and the developmental stage specific expression in response to WAFs, which can be used as potential biomarkers for environmental stressors with ecotoxicological evaluations in copepods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports are periodic reports issued for public release. For the deep set fishery these reports are issued quarterly and anually....

  12. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  13. Identification of Interleukin-27 (IL-27)/IL-27 Receptor Subunit Alpha as a Critical Immune Axis for In Vivo HIV Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Riol, M; Berdnik, D; Llano, A; Mothe, B; Gálvez, C; Pérez-Álvarez, S; Oriol-Tordera, B; Olvera, A; Silva-Arrieta, S; Meulbroek, M; Pujol, F; Coll, J; Martinez-Picado, J; Ganoza, C; Sanchez, J; Gómez, G; Wyss-Coray, T; Brander, C

    2017-08-15

    Intact and broad immune cell effector functions and specific individual cytokines have been linked to HIV disease outcome, but their relative contribution to HIV control remains unclear. We asked whether the proteome of secreted cytokines and signaling factors in peripheral blood can be used to discover specific pathways critical for host viral control. A custom glass-based microarray, able to measure >600 plasma proteins involved in cell-to-cell communication, was used to measure plasma protein profiles in 96 HIV-infected, treatment-naive individuals with high (>50,000) or low (HIV RNA copies/ml) viral loads. Univariate and regression model analysis demonstrate that plasma levels of soluble interleukin-27 (IL-27) are significantly elevated in individuals with high plasma viremia ( P HIV-DNA copy numbers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (Rho = 0.4011; P = 0.0027). Moreover, soluble IL-27 plasma levels are negatively associated with the breadth and magnitude of the total virus-specific T-cell responses and directly with plasma levels of molecules involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling. In addition to IL-27, gene expression levels of the specific IL-27 receptor ( IL27RA ) in PBMC correlated directly with both plasma viral load (Rho = 0.3531; P = 0.0218) and the proviral copy number in the peripheral blood as an indirect measure of partial viral reservoir (Rho = 0.4580; P = 0.0030). These results were validated in unrelated cohorts of early infected subjects as well as subjects before and after initiation of antiretroviral treatment, and they identify IL-27 and its specific receptor as a critical immune axis for the antiviral immune response and as robust correlates of viral load and proviral reservoir size in PBMC. IMPORTANCE The detailed knowledge of immune mechanisms that contribute to HIV control is a prerequisite for the design of effective treatment strategies to achieve HIV cure. Cells communicate with each other by secreting signaling proteins, and

  14. Identification and in vitro pharmacological characterization of a novel and selective α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, Br-IQ17B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jing-shu; Xie, Bing-xue; Bian, Xi-ling; Xue, Yu; Wei, Ning-ning; Zhou, Jing-heng; Hao, Yu-chen; Li, Gang; Zhang, Liang-ren; Wang, Ke-wei

    2015-07-01

    Alpha7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR) is a ligand-gated Ca(2+)-permeable ion channel implicated in cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders. Activation of α7 nAChR improves learning, memory, and sensory gating in animal models. To identify novel α7 nAChR agonists, we synthesized a series of small molecules and characterized a representative compound, Br-IQ17B, N-[(3R)-1-azabicyclo[2,2,2]oct-3-yl]-5-bromoindolizine-2-carboxamide, which specifically activates α7 nAChR. Two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC) recordings were primarily used for screening in Xenopus oocytes expressing human α7 nAChR. Assays, including radioisotope ligand binding, Western blots, whole-cell recordings of hippocampal culture neurons, and spontaneous IPSC recordings of brain slices, were also utilized to evaluate and confirm the specific activation of α7 nAChR by Br-IQ17B. Br-IQ17B potently activates α7 nAChR with an EC50 of 1.8±0.2 μmol/L. Br-IQ17B is selective over other subtypes such as α4β2 and α3β4, but it blocks 5-HT3A receptors. Br-IQ17B displaced binding of the α7 blocker [(3)H]-MLA to hippocampal crude membranes with a Ki of 14.9±3.2 nmol/L. In hippocampal neurons, Br-IQ17B evoked α7-like currents that were inhibited by MLA and enhanced in the presence of the α7 PAM PNU-120596. In brain slice recordings, Br-IQ17B enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission in CA1 neurons. Mechanistically, Br-IQ17B increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation that was MLA-sensitive. We identified the novel, potent, and selective α7 agonist Br-IQ17B, which enhances synaptic transmission. Br-IQ17B may be a helpful tool to understand new aspects of α7 nAChR function, and it also has potential for being developed as therapy for schizophrenia and cognitive deficits.

  15. Identification of a Novel Substance P–Neurokinin-1 Receptor MicroRNA-221-5p Inflammatory Network in Human Colonic Epithelial CellsSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Substance P (SP, a neuropeptide member of the tachykinin family, plays a critical role in colitis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression. We examined whether SP modulates expression of microRNAs in human colonic epithelial cells. Methods: We performed microRNA profiling analysis of SP-stimulated human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells overexpressing neurokinin-1 receptor (NCM460-NK-1R. Targets of SP-regulated microRNAs were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Functions of miRNAs were tested in NCM460-NK-1R cells and the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS models of colitis. Results: SP stimulated differential expression of 29 microRNAs, including miR-221-5p, the highest up-regulated miR (by 12.6-fold upon SP stimulation. Bioinformatic and luciferase reporter analyses identified interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R mRNA as a direct target of miR-221-5p in NCM460 cells. Accordingly, SP exposure of NCM460-NK-1R cells increased IL-6R mRNA expression, and overexpression of miR-221-5p reduced IL-6R expression. Nuclear factor κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition decreased SP-induced miR-221-5p expression. MiR-221-5p expression was increased in both TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis and in colonic biopsy samples from ulcerative colitis but not Crohn’s disease patients compared with controls. In mice, intracolonic administration of a miR-221-5p chemical inhibitor exacerbated TNBS- and DSS-induced colitis and increased colonic tumor necrosis factor-α, C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (Cxcl10, and collagen, type II, α 1 (Col2α1 mRNA expression. In situ hybridization in TNBS- and DSS-exposed colons revealed increased miR-221-5p expression primarily in colonocytes. Conclusions: Our results reveal a novel NK-1R-miR-221-5p-IL-6R network that protects from colitis. The use of miR-221-5p mimics may be a promising approach for colitis

  16. Identification of novel driver mutations of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene in squamous cell lung cancer of Chinese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Liyun; Zhang, Deping; Liu, Hongbing; Song, Yong; Wang, Yongsheng; Zhu, Suhua; Shi, Minke; Li, Yan; Ding, Jingjing; Yang, Jun; Ye, Qing; Cai, Hourong

    2014-01-01

    Although many of the recently approved genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients in non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations that drive lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) and development of effective targeted therapies in lung SCC is a promising area to be further investigated. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2), is a novel receptor tyrosine kinases that respond to several collagens and involved in tissue repair, primary and metastatic cancer progression. Expression of DDR2 mRNA was analyzed in 54 lung SCC tissues by qRT-PCR. Over-expression approaches were used to investigate the biological functions of DDR2 and its’ mutations in lung SCC cells. Conventional Sanger sequencing was used to investigate the mutations of DDR2 gene in 86 samples. The effect of DDR2 and its’ mutations on proliferation was evaluated by MTT and colony formation assays; cell migration and invasion was evaluated by trasnwell assays. Lung SCC cells stably transfected with pEGFP-DDR2 WT, pEGFP-DDR2-S131C or empty vector were injection into nude mice to study the effect of DDR2 and its’ mutation on tumorigenesis in vivo. Protein and mRNA expression levels of E-cadherin and MMP2 were determined by qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. Differences between groups were tested for significance using Student’s t-test (two-tailed). In this study, we found that DDR2 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in 54 lung SCC tissues compared with normal lung tissues. Moreover, there were 3 novel DDR2 mutations (G531V, S131C, T681I) in 4 patients and provide the mutation rate of 4.6% in the 86 patients with lung SCC. The mutation of S131C in DDR2 could promote lung SCC cells proliferation, migration and invasion via inducing MMP-2, but reducing E-cadherin expression. These data indicated that the novel DDR2 mutation may contribute to the development and progression of lung SCC and this effect may be associated

  17. Identification of aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding targets in mouse hepatic tissue treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, Raymond; Celius, Trine; Forgacs, Agnes L.; Dere, Edward; MacPherson, Laura; Harper, Patricia; Zacharewski, Timothy; Matthews, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide, promoter-focused ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) binding sites was conducted in 8-week old female C57BL/6 treated with 30 μg/kg/body weight 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for 2 h and 24 h. These studies identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. A total of 430 AHR-bound regions were common between the two time points, corresponding to 403 unique genes. Comparison with previous AHR ChIP-chip studies in mouse hepatoma cells revealed that only 62 of the putative target genes overlapped with the 2 h AHR-bound regions in vivo. Transcription factor binding site analysis revealed an over-representation of aryl hydrocarbon response elements (AHREs) in AHR-bound regions with 53% (2 h) and 68% (24 h) of them containing at least one AHRE. In addition to AHREs, E2f-Myc activator motifs previously implicated in AHR function, as well as a number of other motifs, including Sp1, nuclear receptor subfamily 2 factor, and early growth response factor motifs were also identified. Expression microarray studies identified 133 unique genes differentially regulated after 4 h treatment with TCDD. Of which, 39 were identified as AHR-bound genes at 2 h. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on the 39 AHR-bound TCDD responsive genes identified potential perturbation in biological processes such as lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and endocrine system development as a result of TCDD-mediated AHR activation. Our findings identify direct AHR target genes in vivo, highlight in vitro and in vivo differences in AHR signaling and show that AHR recruitment does not necessarily result in changes in target gene expression. -- Highlights: ► ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic AHR binding after 2 h and 24 h of TCDD. ► We identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h. ► 430 regions were common to both time points and highly enriched with AHREs. ► Only 62 putative target regions overlapped AHR-bound regions in

  18. Identification of aryl hydrocarbon receptor binding targets in mouse hepatic tissue treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Raymond; Celius, Trine [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Forgacs, Agnes L. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Dere, Edward [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); MacPherson, Laura [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Harper, Patricia [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Research Institute, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Zacharewski, Timothy [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Matthews, Jason, E-mail: jason.matthews@utoronto.ca [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Genome-wide, promoter-focused ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) binding sites was conducted in 8-week old female C57BL/6 treated with 30 {mu}g/kg/body weight 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) for 2 h and 24 h. These studies identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h, respectively. A total of 430 AHR-bound regions were common between the two time points, corresponding to 403 unique genes. Comparison with previous AHR ChIP-chip studies in mouse hepatoma cells revealed that only 62 of the putative target genes overlapped with the 2 h AHR-bound regions in vivo. Transcription factor binding site analysis revealed an over-representation of aryl hydrocarbon response elements (AHREs) in AHR-bound regions with 53% (2 h) and 68% (24 h) of them containing at least one AHRE. In addition to AHREs, E2f-Myc activator motifs previously implicated in AHR function, as well as a number of other motifs, including Sp1, nuclear receptor subfamily 2 factor, and early growth response factor motifs were also identified. Expression microarray studies identified 133 unique genes differentially regulated after 4 h treatment with TCDD. Of which, 39 were identified as AHR-bound genes at 2 h. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis on the 39 AHR-bound TCDD responsive genes identified potential perturbation in biological processes such as lipid metabolism, drug metabolism, and endocrine system development as a result of TCDD-mediated AHR activation. Our findings identify direct AHR target genes in vivo, highlight in vitro and in vivo differences in AHR signaling and show that AHR recruitment does not necessarily result in changes in target gene expression. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ChIP-chip analysis of hepatic AHR binding after 2 h and 24 h of TCDD. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 1642 and 508 AHR-bound regions at 2 h and 24 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 430 regions were common to both time points and highly enriched with

  19. In vitro phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1 by protein kinase C-zeta: functional analysis and identification of novel phosphorylation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Mark R; Metzger, Sabine; Stosik, Magdalene; Tennagels, Norbert; Eckel, Jürgen

    2004-05-18

    Protein kinase C-zeta (PKC-zeta) participates both in downstream insulin signaling and in the negative feedback control of insulin action. Here we used an in vitro approach to identify PKC-zeta phosphorylation sites within insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1) and to characterize the functional implications. A recombinant IRS-1 fragment (rIRS-1(449)(-)(664)) containing major tyrosine motifs for interaction with phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase strongly associated to the p85alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase after Tyr phosphorylation by the insulin receptor. Phosphorylation of rIRS-1(449)(-)(664) by PKC-zeta induced a prominent inhibition of this process with a mixture of classical PKC isoforms being less effective. Both PKC-zeta and the classical isoforms phosphorylated rIRS-1(449)(-)(664) on Ser(612). However, modification of this residue did not reduce the affinity of p85alpha binding to pTyr-containing peptides (amino acids 605-615 of rat IRS-1), as determined by surface plasmon resonance. rIRS-1(449)(-)(664) was then phosphorylated by PKC-zeta using [(32)P]ATP and subjected to tryptic phosphopeptide mapping based on two-dimensional HPLC coupled to mass spectrometry. Ser(498) and Ser(570) were identified as novel phosphoserine sites targeted by PKC-zeta. Both sites were additionally confirmed by phosphopeptide mapping of the corresponding Ser --> Ala mutants of rIRS-1(449)(-)(664). Ser(570) was specifically targeted by PKC-zeta, as shown by immunoblotting with a phosphospecific antiserum against Ser(570) of IRS-1. Binding of p85alpha to the S570A mutant was less susceptible to inhibition by PKC-zeta, when compared to the S612A mutant. In conclusion, our in vitro data demonstrate a strong inhibitory action of PKC-zeta at the level of IRS-1/PI 3-kinase interaction involving multiple serine phosphorylation sites. Whereas Ser(612) appears not to participate in the negative control of insulin signaling, Ser(570) may at least partly contribute to this process.

  20. Identification of a new gene regulatory circuit involving B cell receptor activated signaling using a combined analysis of experimental, clinical and global gene expression data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Alexandra; Meyer, Katharina; Walther, Neele; Stolz, Ailine; Feist, Maren; Hand, Elisabeth; von Bonin, Frederike; Evers, Maurits; Kohler, Christian; Shirneshan, Katayoon; Vockerodt, Martina; Klapper, Wolfram; Szczepanowski, Monika; Murray, Paul G.; Bastians, Holger; Trümper, Lorenz; Spang, Rainer; Kube, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    To discover new regulatory pathways in B lymphoma cells, we performed a combined analysis of experimental, clinical and global gene expression data. We identified a specific cluster of genes that was coherently expressed in primary lymphoma samples and suppressed by activation of the B cell receptor (BCR) through αIgM treatment of lymphoma cells in vitro. This gene cluster, which we called BCR.1, includes numerous cell cycle regulators. A reduced expression of BCR.1 genes after BCR activation was observed in different cell lines and also in CD10+ germinal center B cells. We found that BCR activation led to a delayed entry to and progression of mitosis and defects in metaphase. Cytogenetic changes were detected upon long-term αIgM treatment. Furthermore, an inverse correlation of BCR.1 genes with c-Myc co-regulated genes in distinct groups of lymphoma patients was observed. Finally, we showed that the BCR.1 index discriminates activated B cell-like and germinal centre B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphoma supporting the functional relevance of this new regulatory circuit and the power of guided clustering for biomarker discovery. PMID:27166259

  1. Identification of the Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 cholesterol absorption receptor as a new hepatitis C virus entry factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz, Bruno; Barretto, Naina; Martin, Danyelle N.; Hiraga, Nobuhiko; Imamura, Michio; Hussain, Snawar; Marsh, Katherine A.; Yu, Xuemei; Chayama, Kazuaki; Alrefai, Waddah A.; Uprichard, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide. With ~170 million individuals infected and current interferon-based treatment having toxic side-effects and marginal efficacy, more effective antivirals are critically needed1. Although HCV protease inhibitors were just FDA approved, analogous to HIV therapy, optimal HCV therapy likely will require a combination of antivirals targeting multiple aspects of the viral lifecycle. Viral entry represents a promising multi-faceted target for antiviral intervention; however, to date FDA-approved inhibitors of HCV cell entry are unavailable. Here we show that the cellular Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) cholesterol uptake receptor is an HCV entry factor amendable to therapeutic intervention. Specifically, NPC1L1 expression is necessary for HCV infection as silencing or antibody-mediated blocking of NPC1L1 impairs cell-cultured-derived HCV (HCVcc) infection initiation. In addition, the clinically-available FDA-approved NPC1L1 antagonist ezetimibe2,3 potently blocks HCV uptake in vitro via a virion cholesterol-dependent step prior to virion-cell membrane fusion. Importantly, ezetimibe inhibits infection of all major HCV genotypes in vitro, and in vivo delays the establishment of HCV genotype 1b infection in mice with human liver grafts. Thus, we have not only identified NPC1L1 as an HCV cell entry factor, but also discovered a new antiviral target and potential therapeutic agent. PMID:22231557

  2. Estradiol-mediated internalisation of the non-activated estrogen receptor from the goat uterine plasma membrane: identification of the proteins involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, S; Thampan, Raghava Varman

    2004-04-01

    An indirect approach has been made to study the molecular details associated with the estradiol-induced internalisation of the non-activated estrogen receptor (naER) from the goat uterine plasma membrane. The internalisation of naER appears to be an energy dependent process. Exposure of the plasma membrane to estradiol results in the activation of a Mg2+ dependent ATPase associated with the membrane fraction. Presence of quercetin in the medium prevented the activation of the Mg2+ ATPase as well as the dissociation of naER from the plasma membrane. Using isolated plasma membrane preparations it has been possible to identify the proteins which interact with naER during various stages of its internalisation. The main proteins identified are: (1) a 58 kDa protein, p58, which apparently recognizes the nuclear localization signals on the naER and transports it to the nucleus: (2) hsp70: (3) hsp90, the functional roles of which remain unknown at this stage; (4) a 50 kDa protein associated with the clathrin coated vesicles, presumed to be involved in recognizing the tyrosine based internalisation signals on the naER; (5) actin which mediates the plasma membrane-to-nucleus movement of the naER-p58 complex.

  3. Identification of the Beer Component Hordenine as Food-Derived Dopamine D2 Receptor Agonist by Virtual Screening a 3D Compound Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Thomas; Hübner, Harald; El Kerdawy, Ahmed; Gmeiner, Peter; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Clark, Timothy

    2017-03-01

    The dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) is involved in food reward and compulsive food intake. The present study developed a virtual screening (VS) method to identify food components, which may modulate D2R signalling. In contrast to their common applications in drug discovery, VS methods are rarely applied for the discovery of bioactive food compounds. Here, databases were created that exclusively contain substances occurring in food and natural sources (about 13,000 different compounds in total) as the basis for combined pharmacophore searching, hit-list clustering and molecular docking into D2R homology models. From 17 compounds finally tested in radioligand assays to determine their binding affinities, seven were classified as hits (hit rate = 41%). Functional properties of the five most active compounds were further examined in β-arrestin recruitment and cAMP inhibition experiments. D2R-promoted G-protein activation was observed for hordenine, a constituent of barley and beer, with approximately identical ligand efficacy as dopamine (76%) and a Ki value of 13 μM. Moreover, hordenine antagonised D2-mediated β-arrestin recruitment indicating functional selectivity. Application of our databases provides new perspectives for the discovery of bioactive food constituents using VS methods. Based on its presence in beer, we suggest that hordenine significantly contributes to mood-elevating effects of beer.

  4. Lipid A structural modifications in extreme conditions and identification of unique modifying enzymes to define the Toll-like receptor 4 structure-activity relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alison J; Oyler, Benjamin L; Goodlett, David R; Ernst, Robert K

    2017-11-01

    Strategies utilizing Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) agonists for treatment of cancer, infectious diseases, and other targets report promising results. Potent TLR4 antagonists are also gaining attention as therapeutic leads. Though some principles for TLR4 modulation by lipid A have been described, a thorough understanding of the structure-activity relationship (SAR) is lacking. Only through a complete definition of lipid A-TLR4 SAR is it possible to predict TLR4 signaling effects of discrete lipid A structures, rendering them more pharmacologically relevant. A limited 'toolbox' of lipid A-modifying enzymes has been defined and is largely composed of enzymes from mesophile human and zoonotic pathogens. Expansion of this 'toolbox' will result from extending the search into lipid A biosynthesis and modification by bacteria living at the extremes. Here, we review the fundamentals of lipid A structure, advances in lipid A uses in TLR4 modulation, and the search for novel lipid A-modifying systems in extremophile bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Bacterial Lipids edited by Russell E. Bishop. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait.

  6. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko [Alliance for Research on North Africa (ARENA), University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Faculty of Life and Environment, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Neffati, Mohamed [Arid Zone Research Institute (IRA), Médenine 4119 (Tunisia); Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro [Nippon Shinyaku CO., LTD., Kyoto 601-8550 (Japan); Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagao, Masaya, E-mail: mnagao@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •6-ODA, a rare fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified from Marrubium vulgare. •6-ODA was synthesized from petroselinic acid as a starting material. •6-ODA stimulated lipid accumulation in HSC-T6 and 3T3-L1 cells. •The first report of a fatty acid with a triple bond functioning as a PPARγ agonist. •This study sheds light on novel functions of a fatty acid with a triple bond. -- Abstract: 6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPARγ whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPARγ agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPARγ agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPARγ in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPARγ-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPARγ agonists.

  7. Identification of Tumor Antigen AF20 as Glycosylated Transferrin Receptor 1 in Complex with Heat Shock Protein 90 and/or Transporting ATPase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M Shapiro

    Full Text Available We previously isolated AF20, a murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes a cell surface glycoprotein of approximately 90-110 kDa. The AF20 antigen is specifically expressed in human hepatoma and colon cancer cell lines, and thus could serve as a cancer biomarker. To uncover the molecular identity of the AF20 antigen, a combination of ion-exchange chromatography, immunoprecipitation, and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was employed to purify the AF20 antigen followed by trypsin digestion and mass spectrometry. Surprisingly, three host proteins were thus purified from human hepatoma and colon cancer cell lines: transferrin receptor 1 (TFR1, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90, and Na+/K+ ATPase or Mg++ ATPase. Co-immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis confirmed interaction among the three proteins. However, only the cDNA encoding TFR1 conferred strong cell surface staining by the AF20 antibody following its transient transfection into a cell line lacking endogenous AF20. In support of the molecular identity of AF20 as TFR1, diferric but not iron-free transferrin could prevent AF20 antigen-antibody interaction during immunoprecipitation. Moreover, very similar patterns of AF20 and TFR1 overexpression was documented in colon cancer tissues. In conclusion, AF20 is glycosylated TFR1. This finding could explain the molecular structure of AF20, its cell surface localization, as well as overexpression in cancer cells. Glycosylated TFR1 should serve as a usefulness target for anti-cancer therapy, or a vehicle for delivery of anti-tumor drugs with high affinity and specificity. The biological significance of the complex formation between TFR1, HSP90, and/or transporting ATPase warrants further investigation.

  8. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide γ-chain-specific monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, C.G.; Itoh, K.; Fox, F.E.; Pahwa, R.; Good, R.A.; Platsoucas, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the λ chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, they identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from 125 I-labeled denatured lysates of T3 + WT31 - lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. Chemical crosslinking of 125 I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3 + WT31 - cell populations are required to determine whether the TCR contains two λ polypeptide chains. Using the same 9D7 anti-P18K mAb and immunoblotting analysis, they identified a 35 kDa γ-chain polypeptide under reducing conditions expressed on purified L3T4 - Lyt2 - BALB/c mouse thymocytes. This γ-chain TCR is disulfide linked and has a molecular mass of 80 kDa under nonreducing conditions

  9. Identification of selected in vitro generated phase-I metabolites of the steroidal selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 for doping control purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagojda, Andreas; Kuehne, Dirk; Krug, Oliver; Thomas, Andreas; Wigger, Tina; Karst, Uwe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Research into developing anabolic agents for various therapeutic purposes has been pursued for decades. As the clinical utility of anabolic-androgenic steroids has been found to be limited because of their lack of tissue selectivity and associated off-target effects, alternative drug entities have been designed and are commonly referred to as selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). While most of these SARMs are of nonsteroidal structure, the drug candidate MK-0773 comprises a 4-aza-steroidal nucleus. Besides the intended therapeutic use, SARMs have been found to be illicitly distributed and misused as doping agents in sport, necessitating frequently updated doping control analytical assays. As steroidal compounds reportedly undergo considerable metabolic transformations, the phase-I metabolism of MK-0773 was simulated using human liver microsomal (HLM) preparations and electrochemical conversion. Subsequently, major metabolic products were identified and characterized employing liquid chromatography-high-resolution/high- accuracy tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. MK-0773 produced numerous phase-I metabolites under the chosen in vitro incubation reactions, mostly resulting from mono- and bisoxygenation of the steroid. HLM yielded at least 10 monooxygenated species, while electrochemistry-based experiments resulted predominantly in three monohydroxylated metabolites. Elemental composition data and product ion mass spectra were generated for these analytes, ESI/APCI measurements corroborated the formation of at least two N-oxygenated metabolites, and NMR data obtained from electrochemistry-derived products supported structures suggested for three monohydroxylated compounds. Hereby, the hydroxylation of the A-ring located N- bound methyl group was found to be of particular intensity. In the absence of controlled elimination studies, the

  10. Identification of clonally rearranged T-cell receptor beta chain genes in HTLV-I carriers as a potential instrument for early detection of neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Sales

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed the genetic recombination pattern of the T-cell receptor beta-chain gene (TCR-beta in order to identify clonal expansion of T-lymphocytes in 17 human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I-positive healthy carriers, 7 of them with abnormal features in the peripheral blood lymphocytes. Monoclonal or oligoclonal expansion of T-cells was detected in 5 of 7 HTLV-I-positive patients with abnormal lymphocytes and unconfirmed diagnosis by using PCR amplification of segments of TCR-beta gene, in a set of reactions that target 102 different variable (V segments, covering all members of the 24 V families available in the gene bank, including the more recently identified segments of the Vbeta-5 and Vbeta-8 family and the two diversity beta segments. Southern blots, the gold standard method to detect T-lymphocyte clonality, were negative for all of these 7 patients, what highlights the low sensitivity of this method that requires a large amount of very high quality DNA. To evaluate the performance of PCR in the detection of clonality we also analyzed 18 leukemia patients, all of whom tested positive. Clonal expansion was not detected in any of the negative controls or healthy carriers without abnormal lymphocytes. In conclusion, PCR amplification of segments of rearranged TCR-beta is reliable and highly suitable for the detection of small populations of clonal T-cells in asymptomatic HTLV-I carriers who present abnormal peripheral blood lymphocytes providing an additional instrument for following up these patients with potentially higher risk of leukemia.

  11. Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the bovine Toll-like receptor 1 gene and association with health traits in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Christopher D

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bovine mastitis remains the most common and costly disease of dairy cattle worldwide. A complementary control measure to herd hygiene and vaccine development would be to selectively breed cattle with greater resistance to mammary infection. Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1 has an integral role for the initiation and regulation of the immune response to microbial pathogens, and has been linked to numerous inflammatory diseases. The objective of this study was to investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the bovine TLR1 gene (boTLR1 are associated with clinical mastitis (CM. Selected boTLR1 SNPs were analysed within a Holstein Friesian herd. Significant associations were found for the tagging SNP -79 T > G and the 3'UTR SNP +2463 C > T. We observed favourable linkage of reduced CM with increased milk fat and protein, indicating selection for these markers would not be detrimental to milk quality. Furthermore, we present evidence that some of these boTLR1 SNPs underpin functional variation in bovine TLR1. Animals with the GG genotype (from the tag SNP -79 T > G had significantly lower boTLR1 expression in milk somatic cells when compared with TT or TG animals. In addition, stimulation of leucocytes from GG animals with the TLR1-ligand Pam3csk4 resulted in significantly lower levels of CXCL8 mRNA and protein. SNPs in boTLR1 were significantly associated with CM. In addition we have identified a bovine population with impaired boTLR1 expression and function. This may have additional implications for animal health and warrants further investigation to determine the suitability of identified SNPs as markers for disease susceptibility.

  12. [125I]2-iodo-3,7,8-trichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-binding species in mouse liver induced by agonists for the Ah receptor: Characterization and identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poland, A.; Teitelbaum, P.; Glover, E.

    1989-01-01

    The admininistration of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to C57BL/6J mice produces a dose-related increase in the hepatic uptake of [ 125 I]2-iodo-3,7,8-trichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin ([ 125 I]Cl3DpD) in vivo and the binding of the radioligand to liver homogenate in vitro. The TCDD-induced hepatic binding species was found to be predominantly in the microsomal fraction and was inactivated by heating at 60 degree, trypsin, and mercurials. The TCDD-induced binding species was found to have an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, KD, ([ 125 I]Cl3DpD) of 56 +/- 16 nM and a pool size, Bmax, of 22 +/- 5 nmol/g of liver. A number of halogenated dibenzo-p-dioxins, biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons compete with [ 125 I]Cl3DpD binding to this species; all are aromatic and planar. The distinctive profile of this binding species, a protein of large pool size induced in the microsomal fraction of liver but not other tissues and induced by agonists for the Ah receptor, suggested that this moiety might be cytochrome P3-450. The coincidence of the major microsomal species covalently labeled with the photoaffinity ligand [ 125 I]2-iodo-3-azido-7,8-dibromodibenzo-p-dioxin and that immunochemically stained with polyclonal antiserum that binds to cytochrome P3-450 confirms this hypothesis. This is a novel role for a cytochrome P-450 isozyme, as an induced sequestration site that enhances the hepatic localization of the agonist drug

  13. Systematic Proteomic Identification of the Heat Shock Proteins (Hsp) that Interact with Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα) and Biochemical Characterization of the ERα-Hsp70 Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamad, Ahmed E; Zhou, Zhenqi; Zhou, Jianhong; Du, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are known to associate with estrogen receptors (ER) and regulate ER-mediated cell proliferation. Historically, the studies in this area have focused on Hsp90. However, some critical aspects of the Hsp-ERα interactions remain unclear. For example, we do not know which Hsps are the major or minor ERα interactants and whether or not different Hsp isoforms associate equally with ERα. In the present study, through a quantitative proteomic method we found that 21 Hsps and 3 Hsp cochaperones were associated with ERα in human 293T cells that were cultured in a medium containing necessary elements for cell proliferation. Four Hsp70s (Hsp70-1, Hsc70, Grp75, and Grp78) were the most abundant Hsps identified to associate with ERα, followed by two Hsp90s (Hsp90α and Hsp90β) and three Hsp110s (Hsp105, HspA4, and HspA4L). Hsp90α was found to be 2-3 times more abundant than Hsp90β in the ERα-containing complexes. Among the reported Hsp cochaperones, we detected prostaglandin E synthase 3 (p23), peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase FKBP5 (FKBP51), and E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase CHIP (CHIP). Studies with the two most abundant ERα-associated Hsps, Hsp70-1 and Hsc70, using human breast cancer MCF7 cells demonstrate that the two Hsps interacted with ERα in both the cytoplasm and nucleus when the cells were cultured in a medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum and phenol red. Interestingly, the ERα-Hsp70-1/Hsc70 interactions were detected only in the cytoplasm but not in the nucleus under hormone starvation conditions, and stimulation of the starved cells with 17β-estradiol (E2) did not change this. In addition, E2-treatment weakened the ERα-Hsc70 interaction but had no effect on the ERα-Hsp70-1 interaction. Further studies showed that significant portions of Hsp70-1 and Hsc70 were associated with transcriptionally active chromatin and inactive chromatin, and the two Hsps interacted with ERα in both forms of the chromatins in MCF7 cells.

  14. Annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This report from the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory in Uppsala covers work performed during the calendar year of 1975. It is the fourth annual report issued in English since research at the laboratory was begun in November 1970. The major part of the beam time for research (almost 80%) has been taken up in studies of problems in nuclear physics. Investigations in atomic physics and solid state physics have been carried out through experiments in beam-foil spectroscopy and on hyperfine fields with perturbed angular correlation techniques, respectively. Nuclear methods and knowledge have been applied in solid state electronics and in physical biology. A marked shift towards the use of heavy ions can be noted. In fact, twice as much accelerator time has been used for 16 O and heavier ions during 1975 than during the previous year. This trend can be expected to continue, in particular after the recently purchased sputtering ion source has been installed. Experimental techniques and methods have been developed, for instance, with the aim to introduce improvements in the detection and identification of stable and unstable heavy ions and in the measurement of nuclear lifetimes using pulsed accelerator beams and conversion electrons. Eight doctoral theses have been presented during 1975, which have been based on research carried out at the Tandem Laboratory. In all, work at the laboratory has now resulted in seventeen theses. (Auth.)

  15. Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium Annual Report 1986. Volume 4. Part A. Hierarchical Region-Based Approach to Automatic Photointerpretation. Part B. Application of AI Techniques to Image Segmentation and Region Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    MONITORING ORGANIZATION Northeast Artificial (If applicaole)nelincCostum(AcRome Air Development Center (COCU) Inteligence Consortium (NAIC)I 6c. ADDRESS...f, Offell RADC-TR-88-1 1, Vol IV (of eight) Interim Technical ReportS June 1988 NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE CONSORTIUM ANNUAL REPORT 1986...13441-5700 EMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO62702F 5 8 71 " " over) I 58 27 13 " ൓ TITLE (Include Security Classification) NORTHEAST ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  16. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  17. The ABA receptors -- we report you decide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCourt, Peter; Creelman, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated in a variety of physiological responses ranging from seed dormancy to stomatal conductance. Recently, three groups have reported the molecular identification of three disparate ABA receptors. Unlike the identification of other hormone receptors, in these three cases high affinity binding to ABA rather than the isolation of ABA insensitive mutants led to these receptor genes. Interestingly, two of the receptors encode genes involved in floral timing and chlorophyll biosynthesis, which are not considered traditional ABA responses. And the third receptor has been clouded in issues of its molecular identity. To clearly determine the roles of these genes in ABA perception it will require placing of these ABA-binding proteins into the rich ABA physiological context that has built up over the years.

  18. Identification of the haemoglobin scavenger receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Jacobsen, C

    2001-01-01

    Intravascular haemolysis is a physiological phenomenon as well as a severe pathological complication when accelerated in various autoimmune, infectious (such as malaria) and inherited (such as sickle cell disease) disorders. Haemoglobin released into plasma is captured by the acute phase protein...

  19. Molecular basis of cannabinoid CB1 receptor coupling to the G protein heterotrimer Gαiβγ: identification of key CB1 contacts with the C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Ahn, Kwang H; Kendall, Debra A

    2013-11-08

    The cannabinoid (CB1) receptor is a member of the rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. The human CB1 receptor, which is among the most expressed receptors in the brain, has been implicated in several disease states, including drug addiction, anxiety, depression, obesity, and chronic pain. Different classes of CB1 agonists evoke signaling pathways through the activation of specific subtypes of G proteins. The molecular basis of CB1 receptor coupling to its cognate G protein is unknown. As a first step toward understanding CB1 receptor-mediated G protein signaling, we have constructed a ternary complex structural model of the CB1 receptor and Gi heterotrimer (CB1-Gi), guided by the x-ray structure of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) in complex with Gs (β2AR-Gs), through 824-ns duration molecular dynamics simulations in a fully hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer environment. We identified a group of residues at the juxtamembrane regions of the intracellular loops 2 and 3 (IC2 and IC3) of the CB1 receptor, including Ile-218(3.54), Tyr-224(IC2), Asp-338(6.30), Arg-340(6.32), Leu-341(6.33), and Thr-344(6.36), as potential key contacts with the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. Ala mutations of these residues at the receptor-Gi interface resulted in little G protein coupling activity, consistent with the present model of the CB1-Gi complex, which suggests tight interactions between CB1 and the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gαi. The model also suggests that unique conformational changes in the extreme C-terminal helix α5 of Gα play a crucial role in the receptor-mediated G protein activation.

  20. Identification of tetrapeptides from a mixture based positional scanning library that can restore nM full agonist function of the L106P, I69T, I102S, A219V, C271Y, and C271R human melanocortin-4 polymorphic receptors (hMC4Rs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslach, Erica M; Huang, Huisuo; Dirain, Marvin; Debevec, Ginamarie; Geer, Phaedra; Santos, Radleigh G; Giulianotti, Marc A; Pinilla, Clemencia; Appel, Jon R; Doering, Skye R; Walters, Michael A; Houghten, Richard A; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie

    2014-06-12

    Human obesity has been linked to genetic factors and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) SNPs have been associated with up to 6% frequency in morbidly obese children and adults. A potential therapy for individuals possessing such genetic modifications is the identification of molecules that can restore proper receptor signaling and function. These compounds could serve as personalized medications improving quality of life issues as well as alleviating diseases symptoms associated with obesity including type 2 diabetes. Several hMC4 SNP receptors have been pharmacologically characterized in vitro to have a decreased, or a lack of response, to endogenous agonists such as α-, β-, and γ2-melanocyte stimulating hormones (MSH) and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH). Herein we report the use of a mixture based positional scanning combinatorial tetrapeptide library to discover molecules with nM full agonist potency and efficacy to the L106P, I69T, I102S, A219V, C271Y, and C271R hMC4Rs. The most potent compounds at all these hMC4R SNPs include Ac-His-(pI)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, Ac-His-(pCl)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, Ac-His-(pCl)DPhe-Arg-(pI)Phe-NH2, and Ac-Arg-(pCl)DPhe-Tic-(pNO2)DPhe-NH2, revealing new ligand pharmacophore models for melanocortin receptor drug design strategies.

  1. 1H-cyclopentapyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione-related ionotropic glutamate receptors ligands. Structure-activity relationships and identification of potent and selective iGluR5 modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butini, Stefania; Pickering, Darryl S; Morelli, Elena

    2008-01-01

    (S)-CPW399 ((S)-1) is a potent and excitotoxic AMPA receptor partial agonist. Modifying the cyclopentane ring of (S)-1, we developed two of the most potent and selective functional antagonists (5 and 7) for kainate receptor (KA-R) subunit iGluR5. Derivatives 5 and 7, with their unique pharmacolog...

  2. Annual report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The GKSS scientific annual report summarizes the problems and results of the research and development projects of 1973. In contrast to earlier annual reports, a comprehensive description of the research facilities is not included. The annual report was extended by the paragraph 'Financial Report 1973' in the chapter 'Development of Geesthacht Research Centre'. The financial report gives a survey of the financial transactions and the major operations of the year under review. (orig./AK) [de

  3. NUKEM annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of this important undertaking in the German nuclear industry informs about its structure, holdings and activities in 1981. The report of the management is followed by remarks on the annual statement of accounts (annual balance, profit-loss accounting) and the report of the Supervisory Board. In the annex the annual balance of NUKEM GmbH/HOBEG mbH as per December 31, 1981, and the profit-loss accounting of NUKEM GmbH/HOBEG mbH for the business year 1981 are presented. (UA) [de

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  10. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  11. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  12. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  13. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  14. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. CSIR Annual report 1965

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1965-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1965.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 48 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1965.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  1. CSIR Annual report 1992

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1992.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 39 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1992.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  2. CSIR Annual report 1979

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1979-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR Annual report_1979.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 86 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR Annual report_1979.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  3. CSIR Annual report 1976

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1976-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_1976.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 75 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_1976.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  4. CSIR Annual report 1978

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_1978.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 78 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_1978.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  5. CSIR Annual report 1991

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1991.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 40 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1991.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  6. Annual Partnership Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. This partnership report fulfills statutory reporting requirement W.S. 21-18-202(e)(iv) which mandates the development of annual reports to the legislature on the outcomes of partnerships between colleges…

  7. Annual Report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  8. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  9. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual 1991 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of selected companies

  10. Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 2001. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  11. Annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to Congress of the United States Department of Energy. It covers the activities of all elements of the Department except the independent Federal Regulatory Commission, which issues its own annual report. 88 refs., 43 tabs

  12. Annual Report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K.

    1998-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  13. Annual Report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golnik, N; Mika, J R; Wieteska, K [eds.

    1999-12-31

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  14. Identification of a direct interaction between residue 19 in the helical portion of calcitonin and the amino-terminal domain of the calcitonin receptor from photoaffinity cross-linking and mutational studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, V.; Wade, J.; McDowall, S.G.; Quiza, M.; Sexton, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Calcitonins (CTs) are 32 amino acid hormones with both peripheral and central actions mediated via specific cell surface receptors, which belong to the superfamily of class II G-protein coupled receptors. Chimeric receptor and mutational data suggested that the helical portion (residues 8-22) of salmon CT (sCT) is important for high affinity binding to the amino-terminal extracellular domain of the human CT receptor (hCTR). In this study, we have developed photoactive sCT analogues [Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and [Arg 11 , 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32) that incorporate a photolabile Bpa (p-benzoyl-L-phenylalanine) into position 19 of the helical domain of the ligand and used this to determine a specific receptor fragment proximate to it. These analogues saturably bound to the CTR with high affinity (IC 50 = 3 nM) which was similar to that of the natural sCT and its antagonist (IC 50 = 2 nM and 20 nM, respectively). Upon photolysis, radioiodinated 125 I-[Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and 125 I-[Arg 11,18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32) efficiently and specifically cross-linked to hCTR stably expressed in baby hamster kidney cells (Hollexl cells, ∼ 800,000 receptors per cell), generating a single radiolabeled band of ∼ 72-kDa on SDS/PAGE autoradiography. To identify the 'contact domain' within CTR involved in binding of 125 I-[Arg1 1 , 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT and 125 I-[Arg 11, 18 , Bpa 19 ]sCT(8-32), the radiolabeled band containing the ligand-receptor conjugate was subjected to chemical and enzymatic cleavage. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native receptor yielded a radiolabeled fragment of apparent Mr ∼ 31-kDa that shifted to Mr ∼ 14 kDa after deglycosylation. This receptor domain corresponded to amino acids 59-134 of the hCTR, located at the amino-terminal extracellular region of the receptor. These results provide the first direct demonstration of a contact domain between calcitonin and its receptor, and will contribute towards the modelling of CT-CTR interface. Copyright

  15. Sequence analysis and identification of new isoform of EP4 receptors in different atlantic salmon tissues (Salmo salar L. and its role in PGE2 induced immunomodulation in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tz Chun Guo

    Full Text Available PGE2 plays an important role in a broad spectrum of physiological and pathological processes mediated through a membrane-bound G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR called EP receptor. In mammals, four subtypes of EP receptor (EP 1-4 are identified and each of them functions through different signal transduction pathways. Orthologous EP receptors have also been identified in other non-mammalian species, such as chicken and zebrafish. EP4 is the only identified PGE2 receptor to date in Atlantic salmon but its tissue distribution and function have not been studied in any detail. In this study, we first sequenced EP4 receptor in different tissues and found that the presence of the 3nt deletion in the 5' untranslated region was accompanied by silent mutation at nt 668. While attempting to amplify the same sequence in TO cells (an Atlantic salmon macrophage-like cell line, we failed to obtain the full-length product. Further investigation revealed different isoform of EP4 receptor in TO cells and we subsequently documented its presence in different Atlantic salmon tissues. These two isoforms of EP4 receptor share high homology in their first half of sequence but differ in the second half part with several deletion segments though the final length of coding sequence is the same for two isoforms. We further studied the immunomodulation effect of PGE2 in TO cells and found that PGE2 inhibited the induction of CXCL-10, CCL-4, IL-8 and IL-1β genes expression in a time dependent manner and without cAMP upregulation.

  16. Preface. Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siwek-Wilczynska, K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: This Annual Report summarizes the research activities of the Nuclear Physics Division in the year 2004. As in previous years, contributions are grouped in two sections: - Reaction Mechanism and Nuclear Structure, - Experimental Methods and Instrumentation. The research program of our Division includes ''in-house'' activities and experiments with beams from the Warsaw Cyclotron of the Heavy Ion Laboratory as well as participation in the research at large accelerator facilities around the world. Most of the work described throughout this report was carried out as joint efforts of various international collaborations. During the last year we continued our participation in the FOPI, TAPS and WASA-PROMISE international collaborations. Starting this year, we joined a new international Compressed Baryonic Matter project with the aim of building a heavy ion detector to investigate the properties of highly compressed baryonic matter using the future accelerator facility in Darmstadt - FAIR. The first report deals with the question of feasibility of J/ψ detection in the CBM via dimuon decays. In particular, the key issue in this measurement is the suppression of muons originating from weak decays of pions and kaons. The separation of those muons from primary muons emerging from the target area can be accomplished with a number of tracking devices placed on the path to the muon identification detector. We also continue our involvement in the FOPI project. The present Report presents an analysis of Φ meson production in the Ni + Ni reaction at 1.93 AGeV. The first experiment performed in 1995 was repeated in 2003 with highly increased statistics. Two subdetectors, the CDC chamber and the Barrel scintillator, were used for kaon identification. About 120 Φ mesons were found by reconstructing the Φ invariant mass from K + K - candidates. The probability of meson production was obtained. Data from two bremstrahlung-photon interferometry experiments carried out for

  17. Identification of the ligand-binding subunit of the human 5-hydroxytryptamine1A receptor with N-(p-azido-m-[125I] iodophenethyl)spiperone, a high affinity radioiodinated photoaffinity probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.R.; Fargin, A.; Lohse, M.J.; Regan, J.W.; Senogles, S.E.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Caron, M.G.

    1989-01-01

    The ligand-binding subunit of the human 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) receptor transiently expressed in COS-7 cells and of the native human 5-HT1A receptor derived from hippocampus and frontal cortex were identified by photoaffinity labeling with N-(p-azido-m-[125I]iodophenethyl)spiperone [( 125I]N3-NAPS), previously characterized as a high affinity radioiodinated D2-dopamine receptor probe. The identity of the ligand-binding subunit was confirmed by immunoprecipitation with an antipeptide rabbit antiserum, JWR21, raised against a synthetic peptide derived from the predicted amino acid sequence of the putative third intracellular loop of the human 5-HT1A receptor. In transiently transfected COS-7 cells expressing 14 +/- 3 pmol/mg of protein human 5-HT1A receptors, a single broad 75-kDa band was photoaffinity labeled by [125I]N3-NAPS. This band displayed the expected pharmacology of the 5-HT1A receptor, as evidenced by the ability of a series of competing ligands to block [125I]N3-NAPS photoincorporation. Moreover, antiserum JWR21 specifically and quantitatively immunoprecipitated the 75-kDa photoaffinity-labeled band from a soluble extract of the transfected COS-7 cell membranes, further confirming its identity. Finally, utilizing a combination of photoaffinity labeling and immunoprecipitation, the native ligand-binding subunit of 62-64 kDa was identified in human hippocampus and frontal cortex. The availability of the high specific activity, high affinity, photoaffinity ligand [125I]N3-NAPS and of a potent immunoprecipitating antiserum (JWR21) should greatly facilitate the biochemical characterization of the human 5-HT1A receptor

  18. NIRE annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    The National Institute for Resources and Environment (NIRE) has a R & D concept of 'ecotechnology' that aims to protect the environment from degradation whilst promoting sustainable development. This annual report presents summaries of 32 recent research efforts.

  19. ASIST 2002 annual meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Peek, R

    2003-01-01

    Review of discussions and presentations at the American Society for Information Science and Technology 2002 annual meeting. Topics covered included new models of scholarly publishing and the development of the semantic web (1 page).

  20. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  1. IKO Annual Report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The IKO Annual Report of 1976 relates their progress in different projects and project fields. The fields covered include electron scattering, pion and muon physics, theory, radio- and nuclear chemistry, technical department, MEA, nuclear reactions and nuclear spectroscopy

  2. Annual Adjustment Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Department of Housing and Urban Development establishes the rent adjustment factors - called Annual Adjustment Factors (AAFs) - on the basis of Consumer Price...

  3. 2002 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2002 presents information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentina during 2002

  4. Annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains a description of the named institute, the research programm, reports from the scientific establishments, a description of different cooperations, and a list of scientific publications. (HSI) [de

  5. Annual Report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report supersedes the work done in the nuclear physics institute at Lyon. The studied matters are the following: nuclear theory, nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear chemistry [fr

  6. 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-01

    This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  7. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Lorenzen, R.

    1991-04-01

    This annual report of the chemistry laboratory gives an overview of research performed during 1990 in the field of geochemistry, trace analysis, aerosol chemistry, heavy elements, cement chemistry and analytical chemistry. figs., tabs., refs

  8. Scientific annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains a collection of the abstracts of the publications concerning research and development in the named institute together with a bibliography about further publications, contributions to conferences and speeches. (HSI) [de

  9. Annual report - LNLS - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the 1990 Annual Report of the LNLS, the upcoming Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source. It discusses its projects, organization as well as the proposed experimental stations. It presents also a list of publications. (A.C.A.S.)

  10. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2006-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2005 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  11. Annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2003-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2002 is reported. Structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  12. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2005-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2004 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  13. Annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2004-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2003 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  14. Annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2006 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  15. Annual Report 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The annual report gives the specific scientific results in the fields of nuclear and radiation physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry and data processing with a list of publications. (orig.) [de

  16. 2000 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2000 present information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentina during 2000

  17. 2001 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2001 presents information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentina during 2001

  18. Isotope Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-18

    The objective of this training modules is to examine the process of using gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identification; apply pattern recognition to gamma spectra; identify methods of verifying energy calibration; and discuss potential causes of isotope misidentification.

  19. Annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Delivering products and services to nuclear power plants operators, AREVA operates in every sector of the civilian nuclear power and fuel cycle industry. This annual report 2003 provides, in seven chapters, information on persons responsible for the annual report and for auditing the financial statements, general information on the company and share capital (statute, capital, share trading, dividends), information on company operations, changes and future prospects, assets, financial position and financial performance, corporate governance, recent developments and future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  20. Annual report June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report reviews the activities of the National Accelerator Centre until June 1988. The 200 MeV cyclotron facility, the Pretoria cyclotron facility and the Van De Graaff facility are discussed in detail. Aspects of the 200 MeV cyclotron facility examined are, inter alia: the injector cyclotrons, the separated-sector cyclotron, the control system, the beam transport system and radioisotope production. Separate abstracts were prepared for the various subdivisions contained in this annual report

  1. Natural gas annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  2. Natural gas annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1993 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1989 to 1993 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  3. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1991 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition form 1987 to 1991 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  4. 1st Annual Meeting of the Future Circular Collider study

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This first Annual Meeting of the Future Circular Collider study is an important milestone to conclude the first, exploratory phase, leading to the identification of the baseline for the further study. Organized as an IEEE conference, it will provide the opportunity for re-enforcing the cohesion of the community and to catalyse cross-fertilization within the FCC study.

  5. Occupational radiation exposure. Twelfth annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.; McDonald, S.; Richardson, E.

    1982-08-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that is maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Radiation Exposure Information and Reports System (REIRS). This report is usually published on an annual basis and is available at all NRC public document rooms. The bulk of the information contained in the report was extracted from annual statistical reports submitted by all NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.407. Four categories of licensees - operating nuclear power reactors, fuel fabricators and reprocessors, industrial radiographers, and manufacturers and distributors of specified quantities of byproduct materials - also submit personal identification and exposure information for terminating employees pursuant to 10 CFR 20.408, and some analysis of this data is also presented in this report

  6. Extracting the annual signal from Greenland ice-core chemistry and isotopic records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sune Olander; Andersen, Katrine K.; Andersen, Marie Louise Siggaard

    2002-01-01

    Stratigraphic dating of ice cores by identification and counting of annual cycles in, for example, chemical measurements requires skill and experience. The work presented here investigates a method of data enhancement which is a first step towards an automated and more objective method of annual...

  7. Identification, validation, and clinical implementation of tumor-associated biomarkers to improve therapy concepts, survival, and quality of life of cancer patients: tasks of the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitt, M.; Harbeck, N.; Daidone, M.G.; Brynner, N.; Duffy, M.J.; Foekens, J.A.; Sweep, C.G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Guiding principles are provided and discussed on how to inform the physician scientist and cancer researcher about quality control systems to enable a consistent assessment of the clinical value of tumor-associated biomarkers. Next to cancer research itself, the Receptor and Biomarker Group of the

  8. Identification of a novel stereotypic IGHV4-59/IGHJ5-encoded B-cell receptor subset expressed by various B-cell lymphomas with high affinity rheumatoid factor activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bende, Richard J.; Janssen, Jerry; Wormhoudt, Thera A. M.; Wagner, Koen; Guikema, Jeroen E. J.; van Noesel, Carel J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Subsets of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, splenic marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (MZBCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been identified that express near-identical B-cell receptors (BCRs), strongly suggesting selection by restricted antigenic epitopes. We here report

  9. Solitary expression of CD7 among T-cell antigens in acute myeloid leukemia: identification of a group of patients with similar T-cell receptor beta and delta rearrangements and course of disease suggestive of poor prognosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A W; Hokland, M; Jørgensen, H

    1991-01-01

    rearrangements in Ig- or T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, such genetic alterations were demonstrated in four of five patients for the TCR delta gene and in all patients for the TCR beta gene. Interestingly, DNA fragments of similar size were demonstrated in three of five patients for both the beta and delta genes...

  10. Implant - Identification Tool for Forensic Dentistry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dostálová, T.; Eliášová, H.; Seydlová, M.; Zvárová, Jana

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 9 (2008), s. 926-926 ISSN 0905-7161. [EAO Annual Scientific Meeting /17./. 18.09.2008-20.09.2008, Warsaw] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : forensic dentistry * identification * electronic health record Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  11. Annual report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report is the fifth issued in English from the Tandem Accelerator Laboratory in Uppsala since research was started in November 1970. It covers work performed during the calendar year 1976 and updates information given in earlier annual reports with regard to laboratory facilities such as computer configuration and layout of the experimental area. The descriptions of the research projects are also in general more detailed than usual and may sometime contain results obtained before 1976 in order to avoid too many references to earlier annual reports. It has, for instance, been thought of interest to make the sections on the study of beam foil excitation of atoms and on the measurements of nuclear deformations by the REPREC method quite extensive. (Auth.)

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary

  13. Natural gas annual 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs

  14. Natural gas annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  15. International energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  16. Identification of D3 and sigma receptors in the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens using (+/-)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-[3H]propyl-2-aminotetralin and carbetapentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D R; Booze, R M

    1995-02-01

    Cross-reactions between dopamine D3 and sigma receptor ligands were investigated using (+/-)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-[3H]propyl-2-aminotetralin [(+/-)-7-OH-[3H]-DPAT], a putative D3-selective radioligand, in conjunction with the unlabeled sigma ligands 1,3-di(2-tolyl)guanidine (DTG), carbetapentane, and R(-)-N-(3-phenyl-1-propyl)-1-phenyl-2-aminopropane [R(-)-PPAP]. In transfected CCL1.3 mouse fibroblasts expressing the human D3 receptor, neither DTG nor carbetapentane (0.1 microM) displaced (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binding. R(-)-PPAP (0.1 microM) displaced 39.6 +/- 1.0% of total (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binding. In striatal and nucleus accumbens homogenates, (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT labeled a single site (15-20 fmol/mg of protein) with high (1 nM) affinity. Competition analysis with carbetapentane defined both high- and low-affinity sites in striatal (35 and 65%, respectively) and nucleus accumbens (59 and 41%, respectively) tissue, yet R(-)-PPAP identified two sites in equal proportion. Carbetapentane and R(-)-PPAP (0.1 microM) displaced approximately 20-50% of total (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binding in striatum, nucleus accumbens, and olfactory tubercle in autoradiographic studies, with the nucleus accumbens shell subregion exhibiting the greatest displacement. To determine directly (+)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binding to sigma receptors, saturation analysis was performed in the cerebellum while masking D3 receptors with 1 microM dopamine. Under these conditions (+)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT labeled sigma receptors with an affinity of 24 nM. These results suggest that (a) (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binds D3 receptors with high affinity in rat brain and (b) a significant proportion of (+/-)-7-OH-[3H]DPAT binding consists of sigma 1 sites and the percentages of these sites differ among the subregions of the striatum and nucleus accumbens.

  17. Symposium overview: alterations in cytokine receptors by xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M D; Schook, L B; Oppenheim, J J; Freed, B M; Rodgers, K E

    1999-04-01

    A symposium entitled Alterations in Cytokine Receptors by Xenobiotics was held at the 37th Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in Seattle, Washington. The symposium was sponsored by the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section of SOT and was designed to present information on the effect of several different classes of xenobiotics on various aspects of receptor function (i.e., post-receptor signal transduction of receptor expression), or the involvement of cytokine receptors in the action of the toxicant under consideration. This symposium brought together scientists in the area of receptor immunobiology whose expertise in receptor modulation encompassed those major signaling agents involved in the normal immune response, i.e., proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, and interferons. The following is a summary of each of the individual presentations.

  18. Pathophysiological consequences of receptor mistraffic: Tales from the platelet P2Y12 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Aungraheeta, Riyaad; Mundell, Stuart J

    2017-07-05

    Genetic variations in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes can disrupt receptor function in a wide variety of human genetic diseases, including platelet bleeding disorders. Platelets are critical for haemostasis with inappropriate platelet activation leading to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke whilst decreased platelet activity is associated with an increased risk of bleeding. GPCRs expressed on the surface of platelets play key roles in regulating platelet activity and therefore function. Receptors include purinergic receptors (P2Y 1 and P2Y 12 ), proteinase-activated receptor (PAR1 and PAR4) and thromboxane receptors (TPα), among others. Pharmacological blockade of these receptors forms a powerful therapeutic tool in the treatment and prevention of arterial thrombosis. With the advance of genomic technologies, there has been a substantial increase in the identification of naturally occurring rare and common GPCR variants. These variants include single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertion or deletions that have the potential to alter GPCR expression or function. A number of defects in platelet GPCRs that disrupt receptor function have now been characterized in patients with mild bleeding disorders. This review will focus on rare, function-disrupting variants of platelet GPCRs with particular emphasis upon mutations in the P2Y 12 receptor gene that affect receptor traffic to modulate platelet function. Further this review will outline how the identification and characterization of function-disrupting GPCR mutations provides an essential link in translating our detailed understanding of receptor traffic and function in cell line studies into relevant human biological systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000

  20. IRI annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary reports are presented of current research and teaching activities during 1989 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics, operation and maintenance of, and experiments with the Delft Hoger Onderwijs reactor, nuclear instrumentation projects and supporting services. (H.W.). 299 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  1. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This annual report contains short descriptions of the work done at the named institute. These concern the study of hyperfine interactions, experiments with synchroton radiation, experiments at storage rings, and experiments at CERN. Furthermore, a list of publications, contributions to conferences and these is presented. (HSI) [de

  2. CSIR Annual report 1966

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty second annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1966, to the 31st December 1966. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  3. Annual Report - ESCELSA - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The annual report of ESCELSA - Brazilian electric power distribution company - introduces the following main topics: state of Espirito Santo; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sales; market overview; market expansion; customers; technological stream; measuring quality; electric system; investments; protecting the environment; and resource allocation

  4. Annual Conference Abstracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Engineering Education, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Includes abstracts of papers presented at the 80th Annual Conference of the American Society for Engineering Education. The broad areas include aerospace, affiliate and associate member council, agricultural engineering, biomedical engineering, continuing engineering studies, chemical engineering, civil engineering, computers, cooperative…

  5. HASYLAB annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at HASYLAB together with a list of publications, speeches, and theses. The work concerns technical developments, the study of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, solids, surfaces, and liquids, X-ray structure studies of solids and interfaces, molecular biology, further applications of synchrotron radiation, and experimental developments. (HSI)

  6. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  7. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  8. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  9. CSIR Annual report 1968

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fourth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1968, to the 31st December 1968. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  10. CSIR Annual report 1971

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty seventh annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1971, to the 31st December 1971. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  11. CSIR Annual report 1970

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty sixth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1970, to the 31st December 1970. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  12. CSIR Annual report 1969

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fifth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1969, to the 31st December 1969. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  13. International energy annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules

  14. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  15. KTA annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report gives an overview of the rulemaking work in the individual fields as well as other activities, such as meetings, international codes of rules, and publications. KTA organization, including its administration and funds is listed. (orig./HP) [de

  16. IRI annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary reports are presented of current research and teaching activities during 1989 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics, operation and maintenance of, and experiments with the Delft Hoger Onderwijs reactor, nuclear instrumentation projects and supporting services. (H.W.). 145 refs.; 20 figs.; 4 fotos; 2 tabs

  17. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In this annual report the work done at the named Institute is described. This concerns particle and fields in the solar system, infrared astronomy, X-ray astronomy, γ-astronomy, and molecule spectroscopy. A list of publications is added. (HSI)

  18. ANCLI annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The National Association for the Information Local Commissions (ANCLI) was created in september 1999. This association aims to develop an exchange and information network for the information local commissions. In this framework it develops information sheets, Internet site, nuclear centers visits, colloquium and formations organizations. This report presents the annual activities for the year 2003. (A.L.B.)

  19. ANCLI annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The National Association for the Information Local Commissions (ANCLI) was created in september 1999. This association aims to develop an exchange and information network for the information local commissions. In this framework it develops information sheets, Internet site, nuclear centers visits, colloquium and formations organizations. This report presents the annual activities for the year 2004. (A.L.B.)

  20. Annual Report 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keeley, N; Skalski, J [The Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk-Otwock (Poland)

    2009-07-01

    The ''Annual Report 2008'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2008. Report consists of two parts. First one consists of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel, financial support and conferences while the second one describes the scientific activity of Institute. A Foreword to all report written by Director of the Institute prof. Grzegorz Wrochna is also given.

  1. TIARA annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shigeru; Narumi, Kazumasa; Yoshida, Masaru; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Yoshikawa, Masato; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Otsubo, Michiro; Yokota, Watalu; Nakamura, Yoshiteru

    2006-01-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005. The 126 of the presented papers are indexed individually. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (J.P.N.)

  2. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research center using neutrons to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a broad range of materials. This annual report presents the ILL activities in 2000: the scientific highlights, the Millennium programme and the new developments, the workshops organized by the ILL, the experimental programme and the publications. (A.L.B.)

  3. International Energy Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  4. ANCLI annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Association for the Information Local Commissions (ANCLI) was created in september 1999. This association aims to develop an exchange and information network for the information local commissions. In this framework it develops information sheets, Internet site, nuclear centers visits, colloquium and formations organizations. This report presents the annual activities for the year 2002. (A.L.B.)

  5. Annual General Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We have produced this information booklet to explain why companies must – by law – hold an Annual General Meeting (AGM). The laws which cover AGMs are known as the Companies Acts. This guide gives only a summary of the rules for AGMs. If you have a concern about the AGM of a particular company, you should get independent legal advice.

  6. Annual report 1981, annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This volume entitled ''Annex to the annual report'' deals in more detail with the scientific works of the I.L.L.: the scientific activity of theoricians; experimental reports on inelastic scattering in simple solids, crystallographic and magnetic structures, fluids and amorphous substances, imperfections, biology, chemistry

  7. Annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains.

  8. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawlikowicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.

    2007-03-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University describes the activities of Laboratory in 2006. The document consist of four parts: 'Laboratory Overview', 'Experiments and Experimental Set-ups', 'Experiments Using the Outside Facilities' and 'General Information on HIL Activities'. An 'Introduction' written by director of the Department prof. J. Jastrzebski is also given

  9. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The annual report from IKU (Continental Shelf Institute) in Norway deals with the market adjustment of research activities at the institute as a result of offshore cost-cutting policy in the petroleum industry. The market is about to shift focus from volume to competence. In practice, that means buying competence instead of project ideas or proposals

  10. BAM - Annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The annual report contains progress and activity reports of the presidential department, the departments metals and metal construction, civil engineering and building activities, organic matter, chemical safety engineering, special fields of materials testing, techniques independent of the type of material, an index, as well as general and statistic statements. (HK) [de

  11. Annual report - ENERSUL - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The annual report of ENERSUL - Brazilian electric power distribution company - introduces the following main topics: Outlook for the State of Mato Grosso do Sul; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sold; capacity increases; customers; customers; energy balance; performance and quality; electric system; investments; people; human resources; synergies; awards; workplace safety; social balance; and patrimonial balance

  12. 2001 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is the 2001 annual report of the French union of the petroleum industry (UFIP). It summarizes the highlights of the petroleum industry activity in France in 2001 and gives some additional information about the production, refining and distribution of petroleum products in the rest of the world. (J.S.)

  13. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.

    2008-03-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University describes the activities of Laboratory in 2007. The document consist of four parts: '' Laboratory Overview '', '' Experiments and Experimental Set-ups '', '' Experiments Using the Outside Facilities '' and '' General Information on HIL Activities ''. An '' Introduction '' written by director of the Department prof. J. Jastrzebski is also given

  14. International Energy Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules

  15. 2010 AAUW Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Women, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights some of the outstanding accomplishments of AAUW (American Association of University Women) for fiscal year 2010. This year's annual report also features stories of remarkable women who are leading the charge to break through barriers and ensure that all women have a fair chance. Sharon is working to reduce the pay gap…

  16. Annual report - ESCELSA - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The annual report of 1999 of ESCELSA - Brazilian electric power company - introduces the next main topics: state of Espirito Santo; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sales; customers; quality; electric system; investments; people; resources; synergies; awards; outlook; social balancing; and patrimonial balancing

  17. IKF annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The annual report of 1988 gives a survey of the following category of themes: nuclear physics, atom physics, nuclear methods, nuclear solid-state physics and developments of machines. Apart from the use of its own Van de Graaff accelerators the institute takes part in joint ventures in research, for example with the GSI (Association for Heavy-Ion Research) in Darmstadt. (DG) [de

  18. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.

    2006-05-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University describes the activities of Laboratory in 2005. The document consist of four parts: Laboratory Overview, Experiments and Experimental Set-ups, Experiments Using the Outside Facilities and General Information on HIL Activities. An Introduction written by director of the Department prof. J. Jastrzebski is also given

  19. KVI Annual Report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    This annual report offers 93 informative descriptions of the current research projects at the KVI cyclotron during 1982. The projects are classed under the following heads: elastic and inelastic scattering; giant resonances; transfer and charge exchange reactions; breakup reactions; heavy ion reactions; electromagnetic and weak interactions; theoretical nuclear physics; atomic physics; nuclear solid state physics; cyclotron, computers and instrumentation; nuclear medicine; environmental studies. (Auth.)

  20. NERSC Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

    2005-04-15

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  1. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    In this annual report the work done at the named institute is described. This concerns experiments with synchrotron radiations, high energy physics experiments at the PETRA and DORIS storage rings, studies of MFS interactions, and some neutrino experiments at CERN. A list of publications is included. (HSI)

  2. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research center using neutrons to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a broad range of materials. This annual report presents the ILL activities in 2000: the scientific highlights, the Millennium programme and the new developments, the workshops organized by the ILL, the experimental programme and the publications. (A.L.B.)

  3. Total 2004 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This annual report of the Group Total brings information and economic data on the following topics, for the year 2004: the corporate governance, the corporate social responsibility, the shareholder notebook, the management report, the activities, the upstream (exploration and production) and downstream (refining and marketing) operating, chemicals and other matters. (A.L.B.)

  4. NERSC Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John

    2003-01-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2002 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects), and information about NERSC's current and planned systems and service

  5. Annual results 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2004 annual evaluation of the french RTE company (electric power transport network) provides information on the 2004 results on: institutional information, financial results, customers and market, industrial resources, environment and consultation, human resources and international aspects. (A.L.B.)

  6. Annual report SNET 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This annual report of the SNET (National Society of Electricity and thermic) presents the society activities and the financial report for the year 2003. The society position in the market, the environmental policy, the performance, the workers and financial data are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  7. Environment annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the 1993 Environment Annual Report for BNFL, data are presented for radioactive discharges to the environment and their associated doses to the criteria group members of the public in the vicinity of Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst. Similarly, data are also presented for non-radioactive discharges to water and air for each site. (UK)

  8. NUFFIC Annual Report, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Co-operation, The Hague.

    The 1977 annual report of the Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Cooperation (NUFFIC) considers the following topics: major developments in work and policy; relationships NUFFIC has with other organizations; University Development Cooperation; developments in international education; the functioning of the Consultative Structure…

  9. CSIR Annual report 1967

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty third annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1967, to the 31st December 1967. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  10. Annual report 1982. Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the scientific annual report 1982 of the ILL on R and D activities of the different colleges: fundamental and nuclear physics, inelastic scattering in simple solids, crystallographic and magnetic structures, fluids and amorphous substances, imperfections, biology, chemistry, theory. Abstracts of the publications published during the year are presented

  11. CSIR Annual report 1980

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty-sixth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1980 to 31 December 1980. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1980, certified...

  12. NRCC annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer

  13. GKSS annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This annual report reviews the structure and activities of the GKSS in 1983. R and D work was done on reactor safety engineering, environmental research/environmental engineering and underwater technology. It also reports on cooperation with outside partners, the organization, financing, and developments in the staff structure as well as on publications, lectures, applications for patents, etc. (UA) [de

  14. NERSC Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules (Ed.), John

    2006-07-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  15. ELETRONUCLEAR - Annual report - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The annual activities report of 1997 of ELETRONUCLEAR - Brazilian company responsible by the electric power generation from the nuclear technology - introduces the next main topics: company vision and mission; energy production and commercialization; investments in the electric power generation; economic and financial situation; social balancing; and patrimonial balancing

  16. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  17. PTB annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The annual report presents general information on the institution's activities and the various departments, and reports on scientific work in the field of metrology and safety engineering. Brief scientific accounts refer to work in the domains of mechanics and acoustics, electricity, heat, optics, industrial metrology, atomic physics, technical and scientific services, collection and disposal of radioactive waste. (DG) [de

  18. Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2004. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiological protection and monitoring of environment; Nuclear techniques in health and environment protection and in last section the list of published in 2004 papers is presented

  19. NIKHEF Annual Report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this annual report 1982, the NIKHEF research programs of high-energy physics, nuclear physics and radiochemistry is described in a wide context. Next, the reports of the individual projects of section-H and section-K are described in detail. Finally, the report gives some statistical information of publications, colloquia and co-workers. (Auth.)

  20. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary and detailed reports are presented of current research during 1987 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics. (H.W.). 61 refs.; 13 figs.; 14 tabs

  1. NIKHEF Annual Report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the Dutch National Institute for Nuclear and High Energy Physics (NIKHEF) during its first year. Following a general introduction to the research areas in which NIKHEF is involved, 29 brief reports from the project groups are presented. Details concerning personnel, participation in councils and committees, finances, publications, colloquia and participation in congresses and schools are included. (Auth.)

  2. Annual Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacz, M.; Zielinska, M.

    2011-06-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw describes the activities of Laboratory in 2010. The document consist of four parts: '' Laboratory Overview '', '' Experiments at HIL '', '' Experiments Using the Outside Facilities '' and '' Appendices '' where general information on HIL activities are described. An '' Introduction '' written by director of the Heavy Ion Laboratory prof. K. Rusek is also given.

  3. CSIR Annual report 1962

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the eighteenth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1962 to 31 December 1962. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1962, certified...

  4. CSIR Annual report 1983

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1983-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty ninth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1983 to 31 December 1983. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1983, certified...

  5. CSIR Annual report 1981

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty seventh annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1981 to 31 December 1981. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1981, certified...

  6. CSIR Annual report 1982

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty eighth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1982 to 31 December 1982. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1982, certified...

  7. CSIR Annual report 1963

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the nineteenth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1963, to the 31st December 1963. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  8. Sustainability Annual Report 2013

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  9. Sustainability Annual Report 2014

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  10. Sustainability Annual Report 2017

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  11. Sustainability Annual Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  12. Sustainability Annual Report 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  13. Sustainability Annual Report 2015

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  14. Sustainability Annual Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  15. Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeley, N.; Skalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ''Annual Report 2008'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2008. Report consists of two parts. First one consists of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel, financial support and conferences while the second one describes the scientific activity of Institute. A Foreword to all report written by Director of the Institute prof. Grzegorz Wrochna is also given

  16. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  17. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Master Identification Records (annual)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of all individually identified Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These seals were identified by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists...

  18. Regional issue identification and assessment. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This regional assessment report portrays the major regional environmental, human health and safety, socioeconomic and institutional effects that might result from the implementation of one of a set of national energy supply and demand projections developed by the Department of Energy in 1978. General problem areas are identified and assessed on a regional and state basis that could either constrain or significantly modify the realization of the energy projections. Many of the issues identified are of a long-standing nature and would continue to exist, in spite of the particular energy projection used. The research and assessments reflected in this document were performed by six national laboratories. It is a compilation of individual reports prepared by Federal regions and available separately.

  19. Identification and characterization of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a novel, orally bioavailable C5a receptor inverse agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodbeck, Robbin M; Cortright, Daniel N; Kieltyka, Andrzej P; Yu, Jianying; Baltazar, Carolyn O; Buck, Marianne E; Meade, Robin; Maynard, George D; Thurkauf, Andrew; Chien, Du-Shieng; Hutchison, Alan J; Krause, James E

    2008-12-01

    The complement system represents an innate immune mechanism of host defense that has three effector arms, the C3a receptor, the C5a receptor (C5aR), and the membrane attack complex. Because of its inflammatory and immune-enhancing properties, the biological activity of C5a and its classical receptor have been widely studied. Because specific antagonism of the C5aR could have therapeutic benefit without affecting the protective immune response, the C5aR continues to be a promising target for pharmaceutical research. The lack of specific, potent and orally bioavailable small-molecule antagonists has limited the clinical investigation of the C5aR. We report the discovery of NDT 9513727 [N,N-bis(1,3-benzodioxol-5-ylmethyl)-1-butyl-2,4-diphenyl-1H-imidazole-5-methanamine], a small-molecule, orally bioavailable, selective, and potent inverse agonist of the human C5aR. NDT 9513727 was discovered based on the integrated use of in vitro affinity and functional assays in conjunction with medicinal chemistry. NDT 9513727 inhibited C5a-stimulated responses, including guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding, Ca(2+) mobilization, oxidative burst, degranulation, cell surface CD11b expression and chemotaxis in various cell types with IC(50)s from 1.1 to 9.2 nM, respectively. In C5a competition radioligand binding experiments, NDT 9513727 exhibited an IC(50) of 11.6 nM. NDT 9513727 effectively inhibited C5a-induced neutropenia in gerbil and cynomolgus macaque in vivo. The findings suggest that NDT 9513727 may be a promising new entity for the treatment of human inflammatory diseases.

  20. 2017 Annual Disability Statistics Supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, E. A; Houtenville, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The "Annual Disability Statistics Supplement" is a companion report to the "Annual Disability Statistics Compendium." The "Supplement" presents statistics on the same topics as the "Compendium," with additional categorizations by demographic characteristics including age, gender and race/ethnicity. In…

  1. Identification of Molecular Markers Associated with Alteration of Receptor-Binding Specificity in a Novel Genotype of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses Detected in Cambodia in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith, Sareth; Davis, C. Todd; Duong, Veasna; Sar, Borann; Horm, Srey Viseth; Chin, Savuth; Ly, Sovann; Laurent, Denis; Richner, Beat; Oboho, Ikwo; Jang, Yunho; Davis, William; Thor, Sharmi; Balish, Amanda; Iuliano, A. Danielle; Sorn, San; Holl, Davun; Sok, Touch; Seng, Heng; Tarantola, Arnaud; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Parry, Amy; Chea, Nora; Allal, Lotfi; Kitsutani, Paul; Warren, Dora; Prouty, Michael; Horwood, Paul; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Lindstrom, Stephen; Villanueva, Julie; Donis, Ruben; Cox, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Human infections with influenza A(H5N1) virus in Cambodia increased sharply during 2013. Molecular characterization of viruses detected in clinical specimens from human cases revealed the presence of mutations associated with the alteration of receptor-binding specificity (K189R, Q222L) and respiratory droplet transmission in ferrets (N220K with Q222L). Discovery of quasispecies at position 222 (Q/L), in addition to the absence of the mutations in poultry/environmental samples, suggested that the mutations occurred during human infection and did not transmit further. PMID:25210193

  2. Fourth annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The Independent Radiation Monitoring Scheme for Clwyd began its monitoring programme in Clwyd in 1988. This is the fourth report on the results of the radiation monitoring carried out within Clwyd. The historical reasons for the conception of the Radiation Monitoring Scheme are given in the First Annual Report together with the protocol of operation and detailed sampling and monitoring information. The fourth Annual Report identifies any changes in techniques that have occurred in the last twelve months together with the latest monitoring and analytical data. Samples of air, beach materials, coastal sand and silt, seaweed, meat, fish and milk were taken from various locations within the county. No significant charges in radiation levels were found when compared with data from previous years. The values have remained within the range currently being expected throughout the United Kingdom. (author)

  3. Renewable energy annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic

  4. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Document Server

    Pension Fund

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud). Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys). Questions from members and beneficiaries. Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer). As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  5. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  6. Coal industry annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  7. Annual recertification: fun? Wow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, A

    1994-01-01

    Learning is critical to fostering a knowledge base required for maintaining currency and furthering professional development. In the ever-changing field of nephrology, most skills practised in nursing are considered to be sanctioned medical acts or added nursing skills. Therefore, annual recertification of the skills designated as sanctioned medical acts is an expectation of the College of Nurses of Ontario. The Wellesley Hospital policy indicates one time only or annual approval of the added nursing skills. The article will discuss the use of games as a creative, non-threatening educational tool in the recertification/re-approval process currently in place at The Wellesley Hospital, renal programs. In the past two years, several games or alternative teaching strategies have been utilized to assist the staff in preparing for recertification. This paper will examine the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing alternative teaching formats. Commentary regarding the response of staff nurses, nursing management and education will be highlighted.

  8. Annual Energy Review 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  9. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  10. NAGRA Annual report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    This annual report presents the highlights of the activities carried out by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA during the year 2010. These include reviews by various commissions of the NAGRA co-operative's proposals for possible sites for nuclear waste repositories. Also, the enhancements made concerning information facilities for the general public at the co-operative's rock laboratories are mentioned. The operation of initial satellite-based precision measurement systems for movements in the earth's crust is noted. Organisational aspects and international co-operation are discussed. This annual report also looks at NAGRA's organisational structures and its commercial accounts. Appendices provide details on waste inventories and volumes and publications made in 2010. A selection of relevant internet addresses is also provided

  11. 1986 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This annual report describes the reasearch activity carried out during 1986 by the Fusion Department of the Italian Commision for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources (ENEA). The report outlines the main results obtained by the three major projects of the Fusion Department (Fusion Physics, Frascati Tokamak Upgrade, and Fusion Reactor Engineering), plus the divisional project Inertial Confinement mentioned separately because of its particular scientific content. Most of the research work was performed by the Fusion Department at its location at the ENEA Frascati Energy Research Center, but some work was also done elsewhere, or with recourse to other ENEA departments. The research activity described in this annual report was carried out with the frame of the Association Euratom-ENEA on Fusion, with the exception of some minor activities

  12. NAGRA Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    This annual report presents the highlights of the activities carried out by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA during the year 2010. These include reviews by various commissions of the NAGRA co-operative's proposals for possible sites for nuclear waste repositories. Also, the enhancements made concerning information facilities for the general public at the co-operative's rock laboratories are mentioned. The operation of initial satellite-based precision measurement systems for movements in the earth's crust is noted. Organisational aspects and international co-operation are discussed. This annual report also looks at NAGRA's organisational structures and its commercial accounts. Appendices provide details on waste inventories and volumes and publications made in 2010. A selection of relevant internet addresses is also provided

  13. International energy annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  14. Renewable energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic.

  15. Nagra annual report 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    This annual report made by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) takes a look at the cooperative’s activities and work done in 2013. Nagra’s task is recapitulated. Developments in 2013 concerning legislation, inventories of radioactive materials, sectorial planning and scientific and technical aspects are examined. Work done in the rock laboratories, in the public relations sector and consulting areas is looked at. Nagra’s organizational structure with its management, commissions and auditors is commented on and an organigram of the head office is presented. On the financial side of things, the annual financial statement with incomes, cash flow and accumulated accounts is presented as is the report made by the statutory auditors. An appendix to the report contains details on waste inventories and volumes, a list publications made in 2012 as well as Internet addresses and a glossary.

  16. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date

  17. Nagra annual report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This annual report made by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) takes a look at the cooperative’s activities and work done in 2013. Nagra’s task is recapitulated. Developments in 2013 concerning legislation, inventories of radioactive materials, sectorial planning and scientific and technical aspects are examined. Work done in the rock laboratories, in the public relations sector and consulting areas is looked at. Nagra’s organizational structure with its management, commissions and auditors is commented on and an organigram of the head office is presented. On the financial side of things, the annual financial statement with incomes, cash flow and accumulated accounts is presented as is the report made by the statutory auditors. An appendix to the report contains details on waste inventories and volumes, a list publications made in 2012 as well as Internet addresses and a glossary

  18. Coal industry annual 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs

  19. 2017 Annual Technology Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hand, M. M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eberle, Annika [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feldman, David J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Augustine, Chad R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maness, Michael [Formerly NREL; O' Connor, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2018-03-26

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory annually provides an organized and centralized set of such cost and performance data. The ATB uses the best information from the Department of Energy national laboratories' renewable energy analysts as well as information from the Energy Information Administration for fuel-based technologies. The ATB has been reviewed by experts and it includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind, offshore wind, utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PV), commercial-scale solar PV, residential-scale solar PV, concentrating solar power, geothermal power, hydropower, coal, natural gas, nuclear, and conventional biopower. This webinar presentation introduces the 2017 ATB.

  20. TIARA annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Itoh, Hisayoshi [eds.; Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; and others

    2000-10-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000. Summary reports of 106 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  1. TIARA annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Namba, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; and others

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. Summary reports of 103 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  2. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Areva is a world energy expert on technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. This 2005 annual report provides information on the Group results in the following domains: information pertaining to the transaction, general information on the company and share capital, information on company operations, new developments and future prospects, assets, financial position, financial performance, corporate governance, recent developments and outlook. (A.L.B.)

  3. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  4. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2006. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiation protection and dosimetry; Nuclear Technology in Energy Generation; Solid State Physics; Nuclear techniques in Health and Environment Protection management of Hazards and in last section the list of published in 2006 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented

  5. Risoe annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    An explanation of Risoe National Laboratory's function within the Danish research system is followed by brief accounts of research activities at Risoe during 1987. Energy resources, technology and policy are discussed, the annual accounts are presented, a guide to the National Laboratory and a list of its publications are given. Some of the research activities that took place in 1987 described in more detail are within the fields of chemistry and the environment, superconductivity, new aspects of powdery mildew, polymers and robotics. (AB)

  6. Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiboda, G [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2005. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiological protection and dosimetry; Nuclear Technology in Energy Generation; Solid State Physics; Nuclear techniques in Health and Environment Protection management of Hazards and in last section the list of published in 2004 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented.

  7. Annual Report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1986-06-01

    This annual report covers the work carried out at the Radioisotope Department, ZfK Rossendorf, during the year 1985. It contains 12 contributions related to the development of processes for generating radioisotopes, 23 contributions related to the synthesis of radioactive compounds, and 26 contributions related to the characterization of radioactive compounds. All contributions are published in summary form only and are individually processed for the INIS database. Additionally, a list is given of publications and lectures issued between January and December 1985

  8. ILL Annual Report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This annual report provides a general view of the activities of the different sections of the ILL. In 1974, twenty-two different neutron spectrometers with different characteristics were available on a regular basis. Moreover, a number of special neutron sources were employed for on-line experiments. The major effort was devoted to an increase in experimental systems and to the development of new measurement techniques [fr

  9. OPEC annual report 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    This annual report is concerned with the following items: the general economic situation of OPEC member countries, other developing countries and the industrial countries; energy market developments (environment, crude oil, crude oil prices, oil stock movements); upstream and downstream activities (exploration, production and reserves, refining, petrochemicals, hydrocarbon transportation, legislation, contracts and agreements in Member Countries); activities of the Secretariat. The annexes contain statistical data, press releases and resolutions and a schedule of member Country representatives and officials of the Secretariat.

  10. Annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Vyver, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    In 1983, the various research projects in which the nuclear physics laboratory of Ghent State University is involved, were continued. In the present Annual Report, the results obtained in the field of photofission, photonuclear reactions positron annihilation, dosimetry and nuclear theory are summarized. The new 10 MeV high duty factor linear electron accelerator is presently being installed: performance tests will be carried out until July 1984; after which this facility will gradually become available for nuclear research purposes. (AF)

  11. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2005. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiological protection and dosimetry; Nuclear Technology in Energy Generation; Solid State Physics; Nuclear techniques in Health and Environment Protection management of Hazards and in last section the list of published in 2004 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented

  12. Annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    In this annual report a survey is given about the research programs of the named institute during 1980. The research concerns experiments with synchrotron radiation, hyperfine structure studies, experiments with the DORIS and PETRA storage rings, and experiments at the CERN accelerators. Furthermore the development of instruments in this institute is described. In addition a list of publications, contributions to conferences, and theses of this institute is given. (HSI)

  13. NERSC 1998 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John (ed.)

    1999-03-01

    This 1998 annual report from the National Scientific Energy Research Computing Center (NERSC) presents the year in review of the following categories: Computational Science; Computer Science and Applied Mathematics; and Systems and Services. Also presented are science highlights in the following categories: Basic Energy Sciences; Biological and Environmental Research; Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; and Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Other Projects.

  14. TIARA annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shigeru; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Itoh, Hisayosi; Yoshikawa, Masato; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Otsubo, Michiaki; Tajima, Satoshi; Tanaka, Susumu

    2004-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004. Summary reports of 115 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  15. Annual Pension Fund Update

    CERN Multimedia

    Pension Fund

    2011-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual Pension Fund Update to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Tuesday 20 September 2011 from 10-00 to 12-00 a.m. Copies of the 2010 Financial Statements are available from departmental secretariats. Coffee and croissants will be served prior to the meeting as of 9-30 a.m.

  16. Annual Report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report from the Netherlands Centre for Energy Research, includes the progress made in the five main research areas: fission energy, nuclear fusion and superconductivity, combustion energy (including environmental research), current energy and non-energetic applications of nuclear fission. Studies performed by the Energy Study Centrum, a department within ECN, and the Bureau for Energy Research Projects are described. A financial report is presented and a list of publications included. (C.F.)

  17. Annual report ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggin, S.

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the 1988 Annual Report for ISIS (United Kingdom). A description is given of the accelerator and target station. The capability of ISIS is described including the facilities available and the type of science carried out using the instruments. The development and support activities are outlined, along with the ISIS organisation and user interaction. The appendix contains experimental reports on research work conducted at ISIS. (U.K.)

  18. Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalik, J; Smulek, W; Godlewska-Para, E [eds.

    2006-07-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes the activities of the Institute in 2005. The document consist of four parts: (1) Radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies; (2) Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, general chemistry; (3) Radiobiology; (4) Nuclear technologies and methods. In total - 73 detailed papers prepared by the Institute workers and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity and the international cooperation is also listed.

  19. Annual Report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swiboda, G [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2008-07-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2007. The document consist of eight parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiation protection and dosimetry; Nuclear technology in energy generation; Condensed matter physics; Nuclear techniques in health and environment protection management of hazards; Radioisotope center POLATOM and in last section in which the lists of published in 2007 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented.

  20. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2007. The document consist of eight parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiation protection and dosimetry; Nuclear technology in energy generation; Condensed matter physics; Nuclear techniques in health and environment protection management of hazards; Radioisotope center POLATOM and in last section in which the lists of published in 2007 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented