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Sample records for receptor gene ar

  1. Rescue of Metabolic Alterations in AR113Q Skeletal Muscle by Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Giorgetti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA, a progressive degenerative disorder, is caused by a CAG/glutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (polyQ AR. Recent studies demonstrate that skeletal muscle is an important site of toxicity that contributes to the SBMA phenotype. Here, we sought to identify critical pathways altered in muscle that underlie disease manifestations in AR113Q mice. This led to the unanticipated identification of gene expression changes affecting regulators of carbohydrate metabolism, similar to those triggered by denervation. AR113Q muscle exhibits diminished glycolysis, altered mitochondria, and an impaired response to exercise. Strikingly, the expression of genes regulating muscle energy metabolism is rescued following peripheral polyQ AR gene silencing by antisense oligonucleotides (ASO, a therapeutic strategy that alleviates disease. Our data establish the occurrence of a metabolic imbalance in SBMA muscle triggered by peripheral expression of the polyQ AR and indicate that alterations in energy utilization contribute to non-neuronal disease manifestations.

  2. Epigenetic Machinery Regulates Alternative Splicing of Androgen Receptor (AR) Gene in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Splicing of Androgen Receptor (AR) Gene in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jer...Epigenetic regulation of androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer . Epigenetics. 5, 100-104. 2. Duan LL, Rai G , Roggero C, Zhang Q-J, Wei Q... Prostate Cancer (CRPC) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hsieh, Jer-Tsong CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

  3. Screening for mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing infertility in Syrian men using real-time PCR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madania, A.; Ghouri, I.; Abou-Alshamat, Gh.; Issa, M.; Al-Halabi, M.

    2012-01-01

    14 known point mutations in the androgen receptor gene (AR) causing male infertility were screened by real time PCR and by DNA sequencing, in order to identify point mutations in the AR gene causing infertility in azoospermic men. We screened 110 Syrian patients suffering from non-obstructive azoospermia with no chromosomal aberrations or AZF micro deletions. We discovered a new AR mutation, del 57Leu, described for the first time as a possible cause of male infertility. Furthermore, we found two patients with the Ala474Val mutation and one patient bearing the Pro390Ser mutation. Our results indicate that these mutations are significant markers for idiopathic male infertility in the Syrian society and in Mediterranean populations in general. (author)

  4. Fenofibrate down-regulates the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes and induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hu; Zhu, Chen; Qin, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tao, Tao [Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Li, Jie; Cheng, Gong; Li, Pu; Cao, Qiang; Meng, Xiaoxin; Ju, Xiaobing; Shao, Pengfei; Hua, Lixin [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Gu, Min, E-mail: medzhao1980@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Yin, Changjun, E-mail: drcjyin@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Reproductive Medicine, Department of Urology, First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate reduces the expressions of androgen receptor in LNCaP cells. ► Fenofibrate induces oxidative stress in the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. -- Abstract: Fenofibrate, a peroxisome proliferator-androgen receptor-alpha agonist, is widely used in treating different forms of hyperlipidemia and hypercholesterolemia. Recent reports have indicated that fenofibrate exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. This study aims to investigate the effects of fenofibrate on the prostate cancer (PCa) cell line LNCaP. The effects of fenofibrate on LNCaP cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, Western blot analysis, and dual-luciferase reporter assay. Fenofibrate induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and apoptosis in LNCaP cells, reduces the expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and AR target genes (prostate-specific antigen and TMPRSS2), and inhibits Akt phosphorylation. Fenofibrate can induce the accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and decrease the activities of total anti-oxidant and superoxide dismutase in LNCaP cells. Fenofibrate exerts an anti-proliferative property by inhibiting the expression of AR and induces apoptosis by causing oxidative stress. Therefore, our data suggest fenofibrate may have beneficial effects in fenofibrate users by preventing prostate cancer growth through inhibition of androgen activation and expression.

  5. Altered Rhythm of Adrenal Clock Genes, StAR and Serum Corticosterone in VIP Receptor 2-Deficient Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens

    2012-01-01

    oscillator based on a group of clock genes and their protein products. Mice lacking the VPAC2 receptor display disrupted circadian rhythm of physiology and behaviour, and therefore, we using real-time RT-PCR quantified (1) the mRNAs for the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 in the adrenal gland and SCN, (2......RNA expression and serum corticosterone concentration. Double immunohistochemistry showed that the PER1 protein and StAR were co-localised in the same steroidogenic cells. Circulating corticosterone plays a role in the circadian timing system and the misaligned corticosterone rhythm in the VPAC2 receptor......The circadian time-keeping system consists of clocks in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and in peripheral organs including an adrenal clock linked to the rhythmic corticosteroid production by regulating steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Clock cells contain an autonomous molecular...

  6. Androgen receptor and its splice variant, AR-V7, differentially regulate FOXA1 sensitive genes in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, William C; Shafi, Ayesha A; Nakka, Manjula; Weigel, Nancy L

    2014-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-dependent disease, and tumors that are resistant to androgen ablation therapy often remain androgen receptor (AR) dependent. Among the contributors to castration-resistant PCa are AR splice variants that lack the ligand-binding domain (LBD). Instead, they have small amounts of unique sequence derived from cryptic exons or from out of frame translation. The AR-V7 (or AR3) variant is constitutively active and is expressed under conditions consistent with CRPC. AR-V7 is reported to regulate a transcriptional program that is similar but not identical to that of AR. However, it is unknown whether these differences are due to the unique sequence in AR-V7, or simply to loss of the LBD. To examine transcriptional regulation by AR-V7, we have used lentiviruses encoding AR-V7 (amino acids 1-627 of AR with the 16 amino acids unique to the variant) to prepare a derivative of the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells with inducible expression of AR-V7. An additional cell line was generated with regulated expression of AR-NTD (amino acids 1-660 of AR); this mutant lacks the LBD but does not have the AR-V7 specific sequence. We find that AR and AR-V7 have distinct activities on target genes that are co-regulated by FOXA1. Transcripts regulated by AR-V7 were similarly regulated by AR-NTD, indicating that loss of the LBD is sufficient for the observed differences. Differential regulation of target genes correlates with preferential recruitment of AR or AR-V7 to specific cis-regulatory DNA sequences providing an explanation for some of the observed differences in target gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankvoort, B.M.G.; Groene, E.M. de; Meeteren-Kreikamp, A.P. van; Witkamp, R.F.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2

  8. Epigenetic Machinery Regulates Alternative Splicing of Androgen Receptor (AR) Gene in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    resistant prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zhi-Ping Liu CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75390 REPORT DATE...NUMBER gene in castration-resistant prostate cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-16-1-0531 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Zhi-Ping Liu 5d...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the primary treatment for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) since PCa depends on androgen for

  9. Baicalein suppresses the androgen receptor (AR)-mediated prostate cancer progression via inhibiting the AR N-C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Defeng; Chen, Qiulu; Liu, Yalin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2017-12-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a critical role in prostate cancer (PCa) development and progression. Androgen deprivation therapy with antiandrogens to reduce androgen biosynthesis or prevent androgens from binding to AR are widely used to suppress AR-mediated PCa growth. However, most of ADT may eventually fail with development of the castration resistance after 12-24 months. Here we found that a natural product baicalein can effectively suppress the PCa progression via targeting the androgen-induced AR transactivation with little effect to AR protein expression. PCa cells including LNCaP, CWR22Rv1, C4-2, PC-3, and DU145, were treated with baicalein and luciferase assay was used to evaluate their effect on the AR transactivation. Cell growth and IC 50 were determined by MTT assay after 48 hrs treatment. RT-PCR was used to evaluate the mRNA levels of AR target genes including PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1. Western blot was used to determine AR and PSA protein expression. The natural product of baicalein can selectively inhibit AR transactivation with little effect on the other nuclear receptors, including ERα, and GR. At a low concentration, 2.5 μM of baicalein effectively suppresses the growth of AR-positive PCa cells, and has little effect on AR-negative PCa cells. Mechanism dissection suggest that baicalein can suppress AR target genes (PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1) expression in both androgen responsive LNCaP cells and castration resistant CWR22Rv1 cells, that may involve the inhibiting the AR N/C dimerization and AR-coactivators interaction. Baicalein may be developed as an effective anti-AR therapy via its ability to inhibit AR transactivation and AR-mediated PCa cell growth.

  10. Chromosomal organization of adrenergic receptor genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang-Feng, T.L.; Xue, Feiyu; Zhong, Wuwei; Cotecchia, S.; Frielle, T.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Francke, U.

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors (ARs) (subtypes α 1 , α 2 , β 1 , and β 2 ) are a prototypic family of guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-coupled receptors that mediate the physiological effects of the hormone epinephrine and the neurotransmitter norepinephrine. The authors have previously assigned the genes for β 2 -and α 2 -AR to human chromosomes 5 and 10, respectively. By Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids and in situ chromosomal hybridization, they have now mapped the α 1 -AR gene to chromosome 5q32→q34, the same position as β 2 -AR, and the β 1 -AR gene to chromosome 10q24→q26, the region where α 2 -AR, is located. In mouse, both α 2 -and β 1 -AR genes were assigned to chromosome 19, and the α 1 -AR locus was localized to chromosome 11. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis has shown that the α 1 -and β 2 -AR genes in humans are within 300 kilobases (kb) and the distance between the α 2 - and β 1 -AR genes is <225 kb. The proximity of these two pairs of AR genes and the sequence similarity that exists among all the ARs strongly suggest that they are evolutionarily related. Moreover, they likely arose from a common ancestral receptor gene and subsequently diverged through gene duplication and chromosomal duplication to perform their distinctive roles in mediation the physiological effects of catecholamines. The AR genes thus provide a paradigm for understanding the evolution of such structurally conserved yet functionally divergent families off receptor molecules

  11. Androgen Receptor (AR Gene (CAGn and (GGNn Length Polymorphisms and Symptoms in Young Males With Long-Lasting Adverse Effects After Finasteride Use Against Androgenic Alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Cauci, PhD

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that short and/or long (CAGn and (GGNn repeats had different frequencies according to symptoms reported by patients with PFS, likely reflecting the vast array of genes modulated by the AR. This study showed a U-curvilinear profile of (CAGn repeats for skin dryness symptoms, where the two extremes exhibited a worse condition than medium repeats. Further studies are necessary to investigate the PFS pathophysiology using a precision medicine approach.

  12. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT. However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  13. Protein kinase D1 (PKD1) influences androgen receptor (AR) function in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Paul; Jaggi, Meena; Syed, Viqar; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Hassan, Sazzad; Biswas, Helal; Balaji, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    Protein kinase D1 (PKD1), founding member of PKD protein family, is down-regulated in advanced prostate cancer (PCa). We demonstrate that PKD1 and androgen receptor (AR) are present as a protein complex in PCa cells. PKD1 is associated with a transcriptional complex which contains AR and promoter sequence of the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) gene. Ectopic expression of wild type PKD1 and the kinase dead mutant PKD1 (K628W) attenuated the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR in prostate cancer cells and yeast cells indicating that PKD1 can affect AR transcription activity, whereas knocking down PKD1 enhanced the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation of AR. Co-expression of kinase dead mutant with AR significantly inhibited androgen-mediated cell proliferation in both LNCaP and DU145 PC cells. Our data demonstrate for the first time that PKD1 can influence AR function in PCa cells

  14. Polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene and the androgen receptor gene and the risk of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bousema, J. T.; Bussemakers, M. J.; van Houwelingen, K. P.; Debruyne, F. M.; Verbeek, A. L.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Kiemeney, L. A.

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about risk factors for the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Recently, associations were observed between prostate cancer (CaP) risk and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Since both receptors are relevant for

  15. Shorter CAG repeat in the AR gene is associated with atypical hyperplasia and breast carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Abreu, Francine Blumental; Pirolo, Leandro Júnior; Canevari, Renata de Azevedo

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous reports into the role of [CAG]n repeat lengths in the androgen receptor (AR) gene indicate that these may play an important part in the development and progression of breast cancer, however, knowledge regarding benign breast lesions is limited. PATIENTS AND METHODS: PCR-based...

  16. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  17. Polymorphisms in the AR and PSA genes as markers of susceptibility and aggressiveness in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuasne, Hellen; Rodrigues, Iara Sant'Ana; Fuganti, Paulo Emílio

    2010-01-01

    The study of genes involved in androgen pathway can contribute to a better knowledge of prostate cancer. Our aim was to examine if polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) genes were involved in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Genotypes were determined...... by PCR-RFLP (PSA) or using a 377 ABI DNA Sequencer (AR). PSA(G/G) genotype (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.06–2.99) and AR short CAG repeats (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.21–2.96) increased risk for prostate cancer and were related with tumor aggressiveness. About 38.3% of tumors showed microsatellite instability....... In conclusion, polymorphisms in these genes may be indicated as potential biomarkers for prostate cancer....

  18. Prostate Cancer Cells Express More Androgen Receptor (AR) Following Androgen Deprivation, Improving Recognition by AR-Specific T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; Gamat, Melissa; Seliski, Joseph; Sawicki, Thomas; Jeffery, Justin; Ellis, Leigh; Drake, Charles G; Weichert, Jamey; McNeel, Douglas G

    2017-12-01

    Androgen deprivation is the primary therapy for recurrent prostate cancer, and agents targeting the androgen receptor (AR) pathway continue to be developed. Because androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has immmunostimulatory effects as well as direct antitumor effects, AR-targeted therapies have been combined with other anticancer therapies, including immunotherapies. Here, we sought to study whether an antigen-specific mechanism of resistance to ADT (overexpression of the AR) may result in enhanced AR-specific T-cell immune recognition, and whether this might be strategically combined with an antitumor vaccine targeting the AR. Androgen deprivation increased AR expression in human and murine prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo The increased expression persisted over time. Increased AR expression was associated with recognition and cytolytic activity by AR-specific T cells. Furthermore, ADT combined with vaccination, specifically a DNA vaccine encoding the ligand-binding domain of the AR, led to improved antitumor responses as measured by tumor volumes and delays in the emergence of castrate-resistant prostate tumors in two murine prostate cancer models (Myc-CaP and prostate-specific PTEN-deficient mice). Together, these data suggest that ADT combined with AR-directed immunotherapy targets a major mechanism of resistance, overexpression of the AR. This combination may be more effective than ADT combined with other immunotherapeutic approaches. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(12); 1074-85. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Identification of an IL-1-induced gene expression pattern in AR+ PCa cells that mimics the molecular phenotype of AR- PCa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Jardin, Shayna E; Kanchwala, Mohammed S; Jacob, Joan; Merchant, Sana; Meade, Rachel K; Gahnim, Nagham M; Nawas, Afshan F; Xing, Chao; Delk, Nikki A

    2018-06-01

    In immunosurveillance, bone-derived immune cells infiltrate the tumor and secrete inflammatory cytokines to destroy cancer cells. However, cancer cells have evolved mechanisms to usurp inflammatory cytokines to promote tumor progression. In particular, the inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1 (IL-1), is elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) patient tissue and serum, and promotes PCa bone metastasis. IL-1 also represses androgen receptor (AR) accumulation and activity in PCa cells, yet the cells remain viable and tumorigenic; suggesting that IL-1 may also contribute to AR-targeted therapy resistance. Furthermore, IL-1 and AR protein levels negatively correlate in PCa tumor cells. Taken together, we hypothesize that IL-1 reprograms AR positive (AR + ) PCa cells into AR negative (AR - ) PCa cells that co-opt IL-1 signaling to ensure AR-independent survival and tumor progression in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment. LNCaP and PC3 PCa cells were treated with IL-1β or HS-5 bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) conditioned medium and analyzed by RNA sequencing and RT-QPCR. To verify genes identified by RNA sequencing, LNCaP, MDA-PCa-2b, PC3, and DU145 PCa cell lines were treated with the IL-1 family members, IL-1α or IL-1β, or exposed to HS-5 BMSC in the presence or absence of Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1RA). Treated cells were analyzed by western blot and/or RT-QPCR. Comparative analysis of sequencing data from the AR + LNCaP PCa cell line versus the AR - PC3 PCa cell line reveals an IL-1-conferred gene suite in LNCaP cells that is constitutive in PC3 cells. Bioinformatics analysis of the IL-1 regulated gene suite revealed that inflammatory and immune response pathways are primarily elicited; likely facilitating PCa cell survival and tumorigenicity in an inflammatory tumor microenvironment. Our data supports that IL-1 reprograms AR + PCa cells to mimic AR - PCa gene expression patterns that favor AR-targeted treatment resistance and cell survival. © 2018 Wiley

  20. Context dependent regulatory patterns of the androgen receptor and androgen receptor target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, Jan Roger; Azeem, Waqas; Hellem, Margrete Reime; Marvyin, Kristo; Hua, Yaping; Qu, Yi; Li, Lisha; Lin, Biaoyang; Ke, XI- Song; Øyan, Anne Margrete; Kalland, Karl- Henning

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the androgen receptor (AR) is associated with androgen-dependent proliferation arrest and terminal differentiation of normal prostate epithelial cells. Additionally, activation of the AR is required for survival of benign luminal epithelial cells and primary cancer cells, thus androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) leads to apoptosis in both benign and cancerous tissue. Escape from ADT is known as castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the course of CRPC development the AR typically switches from being a cell-intrinsic inhibitor of normal prostate epithelial cell proliferation to becoming an oncogene that is critical for prostate cancer cell proliferation. A clearer understanding of the context dependent activation of the AR and its target genes is therefore desirable. Immortalized human prostate basal epithelial EP156T cells and progeny cells that underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), primary prostate epithelial cells (PrECs) and prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, VCaP and 22Rv1 were used to examine context dependent restriction and activation of the AR and classical target genes, such as KLK3. Genome-wide gene expression analyses and single cell protein analyses were applied to study the effect of different contexts. A variety of growth conditions were tested and found unable to activate AR expression and transcription of classical androgen-dependent AR target genes, such as KLK3, in prostate epithelial cells with basal cell features or in mesenchymal type prostate cells. The restriction of androgen- and AR-dependent transcription of classical target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells was at the level of AR expression. Exogenous AR expression was sufficient for androgen-dependent transcription of AR target genes in prostate basal epithelial cells, but did not exert a positive feedback on endogenous AR expression. Treatment of basal prostate epithelial cells with inhibitors of epigenetic gene silencing was not efficient in

  1. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  2. Stilbene induced inhibition of androgen receptor dimerization: implications for AR and ARΔLBD-signalling in human prostate cancer cells.

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    Wolfgang Streicher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Advanced castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC is often characterized by an increase of C-terminally truncated, constitutively active androgen receptor (AR variants. Due to the absence of a ligand binding domain located in the AR-C-terminus, these receptor variants (also termed ARΔLBD are unable to respond to all classical forms of endocrine treatments like surgical/chemical castration and/or application of anti-androgens. METHODOLOGY: In this study we tested the effects of the naturally occurring stilbene resveratrol (RSV and (E-4-(2, 6-Difluorostyryl-N, N-dimethylaniline, a fluorinated dialkylaminostilbene (FIDAS on AR- and ARΔLBD in prostate cancer cells. The ability of the compounds to modulate transcriptional activity of AR and the ARΔLBD-variant Q640X was shown by reporter gene assays. Expression of endogenous AR and ARΔLBD mRNA and protein levels were determined by qRT-PCR and Western Blot. Nuclear translocation of AR-molecules was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. AR and ARΔLBD/Q640X homo-/heterodimer formation was assessed by mammalian two hybrid assays. Biological activity of both compounds in vivo was demonstrated using a chick chorioallantoic membrane xenograft assay. RESULTS: The stilbenes RSV and FIDAS were able to significantly diminish AR and Q640X-signalling. Successful inhibition of the Q640X suggests that RSV and FIDAS are not interfering with the AR-ligand binding domain like all currently available anti-hormonal drugs. Repression of AR and Q640X-signalling by RSV and FIDAS in prostate cancer cells was caused by an inhibition of the AR and/or Q640X-dimerization. Although systemic bioavailability of both stilbenes is very low, both compounds were also able to downregulate tumor growth and AR-signalling in vivo. CONCLUSION: RSV and FIDAS are able to inhibit the dimerization of AR and ARΔLBD molecules suggesting that stilbenes might serve as lead compounds for a novel generation of AR-inhibitors.

  3. Androgen Receptor (AR) Physiological Roles in Male and Female Reproductive Systems: Lessons Learned from AR-Knockout Mice Lacking AR in Selective Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chawnshang; Lee, Soo Ok; Wang, Ruey-Sheng; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Ta-Min

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Androgens/androgen receptor (AR) signaling is involved primarily in the development of male-specific phenotypes during embryogenesis, spermatogenesis, sexual behavior, and fertility during adult life. However, this signaling has also been shown to play an important role in development of female reproductive organs and their functions, such as ovarian folliculogenesis, embryonic implantation, and uterine and breast development. The establishment of the testicular feminization (Tfm) mouse model exploiting the X-linked Tfm mutation in mice has been a good in vivo tool for studying the human complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, but this mouse may not be the perfect in vivo model. Mouse models with various cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) might allow us to study AR roles in individual types of cells in these male and female reproductive systems, although discrepancies are found in results between labs, probably due to using various Cre mice and/or knocking out AR in different AR domains. Nevertheless, no doubt exists that the continuous development of these ARKO mouse models and careful studies will provide information useful for understanding AR roles in reproductive systems of humans and may help us to develop more effective and more specific therapeutic approaches for reproductive system-related diseases. PMID:23782840

  4. Androgen Receptor Variant AR-V9 Is Coexpressed with AR-V7 in Prostate Cancer Metastases and Predicts Abiraterone Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Manish; Ho, Yeung; Hillman, David W; Van Etten, Jamie L; Henzler, Christine; Yang, Rendong; Sperger, Jamie M; Li, Yingming; Tseng, Elizabeth; Hon, Ting; Clark, Tyson; Tan, Winston; Carlson, Rachel E; Wang, Liguo; Sicotte, Hugues; Thai, Ho; Jimenez, Rafael; Huang, Haojie; Vedell, Peter T; Eckloff, Bruce W; Quevedo, Jorge F; Pitot, Henry C; Costello, Brian A; Jen, Jin; Wieben, Eric D; Silverstein, Kevin A T; Lang, Joshua M; Wang, Liewei; Dehm, Scott M

    2017-08-15

    Purpose: Androgen receptor (AR) variant AR-V7 is a ligand-independent transcription factor that promotes prostate cancer resistance to AR-targeted therapies. Accordingly, efforts are under way to develop strategies for monitoring and inhibiting AR-V7 in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The purpose of this study was to understand whether other AR variants may be coexpressed with AR-V7 and promote resistance to AR-targeted therapies. Experimental Design: We utilized complementary short- and long-read sequencing of intact AR mRNA isoforms to characterize AR expression in CRPC models. Coexpression of AR-V7 and AR-V9 mRNA in CRPC metastases and circulating tumor cells was assessed by RNA-seq and RT-PCR, respectively. Expression of AR-V9 protein in CRPC models was evaluated with polyclonal antisera. Multivariate analysis was performed to test whether AR variant mRNA expression in metastatic tissues was associated with a 12-week progression-free survival endpoint in a prospective clinical trial of 78 CRPC-stage patients initiating therapy with the androgen synthesis inhibitor, abiraterone acetate. Results: AR-V9 was frequently coexpressed with AR-V7. Both AR variant species were found to share a common 3' terminal cryptic exon, which rendered AR-V9 susceptible to experimental manipulations that were previously thought to target AR-V7 uniquely. AR-V9 promoted ligand-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. High AR-V9 mRNA expression in CRPC metastases was predictive of primary resistance to abiraterone acetate (HR = 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.31-12.2; P = 0.02). Conclusions: AR-V9 may be an important component of therapeutic resistance in CRPC. Clin Cancer Res; 23(16); 4704-15. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  6. Characterization of a novel androgen receptor (AR) coregulator RIPK1 and related chemicals that suppress AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide and chemical screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, Ting-Wei; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Kuo, Yung-Chia; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Lee, Li-Yu; Ma, Wen-Lung; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2017-09-19

    Using bicalutamide-androgen receptor (AR) DNA binding domain-ligand binding domain as bait, we observed enrichment of FxxFY motif-containing peptides. Protein database searches revealed the presence of receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) harboring one FxxFY motif. RIPK1 interacted directly with AR and suppressed AR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. Domain mapping experiments showed that the FxxFY motif in RIPK1 is critical for interactions with AR and the death domain of RIPK1 plays a crucial role in its inhibitory effect on transactivation. In terms of tissue expression, RIPK1 levels were markedly higher in benign prostate hyperplasia and non-cancerous tissue regions relative to the tumor area. With the aid of computer modeling for screening of chemicals targeting activation function 2 (AF-2) of AR, we identified oxadiazole derivatives as good candidates and subsequently generated a small library of these compounds. A number of candidates could effectively suppress AR transactivation and AR-related functions in vitro and in vivo with tolerable toxicity via inhibiting AR-peptide, AR-coregulator and AR N-C interactions. Combination of these chemicals with antiandrogen had an additive suppressive effect on AR transcriptional activity. Our collective findings may pave the way in creating new strategies for the development and design of anti-AR drugs.

  7. Cerebral A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) in liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Christian; Meyer, Philipp T.; Kircheis, Gerald; Haussinger, Dieter; Holschbach, Marcus H.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David; Kaiser, Hans J.; Zilles, Karl; Bauer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The cerebral mechanisms underlying hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are poorly understood. Adenosine, a neuromodulator that pre- and postsynaptically modulates neuronal excitability and release of classical neurotransmitters via A 1 adenosine receptors (A 1 AR), is likely to be involved. The present study investigates changes of cerebral A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients by means of positron emission tomography (PET) and [ 18 F]CPFPX, a novel selective A 1 AR antagonist. PET was performed in cirrhotic patients (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10). Quantification of in vivo receptor density was done by Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis (pons as reference region). The outcome parameter was the apparent binding potential (aBP, proportional to B max /K D ). Cortical and subcortical regions showed lower A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients than in controls. The aBP changes reached statistical significance vs healthy controls (p 1 AR binding may further aggravate neurotransmitter imbalance at the synaptic cleft in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Different pathomechanisms may account for these alterations including decrease of A 1 AR density or affinity, as well as blockade of the A 1 AR by endogenous adenosine or exogenous xanthines. (orig.)

  8. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yaoyao; Wang, Long; Li, Yuan; Chen, Minfeng; He, Wei; Qi, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA's target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR) is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells' proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3'UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The Long Non-Coding RNA XIST Interacted with MiR-124 to Modulate Bladder Cancer Growth, Invasion and Migration by Targeting Androgen Receptor (AR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyao Xiong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds/Aims: Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA X-inactive specific transcript (XIST is involved in the progression of several tumors. The interaction between lncRNA and miRNA or miRNA’s target genes is reported to play crucial roles in malignancy. In addition, Androgen receptor (AR is considered to be involved in bladder cancer progression. In this study, we investigated the role of XIST in human bladder cancer and its interaction with miR-124 and AR. Methods: XIST and AR expression was detected in bladder tumor samples and cell lines. Effects of XIST and AR on bladder cancer cells growth, invasion and migration were analyzed. Bioinformatic analysis and luciferase assays were used to identify the interaction among XIST, AR and miR-124. The correlations of miR-124 with XIST and AR in bladder cancer samples were statistically analyzed. Results: XIST and AR were upregulated in bladder cancer tissues and positively correlated. Higher XIST and AR expression were related to poorer TNM stage of bladder cancer. XIST knockdown reduced bladder cancer cells’ proliferation, invasion and migration. While this inhibitory effect could be partially restored by AR overexpression. XIST inhibited miR-124 expression by directly targeting. Moreover, miR-124 could bind to the 3’UTR of AR to regulate its expression. MiR-124 inhibition partially restored the XIST knockdown-induced reduction of AR, c-myc, p27, MMP13 and MMP9 expression. In bladder cancer tissues, miR-124 level was inversely correlated with the expression of XIST and AR, respectively. Conclusion: These findings indicated that XIST might be an oncogenic lncRNA that promoted the bladder cancer growth, invasion and migration via miR-124 dependent AR regulation.

  10. Interrelation of androgen receptor and miR-30a and miR-30a function in ER-, PR-, AR+ MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shuhua; Liu, Han; Liu, Xia; Liu, Shan; Wang, Yahong; Yu, Qi; Niu, Yun

    2017-10-01

    The association between androgen-induced androgen receptor (AR) activating signal and microRNA (miR)-30a was investigated, as well as the function of miR-30a in estrogen receptor-negative (ER - ), progesterone receptor-negative (PR - ), and AR-positive (AR + ) MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells. Androgen-induced AR activating signal upregulated the expression of AR, and downregulated the expression of miR-30a, b and c. Bioinformatics analysis indicated a putative miR-30a, b and c binding site in the 3'-untranslated region of AR mRNA. It was confirmed that the AR gene is a direct target of miR-30a, whereas AR does not target the miR-30a promoter, and AR activating signal may indirectly downregulate miR-30a through other cell signaling pathways. In this positive feedback mechanism AR is then upregulated through miR-30a. Overexpression of miR-30a inhibited cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of miR-30a expression by specific antisense oligonucleotides, increased cell growth. Previously, androgen-induced AR activating signal was demonstrated to inhibit cell proliferation in ER - , PR - and AR + MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells, but AR activating signal downregulated the expression of miR-30a, relieving the inhibition of MDA-MB-453 cell growth. Therefore, in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells, miR-30a has two different functions regarding cell growth: Inhibition of cell proliferation through a positive feedback signaling pathway; and the relative promotion of cell proliferation through downregulation of miR-30a. Thus, the association between AR activating signal and microRNAs is complex, and microRNAs may possess different functions due to different signaling pathways. Although the results of the present study were obtained in one cell line, they contribute to subsequent studies on ER - , PR - and AR + breast cancer.

  11. Critical role for complement receptor C5aR2 in the pathogenesis of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppelaars, Felix; van Werkhoven, Maaike B; Kotimaa, Juha; Veldhuis, Zwanida J; Ausema, Albertina; Broeren, Stefan G M; Damman, Jeffrey; Hempel, Julia C.; Leuvenink, Henri G D; Daha, Mohamed R; van Son, Willem J; van Kooten, Cees; van Os, Ronald P; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Seelen, Marc A

    The complement system, and specifically C5a, is involved in renal ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. The 2 receptors for complement anaphylatoxin C5a (C5aR1 and C5aR2) are expressed on leukocytes as well as on renal epithelium. Extensive evidence shows that C5aR1 inhibition protects kidneys from IR

  12. Androgen Receptor Gene Polymorphism, Aggression, and Reproduction in Tanzanian Foragers and Pastoralists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butovskaya, Marina L.; Lazebny, Oleg E.; Vasilyev, Vasiliy A.; Dronova, Daria A.; Karelin, Dmitri V.; Mabulla, Audax Z. P.; Shibalev, Dmitri V.; Shackelford, Todd K.; Fink, Bernhard; Ryskov, Alexey P.

    2015-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) gene polymorphism in humans is linked to aggression and may also be linked to reproduction. Here we report associations between AR gene polymorphism and aggression and reproduction in two small-scale societies in northern Tanzania (Africa)—the Hadza (monogamous foragers) and the Datoga (polygynous pastoralists). We secured self-reports of aggression and assessed genetic polymorphism of the number of CAG repeats for the AR gene for 210 Hadza men and 229 Datoga men (aged 17–70 years). We conducted structural equation modeling to identify links between AR gene polymorphism, aggression, and number of children born, and included age and ethnicity as covariates. Fewer AR CAG repeats predicted greater aggression, and Datoga men reported more aggression than did Hadza men. In addition, aggression mediated the identified negative relationship between CAG repeats and number of children born. PMID:26291982

  13. Baldness and the androgen receptor: the AR polyglycine repeat polymorphism does not confer susceptibility to androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Scurrah, Katrina J; Cobb, Joanna E; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Duncan, Anna E; Harrap, Stephen B

    2007-05-01

    Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, is a complex condition with a strong heritable component. In 2001, we published the first significant evidence of a genetic association between baldness and a synonymous coding SNP (rs6152) in the androgen receptor gene, AR. Recently, this finding was replicated in three independent studies, confirming an important role for AR in the baldness phenotype. In one such replication study, it was claimed that the causative variant underlying the association was likely to be the polyglycine (GGN) repeat polymorphism, one of two apparently functional triplet repeat polymorphisms located in the exon 1 transactivating domain of the gene. Here, we extend our original association finding and present comprehensive evidence from approximately 1,200 fathers and sons drawn from 703 families of the Victorian Family Heart Study, a general population Caucasian cohort, that neither exon 1 triplet repeat polymorphism is causative in this condition. Seventy-eight percent of fathers (531/683) and 30% of sons (157/520) were affected to some degree with AGA. We utilised statistical methods appropriate for the categorical nature of the phenotype and familial structure of the cohort, and determined that whilst SNP rs6152 was strongly associated with baldness (P baldness, but also for the many other complex conditions that have thus far been linked to AR.

  14. CD147 modulates androgen receptor activity through the Akt/Gsk-3β/β-catenin/AR pathway in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Qin, Yingxin; Hao, Feng; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Shuang; Zhao, Liangzhong; Wang, Liguo; Cai, Jianhui

    2016-08-01

    The androgen signaling pathway serves an important role in the development of prostate cancer. β-Catenin is an androgen receptor (AR) cofactor and augments AR signaling. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), a target of phosphorylated serine/threonine protein kinase B (p-Akt), regulates β-catenin stability. In addition, β-catenin, a coregulator of AR, physically interacts with AR and enhances AR-mediated target gene transcription. The multifunctional glycoprotein cluster of differentiation (CD) 147 is highly expressed on the cell surface of the majority of cancer cells, and it promotes tumor invasion, metastasis and growth. In the present study, the molecular effects of CD147 on the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin/AR signaling network were investigated in LNCaP cells. Using short hairpin-mediated RNA knockdown of CD147 in LNCaP cells, it was demonstrated that downregulation of CD147 resulted in inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK-3β, and then promoted degeneration of β-catenin and reduced nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In addition, immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that CD147 downregulation decreased the formation of a complex between β-catenin and AR. It was shown that CD147 knockdown suppressed the expression of the AR target gene prostate-specific antigen and the growth of AR-positive LNCaP cells. Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 augmented CD147-mediated function. The present study indicates that the PI3K/Akt pathway may facilitate CD147-mediated activation of the AR pathway.

  15. Cerebral A{sub 1} adenosine receptors (A{sub 1}AR) in liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boy, Christian [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Meyer, Philipp T. [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Kircheis, Gerald; Haussinger, Dieter [University of Duesseldorf, Clinic for Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Holschbach, Marcus H.; Coenen, Heinz H. [Research Centre Juelich, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Juelich (Germany); Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, Hans J. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Zilles, Karl [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); C. and O. Vogt Institute of Brain Research, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bauer, Andreas [Research Centre Juelich, Brain Imaging Centre West, Institute of Medicine, Juelich (Germany); University of Duesseldorf, Department of Neurology, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    The cerebral mechanisms underlying hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are poorly understood. Adenosine, a neuromodulator that pre- and postsynaptically modulates neuronal excitability and release of classical neurotransmitters via A{sub 1} adenosine receptors (A{sub 1}AR), is likely to be involved. The present study investigates changes of cerebral A{sub 1}AR binding in cirrhotic patients by means of positron emission tomography (PET) and [{sup 18}F]CPFPX, a novel selective A{sub 1}AR antagonist. PET was performed in cirrhotic patients (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10). Quantification of in vivo receptor density was done by Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis (pons as reference region). The outcome parameter was the apparent binding potential (aBP, proportional to B{sub max}/K{sub D}). Cortical and subcortical regions showed lower A{sub 1}AR binding in cirrhotic patients than in controls. The aBP changes reached statistical significance vs healthy controls (p < 0.05, U test with Bonferroni-Holm adjustment for multiple comparisons) in cingulate cortex (-50.0%), precentral gyrus (-40.9%), postcentral gyrus (-38.6%), insular cortex (-38.6%), thalamus (-32.9%), parietal cortex (-31.7%), frontal cortex (-28.6), lateral temporal cortex (-28.2%), orbitofrontal cortex (-27.9%), occipital cortex (-24.6), putamen (-22.7%) and mesial temporal lobe (-22.4%). Regional cerebral adenosinergic neuromodulation is heterogeneously altered in cirrhotic patients. The decrease of cerebral A{sub 1}AR binding may further aggravate neurotransmitter imbalance at the synaptic cleft in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Different pathomechanisms may account for these alterations including decrease of A{sub 1}AR density or affinity, as well as blockade of the A{sub 1}AR by endogenous adenosine or exogenous xanthines. (orig.)

  16. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  17. Bacillus sp.CDB3 isolated from cattle dip-sites possesses two ars gene clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Somanath Bhat; Xi Luo; Zhiqiang Xu; Lixia Liu; Ren Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Contamination of soil and water by arsenic is a global problem.In Australia, the dipping of cattle in arsenic-containing solution to control cattle ticks in last centenary has left many sites heavily contaminated with arsenic and other toxicants.We had previously isolated five soil bacterial strains (CDB1-5) highly resistant to arsenic.To understand the resistance mechanism, molecular studies have been carried out.Two chromosome-encoded arsenic resistance (ars) gene clusters have been cloned from CDB3 (Bacillus sp.).They both function in Escherichia coli and cluster 1 exerts a much higher resistance to the toxic metalloid.Cluster 2 is smaller possessing four open reading frames (ORFs) arsRorf2BC, similar to that identified in Bacillus subtilis Skin element.Among the eight ORFs in cluster 1 five are analogs of common ars genes found in other bacteria, however, organized in a unique order arsRBCDA instead of arsRDABC.Three other putative genes are located directly downstream and designated as arsTIP based on the homologies of their theoretical translation sequences respectively to thioredoxin reductases, iron-sulphur cluster proteins and protein phosphatases.The latter two are novel of any known ars operons.The arsD gene from Bacillus species was cloned for the first time and the predict protein differs from the well studied E.coli ArsD by lacking two pairs of C-terrninal cysteine residues.Its functional involvement in arsenic resistance has been confirmed by a deletion experiment.There exists also an inverted repeat in the intergenic region between arsC and arsD implying some unknown transcription regulation.

  18. Differentially methylated genes and androgen receptor re-expression in small cell prostate carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleb, Brittany; Estécio, Marcos R H; Zhang, Jiexin; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Chung, Woonbok; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Navone, Nora M; Tahir, Salahaldin; Marquez, Victor E; Issa, Jean-Pierre; Maity, Sankar; Aparicio, Ana

    2016-03-03

    Small cell prostate carcinoma (SCPC) morphology is rare at initial diagnosis but often emerges during prostate cancer progression and portends a dismal prognosis. It does not express androgen receptor (AR) or respond to hormonal therapies. Clinically applicable markers for its early detection and treatment with effective chemotherapy are needed. Our studies in patient tumor-derived xenografts (PDX) revealed that AR-negative SCPC (AR(-)SCPC) expresses neural development genes instead of the prostate luminal epithelial genes characteristic of AR-positive castration-resistant adenocarcinomas (AR(+)ADENO). We hypothesized that the differences in cellular lineage programs are reflected in distinct epigenetic profiles. To address this hypothesis, we compared the DNA methylation profiles of AR(-) and AR(+) PDX using methylated CpG island amplification and microarray (MCAM) analysis and identified a set of differentially methylated promoters, validated in PDX and corresponding donor patient samples. We used the Illumina 450K platform to examine additional regions of the genome and the correlation between the DNA methylation profiles of the PDX and their corresponding patient tumors. Struck by the low frequency of AR promoter methylation in the AR(-)SCPC, we investigated this region's specific histone modification patterns by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We found that the AR promoter was enriched in silencing histone modifications (H3K27me3 and H3K9me2) and that EZH2 inhibition with 3-deazaneplanocin A (DZNep) resulted in AR expression and growth inhibition in AR(-)SCPC cell lines. We conclude that the epigenome of AR(-) is distinct from that of AR(+) castration-resistant prostate carcinomas, and that the AR(-) phenotype can be reversed with epigenetic drugs.

  19. Performance comparison of two androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernemann, Christof; Steinestel, Julie; Humberg, Verena; Bögemann, Martin; Schrader, Andres Jan; Lennerz, Jochen K

    2018-01-23

    To compare the performance of two established androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) mRNA detection systems, as paradoxical responses to next-generation androgen-deprivation therapy in AR-V7 mRNA-positive circulating tumour cells (CTC) of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) could be related to false-positive classification using detection systems with different sensitivities. We compared the performance of two established mRNA-based AR-V7 detection technologies using either SYBR Green or TaqMan chemistries. We assessed in vitro performance using eight genitourinary cancer cell lines and serial dilutions in three AR-V7-positive prostate cancer cell lines, as well as in 32 blood samples from patients with CRPC. Both assays performed identically in the cell lines and serial dilutions showed identical diagnostic thresholds. Performance comparison in 32 clinical patient samples showed perfect concordance between the assays. In particular, both assays determined AR-V7 mRNA-positive CTCs in three patients with unexpected responses to next-generation anti-androgen therapy. Thus, technical differences between the assays can be excluded as the underlying reason for the unexpected responses to next-generation anti-androgen therapy in a subset of AR-V7 patients. Irrespective of the method used, patients with AR-V7 mRNA-positive CRPC should not be systematically precluded from an otherwise safe treatment option. © 2018 The Authors BJU International © 2018 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  1. StAR Enhances Transcription of Genes Encoding the Mitochondrial Proteases Involved in Its Own Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is essential for steroid hormone synthesis in the adrenal cortex and the gonads. StAR activity facilitates the supply of cholesterol substrate into the inner mitochondrial membranes where conversion of the sterol to a steroid is catalyzed. Mitochondrial import terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity of StAR and leads to mounting accumulation of StAR in the mitochondrial matrix. Our studies suggest that to prevent mitochondrial impairment, StAR proteolysis is executed by at least 2 mitochondrial proteases, ie, the matrix LON protease and the inner membrane complexes of the metalloproteases AFG3L2 and AFG3L2:SPG7/paraplegin. Gonadotropin administration to prepubertal rats stimulated ovarian follicular development associated with increased expression of the mitochondrial protein quality control system. In addition, enrichment of LON and AFG3L2 is evident in StAR-expressing ovarian cells examined by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, reporter studies of the protease promoters examined in the heterologous cell model suggest that StAR expression stimulates up to a 3.5-fold increase in the protease gene transcription. Such effects are StAR-specific, are independent of StAR activity, and failed to occur upon expression of StAR mutants that do not enter the matrix. Taken together, the results of this study suggest the presence of a novel regulatory loop, whereby acute accumulation of an apparent nuisance protein in the matrix provokes a mitochondria to nucleus signaling that, in turn, activates selected transcription of genes encoding the enrichment of mitochondrial proteases relevant for enhanced clearance of StAR. PMID:24422629

  2. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of estrogen receptor gene expression in laser microdissected prostate cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Thomas J; Li, Geng; McCulloch, Thomas A; Seth, Rashmi; Powe, Desmond G; Bishop, Michael C; Rees, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis of laser microdissected tissue is considered the most accurate technique for determining tissue gene expression. The discovery of estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) has focussed renewed interest on the role of estrogen receptors in prostate cancer, yet few studies have utilized the technique to analyze estrogen receptor gene expression in prostate cancer. Fresh tissue was obtained from 11 radical prostatectomy specimens and from 6 patients with benign prostate hyperplasia. Pure populations of benign and malignant prostate epithelium were laser microdissected, followed by RNA isolation and electrophoresis. Quantitative RT-PCR was performed using primers for androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), progesterone receptor (PGR) and prostate specific antigen (PSA), with normalization to two housekeeping genes. Differences in gene expression were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test. Correlation coefficients were analyzed using Spearman's test. Significant positive correlations were seen when AR and AR-dependent PSA, and ERalpha and ERalpha-dependent PGR were compared, indicating a representative population of RNA transcripts. ERbeta gene expression was significantly over-expressed in the cancer group compared with benign controls (P cancer group (P prostate cancer specimens. In concert with recent studies the findings suggest differential production of ERbeta splice variants, which may play important roles in the genesis of prostate cancer. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not be...Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT...recognition, we performed a high -throughput screen for compounds eliciting differential AR activity on cARE vs. sARE reporters. Of 10,000 compounds

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and archaeal arsC gene sequences suggests an ancient, common origin for arsenate reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugas Sandra L

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ars gene system provides arsenic resistance for a variety of microorganisms and can be chromosomal or plasmid-borne. The arsC gene, which codes for an arsenate reductase is essential for arsenate resistance and transforms arsenate into arsenite, which is extruded from the cell. A survey of GenBank shows that arsC appears to be phylogenetically widespread both in organisms with known arsenic resistance and those organisms that have been sequenced as part of whole genome projects. Results Phylogenetic analysis of aligned arsC sequences shows broad similarities to the established 16S rRNA phylogeny, with separation of bacterial, archaeal, and subsequently eukaryotic arsC genes. However, inconsistencies between arsC and 16S rRNA are apparent for some taxa. Cyanobacteria and some of the γ-Proteobacteria appear to possess arsC genes that are similar to those of Low GC Gram-positive Bacteria, and other isolated taxa possess arsC genes that would not be expected based on known evolutionary relationships. There is no clear separation of plasmid-borne and chromosomal arsC genes, although a number of the Enterobacteriales (γ-Proteobacteria possess similar plasmid-encoded arsC sequences. Conclusion The overall phylogeny of the arsenate reductases suggests a single, early origin of the arsC gene and subsequent sequence divergence to give the distinct arsC classes that exist today. Discrepancies between 16S rRNA and arsC phylogenies support the role of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in the evolution of arsenate reductases, with a number of instances of HGT early in bacterial arsC evolution. Plasmid-borne arsC genes are not monophyletic suggesting multiple cases of chromosomal-plasmid exchange and subsequent HGT. Overall, arsC phylogeny is complex and is likely the result of a number of evolutionary mechanisms.

  5. Comprehensive Profiling of the Androgen Receptor in Liquid Biopsies from Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Reveals Novel Intra-AR Structural Variation and Splice Variant Expression Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Laere, Bram; van Dam, Pieter-Jan; Whitington, Tom; Mayrhofer, Markus; Diaz, Emanuela Henao; Van den Eynden, Gert; Vandebroek, Jean; Del-Favero, Jurgen; Van Laere, Steven; Dirix, Luc; Grönberg, Henrik; Lindberg, Johan

    2017-08-01

    Expression of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) is associated with poor response to second-line endocrine therapy in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, a large fraction of nonresponding patients are AR-V7-negative. To investigate if a comprehensive liquid biopsy-based AR profile may improve patient stratification in the context of second-line endocrine therapy. Peripheral blood was collected from patients with CRPC (n=30) before initiation of a new line of systemic therapy. We performed profiling of circulating tumour DNA via low-pass whole-genome sequencing and targeted sequencing of the entire AR gene, including introns. Targeted RNA sequencing was performed on enriched circulating tumour cell fractions to assess the expression levels of seven AR splice variants (ARVs). Somatic AR variations, including copy-number alterations, structural variations, and point mutations, were combined with ARV expression patterns and correlated to clinicopathologic parameters. Collectively, any AR perturbation, including ARV, was detected in 25/30 patients. Surprisingly, intra-AR structural variation was present in 15/30 patients, of whom 14 expressed ARVs. The majority of ARV-positive patients expressed multiple ARVs, with AR-V3 the most abundantly expressed. The presence of any ARV was associated with progression-free survival after second-line endocrine treatment (hazard ratio 4.53, 95% confidence interval 1.424-14.41; p=0.0105). Six out of 17 poor responders were AR-V7-negative, but four carried other AR perturbations. Comprehensive AR profiling, which is feasible using liquid biopsies, is necessary to increase our understanding of the mechanisms underpinning resistance to endocrine treatment. Alterations in the androgen receptor are associated with endocrine treatment outcomes. This study demonstrates that it is possible to identify different types of alterations via simple blood draws. Follow-up studies are needed to determine the effect of

  6. Splicing Factor Prp8 Interacts With NES(AR) and Regulates Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Nguyen, Minh M; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Singh, Prabhpreet; Jing, Yifeng; O'Malley, Katherine; Dar, Javid A; Dhir, Rajiv; Wang, Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays a pivotal role in the development of primary as well as advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Previous work in our lab identified a novel nuclear export signal (NES) (NES(AR)) in AR ligand-binding domain essential for AR nucleocytoplasmic trafficking. By characterizing the localization of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged NES(AR), we designed and executed a yeast mutagenesis screen and isolated 7 yeast mutants that failed to display the NES(AR) export function. One of those mutants was identified as the splicing factor pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8). We further showed that Prp8 could regulate NES(AR) function using short hairpin RNA knockdown of Prp8 coupled with a rapamycin export assay in mammalian cells and knockdown of Prp8 could induce nuclear accumulation of GFP-tagged AR in PC3 cells. Prp8 expression was decreased in castration-resistant LuCaP35 xenograft tumors as compared with androgen-sensitive xenografts. Laser capture microdissection and quantitative PCR showed Prp8 mRNA levels were decreased in human prostate cancer specimens with high Gleason scores. In prostate cancer cells, coimmunoprecipitation and deletion mutagenesis revealed a physical interaction between Prp8 and AR mainly mediated by NES(AR). Luciferase assay with prostate specific antigen promoter-driven reporter demonstrated that Prp8 regulated AR transcription activity in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, Prp8 knockdown also increased polyubiquitination of endogenous AR. This may be 1 possible mechanism by which it modulates AR activity. These results show that Prp8 is a novel AR cofactor that interacts with NES(AR) and regulates AR function in prostate cancer cells.

  7. Testosterone increases renal anti-aging klotho gene expression via the androgen receptor-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shih-Che; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Shih-Hua; Ka, Shuk-Man; Chen, Ann; Shih, Meng-Fu; Hsu, Yu-Juei

    2014-12-01

    Gender is known to be associated with longevity and oestrogen administration induced longevity-associated gene expression is one of the potential mechanisms underlying the benefits of oestrogen on lifespan, whereas the role of testosterone in the regulation of longevity-associated gene expressions remains largely unclear. The klotho gene, predominantly expressed in the kidney, has recently been discovered to be an aging suppressor gene. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory effects of testosterone on renal klotho gene expression in vivo and in vitro. In testosterone-administered mouse kidney and NRK-52E cells, increased klotho expression was accompanied by the up-regulation of the nuclear androgen receptor (AR). Overexpression of AR enhanced the expression of klotho mRNA and protein. Conversely, testosterone-induced klotho expression was attenuated in the presence of flutamide, an AR antagonist. A reporter assay and a chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated that AR directly binds to the klotho promoter via androgen response elements (AREs) which reconfirmed its importance for AR binding via the element mutation. In summary, our study demonstrates that testosterone up-regulates anti-aging klotho together with AR expression in the kidney in vivo and in vitro by recruiting AR on to the AREs of the klotho promoter.

  8. Study on predictive role of AR and EGFR family genes with response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer in Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, L C; Chakraborty, Anurupa; Mishra, Ashwani K; Devi, Thoudam Regina; Sugandhi, Nidhi; Chintamani, Chintamani; Bhatnagar, Dinesh; Kapur, Sujala; Saxena, Sunita

    2012-06-01

    Locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) remains a clinical challenge as the majority of patients with this diagnosis develop distant metastases despite appropriate therapy. We analyzed expression of steroid and growth hormone receptor genes as well as gene associated with metabolism of chemotherapeutic drugs in locally advanced breast cancer before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) to study whether there is a change in gene expression induced by chemotherapy and whether such changes are associated with tumor response or non-response. Fifty patients were included with locally advanced breast cancer treated with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, 5-fluorouracil (CAF)-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery. Total RNA was extracted from 50 match samples of pre- and post-NACT tumor tissues. RNA expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor family genes including EGFR, ERBB2, ERBB3, androgen receptor (AR), and multidrug-resistance gene 1 (MDR1) were determined by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Responders show significantly high levels of pre-NACT AR gene expression (P = 0.016), which reduces following NACT (P = 0.008), and hence can serve as a useful tool for the prediction of the success of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in individual cancer patients with locally advanced breast carcinoma. Moreover, a significant post-therapeutic increase in the expression levels of EGFR and MDR1 gene in responders (P = 0.026 and P < 0.001) as well as in non-responders (P = 0.055, P = 0.001) suggests that expression of these genes changes during therapy but they do not have any impact on tumor response, whereas a post-therapeutic reduction was observed in AR in responders. This indicates an independent predictive role of AR with response to NACT.

  9. Epigenetic modulation of AR gene expression in prostate cancer DU145 cells with the combination of sodium butyrate and 5'-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialova, Barbora; Luzna, Petra; Gursky, Jan; Langova, Katerina; Kolar, Zdenek; Trtkova, Katerina Smesny

    2016-10-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a consequence of androgen deprivation therapy. Unchecked CRPC followed by metastasis is lethal. Some CRPCs show decreased AR gene expression due to epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone deacetylation. The aim of this study was to epigenetically modulate the methylated state of the AR gene leading to targeted demethylation and AR gene expression in androgen-independent human prostate cancer DU145 cell line, representing the CRPC model with very low or undetectable AR levels. The cell treatment was based on single and combined applications of two epigenetic inhibitors, sodium butyrate (NaB) as histone deacetylases inhibitor and 5'-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza-dC) as DNA methyltransferases inhibitor. We found that the Aza-dC in combination with NaB may help reduce the toxicity of higher NaB concentrations in cancer cells. In normal RWPE-1 cells and even stronger in cancer DU145 cells, the combined treatment induced both AR gene expression on the mRNA level and increased histone H4 acetylation in AR gene promoter. Also activation and maintenance of G2/M cell cycle arrest and better survival in normal RWPE-1 cells compared to cancer DU145 cells were observed after the treatments. These results imply the selective toxicity effect of both inhibitors used and their potentially more effective combined use in the epigenetic therapy of prostate cancer patients.

  10. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca). Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Selective AR Modulators that Distinguish Proliferative from Differentiative Gene Promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    levels, and in some cases be useful in early stage disease or watchful waiting, and in other cases castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC...dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene through an androgen response element in the proximal promoter. Molecular endocrinology 13, 376 (Mar, 1999). 9...analyses and in mouse xenograft experiments, as planned. We will also continue to probe the molecular mechanism by which dox elicits these differential

  12. Structure of the gene for human β2-adrenergic receptor: expression and promoter characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emorine, L.J.; Marullo, S.; Delavier-Klutchko, C.; Kaveri, S.V.; Durieu-Trautmann, O.; Strosberg, A.D.

    1987-01-01

    The genomic gene coding for the human β 2 -adrenergic receptor (β 2 AR) from A431 epidermoid cells has been isolated. Transfection of the gene into eukaryotic cells restores a fully active receptor/GTP-binding protein/adenylate cyclase complex with β 2 AR properties. Southern blot analyses with β 2 AR-specific probes show that a single β 2 AR gene is common to various human tissues and that its flanking sequences are highly conserved among humans and between man and rabbit, mouse, and hamster. Functional significance of these regions is supported by the presence of a promoter region (including mRNA cap sites, two TATA boxes, a CAAT box, and three G + C-rich regions that resemble binding sites for transcription factor Sp1) 200-300 base pairs 5' to the translation initiation codon. In the 3' flanking region, sequences homologous to glucocorticoid-response elements might be responsible for the increased expression of the β 2 AR gene observed after treatment of the transfected cells with hydrocortisone. In addition, 5' to the promoter region, an open reading frame encodes a 251-residue polypeptide that displays striking homologies with protein kinases and other nucleotide-binding proteins

  13. Direct detection of the AR-E211 G > A gene polymorphism from blood and tissue samples without DNA isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reptova, Silvie; Trtkova, Katerina Smesny; Kolar, Zdenek

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of prostate cancer (CaP) involves alterations in a gene structure of the androgen receptor (AR). The single nucleotide polymorphism AR-E211 G > A localized in exon 1 of the AR gene (G1733A) was detected using direct polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion (PCR-RFLP) method on blood and tissue samples without prior DNA isolation. We used blood samples of patients with a diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or CaP. From monitored group of CaP patients were selected specimen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks with morphology of BPH and CaP. The main objective of our study was to develop a method based the direct PCR-RFLP analysis from blood and tissue without prior DNA isolation for faster genotyping analysis of a large number of samples. We found no statistically significant differences in allelic % of the AR-E211 G > A polymorphism between BPH and CaP patients (p ≤ 0.8462). Genotyping of the AR-E211 G > A variant in blood was not identical with tumor tissue genotyping analysis. Significant agreement between blood and tissue AR-E211 G > A polymorphism only in non-tumor tissue focus was confirmed. Although we analyzed a limited number of the tissue samples, we suppose that a presence of the minor allele A may be associated with cancer transformation-induced changes of the modified AR gene.

  14. The phytochemical 3,3'-diindolylmethane decreases expression of AR-controlled DNA damage repair genes through repressive chromatin modifications and is associated with DNA damage in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Watson, Gregory W; Wong, Carmen P; Beaver, Laura M; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Ho, Emily

    2017-09-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a transcription factor involved in normal prostate physiology and prostate cancer (PCa) development. 3,3'-Diindolylmethane (DIM) is a promising phytochemical agent against PCa that affects AR activity and epigenetic regulators in PCa cells. However, whether DIM suppresses PCa via epigenetic regulation of AR target genes is unknown. We assessed epigenetic regulation of AR target genes in LNCaP PCa cells and showed that DIM treatment led to epigenetic suppression of AR target genes involved in DNA repair (PARP1, MRE11, DNA-PK). Decreased expression of these genes was accompanied by an increase in repressive chromatin marks, loss of AR occupancy and EZH2 recruitment to their regulatory regions. Decreased DNA repair gene expression was associated with an increase in DNA damage (γH2Ax) and up-regulation of genomic repeat elements LINE1 and α-satellite. Our results suggest that DIM suppresses AR-dependent gene transcription through epigenetic modulation, leading to DNA damage and genome instability in PCa cells. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Bacillus cereus AR156 primes induced systemic resistance by suppressing miR825/825* and activating defense-related genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Dongdong; Xia, Jing; Jiang, Chunhao; Qi, Beibei; Ling, Xiaoyu; Lin, Siyuan; Zhang, Weixiong; Guo, Jianhua; Jin, Hailing; Zhao, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Small RNAs play an important role in plant immune responses. However, their regulatory function in induced systemic resistance (ISR) is nascent. Bacillus cereus AR156 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that induces ISR in Arabidopsis against bacterial infection. Here, by comparing small RNA profiles of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000-infected Arabidopsis with and without AR156 pretreatment, we identified a group of Arabidopsis microRNAs (miRNAs) that are differentially regulated by AR156 pretreatment. miR825 and miR825* are two miRNA generated from a single miRNA gene. Northern blot analysis indicated that they were significantly downregulated in Pst DC3000-infected plants pretreated with AR156, in contrast to the plants without AR156 pretreatment. miR825 targets two ubiquitin-protein ligases, while miR825* targets toll-interleukin-like receptor (TIR)-nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) type resistance (R) genes. The expression of these target genes negatively correlated with the expression of miR825 and miR825*. Moreover, transgenic plants showing reduced expression of miR825 and miR825* displayed enhanced resistance to Pst DC3000 infection, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing miR825 and miR825* were more susceptible. Taken together, our data indicates that Bacillus cereus AR156 pretreatment primes ISR to Pst infection by suppressing miR825 and miR825* and activating the defense related genes they targeted. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Transcription factor Brn-3α mRNA in cancers, relationship with AR, ER receptors and AKT/m-TOR pathway components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirina, L. V.; Gorbunov, A. K.; Chigevskaya, S. Y.; Usynin, Y. A.; Kondakova, I. V.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Usynin, E. A.; Choinzonov, E. L.; Zaitseva, O. S.

    2017-09-01

    Transcription factors POU4F1 (neurogenic factor Brn-3α) play a pivotal role in cancers development. The aim of the study was to reveal the Brn-3α expression, AR, ER expression in cancers development, association with AKT/mTOR pathway activation. 30 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, 20 patients with papillary thyroid cancer, T2-3N0-1M0 stages and 40 patients with renal cell cancer T2-3N0M0-1 were involved into the study. The expressions of Brn-3α, AR, ERα, components of AKT/m-TOR signaling pathway genes were performed by real-time PCR. The dependence of Brn-3α expression on mRNA levels of steroid hormone receptors and components of AKT/m-TOR signaling pathway in studied cancers were shown. High levels of mRNA of nuclear factor, steroid hormone receptors were found followed by the activation of this signaling pathway in prostate cancer tissue. The reduction of transcription factor Brn-3α was accompanied with tumor invasive growth with increasing rates of AR, ER and 4E-BP1 mRNA. Thyroid cancer development happened in a case of a Brn-3α and steroid hormone receptors decrease. The activation of AKT/m-TOR signaling pathway was established in the metastatic renal cancers, accompanied with the increase of ER mRNA. But there was no correlation between the steroid receptor and Brn-3α. One-direction changes of Brn-3α were observed in the development of prostate and thyroid cancer due to its effect on the steroid hormone receptors and the activation of AKT/m-TOR signaling pathway components. The influence of this factor on the development of the kidney cancer was mediated through m-TOR activity modifications, the key enzyme of oncogenesis.

  17. REST mediates androgen receptor actions on gene repression and predicts early recurrence of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Charlotte; Ceder, Jens; Iglesias Gato, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a key regulator of prostate tumorgenesis through actions that are not fully understood. We identified the repressor element (RE)-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) as a mediator of AR actions on gene repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that AR binds...... in cell cycle progression, including Aurora Kinase A, that has previously been implicated in the growth of NE-like castration-resistant tumors. The analysis of prostate cancer tissue microarrays revealed that tumors with reduced expression of REST have higher probability of early recurrence, independently...... of their Gleason score. The demonstration that REST modulates AR actions in prostate epithelia and that REST expression is negatively correlated with disease recurrence after prostatectomy, invite a deeper characterization of its role in prostate carcinogenesis....

  18. Mechanisms and Regulation of Gene Expression by Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhengxin

    2003-01-01

    ...) in the cytoplasm of LNCaP cells. Transient transfection assay revealed that p44 enhances AR-, glucocorticoid receptor-, and progesterone receptor- dependent transcription but not estrogen receptor- or thyroid hormone receptor-dependent transcription...

  19. Gene transfer of heterologous G protein-coupled receptors to cardiomyocytes: differential effects on contractility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugwitz, K L; Weig, H J; Moretti, A; Hoffmann, E; Ueblacker, P; Pragst, I; Rosport, K; Schömig, A; Ungerer, M

    2001-04-13

    In heart failure, reduced cardiac contractility is accompanied by blunted cAMP responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation. Parathyroid hormone (PTH)-related peptide and arginine vasopressin are released from the myocardium in response to increased wall stress but do not stimulate contractility or adenylyl cyclase at physiological concentrations. To bypass the defective beta-adrenergic signaling cascade, recombinant P1 PTH/PTH-related peptide receptors (rPTH1-Rs) and V(2) vasopressin receptors (rV(2)-Rs), which are normally not expressed in the myocardium and which are both strongly coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and recombinant beta(2)-adrenergic receptors (rbeta(2)-ARs) were overexpressed in cardiomyocytes by viral gene transfer. The capacity of endogenous hormones to increase contractility via the heterologous, recombinant receptors was compared. Whereas V(2)-Rs are uniquely coupled to Gs, PTH1-Rs and beta(2)-ARs are also coupled to other G proteins. Gene transfer of rPTH1-Rs or rbeta(2)-ARs to adult cardiomyocytes resulted in maximally increased basal contractility, which could not be further stimulated by adding receptor agonists. Agonists at rPTH1-Rs induced increased cAMP formation and phospholipase C activity. In contrast, healthy or failing rV(2)-R-expressing cardiomyocytes showed unaltered basal contractility. Their contractility and cAMP formation increased only at agonist exposure, which did not activate phospholipase C. In summary, we found that gene transfer of PTH1-Rs to cardiomyocytes results in constitutive activity of the transgene, as does that of beta(2)-ARS: In the absence of receptor agonists, rPTH1-Rs and rbeta(2)-ARs increase basal contractility, coupling to 2 G proteins simultaneously. In contrast, rV(2)-Rs are uniquely coupled to Gs and are not constitutively active, retaining their property to be activated exclusively on agonist stimulation. Therefore, gene transfer of V(2)-Rs might be more suited to test the effects of c

  20. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  1. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-12-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we found that anti-androgens-mt-ARs have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-wt-AR. Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and the AR. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed AR transactivation, interrupted AR N-C interaction, and suppressed AR-mediated cell growth. Combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis may serve as a new strategy for developing anti-ARs that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of yeast ArDH gene in chloroplasts confers salinity tolerance in plants (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.; Kanwal, B.; Khalid, A.M.; Zafar, Y.; Malik, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    Water stress due to salinity and drought is the main limiting factor for plant growth, productivity and quality. A common response to water deficit is the accumulation of osmoprotectants such as sugars and amino acids. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase is found responsible for the production of arabitol from ribulose-5-phosphate. All plants synthesize ribulose-5-phosphate via pentose pathway in chloroplasts.. Therefore, osmotolerance of the plants could be enhanced through metabolic engineering of chloroplasts by introducing ArDH gene into the plastome, which is responsible for the conversion of ribulose-5- phosphate to arabitol. Here we report high-level expression of arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH) in chloroplasts. Homoplasmic transgenic plants were recovered on spectinomycin-containing regeneration medium. Transformed tobacco plants survived whereas non-transformed were severely stressed or killed when two weeks old seedlings were exposed to NaCl (up to 400 mM), suggesting a role for arabitol in salt tolerance. Seedlings survived up to five weeks on medium containing high salt concentrations (350-400 mM). Nevertheless, seedlings remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl for several weeks. Hypothesis that membranes are protected under stress conditions due to the arabitol accumulation in chloroplasts, seedlings were grown in liquid medium containing polyethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6%). Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ArDH enzyme protects membranes integrity under stress. Therefore, it is concluded that ArDH gene could be expressed in crop plants to withstand abiotic stresses. (author)

  3. Methylation of the PMEPA1 gene, a negative regulator of the androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharad, Shashwat; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; Haffner, Michael C; Li, Hua; Yan, Wusheng; Sesterhenn, Isabell A; Chen, Yongmei; Ali, Amina; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; McLeod, David G; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Srivastava, Shiv; Dobi, Albert; Petrovics, Gyorgy

    2014-06-01

    The prostate transmembrane protein androgen induced 1 (PMEPA1) gene is highly expressed in prostate epithelial cells and is a direct transcriptional target for the androgen receptor (AR). AR protein levels are controlled by the AR-PMEPA1 negative feedback loop through NEDD4-E3 ligase. Reduced expression of PMEPA1 observed in prostate tumors, suggests that loss of PMEPA1 may play critical roles in prostate tumorigenesis. This study focuses on epigenetic mechanisms of reduced PMEPA1 expression in the cancer of the prostate (CaP). Benign (n = 77) and matched malignant (n = 77) prostate epithelial cells were laser capture micro-dissected from optimum cutting temperature embedded frozen prostate sections from 42 Caucasian American (CA) and 35 African American (AA) cases. Purified DNA specimens were analyzed for CpG methylation of the PMEPA1 gene. PMEPA1 mRNA expression levels were evaluated by qRT-PCR. Analysis of PMEPA1 methylation and mRNA expression in the same tumor cell populations indicated a significant inverse correlation between mRNA expression and methylation in CaP (P = 0.0115). We noted higher frequency of CpG methylation within the evaluated first intronic region of the PMEPA1 gene in prostate tumors of CA men as compared with AA. In CaP cell lines, PMEPA1 expression was induced and AR protein levels were diminished in response to treatment with the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (decitabine). Cell culture-based studies demonstrated that decitabine restores PMEPA1 expression in AR-positive CaP cell lines. This report reveals the potential role of PMEPA1 gene methylation in the regulation of AR stability. Thus, downregulation of PMEPA1 may result in increased AR protein levels and function in CaP cells, contributing to prostate tumorigenesis.

  4. GGC and StuI polymorphism on the androgen receptor gene in endometrial cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Masahiro; Karube, Akihiro; Karube, Yuko; Watari, Michiko; Sakuragi, Noriaki; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2005-01-01

    Androgens have an anti-proliferative effect on endometrial cells. Human androgen receptor (AR) gene contains two polymorphic short tandem repeats of GGC and CAG, and a single-nucleotide polymorphism on exon 1 that is recognized by the restriction enzyme, StuI. Prior studies have shown that the lengths of the CAG repeat are inversely and linearly related to AR activity and associated with endometrial cancer. However, little is known about the GGC repeat and the StuI polymorphism of the AR gene. Thus, we investigated whether these AR polymorphisms are risk factors for endometrial cancer. To test this hypothesis, the genetic distributions of these polymorphisms were investigated in blood samples from endometrial cancer patients and healthy controls. The allelic and genotyping profiles were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and direct DNA sequencing, and analyzed statistically. The GGC repeat was significantly longer in endometrial cancer patients as compared to normal healthy controls. In general, an increased risk of endometrial cancer was found with increasing GGC repeat. The relative risk for the 17 GGC repeat was greater than 4, as compared to controls. However, the StuI polymorphism was not significantly different between patients and controls. The findings suggest that increased numbers of GGC repeat on the AR gene may be a risk factor for endometrial cancer

  5. [The impact of the androgen receptor splice variant AR-V7 on the prognosis and treatment of advanced prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, P; Taubert, H; Duensing, S; Kristiansen, G; Merseburger, A S; Cronauer, M V

    2018-01-25

    A recently discovered mechanism enabling prostate cancer cells to escape the effects of endocrine therapies consists in the synthesis of C-terminally truncated, constitutively active androgen receptor (AR) splice variants (AR-V). Devoid of a functional C-terminal hormone/ligand binding domain, various AR-Vs are insensitive to therapies targeting the androgen/AR signalling axis. Preliminary studies suggest that AR-V7, the most common AR-V, is a promising predictive tumour marker and a relevant selection marker for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. This review critically outlines recent advances in AR-V7 diagnostics and presents an overview of current AR-V7 targeted therapies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. The urinary metabolites of DINCH® have an impact on the activities of the human nuclear receptors ERα, ERβ, AR, PPARα and PPARγ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Anika; Buhrke, Thorsten; Kasper, Stefanie; Behr, Anne-Cathrin; Braeuning, Albert; Jessel, Sönke; Seidel, Albrecht; Völkel, Wolfgang; Lampen, Alfonso

    2018-05-01

    DINCH ® (di-isononyl cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylate) is a non-phthalate plasticizer that has been developed to replace phthalate plasticizers such as DEHP (di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) or DINP (di-isononyl phthalate). DINCH ® is metabolized to its corresponding monoester and subsequently to oxidized monoester derivatives. These are conjugated to glucuronic acid and subject to urinary excretion. In contrast to DINCH ® , there are almost no toxicological data available regarding its primary and secondary metabolites. The present study aimed at the characterization of potential endocrine properties of DINCH ® and five DINCH ® metabolites by using reporter gene assays to monitor the activity of the human nuclear receptors ERα, ERβ, AR, PPARα and PPARγ in vitro. DINCH ® itself did not have any effect on the activity of these receptors whereas DINCH ® metabolites were shown to activate all these receptors. In the case of AR, DINCH ® metabolites predominantly enhanced dihydrotestosterone-stimulated AR activity. In the H295R steroidogenesis assay, neither DINCH ® nor any of its metabolites affected estradiol or testosterone synthesis. In conclusion, primary and secondary DINCH ® metabolites exert different effects at the molecular level compared to DINCH ® itself. All these in vitro effects of DINCH ® metabolites, however, were only observed at high concentrations such as 10 μM or above which is about three orders of magnitude above reported DINCH ® metabolite concentrations in human urine. Thus, the in vitro data do not support the notion that DINCH ® or any of the investigated metabolites may exert considerable endocrine effects in vivo at relevant human exposure levels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Reproductive phase dependent daily variation in melatonin receptors (Mel(1a) and Mel(1b)), androgen receptor (AR) and lung associated immunity of Perdicula asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharwar, R K; Haldar, C

    2011-06-01

    Our knowledge about the involvement of melatonin in the regulation of lung associated immune system (LAIS) is still poor though the melatonin receptor types (Mel(1a) and Mel(1b)) have been localized in lungs of some wild birds. We thought to explore the correlation between daily variation (within a 24h time scale) in peripheral melatonin and testosterone along with expression of melatonin receptors (Mel(1a) and Mel(1b)) and androgen receptor (AR) in lungs during reproductively active and inactive phases. Receptor expression of Mel(1b) was more prominent than Mel(1a) at all the time points during both the reproductive phases. The expression of AR was inversely related to both the melatonin and its receptor expression at the 24h time scale during both the reproductive phases. Results also reflected a parallel relationship of melatonin, melatonin receptors and all the immune parameters (total leukocyte count, lymphocyte count, % stimulation ratio) suggesting that peripheral melatonin might be responsible for daily periodicity of LAIS. The presence of androgen receptors in lung led us to propose that gonadal steroid does influence the LAIS. Therefore melatonin along with testosterone might be acting as a temporal synchronizer for daily rhythms in lung associated immunity in Perdicula asiatica during different reproductive phases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Association of ghrelin receptor gene polymorphism with bulimia nervosa in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, K; Hosoya, H; Sekime, A; Ohta, M; Amono, H; Matsushita, S; Suzuki, K; Higuchi, S; Funakoshi, A

    2006-09-01

    Eating disorders (EDs) have a highly heterogeneous etiology and multiple genetic factors might contribute to their pathogenesis. Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, enhances appetite and increases food intake, and human ghrelin plasma levels are inversely correlated with body mass index. In the present study, we examined the 171T/C polymorphism of the ghrelin receptor (growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR) gene in patients diagnosed with EDs, because the subjects having ghrelin gene polymorphism (Leu72Met) was not detected in a Japanese population, previously. In addition, beta3 adrenergic receptor gene polymorphism (Try64Arg) and cholecystokinin (CCK)-A receptor (R) gene polymorphism (-81A/G, -128G/T), which are both associated with obesity, were investigated. The subjects consisted of 228 Japanese patients with EDs [96 anorexia nervosa (AN), 116 bulimia nervosa (BN) and 16 not otherwise specified (NOS)]. The age- and gender-matched control group consisted of 284 unrelated Japanese subjects. The frequency of the CC type of the GHSR gene was significantly higher in BN subjects than in control subjects (chi(2) = 4.47, p = 0.035, odds ratio = 2.05, Bonferroni correction: p = 0.070), while the frequency in AN subjects was not different from that in controls. The distribution of neither beta3 adrenergic receptor gene nor CCK-AR polymorphism differed between EDs and control subjects. Therefore, the CC type of GHSR gene polymorphism (171T/C) is a risk factor for BN, but not for AN.

  9. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. BALACHANDRAN .... Three novel AR gene mutations associated with AIS in XY sex-reversed females. Ta b le. 1 . ( contd. ) ..... disease, 1st edition. Springer Science + ...

  10. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  11. Long and noncoding RNAs (lnc-RNAs determine androgen receptor dependent gene expression in prostate cancer growth in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G Pestell

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hyperactive androgen receptor (AR activity remains a key determinant of the onset and progression of prostate cancer and resistance to current therapies. The mechanisms governing castrate resistant prostate cancer are poorly understood, but defining these molecular events is essential in order to impact deaths from prostate cancer. Yang et al. demonstrate that two lnc-RNAs known to be overexpressed in therapy resistant prostate cancer, PRNCR1 (also known as PCAT8 and PCGEM1, bound to the AR to enhance ligand-dependent and ligand-independent AR gene expression and proliferation of prostate cancer cells.1 The sequence of these interactions involved the binding of PRNCR1 to the acetylated AR and a subsequent association of DOT1L, which was required for the sequential recruitment of the lncRNA PCGEM1 to the AR amino terminus, which in turn was methylated by DOT1L.

  12. Association of Immune and Metabolic Receptors C5aR and C5L2 with Adiposity in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Reza; Gupta, Abhishek; Marceau, Picard; Tchernof, André

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue receptors C5aR and C5L2 and their heterodimerization/functionality and interaction with ligands C5a and acylation stimulating protein (ASP) have been evaluated in cell and rodent studies. Their contribution to obesity factors in humans remains unclear. We hypothesized that C5a receptors, classically required for host defense, are also associated with adiposity. Anthropometry and fasting blood parameters were measured in 136 women divided by body mass index (BMI): normal/overweight (≤30 kg/m2; n = 34), obese I (≤45 kg/m2; n = 33), obese II (≤51 kg/m2; n = 33), and obese III (≤80 kg/m2; n = 36). Subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue C5aR and C5L2 expression were analysed. C5L2 expression was comparable between subcutaneous and omental across all BMI groups. Plasma ASP and ASP/omental C5L2 expression increased with BMI (P correlations between C5L2/C5aR and waist circumference, HDL-C, and adiponectin. Tissue and BMI differences in receptors and ligands, particularly in omental, suggest relationship to metabolic disturbances and highlight adipose-immune interactions. PMID:24523571

  13. Melatonin Inhibits Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-7 (AR-V7-Induced Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB Activation and NF-κB Activator-Induced AR-V7 Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells: Potential Implications for the Use of Melatonin in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Wing Sun Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A major current challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, which can be initially controlled by medical or surgical castration, is the development of effective, safe, and affordable therapies against progression of the disease to the stage of castration resistance. Here, we showed that in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells transiently overexpressing androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB was activated and could result in up-regulated interleukin (IL-6 gene expression, indicating a positive interaction between AR-V7 expression and activated NF-κB/IL-6 signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC pathogenesis. Importantly, both AR-V7-induced NF-κB activation and IL-6 gene transcription in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells could be inhibited by melatonin. Furthermore, stimulation of AR-V7 mRNA expression in LNCaP cells by betulinic acid, a pharmacological NF-κB activator, was reduced by melatonin treatment. Our data support the presence of bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 expression and NF-κB activation in CRPC pathogenesis. Of note, melatonin, by inhibiting NF-κB activation via the previously-reported MT1 receptor-mediated antiproliferative pathway, can disrupt these bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 and NF-κB and thereby delay the development of castration resistance in advanced prostate cancer. Apparently, this therapeutic potential of melatonin in advanced prostate cancer/CRPC management is worth translation in the clinic via combined androgen depletion and melatonin repletion.

  14. Melatonin Inhibits Androgen Receptor Splice Variant-7 (AR-V7)-Induced Nuclear Factor-Kappa B (NF-κB) Activation and NF-κB Activator-Induced AR-V7 Expression in Prostate Cancer Cells: Potential Implications for the Use of Melatonin in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Vincent Wing Sun; Yau, Wing Lung; Tam, Chun Wai; Yao, Kwok-Ming; Shiu, Stephen Yuen Wing

    2017-05-31

    A major current challenge in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer, which can be initially controlled by medical or surgical castration, is the development of effective, safe, and affordable therapies against progression of the disease to the stage of castration resistance. Here, we showed that in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells transiently overexpressing androgen receptor splice variant-7 (AR-V7), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) was activated and could result in up-regulated interleukin ( IL ) -6 gene expression, indicating a positive interaction between AR-V7 expression and activated NF-κB/IL-6 signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) pathogenesis. Importantly, both AR-V7-induced NF-κB activation and IL-6 gene transcription in LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells could be inhibited by melatonin. Furthermore, stimulation of AR-V7 mRNA expression in LNCaP cells by betulinic acid, a pharmacological NF-κB activator, was reduced by melatonin treatment. Our data support the presence of bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 expression and NF-κB activation in CRPC pathogenesis. Of note, melatonin, by inhibiting NF-κB activation via the previously-reported MT₁ receptor-mediated antiproliferative pathway, can disrupt these bi-directional positive interactions between AR-V7 and NF-κB and thereby delay the development of castration resistance in advanced prostate cancer. Apparently, this therapeutic potential of melatonin in advanced prostate cancer/CRPC management is worth translation in the clinic via combined androgen depletion and melatonin repletion.

  15. Neural androgen receptors modulate gene expression and social recognition but not social investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara A Karlsson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of sex and androgen receptors (ARs for social preference and social memory is rather unknown. In this study of mice we compared males, females and males lacking ARs specifically in the nervous system, ARNesDel, with respect to social preference, assessed with the three-chambered apparatus test, and social recognition, assessed with the social discrimination procedure. In the social discrimination test we also evaluated the tentative importance of the sex of the stimulus animal. Novel object recognition and olfaction were investigated to complement the results from the social tests. Gene expression analysis was performed to reveal molecules involved in the effects of sex and androgens on social behaviors. All three test groups showed social preference in the three-chambered apparatus test. In both social tests an AR-independent sexual dimorphism was seen in the persistence of social investigation of female conspecifics, whereas the social interest towards male stimuli mice was similar in all groups. Male and female controls recognized conspecifics independent of their sex, whereas ARNesDel males recognized female but not male stimuli mice. Moreover, the non-social behaviors were not affected by AR deficiency. The gene expression analyses of hypothalamus and amygdala indicated that Oxtr, Cd38, Esr1, Cyp19a1, Ucn3, Crh and Gtf2i were differentially expressed between the three groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that ARs are required for recognition of male but not female conspecifics, while being dispensable for social investigation towards both sexes. In addition, the AR seems to regulate genes related to oxytocin, estrogen and William’s syndrome.

  16. Androgen receptor polyglutamine repeat length (AR-CAGn) modulates the effect of testosterone on androgen-associated somatic traits in Filipino young adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Calen P; Georgiev, Alexander V; McDade, Thomas W; Gettler, Lee T; Eisenberg, Dan T A; Rzhetskaya, Margarita; Agustin, Sonny S; Hayes, M Geoffrey; Kuzawa, Christopher W

    2017-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) mediates expression of androgen-associated somatic traits such as muscle mass and strength. Within the human AR is a highly variable glutamine short-tandem repeat (AR-CAGn), and CAG repeat number has been inversely correlated to AR transcriptional activity in vitro. However, evidence for an attenuating effect of long AR-CAGn on androgen-associated somatic traits has been inconsistent in human populations. One possible explanation for this lack of consistency is that the effect of AR-CAGn on AR bioactivity in target tissues likely varies in relation to circulating androgen levels. We tested whether relationships between AR-CAGn and several androgen-associated somatic traits (waist circumference, lean mass, arm muscle area, and grip strength) were modified by salivary (waking and pre-bed) and circulating (total) testosterone (T) levels in young adult males living in metropolitan Cebu, Philippines (n = 675). When men's waking T was low, they had a reduction in three out of four androgen-associated somatic traits with lengthening AR-CAGn (p AR-CAGn was associated with an increase in these same somatic traits. Our finding that longer AR-CAGn predicts greater androgen-associated trait expression among high-T men runs counter to in vitro work, but is generally consistent with the few prior studies to evaluate similar interactions in human populations. Collectively, these results raise questions about the applicability of findings derived from in vitro AR-CAGn studies to the receptor's role in maintaining androgen-associated somatic traits in human populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. c-Myc Antagonises the Transcriptional Activity of the Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Affecting Key Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barfeld, Stefan J; Urbanucci, Alfonso; Itkonen, Harri M; Fazli, Ladan; Hicks, Jessica L; Thiede, Bernd; Rennie, Paul S; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Mills, Ian G

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in men. The androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, constitutes the main drug target for advanced cases of the disease. However, a variety of other transcription factors and signaling networks have been shown to be altered in patients and to influence AR activity. Amongst these, the oncogenic transcription factor c-Myc has been studied extensively in multiple malignancies and elevated protein levels of c-Myc are commonly observed in PCa. Its impact on AR activity, however, remains elusive. In this study, we assessed the impact of c-Myc overexpression on AR activity and transcriptional output in a PCa cell line model and validated the antagonistic effect of c-MYC on AR-targets in patient samples. We found that c-Myc overexpression partially reprogrammed AR chromatin occupancy and was associated with altered histone marks distribution, most notably H3K4me1 and H3K27me3. We found c-Myc and the AR co-occupy a substantial number of binding sites and these exhibited enhancer-like characteristics. Interestingly, c-Myc overexpression antagonised clinically relevant AR target genes. Therefore, as an example, we validated the antagonistic relationship between c-Myc and two AR target genes, KLK3 (alias PSA, prostate specific antigen), and Glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT), in patient samples. Our findings provide unbiased evidence that MYC overexpression deregulates the AR transcriptional program, which is thought to be a driving force in PCa. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. c-Myc Antagonises the Transcriptional Activity of the Androgen Receptor in Prostate Cancer Affecting Key Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan J. Barfeld

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in men. The androgen receptor (AR, a ligand-activated transcription factor, constitutes the main drug target for advanced cases of the disease. However, a variety of other transcription factors and signaling networks have been shown to be altered in patients and to influence AR activity. Amongst these, the oncogenic transcription factor c-Myc has been studied extensively in multiple malignancies and elevated protein levels of c-Myc are commonly observed in PCa. Its impact on AR activity, however, remains elusive. In this study, we assessed the impact of c-Myc overexpression on AR activity and transcriptional output in a PCa cell line model and validated the antagonistic effect of c-MYC on AR-targets in patient samples. We found that c-Myc overexpression partially reprogrammed AR chromatin occupancy and was associated with altered histone marks distribution, most notably H3K4me1 and H3K27me3. We found c-Myc and the AR co-occupy a substantial number of binding sites and these exhibited enhancer-like characteristics. Interestingly, c-Myc overexpression antagonised clinically relevant AR target genes. Therefore, as an example, we validated the antagonistic relationship between c-Myc and two AR target genes, KLK3 (alias PSA, prostate specific antigen, and Glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT, in patient samples. Our findings provide unbiased evidence that MYC overexpression deregulates the AR transcriptional program, which is thought to be a driving force in PCa.

  19. RiArsB and RiMT-11: Two novel genes induced by arsenate in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Mendoza, Ignacio E; Harrison, Maria J

    Plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) increase their tolerance to arsenic-polluted soils. This study aims to investigate the genes involved in the AMF molecular response to arsenic pollution. Genes encoding proteins involved in arsenic metabolism were identified and their expression assessed by PCR or RT-qPCR. The As-inducible gene GiArsA (R. irregularis ABC ATPase component of the ArsAB arsenite efflux pump) and two new genes, an arsenate/arsenite permease component of ArsAB (RiArsB) and a methyltransferase type 11 (RiMT-11) were induced when arsenate was added to two-compartment in vitro monoxenic cultures of R. irregularis-transformed carrot roots. RiArsB and RiMT-11 expression in extraradical hyphae in response to arsenate displayed maximum induction 4-6 h after addition of 350 μM arsenate. Their expression was also detected in colonized root tissues grown in pots, or in the root-fungus compartment of two-compartment in vitro systems. We used a Medicago truncatula double mutant (mtpt4/mtpt8) to demonstrate that RiMT-11 and RiArsB transcripts accumulate in response to the addition of arsenate but not in response to phosphate. These results suggest that these genes respond to arsenate addition regardless of non-functional Pi symbiotic transport, and that RiMT-11 may be involved in arsenate detoxification by methylation in AMF-colonized tissues. Copyright © 2017 British Mycological Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Widespread ectopic expression of olfactory receptor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanai Itai

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olfactory receptors (ORs are the largest gene family in the human genome. Although they are expected to be expressed specifically in olfactory tissues, some ectopic expression has been reported, with special emphasis on sperm and testis. The present study systematically explores the expression patterns of OR genes in a large number of tissues and assesses the potential functional implication of such ectopic expression. Results We analyzed the expression of hundreds of human and mouse OR transcripts, via EST and microarray data, in several dozens of human and mouse tissues. Different tissues had specific, relatively small OR gene subsets which had particularly high expression levels. In testis, average expression was not particularly high, and very few highly expressed genes were found, none corresponding to ORs previously implicated in sperm chemotaxis. Higher expression levels were more common for genes with a non-OR genomic neighbor. Importantly, no correlation in expression levels was detected for human-mouse orthologous pairs. Also, no significant difference in expression levels was seen between intact and pseudogenized ORs, except for the pseudogenes of subfamily 7E which has undergone a human-specific expansion. Conclusion The OR superfamily as a whole, show widespread, locus-dependent and heterogeneous expression, in agreement with a neutral or near neutral evolutionary model for transcription control. These results cannot reject the possibility that small OR subsets might play functional roles in different tissues, however considerable care should be exerted when offering a functional interpretation for ectopic OR expression based only on transcription information.

  1. Relationships among estrogen receptor, oxytocin and vasopressin gene expression and social interaction in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, G; Hunter, R G; Fontaine, C; Ribeiro, A; Pfaff, D

    2011-08-01

    The incidence of social disorders such as autism and schizophrenia is significantly higher in males, and the presentation more severe, than in females. This suggests the possible contribution of sex hormones to the development of these psychiatric disorders. There is also evidence that these disorders are highly heritable. To contribute toward our understanding of the mechanisms underlying social behaviors, particularly social interaction, we assessed the relationship of social interaction with gene expression for two neuropeptides, oxytocin (OT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), using adult male mice. Social interaction was positively correlated with: oxytocin receptor (OTR) and vasopressin receptor (V1aR) mRNA expression in the medial amygdala; and OT and AVP mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). When mice representing extremes of social interaction were compared, all of these mRNAs were more highly expressed in high social interaction mice than in low social interaction mice. OTR and V1aR mRNAs were highly correlated with estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA in the medial amygdala, and OT and AVP mRNAs with estrogen receptor β (ERβ) mRNA in the PVN, indicating that OT and AVP systems are tightly regulated by estrogen receptors. A significant difference in the level of ERα mRNA in the medial amygdala between high and low social interaction mice was also observed. These results support the hypothesis that variations of estrogen receptor levels are associated with differences in social interaction through the OT and AVP systems, by upregulating gene expression for those peptides and their receptors. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. FGF receptor genes and breast cancer susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, D; Pineda, S; Michailidou, K

    2014-01-01

    Background:Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in women. Genome-wide association studies have identified FGFR2 as a breast cancer susceptibility gene. Common variation in other fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptors might also modify risk. We tested this hypothesis by studying...... genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and imputed SNPs in FGFR1, FGFR3, FGFR4 and FGFRL1 in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium.Methods:Data were combined from 49 studies, including 53 835 cases and 50 156 controls, of which 89 050 (46 450 cases and 42 600 controls) were of European ancestry......, 12 893 (6269 cases and 6624 controls) of Asian and 2048 (1116 cases and 932 controls) of African ancestry. Associations with risk of breast cancer, overall and by disease sub-type, were assessed using unconditional logistic regression.Results:Little evidence of association with breast cancer risk...

  3. Research progress of the bitter taste receptor genes in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ping; Luo, Rui-Jian

    2018-02-20

    Among the five basic tastes (umami, sweet, bitter, salty and sour), the perception of bitterness is believed to protect animals from digesting toxic and harmful substances, thus it is vital for animal survival. The taste of bitterness is triggered by the interaction between bitter substances and bitter taste receptors, which are encoded by Tas2rs. The gene numbers vary largely across species to meet different demands. So far, several ligands of bitter receptors have been identified in primates. They also discovered that the selective pressure of certain bitter taste receptor genes vary across taxa, genes or even different functional regions of the gene. In this review, we summarize the research progress of bitter taste receptor genes in primates by introducing the functional diversity of bitter receptors, the specific interaction between bitter taste receptors and ligands, the relationship between the evolutionary pattern of bitter taste receptors and diets, and the adaptive evolution of bitter taste receptor genes. We aim to provide a reference for further research on bitter receptor genes in primates.

  4. Molecular characteristics of an immobilization antigen gene of the fish-parasitic protozoan Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichthyophthirius multifiliis, a ciliated protozoan parasite of fish, expresses surface antigens (i-antigens), which react with host antibodies that render them immobile. The nucleotide sequence of an i-antigen gene of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis strain ARS-6 was deduced. The predicted protein of 47...

  5. Polymorphism in leptin receptor gene was associated with obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mutation in leptin receptor (LEPR) gene causes splicing abnormality that resulted in truncated receptor, aberrant signal transduction, leptin resistance, and obesity. This study aims to determine the association of LEPR gene polymorphisms, rs1137100 and rs1137101, on phenotype and leptin level between obese and ...

  6. CCAAT/enhancer-binding proteins regulate expression of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, L K; Johnson, P F; McAllister, J M; Strauss, J F

    1999-09-10

    Two putative CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) response elements were identified in the proximal promoter of the human steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene, which encodes a key protein-regulating steroid hormone synthesis. Expression of C/EBPalpha and -beta increased StAR promoter activity in COS-1 and HepG2 cells. Cotransfection of C/EBPalpha or -beta and steroidogenic factor 1, a transcription factor required for cAMP regulation of StAR expression, into COS-1 augmented 8-bromoadenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP)-stimulated promoter activity. When the putative C/EBP response elements were mutated, individually or together, a pronounced decline in basal StAR promoter activity in human granulosa-lutein cells resulted, but the fold stimulation of promoter activity by 8-Br-cAMP was unaffected. Recombinant C/EBPalpha and -beta bound to the two identified sequences but not the mutated elements. Human granulosa-lutein cell nuclear extracts also bound these elements but not the mutated sequences. An antibody to C/EBPbeta, but not C/EBPalpha, supershifted the nuclear protein complex associated with the more distal element. The complex formed by nuclear extracts with the proximal element was not supershifted by either antibody. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of C/EBPalpha and C/EBPbeta in human granulosa-lutein cell nuclear extracts. C/EBPbeta levels were up-regulated 3-fold by 8-Br-cAMP treatment. Our studies demonstrate a role for C/EBPbeta as well as yet to be identified proteins, which can bind to C/EBP response elements, in the regulation of StAR gene expression and suggest a mechanism by which C/EBPbeta participates in the cAMP regulation of StAR gene transcription.

  7. Archaeal Clusters of Orthologous Genes (arCOGs): An Update and Application for Analysis of Shared Features between Thermococcales, Methanococcales, and Methanobacteriales

    OpenAIRE

    Makarova, Kira; Wolf, Yuri; Koonin, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    With the continuously accelerating genome sequencing from diverse groups of archaea and bacteria, accurate identification of gene orthology and availability of readily expandable clusters of orthologous genes are essential for the functional annotation of new genomes. We report an update of the collection of archaeal Clusters of Orthologous Genes (arCOGs) to cover, on average, 91% of the protein-coding genes in 168 archaeal genomes. The new arCOGs were constructed using refined algorithms for...

  8. Complement Receptors C5aR and C5L2 Are Associated with Metabolic Profile, Sex Hormones, and Liver Enzymes in Obese Women Pre- and Postbariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Rezvani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obesity is associated with metabolic dysfunction with sex differences and chronic, low-grade inflammation. We proposed that hepatic expression of immune complement C3 related receptors (C3aR, C5aR, and C5L2 would be associated with pre- or postmenopausal status and metabolic profile in severely obese women. We hypothesized that C5L2/C5aR ratio, potentially influencing the ASP/C5L2 metabolic versus C5a/C5aR immune response, would predict metabolic profiles after weight loss surgery. Materials and Methods. Fasting plasma (hormone, lipid, and enzyme analysis and liver biopsies (RT-PCR gene expression were obtained from 91 women during surgery. Results. Hepatic C5L2 mRNA expression was elevated in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01 and correlated positively with circulating estradiol, estrone, ApoB, ApoA1, ApoA1/B, waist circumference, age, and LDL-C (all P<0.05. While plasma ASP was lower in pre- versus postmenopausal women (P<0.01, the hepatic C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio was increased (P<0.001 and correlated positively with estrone (P<0.01 and estradiol (P<0.001 and negatively with circulating ApoB and liver enzymes ALT, AST, and GGT (all P<0.05. Over 12 months postoperatively, liver enzymes in low C5L2/C5aR mRNA ratio group remained higher (ALP and ALT, P<0.05, AST and GGT, P<0.001 2-way-ANOVA. Conclusion. C5L2-C5aR association with other mediators including estrogens may contribute to hepatic metabolic and inflammatory function.

  9. Bidirectional modulation of hippocampal gamma (20-80 Hz) frequency activity in vitro via alpha(α)- and beta(β)-adrenergic receptors (AR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, D C; Glykos, V; Adams, N E; Lebeau, F E N

    2013-12-03

    Noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus plays an important role in memory function and has been shown to modulate different forms of synaptic plasticity. Oscillations in the gamma frequency (20-80 Hz) band in the hippocampus have also been proposed to play an important role in memory functions and, evidence from both in vitro and in vivo studies, has suggested this activity can be modulated by NA. However, the role of different NA receptor subtypes in the modulation of gamma frequency activity has not been fully elucidated. We have found that NA (30 μM) exerts a bidirectional control on the magnitude of kainate-evoked (50-200 nM) gamma frequency oscillations in the cornu Ammonis (CA3) region of the rat hippocampus in vitro via activation of different receptor subtypes. Activation of alpha-adrenergic receptors (α-AR) reduced the power of the gamma frequency oscillation. In contrast, activation of beta-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) caused an increase in the power of the gamma frequency oscillations. Using specific agonists and antagonists of AR receptor subtypes we demonstrated that these effects are mediated specifically via α1A-AR and β1-AR subtypes. NA activated both receptor subtypes, but the α1A-AR-mediated effect predominated, resulting in a reversible suppression of gamma frequency activity. These results suggest that NA is able to differentially modulate on-going gamma frequency oscillatory activity that could result in either increased or decreased information flow through the hippocampus. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gene Transfer and Molecular Cloning of the Human NGF Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Moses V.; Bothwell, Mark A.; Ross, Alonzo H.; Koprowski, Hilary; Lanahan, Anthony A.; Buck, C. Randall; Sehgal, Amita

    1986-04-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and its receptor are important in the development of cells derived from the neural crest. Mouse L cell transformants have been generated that stably express the human NGF receptor gene transfer with total human DNA. Affinity cross-linking, metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation, and equilibrium binding with 125I-labeled NGF revealed that this NGF receptor had the same size and binding characteristics as the receptor from human melanoma cells and rat PC12 cells. The sequences encoding the NGF receptor were molecularly cloned using the human Alu repetitive sequence as a probe. A cosmid clone that contained the human NGF receptor gene allowed efficient transfection and expression of the receptor.

  11. Binding of the Antagonist Caffeine to the Human Adenosine Receptor hA2AR in Nearly Physiological Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyin Cao

    Full Text Available Lipid composition may significantly affect membrane proteins function, yet its impact on the protein structural determinants is not well understood. Here we present a comparative molecular dynamics (MD study of the human adenosine receptor type 2A (hA(2AR in complex with caffeine--a system of high neuro-pharmacological relevance--within different membrane types. These are POPC, mixed POPC/POPE and cholesterol-rich membranes. 0.8-μs MD simulations unambiguously show that the helical folding of the amphipathic helix 8 depends on membrane contents. Most importantly, the distinct cholesterol binding into the cleft between helix 1 and 2 stabilizes a specific caffeine-binding pose against others visited during the simulation. Hence, cholesterol presence (~33%-50% in synaptic membrane in central nervous system, often neglected in X-ray determination of membrane proteins, affects the population of the ligand binding poses. We conclude that including a correct description of neuronal membranes may be very important for computer-aided design of ligands targeting hA(2AR and possibly other GPCRs.

  12. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Liang; Li, Mingyang; Feng, Fan; Yang, Yutao; Hang, Xingyi; Cui, Jiajun; Gao, Jiangping

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells

  13. MEIS1 functions as a potential AR negative regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, Liang [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Department of Urology, Civil Aviation General Hospital/Civil Aviation Medical College of Peking University, Beijing 100123 (China); Li, Mingyang [Department of Gastroenterology, Nan Lou Division, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Feng, Fan [Department of Pharmacy, General Hospital of Shenyang Military Command, Shenyang 110016 (China); Yang, Yutao [Beijing Institute for Neuroscience, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Hang, Xingyi [National Scientific Data Sharing Platform for Population and Health, Beijing 100730 (China); Cui, Jiajun, E-mail: cuijn@ucmail.uc.edu [Department of Cancer and Cell Biology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Gao, Jiangping, E-mail: jpgao@163.com [Department of Urology, Chinese PLA Medical School/Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2014-10-15

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays critical roles in human prostate carcinoma progression and transformation. However, the activation of AR is regulated by co-regulators. MEIS1 protein, the homeodomain transcription factor, exhibited a decreased level in poor-prognosis prostate tumors. In this study, we investigated a potential interaction between MEIS1 and AR. We found that overexpression of MEIS1 inhibited the AR transcriptional activity and reduced the expression of AR target gene. A potential protein–protein interaction between AR and MEIS1 was identified by the immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays. Furthermore, MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation and the recruitment to androgen response element in prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene promoter sequences. In addition, MEIS1 promoted the recruitment of NCoR and SMRT in the presence of R1881. Finally, MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells. Taken together, our data suggests that MEIS1 functions as a novel AR co-repressor. - Highlights: • A potential interaction was identified between MEIS1 and AR signaling. • Overexpression of MEIS1 reduced the expression of AR target gene. • MEIS1 modulated AR cytoplasm/nucleus translocation. • MEIS1 inhibited the proliferation and anchor-independent growth of LNCaP cells.

  14. Impact of estrogen receptor α gene and oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms on female sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia K Armeni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, research attention has increasingly been paid to the neurobiological component of sexual behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation of estrogen receptor α (ERA gene polymorphism (rs2234693-PvuII (T→C substitution and oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (rs53576 (G→A substitution with sexuality parameters of young, healthy women. One hundred thirty-three Greek heterosexual women, students in higher education institutions, 20–25 years of age, sexually active, with normal menstrual cycles (28–35 days, were recruited in the study. Exclusion criteria were chronic and/or major psychiatric diseases, use of oral contraceptive pills (OCs, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, thyroid diseases as well as drugs that are implicated in hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis. T allele (wildtype of rs2234693 (PvuII polymorphism of ERA gene was correlated with increased levels of arousal and lubrication, whereas A allele (polymorphic of rs53576 (OXTR polymorphism was correlated with increased arousal levels. The simultaneous presence of both T allele of rs2234693 (PvuII and A allele of rs53576 (OXTR polymorphisms (T + A group was correlated with increased arousal, orgasm levels as well as female sexual function index full score. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the interaction between ERA and OXTR with regard to sexual function in women. Female sexuality is a complex behavioral trait that encompasses both biological and psychological components. It seems that variability in female sexual response stems from genetic variability that characterizes endocrine, neurotransmitter and central nervous system influences.

  15. Differential modulation of expression of nuclear receptor mediated genes by tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) on early life stages of zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zhiyuan_nju@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Yu, Yijun, E-mail: yjun.yu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Tang, Song [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Liu, Hongling, E-mail: hlliu@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Su, Guanyong; Xie, Yuwei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Giesy, John P. [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Veterinary Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (Hong Kong); Hecker, Markus [School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Toxicology Centre, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5B3 (Canada); Yu, Hongxia [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of the Environment, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210023 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of TBOEP on expression of genes of several nuclear hormone receptors and their relationship with adverse effect pathways in zebrafish. • TBOEP was neither an agonist nor antagonist of AR or AhR as determined by use of in vitro mammalian cell-based receptor transactivation assays. • Modulation of ER- and MR-dependent pathways allowed for development of feasible receptor-mediated, critical mechanisms of toxic action. - Abstract: As one substitute for phased-out brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate (TBOEP) is frequently detected in aquatic organisms. However, knowledge about endocrine disrupting mechanisms associated with nuclear receptors caused by TBOEP remained restricted to results from in vitro studies with mammalian cells. In the study, results of which are presented here, embryos/larvae of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to 0.02, 0.1 or 0.5 μM TBOEP to investigate expression of genes under control of several nuclear hormone receptors (estrogen receptors (ERs), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), aryl hydrocarbon (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), and pregnane × receptor (P × R)) pathways at 120 hpf. Exposure to 0.5 μM TBOEP significantly (p < 0.05, one-way analysis of variance) up-regulated expression of estrogen receptors (ERs, er1, er2a, and er2b) genes and ER-associated genes (vtg4, vtg5, pgr, ncor, and ncoa3), indicating TBOEP modulates the ER pathway. In contrast, expression of most genes (mr, 11βhsd, ube2i,and adrb2b) associated with the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) pathway were significantly down-regulated. Furthermore, in vitro mammalian cell-based (MDA-kb2 and H4IIE-luc) receptor transactivation assays, were also conducted to investigate possible agonistic or antagonistic effects on AR- and AhR-mediated pathways. In mammalian cells, none of these pathways were

  16. Differential contribution of complement receptor C5aR in myeloid and non-myeloid cells in chronic ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Rebecca L; McMullen, Megan R; Das, Dola; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Strainic, Michael G; Medof, M Edward; Nagy, Laura E

    2016-07-01

    Complement is implicated in the development of alcoholic liver disease. C3 and C5 contribute to ethanol-induced liver injury; however, the role of C5a receptor (C5aR) on myeloid and non-myeloid cells to progression of injury is not known. C57BL/6 (WT), global C5aR-/-, myeloid-specific C5aR-/-, and non-myeloid-specific C5aR-/- mice were fed a Lieber-DeCarli diet (32%kcal EtOH) for 25 days. Cultured hepatocytes were challenged with ethanol, TNFα, and C5a. Chronic ethanol feeding increased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in livers of WT mice; this response was completely blunted in C5aR-/- mice. However, C5aR-/- mice were not protected from other measures of hepatocellular damage, including ethanol-induced increases in hepatic triglycerides, plasma alanine aminotransferase and hepatocyte apoptosis. CYP2E1 and 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts were induced in WT and C5aR-/- mice. Myeloid-specific C5aR-/- mice were protected from ethanol-induced increases in hepatic TNFα, whereas non-myeloid-specific C5aR-/- displayed increased hepatocyte apoptosis and inflammation after chronic ethanol feeding. In cultured hepatocytes, cytotoxicity induced by challenge with ethanol and TNFα was completely eliminated by treatment with C5a in cells from WT, but not C5aR-/- mice. Further, treatment with C5a enhanced activation of pro-survival signal AKT in hepatocytes challenged with ethanol and TNFα. Taken together, these data reveal a differential role for C5aR during ethanol-induced liver inflammation and injury, with C5aR on myeloid cells contributing to ethanol-induced inflammatory cytokine expression, while non-myeloid C5aR protects hepatocytes from death after chronic ethanol feeding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristics of the mouse genomic histamine H1 receptor gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Isao; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Kitamura, Daisuke [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1996-08-15

    We report here the molecular cloning of a mouse histamine H1 receptor gene. The protein deduced from the nucleotide sequence is composed of 488 amino acid residues with characteristic properties of GTP binding protein-coupled receptors. Our results suggest that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene is a single locus, and no related sequences were detected. Interspecific backcross analysis indicated that the mouse histamine H1 receptor gene (Hrh1) is located in the central region of mouse Chromosome 6 linked to microphthalmia (Mitfmi), ras-related fibrosarcoma oncogene 1 (Raf1), and ret proto-oncogene (Ret) in a region of homology with human chromosome 3p. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Energy expenditure, body composition and insulin response to glucose in male twins discordant for the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the β3-adrenergic receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Christiansen, Christian; Bjørnsbo, K.S.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: The tryptophan to arginine change in position 64 (Trp64Arg) polymorphism of the beta3-adrenergic receptor (beta3AR) gene has been associated with an increased prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In this, decreased rates of energy expenditure and impaired insulin...... and environmental background, the Trp64Arg polymorphism of the beta3AR gene is associated with lower fat mass, fasting insulin levels and an appropriate insulin response to glucose. Thus, heterozygosity for the Trp64Arg variant is unlikely to increase the risk of obesity, insulin resistance or type 2 diabetes....

  19. Interleukin 18 receptor 1 gene polymorphisms are associated with asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Guohua; Whyte, Moira K B; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    The interleukin 18 receptor (IL18R1) gene is a strong candidate gene for asthma. It has been implicated in the pathophysiology of asthma and maps to an asthma susceptibility locus on chromosome 2q12. The possibility of association between polymorphisms in IL18R1 and asthma was examined by genotyp...

  20. Vitamin D receptor gene variants in Parkinson's disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in neurodegenerative disorders as a crucial neuro-immunomodulator. Accumulating data provide evidences that vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene is a candidate gene for susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD). Aim: To find out whether the risk of the development of sporadic ...

  1. Hormonal control of spermatogenesis: expression of FSJH receptor and androgen receptor genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. Blok (Leen)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractFSH and testosterone are the main hormonal regulators of spermatogenesis. The actions of androgens and FSH are mediated by their respective receptors. Receptor gene expression (mRNA and protein). is an important determinant of hormone action. Biochemical aspects of the regulation of

  2. Shorter CAG repeat length in the AR gene is associated with poor outcome in head and neck cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, Fabíola Encinas; dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos; Poli-Frederico, Regina Célia

    2007-01-01

    microsatellite instability (MSI) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in these tumors. DESIGN: Matched samples of blood and head and neck tumors were evaluated using two methodologies, silver-stained gels to perform the analyses of MSI and LOH, and automated analysis to confirm these results and for genotyping...... of the AR [CAG](n) repeat length. Sixty-nine individuals without cancer were used as a control group for both procedures. The Log-rank test was used to compare overall survival and disease-free survival curves. The Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to determine the [CAG](n) repeats......: These results suggest that short [CAG](n) repeat length (poor prognosis in a subset of male patients with head and neck cancer and that AR gene microsatellite instability is uncommon in these tumors....

  3. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Chay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptorsARs, facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA, and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory.

  4. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  5. Elevated expression of steroidogenesis pathway genes; CYP17, GATA6 and StAR in prenatally androgenized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Marziyeh Salehi; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani; Noroozzadeh, Mahsa; Zarkesh, Maryam; Ghasemi, Asghar; Zadeh-Vakili, Azita

    2016-11-15

    It is believed that excess androgen exposure of the fetus, via altered gene expression, causes hyperandrogenism a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The aim of this study was to evaluate expression of Cytochrome P450-17 (CYP17), GATA-binding protein (GAGT6) and Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), genes of adult female rats prenatally exposed to androgen excess, closely reflect endocrine and ovarian disturbances of PCOS in women, by comparing them during different phases of estrus cycle with those of non-treated rats. Both the adult prenatally testosterone exposed and control rats (n=23, each) were divided into four groups based on their observed vaginal smear (proestrus, estrus, metestrus and diestrus) and the relative expression of CYP17, GATA6 and StAR genes was measured in ovarian theca cells using Cyber-green Real-Time PCR. Serum sex steroid hormones and gonadotropins levels were measured using the ELISA method; a comparison of these two groups showed that there was an overall increase in the studied genes (CYP17; 2.39 fold change, 95% CI: 1.23-3.55; PPCOS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B.

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons

  7. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. (Universite de Bordeaux II (France))

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  8. Selected estrogen receptor 1 and androgen receptor gene polymorphisms in relation to risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions among Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoda, Lori C; Blackston, Christie R; Doherty, Jennifer A; Ray, Roberta M; Lin, Ming Gang; Gao, Dao Li; Stalsberg, Helge; Feng, Ziding; Thomas, David B; Chen, Chu

    2011-02-01

    Polymorphisms in sex hormone receptor-encoding genes may alter the activity of sex hormone receptors and thereby affect susceptibility to breast cancer and related outcomes. In a case-control study of women from Shanghai, China, we examined the risk of breast cancer and fibrocystic breast conditions associated with the ESR1 PvuII (rs2234693) and XbaI (rs9340799) and AR CAG repeat ((CAG)(n)) and GGC repeat ((GGC)(n)) polymorphisms among 614 women with breast cancer, 467 women with fibrocystic conditions, and 879 women without breast disease. We also evaluated whether risk differed by the presence/absence of proliferative changes (in the extratumoral epithelium or fibrocystic lesion), menopausal status, or body mass index (BMI). Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using logistic regression. Only associations with AR (CAG)(n) and (GGC)(n) genotypes were detected. Allocating AR (CAG)(n) genotypes into six categories, with the (CAG)(22-24)/(CAG)(22-24) genotype category designated as the reference group, the (CAG)(>24)/(CAG)(>24) genotype category was associated with an increased risk of fibrocystic breast conditions (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-3.0). Relative to the AR (GGC)(17)/(GGC)(17) genotype, the (GGC)(17)/(GGC)(14) genotype was associated with elevated risks of incident breast cancer (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.3-5.4) and fibrocystic conditions (OR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.5). Results did not differ according to proliferation status, menopausal status, or BMI. Although these data lend support for a link between AR variation and breast disease development, given the low frequency of the putative risk-conferring genotypes and other constraints, further confirmation of our results is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Mouse Solitary Odorant Receptor Gene Promoters as Models for the Study of Odorant Receptor Gene Choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Degl'Innocenti

    Full Text Available In vertebrates, several anatomical regions located within the nasal cavity mediate olfaction. Among these, the main olfactory epithelium detects most conventional odorants. Olfactory sensory neurons, provided with cilia exposed to the air, detect volatile chemicals via an extremely large family of seven-transmembrane chemoreceptors named odorant receptors. Their genes are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion: a single allele of a single odorant receptor gene is transcribed in a given mature neuron, through a still uncharacterized molecular mechanism known as odorant receptor gene choice.Odorant receptor genes are typically arranged in genomic clusters, but a few are isolated (we call them solitary from the others within a region broader than 1 Mb upstream and downstream with respect to their transcript's coordinates. The study of clustered genes is problematic, because of redundancy and ambiguities in their regulatory elements: we propose to use the solitary genes as simplified models to understand odorant receptor gene choice.Here we define number and identity of the solitary genes in the mouse genome (C57BL/6J, and assess the conservation of the solitary status in some mammalian orthologs. Furthermore, we locate their putative promoters, predict their homeodomain binding sites (commonly present in the promoters of odorant receptor genes and compare candidate promoter sequences with those of wild-caught mice. We also provide expression data from histological sections.In the mouse genome there are eight intact solitary genes: Olfr19 (M12, Olfr49, Olfr266, Olfr267, Olfr370, Olfr371, Olfr466, Olfr1402; five are conserved as solitary in rat. These genes are all expressed in the main olfactory epithelium of three-day-old mice. The C57BL/6J candidate promoter of Olfr370 has considerably varied compared to its wild-type counterpart. Within the putative promoter for Olfr266 a homeodomain binding site is predicted. As a whole, our findings

  10. Integrated olfactory receptor and microarray gene expression databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crasto Chiquito J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression patterns of olfactory receptors (ORs are an important component of the signal encoding mechanism in the olfactory system since they determine the interactions between odorant ligands and sensory neurons. We have developed the Olfactory Receptor Microarray Database (ORMD to house OR gene expression data. ORMD is integrated with the Olfactory Receptor Database (ORDB, which is a key repository of OR gene information. Both databases aim to aid experimental research related to olfaction. Description ORMD is a Web-accessible database that provides a secure data repository for OR microarray experiments. It contains both publicly available and private data; accessing the latter requires authenticated login. The ORMD is designed to allow users to not only deposit gene expression data but also manage their projects/experiments. For example, contributors can choose whether to make their datasets public. For each experiment, users can download the raw data files and view and export the gene expression data. For each OR gene being probed in a microarray experiment, a hyperlink to that gene in ORDB provides access to genomic and proteomic information related to the corresponding olfactory receptor. Individual ORs archived in ORDB are also linked to ORMD, allowing users access to the related microarray gene expression data. Conclusion ORMD serves as a data repository and project management system. It facilitates the study of microarray experiments of gene expression in the olfactory system. In conjunction with ORDB, ORMD integrates gene expression data with the genomic and functional data of ORs, and is thus a useful resource for both olfactory researchers and the public.

  11. Variation of bacterial communities and expression of Toll-like receptor genes in the rumen of steers differing in susceptibility to subacute ruminal acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanhong; Oba, Masahito; Guan, Le Luo

    2012-10-12

    In order to determine differences in the ruminal bacterial community and host Toll-like receptor (TLR) gene expression of beef cattle with different susceptibility to acidosis, rumen papillae and content were collected from acidosis-susceptible (AS, n=3) and acidosis-resistant (AR, n=3) steers. The ruminal bacterial community was characterized using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis. Global R analysis of bacterial profile similarity revealed that bacterial diversity was significantly different between AR and AS groups for both rumen content (P=0.001) and epithelial (P=0.002) communities. The copy number of total bacterial 16S rRNA genes in content of AS steers was 10-fold higher than that of AR steers, and the copy number of total 16S rRNA genes of epimural bacteria in AR steers was positively correlated with ruminal pH (r=0.59, P=0.04), and negatively correlated with total VFA concentration (r=-0.59, P=0.05). The expressions of host TLR2 and 4 genes were significantly higher in AR steers compared to those in AS steers. These findings enhance our understanding about the ruminal microbial ecology and host gene expression changes that may be useful in the prevention of ruminal acidosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Androgen receptor (AR) degradation enhancer ASC-J9® in an FDA-approved formulated solution suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Max A; Chou, Fu-Ju; Wang, Keliang; Yang, Rachel; Ding, Jie; Zhang, Qiaoxia; Li, Gonghui; Yeh, Shuyuan; Xu, Defeng; Chang, Chawnshang

    2018-03-28

    ASC-J9 ® is a recently-developed androgen receptor (AR)-degradation enhancer that effectively suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer (PCa) cell proliferation and invasion. The optimal half maximum inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ) of ASC-J9 ® at various PCa cell confluences (20%, 50%, and 100%) were assessed via both short-term MTT growth assays and long-term clonogenic proliferation assays. Our results indicate that the IC 50 values for ASC-J9 ® increased with increasing cell confluency. The IC 50 values were significantly decreased in PCa AR-positive cells compared to PCa AR-negative cells or in normal prostate cells. This suggests that ASC-J9 ® may function mainly via targeting the AR-positive PCa cells with limited unwanted side-effects to suppress the surrounding normal prostate cells. Mechanism dissection indicated that ASC-J9 ® might function via altering the apoptosis signals to suppress the PCa AR-negative PC-3 cells. Preclinical studies using multiple in vitro PCa cell lines and an in vivo mouse model with xenografted castration-resistant PCa CWR22Rv1 cells demonstrated that ASC-J9 ® has similar AR degradation effects when dissolved in FDA-approved solvents, including DMSO, PEG-400:Tween-80 (95:5), DMA:Labrasol:Tween-80 (10:45:45), and DMA:Labrasol:Tween-20 (10:45:45). Together, results from preclinical studies suggest a potential new therapy with AR-degradation enhancer ASC-J9 ® may potentially be ready to be used in human clinical trials in order to better suppress PCa at later castration resistant stages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Salivary testosterone and a trinucleotide (CAG) length polymorphism in the androgen receptor gene predict amygdala reactivity in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuck, Stephen B; Marsland, Anna L; Flory, Janine D; Gorka, Adam; Ferrell, Robert E; Hariri, Ahmad R

    2010-01-01

    In studies employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), reactivity of the amygdala to threat-related sensory cues (viz., facial displays of negative emotion) has been found to correlate positively with interindividual variability in testosterone levels of women and young men and to increase on acute administration of exogenous testosterone. Many of the biological actions of testosterone are mediated by intracellular androgen receptors (ARs), which exert transcriptional control of androgen-dependent genes and are expressed in various regions of the brain, including the amygdala. Transactivation potential of the AR decreases (yielding relative androgen insensitivity) with expansion a polyglutamine stretch in the N-terminal domain of the AR protein, as encoded by a trinucleotide (CAG) repeat polymorphism in exon 1 of the X-chromosome AR gene. Here we examined whether amygdala reactivity to threat-related facial expressions (fear, anger) differs as a function of AR CAG length variation and endogenous (salivary) testosterone in a mid-life sample of 41 healthy men (mean age=45.6 years, range: 34-54 years; CAG repeats, range: 19-29). Testosterone correlated inversely with participant age (r=-0.39, p=0.012) and positively with number of CAG repeats (r=0.45, p=0.003). In partial correlations adjusted for testosterone level, reactivity in the ventral amygdala was lowest among men with largest number of CAG repeats. This inverse association was seen in both the right (r(p)=-0.34, pleft (r(p)=-0.32, pdifferences in salivary testosterone, also in right (r=0.40, pleft (r=0.32, pdifferences in salivary testosterone also predicted dorsal amygdala reactivity and did so independently of CAG repeats, it is suggested that androgenic influences within this anatomically distinct region may be mediated, in part, by non-genomic or AR-independent mechanisms.

  14. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Alpha Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Rakhshandehroo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα is a ligand-activated transcription factor involved in the regulation of a variety of processes, ranging from inflammation and immunity to nutrient metabolism and energy homeostasis. PPARα serves as a molecular target for hypolipidemic fibrates drugs which bind the receptor with high affinity. Furthermore, PPARα binds and is activated by numerous fatty acids and fatty acid-derived compounds. PPARα governs biological processes by altering the expression of a large number of target genes. Accordingly, the specific role of PPARα is directly related to the biological function of its target genes. Here, we present an overview of the involvement of PPARα in lipid metabolism and other pathways through a detailed analysis of the different known or putative PPARα target genes. The emphasis is on gene regulation by PPARα in liver although many of the results likely apply to other organs and tissues as well.

  15. The repertoire of bitter taste receptor genes in canids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Shuai; Wu, Xiaoyang; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Huanxin; Zhong, Huaming; Wei, Qinguo; Yan, Jiakuo; Li, Haotian; Liu, Guangshuai; Sha, Weilai; Zhang, Honghai

    2017-07-01

    Bitter taste receptors (Tas2rs) play important roles in mammalian defense mechanisms by helping animals detect and avoid toxins in food. Although Tas2r genes have been widely studied in several mammals, minimal research has been performed in canids. To analyze the genetic basis of Tas2r genes in canids, we first identified Tas2r genes in the wolf, maned wolf, red fox, corsac fox, Tibetan fox, fennec fox, dhole and African hunting dog. A total of 183 Tas2r genes, consisting of 118 intact genes, 6 partial genes and 59 pseudogenes, were detected. Differences in the pseudogenes were observed among nine canid species. For example, Tas2r4 was a pseudogene in the dog but might play a functional role in other canid species. The Tas2r42 and Tas2r10 genes were pseudogenes in the maned wolf and dhole, respectively, and the Tas2r5 and Tas2r34 genes were pseudogenes in the African hunting dog; however, these genes were intact genes in other canid species. The differences in Tas2r pseudogenes among canids might suggest that the loss of intact Tas2r genes in canid species is species-dependent. We further compared the 183 Tas2r genes identified in this study with Tas2r genes from ten additional carnivorous species to evaluate the potential influence of diet on the evolution of the Tas2r gene repertoire. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most of the Tas2r genes from the 18 species intermingled across the tree, suggesting that Tas2r genes are conserved among carnivores. Within canids, we found that some Tas2r genes corresponded to the traditional taxonomic groupings, while some did not. PIC analysis showed that the number of Tas2r genes in carnivores exhibited no positive correlation with diet composition, which might be due to the limited number of carnivores included in our study.

  16. Evolution of the vertebrate insulin receptor substrate (Irs) gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salam, Ahmad; Irwin, David M

    2017-06-23

    Insulin receptor substrate (Irs) proteins are essential for insulin signaling as they allow downstream effectors to dock with, and be activated by, the insulin receptor. A family of four Irs proteins have been identified in mice, however the gene for one of these, IRS3, has been pseudogenized in humans. While it is known that the Irs gene family originated in vertebrates, it is not known when it originated and which members are most closely related to each other. A better understanding of the evolution of Irs genes and proteins should provide insight into the regulation of metabolism by insulin. Multiple genes for Irs proteins were identified in a wide variety of vertebrate species. Phylogenetic and genomic neighborhood analyses indicate that this gene family originated very early in vertebrae evolution. Most Irs genes were duplicated and retained in fish after the fish-specific genome duplication. Irs genes have been lost of various lineages, including Irs3 in primates and birds and Irs1 in most fish. Irs3 and Irs4 experienced an episode of more rapid protein sequence evolution on the ancestral mammalian lineage. Comparisons of the conservation of the proteins sequences among Irs paralogs show that domains involved in binding to the plasma membrane and insulin receptors are most strongly conserved, while divergence has occurred in sequences involved in interacting with downstream effector proteins. The Irs gene family originated very early in vertebrate evolution, likely through genome duplications, and in parallel with duplications of other components of the insulin signaling pathway, including insulin and the insulin receptor. While the N-terminal sequences of these proteins are conserved among the paralogs, changes in the C-terminal sequences likely allowed changes in biological function.

  17. Vitamin D receptor and estrogen receptor gene polymorphisms in postmenopausal Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Hassager, C; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the polymorphisms of the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and estrogen receptor (ER) genes in relation to biochemical markers of bone turnover (serum osteocalcin and urinary collagen type I degradation products (CrossLaps), and to study ER genotypes in relation to serum lipoproteins, blood...... pressure, or changes in these parameters after 2 years of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in 499 Danish postmenopausal women....

  18. Sequence of the intron/exon junctions of the coding region of the human androgen receptor gene and identification of a point mutation in a family with complete androgen insensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubahn, D.B.; Simental, J.A.; Higgs, H.N.; Wilson, E.M.; French, F.S.; Brown, T.R.; Migeon, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    Androgens act through a receptor protein (AR) to mediate sex differentiation and development of the male phenotype. The authors have isolated the eight exons in the amino acid coding region of the AR gene from a human X chromosome library. Nucleotide sequences of the AR gene intron/exon boundaries were determined for use in designing synthetic oligonucleotide primers to bracket coding exons for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Genomic DNA was amplified from 46, XY phenotypic female siblings with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. AR binding affinity for dihydrotestosterone in the affected siblings was lower than in normal males, but the binding capacity was normal. Sequence analysis of amplified exons demonstrated within the AR steroid-binding domain (exon G) a single guanine to adenine mutation, resulting in replacement of valine with methionine at amino acid residue 866. As expected, the carrier mother had both normal and mutant AR genes. Thus, a single point mutation in the steroid-binding domain of the AR gene correlated with the expression of an AR protein ineffective in stimulating male sexual development

  19. PSA and androgen-related gene (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) polymorphisms and the risk of adenocarcinoma at prostate biopsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    dos Santos, Rodrigo Mattos; de Jesus, Carlos Márcio Nóbrega; Trindade Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen-related genes (AR, CYP17, and CYP19) on prostate cancer (PCa) risk in selected high-risk patients who underwent prostate biopsy. Blood samples and prostate tissues were obtained......=0.0110) genotypes. Genetic instability at the AR locus leading to somatic mosaicism was detected in one PCa patient by comparing the length of AR CAG repeats in matched peripheral blood and prostate biopsy cores. Taken together, these findings suggest that the PSA genotype should be a clinically relevant biomarker...

  20. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd [binding affinity] and Bmax [number of binding sites]) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism

  1. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism (TaqI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 3. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism (TaqI) and obesity in Chinese population. Hui-Ru Fan Li-Qun Lin Hao Ma Ying Li Chang-Hao Sun. Research Note Volume 94 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 473-478 ...

  2. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan domestic and Tibetan chicken populations. YUAN SU DIYAN LI UMA GAUR YAN WANG NAN WU BINLONG CHEN HONGXIAN XU HUADONG YIN YAODONG HU QING ZHU. RESEARCH ARTICLE Volume 95 Issue 3 September 2016 pp 675-681 ...

  3. Three novel and two known androgen receptor gene mutations ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gene mutations associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome in sex-reversed XY female patients. J. Genet. ... signal and a C-terminal. Keywords. androgen insensitivity syndrome; androgen receptor; truncation mutation; N-terminal domain; XY sex reversal. .... and an increased risk of gonadal tumour. Mutations in SRY.

  4. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism (TaqI)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 94; Issue 3. Association between vitamin D receptor gene polymorphism (TaqI) and obesity in Chinese population. Hui-Ru Fan Li-Qun Lin Hao Ma Ying Li Chang-Hao Sun. Research Note Volume 94 Issue 3 September 2015 pp 473-478 ...

  5. Genetic diversity of bitter taste receptor gene family in Sichuan ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Previous research had revealed that chicken has only three bitter taste receptor genes (Tas2r1, ... Journal of Genetics, DOI 10.1007/s12041-016-0684-4, Vol. ..... between red-winged blackbirds and European starlings. ... Academic Press,.

  6. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Tingting; Chen, Man; Liu, Lian; Cheng, Huaiyan; Yan, You-E; Feng, Ying-Hong; Wang, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: ► Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. ► Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. ► Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination. ► Single CpG methylation located at Pax6 binding motif regulates StAR

  7. Nicotine induced CpG methylation of Pax6 binding motif in StAR promoter reduces the gene expression and cortisol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tingting [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Chen, Man; Liu, Lian [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Cheng, Huaiyan [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Yan, You-E [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Feng, Ying-Hong, E-mail: yhfeng@usuhs.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) mediates the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of steroid hormones, essential to fetal development. We have reported that the StAR expression in fetal adrenal is inhibited in a rat model of nicotine-induced intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR). Here using primary human fetal adrenal cortex (pHFAC) cells and a human fetal adrenal cell line NCI-H295A, we show that nicotine inhibits StAR expression and cortisol production in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and prolongs the inhibitory effect on cells proliferating over 5 passages after termination of nicotine treatment. Methylation detection within the StAR promoter region uncovers a single site CpG methylation at nt -377 that is sensitive to nicotine treatment. Nicotine-induced alterations in frequency of this point methylation correlates well with the levels of StAR expression, suggesting an important role of the single site in regulating StAR expression. Further studies using bioinformatics analysis and siRNA approach reveal that the single CpG site is part of the Pax6 binding motif (CGCCTGA) in the StAR promoter. The luciferase activity assays validate that Pax6 increases StAR gene expression by binding to the glucagon G3-like motif (CGCCTGA) and methylation of this site blocks Pax6 binding and thus suppresses StAR expression. These data identify a nicotine-sensitive CpG site at the Pax6 binding motif in the StAR promoter that may play a central role in regulating StAR expression. The results suggest an epigenetic mechanism that may explain how nicotine contributes to onset of adult diseases or disorders such as metabolic syndrome via fetal programming. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced StAR inhibition in two human adrenal cell models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nicotine-induced single CpG site methylation in StAR promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Persistent StAR inhibition and single CpG methylation after nicotine termination

  8. A targeted genotyping approach enhances identification of variants in taste receptor and appetite/reward genes of potential functional importance for obesity-related porcine traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, S.; Clop, A.; Jacobsen, M. J.

    2018-01-01

    Taste receptors (TASRs) and appetite and reward (AR) mechanisms influence eating behaviour, which in turn affects food intake and risk of obesity. In a previous study, we used next generation sequencing to identify potentially functional mutations in TASR and AR genes and found indications...... for genetic associations between identified variants and growth and fat deposition in a subgroup of animals (n = 38) from the UNIK resource pig population. This population was created for studying obesity and obesity-related diseases. In the present study we validated results from our previous study...... by investigating genetic associations between 24 selected single nucleotide variants in TASR and AR gene variants and 35 phenotypes describing obesity and metabolism in the entire UNIK population (n = 564). Fifteen variants showed significant association with specific obesity-related phenotypes after Bonferroni...

  9. The Relationship between Birthweight and Longitudinal Changes of Blood Pressure Is Modulated by Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Genes: The Bogalusa Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the genetic influence of β-adrenergic receptor gene polymorphisms (β2-AR Arg16Gly and β3-AR Trp64Arg on the relationship of birthweight to longitudinal changes of blood pressure (BP from childhood to adulthood in 224 black and 515 white adults, aged 21–47 years, enrolled in the Bogalusa Heart Study. Blacks showed significantly lower birthweight and frequencies of β2-AR Gly16 and β3-AR Trp64 alleles and higher BP levels and age-related trends than whites. In multivariable regression analyses using race-adjusted BP and birthweight, low birthweight was associated with greater increase in age-related trend of systolic BP (standardized regression coefficient β=−0.09, P=.002 and diastolic BP (β=−0.07, P=.037 in the combined sample of blacks and whites, adjusting for the first BP measurement in childhood, sex, age, and gestational age. Adjustment for the current body mass index strengthened the birthweight-BP association. Importantly, the strength of the association, measured as regression coefficients, was modulated by the combination of β2-AR and β3-AR genotypes for systolic (P=.042 for interaction and diastolic BP age-related trend (P=.039 for interaction, with blacks and whites showing a similar trend in the interaction. These findings indicate that the intrauterine programming of BP regulation later in life depends on β-AR genotypes.

  10. Gene specific actions of thyroid hormone receptor subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Z Lin

    Full Text Available There are two homologous thyroid hormone (TH receptors (TRs α and β, which are members of the nuclear hormone receptor (NR family. While TRs regulate different processes in vivo and other highly related NRs regulate distinct gene sets, initial studies of TR action revealed near complete overlaps in their actions at the level of individual genes. Here, we assessed the extent that TRα and TRβ differ in target gene regulation by comparing effects of equal levels of stably expressed exogenous TRs +/- T(3 in two cell backgrounds (HepG2 and HeLa. We find that hundreds of genes respond to T(3 or to unliganded TRs in both cell types, but were not able to detect verifiable examples of completely TR subtype-specific gene regulation. TR actions are, however, far from identical and we detect TR subtype-specific effects on global T(3 response kinetics in HepG2 cells and many examples of TR subtype specificity at the level of individual genes, including effects on magnitude of response to TR +/- T(3, TR regulation patterns and T(3 dose response. Cycloheximide (CHX treatment confirms that at least some differential effects involve verifiable direct TR target genes. TR subtype/gene-specific effects emerge in the context of widespread variation in target gene response and we suggest that gene-selective effects on mechanism of TR action highlight differences in TR subtype function that emerge in the environment of specific genes. We propose that differential TR actions could influence physiologic and pharmacologic responses to THs and selective TR modulators (STRMs.

  11. No relationship between most polymorphisms of steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR gene with polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh-Sadat Nazouri

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is one of the most common endocrine women’s disorders in reproductive age. Hyperandrogenism has a critical role in the etiology of PCOS and it can cause fault in Steroidogenesis process. During steroidogenesis, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR seems to increase the delivery of cholesterol through mitochondrial membrane. Therefore, polymorphisms of StAR might effect on this protein and play a role in the etiology of PCOS. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between StAR SNPs with PCOS. Thus, seven polymorphisms in this gene: rs104894086, rs104894089, rs104894090, rs137852689, rs10489487, rs104894085 were detected. Materials and Methods: In this case control study, 45 PCOS women, 40 male factor/unexplained infertile women, and 40 fertile women as two control groups were participated from 2008-2012. Polymorphisms were detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method. Results: Heterozygote genotyping for rs137852689 SNP (amino acid 218 C > T was only seen in seven PCOS patients, one in normal ovulatory women, and five in male factor/unexplained infertile women (15.5%, 2.5%, 12.5%, respectively (p= 0.12. While, it has shown no association between other SNPS with PCOs. Conclusion: The RFLP results for seven chosen SNPs, which located in exon 5 and 7 showed normal status in three groups, it means no heterozygous or homozygous forms of selected SNPs were observed. So, it seems evaluation of the active amino acid sites should be investigated and also the study population should be increased.

  12. The Prognostic Role of Androgen Receptor in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A Meta-analysis of Clinical and Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, Ivana; Zardavas, Dimitrios; Brohée, Sylvain; Ameye, Lieveke; Fumagalli, Debora; Ades, Felipe; de Azambuja, Evandro; Bareche, Yacine; Piccart, Martine; Paesmans, Marianne; Sotiriou, Christos

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: Androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in about 70% of patients with breast cancer, but its prognostic role remains uncertain. Experimental Design: To assess the prognostic role of AR expression in early-stage breast cancer, we performed a meta-analysis of studies that evaluated the impact of AR at the protein and gene expression level on disease-free survival (DFS) and/or overall survival (OS). Eligible studies were identified by systematic review of electronic databases using the MeSH-terms "breast neoplasm" and "androgen receptor" and were selected after a qualitative assessment based on the REMARK criteria. A pooled gene expression analysis of 35 publicly available microarray data sets was also performed from patients with early-stage breast cancer with available gene expression and clinical outcome data. Results: Twenty-two of 33 eligible studies for the clinical meta-analysis, including 10,004 patients, were considered as evaluable for the current study after the qualitative assessment. AR positivity defined by IHC was associated with improved DFS in all patients with breast cancer [multivariate (M) analysis, HR 0.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.58, P expression analysis. High AR mRNA levels were found to confer positive prognosis overall in terms of DFS (HR 0.82; 95% CI 0.72-0.92; P = 0.0007) and OS (HR 0.84; 95% CI, 0.75-0.94; P = 0.02) only in univariate analysis. Conclusions: Our analysis, conducted among more than 17,000 women with early-stage breast cancer included in clinical and gene expression analysis, demonstrates that AR positivity is associated with favorable clinical outcome. Clin Cancer Res; 23(11); 2702-12. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. CRDB: database of chemosensory receptor gene families in vertebrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Dong

    Full Text Available Chemosensory receptors (CR are crucial for animals to sense the environmental changes and survive on earth. The emergence of whole-genome sequences provides us an opportunity to identify the entire CR gene repertoires. To completely gain more insight into the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates, we identified the nearly all CR genes in 25 vertebrates using homology-based approaches. Among these CR gene repertoires, nearly half of them were identified for the first time in those previously uncharacterized species, such as the guinea pig, giant panda and elephant, etc. Consistent with previous findings, we found that the numbers of CR genes vary extensively among different species, suggesting an extreme form of 'birth-and-death' evolution. For the purpose of facilitating CR gene analysis, we constructed a database with the goals to provide a resource for CR genes annotation and a web tool for exploring their evolutionary patterns. Besides a search engine for the gene extraction from a specific chromosome region, an easy-to-use phylogenetic analysis tool was also provided to facilitate online phylogeny study of CR genes. Our work can provide a rigorous platform for further study on the evolution of CR genes in vertebrates.

  14. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPCa) increased the neighboring PCa chemo-resistance via altering the PTHrP/p38/Hsp27/androgen receptor (AR)/p21 signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun; Sun, Yin; Hu, Shuai; Luo, Jie; Li, Lei; Li, Xin; Yeh, Shuyuan; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic neuroendocrine cells (NE) are an integral part of prostate cancer (PCa) that are associated with PCa progression. As the current androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with anti-androgens may promote the neuroendocrine PCa (NEPCa) development, and few therapies can effectively suppress NEPCa, understanding the impact of NEPCa on PCa progression may help us to develop better therapies to battle PCa. Here we found NEPCa cells could increase the docetaxel-resistance of their neighboring PCa cells. Mechanism dissection revealed that through secretion of PTHrP, NEPCa cells could alter the p38/MAPK/Hsp27 signals in their neighboring PCa cells that resulted in increased androgen receptor (AR) activity via promoting AR nuclear translocation. The consequences of increased AR function might then increase docetaxel-resistance via increasing p21 expression. In vivo xenograft mice experiments also confirmed NEPCa could increase the docetaxel-resistance of neighboring PCa, and targeting this newly identified PTHrP/p38/Hsp27/AR/p21 signaling pathway with either p38 inhibitor (SB203580) or sh-PTHrP may result in improving/restoring the docetaxel sensitivity to better suppress PCa. PMID:27375022

  15. Gene expression changes in rat prostate after activation or blocking of the androgen and estrogen receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nellemann, Christine Lydia; Dalgaard, Majken; Holst, Bjørn

    2005-01-01

    responsive genes (complement C3, ER alpha, ER beta, AR, TRPM-2, PBPC3, ODC, and IGF-1 mRNA) was analyzed in rat ventral prostate by real time RT-PCR. Administration of estradiol benzoate (EB) to castrated testosterone-treated rats had no effect on reproductive organ weights or gene expression levels...... reversed by ICI 182780, and affected TRPM-2, PBP C3, ODC, IGF-1, AR, and ERa mRNA levels. AR expression in the prostate seemed to be under regulation of both estrogens and androgens, as ICI 182780 inhibited the testosterone-induced AR expression, and flutamide inhibited the EB-induced AR expression...... administration abolished the effects of EB. First choice of gene expression profiles in the Hershberger assay to study androgenic or anti-androgenic effects would be the traditional, TRPNI-2 and PBP C3, supplemented with the new complement C3....

  16. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Dinarvand

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction.  Methods: 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR whose products were then sequenced.  Results: Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T>C and 877G>A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G>C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant.  Discussion: It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T>C, 877G>A and 1043G>C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population.

  17. The association between glutamine repeats in the androgen receptor gene and personality traits in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Sherif; Nowier, Amira M; Hori, Yusuke; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2018-01-01

    Temperament traits such as fearfulness are important as they define an animal's responses to its environment and handling. The increasing automation of daily tasks and growing population limits contact between camels and humans. Such limitations contribute to fear of humans and changes in physical environment. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) and androgen receptor (AR) genes are important candidates associated with mammal personality. In our analysis, MAOA exon 15 showed no polymorphism but a novel polymorphism was seen in the camel AR exon 1; 16, 17, 18, and 19 glutamine repeats were detected. We genotyped 138 camels belonging to four Egyptian breeds: Maghrabi (n = 90), Sudani (n = 15), Somali (n = 23), and Baladi (n = 10) for AR. Out of the 90 genotyped Maghrabi camels, we evaluated responses of 33 and 32 mature females to a novel object and exposure to an unfamiliar person, respectively. AR gene showed a significant association based on the principal component (PC) score, which indicated the fear of human touch, and the PC score indicates fear during interaction with novel objects. Individuals carrying a shorter genotype in homozygote (S/S) were found to be more fearful. Furthermore, we found that Sudani and Somali breeds had a higher frequency of shorter genotype (S/S), which was associated with increased fearfulness. These findings reflect the behavioral tendency and consequently, affect the use of this breed. This is the first report showing the role of AR glutamine repeats influencing a behavioral trait in dromedary camels and leading to inter-breed differences. Fear-related traits reported here are important because camels cope with various types of stresses and fear, resulting from the demands of intensive production systems and racing events. However, further studies, employing functional genomics and linkage analysis are necessary for confirming the relationship between fearfulness and genetic variation.

  18. The association between glutamine repeats in the androgen receptor gene and personality traits in dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherif Ramadan

    Full Text Available Temperament traits such as fearfulness are important as they define an animal's responses to its environment and handling. The increasing automation of daily tasks and growing population limits contact between camels and humans. Such limitations contribute to fear of humans and changes in physical environment. Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA and androgen receptor (AR genes are important candidates associated with mammal personality. In our analysis, MAOA exon 15 showed no polymorphism but a novel polymorphism was seen in the camel AR exon 1; 16, 17, 18, and 19 glutamine repeats were detected. We genotyped 138 camels belonging to four Egyptian breeds: Maghrabi (n = 90, Sudani (n = 15, Somali (n = 23, and Baladi (n = 10 for AR. Out of the 90 genotyped Maghrabi camels, we evaluated responses of 33 and 32 mature females to a novel object and exposure to an unfamiliar person, respectively. AR gene showed a significant association based on the principal component (PC score, which indicated the fear of human touch, and the PC score indicates fear during interaction with novel objects. Individuals carrying a shorter genotype in homozygote (S/S were found to be more fearful. Furthermore, we found that Sudani and Somali breeds had a higher frequency of shorter genotype (S/S, which was associated with increased fearfulness. These findings reflect the behavioral tendency and consequently, affect the use of this breed. This is the first report showing the role of AR glutamine repeats influencing a behavioral trait in dromedary camels and leading to inter-breed differences. Fear-related traits reported here are important because camels cope with various types of stresses and fear, resulting from the demands of intensive production systems and racing events. However, further studies, employing functional genomics and linkage analysis are necessary for confirming the relationship between fearfulness and genetic variation.

  19. [Study of androgen receptor and phosphoglycerate kinase gene polymorphism in major cellular components of the so-called pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Feng-jie; Zhang, Xiu-wei; Zhang, Yong-xing; Dai, Shun-dong; Wang, En-hua

    2006-05-01

    To study the clonality of polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells in the so-called pulmonary sclerosing hemangioma (PSH). 17 female surgically resected PSH were found. The polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells of the 17 PSH cases were microdissected from routine hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections. Genomic DNA was extracted, pretreated through incubation with methylation-sensitive restrictive endonuclease HhaI or HpaII, and amplified by nested polymerase chain reaction for X chromosome-linked androgen receptor (AR) and phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) genes. The length polymorphism of AR gene was demonstrated by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The PGK gene products were treated with Bst XI and resolved on agarose gel. Amongst the 17 female cases of PSH, 15 samples were successfully amplified for AR and PGK genes. The rates of polymorphism were 53% (8/15) and 27% (4/15) for AR and PGK genes respectively. Polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells of 10 cases which were suitable for clonality study, showed the same loss of alleles (clonality ratio = 0) or unbalanced methylation pattern (clonality ratio < 0.25). The polygonal cells and surface cuboidal cells in PSH demonstrate patterns of monoclonal proliferation, indicating that both represent true neoplastic cells.

  20. Ars disyecta Ars disyecta

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    Alejandra Castillo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bajo la nominación Ars Disyecta se busca exponer el vínculo entre artes visuales, feminismo y metamorfosis. Las prácticas artísticas feministas aquí presentadas se proponen perturbar el espacio metafórico heredado de la diferencia sexual (pensemos, por ejemplo, en las palabras engendramiento, matriz, vida, compenetración o invaginamiento. En este sentido, la nominación Ars disyecta pone en escena un conjunto de prácticas e intervenciones que intentan interrumpir la matriz de la diferencia, desestabilizando lo femenino desde aquellas figuras que se resisten a la lógica de la totalidad y de un tiempo propio. Buscando seguir la huella de un arte disyecto es que interrogaré en este ensayo aquellas autorías feministas que en el arte contemporáneo trafican con las huellas del contagio, la mutación y la alteridad.This article aims to present the relation between visual arts, feminism I and metamorphosis. The feminist artistic practices portrayed in this article attempt to question categories inherited from the metaphor of sexual difference such as engendering, matrix and life. From this perspective, Ars disyecta will establish a set of artistic practices and interventions that intend to interrupt the proper idea of «feminine difference». Following this line of argument, I will discuss in this article a few contemporary feminist works of art that could be defined by words such as contagious, mutation and otherness.

  1. Dynamic evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in vertebrates

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    Jones Gareth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensing bitter tastes is crucial for many animals because it can prevent them from ingesting harmful foods. This process is mainly mediated by the bitter taste receptors (T2R, which are largely expressed in the taste buds. Previous studies have identified some T2R gene repertoires, and marked variation in repertoire size has been noted among species. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of vertebrate T2R genes remain poorly understood. Results To better understand the evolutionary pattern of these genes, we identified 16 T2R gene repertoires based on the high coverage genome sequences of vertebrates and studied the evolutionary changes in the number of T2R genes during birth-and-death evolution using the reconciled-tree method. We found that the number of T2R genes and the fraction of pseudogenes vary extensively among species. Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, we showed that T2R gene families in teleost fishes are more diverse than those in tetrapods. In addition to the independent gene expansions in teleost fishes, frogs and mammals, lineage-specific gene duplications were also detected in lizards. Furthermore, extensive gains and losses of T2R genes were detected in each lineage during their evolution, resulting in widely differing T2R gene repertoires. Conclusion These results further support the hypotheses that T2R gene repertoires are closely related to the dietary habits of different species and that birth-and-death evolution is associated with adaptations to dietary changes.

  2. AR Expression in Breast Cancer CTCs Associates with Bone Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, Nicola; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S; Donaldson, Maria C; O'Keefe, Ryan; Engstrom, Amanda; Bersani, Francesca; Zheng, Yu; Comaills, Valentine; Niederhoffer, Kira; Zhu, Huili; Mackenzie, Olivia; Shioda, Toshi; Sgroi, Dennis; Kapur, Ravi; Ting, David T; Moy, Beverly; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Toner, Mehmet; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala

    2018-04-01

    Molecular drivers underlying bone metastases in human cancer are not well understood, in part due to constraints in bone tissue sampling. Here, RNA sequencing was performed of circulating tumor cells (CTC) isolated from blood samples of women with metastatic estrogen receptor (ER) + breast cancer, comparing cases with progression in bone versus visceral organs. Among the activated cellular pathways in CTCs from bone-predominant breast cancer is androgen receptor (AR) signaling. AR gene expression is evident, as is its constitutively active splice variant AR-v7. AR expression within CTCs is correlated with the duration of treatment with aromatase inhibitors, suggesting that it contributes to acquired resistance to endocrine therapy. In an established breast cancer xenograft model, a bone-tropic derivative displays increased AR expression, whose genetic or pharmacologic suppression reduces metastases to bone but not to lungs. Together, these observations identify AR signaling in CTCs from women with bone-predominant ER + breast cancer, and provide a rationale for testing androgen inhibitors in this subset of patients. Implications: This study highlights a role for the AR in breast cancer bone metastasis, and suggests that therapeutic targeting of the AR may benefit patients with metastatic breast cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 16(4); 720-7. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Functional participation of a nifH-arsA2 chimeric fusion gene in arsenic reduction by Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara

    2008-01-01

    The NifH (dimer) and ArsA proteins are structural homologs and share common motifs like nucleotide-binding domains, signal transduction domains and also possible similar metal center ligands. Given the similarity between two proteins, we investigated if the NifH protein from Azotobacter vinelandii could functionally substitute for the ArsA1 half of the ArsA protein of Escherichia coli. The chimeric NifH-ArsA2 protein was expressed and detected in the E. coli strain by Western blotting. Growth comparisons of E. coli strains containing plasmids encoding for complete ArsA, partial ArsA (ArsA2) or chimeric ArsA (NifH-ArsA2) in media with increasing sodium arsenite concentrations (0-5 mM) showed that the chimeric NifH-ArsA2 could substitute for the ArsA. This functional complementation demonstrated the strong conservation of essential domains that have been maintained in NifH and ArsA even after their divergence to perform varied functions

  4. Replicated Risk Nicotinic Cholinergic Receptor Genes for Nicotine Dependence

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    Lingjun Zuo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs play important roles in nicotine dependence (ND and influence the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD in smokers. We compiled the associations between nicotinic cholinergic receptor genes (CHRNs and ND/CPD that were replicated across different studies, reviewed the expression of these risk genes in human/mouse brains, and verified their expression using independent samples of both human and mouse brains. The potential functions of the replicated risk variants were examined using cis-eQTL analysis or predicted using a series of bioinformatics analyses. We found replicated and significant associations for ND/CPD at 19 SNPs in six genes in three genomic regions (CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4 and CHRNA4. These six risk genes are expressed in at least 18 distinct areas of the human/mouse brain, with verification in our independent human and mouse brain samples. The risk variants might influence the transcription, expression and splicing of the risk genes, alter RNA secondary or protein structure. We conclude that the replicated associations between CHRNB3-A6, CHRNA5-A3-B4, CHRNA4 and ND/CPD are very robust. More research is needed to examine how these genetic variants contribute to the risk for ND/CPD.

  5. Retinoid X receptor and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activate an estrogen responsive gene independent of the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, S B; Medin, J A; Braissant, O; Kemp, L; Wahli, W; Ozato, K; Segars, J H

    1997-03-14

    Estrogen receptors regulate transcription of genes essential for sexual development and reproductive function. Since the retinoid X receptor (RXR) is able to modulate estrogen responsive genes and both 9-cis RA and fatty acids influenced development of estrogen responsive tumors, we hypothesized that estrogen responsive genes might be modulated by RXR and the fatty acid receptor (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, PPAR). To test this hypothesis, transfection assays in CV-1 cells were performed with an estrogen response element (ERE) coupled to a luciferase reporter construct. Addition of expression vectors for RXR and PPAR resulted in an 11-fold increase in luciferase activity in the presence of 9-cis RA. Furthermore, mobility shift assays demonstrated binding of RXR and PPAR to the vitellogenin A2-ERE and an ERE in the oxytocin promoter. Methylation interference assays demonstrated that specific guanine residues required for RXR/PPAR binding to the ERE were similar to residues required for ER binding. Moreover, RXR domain-deleted constructs in transfection assays showed that activation required RXR since an RXR delta AF-2 mutant completely abrogated reporter activity. Oligoprecipitation binding studies with biotinylated ERE and (35)S-labeled in vitro translated RXR constructs confirmed binding of delta AF-2 RXR mutant to the ERE in the presence of baculovirus-expressed PPAR. Finally, in situ hybridization confirmed RXR and PPAR mRNA expression in estrogen responsive tissues. Collectively, these data suggest that RXR and PPAR are present in reproductive tissues, are capable of activating estrogen responsive genes and suggest that the mechanism of activation may involve direct binding of the receptors to estrogen response elements.

  6. Study on transferring improved green fluorescent protein gene into wheat via low energy Ar+ implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Lifang; Li Hong; Song Daojun

    2000-01-01

    An improved GFP gene (mGFP4) was introduced into mature embryo cells of wheat cultivars Wan 9210 and Wanmai 32 via low energy ion beam-mediated delivery technique. Resistant calli were selected on medium containing paromomycin (100-140 mg/L). Five green plants were regenerated from resistant calli of Wan 9210 derived from 387 implated mature embryos. 32 green plants were obtained from 776 irradiated mature embryos in Wanmai 32. No green plant was regenerated from calli of 200 non-transformed embryos. PCR assays of 37 green plants showed that they all obtained the expected size of amplified DNA fragment (600 bp). Southern blot of 4 well-developed green plants confirmed stable integration of GFP gene into wheat genome. The average transformation frequencies of Wan 9210 and Wanmai 32 were 1.3% and 4.1%, respectively, according to the results of PCR assays

  7. Androgen receptor (AR) promotes clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) migration and invasion via altering the circHIAT1/miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kefeng; Sun, Yin; Tao, Wei; Fei, Xiang; Chang, Chawnshang

    2017-05-28

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the androgen receptor (AR) plays important roles to promote the metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). The detailed mechanisms, especially how AR functions via altering the circular RNAs (circRNAs) remain unclear. Here we identified a new circRNA (named as circHIAT1) whose expression was lower in ccRCCs than adjacent normal tissues. Targeting AR could suppress ccRCC cell progression via increasing circHIAT1 expression. ChIP assay and luciferase assay demonstrated that AR suppressed circHIAT1 expression via regulating its host gene, Hippocampus Abundant Transcript 1 (HIAT1) expression at the transcriptional level. The consequences of AR-suppressed circHIAT1 resulted in deregulating miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p expressions, which increased CDC42 expression to enhance ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Increasing this newly identified signal via circHIAT1 suppressed AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Together, these results suggested that circHIAT1 functioned as a metastatic inhibitor to suppress AR-enhanced ccRCC cell migration and invasion. Targeting this newly identified AR-circHIAT1-mediated miR-195-5p/29a-3p/29c-3p/CDC42 signals may help us develop potential new therapies to better suppress ccRCC metastasis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teodorov, E.; Ferrari, M.F.R.; Fior-Chadi, D.R.; Camarini, R.; Felício, L.F.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  9. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodorov, E. [Centro de Matemática, Computação e Cognição, Universidade Federal do ABC, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ferrari, M.F.R. [Departamento de Genética e Biologia Evolutiva, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fior-Chadi, D.R. [Departamento de Fisiologia, Instituto de Biociências, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Camarini, R. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felício, L.F. [Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-06-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc) or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg) and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05) because a lower percentage of U69593 group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05) and lactating female rats (P < 0.01), with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in female

  10. Behavioral meaningful opioidergic stimulation activates kappa receptor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Teodorov

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The periaqueductal gray (PAG has been reported to be a location for opioid regulation of pain and a potential site for behavioral selection in females. Opioid-mediated behavioral and physiological responses differ according to the activity of opioid receptor subtypes. The present study investigated the effects of the peripheral injection of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 into the dorsal subcutaneous region of animals on maternal behavior and on Oprk1 gene activity in the PAG of female rats. Female Wistar rats weighing 200-250 g at the beginning of the study were randomly divided into 2 groups for maternal behavior and gene expression experiments. On day 5, pups were removed at 7:00 am and placed in another home cage that was distant from their mother. Thirty minutes after removing the pups, the dams were treated with U69593 (0.15 mg/kg, sc or 0.9% saline (up to 1 mL/kg and after 30 min were evaluated in the maternal behavior test. Latencies in seconds for pup retrieval, grouping, crouching, and full maternal behavior were scored. The results showed that U69593 administration inhibited maternal behavior (P < 0.05 because a lower percentage of kappa group dams showed retrieval of first pup, retrieving all pups, grouping, crouching and displaying full maternal behavior compared to the saline group. Opioid gene expression was evaluated using real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. A single injection of U69593 increased Oprk1 PAG expression in both virgin (P < 0.05 and lactating female rats (P < 0.01, with no significant effect on Oprm1 or Oprd1 gene activity. Thus, the expression of kappa-opioid receptors in the PAG may be modulated by single opioid receptor stimulation and behavioral meaningful opioidergic transmission in the adult female might occur simultaneously to specific changes in gene expression of kappa-opioid receptor subtype. This is yet another alert for the complex role of the opioid system in

  11. A targeted genotyping approach enhances identification of variants in taste receptor and appetite/reward genes of potential functional importance for obesity-related porcine traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera, S; Clop, A; Jacobsen, M J; Guerin, M; Lesnik, P; Jørgensen, C B; Fredholm, M; Karlskov-Mortensen, P

    2018-04-01

    Taste receptors (TASRs) and appetite and reward (AR) mechanisms influence eating behaviour, which in turn affects food intake and risk of obesity. In a previous study, we used next generation sequencing to identify potentially functional mutations in TASR and AR genes and found indications for genetic associations between identified variants and growth and fat deposition in a subgroup of animals (n = 38) from the UNIK resource pig population. This population was created for studying obesity and obesity-related diseases. In the present study we validated results from our previous study by investigating genetic associations between 24 selected single nucleotide variants in TASR and AR gene variants and 35 phenotypes describing obesity and metabolism in the entire UNIK population (n = 564). Fifteen variants showed significant association with specific obesity-related phenotypes after Bonferroni correction. Six of the 15 genes, namely SIM1, FOS, TAS2R4, TAS2R9, MCHR2 and LEPR, showed good correlation between known biological function and associated phenotype. We verified a genetic association between potentially functional variants in TASR/AR genes and growth/obesity and conclude that the combination of identification of potentially functional variants by next generation sequencing followed by targeted genotyping and association studies is a powerful and cost-effective approach for increasing the power of genetic association studies. © 2018 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Transcriptional activation of LON Gene by a new form of mitochondrial stress: A role for the nuclear respiratory factor 2 in StAR overload response (SOR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahat, Assaf; Perlberg, Shira; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Isaac, Sara; Eden, Amir; Lauria, Ines; Langer, Thomas; Orly, Joseph

    2015-06-15

    High output of steroid hormone synthesis in steroidogenic cells of the adrenal cortex and the gonads requires the expression of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) that facilitates cholesterol mobilization to the mitochondrial inner membrane where the CYP11A1/P450scc enzyme complex converts the sterol to the first steroid. Earlier studies have shown that StAR is active while pausing on the cytosolic face of the outer mitochondrial membrane while subsequent import of the protein into the matrix terminates the cholesterol mobilization activity. Consequently, during repeated activity cycles, high level of post-active StAR accumulates in the mitochondrial matrix. To prevent functional damage due to such protein overload effect, StAR is degraded by a sequence of three to four ATP-dependent proteases of the mitochondria protein quality control system, including LON and the m-AAA membranous proteases AFG3L2 and SPG7/paraplegin. Furthermore, StAR expression in both peri-ovulatory ovarian cells, or under ectopic expression in cell line models, results in up to 3-fold enrichment of the mitochondrial proteases and their transcripts. We named this novel form of mitochondrial stress as StAR overload response (SOR). To better understand the SOR mechanism at the transcriptional level we analyzed first the unexplored properties of the proximal promoter of the LON gene. Our findings suggest that the human nuclear respiratory factor 2 (NRF-2), also known as GA binding protein (GABP), is responsible for 88% of the proximal promoter activity, including the observed increase of transcription in the presence of StAR. Further studies are expected to reveal if common transcriptional determinants coordinate the SOR induced transcription of all the genes encoding the SOR proteases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression construct: Development, nanodelivery and effect on reproduction in air-breathing catfish, Clarias batrachus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathor, Pravesh Kumar; Bhat, Irfan Ahmad; Rather, Mohd Ashraf; Gireesh-Babu, Pathakota; Kumar, Kundan; Purayil, Suresh Babu Padinhate; Sharma, Rupam

    2017-11-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for the relocation of cholesterol across mitochondrial membrane in vertebrates and is, therefore, a key factor in regulating the rate and timing of steroidogenesis. In the present study, we developed chitosan nanoparticle (CNP) conjugated StAR gene construct (CNP-pcDNA4-StAR) in a eukaryotic expression vector, pcDNA4/HisMax A. CNPs of 135.4nm diameter, 26.7mV zeta potential and 0.381 polydispersity index were used for conjugation. The loading efficiency (LE) of pcDNA4-StAR construct with CNPs was found to be 86%. After the 24h of intramuscular injection, the CNP-pcDNA4-StAR plasmid could be detected from testis, brain, kidney and muscle tissues of Clarias batrachus. The transcript levels of important reproductive genes viz. cyp11a1, cyp17a1, 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 in CNP-pcDNA4-StAR treated group were initially low up to 24h, but significantly increased subsequently up to 120h. In naked pcDNA4-StAR treated group, the mRNA level of 3β-hsd, 17β-hsd and cyp19a1 increased initially up to 24h, while cyp11a1 and cyp17a1 increased up to 48h and then started declining. Similar results were obtained for 11-Ketotestosterone and 17β-estradiol. The results indicate relatively long lasting effects of nano-conjugated construct compared to the construct alone. Furthermore, the histopathology of gonads and liver authenticates its possible role in the gonadal development in fish without any adverse effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheplyagina Larisa A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 has been suggested as a candidate gene affecting juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA course and prognosis. The purpose of this study is to investigate the glucocorticoid receptor gene BclI polymorphism (rs41423247 in JIA patients, the gene's role in susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and its associations with JIA activity, course and bone mineralization. Methods One hundred twenty-two Caucasian children with JIA and 143 healthy ethnically matched controls were studied. We checked markers of clinical and laboratory activity: morning stiffness, Ritchie Articular Index (RAI, swollen joint count (SJC, tender joint count (TJC, physician's visual analog scale (VAS, hemoglobin level (Hb, leukocyte count (L, platelet count (Pl, Westergren erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, albumin, DAS and DAS28. Bone mineralization was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA of lumbar spine L1-L4. Assessments of bone metabolism included osteocalcin, C-terminal telopeptide (CTT, parathyroid hormone (PTH, total and ionized calcium, inorganic phosphate and total alkaline phosphatase (TAP. BclI polymorphism was genotyped by polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism. Results No association was observed between glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphism and the presence or absence of JIA. In girls with JIA, the presence of the G allele was associated with an unfavorable arthritis course, a younger age of onset of arthritis (p = 0.0017, and higher inflammatory activity. The higher inflammatory activity was demonstrated by the following: increased time of morning stiffness (p = 0.02, VAS (p = 0.014, RAI (p = 0.048, DAS (p = 0.035, DAS28 (p = 0.05, Pl (p = 0.003, L (p = 0.046, CRP (p = 0.01. In addition, these patients had bone metabolism disturbances as follows: decreased BA (p = 0.0001, BMC (p = 0.00007, BMD (0.005 and Z score (p = 0.002; and

  15. Dopamine Receptor Genes Modulate Associative Memory in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, Goran; Becker, Nina; Ferencz, Beata; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Laukka, Erika J; Bäckman, Lars; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-02-01

    Previous research shows that associative memory declines more than item memory in aging. Although the underlying mechanisms of this selective impairment remain poorly understood, animal and human data suggest that dopaminergic modulation may be particularly relevant for associative binding. We investigated the influence of dopamine (DA) receptor genes on item and associative memory in a population-based sample of older adults (n = 525, aged 60 years), assessed with a face-scene item associative memory task. The effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of DA D1 (DRD1; rs4532), D2 (DRD2/ANKK1/Taq1A; rs1800497), and D3 (DRD3/Ser9Gly; rs6280) receptor genes were examined and combined into a single genetic score. Individuals carrying more beneficial alleles, presumably associated with higher DA receptor efficacy (DRD1 C allele; DRD2 A2 allele; DRD3 T allele), performed better on associative memory than persons with less beneficial genotypes. There were no effects of these genes on item memory or other cognitive measures, such as working memory, executive functioning, fluency, and perceptual speed, indicating a selective association between DA genes and associative memory. By contrast, genetic risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) was associated with worse item and associative memory, indicating adverse effects of APOE ε4 and a genetic risk score for AD (PICALM, BIN1, CLU) on episodic memory in general. Taken together, our results suggest that DA may be particularly important for associative memory, whereas AD-related genetic variations may influence overall episodic memory in older adults without dementia.

  16. CNPY2 inhibits MYLIP-mediated AR protein degradation in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Saya; Ueno, Akihisa; Ueda, Takashi; Nakagawa, Hideo; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Fujihara-Iwata, Atsuko; Hongo, Fumiya; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2018-04-03

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that promotes prostate cancer (PC) cell growth through control of target gene expression. This report suggests that Canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) controls AR protein levels in PC cells. We found that AR was ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain interacting protein (MYLIP) and then degraded through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. CNPY2 decreased the ubiquitination activity of MYLIP by inhibition of interaction between MYLIP and UBE2D1, an E2 ubiquitin ligase. CNPY2 up-regulated gene expression of AR target genes such as KLK3 gene which encodes the prostate specific antigen (PSA) and promoted cell growth of PC cells. The cell growth inhibition by CNPY2 knockdown was rescued by AR overexpression. Furthermore, positive correlation of expression levels between CNPY2 and AR/AR target genes was observed in tissue samples from human prostate cancer patients. Together, these results suggested that CNPY2 promoted cell growth of PC cells by inhibition of AR protein degradation through MYLIP-mediated AR ubiquitination.

  17. Human estrogen receptor (ESR) gene locus: PssI dimorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, R T; Taylor, J E; Frossard, P M [California Biotechnology Inc., Mountain View, CA (USA); Shine, J J [Garvan Institute, Darlinghurst (Australia)

    1988-07-25

    pESR-2, a 2.1 kb partial cDNA containing the entire translated sequence of the human estrogen receptor mRNA isolated from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, was subcloned in the Eco RI site of pBR322. PssI (PuGGNCCPy) identifies a single two-allele polymorphism with bands at either 1.7 or 1.4 kb, as well as invariant bands at 12.6, 9.3, 4.1, 3.7, 2.4, 2.2, and 1.2 kb. Its frequency was studied in 77 unrelated North American Caucasians. The human estrogen receptor gene has been localized to 6q24 -- q27 by in situ hybridization. Co-dominant segregation is demonstrated in one family (8 individuals).

  18. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, M A; Argente, J; Chernausek, S; Gracia, R; Guevara-Aguirre, J; Hopp, M; Pérez-Jurado, L; Rosenbloom, A; Toledo, S P; Francke, U

    1993-01-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), we analyzed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. We amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). We identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71 + 1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, we determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations we identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. We conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8488849

  19. Intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation and segregation in a rat fibroblast cell line transfected with a human insulin receptor gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, J.R.; Olefsky, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The cellular processing of insulin and insulin receptors was studied using a rat fibroblast cell line that had been transfected with a normal human insulin receptor gene, expressing approximately 500 times the normal number of native fibroblasts insulin receptors. These cells bind and internalize insulin normally. Biochemically assays based on the selective precipitation by polyethylene glycol of intact insulin-receptor complexes but not of free intracellular insulin were developed to study the time course of intracellular insulin-receptor dissociation. Fibroblasts were incubated with radiolabeled insulin at 4 0 C, and internalization of insulin-receptor complexes was initiated by warming the cells to 37 0 C. Within 2 min, 90% of the internalized radioactivity was composed of intact insulin-receptor complexes. The dissociation of insulin from internalized insulin-receptor complexes was markedly inhibited by monensin and chloroquine. Furthermore, chloroquine markedly increased the number of cross-linkable intracellular insulin-receptor complexes, as analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis autoradiography. These findings suggest that acidification of intracellular vesicles is responsible for insulin-receptor dissociation. Physical segregation of dissociated intracellular insulin from its receptor was monitored. The results are consistent with the view that segregation of insulin and receptor occurs 5-10 min after initiation of dissociation. These studies demonstrate the intracellular itinerary of insulin-receptor complexes, including internalization, dissociation of insulin from the internalized receptor within an acidified compartment, segregation of insulin from the receptor, and subsequent ligand degradation

  20. A young root-specific gene (ArMY2) from horseradish encoding a MYR II myrosinase with kinetic preference for the root-specific glucosinolate gluconasturtiin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebers, Andreas; Müller-Uri, Frieder; Kreis, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    The pungent taste of horseradish is caused by isothiocyanates which are released from glucosinolates by myrosinases. These enzymes are encoded by genes belonging to one of two subfamilies, termed MYR I and MYR II, respectively. A MYR II-type myrosinase gene was identified for the first time in horseradish. The gene termed ArMY2 was only expressed in young roots. A full-length cDNA encoding a myrosinase termed ArMy2 was isolated and heterologously expressed in Pichia pastoris. The recombinant His-tagged enzyme was characterized biochemically. Substrate affinity was 5 times higher towards gluconasturtiin than towards sinigrin. Gluconasturtiin was found to be the most abundant glucosinolate in young horseradish roots while sinigrin dominated in storage roots and leaves. This indicates that a specialized glucosinolate-myrosinase defense system might be active in young roots. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic organization, annotation, and ligand-receptor inferences of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptor genes based on comparative genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemokines and their receptors play important roles in host defense, organogenesis, hematopoiesis, and neuronal communication. Forty-two chemokines and 19 cognate receptors have been found in the human genome. Prior to this report, only 11 chicken chemokines and 7 receptors had been reported. The objectives of this study were to systematically identify chicken chemokines and their cognate receptor genes in the chicken genome and to annotate these genes and ligand-receptor binding by a comparative genomics approach. Results Twenty-three chemokine and 14 chemokine receptor genes were identified in the chicken genome. All of the chicken chemokines contained a conserved CC, CXC, CX3C, or XC motif, whereas all the chemokine receptors had seven conserved transmembrane helices, four extracellular domains with a conserved cysteine, and a conserved DRYLAIV sequence in the second intracellular domain. The number of coding exons in these genes and the syntenies are highly conserved between human, mouse, and chicken although the amino acid sequence homologies are generally low between mammalian and chicken chemokines. Chicken genes were named with the systematic nomenclature used in humans and mice based on phylogeny, synteny, and sequence homology. Conclusion The independent nomenclature of chicken chemokines and chemokine receptors suggests that the chicken may have ligand-receptor pairings similar to mammals. All identified chicken chemokines and their cognate receptors were identified in the chicken genome except CCR9, whose ligand was not identified in this study. The organization of these genes suggests that there were a substantial number of these genes present before divergence between aves and mammals and more gene duplications of CC, CXC, CCR, and CXCR subfamilies in mammals than in aves after the divergence.

  2. Clone and expression of human transferrin receptor gene: a marker gene for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Li; Liu Lizhi; Lv Yanchun; Liu Xuewen; Cui Chunyan; Wu Peihong; Liu Qicai; Ou Shanxing

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To clone human transferrin receptor (hTfR) gene and construct expression vector producing recombination protein. Methods: Human transferrin receptor gene cDNA was amplified by RT-PCR from human embryonic liver and lung tissue. Recombinant pcDNA3-hTfR and pEGFP-Cl-hTfR plasmids were constructed and confirmed by DNA sequencing. These plasmids were stably transfected into the HEK293 cells. The protein expression in vitro was confirmed by Western Blot. The efficiency of expression and the location of hTfR were also investigated by fluorescence microscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Results: The full length cDNA of hTfR gene (2332 bp) was cloned and sequenced. The hTfR (190 000) was overexpressed in transfected HEK293 cells by Western blot analysis. Fluorescence micrographs displayed that the hTfR was expressed at high level and located predominantly in the cell surface. Conclusions: Human transferrin receptor (hTfR) gene has been successfully cloned and obtained high-level expression in HEK293 cells, and the recombination protein of hTfR distributed predominantly in the cell membrane. (authors)

  3. A simple screening method for detection of Klinefelter syndrome and other X-chromosome aneuploidies based on copy number of the androgen receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, A M; Garn, I D; Aksglaede, L

    2007-01-01

    Due to the high prevalence and variable phenotype of patients with Klinefelter syndrome, there is a need for a robust and rapid screening method allowing early diagnosis. Here, we report on the development and detailed clinical validation of a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)-based method...... of the copy number assessment of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located to Xq11.2-q12. We analysed samples from 50 individuals, including a healthy male and female controls and patients with Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY; 48,XXXY) (n = 28), mosaicisms (46,XX/47,XXY/48XXYY; 45,X/46,XY) (n = 3), other sex......-gene expression. The XIST-expression based assay was correct in only 29/36 samples (81%). Our findings demonstrated that the AR-qPCR technique is a simple and reliable screening method for diagnosis of patients with Klinefelter syndrome or other chromosomal disorders involving an aberrant number of X-chromosomes....

  4. Oxytocin receptor gene variation predicts subjective responses to MDMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershad, Anya K; Weafer, Jessica J; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G; Wardle, Margaret C; Miller, Melissa A; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-12-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") enhances desire to socialize and feelings of empathy, which are thought to be related to increased oxytocin levels. Thus, variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) may influence responses to the drug. Here, we examined the influence of a single OXTR nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on responses to MDMA in humans. Based on findings that carriers of the A allele at rs53576 exhibit reduced sensitivity to oxytocin-induced social behavior, we hypothesized that these individuals would show reduced subjective responses to MDMA, including sociability. In this three-session, double blind, within-subjects study, healthy volunteers with past MDMA experience (N = 68) received a MDMA (0, 0.75 mg/kg, and 1.5 mg/kg) and provided self-report ratings of sociability, anxiety, and drug effects. These responses were examined in relation to rs53576. MDMA (1.5 mg/kg) did not increase sociability in individuals with the A/A genotype as it did in G allele carriers. The genotypic groups did not differ in responses at the lower MDMA dose, or in cardiovascular or other subjective responses. These findings are consistent with the idea that MDMA-induced sociability is mediated by oxytocin, and that variation in the oxytocin receptor gene may influence responses to the drug.

  5. Control of Transcriptional Repression of the Vitellogenin Receptor Gene in Largemouth Bass (Micropterus Salmoides) by Select Estrogen Receptors Isotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Bisesi, Joseph H.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The vitellogenin receptor (Vtgr) plays an important role in fish reproduction. This receptor functions to incorporate vitellogenin (Vtg), a macromolecule synthesized and released from the liver in the bloodstream, into oocytes where it is processed into yolk. Although studies have focused on the functional role of Vtgr in fish, the mechanistic control of this gene is still unexplored. Here we report the identification and analysis of the first piscine 5′ regulatory region of the vtgr gene whi...

  6. Variation in melatonin receptors (Mel(1a) and Mel(1b)) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in the spleen of a seasonally breeding bird, Perdicula asiatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, S K; Haldar, C; Singh, S S

    2011-12-01

    Daily variation in the peripheral level of melatonin plays a major role in integrating reproduction and environmental information for seasonally breeding birds. However, the variation in immunity and reproduction has never been assessed in any avian species on a 24 h time scale. Therefore, to understand the relationship between immune function and reproductive phases in a seasonally breeding bird, Perdicula asiatica, the Indian jungle bush quail, we studied the daily variation of melatonin and testosterone levels along with expression of their receptors Mel(1a), Mel(1b), and androgen receptor in the spleen during the reproductively active phase. Immunocytochemistry for the melatonin receptors Mel(1a) and Mel(1b) presented a differential distribution pattern. Western blot of splenic protein suggested a daily rhythm of melatonin receptors, while acrophases for the two melatonin receptors Mel(1a) and Mel(1b) differed by 4 h, suggesting that the expression of the receptors may peak at different times, causing more of either Mel(1a) or Mel(1b) to be available at a particular time to mediate function. The circulatory melatonin level correlated with percentage stimulation ratio of splenocytes and plasma interleukin-2 level, but did not correlate with testosterone or androgen receptor, suggesting that melatonin could be a major hormone imparting a time-of-day effect on the modulation of immune function in a seasonally breeding bird during the reproductively active phase. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. AT1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms in relation to Postprandial Lipemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Klop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent data suggest that the renin-angiotensin system may be involved in triglyceride (TG metabolism. We explored the effect of the common A1166C and C573T polymorphisms of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R gene on postprandial lipemia. Methods. Eighty-two subjects measured daytime capillary TG, and postprandial lipemia was estimated as incremental area under the TG curve. The C573T and A1166C polymorphisms of the AT1R gene were determined. Results. Postprandial lipemia was significantly higher in homozygous carriers of the 1166-C allele (9.39±8.36 mM*h/L compared to homozygous carriers of the 1166-A allele (2.02±6.20 mM*h/L (P<0.05. Postprandial lipemia was similar for the different C573T polymorphisms. Conclusion. The 1166-C allele of the AT1R gene seems to be associated with increased postprandial lipemia. These data confirm the earlier described relationships between the renin-angiotensin axis and triglyceride metabolism.

  8. Synergic prodegradative activity of Bicalutamide and trehalose on the mutant androgen receptor responsible for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgetti, Elise; Rusmini, Paola; Crippa, Valeria; Cristofani, Riccardo; Boncoraglio, Alessandra; Cicardi, Maria E.; Galbiati, Mariarita; Poletti, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked motoneuron disease due to a CAG triplet-repeat expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene, which is translated into an elongated polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in AR protein (ARpolyQ). ARpolyQ toxicity is activated by the AR ligand testosterone

  9. Variation in oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphisms is associated with emotional and behavioral reactions to betrayal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Benjamin A; McCullough, Michael E; Carver, Charles S; Pedersen, Eric J; Cuccaro, Michael L

    2014-06-01

    Variations in the gene that encodes the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) have been associated with many aspects of social cognition as well as several prosocial behaviors. However, potential associations of OXTR variants with reactions to betrayals of trust while cooperating for mutual benefit have not yet been explored. We examined how variations in 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms on OXTR were associated with behavior and emotional reactions after a betrayal of trust in an iterated Prisoner's Dilemma Game. After correction for multiple testing, one haplotype (C-rs9840864, T-rs2268494) was significantly associated with faster retaliation post-betrayal-an association that appeared to be due to this haplotype's intermediate effect of exacerbating people's anger after they had been betrayed. Furthermore, a second haplotype (A-rs237887, C-rs2268490) was associated with higher levels of post-betrayal satisfaction, and a third haplotype (G-rs237887, C-rs2268490) was associated with lower levels of post-betrayal satisfaction. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. DBC1 promotes castration-resistant prostate cancer by positively regulating DNA binding and stability of AR-V7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Sue Jin; Jeong, Byong Chang; Kim, Hwa Jin; Lim, Joung Eun; Kwon, Ghee Young; Kim, Jeong Hoon

    2018-03-01

    Constitutively active AR-V7, one of the major androgen receptor (AR) splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, plays a key role in the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and anti-androgen resistance. However, our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of AR-V7-driven transcription is limited. Here we report DBC1 as a key regulator of AR-V7 transcriptional activity and stability in CRPC cells. DBC1 functions as a coactivator for AR-V7 and is required for the expression of AR-V7 target genes including CDH2, a mesenchymal marker linked to CRPC progression. DBC1 is required for recruitment of AR-V7 to its target enhancers and for long-range chromatin looping between the CDH2 enhancer and promoter. Mechanistically, DBC1 enhances DNA-binding activity of AR-V7 by direct interaction and inhibits CHIP E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of AR-V7 by competing with CHIP for AR-V7 binding, thereby stabilizing and activating AR-V7. Importantly, DBC1 depletion suppresses the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of CRPC cells. Our results firmly establish DBC1 as a critical AR-V7 coactivator that plays a key role in the regulation of DNA binding and stability of AR-V7 and has an important physiological role in CRPC progression.

  11. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  12. Lysosomes are involved in induction of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression and progesterone synthesis through low-density lipoprotein in cultured bovine granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-You; Wu, Yi; Zhao, Shuan; Liu, Zhen-Xing; Zeng, Shen-Ming; Zhang, Gui-Xue

    2015-09-15

    Progesterone is an important steroid hormone in the regulation of the bovine estrous cycle. The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is an indispensable component for transporting cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, which is one of the rate-limiting steps for progesterone synthesis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) supplies cholesterol precursors for progesterone formation, and the lysosomal degradation pathway of LDL is essential for progesterone biosynthesis in granulosa cells after ovulation. However, it is currently unknown how LDL and lysosomes coordinate the expression of the StAR gene and progesterone production in bovine granulosa cells. Here, we investigated the role of lysosomes in LDL-treated bovine granulosa cells. Our results reported that LDL induced expression of StAR messenger RNA and protein as well as expression of cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P-450 (CYP11A1) messenger RNA and progesterone production in cultured bovine granulosa cells. The number of lysosomes in the granulosa cells was also significantly increased by LDL; whereas the lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine, strikingly abolished these LDL-induced effects. Our results indicate that LDL promotes StAR expression, synthesis of progesterone, and formation of lysosomes in bovine granulosa cells, and lysosomes participate in the process by releasing free cholesterol from hydrolyzed LDL. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Gene Implicated in Activation of Retinoic Acid Receptor Targets Is a Novel Renal Agenesis Gene in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brophy, Patrick D.; Rasmussen, Maria; Parida, Mrutyunjaya

    2017-01-01

    investigations have identified several gene variants that cause RA, including EYA1, LHX1, and WT1 However, whereas compound null mutations of genes encoding α and γ retinoic acid receptors (RARs) cause RA in mice, to date there have been no reports of variants in RAR genes causing RA in humans. In this study, we...... in humans....

  14. The Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene, Perceived Parental Support, and Adolescent Loneliness: Longitudinal Evidence for Gene-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods: Associations among the DRD2, sex, parental support,…

  15. The dopamine D2 receptor gene, perceived parental support, and adolescent loneliness : longitudinal evidence for gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Roekel, Eeske; Goossens, Luc; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Verhagen, Maaike

    2011-01-01

    Background: Loneliness is a common problem in adolescence. Earlier research focused on genes within the serotonin and oxytocin systems, but no studies have examined the role of dopamine-related genes in loneliness. In the present study, we focused on the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2). Methods:

  16. Liver X Receptor Genes Variants Modulate ALS Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouzat, Kevin; Molinari, Nicolas; Kantar, Jovana; Polge, Anne; Corcia, Philippe; Couratier, Philippe; Clavelou, Pierre; Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Lobaccaro, Jean -Marc A; Raoul, Cedric; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William

    2018-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe motor neuron (MN) disorders in adults. Phenotype of ALS patients is highly variable and may be influenced by modulators of energy metabolism. Recent works have implicated the liver X receptors α and β (LXRs), either in the propagation process of ALS or in the maintenance of MN survival. LXRs are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols, modulating cholesterol levels, a suspected modulator of ALS severity. In a cohort of 438 ALS patients and 330 healthy controls, the influence of LXR genes on ALS risk and phenotype was studied using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The two LXRα SNPs rs2279238 and rs7120118 were shown to be associated with age at onset in ALS patients. Consistently, homozygotes were twice more correlated than were heterozygotes to delayed onset. The onset was thus delayed by 3.9 years for rs2279238 C/T carriers and 7.8 years for T/T carriers. Similar results were obtained for rs7120118 (+2.1 years and +6.7 years for T/C and C/C genotypes, respectively). The LXRβ SNP rs2695121 was also shown to be associated with a 30% increase of ALS duration (p = 0.0055, FDR = 0.044). The tested genotypes were not associated with ALS risk. These findings add further evidence to the suspected implication of LXR genes in the disease process of ALS and might open new perspectives in ALS therapeutics.

  17. Identifying polymorphisms in the Rattus norvegicus D3 dopamine receptor gene and regulatory region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; D'Souza, U.M.; Berezikov, E.; Cuppen, E.; Sluyter, F.

    2004-01-01

    The D(3) dopamine receptor has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and addiction. Sequence variation in the D(3) gene can lead to subtle alteration in receptor structure or gene expression and thus to a different phenotype. In this

  18. Lack of concordance and linkage disequilibrium among brothers for androgenetic alopecia and CAG/GGC haplotypes of the androgen receptor gene in Mexican families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga-Vázquez, Jazmín; López-Hernández, María A; Svyryd, Yevgeniya; Mutchinick, Osvaldo M

    2015-12-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) or common baldness is the most prevalent form of hair loss in males. Familial predisposition has been recognized, and heritability estimated in monozygotic twins suggests an important genetic predisposition. Several studies indicate that the numbers of CAG/GGC repeats in exon 1 of the androgen receptor gene (AR) maybe associated with AGA susceptibility. To investigate a possible correlation between AR CAG/GGC haplotypes and the presence or not of alopecia in sibships with two or more brothers among them at least one of them has AGA. Thirty-two trios including an alopecic man, one brother alopecic or not, and their mother were enrolled. Sanger sequencing of the exon 1 of the AR gene was conducted to ascertain the number of CAG/GGC repeats in each individual. Heterozygous mother for the CAG/GGC haplotypes was an inclusion criterion to analyze the segregation haplotype patterns in the family. Concordance for the number of repeats and AGA among brothers was evaluated using kappa coefficient and the probability of association in the presence of genetic linkage between CAG and GGC repeats and AGA estimated by means of the family-based association test (FBAT). The median for the CAG and GGC repeats in the AR is similar to that reported in other populations. The CAG/GGC haplotypes were less polymorphic than that reported in other studies, especially due to the GGC number of repeats found. Kappa coefficient resulted in a concordance of 37.3% (IC 95%, 5.0-69.0%) for the AGA phenotype and identical CAG/GGC haplotypes. There was no evidence of linkage disequilibrium. Our results do not confirm a possible correlation or linkage disequilibrium between the CAG/GGC haplotypes of the AR gene and androgenetic alopecia in Mexican brothers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. ID4 promotes AR expression and blocks tumorigenicity of PC3 prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaragiri, Shravan Kumar; Bostanthirige, Dhanushka H.; Morton, Derrick J.; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Upadhyay, Sunil; Chaudhary, Jaideep

    2016-01-01

    Deregulation of tumor suppressor genes is associated with tumorigenesis and the development of cancer. In prostate cancer, ID4 is epigenetically silenced and acts as a tumor suppressor. In normal prostate epithelial cells, ID4 collaborates with androgen receptor (AR) and p53 to exert its tumor suppressor activity. Previous studies have shown that ID4 promotes tumor suppressive function of AR whereas loss of ID4 results in tumor promoter activity of AR. Previous study from our lab showed that ectopic ID4 expression in DU145 attenuates proliferation and promotes AR expression suggesting that ID4 dependent AR activity is tumor suppressive. In this study, we examined the effect of ectopic expression of ID4 on highly malignant prostate cancer cell, PC3. Here we show that stable overexpression of ID4 in PC3 cells leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration. In addition, in vivo studies showed a decrease in tumor size and volume of ID4 overexpressing PC3 cells, in nude mice. At the molecular level, these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR), p21, and AR dependent FKBP51 expression. At the mechanistic level, ID4 may regulate the expression or function of AR through specific but yet unknown AR co-regulators that may determine the final outcome of AR function. - Highlights: • ID4 expression induces AR expression in PC3 cells, which generally lack AR. • ID4 expression increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and invasion. • Overexpression of ID4 reduces tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts in vivo. • ID4 induces p21 and FKBP51 expression- co-factors of AR tumor suppressor activity.

  20. ID4 promotes AR expression and blocks tumorigenicity of PC3 prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaragiri, Shravan Kumar; Bostanthirige, Dhanushka H.; Morton, Derrick J.; Patel, Divya; Joshi, Jugal; Upadhyay, Sunil; Chaudhary, Jaideep, E-mail: jchaudhary@cau.edu

    2016-09-09

    Deregulation of tumor suppressor genes is associated with tumorigenesis and the development of cancer. In prostate cancer, ID4 is epigenetically silenced and acts as a tumor suppressor. In normal prostate epithelial cells, ID4 collaborates with androgen receptor (AR) and p53 to exert its tumor suppressor activity. Previous studies have shown that ID4 promotes tumor suppressive function of AR whereas loss of ID4 results in tumor promoter activity of AR. Previous study from our lab showed that ectopic ID4 expression in DU145 attenuates proliferation and promotes AR expression suggesting that ID4 dependent AR activity is tumor suppressive. In this study, we examined the effect of ectopic expression of ID4 on highly malignant prostate cancer cell, PC3. Here we show that stable overexpression of ID4 in PC3 cells leads to increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration. In addition, in vivo studies showed a decrease in tumor size and volume of ID4 overexpressing PC3 cells, in nude mice. At the molecular level, these changes were associated with increased androgen receptor (AR), p21, and AR dependent FKBP51 expression. At the mechanistic level, ID4 may regulate the expression or function of AR through specific but yet unknown AR co-regulators that may determine the final outcome of AR function. - Highlights: • ID4 expression induces AR expression in PC3 cells, which generally lack AR. • ID4 expression increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and invasion. • Overexpression of ID4 reduces tumor growth of subcutaneous xenografts in vivo. • ID4 induces p21 and FKBP51 expression- co-factors of AR tumor suppressor activity.

  1. The altered promoter methylation of oxytocin receptor gene in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagoz Yuksel, Mine; Yuceturk, Betul; Karatas, Omer Faruk; Ozen, Mustafa; Dogangun, Burak

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the lifelong existing disorders. Abnormal methylation status of gene promoters of oxytonergic system has been implicated as among the etiologic factors of ASDs. We, therefore, investigated the methylation frequency of oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) promoter from peripheral blood samples of children with autistic features. Our sample includes 66 children in total (22-94 months); 27 children with ASDs according to the DSM-IV-TR and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) and 39 children who do not have any autistic like symptoms as the healthy control group. We investigated the DNA methylation status of OXTR promoter by methylation specific enzymatic digestion of genomic DNA and polymerase chain reaction. A significant relationship has been found between ASDs and healthy controls for the reduction of methylation frequency of the regions MT1 and MT3 of OXTR. We could not find any association in the methylation frequency of MT2 and MT4 regions of OXTR. Although our findings indicate high frequency of OXTR promoter hypomethylation in ASDs, there is need for independent replication of the results for a bigger sample set. We expect that future studies with the inclusion of larger, more homogeneous samples will attempt to disentangle the causes of ASDs.

  2. Pharmacogenetics of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Victor E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease with multiple genetic and environmental determinants contributing to the observed variability in response to common anti-asthma therapies. Asthma pharmacogenetic research has focused on multiple candidate genes including the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRβ2) and its effect on individual responses to beta agonist therapy. At present, knowledge about the effects of ADRβ2 variation on therapeutic responses is evolving and should not alter current Asthma Guideline approaches consisting of the use of short acting beta agonists for as-needed symptom based therapy and the use of a regular long-acting beta agonist in combination with inhaled corticosteroid therapy for optimal control of asthma symptoms in those asthmatics who are not controlled on inhaled corticosteroid alone. This approach is based upon studies showing a consistent pharmacogenetic response to regular use of short acting beta agonists (SABA) and less consistent findings in studies evaluating long acting beta agonist (LABA). While emerging pharmacogenetic studies are provocative and should lead to functional approaches, conflicting data with responses to LABA therapy may be caused by factors that include small sample sizes of study populations and differences in experimental design that may limit the conclusions that may be drawn from these clinical trials at the present time. PMID:17996583

  3. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Childhood Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślińska, Anna; Kostyra, Elżbieta; Chwała, Barbara; Moszyńska-Dumara, Małgorzata; Fiedorowicz, Ewa; Teodorowicz, Małgorzata; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2017-09-09

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a group of heterogeneous, behaviorally defined disorders whereby currently no biological markers are common to all affected individuals. A deregulated immune response may be contributing to the etiology of ASD. The active metabolite of vitamin D₃ has an immunoregulatory role mediated by binding to the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in monocyte, macrophages, and lymphocytes. The effects of vitamin D and interaction with the VDR may be influenced by polymorphism in the VDR gene. Genetic association of four different VDR polymorphisms (Apa-I, Bsm-I, Taq-I, Fok-I) associated with susceptibility to the development of autism in children was investigated. We uniquely found an association between the presence of the T allele at position Taq-I and presence of the a allele at position Apa-I of the VDR gene with decreased ASD incidence. There was also an association between female gender and the presence of the T allele. We found no statistical significant correlation between VDR single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and vitamin D₃ concentration in serum of ASD children. Genetic polymorphism in two SNP in VDR may be correlated with development of ASD symptoms by influencing functionality of vitamin D₃ metabolism, while vitamin D₃ levels were not significantly different between ASD and non-ASD children.

  4. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-feng Shi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity.The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE.AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment.We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  5. Developing a System for Directed Gene Introduction into Mammary Gland Via Targeted Infection of Retrovirus Receptor Transgenics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bates, Paul

    1998-01-01

    ... (the Rous sarcoma virus receptor). Directed infection, and thus directed gene expression of cells expressing the viral receptor should provide a rapid and efficient method to test the mammary tumorigenic potential of genes in an animal model...

  6. Systematic study of association of four GABAergic genes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 1 gene, glutamic acid decarboxylase 2 gene, GABA(B) receptor 1 gene and GABA(A) receptor subunit beta2 gene, with schizophrenia using a universal DNA microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu; Qin, Shengying; Shi, Yongyong; Zhang, Aiping; Zhang, Jing; Bian, Li; Wan, Chunling; Feng, Guoyin; Gu, Niufan; Zhang, Guangqi; He, Guang; He, Lin

    2007-07-01

    Several studies have suggested the dysfunction of the GABAergic system as a risk factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. In the present study, case-control association analysis was conducted in four GABAergic genes: two glutamic acid decarboxylase genes (GAD1 and GAD2), a GABA(A) receptor subunit beta2 gene (GABRB2) and a GABA(B) receptor 1 gene (GABBR1). Using a universal DNA microarray procedure we genotyped a total of 20 SNPs on the above four genes in a study involving 292 patients and 286 controls of Chinese descent. Statistically significant differences were observed in the allelic frequencies of the rs187269C/T polymorphism in the GABRB2 gene (P=0.0450, chi(2)=12.40, OR=1.65) and the -292A/C polymorphism in the GAD1 gene (P=0.0450, chi(2)=14.64 OR=1.77). In addition, using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we discovered differences in the U251 nuclear protein binding to oligonucleotides representing the -292 SNP on the GAD1 gene, which suggests that the -292C allele has reduced transcription factor binding efficiency compared with the 292A allele. Using the multifactor-dimensionality reduction method (MDR), we found that the interactions among the rs187269C/T polymorphism in the GABRB2 gene, the -243A/G polymorphism in the GAD2 gene and the 27379C/T and 661C/T polymorphisms in the GAD1 gene revealed a significant association with schizophrenia (Pschizophrenia in the Chinese population.

  7. Environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons affect androgen receptor activation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hnida, Christina; Larsen, John Christian

    2000-01-01

    Nine structurally different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were tested for their ability to either agonize or antagonize the human androgen receptor (hAR) in a sensitive reporter gene assay based on CHO cells transiently cotransfected with a hAR vector and an MMTV-LUC vector. Benz...

  8. AR-v7 protein expression is regulated by protein kinase and phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinan; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E.; Rennie, Paul S.; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-01-01

    Failure of androgen-targeted therapy and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are often attributed to sustained expression of the androgen receptor (AR) and its major splice variant, AR-v7. Although the new generation of anti-androgens such as enzalutamide effectively inhibits AR activity, accumulating pre-clinical and clinical evidence indicates that AR-v7 remains constitutively active in driving CRPC progression. However, molecular mechanisms which control AR-v7 protein expression remain unclear. We apply multiple prostate cancer cell models to demonstrate that enzalutamide induces differential activation of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1) and Akt kinase depending on the gene context of cancer cells. The balance between PP-1 and Akt activation governs AR phosphorylation status and activation of the Mdm2 ubiquitin ligase. Mdm2 recognizes phosphorylated serine 213 of AR-v7, and induces AR-v7 ubiquitination and protein degradation. These findings highlight the decisive roles of PP-1 and Akt for AR-v7 protein expression and activities when AR is functionally blocked. PMID:26378044

  9. Androgen receptor gene CAG repeat polymorphism independently influences recovery of male sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy in postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirabassi, Giacomo; Delli Muti, Nicola; Corona, Giovanni; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Few and contradictory studies have evaluated the possible influence of androgen receptor (AR) gene CAG repeat polymorphism on male sexual function. In this study we evaluated the role of AR gene CAG repeat polymorphism in the recovery of sexual function after testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a condition which is often associated with hypopituitarism and in which the sexual benefits of TRT must be distinguished from those of pituitary-function replacement therapies. Fifteen men affected by postsurgical hypogonadotropic hypogonadism were retrospectively assessed before and after TRT. Main outcome measures included sexual parameters as assessed by the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire, levels of pituitary dependent hormones (total testosterone, free T3, free T4, cortisol, insulin-like growth factor-1 [IGF-1], prolactin), and results of genetic analysis (AR gene CAG repeat number). Plasma concentrations of free T3, free T4, cortisol, and prolactin did not vary significantly between the two phases, while testosterone and IGF-1 increased significantly after TRT. A significant improvement in all sexual parameters studied was found. The number of CAG triplets was negatively and significantly correlated with changes in all the sexual parameters, while opposite correlations were found between changes in sexual parameters and changes in testosterone levels; no correlation of change in IGF1 with change in sexual parameters was reported. On multiple linear regression analysis, after correction for changes in testosterone, nearly all the associations between the number of CAG triplets and changes in sexual parameters were confirmed. Shorter length AR gene CAG repeat number is associated with the recovery of sexual function after TRT in postsurgical male hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, independently of the effects of concomitant pituitary-replacement therapies. © 2014 International Society

  10. Converging evidence for the association of functional genetic variation in the serotonin receptor 2a gene with prefrontal function and olanzapine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasi, Giuseppe; De Virgilio, Caterina; Papazacharias, Apostolos; Taurisano, Paolo; Gelao, Barbara; Fazio, Leonardo; Ursini, Gianluca; Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Andriola, Ileana; Masellis, Rita; Romano, Raffaella; Rampino, Antonio; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Lo Bianco, Luciana; Caforio, Grazia; Piva, Francesco; Popolizio, Teresa; Bellantuono, Cesario; Todarello, Orlando; Kleinman, Joel E; Gadaleta, Gemma; Weinberger, Daniel R; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2013-09-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptor 2a (5-HT2AR) signaling is important for modulation of corticostriatal pathways and prefrontal activity during cognition. Furthermore, newer antipsychotic drugs target 5-HT2AR. A single-nucleotide polymorphism in the 5-HT2AR gene (HTR2A rs6314, C>T; OMIM 182135) has been weakly associated with differential 5-HT2AR signaling and with physiologic as well as behavioral effects. To use a hierarchical approach to determine the functional effects of this single-nucleotide polymorphism on 5-HT2AR messenger RNA and protein expression, on prefrontal phenotypes linked with genetic risk for schizophrenia, and on treatment with olanzapine. In silico predictions, in vitro, and case-control investigations. Academic and clinical facilities. The postmortem study included 112 brains from healthy individuals; the in vivo investigation included a total sample of 371 healthy individuals and patients with schizophrenia. EXPOSURES Patients received olanzapine monotherapy for 8 weeks. In silico predictions, messenger RNA, and protein expression in postmortem human prefrontal cortex and HeLa cells, functional magnetic resonance imaging prefrontal activity and behavior during working memory and attention in healthy individuals, and response to an 8-week trial of olanzapine treatment in patients with schizophrenia. Bioinformatic analysis predicted that rs6314 alters patterns of splicing, with possible effects on HTR2A expression. Moreover, the T allele was associated with reduced prefrontal messenger RNA expression in postmortem prefrontal cortex, with reduced protein expression in vitro, inefficient prefrontal blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging response during working memory and attentional control processing, and impaired working memory and attention behavior, as well as with attenuated improvement in negative symptoms after olanzapine treatment. Our results suggest that HTR2A rs6314 affects 5-HT2AR expression and

  11. Expression of glucocorticoid and progesterone nuclear receptor genes in archival breast cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Robert A; Lea, Rod A; Curran, Joanne E; Weinstein, Stephen R; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies in our laboratory have shown associations of specific nuclear receptor gene variants with sporadic breast cancer. In order to investigate these findings further, we conducted the present study to determine whether expression levels of the progesterone and glucocorticoid nuclear receptor genes vary in different breast cancer grades. RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded archival breast tumour tissue and converted into cDNA. Sample cDNA underwent PCR using labelled primers to enable quantitation of mRNA expression. Expression data were normalized against the 18S ribosomal gene multiplex and analyzed using analysis of variance. Analysis of variance indicated a variable level of expression of both genes with regard to breast cancer grade (P = 0.00033 for glucocorticoid receptor and P = 0.023 for progesterone receptor). Statistical analysis indicated that expression of the progesterone nuclear receptor is elevated in late grade breast cancer tissue

  12. α1B-Adrenergic receptor signaling controls circadian expression of Tnfrsf11b by regulating clock genes in osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takao Hirai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are endogenous and biological oscillations that occur with a period of <24 h. In mammals, the central circadian pacemaker is localized in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and is linked to peripheral tissues through neural and hormonal signals. In the present study, we investigated the physiological function of the molecular clock on bone remodeling. The results of loss-of-function and gain-of-function experiments both indicated that the rhythmic expression of Tnfrsf11b, which encodes osteoprotegerin (OPG, was regulated by Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We also showed that REV-ERBα negatively regulated Tnfrsf11b as well as Bmal1 in MC3T3-E1 cells. We systematically investigated the relationship between the sympathetic nervous system and the circadian clock in osteoblasts. The administration of phenylephrine, a nonspecific α1-adrenergic receptor (AR agonist, stimulated the expression of Tnfrsf11b, whereas the genetic ablation of α1B-AR signaling led to the alteration of Tnfrsf11b expression concomitant with Bmal1 and Per2 in bone. Thus, this study demonstrated that the circadian regulation of Tnfrsf11b was regulated by the clock genes encoding REV-ERBα (Nr1d1 and Bmal1 (Bmal1, also known as Arntl, which are components of the core loop of the circadian clock in osteoblasts.

  13. Takotsubo syndrome and estrogen receptor genes: partners in crime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzino, Gabriele; Bitto, Alessandra; Crea, Pasquale; Khandheria, Bijoy; Vriz, Olga; Carerj, Scipione; Squadrito, Francesco; Minisini, Rosalba; Citro, Rodolfo; Cusmà-Piccione, Maurizio; Madaffari, Antonio; Andò, Giuseppe; Altavilla, Domenica; Zito, Concetta

    2017-04-01

    We aimed to analyze genetic polymorphism of estrogen receptor (ESR) 1 and ESR2 in a series of postmenopausal women with Takotsubo syndrome (TS). In total, 81 consecutive white women were prospectively enrolled: 22 with TS (TS group; mean age 71.2 ± 9.8 years), 22 with acute myocardial infarction (MI group; mean age 73.2 ± 8 years), and 37 asymptomatic healthy controls (CTRL group; mean age 69 ± 4.2 years). Genotyping of ESR1 -397C>T (rs2234693) and -351A>G (rs9340799) and ESR2 -1839G>T (rs 1271572) and 1082G>A (rs1256049) genetic variants was performed. We estimated the odds ratio (OR) between the genotype of each examined locus with the occurrence of TS or MI. The risk of experiencing TS was higher for those study participants carrying the T allele at the rs2234693 locus of the ESR1 gene [OR: 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.973-4.11, P = 0.04, TS vs. MI + CTRL; OR: 2.79, 95% CI: 1.17-6.64, P = 0.016, TS vs. MI alone]. Women carrying a T allele at the rs1271572 locus of the ESR2 gene demonstrated an even higher risk (OR: 3.23, 95% CI: 1.55-6.73, P = 0.0019, TS vs. MI + CTRL; OR: 9.13, 95% CI: 2.78-29.9, P = 0.0001, TS vs. MI alone). The study reports preliminary findings suggesting a possible link between ESR polymorphisms and the occurrence of TS. Larger studies are needed to confirm our results.

  14. Association study of ghrelin receptor gene polymorphisms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, G; Rueda, B; Gonzalez-Gay, M A; Fernández, B; Lamas, J R; Balsa, A; Pascual-Salcedo, D; García, A; Raya, E; Martín, J

    2010-01-01

    Ghrelin is a newly characterised growth hormone (GH) releasing peptide widely distributed that may play an important role in the regulation of metabolic balance in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by decreasing the pro-inflammatory Th1 responses. In this study we investigated the possible contribution of several polymorphisms in the functional Ghrelin receptor to RA susceptibility. A screening of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was performed in a total of 950 RA patients and 990 healthy controls of Spanish Caucasian origin. Genotyping of all 3 SNPs was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction technology, using the TaqMan 5'-allele discrimination assay. We observed no statistically significant deviation between RA patients and controls for the GHSR SNPs analysed. In addition, we performed a haplotype analysis that did not reveal an association with RA susceptibility. The stratification analysis for the presence of shared epitope (SE), rheumatoid factor (RF) or antibodies anti cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) did not detect significant association of the GHSR polymorphisms with RA. These findings suggest that the GHSR gene polymorphisms do not appear to play a major role in RA genetic predisposition in our population.

  15. The Oxytocin Receptor Gene ( OXTR) and Face Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhallen, Roeland J; Bosten, Jenny M; Goodbourn, Patrick T; Lawrance-Owen, Adam J; Bargary, Gary; Mollon, J D

    2017-01-01

    A recent study has linked individual differences in face recognition to rs237887, a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of the oxytocin receptor gene ( OXTR; Skuse et al., 2014). In that study, participants were assessed using the Warrington Recognition Memory Test for Faces, but performance on Warrington's test has been shown not to rely purely on face recognition processes. We administered the widely used Cambridge Face Memory Test-a purer test of face recognition-to 370 participants. Performance was not significantly associated with rs237887, with 16 other SNPs of OXTR that we genotyped, or with a further 75 imputed SNPs. We also administered three other tests of face processing (the Mooney Face Test, the Glasgow Face Matching Test, and the Composite Face Test), but performance was never significantly associated with rs237887 or with any of the other genotyped or imputed SNPs, after corrections for multiple testing. In addition, we found no associations between OXTR and Autism-Spectrum Quotient scores.

  16. Glucocorticoid Receptor Related Genes: Genotype And Brain Gene Expression Relationships To Suicide And Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazatos, Spiro P.; Huang, Yung-yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A.; Mann, J. John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We tested the relationship between genotype, gene expression and suicidal behavior and MDD in live subjects and postmortem samples for three genes, associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD); FK506 binding protein 5 (FKBP5), Spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2) and Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1). Materials and Methods Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes were tested for association with suicidal behavior and MDD in a live (N=277) and a postmortem sample (N=209). RNA-seq was used to examine gene and isoform-level brain expression postmortem (Brodmann Area 9) (N=59). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) relationships were examined using a public database (UK Brain Expression Consortium). Results We identified a haplotype within the FKBP5 gene, present in 47% of the live subjects, that was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt (OR=1.58, t=6.03, p=0.014). Six SNPs on this gene, three SNPs on SKA2 and one near NR3C1 showed before-adjustment association with attempted suicide, and two SNPs of SKA2 with suicide death, but none stayed significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Only the SKA2 SNPs were related to expression in the prefrontal cortex. One NR3C1 transcript had lower expression in suicide relative to non-suicide sudden death cases (b=-0.48, SE=0.12, t=-4.02, adjusted p=0.004). Conclusion We have identified an association of FKBP5 haplotype with risk of suicide attempt and found an association between suicide and altered NR3C1 gene expression in the prefrontal cortex. Our findings further implicate hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction in suicidal behavior. PMID:27030168

  17. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R.

    2010-01-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action. PMID:20457145

  18. The Medicago truncatula lysine motif-receptor-like kinase gene family includes NFP and new nodule-expressed genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arrighi, J.F.; Barre, A.; Amor, Ben B.; Bersoult, A.; Campos Soriano, L.; Mirabella, R.; Carvalho-Niebel, de F.; Journet, E.P.; Ghérardi, M.; Huguet, T.; Geurts, R.; Dénarié, J.; Rougé, P.; Gough, C.

    2006-01-01

    Rhizobial Nod factors are key symbiotic signals responsible for starting the nodulation process in host legume plants. Of the six Medicago truncatula genes controlling a Nod factor signaling pathway, Nod Factor Perception (NFP) was reported as a candidate Nod factor receptor gene. Here, we provide

  19. Expression of StAR and Key Genes Regulating Cortisol Biosynthesis in Near Term Ovine Fetal Adrenocortical Cells: Effects of Long-Term Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Vladimir E; Myers, Dean A; Kaushal, Kanchan M; Ducsay, Charles A

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated decreased expression of key genes regulating cortisol biosynthesis in long-term hypoxic (LTH) sheep fetal adrenals compared to controls. We also showed that inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) with the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK)/ERK inhibitor UO126 limited adrenocorticotropic (ACTH)-induced cortisol production in ovine fetal adrenocortical cells (FACs), suggesting a role for ERKs in cortisol synthesis. This study was designed to determine whether the previously observed decrease in LTH cytochrome P45011A1/cytochrome P450c17 (CYP11A1/CYP17) in adrenal glands was maintained in vitro, and whether ACTH alone with or without UO126 treatment had altered the expression of CYP11A1, CYP17, and steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in control versus LTH FACs. Ewes were maintained at high altitude (3820 m) from ∼40 days of gestation (dG). At 138 to 141 dG, fetal adrenal glands were collected from LTH (n = 5) and age-matched normoxic controls (n = 6). Fetal adrenocortical cells were challenged with ACTH (10 -8 M) with or without UO126 (10 µM) for 18 hours. Media samples were collected for cortisol analysis and messenger RNA (mRNA) for CYP11A1, CYP17, and StAR was quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Cortisol was higher in the LTH versus control ( P StAR mRNA was decreased in LTH versus control ( P StAR expression.

  20. Ars Electronica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Thomas Bjørnsten

    2009-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Ars Electronica festivalen 3. - 8. september, 2009 i Linz, Østrig, der fejrede 30 års jubilæum under temaet "Human Nature". Festivalen fokuserer på interaktion mellem menneske, teknologi, kunst og samfund med særlig vægt på udviklingen af computeren og det digitale. Udgivelsesdato: 15.12...

  1. Oleocanthal Modulates Estradiol-Induced Gene Expression Involving Estrogen Receptor α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiler, Annekathrin Martina; Djiogue, Sefirin; Ehrhardt, Tino; Zierau, Oliver; Skaltsounis, Leandros; Halabalaki, Maria; Vollmer, Günter

    2015-09-01

    Oleocanthal is a bioactive compound from olive oil. It has attracted considerable attention as it is anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and has been shown to possess neuroprotective properties in vitro and in vivo. Delineated from its polyphenolic structure, the aim of this study was to characterize oleocanthal towards estrogenic properties. This might contribute to partly explain the beneficial effects described for the Mediterranean diet. Estrogenic properties of oleocanthal were assessed by different methods: a) stimulation of reporter gene activity in MVLN or RNDA cells either expressing estrogen receptor α or β, b) stimulation of luciferase reporter gene activity in U2OS osteosarcoma cells expressing estrogen receptor α or β, and c) elucidation of the impact on estradiol-induced gene expression in U2OS cells transduced with both estrogen receptors. Depending on the cell line origin, oleocanthal inhibited luciferase activity (MVLN, U2OS-estrogen receptor β) or weakly induced reporter gene activity at 10 µM in U2OS-estrogen receptor α cells. However, oleocanthal inhibited stimulation of luciferase activity by estradiol from both estrogen receptors. Oleocanthal, if given alone, did not stimulate gene expression in U2OS cells, but it significantly modulated the response of estradiol. Oleocanthal enhanced the effect of estradiol on the regulation of those genes, which are believed to be regulated through heterodimeric estrogen receptors. As the estrogenic response pattern of oleocanthal is rather unique, we compared the results obtained with oleacein. Oleocanthal binds to both estrogen receptors inducing estradiol-agonistic or antiagonistic effects depending on the cell line. Regarding regulation of gene expression in U2OS-estrogen receptor α/β cells, oleocanthal and oleacein enhanced estradiol-mediated regulation of heterodimer-regulated genes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. A novel human gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPR15) is located on chromosome 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiber, M.; Marchese, A.; O`Dowd, B.F. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We used sequence similarities among G-protein-coupled receptor genes to discover a novel receptor gene. Using primers based on conserved regions of the opioid-related receptors, we isolated a PCR product that was used to locate the full-length coding region of a novel human receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor gene, which we have named GPR15. A comparison of the amino acid sequence of the receptor encoded by GPR15 with other receptors revealed that it shared sequence identity with the angiotensin II AT1 and AT2 receptors, the interleukin 8b receptor, and the orphan receptors GPR1 and AGTL1. GPR15 was mapped to human chromosome 3q11.2-q13.1. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Functional polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, L B; Harsløf, T; Stenkjær, L

    2013-01-01

    variant allele, which has been associated with increased receptor function in monocytes, was associated with increased total hip BMD in women. With the exception of His155Tyr for which we found conflicting results in men and women, our results are consistent with the phenotype of the knockout mouse......UNLABELLED: The P2X(7) receptor is an ATP-gated cation channel. We investigated the effect of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function polymorphisms in the P2X(7) receptor gene on BMD and risk of vertebral fractures and found that five polymorphisms and haplotypes containing three...... of these polymorphisms were associated with BMD and fracture risk. INTRODUCTION: The P2X(7) receptor is an ATP-gated cation channel. P2X(7) receptor knockout mice have reduced total bone mineral content, and because several functional polymorphisms have been identified in the human P2X(7) receptor gene, we wanted...

  4. Test of Association Between 10 SNPs in the Oxytocin Receptor Gene and Conduct Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Joseph T.; Crowley, Thomas J.; Stallings, Michael C.; McQueen, Matthew; Hewitt, John K.; Hopfer, Christian; Hoft, Nicole R.; Ehringer, Marissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Animal and human studies have implicated oxytocin (OXT) in affiliative and prosocial behaviors. We tested whether genetic variation in the OXT receptor (OXTR) gene is associated with conduct disorder (CD).

  5. Sox2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Repressed Gene That Promotes Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregel, Steven; Kiriluk, Kyle J.; Rosen, Alex M.; Cai, Yi; Reyes, Edwin E.; Otto, Kristen B.; Tom, Westin; Paner, Gladell P.; Szmulewitz, Russell Z.; Vander Griend, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in detection and therapy, castration-resistant prostate cancer continues to be a major clinical problem. The aberrant activity of stem cell pathways, and their regulation by the Androgen Receptor (AR), has the potential to provide insight into novel mechanisms and pathways to prevent and treat advanced, castrate-resistant prostate cancers. To this end, we investigated the role of the embryonic stem cell regulator Sox2 [SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2] in normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. In the normal prostate, Sox2 is expressed in a portion of basal epithelial cells. Prostate tumors were either Sox2-positive or Sox2-negative, with the percentage of Sox2-positive tumors increasing with Gleason Score and metastases. In the castration-resistant prostate cancer cell line CWR-R1, endogenous expression of Sox2 was repressed by AR signaling, and AR chromatin-IP shows that AR binds the enhancer element within the Sox2 promoter. Likewise, in normal prostate epithelial cells and human embryonic stem cells, increased AR signaling also decreases Sox2 expression. Resistance to the anti-androgen MDV3100 results in a marked increase in Sox2 expression within three prostate cancer cell lines, and in the castration-sensitive LAPC-4 prostate cancer cell line ectopic expression of Sox2 was sufficient to promote castration-resistant tumor formation. Loss of Sox2 expression in the castration-resistant CWR-R1 prostate cancer cell line inhibited cell growth. Up-regulation of Sox2 was not associated with increased CD133 expression but was associated with increased FGF5 (Fibroblast Growth Factor 5) expression. These data propose a model of elevated Sox2 expression due to loss of AR-mediated repression during castration, and consequent castration-resistance via mechanisms not involving induction of canonical embryonic stem cell pathways. PMID:23326489

  6. Histone H4 Lys 20 methyltransferase SET8 promotes androgen receptor-mediated transcription activation in prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lushuai [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Yanyan; Du, Fengxia [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Han, Xiao [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Xiaohua [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Niu, Yuanjie [Chawnshang Chang Sex Hormone Research Center, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070 (China); Ren, Shancheng, E-mail: renshancheng@gmail.com [Department of Urology, Shanghai Changhai Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Sun, Yingli, E-mail: sunyl@big.ac.cn [Laboratory of Genome Variations and Precision Bio-Medicine, Beijing Institute of Genomics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Dihydrotestosterone stimulates H4K20me1 enrichment at the PSA promoter. • SET8 promotes AR-mediated transcription activation. • SET8 interacts with AR and promotes cell proliferation. - Abstract: Histone methylation status in different lysine residues has an important role in transcription regulation. The effect of H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) on androgen receptor (AR)-mediated gene transcription remains unclear. Here we show that AR agonist stimulates the enrichment of H4K20me1 and SET8 at the promoter of AR target gene PSA in an AR dependent manner. Furthermore, SET8 is crucial for the transcription activation of PSA. Co-immunoprecipitation analyses demonstrate that SET8 interacts with AR. Therefore, we conclude that SET8 is involved in AR-mediated transcription activation, possibly through its interaction with AR and H4K20me1 modification.

  7. Metabolic engineering of the chloroplast genome reveals that the yeast ArDH gene confers enhanced tolerance to salinity and drought in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sarwar Khan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Osmoprotectants stabilize proteins and membranes against the denaturing effect of high concentrations of salts and other harmful solutes. In yeast, arabitol dehydrogenase (ArDH reduces D-ribulose to D-arabitol where D-ribulose is derived by dephosphorylating D-ribulose-5-PO4 in the oxidized pentose pathway. Osmotolerance in plants could be developed through metabolic engineering of chloroplast genome by introducing genes encoding polyols. Here, we report that ArDH expression in chloroplasts confers tolerance to NaCl (up to 400 mM. Transgenic plants compared to wild type survived for four to five weeks on 400 mM NaCl. Nevertheless, plants remained green and grew normal on concentrations up to 350 mM NaCl. Further, a-week-old seedlings were also challenged with poly ethylene glycol (PEG, up to 6% in the liquid medium, considering that membranes and proteins are protected under stress conditions due to accumulation of arabitol in chloroplasts. Seedlings were tolerant to 6% PEG, suggesting that ARDH enzyme maintains integrity of membranes in chloroplasts under drought conditions via metabolic engineering. Hence, the gene could be expressed in agronomic plants to withstand abiotic stresses.

  8. The androgen receptor malignancy shift in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Ben T; Pal, Sumanta K; Bolton, Eric C; Jones, Jeremy O

    2018-05-01

    Androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) are necessary for the development, function, and homeostatic growth regulation of the prostate gland. However, once prostate cells are transformed, the AR is necessary for the proliferation and survival of the malignant cells. This change in AR function appears to occur in nearly every prostate cancer. We have termed this the AR malignancy shift. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of the AR malignancy shift, including the DNA-binding patterns that define the shift, the transcriptome changes associated with the shift, the putative drivers of the shift, and its clinical implications. In benign prostate epithelial cells, the AR primarily binds consensus AR binding sites. In carcinoma cells, the AR cistrome is dramatically altered, as the AR associates with FOXA1 and HOXB13 motifs, among others. This shift leads to the transcription of genes associated with a malignant phenotype. In model systems, some mutations commonly found in localized prostate cancer can alter the AR cistrome, consistent with the AR malignancy shift. Current evidence suggests that the AR malignancy shift is necessary but not sufficient for transformation of prostate epithelial cells. Reinterpretation of prostate cancer genomic classification systems in light of the AR malignancy shift may improve our ability to predict clinical outcomes and treat patients appropriately. Identifying and targeting the molecular factors that contribute to the AR malignancy shift is not trivial but by doing so, we may be able to develop new strategies for the treatment or prevention of prostate cancer. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cloning of human genes encoding novel G protein-coupled receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchese, A.; Docherty, J.M.; Heiber, M. [Univ. of Toronto, (Canada)] [and others

    1994-10-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of several novel human genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors. Each of the receptors contained the familiar seven transmembrane topography and most closely resembled peptide binding receptors. Gene GPR1 encoded a receptor protein that is intronless in the coding region and that shared identity (43% in the transmembrane regions) with the opioid receptors. Northern blot analysis revealed that GPR1 transcripts were expressed in the human hippocampus, and the gene was localized to chromosome 15q21.6. Gene GPR2 encoded a protein that most closely resembled an interleukin-8 receptor (51% in the transmembrane regions), and this gene, not expressed in the six brain regions examined, was localized to chromosome 17q2.1-q21.3. A third gene, GPR3, showed identity (56% in the transmembrane regions) with a previously characterized cDNA clone from rat and was localized to chromosome 1p35-p36.1. 31 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. PDE4 and mAKAPβ are nodal organizers of β2-ARs nuclear PKA signaling in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedioune, Ibrahim; Lefebvre, Florence; Lechêne, Patrick; Varin, Audrey; Domergue, Valérie; Kapiloff, Michael S; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2018-05-03

    β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) produce different acute contractile effects on the heart partly because they impact on different cytosolic pools of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). They also exert different effects on gene expression but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms by which β1- and β2-ARs regulate nuclear PKA activity in cardiomyocytes. We used cytoplasmic and nuclear targeted biosensors to examine cAMP signals and PKA activity in adult rat ventricular myocytes upon selective β1- or β2-ARs stimulation. Both β1- and β2-AR stimulation increased cAMP and activated PKA in the cytoplasm. While the two receptors also increased cAMP in the nucleus, only β1-ARs increased nuclear PKA activity and up-regulated the PKA target gene and pro-apoptotic factor, inducible cAMP element repressor (ICER). Inhibition of PDE4, but not Gi, PDE3, GRK2 nor caveolae disruption disclosed nuclear PKA activation and ICER induction by β2-ARs. Both nuclear and cytoplasmic PKI prevented nuclear PKA activation and ICER induction by β1-ARs, indicating that PKA activation outside the nucleus is required for subsequent nuclear PKA activation and ICER mRNA expression. Cytoplasmic PKI also blocked ICER induction by β2-AR stimulation (with concomitant PDE4 inhibition). However, in this case nuclear PKI decreased ICER up-regulation by only 30%, indicating that other mechanisms are involved. Down-regulation of mAKAPβ partially inhibited nuclear PKA activation upon β1-AR stimulation, and drastically decreased nuclear PKA activation upon β2-AR stimulation in the presence of PDE4 inhibition. β1- and β2-ARs differentially regulate nuclear PKA activity and ICER expression in cardiomyocytes. PDE4 insulates a mAKAPβ-targeted PKA pool at the nuclear envelope that prevents nuclear PKA activation upon β2-AR stimulation.

  11. Identification and characterization of MEL-3, a novel AR antagonist that suppresses prostate cancer cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Christine; Marchand, Arnaud; Chaltin, Patrick; Munck, Sebastian; Voet, Arnout; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Claessens, Frank

    2012-06-01

    Antiandrogens are an important component of prostate cancer therapy as the androgen receptor (AR) is the key regulator of prostate cancer growth and survival. Current AR antagonists, such as bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide, have a low affinity for the AR and as a result block AR signaling insufficiently. Moreover, many patients develop a resistance for bicalutamide or hydroxyflutamide during therapy or show a clinical improvement after withdrawal of the antiandrogen. New and more effective AR antagonists are needed to ensure follow-up of these patients. We therefore developed a screening system to identify novel AR antagonists from a collection of compounds. MEL-3 [8-(propan-2-yl)-5,6-dihydro-4H-pyrazino[3,2,1-jk]carbazole] was selected as potent inhibitor of the AR and was further characterized in vitro. On different prostate cancer cell lines MEL-3 displayed an improved therapeutic profile compared with bicalutamide. Not only cell growth was inhibited but also the expression of androgen-regulated genes: PSA and FKBP5. Prostate cancer is often associated with mutated ARs that respond to a broadened spectrum of ligands including the current antiandrogens used in the clinic, hydroxyflutamide and bicalutamide. The activity of two mutant receptors (AR T877A and AR W741C) was shown to be reduced in presence of MEL-3, providing evidence that MEL-3 can potentially be a follow-up treatment for bicalutamide- and hydroxyflutamide-resistant patients. The mechanism of action of MEL-3 on the molecular level was further explored by comparing the structure-activity relationship of different chemical derivatives of MEL-3 with the in silico docking of MEL-3 derivatives in the binding pocket of the AR. ©2012 AACR

  12. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ghalandari; Hosseini-Esfahani; Mirmiran

    2015-01-01

    Context Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. E...

  13. A biallelic RFLP of the human. alpha. 2-C4 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRA2RL2) localized on the short arm of chromosome 4 and encoding the putative. alpha. 2B receptor is identified with Bsu 36 L using a 1. 5 kb probe (p ADRA2RL2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, M.R.; Berrettini, W.H. (Clinical Neurogenetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Regan, J.W. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1989-12-11

    A 1.5 kb Eco RI cDNA fragment representing the human alpha2-C4 adrenergic receptor (AR) gene encoding the putative alpha2B-AR, containing approximately 1270 bp of the coding and 240 bp of the 3{prime}flanking region, inserted into pSP65, was used as a probe (p ADRA2RL2). This clone was obtained by screening a human kidney lambda GT10 cDNA library with the 0.95 kb Pst I restriction fragment derived from the coding block of the gene for the human platelet alpha2-AR. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with Bsu 36 I identifies a two allele polymorphism with bands at 12 kb and 5.8 kb. 20 unrelated North American caucasian subjects were evaluated with frequencies of: A allele, 0.45; B allele, 0.55, heterozygosity (obs), 0.5. This alpha2-AR gene has been mapped in a separation effort in 59 CEPH reference pedigrees to the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 just proximal to GB (4p 16.3) reported to be linked to the Huntingston's disease gene. Codominant inheritance was observed in seven families with two and three generations, respectively. The number of meioses scored was 95.

  14. The axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1 is a candidate gene for developmental dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katariina Hannula-Jouppi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  15. The Axon Guidance Receptor Gene ROBO1 Is a Candidate Gene for Developmental Dyslexia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Dyslexia, or specific reading disability, is the most common learning disorder with a complex, partially genetic basis, but its biochemical mechanisms remain poorly understood. A locus on Chromosome 3, DYX5, has been linked to dyslexia in one large family and speech-sound disorder in a subset of small families. We found that the axon guidance receptor gene ROBO1, orthologous to the Drosophila roundabout gene, is disrupted by a chromosome translocation in a dyslexic individual. In a large pedigree with 21 dyslexic individuals genetically linked to a specific haplotype of ROBO1 (not found in any other chromosomes in our samples, the expression of ROBO1 from this haplotype was absent or attenuated in affected individuals. Sequencing of ROBO1 in apes revealed multiple coding differences, and the selection pressure was significantly different between the human, chimpanzee, and gorilla branch as compared to orangutan. We also identified novel exons and splice variants of ROBO1 that may explain the apparent phenotypic differences between human and mouse in heterozygous loss of ROBO1. We conclude that dyslexia may be caused by partial haplo-insufficiency for ROBO1 in rare families. Thus, our data suggest that a slight disturbance in neuronal axon crossing across the midline between brain hemispheres, dendrite guidance, or another function of ROBO1 may manifest as a specific reading disability in humans.

  16. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun; Jakobsen, Marianne Antonius; Brusgaard, Klaus; Tan, Qihua; Gaster, Michael

    2014-09-05

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls. Glucose transport in myotubes was comparable in patients with PCOS vs. controls and was unchanged by testosterone treatment (p=0.21 PCOS vs. controls). These results suggest that testosterone treatment of myotubes increases the aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression without affecting insulin sensitivity and if testosterone is implicated in muscular insulin resistance in PCOS, this is by and indirect mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Co-regulation of a large and rapidly evolving repertoire of odorant receptor genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lane Robert P

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The olfactory system meets niche- and species-specific demands by an accelerated evolution of its odorant receptor repertoires. In this review, we describe evolutionary processes that have shaped olfactory and vomeronasal receptor gene families in vertebrate genomes. We emphasize three important periods in the evolution of the olfactory system evident by comparative genomics: the adaptation to land in amphibian ancestors, the decline of olfaction in primates, and the delineation of putative pheromone receptors concurrent with rodent speciation. The rapid evolution of odorant receptor genes, the sheer size of the repertoire, as well as their wide distribution in the genome, presents a developmental challenge: how are these ever-changing odorant receptor repertoires coordinated within the olfactory system? A central organizing principle in olfaction is the specialization of sensory neurons resulting from each sensory neuron expressing only ~one odorant receptor allele. In this review, we also discuss this mutually exclusive expression of odorant receptor genes. We have considered several models to account for co-regulation of odorant receptor repertoires, as well as discussed a new hypothesis that invokes important epigenetic properties of the system.

  18. Cloning of the cDNA and gene for a human D2 dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grady, D.K.; Makam, H.; Stofko, R.E.; Bunzow, J.R.; Civelli, O.; Marchionni, M.A.; Alfano, M.; Frothingham, L.; Fischer, J.B.; Burke-Howie, K.J.; Server, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    A clone encoding a human D 2 dopamine receptor was isolated from a pituitary cDNA library and sequenced. The deduced protein sequence is 96% identical with that of the cloned rat receptor with one major difference: the human receptor contains an additional 29 amino acids in its putative third cytoplasmic loop. Southern blotting demonstrated the presence of only one human D 2 receptor gene. Two overlapping phage containing the gene were isolated and characterized. DNA sequence analysis of these clones showed that the coding sequence is interrupted by six introns and that the additional amino acids present in the human pituitary receptor are encoded by a single exon of 87 base pairs. The involvement of this sequence in alternative splicing and its biological significance are discussed

  19. Changes in gene expression following androgen receptor blockade ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu urs

    of gene expression in the ventral prostate, it is not clear whether all the gene expression ... These include clusterin, methionine adenosyl transferase IIα, and prostate-specific ..... MAGEE1 melanoma antigen and no similarity was found with the ...

  20. No linkage and association of atopy to chromosome 16 including the interleukin-4 receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, A; Bjerke, T; Schiøtz, P O

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several susceptibility genes for atopy have been suggested in recent years. Few have been investigated as intensively as the interleukin-4-receptor alpha (IL4Ralpha) gene on chromosome 16. The results remain in dispute. Therefore, in a robust design, we tested for association of type ...

  1. Mutation screening of the Ectodysplasin-A receptor gene EDAR in hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hout, Annemarie H.; Oudesluijs, Gretel G.; Venema, Andrea; Verheij, Joke B. G. M.; Mol, Bart G. J.; Rump, Patrick; Brunner, Han G.; Vos, Yvonne J.; van Essen, Anthonie J.

    Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) can be caused by mutations in the X-linked ectodysplasin A (ED1) gene or the autosomal ectodysplasin A-receptor (EDAR) and EDAR-associated death domain (EDARADD) genes. X-linked and autosomal forms are sometimes clinically indistinguishable. For genetic

  2. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chuang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ γδ T cells. We have previously identified partial or complete genomic sequences for thirteen different WC1 genes through annotation of the bovine genome Btau_3.1 build. We also identified two WC1 cDNA sequences from other cattle that did not correspond to sequences in the Btau_3.1 build. Their absence in the Btau_3.1 build may have reflected gaps in the genome assembly or polymorphisms among animals. Since the response of γδ T cells to bacterial challenge is determined by WC1 gene expression, it was critical to understand whether individual cattle or breeds differ in the number of WC1 genes or display polymorphisms. Results Real-time quantitative PCR using DNA from the animal whose genome was sequenced (“Dominette” and sixteen other animals representing ten breeds of cattle, showed that the number of genes coding for WC1 co-receptors is thirteen. The complete coding sequences of those thirteen WC1 genes is presented, including the correction of an error in the WC1-2 gene due to mis-assembly in the Btau_3.1 build. All other cDNA sequences were found to agree with the previous annotation of complete or partial WC1 genes. PCR amplification and sequencing of the most variable N-terminal SRCR domain (domain 1 which has the SRCR “a” pattern of each of the thirteen WC1 genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved among individuals and breeds. Of 160 sequences of domain 1 from three breeds of cattle, no additional sequences beyond the thirteen described WC1 genes were found. Analysis of the complete WC1 cDNA sequences indicated that the thirteen WC1 genes code for three distinct WC1 molecular forms. Conclusion The bovine WC1 multi-gene family is composed of thirteen genes coding for three structural forms whose

  3. The Association of Polymorphisms in Leptin/Leptin Receptor Genes and Ghrelin/Ghrelin Receptor Genes With Overweight/Obesity and the Related Metabolic Disturbances: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalandari, Hamid; Hosseini-Esfahani, Firoozeh; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2015-07-01

    Leptin and ghrelin are two important appetite and energy balance-regulating peptides. Common polymorphisms in the genes coding these peptides and their related receptors are shown to be associated with body weight, different markers of obesity and metabolic abnormalities. This review article aims to investigate the association of common polymorphisms of these genes with overweight/obesity and the metabolic disturbances related to it. The keywords leptin, ghrelin, polymorphism, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), obesity, overweight, Body Mass Index, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (MeSH headings) were used to search in the following databases: Pubmed, Sciencedirect (Elsevier), and Google scholar. Overall, 24 case-control studies, relevant to our topic, met the criteria and were included in the review. The most prevalent leptin/leptin receptor genes (LEP/LEPR) and ghrelin/ghrelin receptor genes (GHRL/GHSR) single nucleotide polymorphisms studied were LEP G-2548A, LEPR Q223R, and Leu72Met, respectively. Nine studies of the 17 studies on LEP/LEPR, and three studies of the seven studies on GHRL/GHSR showed significant relationships. In general, our study suggests that the association between LEP/LEPR and GHRL/GHSR with overweight/obesity and the related metabolic disturbances is inconclusive. These results may be due to unidentified gene-environment interactions. More investigations are needed to further clarify this association.

  4. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Gazdhar, A.; Weitzel, T.; Schmid, R.; Krause, T.

    2006-01-01

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and humans

  5. PET/CT imaging of human somatostatin receptor 2 (hsstr2) as reporter gene for gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, M. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)]. E-mail: Michael.Hofmann@insel.ch; Gazdhar, A. [Division of Pulmonary Medicine, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Weitzel, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland); Schmid, R. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Bern (Switzerland); Krause, T. [Molecular Imaging and Therapy Group (MIT-Bern), Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Medical School Bern (Switzerland)

    2006-12-20

    Localized information on region-selective gene expression in small animals is widely obtained by use of reporter genes inducing light emission. Using these reporter genes for imaging deep inside the human body fluorescent probes are hindered by attenuation, scattering and possible fluorescence quenching. This can be overcome by use of radio-peptide receptors as reporter genes. Therefore, the feasibility of the somatostatin receptor 2 expression vector system for expression imaging was checked against a control vector containing luciferase gene. For in vivo transduction of vector DNA into the rat forelimb muscles the in vivo electroporation technique was chosen because of its high regio-selectivity. The gene expression was imaged by high-sensitive CCD camera (luciferase activity) and by PET/CT using a Ga-68-DOTATOC as radio peptide probe. The relative sstr2 expression was enhanced by gene transduction at maximum to a factor of 15. The PET/CT images could be fully quantified. The above demonstrated feasibility of radio-peptide PET/CT reporter gene imaging may serve in the future as a tool for full quantitative understanding of regional gene expression, especially in large animals and human000.

  6. Antithetic regulation by β-adrenergic receptors of Gq receptor signaling via phospholipase C underlies the airway β-agonist paradox

    OpenAIRE

    McGraw, Dennis W.; Almoosa, Khalid F.; Paul, Richard J.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Liggett, Stephen B.

    2003-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptorsARs) relax airway smooth muscle and bronchodilate, but chronic β-agonist treatment in asthma causes increased sensitivity to airway constriction (hyperreactivity) and is associated with exacerbations. This paradox was explored using mice with ablated βAR genes (βAR–/–) and transgenic mice overexpressing airway smooth muscle β2AR (β2AR-OE) representing two extremes: absence and persistent activity of airway βAR. Unexpectedly, βAR–/– mice, lacking these bronchodilating ...

  7. Investigation of Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA A receptors genes and migraine susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccodicola Alfredo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Migraine is a neurological disorder characterized by recurrent attacks of severe headache, affecting around 12% of Caucasian populations. It is well known that migraine has a strong genetic component, although the number and type of genes involved is still unclear. Prior linkage studies have reported mapping of a migraine gene to chromosome Xq 24–28, a region containing a cluster of genes for GABA A receptors (GABRE, GABRA3, GABRQ, which are potential candidate genes for migraine. The GABA neurotransmitter has been implicated in migraine pathophysiology previously; however its exact role has not yet been established, although GABA receptors agonists have been the target of therapeutic developments. The aim of the present research is to investigate the role of the potential candidate genes reported on chromosome Xq 24–28 region in migraine susceptibility. In this study, we have focused on the subunit GABA A receptors type ε (GABRE and type θ (GABRQ genes and their involvement in migraine. Methods We have performed an association analysis in a large population of case-controls (275 unrelated Caucasian migraineurs versus 275 controls examining a set of 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region (exons 3, 5 and 9 of the GABRE gene and also the I478F coding variant of the GABRQ gene. Results Our study did not show any association between the examined SNPs in our test population (P > 0.05. Conclusion Although these particular GABA receptor genes did not show positive association, further studies are necessary to consider the role of other GABA receptor genes in migraine susceptibility.

  8. High-throughput Microarray Detection of Vomeronasal Receptor Gene Expression in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We performed comprehensive data mining to explore the vomeronasal receptor (V1R & V2R repertoires in mouse and rat using the mm5 and rn3 genome, respectively. This bioinformatic analysis was followed by investigation of gene expression using a custom designed high-density oligonucleotide array containing all of these receptors and other selected genes of interest. This array enabled us to detect the specific expression of V1R and V2Rs which were previously identified solely based on computational prediction from gene sequence data, thereby establishing that these genes are indeed part of the vomeronasal system, especially the V2Rs. 168 V1Rs and 98 V2Rs were detected to be highly enriched in mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO, and 108 V1Rs and 87 V2Rs in rat VNO. We monitored the expression profile of mouse VR genes in other non-VNO tissues with the result that some VR genes were re-designated as VR-like genes based on their non-olfactory expression pattern. Temporal expression profiles for mouse VR genes were characterized and their patterns were classified, revealing the developmental dynamics of these so-called pheromone receptors. We found numerous patterns of temporal expression which indicate possible behavior-related functions. The uneven composition of VR genes in certain patterns suggests a functional differentiation between the two types of VR genes. We found the coherence between VR genes and transcription factors in terms of their temporal expression patterns. In situ hybridization experiments were performed to evaluate the cell number change over time for selected receptor genes.

  9. Development of gene diagnosis for diabetes and cholecystitis based on gene analysis of CCK-A receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Akira

    1999-01-01

    Base sequence analysis of CCKAR gene (a gene of A-type receptor for cholecystokinin) from OLETF rat, a model rat for insulin-independent diabetes was made based on the base sequence of wild CCKAR gene, which had been clarified in the previous year. From the pancreas of OLETF rat, DNA was extracted and transduced into λphage after fragmentation to construct the gene library of OLETF. Then, λphage DNA clone bound with labelled cDNA of CCKAR gene was analyzed and the gene structure was compared with that of the wild gene. It was demonstrated that CCKAR gene of OLETF had a deletion (6800 b.p.) ranging from the promoter region to the Exon 2, suggesting that CCKAR gene is not functional in OLETF rat. The whole sequence of this mutant gene was registered into Japan DNA Bank (D 50610). Then, F 2 offspring rats were obtained through crossing OLETF (female) and F344 (male) and the time course-changes in the blood glucose level after glucose loading were compared among them. The blood glucose level after glucose loading was significantly higher in the homo-mutant F 2 (CCKAR,-/-) as well as the parent OLETF rat than hetero-mutant F 2 (CCKARm-/+) or the wild rat (CCKAR,+/+). This suggests that CCKAR gene might be involved in the control of blood glucose level and an alteration of the expression level or the functions of CCKAR gene might affect the blood glucose level. (M.N.)

  10. Natural killer cell receptor genes in the family Equidae: not only Ly49.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Futas

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for

  11. Natural Killer Cell Receptor Genes in the Family Equidae: Not only Ly49

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futas, Jan; Horin, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have important functions in immunity. NK recognition in mammals can be mediated through killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) and/or killer cell lectin-like Ly49 receptors. Genes encoding highly variable NK cell receptors (NKR) represent rapidly evolving genomic regions. No single conservative model of NKR genes was observed in mammals. Single-copy low polymorphic NKR genes present in one mammalian species may expand into highly polymorphic multigene families in other species. In contrast to other non-rodent mammals, multiple Ly49-like genes appear to exist in the horse, while no functional KIR genes were observed in this species. In this study, Ly49 and KIR were sought and their evolution was characterized in the entire family Equidae. Genomic sequences retrieved showed the presence of at least five highly conserved polymorphic Ly49 genes in horses, asses and zebras. These findings confirmed that the expansion of Ly49 occurred in the entire family. Several KIR-like sequences were also identified in the genome of Equids. Besides a previously identified non-functional KIR-Immunoglobulin-like transcript fusion gene (KIR-ILTA) and two putative pseudogenes, a KIR3DL-like sequence was analyzed. In contrast to previous observations made in the horse, the KIR3DL sequence, genomic organization and mRNA expression suggest that all Equids might produce a functional KIR receptor protein molecule with a single non-mutated immune tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) domain. No evidence for positive selection in the KIR3DL gene was found. Phylogenetic analysis including rhinoceros and tapir genomic DNA and deduced amino acid KIR-related sequences showed differences between families and even between species within the order Perissodactyla. The results suggest that the order Perissodactyla and its family Equidae with expanded Ly49 genes and with a potentially functional KIR gene may represent an interesting model for evolutionary biology of

  12. Mechanism of Androgen Receptor Corepression by CKβBP2/CRIF1, a Multifunctional Transcription Factor Coregulator Expressed in Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Jiann-an; Bai, Suxia; Grossman, Gail; Titus, Mark A.; Ford, O. Harris; Pop, Elena A.; Smith, Gary J.; Mohler, James L.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; French, Frank S.

    2013-01-01

    The transcription factor coregulator Casein kinase IIβbinding protein 2 or CR6-interacting factor 1 (CKβBP2/CRIF1) binds the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer cells and in response to dihydrotestosterone localizes with AR on the prostate-specific antigen gene enhancer, but does not bind DNA suggesting CKβBP2/CRIF1 localization in chromatin is determined by AR. In this study we show also that CKβBP2/CRIF1 inhibits wild-type AR and AR N-terminal transcriptional activity, binds to the AR...

  13. Prospects and limitations of T cell receptor gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Schotte, Remko; Coccoris, Miriam; de Witte, Moniek A.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is an attractive means to provide cancer patients with immune cells of a desired specificity and the efficacy of such adoptive transfers has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. Because the T cell receptor is the single specificity-determining

  14. The Drosophila gene CG9918 codes for a pyrokinin-1 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Torp, Malene; Hauser, Frank

    2005-01-01

    The database from the Drosophila Genome Project contains a gene, CG9918, annotated to code for a G protein-coupled receptor. We cloned the cDNA of this gene and functionally expressed it in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested a library of about 25 Drosophila and other insect neuropeptides......, and seven insect biogenic amines on the expressed receptor and found that it was activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide, pyrokinin-1 (TGPSASSGLWFGPRLamide; EC50, 5 x 10(-8) M). The receptor was also activated by other Drosophila neuropeptides, terminating with the sequence PRLamide...... (Hug-gamma, ecdysis-triggering-hormone-1, pyrokinin-2), but in these cases about six to eight times higher concentrations were needed. The receptor was not activated by Drosophila neuropeptides, containing a C-terminal PRIamide sequence (such as ecdysis-triggering-hormone-2), or PRVamide (such as capa...

  15. The structure of the human interferon alpha/beta receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfalla, G; Gardiner, K; Proudhon, D; Vielh, E; Uzé, G

    1992-02-05

    Using the cDNA coding for the human interferon alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR), the IFNAR gene has been physically mapped relative to the other loci of the chromosome 21q22.1 region. 32,906 base pairs covering the IFNAR gene have been cloned and sequenced. Primer extension and solution hybridization-ribonuclease protection have been used to determine that the transcription of the gene is initiated in a broad region of 20 base pairs. Some aspects of the polymorphism of the gene, including noncoding sequences, have been analyzed; some are allelic differences in the coding sequence that induce amino acid variations in the resulting protein. The exon structure of the IFNAR gene and of that of the available genes for the receptors of the cytokine/growth hormone/prolactin/interferon receptor family have been compared with the predictions for the secondary structure of those receptors. From this analysis, we postulate a common origin and propose an hypothesis for the divergence from the immunoglobulin superfamily.

  16. Concomitant duplications of opioid peptide and receptor genes before the origin of jawed vertebrates.

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    Görel Sundström

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The opioid system is involved in reward and pain mechanisms and consists in mammals of four receptors and several peptides. The peptides are derived from four prepropeptide genes, PENK, PDYN, PNOC and POMC, encoding enkephalins, dynorphins, orphanin/nociceptin and beta-endorphin, respectively. Previously we have described how two rounds of genome doubling (2R before the origin of jawed vertebrates formed the receptor family. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Opioid peptide gene family members were investigated using a combination of sequence-based phylogeny and chromosomal locations of the peptide genes in various vertebrates. Several adjacent gene families were investigated similarly. The results show that the ancestral peptide gene gave rise to two additional copies in the genome doublings. The fourth member was generated by a local gene duplication, as the genes encoding POMC and PNOC are located on the same chromosome in the chicken genome and all three teleost genomes that we have studied. A translocation has disrupted this synteny in mammals. The PDYN gene seems to have been lost in chicken, but not in zebra finch. Duplicates of some peptide genes have arisen in the teleost fishes. Within the prepropeptide precursors, peptides have been lost or gained in different lineages. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ancestral peptide and receptor genes were located on the same chromosome and were thus duplicated concomitantly. However, subsequently genetic linkage has been lost. In conclusion, the system of opioid peptides and receptors was largely formed by the genome doublings that took place early in vertebrate evolution.

  17. Angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism and diabetic microangiopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L; Cambien, Francois; Rossing, P

    1996-01-01

    with proliferative retinopathy and without diabetic retinopathy was found either: 77 (50%) / 66 (42%) / 13 (8%) vs. 42 (63%) / 22 (33%) / 3 (4%) had AA/AC/CC genotypes, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The A1166-->C polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene does not contribute to the genetic susceptibility...... is present particularly in vascular smooth muscle cells, myocardium and the kidney. A transversion of adenine to cytosine at nucleotide position 1166 in the gene coding for the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor has been associated with hypertension in the non-diabetic population. METHODS: We studied...... the relationship between the A1166-->C polymorphism in the angiotensin-II type 1 receptor gene in patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and diabetic nephropathy (121 men, 77 women, age 41 +/- 10 years, diabetes duration 27 +/- 8 years) and in IDDM patients with normoalbuminuria (116 men, 74...

  18. Oxytocin, vasopressin and estrogen receptor gene expression in relation to social recognition in female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clipperton-Allen, Amy E; Lee, Anna W; Reyes, Anny; Devidze, Nino; Phan, Anna; Pfaff, Donald W; Choleris, Elena

    2012-02-28

    Inter- and intra-species differences in social behavior and recognition-related hormones and receptors suggest that different distribution and/or expression patterns may relate to social recognition. We used qRT-PCR to investigate naturally occurring differences in expression of estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα), ER-beta (ERβ), progesterone receptor (PR), oxytocin (OT) and receptor, and vasopressin (AVP) and receptors in proestrous female mice. Following four 5 min exposures to the same two conspecifics, one was replaced with a novel mouse in the final trial (T5). Gene expression was examined in mice showing high (85-100%) and low (40-60%) social recognition scores (i.e., preferential novel mouse investigation in T5) in eight socially-relevant brain regions. Results supported OT and AVP involvement in social recognition, and suggest that in the medial preoptic area, increased OT and AVP mRNA, together with ERα and ERβ gene activation, relate to improved social recognition. Initial social investigation correlated with ERs, PR and OTR in the dorsolateral septum, suggesting that these receptors may modulate social interest without affecting social recognition. Finally, increased lateral amygdala gene activation in the LR mice may be associated with general learning impairments, while decreased lateral amygdala activity may indicate more efficient cognitive mechanisms in the HR mice. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. arXiv ARS Leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Drewes, M.; Hernandez, P.; Kekic, M.; Lopez-Pavon, J.; Racker, J.; Rius, N.; Salvado, J.; Teresi, D.

    2018-02-28

    We review the current status of the leptogenesis scenario originally proposed by Akhmedov, Rubakov and Smirnov (ARS). It takes place in the parametric regime where the right-handed neutrinos are at the electroweak scale or below and the CP-violating effects are induced by the coherent superposition of different right-handed mass eigenstates. Two main theoretical approaches to derive quantum kinetic equations, the Hamiltonian time evolution as well as the Closed-Time-Path technique are presented, and we discuss their relations. For scenarios with two right-handed neutrinos, we chart the viable parameter space. Both, a Bayesian analysis, that determines the most likely configurations for viable leptogenesis given different variants of flat priors, and a determination of the maximally allowed mixing between the light, mostly left-handed, and heavy, mostly right-handed, neutrino states are discussed. Rephasing invariants are shown to be a useful tool to classify and to understand various distinct contributions to...

  20. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenner Sydney

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events. RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate

  1. Development of gene diagnosis for diabetes and cholecystis based on gene analysis of CCK-A receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Akira

    1998-01-01

    The gene structures of CCK, A type receptor in human, the rat and the mouse were investigated aiming to clarify that the aberration of the gene is involved in the incidences of diabetes and cholecystis. In this fiscal year, 1997, the normal structure of the gene and the accurate base sequence were analyzed using DNA fragments bound to 32 P-labelled cDNA of human CCKAR originated from the gene library of leucocyte. This gene contained about 2.2 x 10 5 base pairs and the base sequence was completely determined and registered to Japan DNA data bank (D85606). In addition, the genome structures and base sequences of mouse and rat CCKAR were analyzed and registered (D 85605 and D 50608, respectively). The differences in the base sequence of CCKAR among the species were found in the promotor region and the intron regions, suggesting that there might be differences in splicing among species. (M.N.)

  2. Behavioral analysis of Drosophila transformants expressing human taste receptor genes in the gustatory receptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Ryota; Sasaki, Yuko; Morita, Hiromi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Goto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic Drosophila expressing human T2R4 and T2R38 bitter-taste receptors or PKD2L1 sour-taste receptor in the fly gustatory receptor neurons and other tissues were prepared using conventional Gal4/UAS binary system. Molecular analysis showed that the transgene mRNAs are expressed according to the tissue specificity of the Gal4 drivers. Transformants expressing the transgene taste receptors in the fly taste neurons were then studied by a behavioral assay to analyze whether transgene chemoreceptors are functional and coupled to the cell response. Since wild-type flies show strong aversion against the T2R ligands as in mammals, the authors analyzed the transformants where the transgenes are expressed in the fly sugar receptor neurons so that they promote feeding ligand-dependently if they are functional and activate the neurons. Although the feeding preference varied considerably among different strains and individuals, statistical analysis using large numbers of transformants indicated that transformants expressing T2R4 showed a small but significant increase in the preference for denatonium and quinine, the T2R4 ligands, as compared to the control flies, whereas transformants expressing T2R38 did not. Similarly, transformants expressing T2R38 and PKD2L1 also showed a similar preference increase for T2R38-specific ligand phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and a sour-taste ligand, citric acid, respectively. Taken together, the transformants expressing mammalian taste receptors showed a small but significant increase in the feeding preference that is taste receptor and also ligand dependent. Although future improvements are required to attain performance comparable to the endogenous robust response, Drosophila taste neurons may serve as a potential in vivo heterologous expression system for analyzing chemoreceptor function.

  3. The nuclear receptor gene family in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, contains a novel subfamily group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogeler, Susanne; Galloway, Tamara S; Lyons, Brett P; Bean, Tim P

    2014-05-15

    Nuclear receptors are a superfamily of transcription factors important in key biological, developmental and reproductive processes. Several of these receptors are ligand- activated and through their ability to bind endogenous and exogenous ligands, are potentially vulnerable to xenobiotics. Molluscs are key ecological species in defining aquatic and terrestrial habitats and are sensitive to xenobiotic compounds in the environment. However, the understanding of nuclear receptor presence, function and xenobiotic disruption in the phylum Mollusca is limited. Here, forty-three nuclear receptor sequences were mined from the genome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. They include members of NR0-NR5 subfamilies, notably lacking any NR6 members. Phylogenetic analyses of the oyster nuclear receptors have been conducted showing the presence of a large novel subfamily group not previously reported, which is named NR1P. Homologues to all previous identified nuclear receptors in other mollusc species have also been determined including the putative heterodimer partner retinoid X receptor, estrogen receptor and estrogen related receptor. C. gigas contains a highly diverse set of nuclear receptors including a novel NR1 group, which provides important information on presence and evolution of this transcription factor superfamily in invertebrates. The Pacific oyster possesses two members of NR3, the sex steroid hormone receptor analogues, of which there are 9 in humans. This provides increasing evidence that steroid ligand specific expansion of this family is deuterostome specific. This new knowledge on divergence and emergence of nuclear receptors in C. gigas provides essential information for studying regulation of molluscan gene expression and the potential effects of xenobiotics.

  4. TBECH, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl) cyclohexane, alters androgen receptor regulation in response to mutations associated with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlyngdoh, Joubert Banjop; Asnake, Solomon; Pradhan, Ajay; Olsson, Per-Erik, E-mail: per-erik.olsson@oru.se

    2016-09-15

    Point mutations in the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) can result in altered AR structures leading to changes of ligand specificity and functions. AR mutations associated to prostate cancer (PCa) have been shown to result in receptor activation by non-androgenic substances and anti-androgenic drugs. Two AR mutations known to alter the function of anti-androgens are the AR{sub T877A} mutation, which is frequently detected mutation in PCa tumors and the AR{sub W741C} that is rare and has been derived in vitro following exposure of cells to the anti-androgen bicalutamide. AR activation by non-androgenic environmental substances has been suggested to affect PCa progression. In the present study we investigated the effect of AR mutations (AR{sub W741C} and AR{sub T877A}) on the transcriptional activation following exposure of cells to an androgenic brominated flame retardant, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2 dibromoethyl) cyclohexane (TBECH, also named DBE-DBCH). The AR mutations resulted in higher interaction energies and increased transcriptional activation in response to TBECH diastereomer exposures. The AR{sub T877A} mutation rendered AR highly responsive to low levels of DHT and TBECH and led to increased AR nuclear translocation. Gene expression analysis showed a stronger induction of AR target genes in LNCaP cells (AR{sub T877A}) compared to T-47D cells (AR{sub WT}) following TBECH exposure. Furthermore, AR knockdown experiments confirmed the AR dependency of these responses. The higher sensitivity of AR{sub T877A} and AR{sub W741C} to low levels of TBECH suggests that cells with these AR mutations are more susceptible to androgenic endocrine disrupters. - Highlights: • TBECH, is an endocrine disrupting compound that differ in activity depending on AR structure and sequence. • TBECH interaction with the human AR-LBD containing the mutations W741C and T877A is increased compared to the wild type receptor • The mutations, W741C and T877A, are more potent than the wild type

  5. Receptor-mediated gene delivery using chemically modified chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T H; Jiang, H L; Nah, J W; Cho, M H; Akaike, T; Cho, C S

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan has been investigated as a non-viral vector because it has several advantages such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and low toxicity with high cationic potential. However, the low specificity and low transfection efficiency of chitosan need to be solved prior to clinical application. In this paper, we focused on the galactose or mannose ligand modification of chitosan for enhancement of cell specificity and transfection efficiency via receptor-mediated endocytosis in vitro and in vivo

  6. Subclinical hyperthyroidism due to a thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene mutation (S505R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Joachim; Pfarr, Nicole; Krüger, Silvia; Hesse, Volker

    2006-12-01

    To identify the molecular defect by which non-autoimmune subclinical hyperthyroidism was caused in a 6-mo-old infant who presented with weight loss. Congenital non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism is caused by activating germline mutations in the thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) gene. Therefore, the TSHR gene was sequenced directly from the patient's genomic DNA. Molecular analysis revealed a heterozygous point mutation (S505R) in the TSHR gene as the underlying defect. A constitutively activating mutation in the TSHR gene has to be considered not only in patients with severe congenital non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism, but also in children with subclinical non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism.

  7. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus

    2011-01-01

    receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets.......The melanocortin system plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Mice genetically deficient in the melanocortin-3 receptor gene have a normal body weight with increased body fat, mild hypophagia compared to wild-type mice. In humans, Thr6Lys and Val81Ile variants of the melanocortin-3...

  8. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  9. Polymorphisms in adenosine receptor genes are associated with infarct size in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Z; Diamond, M A; Chen, J-M; Holly, T A; Bonow, R O; Dasgupta, A; Hyslop, T; Purzycki, A; Wagner, J; McNamara, D M; Kukulski, T; Wos, S; Velazquez, E J; Ardlie, K; Feldman, A M

    2007-10-01

    The goal of this experiment was to identify the presence of genetic variants in the adenosine receptor genes and assess their relationship to infarct size in a population of patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. Adenosine receptors play an important role in protecting the heart during ischemia and in mediating the effects of ischemic preconditioning. We sequenced DNA samples from 273 individuals with ischemic cardiomyopathy and from 203 normal controls to identify the presence of genetic variants in the adenosine receptor genes. Subsequently, we analyzed the relationship between the identified genetic variants and infarct size, left ventricular size, and left ventricular function. Three variants in the 3'-untranslated region of the A(1)-adenosine gene (nt 1689 C/A, nt 2206 Tdel, nt 2683del36) and an informative polymorphism in the coding region of the A3-adenosine gene (nt 1509 A/C I248L) were associated with changes in infarct size. These results suggest that genetic variants in the adenosine receptor genes may predict the heart's response to ischemia or injury and might also influence an individual's response to adenosine therapy.

  10. Selection on the Major Color Gene Melanocortin-1-Receptor Shaped the Evolution of the Melanocortin System Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Dib

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modular genetic systems and networks have complex evolutionary histories shaped by selection acting on single genes as well as on their integrated function within the network. However, uncovering molecular coevolution requires the detection of coevolving sites in sequences. Detailed knowledge of the functions of each gene in the system is also necessary to identify the selective agents driving coevolution. Using recently developed computational tools, we investigated the effect of positive selection on the coevolution of ten major genes in the melanocortin system, responsible for multiple physiological functions and human diseases. Substitutions driven by positive selection at the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R induced more coevolutionary changes on the system than positive selection on other genes in the system. Contrarily, selection on the highly pleiotropic POMC gene, which orchestrates the activation of the different melanocortin receptors, had the lowest coevolutionary influence. MC1R and possibly its main function, melanin pigmentation, seems to have influenced the evolution of the melanocortin system more than functions regulated by MC2-5Rs such as energy homeostasis, glucocorticoid-dependent stress and anti-inflammatory responses. Although replication in other regulatory systems is needed, this suggests that single functional aspects of a genetic network or system can be of higher importance than others in shaping coevolution among the genes that integrate it.

  11. Isoflavones enhance interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Yukimasa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Hirao, Toru; Takeuchi, Shinji; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2018-01-01

    The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of isoflavones on RORα/γ activity and the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In doxycycline-inducible CHO stable cell lines, we found that four isoflavones, biochanin A (BA), genistein, formononetin, and daidzein, enhanced RORα- or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In an activation assay of the Il17a promoter using Jurkat cells, these compounds enhanced the RORα- or RORγ-mediated activation of the Il17a promoter at concentrations of 1 × 10−6 M to 1 × 10−5 M. In mammalian two-hybrid assays, the four isoflavones enhanced the interaction between the RORα- or RORγ-ligand binding domain and the co-activator LXXLL peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, these isoflavones potently enhanced Il17a mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin, but showed slight enhancement of Il17a gene expression in RORα/γ-knockdown EL4 cells. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting assays also revealed that BA enhanced the interaction between RORγt and SRC-1, which is a co-activator for nuclear receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the isoflavones have the ability to enhance IL-17 gene expression by stabilizing the interactions between RORα/γ and co-activators. This also provides the first evidence that dietary chemicals can enhance IL-17 gene expression in immune cells. PMID:25583575

  12. ONC201 Targets AR and AR-V7 Signaling, Reduces PSA, and Synergizes with Everolimus in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Avital; Lulla, Amriti R; Ross, Brian C; Ralff, Marie D; Makhov, Petr B; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2018-05-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in prostate cancer progression, and androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a mainstay clinical treatment regimen for patients with advanced disease. Unfortunately, most prostate cancers eventually become androgen-independent and resistant to ADT with patients progressing to metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Constitutively activated AR variants (AR-V) have emerged as mediators of resistance to AR-targeted therapy and the progression of mCRPC, and they represent an important therapeutic target. Out of at least 15 AR-Vs described thus far, AR-V7 is the most abundant, and its expression correlates with ADT resistance. ONC201/TIC10 is the founding member of the imipridone class of small molecules and has shown anticancer activity in a broad range of tumor types. ONC201 is currently being tested in phase I/II clinical trials for advanced solid tumors, including mCRPC, and hematologic malignancies. There has been promising activity observed in patients in early clinical testing. This study demonstrates preclinical single-agent efficacy of ONC201 using in vitro and in vivo models of prostate cancer. ONC201 has potent antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects in both castration-resistant and -sensitive prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, the data demonstrate that ONC201 downregulates the expression of key drivers of prostate cancer such as AR-V7 and downstream target genes including the clinically used biomarker PSA (KLK3). Finally, the data also provide a preclinical rationale for combination of ONC201 with approved therapeutics for prostate cancer such as enzalutamide, everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), or docetaxel. Implications: The preclinical efficacy of ONC201 as a single agent or in combination, in hormone-sensitive or castration-resistant prostate cancer, suggests the potential for immediate clinical translation. Mol Cancer Res; 16(5); 754-66. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer

  13. Crosstalk between thyroid hormone receptor and liver X receptor in the regulation of selective Alzheimer's disease indicator-1 gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emi Ishida

    Full Text Available Selective Alzheimer's disease (AD indicator 1 (Seladin-1 has been identified as a gene down-regulated in the degenerated lesions of AD brain. Up-regulation of Seladin-1 reduces the accumulation of β-amyloid and neuronal death. Thyroid hormone (TH exerts an important effect on the development and maintenance of central nervous systems. In the current study, we demonstrated that Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the forebrain was increased in thyrotoxic mice compared with that of euthyroid mice. However, unexpectedly, no significant decrease in the gene and protein expression was observed in hypothyroid mice. Interestingly, an agonist of liver X receptor (LXR, TO901317 (TO administration in vivo increased Seladin-1 gene and protein expression in the mouse forebrain only in a hypothyroid state and in the presence of mutant TR-β, suggesting that LXR-α would compensate for TR-β function to maintain Seladin-1 gene expression in hypothyroidism and resistance to TH. TH activated the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter (-1936/+21 bp and site 2 including canonical TH response element (TRE half-site in the region between -159 and -154 bp is responsible for the positive regulation. RXR-α/TR-β heterodimerization was identified on site 2 by gel-shift assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed the recruitment of TR-β to site 2 and the recruitment was increased upon TH administration. On the other hand, LXR-α utilizes a distinct region from site 2 (-120 to -102 bp to activate the mouse Seladin-1 gene promoter. Taking these findings together, we concluded that TH up-regulates Seladin-1 gene expression at the transcriptional level and LXR-α maintains the gene expression.

  14. Genome-wide identification of nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Bo-Young; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Min Chul; Kyung, Do-Hyun; Om, Ae-Son; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-18

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large superfamily of proteins defined by a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). They function as transcriptional regulators to control expression of genes involved in development, homeostasis, and metabolism. The number of NRs differs from species to species, because of gene duplications and/or lineage-specific gene losses during metazoan evolution. Many NRs in arthropods interact with the ecdysteroid hormone and are involved in ecdysone-mediated signaling in arthropods. The nuclear receptor superfamily complement has been reported in several arthropods, including crustaceans, but not in copepods. We identified the entire NR repertoire of the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, which is an important marine model species for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics. Using whole genome and transcriptome sequences, we identified a total of 31 nuclear receptors in the genome of T. japonicus. Nomenclature of the nuclear receptors was determined based on the sequence similarities of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD). The 7 subfamilies of NRs separate into five major clades (subfamilies NR1, NR2, NR3, NR4, and NR5/6). Although the repertoire of NR members in, T. japonicus was similar to that reported for other arthropods, there was an expansion of the NR1 subfamily in Tigriopus japonicus. The twelve unique nuclear receptors identified in T. japonicus are members of NR1L. This expansion may be a unique lineage-specific feature of crustaceans. Interestingly, E78 and HR83, which are present in other arthropods, were absent from the genomes of T. japonicus and two congeneric copepod species (T. japonicus and Tigriopus californicus), suggesting copepod lineage-specific gene loss. We identified all NR receptors present in the copepod, T. japonicus. Knowledge of the copepod nuclear receptor repertoire will contribute to a better understanding of copepod- and crustacean-specific NR evolution.

  15. Polymorphisms of the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4 VNTR) and cannabinoid CB1 receptor gene (CNR1) are not strongly related to cue-reactivity after alcohol exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildenberg, E. van den; Janssen, R.G.J.H.; Hutchison, K.E.; Breukelen, G.J.P. van; Wiers, R.W.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Polymorphisms in the D4 dopamine receptor gene (DRD4) and the CB1 cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR1) have been associated with a differential response to alcohol after consumption. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether heavy drinkers with these polymorphisms would respond with

  16. Embryonic expression of the transforming growth factor beta ligand and receptor genes in chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James R; Yatskievych, Tatiana A; Antin, Parker B

    2014-03-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling regulates a myriad of biological processes during embryogenesis, in the adult, and during the manifestation of disease. TGFβ signaling is propagated through one of three TGFβ ligands interacting with Type I and Type II receptors, and Type III co-receptors. Although TGFβ signaling is regulated partly by the combinatorial expression patterns of TGFβ receptors and ligands, a comprehensive gene expression analysis has not been published. Here we report the embryonic mRNA expression patterns in chicken embryos of the canonical TGFβ ligands (TGFB1, TGFB2, and TGFB3) and receptors (TGFBR1, TGFBR2, TGFBR3), plus the Activin A receptor, type 1 (ACVR1) and co receptor Endoglin (ENG) that also transduce TGFβ signaling. TGFB ligands and receptors show dynamic and frequently overlapping expression patterns in numerous embryonic cell layers and structures. Integrating expression information identifies combinations of ligands and receptors that are involved in specific developmental processes including somitogenesis, cardiogenesis and vasculogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Oxytocin and Vasopressin Receptor Gene Polymorphisms: Role in Social and Psychiatric Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspé-Sánchez, Mauricio; Moreno, Macarena; Rivera, Maria Ignacia; Rossi, Alejandra; Ewer, John

    2016-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) and arginine-vasopressin (AVP) are two phylogenetically conserved neuropeptides that have been implicated in a wide range of social behaviors. Although a large body of research, ranging from rodents to humans, has reported on the effects of OXT and AVP administration on affiliative and trust behaviors, and has highlighted the genetic contributions of OXT and AVP receptor polymorphisms to both social behaviors and to diseases related to social deficits, the consequences of peptide administration on psychiatric symptoms, and the impact of receptor polymorphisms on receptor function, are still unclear. Despite the exciting advances that these reports have brought to social neuroscience, they remain preliminary and suffer from the problems that are inherent to monogenetic linkage and association studies. As an alternative, some studies are using polygenic approaches, and consider the contributions of other genes and pathways, including those involving DA, 5-HT, and reelin, in addition to OXT and AVP; a handful of report are also using genome-wide association studies. This review summarizes findings on the associations between OXT and AVP receptor polymorphism, social behavior, and psychiatric diseases. In addition, we discuss reports on the interactions of OXT and AVP receptor genes and genes involved in other pathways (such as those of dopamine, serotonin, and reelin), as well as research that has shed some light on the impact of gene polymorphisms on the volume, connectivity, and activation of specific neural structures, differential receptor expression, and plasma levels of the OXT and AVP peptides. We hope that this effort will be helpful for understanding the studies performed so far, and for encouraging the inclusion of other candidate genes not explored to date. PMID:26858594

  18. Small angle Ar2+ + Ar collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    Electron capture in Ar 2+ + Ar is studied at low keV energies. Using Ar 2+ + He collisions as a calibration, it is shown that the dominant single electron capture process is endothermic and of the type Ar 2+ ( 3 P) + ArAr + ( 2 P) + Ar + (3s 2 3p 4 nI), with nI primarily being 3d and 4p. Weaker exothermic processes are also found and are due mainly to the existence of long-lived highly-excited states in the incident Ar 2+ beam. The direct scattering and double electron capture processes are also studied. Direct scattering occurs with no target excitation. Differential cross sections are presented for the collision processes. The single electron capture results are interpreted using a simple model in which a strongly attractive intermediate state couples with incident and outgoing channels

  19. Disruption of the 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor gene in bovine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... gene encoding for the prion binding site in bovine fetal fibroblasts. The heterozygous BFF are ready to be used in producing homozygous cattle, which will be applied to study the interaction between prion and the 37-kDa/67-kDa LRP/LR. Key words: Prion, PrPC, PrPSc, 37-kDa/67-kDa laminin receptor, gene targeting.

  20. Polymorphism in leptin receptor gene was associated with obesity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pramudji Hastuti

    2016-01-11

    Jan 11, 2016 ... This study aims to determine the association of LEPR gene polymorphisms, rs1137100 and rs1137101, on .... and that leptin levels were correlated with type 2 diabetes mel- .... Research using statistical meta-analysis [36,37] found ... and changes in glucose homeostasis in response to regular exercise.

  1. Retinitis pigmentosa: mutations in a receptor tyrosine kinase gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    patients show early and severe impairment of pure rod responses (Pagon 1993). ... is characterized by total blindness or greatly impaired vision at birth or within ... gene, Mertk, in the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat (D'Cruz et al 2000) ...

  2. Identification of chemosensory receptor genes in Manduca sexta and knockdown by RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howlett Natalie

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects detect environmental chemicals via a large and rapidly evolving family of chemosensory receptor proteins. Although our understanding of the molecular genetic basis for Drosophila chemoreception has increased enormously in the last decade, similar understanding in other insects remains limited. The tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta, has long been an important model for insect chemosensation, particularly from ecological, behavioral, and physiological standpoints. It is also a major agricultural pest on solanaceous crops. However, little sequence information and lack of genetic tools has prevented molecular genetic analysis in this species. The ability to connect molecular genetic mechanisms, including potential lineage-specific changes in chemosensory genes, to ecologically relevant behaviors and specializations in M. sexta would be greatly beneficial. Results Here, we sequenced transcriptomes from adult and larval chemosensory tissues and identified chemosensory genes based on sequence homology. We also used dsRNA feeding as a method to induce RNA interference in larval chemosensory tissues. Conclusions We report identification of new chemosensory receptor genes including 17 novel odorant receptors and one novel gustatory receptor. Further, we demonstrate that systemic RNA interference can be used in larval olfactory neurons to reduce expression of chemosensory receptor transcripts. Together, our results further the development of M. sexta as a model for functional analysis of insect chemosensation.

  3. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Gmach, Philipp; Winter, Jan; Kranz, Dominique; Boutros, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Signaling pathway modules are often encoded by several closely related paralogous genes that can have redundant roles and are therefore difficult to analyze by loss-of-function analysis. A typical example is the Wnt signaling pathway, which in mammals is mediated by 19 Wnt ligands that can bind to 10 Frizzled (FZD) receptors. Although significant progress in understanding Wnt-FZD receptor interactions has been made in recent years, tools to generate systematic interaction maps have been largely lacking. Here we generated cell lines with multiplex mutant alleles of FZD1 , FZD2 , and FZD7 and demonstrate that these cells are unresponsive to canonical Wnt ligands. Subsequently, we performed genetic rescue experiments with combinations of FZDs and canonical Wnts to create a functional ligand-receptor interaction map. These experiments showed that whereas several Wnt ligands, such as Wnt3a, induce signaling through a broad spectrum of FZD receptors, others, such as Wnt8a, act through a restricted set of FZD genes. Together, our results map functional interactions of FZDs and 10 Wnt ligands and demonstrate how multiplex targeting by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 can be used to systematically elucidate the functions of multigene families.-Voloshanenko, O., Gmach, P., Winter, J., Kranz, D., Boutros, M. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families. © The Author(s).

  4. Gene structure and expression characteristic of a novel odorant receptor gene cluster in the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S-N; Shan, S; Zheng, Y; Peng, Y; Lu, Z-Y; Yang, Y-Q; Li, R-J; Zhang, Y-J; Guo, Y-Y

    2017-08-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) expressed in the antennae of parasitoid wasps are responsible for detection of various lipophilic airborne molecules. In the present study, 107 novel OR genes were identified from Microplitis mediator antennal transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analysis of the set of OR genes from M. mediator and Microplitis demolitor revealed that M. mediator OR (MmedOR) genes can be classified into different subfamilies, and the majority of MmedORs in each subfamily shared high sequence identities and clear orthologous relationships to M. demolitor ORs. Within a subfamily, six MmedOR genes, MmedOR98, 124, 125, 126, 131 and 155, shared a similar gene structure and were tightly linked in the genome. To evaluate whether the clustered MmedOR genes share common regulatory features, the transcription profile and expression characteristics of the six closely related OR genes were investigated in M. mediator. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR experiments revealed that the OR genes within the cluster were transcribed as single mRNAs, and a bicistronic mRNA for two adjacent genes (MmedOR124 and MmedOR98) was also detected in female antennae by reverse transcription PCR. In situ hybridization experiments indicated that each OR gene within the cluster was expressed in a different number of cells. Moreover, there was no co-expression of the two highly related OR genes, MmedOR124 and MmedOR98, which appeared to be individually expressed in a distinct population of neurons. Overall, there were distinct expression profiles of closely related MmedOR genes from the same cluster in M. mediator. These data provide a basic understanding of the olfactory coding in parasitoid wasps. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Comparison of lentiviral and sleeping beauty mediated αβ T cell receptor gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christine Field

    Full Text Available Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm's tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies.

  6. Pseudogenization of a sweet-receptor gene accounts for cats' indifference toward sugar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Li

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Although domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus possess an otherwise functional sense of taste, they, unlike most mammals, do not prefer and may be unable to detect the sweetness of sugars. One possible explanation for this behavior is that cats lack the sensory system to taste sugars and therefore are indifferent to them. Drawing on work in mice, demonstrating that alleles of sweet-receptor genes predict low sugar intake, we examined the possibility that genes involved in the initial transduction of sweet perception might account for the indifference to sweet-tasting foods by cats. We characterized the sweet-receptor genes of domestic cats as well as those of other members of the Felidae family of obligate carnivores, tiger and cheetah. Because the mammalian sweet-taste receptor is formed by the dimerization of two proteins (T1R2 and T1R3; gene symbols Tas1r2 and Tas1r3, we identified and sequenced both genes in the cat by screening a feline genomic BAC library and by performing PCR with degenerate primers on cat genomic DNA. Gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR of taste tissue, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. The cat Tas1r3 gene shows high sequence similarity with functional Tas1r3 genes of other species. Message from Tas1r3 was detected by RT-PCR of taste tissue. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that Tas1r3 is expressed, as expected, in taste buds. However, the cat Tas1r2 gene shows a 247-base pair microdeletion in exon 3 and stop codons in exons 4 and 6. There was no evidence of detectable mRNA from cat Tas1r2 by RT-PCR or in situ hybridization, and no evidence of protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Tas1r2 in tiger and cheetah and in six healthy adult domestic cats all show the similar deletion and stop codons. We conclude that cat Tas1r3 is an apparently functional and expressed receptor but that cat Tas1r2 is an unexpressed pseudogene. A functional sweet-taste receptor heteromer

  7. Pseudogenization of a Sweet-Receptor Gene Accounts for Cats' Indifference toward Sugar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Although domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus possess an otherwise functional sense of taste, they, unlike most mammals, do not prefer and may be unable to detect the sweetness of sugars. One possible explanation for this behavior is that cats lack the sensory system to taste sugars and therefore are indifferent to them. Drawing on work in mice, demonstrating that alleles of sweet-receptor genes predict low sugar intake, we examined the possibility that genes involved in the initial transduction of sweet perception might account for the indifference to sweet-tasting foods by cats. We characterized the sweet-receptor genes of domestic cats as well as those of other members of the Felidae family of obligate carnivores, tiger and cheetah. Because the mammalian sweet-taste receptor is formed by the dimerization of two proteins (T1R2 and T1R3; gene symbols Tas1r2 and Tas1r3, we identified and sequenced both genes in the cat by screening a feline genomic BAC library and by performing PCR with degenerate primers on cat genomic DNA. Gene expression was assessed by RT-PCR of taste tissue, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry. The cat Tas1r3 gene shows high sequence similarity with functional Tas1r3 genes of other species. Message from Tas1r3 was detected by RT-PCR of taste tissue. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical studies demonstrate that Tas1r3 is expressed, as expected, in taste buds. However, the cat Tas1r2 gene shows a 247-base pair microdeletion in exon 3 and stop codons in exons 4 and 6. There was no evidence of detectable mRNA from cat Tas1r2 by RT-PCR or in situ hybridization, and no evidence of protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Tas1r2 in tiger and cheetah and in six healthy adult domestic cats all show the similar deletion and stop codons. We conclude that cat Tas1r3 is an apparently functional and expressed receptor but that cat Tas1r2 is an unexpressed pseudogene. A functional sweet-taste receptor heteromer

  8. Identification of a bitter-taste receptor gene repertoire in different Lagomorphs species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The repertoires of bitter taste receptor (T2R gene have been described for several animal species, but these data are still scarce for Lagomorphs. The aim of the present work is to identify potential repertoires of T2R in several Lagomorph species, covering a wide geographical distribution. We studied these genes in Lepus timidus, Lepus europaeus, Oryctolagus cuniculus algirus, Romerolagus diazi and Sylvilagus floridanus, using Oryctolagus cuniculus cuniculus as control species for PCR and DNA sequencing. We studied the identities of the DNA sequences and built the corresponding phylogenetic tree. Sequencing was successful for both subspecies of Oryctolagus cuniculus for all T2R genes studied, for five genes in Lepus, and for three genes in Romerolagus diazi and Sylvilagus floridanus. We describe for the first time the partial repertoires of T2R genes for Lagomorphs species, other than the common rabbit. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that sequence proximity levels follow the established taxonomic classification.

  9. Genetic Variation in the Leptin Receptor Gene, Leptin, and Weight Gain in Young Dutch Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, van C.T.M.; Hoebee, B.; Baak, van M.A.; Mars, M.; Saris, W.H.M.; Seidell, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between leptin levels, polymorphisms in the leptin receptor (LEPR) gene, and weight gain. Research Methods and Procedures: From two large prospective cohorts in The Netherlands (n = 17, 500), we compared the baseline leptin of 259 subjects who had gained an

  10. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on

  11. Adeno-associated virus LPL(S447X) gene therapy in LDL receptor knockout mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Jaap; Sierts, Jeroen A.; Vaessen, Stefan F. C.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Twisk, Jaap; Kuivenhoven, Jan Albert

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Overexpression of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) protects against atherosclerosis in genetically engineered mice. We tested whether a gene therapy vector that delivers human (h) LPL(S447X) cDNA to skeletal muscle could induce similar effects. METHODS: LDL receptor knockout (LDLr-/-) mice were

  12. Polymorphisms in the glucocorticoid receptor gene and their associations with metabolic parameters and body composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMost actions of glucocorticoids (GCs) are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The interindividual response to GCs varies considerably, as demonstrated by a variable suppressive response to 0.25-mg dexamethasone (DEX). Several polymorphisms in the gene coding

  13. A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the progesterone receptor gene associated with endometrial cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vivo, Immaculata; Huggins, Gordon S; Hankinson, Susan E; Lescault, Pamela J; Boezen, Hendrika; Colditz, Graham A; Hunter, David J

    2002-01-01

    Excessive estrogen stimulation unopposed by progesterone strongly predisposes to endometrial cancer. Because the antiproliferative effect of progesterone requires the progesterone receptor (PR), which exists in two isoforms, PR-A and -B, we reasoned that variants in the PR gene may predispose to

  14. Genomic organization of the mouse peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor beta/delta gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Leif K; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Mandrup, Susanne

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) beta/delta is ubiquitously expressed, but the level of expression differs markedly between different cell types. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing PPARbeta/delta gene expression, we have isolated and characterized the mouse...

  15. Variations in estrogen receptor ? gene and risk of dementia, and brain volumes on MRI.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C.E. Schuit (Stephanie); A. Hofman (Albert); P.J. Koudstaal (Peter Jan); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); T. den Heijer (Tom)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe role of estrogens in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is controversial. We investigated the association between well-recognized, and potentially functional, polymorphisms in the estrogen receptor (ER) gene and the risk of AD in a prospective study of 6056 Caucasian older men and women aged

  16. Effects of triiodothyronine and amiodarone on the promoter of the human LDL receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.; Hudig, F.; Meijssen, S.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    Treatment of patients with amiodarone, a potent anti arrhythmic drug, increases plasma LDL cholesterol levels, similar to that seen during hypothyroidism. This increase is the result of a decreased expression of the hepatic LDL receptor gene. We investigated the effects of thyroid hormone,

  17. Amplification of epidermal growth factor receptor gene in renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Hariry, Iman; Powles, Thomas; Lau, Mike R

    2010-01-01

    Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) may be of prognostic value in renal cell cancer (RCC). Gene amplification of EGFR was investigated in a cohort of 315 patients with advanced RCC from a previously reported randomised study. Using fluorescent in situ hybridisation, only 2...

  18. Polymorphism of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor gene (rs1042044 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patience

    2015-02-16

    Feb 16, 2015 ... turnover via GLP-1 receptors (GLP1Rs) in postmenopausal state. Furthermore, polymorphisms in. GLP1R gene were suggested to affect the function of GLP1Rs and be associated with many diseases. However, the relationships between GLP1R polymorphisms and osteoporosis susceptibility and bone.

  19. Polymorphism of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor gene (rs1042044 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous investigations indicated that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) played important roles in bone turnover via GLP-1 receptors (GLP1Rs) in postmenopausal state. Furthermore, polymorphisms in GLP1R gene were suggested to affect the function of GLP1Rs and be associated with many diseases. However, the ...

  20. Disruption of the GH Receptor Gene in Adult Mice Increases Maximal Lifespan in Females

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junnila, Riia K.; Duran-Ortiz, Silvana; Suer, Ozan

    2016-01-01

    GH and IGF-1 are important for a variety of physiological processes including growth, development, and aging. Mice with reduced levels of GH and IGF-1 have been shown to live longer than wild-type controls. Our laboratory has previously found that mice with a GH receptor gene knockout (GHRKO) fro...

  1. Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozhidaev, Ivan V; Alifirova, V. M.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Zhukova, I.A.; Fedorenko, Olga Yu; Osmanova, Diana Z; Mironova, Y.S.; Wilffert, Berend; Ivanova, Svetlana A.; Loonen, Antonius

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine receptors genes polymorphisms in Parkinson patients with levodopa-induced dyskinesia I. Pozhidaev(1), V.M. Alifirova(2), M.B. Freidin(3), I.A. Zhukova(2), O.Y. Fedorenko(1), D.Z. Osmanova(1), Y.S. Mironova(2), B. Wilffert(4), S.A. Ivanova(1), A.J.M. Loonen(5) (1)Mental Health Research

  2. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement in Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbello, L; Riva, M; Veronese, S; Nosari, A M; Ravano, E; Colosimo, A; Paris, L; Morra, E

    2012-09-01

    This report describes the case of a previously healthy young man who presented with fever, pharyngitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, lymphocytosis, and severe thrombocytopenia. Serological tests for Epstein-Barr virus were diagnostic of a primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis but severe thrombocytopenia aroused the suspicion of a lymphoproliferative disease. T-cell receptor gene analysis performed on peripheral and bone marrow blood revealed a T-cell receptor γ-chain rearrangement without the evidence of malignancy using standard histologic and immunophenotype studies. Signs and symptoms of the infectious disease, blood count, and T-cell receptor gene rearrangement resolved with observation without the evidence of emergence of a lymphoproliferative disease. In the contest of a suspected lymphoproliferative disease, molecular results should be integrated with all available data for an appropriate diagnosis.

  3. Suicide Gene Therapy to Increase the Safety of Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Casucci, Attilio Bondanza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding motif of a monoclonal antibody (mAb with the signal transduction machinery of the T-cell receptor (TCR. The genetic modification of T lymphocytes with chimeric receptors specific for tumor-associated antigens (TAAs allows for the redirection towards tumor cells. Clinical experience with CAR-redirected T cells suggests that antitumor efficacy associates with some degree of toxicity, especially when TAA expression is shared with healthy tissues. This situation closely resembles the case of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, wherein allorecognition causes both the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD. Suicide gene therapy, i.e. the genetic induction of a conditional suicide phenotype into donor T cells, enables dissociating the GVL effect from GVHD. Applying suicide gene modification to CAR-redirected T cells may therefore greatly increase their safety profile and facilitate their clinical development.

  4. A Somatically Acquired Enhancer of the Androgen Receptor Is a Noncoding Driver in Advanced Prostate Cancer. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increased androgen receptor (AR) activity drives therapeutic resistance in advanced prostate cancer. The most common resistance mechanism is amplification of this locus presumably targeting the AR gene. Here, we identify and characterize a somatically acquired AR enhancer located 650 kb centromeric to the AR. Systematic perturbation of this enhancer using genome editing decreased proliferation by suppressing AR levels. Insertion of an additional copy of this region sufficed to increase proliferation under low androgen conditions and to decrease sensitivity to enzalutamide.

  5. Ar-Ar_Redux: rigorous error propagation of 40Ar/39Ar data, including covariances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeesch, P.

    2015-12-01

    Rigorous data reduction and error propagation algorithms are needed to realise Earthtime's objective to improve the interlaboratory accuracy of 40Ar/39Ar dating to better than 1% and thereby facilitate the comparison and combination of the K-Ar and U-Pb chronometers. Ar-Ar_Redux is a new data reduction protocol and software program for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology which takes into account two previously underappreciated aspects of the method: 1. 40Ar/39Ar measurements are compositional dataIn its simplest form, the 40Ar/39Ar age equation can be written as: t = log(1+J [40Ar/39Ar-298.5636Ar/39Ar])/λ = log(1 + JR)/λ Where λ is the 40K decay constant and J is the irradiation parameter. The age t does not depend on the absolute abundances of the three argon isotopes but only on their relative ratios. Thus, the 36Ar, 39Ar and 40Ar abundances can be normalised to unity and plotted on a ternary diagram or 'simplex'. Argon isotopic data are therefore subject to the peculiar mathematics of 'compositional data', sensu Aitchison (1986, The Statistical Analysis of Compositional Data, Chapman & Hall). 2. Correlated errors are pervasive throughout the 40Ar/39Ar methodCurrent data reduction protocols for 40Ar/39Ar geochronology propagate the age uncertainty as follows: σ2(t) = [J2 σ2(R) + R2 σ2(J)] / [λ2 (1 + R J)], which implies zero covariance between R and J. In reality, however, significant error correlations are found in every step of the 40Ar/39Ar data acquisition and processing, in both single and multi collector instruments, during blank, interference and decay corrections, age calculation etc. Ar-Ar_Redux revisits every aspect of the 40Ar/39Ar method by casting the raw mass spectrometer data into a contingency table of logratios, which automatically keeps track of all covariances in a compositional context. Application of the method to real data reveals strong correlations (r2 of up to 0.9) between age measurements within a single irradiation batch. Propertly taking

  6. Interleukin 17 Receptor Gene Polymorphism in Periimplantitis and Chronic Periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Kadkhodazadeh

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene polymorphism of cytokines influencing their function has been known as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the tooth and implant supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of IL-17R gene polymorphism (rs879576 with chronic periodontitis and periimplantitis in an Iranian population. 73 patients with chronic periodontitis, 37 patients with periimplantitis and 83 periodontally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. 5cc blood was obtained from each subject’s arm vein and transferred to tubes containing EDTA. Genomic DNA was extracted using Miller's Salting Out technique. The DNA was transferred into 96 division plates, transported to Kbioscience Institute in United Kingdom and analyzed using the Kbioscience Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP technique. Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests were used to analyze differences in the expression of genotypes and frequency of alleles in disease and control groups (P-Value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. There were no significant differences between periodontitis, periimplantitis with AA, GG, GA genotype of IL-17R gene (P=0.8239. Also comparison of frequency of alleles in SNP rs879576 of IL-17R gene between the chronic periodontitis group and periimplantitis group did not revealed statistically significant differences (P=0.8239. The enigma of IL-17 and its polymorphism-role in periodontitis and periimplantitis is yet to be investigated more carefully throughout further research but this article demonstrates that polymorphism of IL-17R plays no significant role in incidence of chronic periodontitis and Periimplantitis.

  7. Interleukin 17 receptor gene polymorphism in periimplantitis and chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Kadkhodazadeh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene polymorphism of cytokines influencing their function has been known as a contributing factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases of the tooth and implant supporting tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of IL-17R gene polymorphism (rs879576 with chronic periodontitis and periimplantitis in an Iranian population. 73 patients with chronic periodontitis, 37 patients with periimplantitis and 83 periodontally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. 5cc blood was obtained from each subject's arm vein and transferred to tubes containing EDTA. Genomic DNA was extracted using Miller's Salting Out technique. The DNA was transferred into 96 division plates, transported to Kbioscience Institute in United Kingdom and analyzed using the Kbioscience Competitive Allele Specific PCR (KASP technique. Chi-square and Kruskal Wallis tests were used to analyze differences in the expression of genotypes and frequency of alleles in disease and control groups (P-Value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. There were no significant differences between periodontitis, periimplantitis with AA, GG, GA genotype of IL-17R gene (P=0.8239. Also comparison of frequency of alleles in SNP rs879576 of IL-17R gene between the chronic periodontitis group and periimplantitis group did not revealed statistically significant differences (P=0.8239. The enigma of IL-17 and its polymorphism-role in periodontitis and periimplantitis is yet to be investigated more carefully throughout further research but this article demonstrates that polymorphism of IL-17R plays no significant role in incidence of chronic periodontitis and Periimplantitis.

  8. Isoflavones enhance interleukin-17 gene expression via retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Yukimasa; Muromoto, Ryuta; Takahashi, Miki; Hirao, Toru; Takeuchi, Shinji; Jetten, Anton M.; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Nuclear receptors, RORα and RORγ, are key regulators of Th17 cell differentiation. • Isoflavones have RORα/γ agonistic activities. • Isoflavones enhance the interaction of RORα/γ with co-activator. • These compounds enhance the expression of Il17a mRNA in mouse EL4 cells. • Dietary isoflavones can act as modulators of Il17a expression via RORα/γ. - Abstract: The retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptors α and γ (RORα and RORγ), are key regulators of helper T (Th)17 cell differentiation, which is involved in the innate immune system and autoimmune disorders. In this study, we investigated the effects of isoflavones on RORα/γ activity and the gene expression of interleukin (IL)-17, which mediates the function of Th17 cells. In doxycycline-inducible CHO stable cell lines, we found that four isoflavones, biochanin A (BA), genistein, formononetin, and daidzein, enhanced RORα- or RORγ-mediated transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In an activation assay of the Il17a promoter using Jurkat cells, these compounds enhanced the RORα- or RORγ-mediated activation of the Il17a promoter at concentrations of 1 × 10 −6 M to 1 × 10 −5 M. In mammalian two-hybrid assays, the four isoflavones enhanced the interaction between the RORα- or RORγ-ligand binding domain and the co-activator LXXLL peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, these isoflavones potently enhanced Il17a mRNA expression in mouse T lymphoma EL4 cells treated with phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin, but showed slight enhancement of Il17a gene expression in RORα/γ-knockdown EL4 cells. Immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting assays also revealed that BA enhanced the interaction between RORγt and SRC-1, which is a co-activator for nuclear receptors. Taken together, these results suggest that the isoflavones have the ability to enhance IL-17 gene expression by stabilizing the interactions between RORα/γ and co-activators. This also

  9. Molecular analysis of the androgen-receptor gene in a family with receptor-positive partial androgen insensitivity: an unusual type of intronic mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); S. Ramnarain; M.C. Verleun-Mooijman; D.P.E. Satijn (David); J. Trapman (Jan); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn the coding part and the intron-exon boundaries of the androgen-receptor gene of a patient with partial androgen insensitivity, no mutation was found. The androgen receptor of this patient displayed normal ligand-binding parameters and migrated as a

  10. [Polymorphism of vitamin D receptor gene Fok I in Mongolian population of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shao-ji; Zhou, Li-she; Xu, Xiu-ju

    2006-04-01

    To investigate the polymorphism distribution of vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene Fok I in Mongolian population of China. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used to analyze three genotypes FF, Ff and ff in the start codon of VDR gene (Fok I) in unrelated normal healthy Mongolian individuals of China. In the population, we obtained the allelic frequencies of 57% and 43% for (F) and (f) allele and the percentage of genotypes FF, Ff and ff to be 31%, 52%, and 17% respectively. The polymorphism frequency and distribution of this VDR gene Fok I in Mongolian population of China exhibit its own characteristics.

  11. Variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) is associated with differences in moral judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Regan M; Chaponis, Jonathan; Siburian, Richie; Gallagher, Patience; Ransohoff, Katherine; Wikler, Daniel; Perlis, Roy H; Greene, Joshua D

    2016-12-01

    Moral judgments are produced through the coordinated interaction of multiple neural systems, each of which relies on a characteristic set of neurotransmitters. Genes that produce or regulate these neurotransmitters may have distinctive influences on moral judgment. Two studies examined potential genetic influences on moral judgment using dilemmas that reliably elicit competing automatic and controlled responses, generated by dissociable neural systems. Study 1 (N = 228) examined 49 common variants (SNPs) within 10 candidate genes and identified a nominal association between a polymorphism (rs237889) of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) and variation in deontological vs utilitarian moral judgment (that is, judgments favoring individual rights vs the greater good). An association was likewise observed for rs1042615 of the arginine vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR1A). Study 2 (N = 322) aimed to replicate these findings using the aforementioned dilemmas as well as a new set of structurally similar medical dilemmas. Study 2 failed to replicate the association with AVPR1A, but replicated the OXTR finding using both the original and new dilemmas. Together, these findings suggest that moral judgment is influenced by variation in the oxytocin receptor gene and, more generally, that single genetic polymorphisms can have a detectable effect on complex decision processes. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press.

  12. RFLP for the human retinoic acid receptor gene RAR-. beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datson, N A; Oostra, B A [Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands); van der Saag, P T [Netherlands Institute for Developmental Biology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1989-11-11

    1.4 kb Mae I fragment containing the entire RAR-{beta} ORF was cloned into the Sma I site of pTZ18U, yielding the plasmid pCOD20. Msp I digestion of genomic DNA and hybridization with the pCOD20 probe detects a two allele polymorphism with allelic fragments of 8.1 and 7.7 kb. The human RAR-{beta} gene has been localized to the p24 band of chromosome 3. Co-dominant segregation of the alleles was observed in 4 Caucasian families.

  13. Restoration of spermatogenesis and male fertility using an androgen receptor transgene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Walker

    Full Text Available Androgens signal through the androgen receptor (AR to regulate male secondary sexual characteristics, reproductive tract development, prostate function, sperm production, bone and muscle mass as well as body hair growth among other functions. We developed a transgenic mouse model in which endogenous AR expression was replaced by a functionally modified AR transgene. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC was constructed containing all AR exons and introns plus 40 kb each of 5' and 3' regulatory sequence. Insertion of an internal ribosome entry site and the EGFP gene 3' to AR allowed co-expression of AR and EGFP. Pronuclear injection of the BAC resulted in six founder mice that displayed EGFP production in appropriate AR expressing tissues. The six founder mice were mated into a Sertoli cell specific AR knockout (SCARKO background in which spermatogenesis is blocked at the meiosis stage of germ cell development. The AR-EGFP transgene was expressed in a cyclical manner similar to that of endogenous AR in Sertoli cells and fertility was restored as offspring were produced in the absence of Sertoli cell AR. Thus, the AR-EGFP transgene under the control of AR regulatory elements is capable of rescuing AR function in a cell selective, AR-null background. These initial studies provide proof of principle that a strategy employing the AR-EGFP transgene can be used to understand AR functions. Transgenic mice expressing selective modifications of the AR-EGFP transgene may provide crucial information needed to elicit the molecular mechanisms by which AR acts in the testis and other androgen responsive tissues.

  14. Arabidopsis ETR1 and ERS1 Differentially Repress the Ethylene Response in Combination with Other Ethylene Receptor Genes1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Wen, Chi-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    The ethylene response is negatively regulated by a family of five ethylene receptor genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The five members of the ethylene receptor family can physically interact and form complexes, which implies that cooperativity for signaling may exist among the receptors. The ethylene receptor gene mutations etr1-1(C65Y)(for ethylene response1-1), ers1-1(I62P) (for ethylene response sensor1-1), and ers1C65Y are dominant, and each confers ethylene insensitivity. In this study, the repression of the ethylene response by these dominant mutant receptor genes was examined in receptor-defective mutants to investigate the functional significance of receptor cooperativity in ethylene signaling. We showed that etr1-1(C65Y), but not ers1-1(I62P), substantially repressed various ethylene responses independent of other receptor genes. In contrast, wild-type receptor genes differentially supported the repression of ethylene responses by ers1-1(I62P); ETR1 and ETHYLENE INSENSITIVE4 (EIN4) supported ers1-1(I62P) functions to a greater extent than did ERS2, ETR2, and ERS1. The lack of both ETR1 and EIN4 almost abolished the repression of ethylene responses by ers1C65Y, which implied that ETR1 and EIN4 have synergistic effects on ers1C65Y functions. Our data indicated that a dominant ethylene-insensitive receptor differentially repressed ethylene responses when coupled with a wild-type ethylene receptor, which supported the hypothesis that the formation of a variety of receptor complexes may facilitate differential receptor signal output, by which ethylene responses can be repressed to different extents. We hypothesize that plants can respond to a broad ethylene concentration range and exhibit tissue-specific ethylene responsiveness with differential cooperation of the multiple ethylene receptors. PMID:22227969

  15. A novel Dock8 gene mutation confers diabetogenic susceptibility in the LEW.1AR1/Ztm-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arndt, Tanja; Wedekind, Dirk; Jörns, Anne; Tsiavaliaris, Georgios; Cuppen, Edwin; Hedrich, Hans-Jürgen; Lenzen, Sigurd

    2015-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The LEW.1AR1-iddm rat, an animal model of human type 1 diabetes, arose through a spontaneous mutation within the inbred strain LEW.1AR1. A susceptibility locus (Iddm8) on rat chromosome 1 (RNO1) has been identified previously, which is accompanied by autoimmune diabetes and the

  16. Coagulation factor VII is regulated by androgen receptor in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Ali

    2015-02-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is widely expressed in breast cancer; however, there is limited information on the key molecular functions and gene targets of AR in this disease. In this study, gene expression data from a cohort of 52 breast cancer cell lines was analyzed to identify a network of AR co-expressed genes. A total of 300 genes, which were significantly enriched for cell cycle and metabolic functions, showed absolute correlation coefficients (|CC|) of more than 0.5 with AR expression across the dataset. In this network, a subset of 35 "AR-signature" genes were highly co-expressed with AR (|CC|>0.6) that included transcriptional regulators PATZ1, NFATC4, and SPDEF. Furthermore, gene encoding coagulation factor VII (F7) demonstrated the closest expression pattern with AR (CC=0.716) in the dataset and factor VII protein expression was significantly associated to that of AR in a cohort of 209 breast tumors. Moreover, functional studies demonstrated that AR activation results in the induction of factor VII expression at both transcript and protein levels and AR directly binds to a proximal region of F7 promoter in breast cancer cells. Importantly, AR activation in breast cancer cells induced endogenous factor VII activity to convert factor X to Xa in conjunction with tissue factor. In summary, F7 is a novel AR target gene and AR activation regulates the ectopic expression and activity of factor VII in breast cancer cells. These findings have functional implications in the pathobiology of thromboembolic events and regulation of factor VII/tissue factor signaling in breast cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and functional analysis of pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 mating locus of Pleurotus eryngii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Hee; Kang, Young Min; Im, Chak Han; Ali, Asjad; Kim, Sun Young; Je, Hee-Jeong; Kim, Min-Keun; Rho, Hyun Su; Lee, Hyun Sook; Kong, Won-Sik; Ryu, Jae-San

    2014-01-01

    Pleurotus eryngii has recently become a major cultivated mushroom; it uses tetrapolar heterothallism as a part of its reproductive process. Sexual development progresses only when the A and B mating types are compatible. Such mating incompatibility occasionally limits the efficiency of breeding programs in which crossing within loci-shared strains or backcrossing strategies are employed. Therefore, understanding the mating system in edible mushroom fungi will help provide a short cut in the development of new strains. We isolated and identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and performed a functional analysis of the genes in the mating process by transformation. A genomic DNA library was constructed to map the entire mating-type locus. The B3 locus was found to contain four pheromone precursor genes and four receptor genes. Remarkably, receptor PESTE3.3.1 has just 34 amino acid residues in its C-terminal cytoplasmic region; therefore, it seems likely to be a receptor-like gene. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR (real-time qRT-PCR) revealed that most pheromone and receptor genes showed significantly higher expression in monokaryotic cells than dikaryotic cells. The pheromone genes PEphb3.1 and PEphb3.3 and the receptor gene PESTE3.3.1 were transformed into P5 (A3B4). The transformants were mated with a tester strain (A4B4), and the progeny showed clamp connections and a normal fruiting body, which indicates the proposed role of these genes in mating and fruiting processes. This result also confirms that PESTE3.3.1 is a receptor gene. In this study, we identified pheromone and receptor genes in the B3 locus of P. eryngii and found that some of those genes appear to play a role in the mating and fruiting processes. These results might help elucidate the mechanism of fruiting differentiation and improve breeding efficiency.

  18. Origin and diversification of leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase (LRR-RLK) genes in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ping-Li; Du, Liang; Huang, Yuan; Gao, Shu-Min; Yu, Meng

    2017-01-01

    Background Leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinases (LRR-RLKs) are the largest group of receptor-like kinases in plants and play crucial roles in development and stress responses. The evolutionary relationships among LRR-RLK genes have been investigated in flowering plants; however, no comprehensive studies have been performed for these genes in more ancestral groups. The subfamily classification of LRR-RLK genes in plants, the evolutionary history and driving force for the evolution...

  19. Testosterone treatment increases androgen receptor and aromatase gene expression in myotubes from patients with PCOS and controls, but does not induce insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette Brandt; Glintborg, Dorte; Nielsen, Michael Friberg Bruun

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity is conse......Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Skeletal muscle is the major site of insulin mediated glucose disposal and the skeletal muscle tissue is capable to synthesize, convert and degrade androgens. Insulin sensitivity...... is conserved in cultured myotubes (in vitro) from patients with PCOS, but the effect of testosterone on this insulin sensitivity is unknown. We investigated the effect of 7days testosterone treatment (100nmol/l) on glucose transport and gene expression levels of hormone receptors and enzymes involved...... in the synthesis and conversion of testosterone (HSD17B1, HSD17B2, CYP19A1, SRD5A1-2, AR, ER-α, HSD17B6 and AKR1-3) in myotubes from ten patients with PCOS and ten matched controls. Testosterone treatment significantly increased aromatase and androgen receptor gene expression levels in patients and controls...

  20. Partial least squares based gene expression analysis in estrogen receptor positive and negative breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Zhang, T-F; Lu, P; Lu, S H

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is categorized into two broad groups: estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and ER negative (ER-) groups. Previous study proposed that under trastuzumab-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor initiating cell (TIC) featured ER- tumors response better than ER+ tumors. Exploration of the molecular difference of these two groups may help developing new therapeutic strategies, especially for ER- patients. With gene expression profile from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we performed partial least squares (PLS) based analysis, which is more sensitive than common variance/regression analysis. We acquired 512 differentially expressed genes. Four pathways were found to be enriched with differentially expressed genes, involving immune system, metabolism and genetic information processing process. Network analysis identified five hub genes with degrees higher than 10, including APP, ESR1, SMAD3, HDAC2, and PRKAA1. Our findings provide new understanding for the molecular difference between TIC featured ER- and ER+ breast tumors with the hope offer supports for therapeutic studies.

  1. [Severe type A insulin resistance syndrome due to a mutation in the insulin receptor gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, P; Colino-Alcol, E; Grasso, V; Barbetti, F; Argente, J

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance syndromes without lipodystrophy are an infrequent and heterogeneous group of disorders with variable clinical phenotypes, associated with hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. The three conditions related to mutations in the insulin receptor gene are leprechaunism or Donohue syndrome, Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, and Type A syndrome. A case is presented on a patient diagnosed with type A insulin resistance, defined by the triad of extreme insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, and hyperandrogenism, carrying a heterozygous mutation in exon 19 of the insulin receptor gene coding for its tyrosine kinase domain that is crucial for the catalytic activity of the receptor. The molecular basis of the syndrome is reviewed, focusing on the structure-function relationships of the insulin receptor, knowing that the criteria for survival are linked to residual insulin receptor function. It is also pointed out that, although type A insulin resistance appears to represent a somewhat less severe condition, these patients have a high morbidity and their treatment is still unsatisfactory. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Cloning and functional characterization of the DA2 receptor gene in Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min-jie; Zhang, Cong; Yang, Zhigang

    2018-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a modulatory role in numerous physiological processes such as light adaptation and food intake, and exerts these functions through DA receptors (DARs). This study presents, for the first time, isolation and characterization of the dopamine receptor 2(DA2 receptor) cDNA from the intestinal tissue of Eriocheir sinensis, an economically important freshwater aquaculture species in China. The DA2 receptor cDNA sequence, which was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends, is 2369bp long, encode peptide of 589 amino acid, and is highly homologous to related sequences in crustaceans. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence and the structure of the DA2 indicated that this receptor is a member of the family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as it contains seven transmembrane domains and other common signatures of GPCRs. RT-PCR showed that the expression of the DA2 receptor gene was distributed in various tissues, and high expression levels were observed in the cranial ganglia and the thoracic ganglia. Further study of the effect of photoperiod on DA2 expression showed that constant darkness induced a significant increase in DA2 expression in the cranial ganglia. Finally, analysis of DA2 receptor expression under different feeding statuses showed that there was significantly greater expression in the hepatopancreas and intestines after feeding than before feeding, but there were no differences in expression between the before feeding and during feeding periods in either tissue. Our results indicate that the DA2 receptor structurally belongs to the family of G protein-coupled receptors, and that the cranial ganglia are the main tissues in which the DA2 receptor participates in light adaptation during dark hours. In addition, the DA2 receptor in E. sinensis may be involved in the physiological regulation of the hepatopancreas and digestive tract after the ingestion of food. This study provides a foundation for further exploration of the light

  3. Control of transcriptional repression of the vitellogenin receptor gene in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) by select estrogen receptors isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Bisesi, Joseph H; Kroll, Kevin J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sabo-Attwood, Tara

    2014-10-01

    The vitellogenin receptor (Vtgr) plays an important role in fish reproduction. This receptor functions to incorporate vitellogenin (Vtg), a macromolecule synthesized and released from the liver in the bloodstream, into oocytes where it is processed into yolk. Although studies have focused on the functional role of Vtgr in fish, the mechanistic control of this gene is still unexplored. Here we report the identification and analysis of the first piscine 5' regulatory region of the vtgr gene which was cloned from largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Using this putative promoter sequence, we investigated a role for hormones, including insulin and 17β-estradiol (E2), in transcriptional regulation through cell-based reporter assays. No effect of insulin was observed, however, E2 was able to repress transcriptional activity of the vtgr promoter through select estrogen receptor subtypes, Esr1 and Esr2a but not Esr2b. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that Esr1 likely interacts with the vtgr promoter region through half ERE and/or SP1 sites, in part. Finally we also show that ethinylestradiol (EE2), but not bisphenol-A (BPA), represses promoter activity similarly to E2. These results reveal for the first time that the Esr1 isoform may play an inhibitory role in the expression of LMB vtgr mRNA under the influence of E2, and potent estrogens such as EE2. In addition, this new evidence suggests that vtgr may be a target of select endocrine disrupting compounds through environmental exposures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Dopamine inhibits somatolactin gene expression in tilapia pituitary cells through the dopamine D2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Quan; Lian, Anji; He, Qi

    2016-07-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important neurotransmitter in the central nervous system of vertebrates and possesses key hypophysiotropic functions. Early studies have shown that DA has a potent inhibitory effect on somatolactin (SL) release in fish. However, the mechanisms responsible for DA inhibition of SL gene expression are largely unknown. To this end, tilapia DA type-1 (D1) and type-2 (D2) receptor transcripts were examined in the neurointermediate lobe (NIL) of the tilapia pituitary by real-time PCR. In tilapia, DA not only was effective in inhibiting SL mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, but also could abolish pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)- and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH)-stimulated SL gene expression at the pituitary level. In parallel studies, the specific D2 receptor agonists quinpirole and bromocriptine could mimic the DA-inhibited SL gene expression. Furthermore, the D2 receptor antagonists domperidone and (-)-sulpiride could abolish the SL response to DA or the D2 agonist quinpirole, whereas D1 receptor antagonists SCH23390 and SKF83566 were not effective in this respect. In primary cultures of tilapia NIL cells, D2 agonist quinpirole-inhibited cAMP production could be blocked by co-treatment with the D2 antagonist domperidone and the ability of forskolin to increase cAMP production was also inhibited by quinpirole. Using a pharmacological approach, the AC/cAMP pathway was shown to be involved in quinpirole-inhibited SL mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that DA can directly inhibit SL gene expression at the tilapia pituitary level via D2 receptor through the AC/cAMP-dependent mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The liver X receptor agonist T0901317 acts as androgen receptor antagonist in human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuu, Chih-pin; Chen, Rou-Yu; Hiipakka, Richard A.; Kokontis, John M.; Warner, Karen V.; Xiang, Jialing; Liao, Shutsung

    2007-01-01

    T0901317 is a potent non-steroidal synthetic liver X receptor (LXR) agonist. T0901317 blocked androgenic stimulation of the proliferation of androgen-dependent LNCaP 104-S cells and androgenic suppression of the proliferation of androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, inhibited the transcriptional activation of an androgen-dependent reporter gene by androgen, and suppressed gene and protein expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a target gene of androgen receptor (AR) without affecting gene and protein expression of AR. T0901317 also inhibited binding of a radiolabeled androgen to AR, but inhibition was much weaker compared to the effect of the antiandrogens, bicalutamide and hydroxyflutamide. The LXR agonist T0901317, therefore, acts as an antiandrogen in human prostate cancer cells

  6. Repurposed transcriptomic data facilitate discovery of innate immunity toll-like receptor (TLR) Genes across Lophotrochozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halanych, Kenneth M; Kocot, Kevin M

    2014-10-01

    The growing volume of genomic data from across life represents opportunities for deriving valuable biological information from data that were initially collected for another purpose. Here, we use transcriptomes collected for phylogenomic studies to search for toll-like receptor (TLR) genes in poorly sampled lophotrochozoan clades (Annelida, Mollusca, Brachiopoda, Phoronida, and Entoprocta) and one ecdysozoan clade (Priapulida). TLR genes are involved in innate immunity across animals by recognizing potential microbial infection. They have an extracellular leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain connected to a transmembrane domain and an intracellular toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain. Consequently, these genes are important in initiating a signaling pathway to trigger defense. We found at least one TLR ortholog in all but two taxa examined, suggesting that a broad array of lophotrochozoans may have innate immune systems similar to those observed in vertebrates and arthropods. Comparison to the SMART database confirmed the presence of both the LRR and the TIR protein motifs characteristic of TLR genes. Because we looked at only one transcriptome per species, discovery of TLR genes was limited for most taxa. However, several TRL-like genes that vary in the number and placement of LRR domains were found in phoronids. Additionally, several contigs contained LRR domains but lacked TIR domains, suggesting they were not TLRs. Many of these LRR-containing contigs had other domains (e.g., immunoglobin) and are likely involved in innate immunity. © 2014 Marine Biological Laboratory.

  7. Polymorphisms at the Ligand Binding Site of the Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Osteomalacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ak, Duygu Gezen; Kahraman, Hakkí; Dursun, Erdinç; Duman, Belgin Süsleyici; Erensoy, Nevin; Alagöl, Faruk; Tanakol, Refik; Yılmazer, Selma

    2005-01-01

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphisms have been suggested as possible determinants of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium metabolism. In this study, our aim was to determine whether there is an association between VDR gene polymorphism and osteomalacia or not. We determined ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene in 24 patients with osteomalacia and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Serum calcium, phosphorus, ALP, PTH, 25OHD levels were also examined. We used PCR and RFLP methods to test for an association between osteomalacia and polymorphisms within, intron 8 and exon 9 of the VDR gene. When the control and patients were compared for their ApaI and TaqI genotypes there was no relationship between VDR gene allelic polymorphisms and osteomalacia. Whereas a nearly significant difference for A allele was found in the allellic distribution of the patients (p = 0.08). Also no association between biochemical data and VDR gene polymorphisms was observed. PMID:16403954

  8. Polymorphisms at the Ligand Binding Site of the Vitamin D Receptor Gene and Osteomalacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Gezen Ak

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin D receptor (VDR gene polymorphisms have been suggested as possible determinants of bone mineral density (BMD and calcium metabolism. In this study, our aim was to determine whether there is an association between VDR gene polymorphism and osteomalacia or not. We determined ApaI and TaqI polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene in 24 patients with osteomalacia and 25 age-matched healthy controls. Serum calcium, phosphorus, ALP, PTH, 25OHD levels were also examined. We used PCR and RFLP methods to test for an association between osteomalacia and polymorphisms within, intron 8 and exon 9 of the VDR gene. When the control and patients were compared for their ApaI and TaqI genotypes there was no relationship between VDR gene allelic polymorphisms and osteomalacia. Whereas a nearly significant difference for A allele was found in the allellic distribution of the patients (p = 0.08. Also no association between biochemical data and VDR gene polymorphisms was observed.

  9. Amtyr1: characterization of a gene from honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain encoding a functional tyramine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenau, W; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A

    2000-03-01

    Biogenic amine receptors are involved in the regulation and modulation of various physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. We have cloned a member of this gene family from the CNS of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. The deduced amino acid sequence is homologous to tyramine receptors cloned from Locusta migratoria and Drosophila melanogaster as well as to an octopamine receptor cloned from Heliothis virescens. Functional properties of the honeybee receptor were studied in stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Tyramine reduced forskolin-induced cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of approximately 130 nM. A similar effect of tyramine was observed in membrane homogenates of honeybee brains. Octopamine also reduced cyclic AMP production in the transfected cell line but was both less potent (EC50 of approximately 3 microM) and less efficacious than tyramine. Receptor-encoding mRNA has a wide-spread distribution in the brain and subesophageal ganglion of the honeybee, suggesting that this tyramine receptor is involved in sensory signal processing as well as in higher-order brain functions.

  10. A novel polymorphism in the coding region of the vasopressin type 2 receptor gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Rocha

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI is a rare disease characterized by renal inability to respond properly to arginine vasopressin due to mutations in the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2(R gene in affected kindreds. In most kindreds thus far reported, the mode of inheritance follows an X chromosome-linked recessive pattern although autosomal-dominant and autosomal-recessive modes of inheritance have also been described. Studies demonstrating mutations in the V2(R gene in affected kindreds that modify the receptor structure, resulting in a dys- or nonfunctional receptor have been described, but phenotypically indistinguishable NDI patients with a structurally normal V2(R gene have also been reported. In the present study, we analyzed exon 3 of the V2(R gene in 20 unrelated individuals by direct sequencing. A C®T alteration in the third position of codon 331 (AGC®AGT, which did not alter the encoded amino acid, was found in nine individuals, including two unrelated patients with NDI. Taken together, these observations emphasize the molecular heterogeneity of a phenotypically homogeneous syndrome

  11. Association study between schizophrenia and dopamine D3 receptor gene polymorphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Toshihisa; Takahashi, Makoto; Maeda, Masaya [Niigata Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    Crocq et al. reported the existence of an association between schizophrenia and homozygosity of a BalI polymorphism in the first exon of the dopamine D3 receptor (DRD3) gene. In response to this report, further studies were conducted; however, these studies yielded conflicting results. In the present study, we examined 100 unrelated Japanese schizophrenics and 100 normal controls to determine any association between this polymorphism and schizophrenia. Results suggest that neither allele nor genotype frequencies of the DRD3 gene in the schizophrenics as a whole are significantly different from those of the controls. Further, we found no association between any allele or genotype and any clinical subtype based on family history of schizophrenia and age-at-onset. A significantly high frequency of homozygosity of a dopamine D3 receptor gene allele was not observed in the schizophrenics as a whole, or in clinical subtypes. Our results suggest that an association between the dopamine D3 receptor gene and schizophrenia is unlikely to exist. 26 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Anna; Bence, Melinda; Lakatos, Gabriella; Pergel, Enikő; Turcsán, Borbála; Pluijmakers, Jolanda; Vas, Judit; Elek, Zsuzsanna; Brúder, Ildikó; Földi, Levente; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Miklósi, Adám; Rónai, Zsolt; Kubinyi, Enikő

    2014-01-01

    The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG) and one known (rs8679684) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR) of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104) and Border Collie (N = 103) dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i) proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii) how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system.

  13. Sweet taste receptor gene variation and aspartame taste in primates and other species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Maehashi, Kenji; Li, Weihua; Lim, Raymond; Brand, Joseph G; Beauchamp, Gary K; Reed, Danielle R; Thai, Chloe; Floriano, Wely B

    2011-06-01

    Aspartame is a sweetener added to foods and beverages as a low-calorie sugar replacement. Unlike sugars, which are apparently perceived as sweet and desirable by a range of mammals, the ability to taste aspartame varies, with humans, apes, and Old World monkeys perceiving aspartame as sweet but not other primate species. To investigate whether the ability to perceive the sweetness of aspartame correlates with variations in the DNA sequence of the genes encoding sweet taste receptor proteins, T1R2 and T1R3, we sequenced these genes in 9 aspartame taster and nontaster primate species. We then compared these sequences with sequences of their orthologs in 4 other nontasters species. We identified 9 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R2 and 32 variant sites in the gene encoding T1R3 that distinguish aspartame tasters and nontasters. Molecular docking of aspartame to computer-generated models of the T1R2 + T1R3 receptor dimer suggests that species variation at a secondary, allosteric binding site in the T1R2 protein is the most likely origin of differences in perception of the sweetness of aspartame. These results identified a previously unknown site of aspartame interaction with the sweet receptor and suggest that the ability to taste aspartame might have developed during evolution to exploit a specialized food niche.

  14. The Ghrelin Receptor (Ghsr) Gene Polymorphism in Indonesian Local Chicken and Crossbreed is Associated with Carcass Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Khaerunnisa, Isyana; Jakaria, Jakaria; Arief, Irma Isnafia; Budiman, Cahyo; Sumantri, Cece

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin receptor (GHSR) gene is candidate gene for growth performance in chicken by modulating growth hormone release from the pituitary by binding to its ligand of ghrelin. Ghrelin gene, or growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) gene, is well known as feed intake and energy homeostasis regulator in mammals and birds. The objectives of this study were to identify the polymorphism of the T1857C GHSR locus in Indonesian local chicken and to evaluate its effects on carcass traits. The gene polymorphi...

  15. Adenosine A2A receptors and A2A receptor heteromers as key players in striatal function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eFerre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A very significant density of adenosine adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs is present in the striatum, where they are preferentially localized postsynaptically in striatopallidal medium spiny neurons (MSNs. In this localization A2ARs establish reciprocal antagonistic interactions with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs. In one type of interaction, A2AR and D2R are forming heteromers and, by means of an allosteric interaction, A2AR counteracts D2R-mediated inhibitory modulation of the effects of NMDA receptor stimulation in the striato-pallidal neuron. This interaction is probably mostly responsible for the locomotor depressant and activating effects of A2AR agonist and antagonists, respectively. The second type of interaction involves A2AR and D2R that do not form heteromers and takes place at the level of adenylyl-cyclase (AC. Due to a strong tonic effect of endogenous dopamine on striatal D2R, this interaction keeps A2AR from signaling through AC. However, under conditions of dopamine depletion or with blockade of D2R, A2AR-mediated AC activation is unleashed with an increased gene expression and activity of the striato-pallidal neuron and with a consequent motor depression. This interaction is probably the main mechanism responsible for the locomotor depression induced by D2R antagonists. Finally, striatal A2ARs are also localized presynaptically, in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals that contact the striato-nigral MSN. These presynaptic A2ARs heteromerize with A1 receptors (A1Rs and their activation facilitates glutamate release. These three different types of A2ARs can be pharmacologically dissected by their ability to bind ligands with different affinity and can therefore provide selective targets for drug development in different basal ganglia disorders.

  16. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes.

  17. Noninvasive Detection of AR-FL/AR-V7 as a Predictive Biomarker for Therapeutic Resistance in Men with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    acknowledged federal support) 5. Antonarakis ES, Armstrong AJ, Dehm SM, Luo J. Androgen receptor variant-driven prostate cancer : clinical implications...Resistant Prostate Cancer abstract Purpose A splice variant of the androgen receptor , AR-V7, confers resistance to AR-targeted therapies (ATTs) but not...androgen receptor ; AR-V7, androgen receptor splice variant 7; mCRPC, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer ; n/N, number of patients in that

  18. Comprehensive gene expression analysis of rice aleurone cells: probing the existence of an alternative gibberellin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Kenji; Aya, Koichiro; Hirano, Ko; Ordonio, Reynante Lacsamana; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2015-02-01

    Current gibberellin (GA) research indicates that GA must be perceived in plant nuclei by its cognate receptor, GIBBERELLIN INSENSITIVE DWARF1 (GID1). Recognition of GA by GID1 relieves the repression mediated by the DELLA protein, a model known as the GID1-DELLA GA perception system. There have been reports of potential GA-binding proteins in the plasma membrane that perceive GA and induce α-amylase expression in cereal aleurone cells, which is mechanistically different from the GID1-DELLA system. Therefore, we examined the expression of the rice (Oryza sativa) α-amylase genes in rice mutants impaired in the GA receptor (gid1) and the DELLA repressor (slender rice1; slr1) and confirmed their lack of response to GA in gid1 mutants and constitutive expression in slr1 mutants. We also examined the expression of GA-regulated genes by genome-wide microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses and confirmed that all GA-regulated genes are modulated by the GID1-DELLA system. Furthermore, we studied the regulatory network involved in GA signaling by using a set of mutants defective in genes involved in GA perception and gene expression, namely gid1, slr1, gid2 (a GA-related F-box protein mutant), and gamyb (a GA-related trans-acting factor mutant). Almost all GA up-regulated genes were regulated by the four named GA-signaling components. On the other hand, GA down-regulated genes showed different expression patterns with respect to GID2 and GAMYB (e.g. a considerable number of genes are not controlled by GAMYB or GID2 and GAMYB). Based on these observations, we present a comprehensive discussion of the intricate network of GA-regulated genes in rice aleurone cells. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. FOXA1 promotes tumor cell proliferation through AR involving the Notch pathway in endometrial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Meiting; Bao, Wei; Wang, Jingyun; Yang, Tingting; He, Xiaoying; Liao, Yun; Wan, Xiaoping

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that forkhead box A1 (FOXA1) is frequently dysregulated in many types of human cancers. However, the exact function and mechanism of FOXA1 in human endometrial cancer (EC) remains unclear. FOXA1 expression, androgen receptor (AR) expression, and the relationships of these two markers with clinicopathological factors were determined by immunohistochemistry analysis. FOXA1 and AR were up-regulated by transient transfection with plasmids, and were down-regulated by transfection with siRNA or short hairpin RNA (shRNA). The effects of FOXA1 depletion and FOXA1 overexpression on AR-mediated transcription as well as Notch pathway and their impact on EC cell proliferation were examined by qRT-PCR, western blotting, co-immunoprecipitation, ChIP-PCR, MTT, colony-formation, and xenograft tumor–formation assays. We found that the expression of FOXA1 and AR in ECs was significantly higher than that in a typical hyperplasia and normal tissues. FOXA1 expression was significantly correlated with AR expression in clinical tissues. High FOXA1 levels positively correlated with pathological grade and depth of myometrial invasion in EC. High AR levels also positively correlated with pathological grade in EC. Moreover, the expression of XBP1, MYC, ZBTB16, and UHRF1, which are downstream targets of AR, was promoted by FOXA1 up-regulation or inhibited by FOXA1 down-regulation. Co-immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 interacted with AR in EC cells. ChIP-PCR assays showed that FOXA1 and AR could directly bind to the promoter and enhancer regions upstream of MYC. Mechanistic investigation revealed that over-expression of Notch1 and Hes1 proteins by FOXA1 could be reversed by AR depletion. In addition, we showed that down-regulation of AR attenuated FOXA1-up-regulated cell proliferation. However, AR didn’t influence the promotion effect of FOXA1 on cell migration and invasion. In vivo xenograft model, FOXA1 knockdown reduced the rate of tumor growth. These

  20. Molecular evolution of the odorant and gustatory receptor genes in lepidopteran insects: implications for their adaptation and speciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engsontia, Patamarerk; Sangket, Unitsa; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Satasook, Chutamas

    2014-08-01

    Lepidoptera (comprised of butterflies and moths) is one of the largest groups of insects, including more than 160,000 described species. Chemoreception plays important roles in the adaptation of these species to a wide range of niches, e.g., plant hosts, egg-laying sites, and mates. This study investigated the molecular evolution of the lepidopteran odorant (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) genes using recently identified genes from Bombyx mori, Danaus plexippus, Heliconius melpomene, Plutella xylostella, Heliothis virescens, Manduca sexta, Cydia pomonella, and Spodoptera littoralis. A limited number of cases of large lineage-specific gene expansion are observed (except in the P. xylostella lineage), possibly due to selection against tandem gene duplication. There has been strong purifying selection during the evolution of both lepidopteran odorant and gustatory genes, as shown by the low ω values estimated through CodeML analysis, ranging from 0.0093 to 0.3926. However, purifying selection has been relaxed on some amino acid sites in these receptors, leading to sequence divergence, which is a precursor of positive selection on these sequences. Signatures of positive selection were detected only in a few loci from the lineage-specific analysis. Estimation of gene gains and losses suggests that the common ancestor of the Lepidoptera had fewer Or genes compared to extant species and an even more reduced number of Gr genes, particularly within the bitter receptor clade. Multiple gene gains and a few gene losses occurred during the evolution of Lepidoptera. Gene family expansion may be associated with the adaptation of lepidopteran species to plant hosts, especially after angiosperm radiation. Phylogenetic analysis of the moth sex pheromone receptor genes suggested that chromosomal translocations have occurred several times. New sex pheromone receptors have arisen through tandem gene duplication. Positive selection was detected at some amino acid sites predicted to be

  1. Association of variation in Fc gamma receptor 3B gene copy number with rheumatoid arthritis in Caucasian samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKinney, Cushla; Fanciulli, Manuela; Merriman, Marilyn E.; Phipps-Green, Amanda; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Dalbeth, Nicola; Gow, Peter J.; Harrison, Andrew A.; Highton, John; Jones, Peter B.; Stamp, Lisa K.; Steer, Sophia; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Franke, Barbara; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Vyse, Tim J.; Aitman, Tim J.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Merriman, Tony R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective There is increasing evidence that variation in gene copy number (CN) influences clinical phenotype. The low-affinity Fc gamma receptor 3B (FCGR3B) located in the FCGR gene cluster is a CN polymorphic gene involved in the recruitment to sites of inflammation and activation of

  2. Association of variation in Fcgamma receptor 3B gene copy number with rheumatoid arthritis in Caucasian samples.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKinney, C.; Fanciulli, M.; Merriman, M.E.; Phipps-Green, A.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Koeleman, B.P.; Dalbeth, N.; Gow, P.J.; Harrison, A.A.; Highton, J.; Jones, P.B.; Stamp, L.K.; Steer, S.; Barrera, P.; Coenen, M.J.H.; Franke, B.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Vyse, T.J.; Aitman, T.J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Merriman, T.R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is increasing evidence that variation in gene copy number (CN) influences clinical phenotype. The low-affinity Fcgamma receptor 3B (FCGR3B) located in the FCGR gene cluster is a CN polymorphic gene involved in the recruitment to sites of inflammation and activation of

  3. Expression map of a complete set of gustatory receptor genes in chemosensory organs of Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huizhen; Cheng, Tingcai; Chen, Zhiwei; Jiang, Liang; Guo, Youbing; Liu, Jianqiu; Li, Shenglong; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Wu, Jiaqi; Kishino, Hirohisa; Zhang, Huijie; Seth, Rakesh K; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Montagné, Nicolas; Jacquin-Joly, Emmanuelle; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2017-03-01

    Most lepidopteran species are herbivores, and interaction with host plants affects their gene expression and behavior as well as their genome evolution. Gustatory receptors (Grs) are expected to mediate host plant selection, feeding, oviposition and courtship behavior. However, due to their high diversity, sequence divergence and extremely low level of expression it has been difficult to identify precisely a complete set of Grs in Lepidoptera. By manual annotation and BAC sequencing, we improved annotation of 43 gene sequences compared with previously reported Grs in the most studied lepidopteran model, the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and identified 7 new tandem copies of BmGr30 on chromosome 7, bringing the total number of BmGrs to 76. Among these, we mapped 68 genes to chromosomes in a newly constructed chromosome distribution map and 8 genes to scaffolds; we also found new evidence for large clusters of BmGrs, especially from the bitter receptor family. RNA-seq analysis of diverse BmGr expression patterns in chemosensory organs of larvae and adults enabled us to draw a precise organ specific map of BmGr expression. Interestingly, most of the clustered genes were expressed in the same tissues and more than half of the genes were expressed in larval maxillae, larval thoracic legs and adult legs. For example, BmGr63 showed high expression levels in all organs in both larval and adult stages. By contrast, some genes showed expression limited to specific developmental stages or organs and tissues. BmGr19 was highly expressed in larval chemosensory organs (especially antennae and thoracic legs), the single exon genes BmGr53 and BmGr67 were expressed exclusively in larval tissues, the BmGr27-BmGr31 gene cluster on chr7 displayed a high expression level limited to adult legs and the candidate CO 2 receptor BmGr2 was highly expressed in adult antennae, where few other Grs were expressed. Transcriptional analysis of the Grs in B. mori provides a valuable new reference for

  4. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha specifically inhibits insulin-increased prolactin gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacob, K K; Sap, J; Stanley, F M

    1998-01-01

    A physiologically relevant response to insulin, stimulation of prolactin promoter activity in GH4 pituitary cells, was used as an assay to study the specificity of protein-tyrosine phosphatase function. Receptor-like protein-tyrosine phosphatase alpha (RPTPalpha) blocks the effect of insulin...... is specific by two criteria. A number of potential RPTPalpha targets were ruled out by finding (a) that they are not affected or (b) that they are not on the pathway to insulin-increased prolactin-CAT activity. The negative effect of RPTPalpha on insulin activation of the prolactin promoter is not due...... to reduced phosphorylation or kinase activity of the insulin receptor or to reduced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 or Shc. Inhibitor studies suggest that insulin-increased prolactin gene expression is mediated by a Ras-like GTPase but is not mitogen-activated protein kinase dependent...

  5. Inhibition of androgen receptor by decoy molecules delays progression to castration-recurrent prostate cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Kyung Myung

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR is a member of the steroid receptor family and a therapeutic target for all stages of prostate cancer. AR is activated by ligand binding within its C-terminus ligand-binding domain (LBD. Here we show that overexpression of the AR NTD to generate decoy molecules inhibited both the growth and progression of prostate cancer in castrated hosts. Specifically, it was shown that lentivirus delivery of decoys delayed hormonal progression in castrated hosts as indicated by increased doubling time of tumor volume, prolonged time to achieve pre-castrate levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA and PSA nadir. These clinical parameters are indicative of delayed hormonal progression and improved therapeutic response and prognosis. Decoys reduced the expression of androgen-regulated genes that correlated with reduced in situ interaction of the AR with androgen response elements. Decoys did not reduce levels of AR protein or prevent nuclear localization of the AR. Nor did decoys interact directly with the AR. Thus decoys did not inhibit AR transactivation by a dominant negative mechanism. This work provides evidence that the AR NTD plays an important role in the hormonal progression of prostate cancer and supports the development of AR antagonists that target the AR NTD.

  6. Structural analysis of complementary DNA and amino acid sequences of human and rat androgen receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Kokontis, J.; Liao, S.

    1988-01-01

    Structural analysis of cDNAs for human and rat androgen receptors (ARs) indicates that the amino-terminal regions of ARs are rich in oligo- and poly(amino acid) motifs as in some homeotic genes. The human AR has a long stretch of repeated glycines, whereas rat AR has a long stretch of glutamines. There is a considerable sequence similarity among ARs and the receptors for glucocorticoids, progestins, and mineralocorticoids within the steroid-binding domains. The cysteine-rich DNA-binding domains are well conserved. Translation of mRNA transcribed from AR cDNAs yielded 94- and 76-kDa proteins and smaller forms that bind to DNA and have high affinity toward androgens. These rat or human ARs were recognized by human autoantibodies to natural Ars. Molecular hybridization studies, using AR cDNAs as probes, indicated that the ventral prostate and other male accessory organs are rich in AR mRNA and that the production of AR mRNA in the target organs may be autoregulated by androgens

  7. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  8. Association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene polymorphisms with hepatorenal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Luo, X.; Ye, J.; Liu, S.; Miu, L.; Bao, J.; Wang, F.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with type I hepatorenal syndrome. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Hangzhou City Xixi Hospital, Hangzhou, China, from January 2012 to June 2014, and comprised patients with type I hepatorenal syndrome and individuals with cirrhosis who acted as the control group. Arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed by high-resolution melting methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 60 participants, 28(46.7%) were in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 32(53.3%) were controls. The mean age was 42.21+-11.30years in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 43.69+-12.60 in the control group (p=0.64). Mean total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin activity levels were 154.76+-51.58, 49.30+-24.67 and 33.42+-3.69 in the hepatorenal syndrome group compared to 181.26+-64.46, 41.78+-17.52 and 32.98+-4.81 among controls (p=0.09, p=0.18 and p=0.70). Statistically significant differences were found in the distributions of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus T allele between type I hepatorenal syndrome patients and the control group (odds ratio= 2.230; p= 0.040). Conclusion: T allele located at arginine vasopressin receptor 1a receptor promoter rs113481894 locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of type I hepatorenal syndrome. (author)

  9. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level. As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater

  10. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  11. Positive association of vitamin D receptor gene variations with multiple sclerosis in South East Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narooie-Nejad, Mehrnaz; Moossavi, Maryam; Torkamanzehi, Adam; Moghtaderi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Among the factors postulated to play a role in MS susceptibility, the role of vitamin D is outstanding. Since the function of vitamin D receptor (VDR) represents the effect of vitamin D on the body and genetic variations in VDR gene may affect its function, we aim to highlight the association of two VDR gene polymorphisms with MS susceptibility. In current study, we recruited 113 MS patients and 122 healthy controls. TaqI (rs731236) and ApaI (rs7975232) genetic variations in these two groups were evaluated using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technique. All genotype and allele frequencies in both variations showed association with the disease status. However, to find the definite connection between genetic variations in VDR gene and MS disease in a population of South East of Iran, more researches on gene structure and its function with regard to patients' conditions are required.

  12. Growth and gene expression are predominantly controlled by distinct regions of the human IL-4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J J; McReynolds, L J; Keegan, A; Wang, L H; Garfein, E; Rothman, P; Nelms, K; Paul, W E

    1996-02-01

    IL-4 causes hematopoietic cells to proliferate and express a series of genes, including CD23. We examined whether IL-4-mediated growth, as measured by 4PS phosphorylation, and gene induction were similarly controlled. Studies of M12.4.1 cells expressing human IL-4R truncation mutants indicated that the region between amino acids 557-657 is necessary for full gene expression, which correlated with Stat6 DNA binding activity. This region was not required for 4PS phosphorylation. Tyrosine-to-phenylalanine mutations in the interval between amino acids 557-657 revealed that as long as one tyrosine remained unmutated, CD23 was fully induced. When all three tyrosines were mutated, the receptor was unable to induce CD23. The results indicate that growth regulation and gene expression are principally controlled by distinct regions of IL-4R.

  13. Association of angiotensin receptor 2 gene polymorphisms with pregnancy induced hypertension risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenyang; Peng, Weijun; Zhang, Heng; Yan, Weirong

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the association of polymorphisms and haplotypes of angiotensin receptor 2 (AT2R) gene with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) in Chinese Han women. A case-control study was designed with 446 cases (gestational hypertension, GH: 124; pre-eclampsia, PE + eclampsia, E: 322) and 650 controls. rs5193, rs1403543 and rs12710567 of AT2R gene were genotyped. A logistic regression approach was applied to estimate the relationship between the polymorphisms and haplotypes of AT2Rgene with PIH risk. No relationship between AT2R gene polymorphisms and PIH was detected. The haplotype analysis also showed a negative result. rs5193, rs1403543 and rs12710567 of AT2R gene might have no effect on PIH risk among Chinese Han women.

  14. Gene Expression of Leptin and Long Leptin Receptor Isoform in Endometriosis: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Prestes Nácul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, leptin/BMI ratio in serum and peritoneal fluid and gene expression of leptin and long form leptin receptor (OB-RL were assessed in eutopic and ectopic endometria of women with endometriosis and controls. Increased serum leptin/BMI ratio was found in endometriosis patients. Leptin and OB-RL gene expression was significantly higher in ectopic versus eutopic endometrium of patients and controls. A positive, significant correlation was observed between leptin and OB-RL transcripts in ectopic endometria and also in eutopic endometria in endometriosis and control groups. A negative and significant correlation was found between OB-RL mRNA expression and peritoneal fluid leptin/BMI ratio only in endometriosis. These data suggest that, through a modulatory interaction with its active receptor, leptin might play a role in the development of endometrial implants.

  15. HindIII identifies a two allele DNA polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caenazzo, L.; Hoehe, M.R.; Hsieh, W.T.; Berrettini, W.H.; Bonner, T.I.; Gershon, E.S. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-09-11

    HCNR p5, a 0.9 kb BamHI/EcoRI fragment from the human cannabinoid receptor gene inserted into pUC19, was used as probe. The fragment is located in an intron approximately 14 kb 5{prime} of the initiation codon. This fragment is a clean single copy sequence by genomic blotting. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with HindIII identified a two allele RFLP with bands at 5.5 (A1) and 3.3 kb (A2). The human cannabinoid receptor gene has been genetically mapped in CEPH reference pedigrees to the centromeric/q region of chromosome 6. In situ hybridization localizes it to 6q14-q15. Codominant segregation has been observed in 26 informative two- and three-generation CEPH pedigrees and in 14 medium-sized disease families.

  16. Novel growth hormone receptor gene mutation in a patient with Laron syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Ahmet; Yüksel, Bilgin; Coker, Ajda; Sarioz, Ozlem; Temiz, Fatih; Topaloglu, Ali Kemal

    2010-04-01

    Growth Hormone (GH) is a 22 kDa protein that has effects on growth and glucose and fat metabolisms. These effects are initiated by binding of growth hormone (GH) to growth hormone receptors (GHR) expressed in target cells. Mutations or deletions in the growth hormone receptor cause an autosomal disorder called Laron-type dwarfism (LS) characterized by high circulating levels of serum GH and low levels of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). We analyzed the GHR gene for genetic defect in seven patients identified as Laron type dwarfism. We identified two missense mutations (S40L and W104R), and four polymorphisms (S473S, L526I, G168G and exon 3 deletion). We are reporting a mutation (W104R) at exon 5 of GHR gene that is not previously reported, and it is a novel mutation.

  17. Ovarian steroids regulate tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression in the mouse uterus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patak Eva

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the mouse uterus, pregnancy is accompanied by changes in tachykinin and tachykinin receptor gene expression and in the uterotonic effects of endogenous tachykinins. In this study we have investigated whether changes in tachykinin expression and responses are a result of changes in ovarian steroid levels. Methods We quantified the mRNAs of tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in uteri from ovariectomized mice and studied their regulation in response to estrogen and progesterone using real-time quantitative RT-PCR. Early (3 h and late (24 h responses to estrogen were evaluated and the participation of the estrogen receptors (ER, ERalpha and ERbeta, was analyzed by treating mice with propylpyrazole triol, a selective ERalpha agonist, or diarylpropionitrile, a selective agonist of ERbeta. Results All genes encoding tachykinins (Tac1, Tac2 and Tac4 and tachykinin receptors (Tacr1, Tacr2 and Tacr3 were expressed in uteri from ovariectomized mice. Estrogen increased Tac1 and Tacr1 mRNA after 3 h and decreased Tac1 and Tac4 expression after 24 h. Tac2 and Tacr3 mRNA levels were decreased by estrogen at both 3 and 24 h. Most effects of estrogen were also observed in animals treated with propylpyrazole triol. Progesterone treatment increased the levels of Tac2. Conclusion These results show that the expression of tachykinins and their receptors in the mouse uterus is tightly and differentially regulated by ovarian steroids. Estrogen effects are mainly mediated by ERalpha supporting an essential role for this estrogen receptor in the regulation of the tachykinergic system in the mouse uterus.

  18. Gene expression analysis after receptor tyrosine kinase activation reveals new potential melanoma proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teutschbein, Janka; Haydn, Johannes M; Samans, Birgit; Krause, Michael; Eilers, Martin; Schartl, Manfred; Meierjohann, Svenja

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive tumor with increasing incidence. To develop accurate prognostic markers and targeted therapies, changes leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes need to be understood. In the Xiphophorus melanoma model system, a mutated version of the EGF receptor Xmrk (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase) triggers melanomagenesis. Cellular events downstream of Xmrk, such as the activation of Akt, Ras, B-Raf or Stat5, were also shown to play a role in human melanomagenesis. This makes the elucidation of Xmrk downstream targets a useful method for identifying processes involved in melanoma formation. Here, we analyzed Xmrk-induced gene expression using a microarray approach. Several highly expressed genes were confirmed by realtime PCR, and pathways responsible for their induction were revealed using small molecule inhibitors. The expression of these genes was also monitored in human melanoma cell lines, and the target gene FOSL1 was knocked down by siRNA. Proliferation and migration of siRNA-treated melanoma cell lines were then investigated. Genes with the strongest upregulation after receptor activation were FOS-like antigen 1 (Fosl1), early growth response 1 (Egr1), osteopontin (Opn), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (Igfbp3), dual-specificity phosphatase 4 (Dusp4), and tumor-associated antigen L6 (Taal6). Interestingly, most genes were blocked in presence of a SRC kinase inhibitor. Importantly, we found that FOSL1, OPN, IGFBP3, DUSP4, and TAAL6 also exhibited increased expression levels in human melanoma cell lines compared to human melanocytes. Knockdown of FOSL1 in human melanoma cell lines reduced their proliferation and migration. Altogether, the data show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Xmrk is a useful tool in the identification of target genes that are commonly expressed in Xmrk-transgenic melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. The identified molecules constitute new possible molecular players in melanoma development

  19. Gene expression analysis after receptor tyrosine kinase activation reveals new potential melanoma proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krause Michael

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanoma is an aggressive tumor with increasing incidence. To develop accurate prognostic markers and targeted therapies, changes leading to malignant transformation of melanocytes need to be understood. In the Xiphophorus melanoma model system, a mutated version of the EGF receptor Xmrk (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase triggers melanomagenesis. Cellular events downstream of Xmrk, such as the activation of Akt, Ras, B-Raf or Stat5, were also shown to play a role in human melanomagenesis. This makes the elucidation of Xmrk downstream targets a useful method for identifying processes involved in melanoma formation. Methods Here, we analyzed Xmrk-induced gene expression using a microarray approach. Several highly expressed genes were confirmed by realtime PCR, and pathways responsible for their induction were revealed using small molecule inhibitors. The expression of these genes was also monitored in human melanoma cell lines, and the target gene FOSL1 was knocked down by siRNA. Proliferation and migration of siRNA-treated melanoma cell lines were then investigated. Results Genes with the strongest upregulation after receptor activation were FOS-like antigen 1 (Fosl1, early growth response 1 (Egr1, osteopontin (Opn, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (Igfbp3, dual-specificity phosphatase 4 (Dusp4, and tumor-associated antigen L6 (Taal6. Interestingly, most genes were blocked in presence of a SRC kinase inhibitor. Importantly, we found that FOSL1, OPN, IGFBP3, DUSP4, and TAAL6 also exhibited increased expression levels in human melanoma cell lines compared to human melanocytes. Knockdown of FOSL1 in human melanoma cell lines reduced their proliferation and migration. Conclusion Altogether, the data show that the receptor tyrosine kinase Xmrk is a useful tool in the identification of target genes that are commonly expressed in Xmrk-transgenic melanocytes and melanoma cell lines. The identified molecules constitute

  20. Ultradian hormone stimulation induces glucocorticoid receptor-mediated pulses of gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A; Wiench, Malgorzata; John, Sam; Conway-Campbell, Becky L; McKenna, Mervyn A; Pooley, John R; Johnson, Thomas A; Voss, Ty C; Lightman, Stafford L; Hager, Gordon L

    2009-09-01

    Studies on glucocorticoid receptor (GR) action typically assess gene responses by long-term stimulation with synthetic hormones. As corticosteroids are released from adrenal glands in a circadian and high-frequency (ultradian) mode, such treatments may not provide an accurate assessment of physiological hormone action. Here we demonstrate that ultradian hormone stimulation induces cyclic GR-mediated transcriptional regulation, or gene pulsing, both in cultured cells and in animal models. Equilibrium receptor-occupancy of regulatory elements precisely tracks the ligand pulses. Nascent RNA transcripts from GR-regulated genes are released in distinct quanta, demonstrating a profound difference between the transcriptional programs induced by ultradian and constant stimulation. Gene pulsing is driven by rapid GR exchange with response elements and by GR recycling through the chaperone machinery, which promotes GR activation and reactivation in response to the ultradian hormone release, thus coupling promoter activity to the naturally occurring fluctuations in hormone levels. The GR signalling pathway has been optimized for a prompt and timely response to fluctuations in hormone levels, indicating that biologically accurate regulation of gene targets by GR requires an ultradian mode of hormone stimulation.

  1. Cloning, mapping and molecular characterization of porcine progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congying Chen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Progesterone plays an important role in sow reproduction by stimulating classic genomic pathways via nuclear receptors and non-genomic pathways via membrane receptors such a progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2. In this work, we used radiation hybrid mapping to assign PGRMC2 to pig chromosome 8 and observed that this receptor has two transcripts in pigs. The full-length cDNA of the large transcript is 1858 bp long and contains a 669-bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a protein of 223 amino acids. The shorter transcript encodes a protein of 170 amino acids. The porcine PGRMC2 gene consists of three exons 446 bp, 156 bp and 1259 bp in length. The promoter sequence is GC-rich and lacks a typical TATA box. Several putative cis-regulatory DNA motifs were identified in the 208-bp upstream genomic region. Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were detected in introns* and the 3' UTR. RT-PCR indicated that the PGRMC2 gene is expressed ubiquitously in all pig tissues examined.

  2. Association between the dopamine D3 receptor gene locus (DRD3) and unipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeos, D G; Papadimitriou, G N; Avramopoulos, D; Karadima, G; Daskalopoulou, E G; Souery, D; Mendlewicz, J; Vassilopoulos, D; Stefanis, C N

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, more recently, affective disorders. Among the dopamine receptors, D3 can be considered as particularly related to affective disorders due to its neuroanatomical localization in the limbic region of the brain and its relation to the serotoninergic activity of the CNS. The possible involvement of dopamine receptor D3 in unipolar (UP) major depression was investigated by a genetic association study of the D3 receptor gene locus (DRD3) on 36 UP patients and 38 ethnically matched controls. An allelic association of DRD3 (Bal I polymorphism) and UP illness was observed, with the Gly-9 allele (allele '2', 206/98 base-pairs long) being more frequent in patients than in controls (49% vs 29%, P < 0.02). The genotypes containing this allele (1-2 and 2-2) were found in 75% of patients vs 50% of controls (P < 0.03, odds ratio = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.12-8.05). The effect of the genotype remained significant (P < 0.02) after sex and family history were controlled by a multiple linear regression analysis. These results further support the hypothesis that dopaminergic mechanisms may be implicated in the pathogenesis of affective disorder. More specifically, the '2' allele of the dopamine receptor D3 gene seems to be associated with unipolar depression and can be considered as a 'phenotypic modifier' for major psychiatric disorders.

  3. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance.

  4. Environmental stress, oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) polymorphism, and mental health following collective stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas-Thompson, RG; Holman, EA

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs53576 genotype buffers the combined impact of negative social environments (e.g., interpersonal conflict/constraint) and economic stress on post-traumatic stress (PTS) symptoms and impaired daily functioning following collective stress (September 11th terrorist attacks). Saliva was collected by mail and used to genotype 704 respondents. Participants completed Web-based assessments of pre-9/11 mental h...

  5. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the tem......Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart......, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism...... in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner....

  6. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Wang Ronglin; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim; Ankley, Gerald T.

    2011-01-01

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  7. Growth hormone receptor gene mutations in two Italian patients with Laron Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassone, L; Corneli, G; Bellone, S; Camacho-Hübner, C; Aimaretti, G; Cappa, M; Ubertini, G; Bona, G

    2007-05-01

    Laron Syndrome (LS) represents a condition characterized by GH insensitivity caused by molecular defects in the GH receptor (GHR) gene or in the post-receptor signalling pathway. We report the molecular characterization of two unrelated Italian girls from Sicily diagnosed with LS. The DNA sequencing of the GHR gene revealed the presence of different nonsense mutations, occurring in the same background haplotype. The molecular defects occurred in the extracellular domain of the GHR leading to a premature termination signal and to a truncated non-functional receptor. In one patient, a homozygous G to T transversion, in exon 6, led to the mutation GAA to TAA at codon 180 (E180X), while in the second patient a homozygous C to T transition in exon 7 was detected, causing the CGA to TAA substitution at codon 217 (R217X). Both probands presented the polymorphisms Gly168Gly and Ile544Leu in a homozygous state in exons 6 and 10, respectively. The E180X represents a novel defect of the GHR gene, while the R217X mutation has been previously reported in several patients from different ethnic backgrounds but all from countries located in the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern region.

  8. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinović-Weigelt, Dalma; Wang, Rong-Lin; Villeneuve, Daniel L; Bencic, David C; Lazorchak, Jim; Ankley, Gerald T

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4×44K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethylene and pollination decrease transcript abundance of an ethylene receptor gene in Dendrobium petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongkum, Monthathip; Burns, Parichart; Bhunchoth, Anjana; Warin, Nuchnard; Chatchawankanphanich, Orawan; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2015-03-15

    We studied the expression of a gene encoding an ethylene receptor, called Ethylene Response Sensor 1 (Den-ERS1), in the petals of Dendrobium orchid flowers. Transcripts accumulated during the young floral bud stage and declined by the time the flowers had been open for several days. Pollination or exposure to exogenous ethylene resulted in earlier flower senescence, an increase in ethylene production and a lower Den-ERS1 transcript abundance. Treatment with 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), an inhibitor of the ethylene receptor, decreased ethylene production and resulted in high transcript abundance. The literature indicates two kinds of ethylene receptor genes with regard to the effects of ethylene. One group shows ethylene-induced down-regulated transcription, while the other has ethylene-induced up-regulation. The present gene is an example of the first group. The 5' flanking region showed binding sites for Myb and myb-like, homeodomain, MADS domain, NAC, TCP, bHLH and EIN3-like transcription factors. The binding site for the EIN3-like factor might explain the ethylene effect on transcription. A few other transcription factors (RAV1 and NAC) seem also related to ethylene effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Gene expression profiling of the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide and vinclozolin in zebrafish (Danio rerio) gonads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma, E-mail: dalma@stthomas.edu [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); University of St. Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Wang Ronglin [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Villeneuve, Daniel L. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States); Bencic, David C.; Lazorchak, Jim [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Exposure Research Laboratory, Ecological Exposure Research Division, 26W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Ankley, Gerald T. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804 (United States)

    2011-01-25

    The studies presented in this manuscript focus on characterization of transcriptomic responses to anti-androgens in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Research on the effects of anti-androgens in fish has been characterized by a heavy reliance on apical endpoints, and molecular mechanisms of action (MOA) of anti-androgens remain poorly elucidated. In the present study, we examined effects of a short term exposure (24-96 h) to the androgen receptor antagonists flutamide (FLU) and vinclozolin (VZ) on gene expression in gonads of sexually mature zebrafish, using commercially available zebrafish oligonucleotide microarrays (4 x 44 K platform). We found that VZ and FLU potentially impact reproductive processes via multiple pathways related to steroidogenesis, spermatogenesis, and fertilization. Observed changes in gene expression often were shared by VZ and FLU, as demonstrated by overlap in differentially-expressed genes and enrichment of several common key pathways including: (1) integrin and actin signaling, (2) nuclear receptor 5A1 signaling, (3) fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling, (4) polyamine synthesis, and (5) androgen synthesis. This information should prove useful to elucidating specific mechanisms of reproductive effects of anti-androgens in fish, as well as developing biomarkers for this important class of endocrine-active chemicals.

  11. Evidence for an indirect transcriptional regulation of glucose-6-phosphatase gene expression by liver X receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grempler, Rolf; Guenther, Susanne; Steffensen, Knut R.; Nilsson, Maria; Barthel, Andreas; Schmoll, Dieter; Walther, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) paralogues α and β (LXRα and LXRβ) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor family and have oxysterols as endogenous ligands. LXR activation reduces hepatic glucose production in vivo through the inhibition of transcription of the key gluconeogenic enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). In the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of G6Pase gene expression by LXR. Both T0901317, a synthetic LXR agonist, and the adenoviral overexpression of either LXRα or LXRβ suppressed G6Pase gene expression in H4IIE hepatoma cells. However, compared to the suppression of G6Pase expression seen by insulin, the decrease of G6Pase mRNA by LXR activation was delayed and was blocked by cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis. These observations, together with the absence of a conserved LXR-binding element within the G6Pase promoter, suggest an indirect inhibition of G6Pase gene expression by liver X receptors

  12. Deletion of the δ opioid receptor gene impairs place conditioning but preserves morphine reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Merrer, Julie; Plaza-Zabala, Ainhoa; Del Boca, Carolina; Matifas, Audrey; Maldonado, Rafael; Kieffer, Brigitte L

    2011-04-01

    Converging experimental data indicate that δ opioid receptors contribute to mediate drug reinforcement processes. Whether their contribution reflects a role in the modulation of drug reward or an implication in conditioned learning, however, has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the impact of δ receptor gene knockout on reinforced conditioned learning under several experimental paradigms. We assessed the ability of δ receptor knockout mice to form drug-context associations with either morphine (appetitive)- or lithium (aversive)-induced Pavlovian place conditioning. We also examined the efficiency of morphine to serve as a positive reinforcer in these mice and their motivation to gain drug injections, with operant intravenous self-administration under fixed and progressive ratio schedules and at two different doses. Mutant mice showed impaired place conditioning in both appetitive and aversive conditions, indicating disrupted context-drug association. In contrast, mutant animals displayed intact acquisition of morphine self-administration and reached breaking-points comparable to control subjects. Thus, reinforcing effects of morphine and motivation to obtain the drug were maintained. Collectively, the data suggest that δ receptor activity is not involved in morphine reinforcement but facilitates place conditioning. This study reveals a novel aspect of δ opioid receptor function in addiction-related behaviors. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  14. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and gene silencing of two Drosophila receptors for the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Carina; Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Williamson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The database of the Drosophila Genome Project contains the sequences of two genes, CG8784 and CG8795, predicted to code for two structurally related G protein-coupled receptors. We have cloned these genes and expressed their coding parts in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that both receptors...... can be activated by low concentrations of the Drosophila neuropeptide pyrokinin-2 (CG8784, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 1x10(-9)M; CG8795, EC(50) for pyrokinin-2, 5 x 10(-10)M). The precise role of Drosophila pyrokinin-2 (SVPFKPRLamide) in Drosophila is unknown, but in other insects, pyrokinins have...... embryos and first instar larvae. In addition to the two Drosophila receptors, we also identified two probable pyrokinin receptors in the genomic database from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. The two Drosophila pyrokinin receptors are, to our knowledge, the first invertebrate pyrokinin receptors...

  15. Genetic spectrum of low density lipoprotein receptor gene variations in South Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ArulJothi, K N; Suruthi Abirami, B; Devi, Arikketh

    2018-03-01

    Low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is a membrane bound receptor maintaining cholesterol homeostasis along with Apolipoprotein B (APOB), Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and other genes of lipid metabolism. Any pathogenic variation in these genes alters the function of the receptor and leads to Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) and other cardiovascular diseases. This study was aimed at screening the LDLR, APOB and PCSK9 genes in Hypercholesterolemic patients to define the genetic spectrum of FH in Indian population. Familial Hypercholesterolemia patients (n=78) of South Indian Tamil population with LDL cholesterol and Total cholesterol levels above 4.9mmol/l and 7.5mmol/l with family history of Myocardial infarction were involved. DNA was isolated by organic extraction method from blood samples and LDLR, APOB and PCSK9 gene exons were amplified using primers that cover exon-intron boundaries. The amplicons were screened using High Resolution Melt (HRM) Analysis and the screened samples were sequenced after purification. This study reports 20 variations in South Indian population for the first time. In this set of variations 9 are novel variations which are reported for the first time, 11 were reported in other studies also. The in silico analysis for all the variations detected in this study were done to predict the probabilistic effect in pathogenicity of FH. This study adds 9 novel variations and 11 recurrent variations to the spectrum of LDLR gene mutations in Indian population. All these variations are reported for the first time in Indian population. This spectrum of variations was different from the variations of previous Indian reports. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Induction of the early-late Ddc gene during Drosophila metamorphosis by the ecdysone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Reece, Christian; O'Keefe, Sandra L; Hawryluk, Gregory W L; Engstrom, Monica M; Hodgetts, Ross B

    2002-06-01

    During Drosophila metamorphosis, the 'early-late' genes constitute a unique class regulated by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone. Their induction is comprised of both a primary and a secondary response to ecdysone. Previous work has suggested that the epidermal expression of the dopa decarboxylase gene (Ddc) is likely that of a typical early-late gene. Accumulation of the Ddc transcript is rapidly initiated in the absence of protein synthesis, which implies that the ecdysone receptor plays a direct role in induction. However, full Ddc expression requires the participation of one of the transcription factors encoded by the Broad-Complex. In this paper, we characterize an ecdysone response element (EcRE) that contributes to the primary response. Using gel mobility shift assays and transgenic assays, we identified a single functional EcRE, located at position -97 to -83 bp relative to the transcription initiation site. This is the first report of an EcRE associated with an early-late gene in Drosophila. Competition experiments indicated that the affinity of the Ddc EcRE for the ecdysone receptor complex was at least four-fold less than that of the canonical EcRE of the hsp27 gene. Using in vitro mutagenesis, we determined that the reduced affinity of the EcRE resided at two positions where the nucleotides differed from those found in the canonical sequence. The ecdysone receptor, acting through this EcRE, releases Ddc from a silencing mechanism, whose cis-acting domain we have mapped to the 5'-upstream region between -2067 and -1427 bp. Deletion of this repressive element resulted in precocious expression of Ddc in both epidermis and imaginal discs. Thus, epidermal Ddc induction at pupariation is under the control of an extended genomic region that contains both positive and negative regulatory elements. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd.

  17. Variability and repertoire size of T-cell receptor V alpha gene segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, D M; Pattern, P; Chien, Y; Yokota, T; Eshhar, Z; Giedlin, M; Gascoigne, N R; Goodnow, C; Wolf, R; Arai, K

    The immune system of higher organisms is composed largely of two distinct cell types, B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes, each of which is independently capable of recognizing an enormous number of distinct entities through their antigen receptors; surface immunoglobulin in the case of the former, and the T-cell receptor (TCR) in the case of the latter. In both cell types, the genes encoding the antigen receptors consist of multiple gene segments which recombine during maturation to produce many possible peptides. One striking difference between B- and T-cell recognition that has not yet been resolved by the structural data is the fact that T cells generally require a major histocompatibility determinant together with an antigen whereas, in most cases, antibodies recognize antigen alone. Recently, we and others have found that a series of TCR V beta gene sequences show conservation of many of the same residues that are conserved between heavy- and light-chain immunoglobulin V regions, and these V beta sequences are predicted to have an immunoglobulin-like secondary structure. To extend these studies, we have isolated and sequenced eight additional alpha-chain complementary cDNA clones and compared them with published sequences. Analyses of these sequences, reported here, indicate that V alpha regions have many of the characteristics of V beta gene segments but differ in that they almost always occur as cross-hybridizing gene families. We conclude that there may be very different selective pressures operating on V alpha and V beta sequences and that the V alpha repertoire may be considerably larger than that of V beta.

  18. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells with Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing for repair of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Zhanxiu; Zhao, Lili; Li, Hui; Wang, Suxia; Shen, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that RNA interference to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells before transplantation might further improve neurological function in rats with spinal cord transection injury. After 2 weeks, the number of neurons and BrdU-positive cells in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group was higher than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly greater compared with the model group. After 4 weeks, behavioral performance was significantly enhanced in the model group. After 8 weeks, the number of horseradish peroxidase-labeled nerve fibers was higher in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group than in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group, and significantly higher than in the model group. The newly formed nerve fibers and myelinated nerve fibers were detectable in the central transverse plane section in the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell group and in the Nogo-66 receptor gene silencing group. PMID:25206893

  19. GABAA receptor subunit gene expression in human prefrontal cortex: comparison of schizophrenics and controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarian, S.; Huntsman, M. M.; Kim, J. J.; Tafazzoli, A.; Potkin, S. G.; Bunney, W. E. Jr; Jones, E. G.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics is hypoactive and displays changes related to inhibitory, GABAergic neurons, and GABAergic synapses. These changes include decreased levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), the enzyme for GABA synthesis, upregulation of muscimol binding, and downregulation of benzodiazepine binding to GABAA receptors. Studies in the visual cortex of nonhuman primates have demonstrated that gene expression for GAD and for several GABAA receptor subunit polypeptides is under control of neuronal activity, raising the possibility that similar mechanisms in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics may explain the abnormalities in GAD and in GABAA receptor regulation. In the present study, which is the first of its type on human cerebral cortex, levels of mRNAs for six GABAA receptor subunits (alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 2) and their laminar expression patterns were analyzed in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics and matched controls, using in situ hybridization histochemistry and densitometry. Three types of laminar expression pattern were observed: mRNAs for the alpha 1, beta 2, and gamma 2 subunits, which are the predominant receptor subunits expressed in the mature cortex, were expressed at comparatively high levels by cells of all six cortical layers, but most intensely by cells in lower layer III and layer IV. mRNAs for the alpha 2, alpha 5, and beta 1 subunits were expressed at lower levels; alpha 2 and beta 1 were expressed predominantly by cells in layers II, III, and IV; alpha 5 was expressed predominantly in layers IV, V, and VI. There were no significant changes in overall mRNA levels for any of the receptor subunits in the prefrontal cortex of schizophrenics, and the laminar expression pattern of all six receptor subunit mRNAs did not differ between schizophrenics and controls. Because gene expression for GABAA receptor subunits is not consistently altered in the prefrontal cortex of

  20. A Killer Immunoglobulin - Like Receptor Gene - Content Haplotype and A Cognate Human Leukocyte Antigen Ligand are Associated with Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Anthony; Westover, Jonna; Benson, Michael; Johnson, Randall; Dykes, Annelise

    2016-01-01

    The killing activity of natural killer cells is largely regulated by the binding of class I human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands to killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor proteins. The killer cell immunoglobulin - like receptor gene - complex contains genes that activate and others that inhibit the killing state of natural killer cells depending on the binding of specific human leukocyte antigen cognate ligands. It has been suggested in previous publications that activating human leuko...

  1. The μ-opioid receptor gene and smoking initiation and nicotine dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendler Kenneth S

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The gene encoding the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1 is reported to be associated with a range of substance dependence. Experiments in knockout mice indicate that the mu-opioid receptor may mediate reinforcing effects of nicotine. In humans, opioid antagonist naltrexone may reduce the reinforcing effects of tobacco smoking. Additionally, the OPRM1 gene is located in a region showing linkage to nicotine dependence. The OPRM1 is thus a plausible candidate gene for smoking behavior. To investigate whether OPRM1 contributes to the susceptibility of smoking initiation and nicotine dependence, we genotyped 11 SNPs in the gene for 688 Caucasian subjects of lifetime smokers and nonsmokers. Three SNPs showed nominal significance for smoking initiation and one reached significance for nicotine dependence. The global test for three-marker (rs9479757-rs2075572-rs10485057 haplotypes was significant for smoking initiation (p = 0.0022. The same three-marker haplotype test was marginal (p = 0.0514 for nicotine dependence. These results suggest that OPRM1 may be involved in smoking initiation and nicotine dependence.

  2. Frequency of distribution of leptin receptor gene polymorphism in obstructive sleep apnea patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popko, K; Gorska, E; Wasik, M; Stoklosa, A; Pływaczewski, R; Winiarska, M; Gorecka, D; Sliwinski, P; Demkow, U

    2007-11-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone regulating energy homeostasis and body weight. Leptin concentration is increased in patients with the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Leptin receptor (LEPR) is a single transmembrane protein belonging to the superfamily of cytokine receptors related by a structure to the hemopoietin receptor family. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the frequency of distribution of leptin receptor gene polymorphism GLN223ARG in OSAS patients compared with healthy controls. The examined group included 179 subjects: 102 OSAS patients (74 men and 28 women) and 77 non-apneic controls (39 men and 38 women). Genomic DNA was isolated with the use of a column method and genotyping of DNA sequence variation was carried out by restriction enzyme analysis of PCR-amplified DNA. The results revealed a significant correlation between the polymorphism of LEPR and OSAS. Carriers of Arg allele in homozygotic genotype Arg/Arg and heterozygotic genotype Gln/Arg were more often obese and developed OSAS than the group of carriers of homozygotic Gln/Gln genotype. This tendency was observed in the whole examined population and in the group of obese women. We also found the highest levels of total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, and triglycerides in the group of homozygotic Arg/Arg genotype carriers, lower in heterozygotic Gln/Arg genotype carriers, and the lowest in the group of persons carring homozygotic Gln/Gln genotype. The presence of Arg allel seems linked to a higher risk of obesity and higher lipid levels in OSAS patients. OSAS may have a strong genetic basis due to the effects from a variety of genes including those for leptin receptor.

  3. GLUCOCORTICOID RECEPTOR-RELATED GENES: GENOTYPE AND BRAIN GENE EXPRESSION RELATIONSHIPS TO SUICIDE AND MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Honglei; Galfalvy, Hanga; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Huang, Yung-Yu; Rosoklija, Gorazd B; Dwork, Andrew J; Burke, Ainsley; Arango, Victoria; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John

    2016-06-01

    We tested the relationship between genotype, gene expression and suicidal behavior and major depressive disorder (MDD) in live subjects and postmortem samples for three genes, associated with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, suicidal behavior, and MDD; FK506-binding protein 5 (FKBP5), Spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2), and Glucocorticoid Receptor (NR3C1). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes were tested for association with suicidal behavior and MDD in a live (N = 277) and a postmortem sample (N = 209). RNA-seq was used to examine gene and isoform-level brain expression postmortem (Brodmann Area 9; N = 59). Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) relationships were examined using a public database (UK Brain Expression Consortium). We identified a haplotype within the FKBP5 gene, present in 47% of the live subjects, which was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt (OR = 1.58, t = 6.03, P = .014). Six SNPs on this gene, three SNPs on SKA2, and one near NR3C1 showed before-adjustment association with attempted suicide, and two SNPs of SKA2 with suicide death, but none stayed significant after adjustment for multiple testing. Only the SKA2 SNPs were related to expression in the prefrontal cortex (pFCTX). One NR3C1 transcript had lower expression in suicide relative to nonsuicide sudden death cases (b = -0.48, SE = 0.12, t = -4.02, adjusted P = .004). We have identified an association of FKBP5 haplotype with risk of suicide attempt and found an association between suicide and altered NR3C1 gene expression in the pFCTX. Our findings further implicate hypothalamic pituitary axis dysfunction in suicidal behavior. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Polymorphism of growth hormone receptor (GHR gene in Holstein Friesian dairy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restu Misrianti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Growth hormone gene have a critical role in the regulation of lactation, mammary gland development and growth process through its interaction with a specific receptor. Growth hormone (GH is an anabolic hormone which is synthesized and secreted by somatotrop cell in pituitary anterior lobe, and interacts with a specific receptor on the surface of the target cells. Growth hormone receptor (GHR has been suggested as candidate gene for traits related to milk production in Bovidae. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic polymorphism of the Growth Hormone Receptor (GHR genes in Holstein Friesian (HF cattle. Total of 353 blood samples were collected from five populations belonging to Cikole Dairy Cattle Breeding Station (BPPT-SP Cikole (88 samples, Pasir Kemis (95 samples, Cilumber (98 samples, Cipelang Livestock Embryo Center (BET Cipelang (40 samples, Singosari National Artificial Insemination Centre (BBIB Singosari (32 samples and 17 frozen semen samples from Lembang Artificial Insemination Center (BIB Lembang. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques then PCR products were genotyped by the Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP methods. There were two allele dan three genotypes were found namely: allele A and G, Genotype AA, AG and GG repectively. Allele A frequency (0.70-0.82 relatively higher than allele G frequency (0.18-0.30. Chi square test show that on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang and BBIB Singosari population were not significantly different (0.00-0.93, while on group of BET Cipelang, BIB Lembang dan BBIB Singosari population were significantly different (6.02-11.13. Degree of observed heterozygosity (Ho ranged from 0.13-0.42 and expected heterozygosity (He ranged from 0.29-0.42.

  5. The pluripotency factor Nanog is directly upregulated by the androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kregel, Steven; Szmulewitz, Russell Z; Vander Griend, Donald J

    2014-11-01

    The Androgen Receptor (AR) is a nuclear hormone receptor that functions as a critical oncogene in all stages of prostate cancer progression, including progression to castration-resistance following androgen-deprivation therapy. Thus, identifying and targeting critical AR-regulated genes is one potential method to block castration-resistant cancer proliferation. Of particular importance are transcription factors that regulate stem cell pluripotency; many of these genes are emerging as critical oncogenes in numerous tumor cell types. Of these, Nanog has been previously shown to increase the self-renewal and stem-like properties of prostate cancer cells. Thus, we hypothesized that Nanog is a candidate AR target gene that may impart castration-resistance. We modulated AR signaling in LNCaP prostate cancer cells and assayed for Nanog expression. Direct AR binding to the NANOG promoter was tested using AR Chromatin Immunoprecipation (ChIP) and analyses of publically available AR ChIP-sequencing data-sets. Nanog over-expressing cells were analyzed for cell growth and cytotoxicity in response to the AR antagonist enzalutamide and the microtubule stabilizing agent docetaxel. AR signaling upregulates Nanog mRNA and protein. AR binds directly to the NANOG promoter, and was not identified within 75 kb of the NANOGP8 pseudogene, suggesting the NANOG gene locus was preferentially activated. Nanog overexpression in LNCaP cells increases overall growth, but does not increase resistance to enzalutamide or docetaxel. Nanog is a novel oncogenic AR target gene in prostate cancer cells, and stable expression of Nanog increases proliferation and growth of prostate cancer cells, but not resistance to enzalutamide or docetaxel. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Phospho-kinase profile of triple negative breast cancer and androgen receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuenca-López, María D; Montero, Juan C; Morales, Jorge C; Prat, Aleix; Pandiella, Atanasio; Ocana, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central role in the oncogenesis of different tumors, as is the case in prostate cancer. In triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) a gene expression classification has described different subgroups including a luminal androgen subtype. The AR can be controlled by several mechanisms like the activation of membrane tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling pathways. However little is known in TNBC about how the AR is modulated by these mechanisms and the potential therapeutic strategists to inhibit its expression. We used human samples to evaluate the expression of AR by western-blot and phospho-proteomic kinase arrays that recognize membrane tyrosine kinase receptors and downstream mediators. Western-blots in human cell lines were carried out to analyze the expression and activation of individual proteins. Drugs against these kinases in different conditions were used to measure the expression of the androgen receptor. PCR experiments were performed to assess changes in the AR gene after therapeutic modulation of these pathways. AR is present in a subset of TNBC and its expression correlates with activated membrane receptor kinases-EGFR and PDGFRβ in human samples and cell lines. Inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR pathway in TNBC cell lines decreased notably the expression of the AR. Concomitant administration of the anti-androgen bicalutamide with the EGFR, PDGFRβ and Erk1/2 inhibitors, decreased the amount of AR compared to each agent given alone, and had an additive anti-proliferative effect. Administration of dihydrotestosterone augmented the expression of AR that was not modified by the inhibition of the PI3K/mTOR or Erk1/2 pathways. AR expression was posttranscriptionally regulated by PI3K or Erk1/2 inhibition. Our results describe the expression of the AR in TNBC as a druggable target and further suggest the combination of bicalutamide with inhibitors of EGFR, PDGFRβ or Erk1/2 for future development

  7. Expression of five acetylcholine receptor subunit genes in Brugia malayi adult worms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Wen Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine receptors (AChRs are required for body movement in parasitic nematodes and are targets of “classical” anthelmintic drugs such as levamisole and pyrantel and of newer drugs such as tribendimidine and derquantel. While neurotransmission explains the effects of these drugs on nematode movement, their effects on parasite reproduction are unexplained. The levamisole AChR type (L-AChRs in Caenorhabditis elegans is comprised of five subunits: Cel-UNC-29, Cel-UNC-38, Cel-UNC-63, Cel-LEV-1 and Cel-LEV-8. The genome of the filarial parasite Brugia malayi contains nine AChRs subunits including orthologues of Cel-unc-29, Cel-unc-38, and Cel-unc-63. We performed in situ hybridization with RNA probes to localize the expression of five AChR genes (Bm1_35890-Bma-unc-29, Bm1_20330-Bma-unc-38, Bm1_38195-Bma-unc-63, Bm1_48815-Bma-acr-26 and Bm1_40515-Bma-acr-12 in B. malayi adult worms. Four of these genes had similar expression patterns with signals in body muscle, developing embryos, spermatogonia, uterine wall adjacent to stretched microfilariae, wall of Vas deferens, and lateral cord. Three L-AChR subunit genes (Bma-unc-29, Bma-unc-38 and Bma-unc-63 were expressed in body muscle, which is a known target of levamisole. Bma-acr-12 was co-expressed with these levamisole subunit genes in muscle, and this suggests that its protein product may form receptors with other alpha subunits. Bma-acr-26 was expressed in male muscle but not in female muscle. Strong expression signals of these genes in early embryos and gametes in uterus and testis suggest that AChRs may have a role in nervous system development of embryogenesis and spermatogenesis. This would be consistent with embryotoxic effects of drugs that target these receptors in filarial worms. Our data show that the expression of these receptor genes is tightly regulated with regard to localization in adult worms and developmental stage in embryos and gametes. These results may help to explain the

  8. Interaction between leptin and leptin receptor in gastric carcinoma: Gene ontology analysis Interacción entre la leptina y su receptor en el carcinoma gástrico: análisis de ontología genética

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wiwanitkit

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Gastric carcinoma is a rare but important malignancy. The link between leptin, a cytokine that is elevated in obese individuals, and cancer development has been proposed. It is noted that leptin and its receptor may play a positive role in the progression in gastric cancer. However, the exact mechanism resulting form the interaction between leptin and leptin receptor has never been clarified. Here, the author used a new gene ontology technology to predict the molecular function and biological process due to the interaction between leptin and leptin receptor. Comparing to leptin and leptin receptor, the leptin-leptin receptor poses the same function and biological process as leptin receptor. This can confirm that leptin receptor has a significant suppressive effect on the expression of leptin. Loss of hormone activity and disturbance of normal cell signaling pathway of leptin can be seen. Blocking of receptor might be rational therapeutic strategy.El carcinoma gástrico es un cáncer muy poco frecuente pero importante. Se ha postulado que la leptina, una citocina que aparece elevada en las personas obesas, está relacionada con el cáncer. Se sabe que la leptina y su receptor pueden desempeñar un papel positivo en la progresión del cáncer gástrico. Sin embargo, nunca se ha dilucidado el mecanismo exacto al que daría lugar la interacción entre la leptina y el receptor de leptina. Aquí, el autor empleó una nueva tecnología de ontología genética para predecir la función molecular y el proceso biológico resultantes de la interacción entre la leptina y su receptor. Frente a la leptina y su receptor, el compuesto leptina-receptor realiza la misma función y el mismo proceso biológico que el receptor de leptina. Esto puede confirmar que el receptor de leptina ejerce un importante efecto supresor sobre la expresión de leptina. Pueden observarse una pérdida de actividad hormonal y la alteración de la vía normal de señalización celular

  9. Expansion of microsatellite in the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene linked to increased receptor expression and less aggressive thyroid cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onda, Masamitsu; Li, Daisy; Suzuki, Shinichi

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the length of the THRA1 microsatellite, which resides in a noncoding portion of the thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 gene, affects receptor expression and is linked to clinicopathological parameters in thyroid cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN......: In 30 cases of surgically resected sporadic thyroid cancer, the length of the THRA1 microsatellite was determined by DNA sequence analysis, and expression of thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 was assessed immunohistochemically in thin sections cut from tumor blocks. The length of THRA1 and expression...... of thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1 were also assessed in seven cancer cell lines. Regression analysis was used to gauge the correlation between the size of THRA1 and receptor expression. Multivariate analysis was used to test for links to the clinical parameters of gender, age, histology, stage, nodal...

  10. Vitamin D receptor FokI genotype may modify the susceptibility to schizophrenia and bipolar mood disorder by regulation of dopamine D1 receptor gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, S; Mirzaei, K; Hossein-Nezhad, A; Shariati, G

    2012-10-01

    This study is designed to test association of FOKI polymorphism in Vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene and its potential effect on expression of dopamine D1 receptor in schizophrenia and bipolar mood disorder as well as in healthy individuals. In this case-control study 196 patient with schizophrenia, 119 patients with bipolar mood disorder and 192 healthy individuals as the control group were recruited. All psychiatric disorders were diagnosed according to DSM IV criteria. Healthy control group denied any family history of such disorders. FOKI was genotyped by means of PCR-RFLP method. The mRNA was extracted from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the cDNA was synthesized. Frequency of ff genotype was more common in patients with bipolar disorders compared to the healthy control group (Odds ratio=1.84, 95% CI; 0.81 to 4.17) with increased relative risk (Relative risk=1.31, CI 95%; 0.86 to 1.99). There were significant differences between relative expressions of dopamine D1 receptor gene in various genotypes. Our results indicated that the ff genotype was associated with lower expression of dopamine D1 receptor gene. VDR as a nuclear receptor may contribute to bipolar disorders via modification of the expression of the neurotransmitters receptor such as dopamine.

  11. Increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression and effects of pharmacologic 5-HT2A receptor inactivation in obese Ay mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Nozue, Kana; Oka, Yoshitomo

    2006-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) 2A receptors contribute to the effects of 5-HT on platelet aggregation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and are reportedly involved in decreases in plasma levels of adiponectin, an adipokine, in diabetic subjects. Here, we report that systemic administration of sarpogrelate, a 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, suppressed appetite and increased hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript, corticotropin releasing hormone, 5-HT2C, and 5-HT1B receptor gene expression. A y mice, which have ectopic expression of the agouti protein, significantly increased hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in association with obesity compared with wild-type mice matched for age. Systemic administration of sarpogrelate suppressed overfeeding, body weight gain, and hyperglycemia in obese A y mice, whereas it did not increase plasma adiponectin levels. These results suggest that obesity increases hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor gene expression, and pharmacologic inactivation of 5-HT2A receptors inhibits overfeeding and obesity in A y mice, but did not increase plasma adiponectin levels

  12. Canine olfactory receptor gene polymorphism and its relation to odor detection performance by sniffer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesniak, Anna; Walczak, Marta; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Sacharczuk, Mariusz; Gawkowski, Maciej; Jaszczak, Kazimierz

    2008-01-01

    The outstanding sensitivity of the canine olfactory system has been acknowledged by using sniffer dogs in military and civilian service for detection of a variety of odors. It is hypothesized that the canine olfactory ability is determined by polymorphisms in olfactory receptor (OR) genes. We investigated 5 OR genes for polymorphic sites which might affect the olfactory ability of service dogs in different fields of specific substance detection. All investigated OR DNA sequences proved to have allelic variants, the majority of which lead to protein sequence alteration. Homozygous individuals at 2 gene loci significantly differed in their detection skills from other genotypes. This suggests a role of specific alleles in odor detection and a linkage between single-nucleotide polymorphism and odor recognition efficiency.

  13. Lack of Association between an Interleukin-I Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphism and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

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    Victor A. Danis

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-MHC linked genes may contribute to genetic predisposition to the development of systemic lupus erythematosus. The possibility that cytokine genes may be involved was raised by the observation of increased frequency in expression of an uncommon allele of an interleukin-I receptor antagonist gene polymorphism and SLE in a recent U.K. study. We have not been able to show any significant differences in expression of this allele in SLE patients as a whole or in any patient subgroups. Our results actually show a slight decrease in the expression of this allele in SLE patients compared with healthy controls and in SLE patients with malar rash compared with SLE patients without malar rash.

  14. Cholecystokinin-2 receptor mediated gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas v O; Borup, Rehannah; Marstrand, Troels

    2007-01-01

    could be identified. Comparison with forskolin- and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells showed that CCK induced a separate set of target genes. Taken together, we propose that neuronal CCK may have a role in the regulation of the circadian rhythm, the metabolism of cerebral cholesterol...... of neuronal CCK are incompletely understood. To identify genes regulated by neuronal CCK, we generated neuronal PC12 cells stably expressing the CCK-2 receptor (CCK-2R) and treated the cells with sulphated CCK-8 for 2-16 h, before the global expression profile was examined. The changes in gene expression...... peaked after 2 h, with 67 differentially expressed transcripts identified. A pathway analysis indicated that CCK was implicated in the regulation of the circadian clock system, the plasminogen system and cholesterol metabolism. But transcripts encoding proteins involved in dopamine signaling, ornithine...

  15. International Union of Pharmacology. XXXII. The mammalian calcitonin gene-related peptides, adrenomedullin, amylin, and calcitonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyner, David R; Sexton, Patrick M; Marshall, Ian; Smith, David M; Quirion, Remi; Born, Walter; Muff, Roman; Fischer, Jan A; Foord, Steven M

    2002-06-01

    The calcitonin family of peptides comprises calcitonin, amylin, two calcitonin gene-related peptides (CGRPs), and adrenomedullin. The first calcitonin receptor was cloned in 1991. Its pharmacology is complicated by the existence of several splice variants. The receptors for the other members the family are made up of subunits. The calcitonin-like receptor (CL receptor) requires a single transmembrane domain protein, termed receptor activity modifying protein, RAMP1, to function as a CGRP receptor. RAMP2 and -3 enable the same CL receptor to behave as an adrenomedullin receptor. Although the calcitonin receptor does not require RAMP to bind and respond to calcitonin, it can associate with the RAMPs, resulting in a series of receptors that typically have high affinity for amylin and varied affinity for CGRP. This review aims to reconcile what is observed when the receptors are reconstituted in vitro with the properties they show in native cells and tissues. Experimental conditions must be rigorously controlled because different degrees of protein expression may markedly modify pharmacology in such a complex situation. Recommendations, which follow International Union of Pharmacology guidelines, are made for the nomenclature of these multimeric receptors.

  16. Herpes simplex virus infection is sensed by both Toll-like receptors and retinoic acid-inducible gene- like receptors, which synergize to induce type I interferon production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon B; Jensen, Søren B; Nielsen, Christoffer

    2009-01-01

    The innate antiviral response is initiated by pattern recognition receptors, which recognize viral pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Here we show that retinoic acid-inducible gene (RIG)-I-like receptors (RLRs) in cooperation with Toll-like receptor (TLR) 9 is required for expression of type I...... interferons (IFNs) after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Our work also identified RNase L as a critical component in IFN induction. Moreover, we found that TLR9 and RLRs activate distinct, as well as overlapping, intracellular signalling pathways. Thus, RLRs are important for recognition of HSV...

  17. The Role of Skp1-Cul1-F-box Ubiquitin Ligases in Src-Stimulated Estrogen Receptor Proteolysis and Estrogen Receptor Target Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Korach,K.S. (2006). Estrogen receptors and human disease. J Clin Invest 116, 561‐ 570 .  Glickman,M.H.  and  Ciechanover,A.  (2002).  The  ubiquitin...P, Nola E et al. Tyrosine kinas/p21ras/MAP-kinase pathway activation by estradiol receptor complex in MCF-7 cells. EMBO J 1996; 15: 1292–1300. 2...elements (EREs) on target gene promoters in order to activate or repress transcription. • Multiple signalling pathways downstream of receptor tyrosine

  18. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...... are particularly interested in the regulation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5-HT2A R). This receptor form a functional complex with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) and is recruited to the cell membrane by the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1). The effect of BDNF on gene...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  19. Haplotypes of the porcine peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene are associated with backfat thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blöcker Helmut

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-inducible transcription factors. It is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene (PPARD has been assigned to a region on porcine chromosome 7, which harbours a quantitative trait locus for backfat. Thus, PPARD is considered a functional and positional candidate gene for backfat thickness. The purpose of this study was to test this candidate gene hypothesis in a cross of breeds that were highly divergent in lipid deposition characteristics. Results Screening for genetic variation in porcine PPARD revealed only silent mutations. Nevertheless, significant associations between PPARD haplotypes and backfat thickness were observed in the F2 generation of the Mangalitsa × Piétrain cross as well as a commercial German Landrace population. Haplotype 5 is associated with increased backfat in F2 Mangalitsa × Piétrain pigs, whereas haplotype 4 is associated with lower backfat thickness in the German Landrace population. Haplotype 4 and 5 carry the same alleles at all but one SNP. Interestingly, the opposite effects of PPARD haplotypes 4 and 5 on backfat thickness are reflected by opposite effects of these two haplotypes on PPAR-δ mRNA levels. Haplotype 4 significantly increases PPAR-δ mRNA levels, whereas haplotype 5 decreases mRNA levels of PPAR-δ. Conclusion This study provides evidence for an association between PPARD and backfat thickness. The association is substantiated by mRNA quantification. Further studies are required to clarify, whether the observed associations are caused by PPARD or are the result of linkage disequilibrium with a causal variant in a neighbouring gene.

  20. Polymorphisms of the low-density lipoprotein receptor gene in Brazilian individuals with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Salazar

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH is a metabolic disorder inherited as an autosomal dominant trait characterized by an increased plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL level. The disease is caused by several different mutations in the LDL receptor gene. Although early identification of individuals carrying the defective gene could be useful in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis and myocardial infarction, the techniques available for determining the number of the functional LDL receptor molecules are difficult to carry out and expensive. Polymorphisms associated with this gene may be used for unequivocal diagnosis of FH in several populations. The aim of our study was to evaluate the genotype distribution and relative allele frequencies of three polymorphisms of the LDL receptor gene, HincII1773 (exon 12, AvaII (exon 13 and PvuII (intron 15, in 50 unrelated Brazilian individuals with a diagnosis of heterozygous FH and in 130 normolipidemic controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood leukocytes by a modified salting-out method. The polymorphisms were detected by PCR-RFLP. The FH subjects showed a higher frequency of A+A+ (AvaII, H+H+ (HincII1773 and P1P1 (PvuII homozygous genotypes when compared to the control group (P<0.05. In addition, FH probands presented a high frequency of A+ (0.58, H+ (0.61 and P1 (0.78 alleles when compared to normolipidemic individuals (0.45, 0.45 and 0.64, respectively. The strong association observed between these alleles and FH suggests that AvaII, HincII1773 and PvuII polymorphisms could be useful to monitor the inheritance of FH in Brazilian families.

  1. Oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with human directed social behavior in dogs (Canis familiaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kis

    Full Text Available The oxytocin system has a crucial role in human sociality; several results prove that polymorphisms of the oxytocin receptor gene are related to complex social behaviors in humans. Dogs' parallel evolution with humans and their adaptation to the human environment has made them a useful species to model human social interactions. Previous research indicates that dogs are eligible models for behavioral genetic research, as well. Based on these previous findings, our research investigated associations between human directed social behaviors and two newly described (-212AG, 19131AG and one known (rs8679684 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the regulatory regions (5' and 3' UTR of the oxytocin receptor gene in German Shepherd (N = 104 and Border Collie (N = 103 dogs. Dogs' behavior traits have been estimated in a newly developed test series consisting of five episodes: Greeting by a stranger, Separation from the owner, Problem solving, Threatening approach, Hiding of the owner. Buccal samples were collected and DNA was isolated using standard protocols. SNPs in the 3' and 5' UTR regions were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction based techniques followed by subsequent electrophoresis analysis. The gene-behavior association analysis suggests that oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms have an impact in both breeds on (i proximity seeking towards an unfamiliar person, as well as their owner, and on (ii how friendly dogs behave towards strangers, although the mediating molecular regulatory mechanisms are yet unknown. Based on these results, we conclude that similarly to humans, the social behavior of dogs towards humans is influenced by the oxytocin system.

  2. Latitudinal Clines of the Human Vitamin D Receptor and Skin Color Genes

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    Dov Tiosano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The well-documented latitudinal clines of genes affecting human skin color presumably arise from the need for protection from intense ultraviolet radiation (UVR vs. the need to use UVR for vitamin D synthesis. Sampling 751 subjects from a broad range of latitudes and skin colors, we investigated possible multilocus correlated adaptation of skin color genes with the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR, using a vector correlation metric and network method called BlocBuster. We discovered two multilocus networks involving VDR promoter and skin color genes that display strong latitudinal clines as multilocus networks, even though many of their single gene components do not. Considered one by one, the VDR components of these networks show diverse patterns: no cline, a weak declining latitudinal cline outside of Africa, and a strong in- vs. out-of-Africa frequency pattern. We confirmed these results with independent data from HapMap. Standard linkage disequilibrium analyses did not detect these networks. We applied BlocBuster across the entire genome, showing that our networks are significant outliers for interchromosomal disequilibrium that overlap with environmental variation relevant to the genes’ functions. These results suggest that these multilocus correlations most likely arose from a combination of parallel selective responses to a common environmental variable and coadaptation, given the known Mendelian epistasis among VDR and the skin color genes.

  3. Neurotensin receptor 1 gene (NTSR1 polymorphism is associated with working memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent molecular genetics studies showed significant associations between dopamine-related genes (including genes for dopamine receptors, transporters, and degradation and working memory, but little is known about the role of genes for dopamine modulation, such as those related to neurotensin (NT, in working memory. A recent animal study has suggested that NT antagonist administration impaired working memory in a learning task. The current study examined associations between NT genes and working memory among humans. METHODS: Four hundred and sixty healthy undergraduate students were assessed with a 2-back working memory paradigm. 5 SNPs in the NTSR1 gene were genotyped. 5 ANOVA tests were conducted to examine whether and how working memory differed by NTSR1 genotype, with each SNP variant as the independent variable and the average accuracy on the working memory task as the dependent variable. RESULTS: ANOVA results suggested that two SNPs in the NTSR1 gene (rs4334545 and rs6090453 were significantly associated with working memory. These results survived corrections for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrated that NTSR1 SNP polymorphisms were significantly associated with variance in working memory performance among healthy adults. This result extended previous rodent studies showing that the NT deficiency impairs the working memory function. Future research should replicate our findings and extend to an examination of other dopamine modulators.

  4. Genetic Analysis Using Partial Sequencing of Melanocortin 4 Receptor (MC4R Gene in Bligon Goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latifah Latifah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Melanocortin 4 Receptor gene is involved in sympathetic nerve activity, adrenal and thyroid functions, and media for leptin in regulating energy balance and homeostasis. The aim of this research was to perform genetic analysis of MC4R gene sequences from Bligon goats. Fourty blood samples of Bligon does were used for DNA extraction. The primers were designed after alignment of 12 DNA sequences of MC4R gene from goat, sheep, and cattle. The primers were constructed on the Capra hircus MC4R gene sequence from GenBank (accession No. NM_001285591. Two DNA polymorphisms of MC4R were revealed in exon region (g.998 A/G and g.1079 C/T. The SNP g.998 A/G was a non-synonymous polymorphism i.e., changing of amino acid from methionine (Met to isoleucine (Ile. The SNP g.1079 C/T was a synonymous polymorphism. Restriction enzyme mapping on Bligon goat MC4R gene revealed three restriction enzymes (RsaI (GT’AC, Acc651 (G’GTAC_C, and KpnI (G_GTAC’C, which can recognize the SNP at g.1079 C/T. The restriction enzymes may be used for genotyping of the gene target using PCR-RFLP method in the future research.

  5. The oxytocin receptor gene, an integral piece of the evolution of Canis familaris from Canis lupus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lee Oliva

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous research in canids has revealed both group (dog versus wolf and individual differences in object choice task (OCT performance. These differences might be explained by variation in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene, as intranasally administered oxytocin has recently been shown to improve performance on this task by domestic dogs. This study looked at microsatellites at various distances from the OXTR gene to determine whether there was an association between this gene and: i species (dog/wolf and ii good versus bad OCT performers. Ten primer sets were designed to amplify 10 microsatellites that were identified at various distances from the canine OXTR gene. We used 94 (52 males, 42 females blood samples from shelter dogs, 75 (33 males, 42 females saliva samples from pet dogs and 12 (6 males, 6 females captive wolf saliva samples to carry out our analyses. Significant species differences were found in the two markers closest to the OXTR gene, suggesting that this gene may have played an important part in the domestic dogs’ evolution from the wolf. However, no significant, meaningful differences were found in microsatellites between good versus bad OCT performers, which suggests that other factors, such as different training and socialisation experiences, probably impacted task performance

  6. Toll like receptors gene expression of human keratinocytes cultured of severe burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Sarita Mac; Noronha, Silvana Aparecida Alves Corrêa de; Noronha, Samuel Marcos Ribeiro de; Cezillo, Marcus V B; Ferreira, Lydia Masako; Gragnani, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the expression profile of genes related to Toll Like Receptors (TLR) pathways of human Primary Epidermal keratinocytes of patients with severe burns. After obtaining viable fragments of skin with and without burning, culture hKEP was initiated by the enzymatic method using Dispase (Sigma-Aldrich). These cells were treated with Trizol(r) (Life Technologies) for extraction of total RNA. This was quantified and analyzed for purity for obtaining cDNA for the analysis of gene expression using specific TLR pathways PCR Arrays plates (SA Biosciences). After the analysis of gene expression we found that 21% of these genes were differentially expressed, of which 100% were repressed or hyporegulated. Among these, the following genes (fold decrease): HSPA1A (-58), HRAS (-36), MAP2K3 (-23), TOLLIP (-23), RELA (-18), FOS (-16), and TLR1 (-6.0). This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to TLR pathways and underlying wound infection caused by the burn. Furthermore, it may provide new strategies to restore normal expression of these genes and thereby change the healing process and improve clinical outcome.

  7. Genetic recombination within the human T-cell receptor α-chain gene complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.A.; Kindt, T.J.

    1987-01-01

    Genetic analyses of the human T-cell receptor (TCR) α-chain genes indicate that recombination events may occur frequently within this gene complex. Examination of the inheritance of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) detected by using probes for constant or variable region gene segments made it possible to assign TCRα haplotypes to the 16 parents and 43 offspring of eight families studied. A total of six RFLP, three for the constant region and three for variable region segments, were examined in the present studies. Most enzyme and probe combinations tested revealed no polymorphism and those finally selected for the study showed limited polymorphism in that only two or, in one case, three allelic forms of the gene were seen. In spite of limited variability at this level, extensive heterogeneity was observed for the combinations of markers present in haplotypes, suggesting that frequent recombination events have occurred. Most strikingly, multiple combinations of RFLP occurring in close proximity of the TCRα constant region gene were observed in this study. A high recombination frequency for the TCRα gene complex is further supported by the observation that two children, one in each of two families, inherited recombinant TCRα haplotypes

  8. Cholecystokinin A receptor (CCKAR gene variation is associated with language lateralization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Ocklenburg

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder associated with atypical handedness and language lateralization. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these functional changes are still poorly understood. Therefore, the present study was aimed at investigating whether variation in schizophrenia-related genes modulates individual lateralization patterns. To this end, we genotyped 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms that have previously been linked to schizophrenia on a meta-analysis level in a sample of 444 genetically unrelated healthy participants and examined the association of these polymorphisms with handedness, footedness and language lateralization. We found a significant association of the cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR gene variation rs1800857 and language lateralization assessed using the dichotic listening task. Individuals carrying the schizophrenia risk allele C of this polymorphism showed a marked reduction of the typical left-hemispheric dominance for language processing. Since the cholecystokinin A receptor is involved in dopamine release in the central nervous system, these findings suggest that genetic variation in this receptor may modulate language lateralization due to its impact on dopaminergic pathways.

  9. Ku proteins function as corepressors to regulate farnesoid X receptor-mediated gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Masae; Kunimoto, Masaaki; Nishizuka, Makoto; Osada, Shigehiro; Imagawa, Masayoshi

    2009-01-01

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR; NR1H4) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates the expression of genes involved in enterohepatic circulation and the metabolism of bile acids. Based on functional analyses, nuclear receptors are divided into regions A-F. To explore the cofactors interacting with FXR, we performed a pull-down assay using GST-fused to the N-terminal A/B region and the C region, which are required for the ligand-independent transactivation and DNA-binding, respectively, of FXR, and nuclear extracts from HeLa cells. We identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), Ku80, and Ku70 as FXR associated factors. These proteins are known to have an important role in DNA repair, recombination, and transcription. DNA-PKcs mainly interacted with the A/B region of FXR, whereas the Ku proteins interacted with the C region and with the D region (hinge region). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that the Ku proteins associated with FXR on the bile salt export pump (BSEP) promoter. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ectopic expression of the Ku proteins decreased the promoter activity and expression of BSEP gene mediated by FXR. These results suggest that the Ku proteins function as corepressors for FXR.

  10. Neurotensin receptor 1 gene activation by the Tcf/beta-catenin pathway is an early event in human colonic adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souazé, Frédérique; Viardot-Foucault, Véronique; Roullet, Nicolas; Toy-Miou-Leong, Mireille; Gompel, Anne; Bruyneel, Erik; Comperat, Eva; Faux, Maree C; Mareel, Marc; Rostène, William; Fléjou, Jean-François; Gespach, Christian; Forgez, Patricia

    2006-04-01

    Alterations in the Wnt/APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) signalling pathway, resulting in beta-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)-dependent transcriptional gene activation, are frequently detected in familial and sporadic colon cancers. The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) is widely distributed in the gastrointestinal tract. Its proliferative and survival effects are mediated by a G-protein coupled receptor, the NT1 receptor. NT1 receptor is not expressed in normal colon epithelial cells, but is over expressed in a number of cancer cells and tissues suggesting a link to the outgrowth of human colon cancer. Our results demonstrate that the upregulation of NT1 receptor occurring in colon cancer is the result of Wnt/APC signalling pathway activation. We first established the functionality of the Tcf response element within the NT1 receptor promoter. Consequently, we observed the activation of NT1 receptor gene by agents causing beta-catenin cytosolic accumulation, as well as a strong decline of endogenous receptor when wt-APC was restored. At the cellular level, the re-establishment of wt-APC phenotype resulted in the impaired functionality of NT1 receptor, like the breakdown in NT-induced intracellular calcium mobilization and the loss of NT pro-invasive effect. We corroborated the Wnt/APC signalling pathway on the NT1 receptor promoter activation with human colon carcinogenesis, and showed that NT1 receptor gene activation was perfectly correlated with nuclear or cytoplasmic beta-catenin localization while NT1 receptor was absent when beta-catenin was localized at the cell-cell junction in early adenomas of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis, hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer and loss of heterozygosity tumours. In this report we establish a novel link in vitro between the Tcf/beta-catenin pathway and NT1 receptor promoter activation.

  11. Increased natriuretic peptide receptor A and C gene expression in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Tue E.H.; Aplin, Mark; Strom, Claes C.

    2006-01-01

    also affects cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. In this study we examined the expression of genes for the NPRs in rats with pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy. The ANG II type 1 receptor was blocked with losartan (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1)) to investigate a possible role of the renin-angiotensin system......RNAs for the natriuretic peptides or their receptors. Although increased gene expression does not necessarily convey a higher concentration of the protein, the data suggest that pressure overload is accompanied by upregulation of not only ANP and BNP but also their receptors NPR-A and NPR-C in the left ventricle....

  12. Identifying Environmental Chemicals as Agonists of the Androgen Receptor by Applying a Quantitative High-throughput Screening Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The androgen receptor (AR, NR3C4) is a nuclear receptor whose main function is acting as a transcription factor regulating gene expression for male sexual development and maintaining accessory sexual organ function. It is also a necessary component of female fertility...

  13. Haplotype specific alteration of diabetes MHC risk by olfactory receptor gene polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahromi, Mohamed M

    2012-12-01

    Evidence for genes associated with risk for Type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the extended region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes is accumulating. The aim of this study was to investigate the association pattern of the extended MHC region with T1D susceptibility to identify effects independent of well established DR/DQ genes. A total of 394 Europid families with T1D were genotyped for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the olfactory receptor family 14, subfamily J, member 1 (OR14J1) gene, rs9257691, in the MHC telomeric region. The OR provides "an internal depiction of our external world" through the capture of odorant molecules in the main OR system by several large families of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR). These receptors transduce and chemosignals into the central nervous system (CNS). This SNP was chosen to identify its association with T1D. Interestingly, OR14J1C allele was significantly associated with T1D that seems to go with DRB1*0401, Χ(2)=10.9, p=0.0003. However, by fixing both genes of DR*0401-DQB1*0302, high risk, the association of T1D with OR14J1C still existed, Χ(2)=7.4, p=0.005. The occurrence of association of the OR14J1C allele with T1D patients with DRB1*401/DQB1*0302 is an independent risk for T1D. As an accumulative report suggests the role of OR in the pathogenesis of diabetic microvascular and other diabetic complications, undoubtedly, this haplotype specific alteration of T1D risk is an independent risk for the disease and can address the promising MHC-linked gene other than DR/DQ. Moreover, there is nothing to hinder for that this might be a signal that identifies the role of OR gene in the pathogenesis of T1D in patients who are prone to diabetic complications. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Rapid characterization of disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene by overexpression in COS cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T G; Andresen, B S; Jensen, H K

    1996-01-01

    To characterize disease-causing mutations in the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) gene, COS cells are transfected with the mutant gene in an EBV-based expression vector and characterized by flow cytometry. Using antibodies against the LDL-receptor the amount of receptor protein on the cel...

  15. Association between a promoter dopamine D2 receptor gene variant and the personality trait detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Cichon, Sven; Gustavsson, J Petter; Grünhage, Frank; Forslund, Kaj; Mattila-Evenden, Marja; Rylander, Gunnar; Asberg, Marie; Farde, Lars; Propping, Peter; Nöthen, Markus M

    2003-04-01

    Personality traits have shown considerable heritable components. Striatal dopamine D(2) receptor density, as determined by positron-emission tomography, has been associated with detached personality, as assessed by the Karolinska Scales of Personality. A putative functional promoter polymorphism in the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2), -141C ins/del, has been associated with dopamine D(2) receptor density. In this study healthy subjects (n = 235) who filled in at least one of several personality questionnaires (Karolinska Scales of Personality, Swedish Universities Scales of Personality, Health-relevant Five-factor Personality Inventory, and Temperament and Character Inventory) were analyzed with regard to the DRD2 -141C ins/del variant. There was an association (p =.001) between the DRD2 -141C ins/del variant and Karolinska Scales of Personality Detachment scale, indicating higher scores in subjects with the -141C del variant. There were also associations between the DRD2 -141C ins/del variant and a number of Karolinska Scales of Personality and Swedish Universities Scales of Personality Neuroticism-related scales, but of these only Swedish Universities Scales of Personality Lack of Assertiveness scale (p =.001) survived correction for multiple testing. These results add further support for the involvement of dopamine D(2) receptor in certain personality traits. The results should be treated with caution until replicated.

  16. 40Ar/39Ar dating of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    York, D.; Masliwec, A.; Kuybida, P.; Hanes, J.A.; Hall, C.M.; Kenyon, W.J.; Spooner, E.T.C.; Scott, S.D.

    1982-01-01

    To overcome difficulties encountered in the customary method of determining the age of mineralization of sulphide ore deposits by analysing silicate material, the sulphide minerals themselves have been examined to see if they contained sufficient potassium and argon for 40 Ar/ 39 Ar age determination. Initial results indicate that this is the case for pyrite from the Geco ore body in northwestern Ontario, Canada. (U.K.)

  17. Vampire bats exhibit evolutionary reduction of bitter taste receptor genes common to other bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhao, Huabin

    2014-01-01

    The bitter taste serves as an important natural defence against the ingestion of poisonous foods and is thus believed to be indispensable in animals. However, vampire bats are obligate blood feeders that show a reduced behavioural response towards bitter-tasting compounds. To test whether bitter taste receptor genes (T2Rs) have been relaxed from selective constraint in vampire bats, we sampled all three vampire bat species and 11 non-vampire bats, and sequenced nine one-to-one orthologous T2Rs that are assumed to be functionally conserved in all bats. We generated 85 T2R sequences and found that vampire bats have a significantly greater percentage of pseudogenes than other bats. These results strongly suggest a relaxation of selective constraint and a reduction of bitter taste function in vampire bats. We also found that vampire bats retain many intact T2Rs, and that the taste signalling pathway gene Calhm1 remains complete and intact with strong functional constraint. These results suggest the presence of some bitter taste function in vampire bats, although it is not likely to play a major role in food selection. Together, our study suggests that the evolutionary reduction of bitter taste function in animals is more pervasive than previously believed, and highlights the importance of extra-oral functions of taste receptor genes. PMID:24966321

  18. Characterization of V1R receptor (ora) genes in Lake Victoria cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Tomoki; Nikaido, Masato; Suzuki, Hikoyu; Hagino-Yamagishi, Kimiko; Okada, Norihiro

    2012-05-15

    Although olfaction could play a crucial role in underwater habitats by allowing fish to sense a variety of nonvolatile chemical signals, the importance of olfaction in species-rich cichlids is still controversial. In particular, examining whether cichlids rely on olfaction for reproduction is of primary interest to understand the mechanisms of speciation. In the present study, we explored the V1R (also known as ora) genes, which are believed to encode reproductive pheromone receptors in fish, in the genomes of Lake Victoria cichlids. By screening a bacterial artificial chromosome library, we identified all six intact V1R genes (V1R1 to V1R6) that have been reported in other teleost fish. Furthermore, RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that all of the V1R genes were expressed in the olfactory epithelium, indicating that these receptors are functional in cichlids. These observations indicate that cichlids use V1R-mediated olfaction in some ways for their social behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression

  20. Are Toll-like receptor gene polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutikhin, Anton G; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E

    2012-01-01

    The suggestion that there is a connection between chronic intraprostatic inflammation and prostate cancer was declared some years ago. As Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the key players in the processes of chronic intraprostatic inflammation, there is a hypothesis that TLR gene polymorphisms may be associated with prostate cancer risk. Although a number of comprehensive studies have been conducted on large samples in various countries, reliable connections between these single nucleotide polymorphisms and prostate cancer risk, stage, grade, aggressiveness, ability to metastasize, and mortality have not been detected. Results have also varied slightly in different populations. The data obtained regarding the absence of connection between the polymorphisms of the genes encoding interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAK1 and IRAK4) and prostate cancer risk might indicate a lack of association between inherited variation in the TLR signaling pathway and prostate cancer risk. It is possible to consider that polymorphisms of genes encoding TLRs and proteins of the TLR pathway also do not play a major role in the etiology and pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Feasibly, it would be better to focus research on associations between TLR single nucleotide polymorphisms and cancer risk in other infection-related cancer types

  1. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon

    2010-01-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  2. Cannabinoid Type-1 Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Are Associated with Central Obesity in a Southern Brazilian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaína P. Jaeger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The CB1 cannabinoid receptor and its endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, are involved in energy balance control, stimulating appetite and increasing body weight in wasting syndromes. Different studies have investigated the relationship between polymorphisms of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CNR1 gene and obesity with conflicting results. In the present study, we investigated the 1359G/A (rs1049353, 3813A/G (rs12720071 and 4895A/G (rs806368 polymorphisms in the CNR1 gene in a Brazilian population of European descent. To verify the association between these variants and obesity-related traits in this population, 756 individuals were genotyped by PCR-RFLP methods. The 4895G allele was associated with waist to hip ratio (WHR (P = 0.014; P = 0.042 after Bonferroni correction. An additive effect with the GAA haplotype was associated with WHR (P = 0.028, although this statistical significance disappeared after Bonferroni correction (P = 0.084. No significant association was observed between the genotypes of the 1359G/A and 3813A/G polymorphisms and any of the quantitative variables investigated. Our findings suggest that CNR1 gene polymorphism is associated with central obesity in this Brazilian population of European ancestry.

  3. Genetic Imaging of the Association of Oxytocin Receptor Gene (OXTR Polymorphisms with Positive Maternal Parenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina J. Michalska

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Well-validated models of maternal behavior in small-brain mammals posit a central role of oxytocin in parenting, by reducing stress and enhancing the reward value of social interactions with offspring. In contrast, human studies are only beginning to gain insights into how oxytocin modulates maternal behavior and affiliation. Methods: To explore associations between oxytocin receptor genes and maternal parenting behavior in humans, we conducted a genetic imaging study of women selected to exhibit a wide range of observed parenting when their children were 4-6 years old. Results: In response to child stimuli during functional magnetic resonance imaging, hemodynamic responses in brain regions that mediate affect, reward, and social behavior were significantly correlated with observed positive parenting. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs53576 and rs1042778 in the gene encoding the oxytocin receptor were significantly associated with both positive parenting and hemodynamic responses to child stimuli in orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and hippocampus. Conclusions: These findings contribute to the emerging literature on the role of oxytocin in human social behavior and support the feasibility of tracing biological pathways from genes to neural regions to positive maternal parenting behaviors in humans using genetic imaging methods.

  4. Itai-itai disease is not associated with polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor {alpha} gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishio, Hisahide; Hayashi, Chiyo; Lee, Myeongjin; Ayaki, Hitoshi; Sumino, Kimiaki [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Yamamoto, Ryoji; Ninomiya, Ruriko; Koizumi, Naoko [Hyogo College of Medicine (Japan). Dept. of Public Health

    1999-11-01

    Itai-itai (or ouch-ouch) disease is a syndrome accompanied by bone mineral disorders, and which may be related to oral cadmium exposure. Itai-itai predominantly affects postmenopausal women with a history of multiple childbirths. Recently, it has been reported that polymorphisms of the estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) gene are associated with postmenopausal reduction of bone mineral density in Japanese women. However, estrogen receptors have never been studied in itai-itai disease. In this study, we examined the genotypic distributions of PvuII and XbaI restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the ER{alpha} gene in patients with itai-itai disease and compared them with those of control subjects. The RFLPs are represented here as P{sub p} (PvuII) and Xx (XbaI); the capital and small letters signify the absence and presence of restriction sites, respectively. The genotypic distributions of the patient group were: PP, 14.8%; Pp, 55.6%; pp, 29.6%; XX, 7.4%; Xx, 29.6%; and xx, 63.0%. These distributions were similar to those observed for the control groups, hence no pattern of genotypic distribution was observed that could be related to itai-itai disease. We conclude that RFLPs of the ER{alpha} gene may not be associated with itai-itai disease. (orig.)

  5. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 participates in human apolipoprotein A5 gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Kwang-Hoon, E-mail: ksong@kiom.re.kr [Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-29

    The orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 (NR4A1) has been reported to play a crucial role in the modulation of diverse metabolic processes in liver. Here, we reported the identification of human apolipoprotein A5 (ApoA5), which implicated in lowering plasma triglyceride levels, as a novel target gene of Nur77. Nur77 induced the human ApoA5 promoter activity. Using 5'-deletion and mutagenesis of human ApoA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, it was shown that Nur77 directly regulated human ApoA5 gene expression by binding to a Nur77 response element (AAAGGTCA) located in the proximal human ApoA5 promoter region. In addition, we demonstrated that blocking of Nur77 transcriptional activity via overexpression of dominant negative Nur77 suppressed human ApoA5 promoter activity and mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Taken together, our results demonstrated that Nur77 is a novel regulator of human ApoA5 gene expression and provide a new insight into the role of this orphan nuclear receptor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  6. Androgen-Sensitized Apoptosis of HPr-1AR Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Chen

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor (AR signaling is crucial to the development and homeostasis of the prostate gland, and its dysregulation mediates common prostate pathologies. The mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells have been investigated in human and rodent adult prostate. However, the cellular stress response of human prostate epithelial cells is not well understood, though it is central to prostate health and pathology. Here, we report that androgen sensitizes HPr-1AR and RWPE-AR human prostate epithelial cells to cell stress agents and apoptotic cell death. Although 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT treatment alone did not induce cell death, co-treatment of HPr-1AR cells with DHT and an apoptosis inducer, such as staurosporine (STS, TNFt, or hydrogen peroxide, synergistically increased cell death in comparison to treatment with each apoptosis inducer by itself. We found that the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer led to activation of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, which is supported by robust cleavage activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Further, the dramatic depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential that we observed upon co-treatment with DHT and STS is consistent with increased mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP in the pro-apoptotic mechanism. Interestingly, the synergy between DHT and apoptosis inducer was abolished by AR antagonists and inhibitors of transcription and protein synthesis, suggesting that AR mediates pro-apoptotic synergy through transcriptional regulation of MOMP genes. Expression analysis revealed that pro-apoptotic genes (BCL2L11/BIM and AIFM2 were DHT-induced, whereas pro-survival genes (BCL2L1/BCL-XL and MCL1 were DHT-repressed. Hence, we propose that the net effect of these AR-mediated expression changes shifts the balance of BCL2-family proteins

  7. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer by siRNA- Mediated Androgen Receptor Gene Silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    and then photographed using a digital camera . AAV production and infection. To silence AR gene expression, a hairpin- structured expression vector...Sandusky GE, Vessella RL, Neubauer BL. Increased AKT activity contributes to prostate cancer progression by dramatically accelerating prostate tumor...HeNe laser. The spectrograph has an f/2.0 Czerny–Turner imaging spec- trometer plus a thermo-electrically cooled Kodak 0401 CCD camera . The fiberoptic

  8. Methylation and silencing of the retinoic acid receptor-β2 gene in cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, Tatyana; Petrenko, Anatolii; Gritsko, Tatyana; Vinokourova, Svetlana; Eshilev, Ernest; Kobzeva, Vera; Kisseljov, Fjodor; Kisseljova, Natalia

    2002-01-01

    Expression of the retinoic acid receptor β2 (RAR-β2), a putative tumor suppressor gene, is reduced in various human cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix. The mechanism of the inhibition of RAR-β2 expression remains obscure. We examined whether methylation of RAR-β2 gene could be responsible for this silencing in cervical SCC. Expression of RAR-β2 mRNA and methylation status of the 5' region of RAR-β2 gene were examined in 20 matched specimens from patients with cervical SCC and in three cervical cancer cell lines by Northern blot analysis and methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay or Southern blot analysis respectively. In 8 out 20 cervical SCC (40%) the levels of RAR-β2 mRNA were decreased or undetectable in comparison with non-neoplastic cervix tissues. All 8 tumors with reduced levels of RAR-β2 mRNA expression showed methylation of the promoter and the first exon expressed in the RAR-β2 transcript. The RAR-β2 gene from non-neoplastic cervical tissues was mostly unmethylated and expressed, but methylated alleles of the gene were found in three samples of the morphologically normal tissues adjacent to the tumors. Three cervical cancer cell lines with extremely low level of RAR-β2 mRNA expression, SiHA, HeLA and CaSki, also showed methylation of this region of the RAR-β2 gene. These findings suggest that methylation of the 5' region of RAR-β2 gene may contribute to gene silencing and that methylation of this region may be an important and early event in cervical carcinogenesis. These findings may be useful to make retinoids more effective as preventive and therapeutic agents in combination with inhibitors of DNA methylation

  9. Estrogen regulates estrogen receptors and antioxidant gene expression in mouse skeletal muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A Baltgalvis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Estrogens are associated with the loss of skeletal muscle strength in women with age. Ovarian hormone removal by ovariectomy in mice leads to a loss of muscle strength, which is reversed with 17beta-estradiol replacement. Aging is also associated with an increase in antioxidant stress, and estrogens can improve antioxidant status via their interaction with estrogen receptors (ER to regulate antioxidant gene expression. The purpose of this study was to determine if ER and antioxidant gene expression in skeletal muscle are responsive to changes in circulating estradiol, and if ERs regulate antioxidant gene expression in this tissue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult C57BL/6 mice underwent ovariectomies or sham surgeries to remove circulating estrogens. These mice were implanted with placebo or 17beta-estradiol pellets acutely or chronically. A separate experiment examined mice that received weekly injections of Faslodex to chronically block ERs. Skeletal muscles were analyzed for expression of ER genes and proteins and antioxidant genes. ERalpha was the most abundant, followed by Gper and ERbeta in both soleus and EDL muscles. The loss of estrogens through ovariectomy induced ERalpha gene and protein expression in the soleus, EDL, and TA muscles at both the acute and chronic time points. Gpx3 mRNA was also induced both acutely and chronically in all 3 muscles in mice receiving 17beta-estradiol. When ERs were blocked using Faslodex, Gpx3 mRNA was downregulated in the soleus muscle, but not the EDL and TA muscles. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that Gpx3 and ERalpha gene expression are sensitive to circulating estrogens in skeletal muscle. ERs may regulate Gpx3 gene expression in the soleus muscle, but skeletal muscle regulation of Gpx3 via ERs is dependent upon muscle type. Further work is needed to determine the indirect effects of estrogen and ERalpha on Gpx3 expression in skeletal muscle, and their importance in the

  10. Molecular characterisation of two novel maize LRR receptor-like kinases, which belong to the SERK gene family

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baudino, S.; Hansen, S.; Brettschneider, R.; Hecht, V.F.G.; Dresselhaus, T.; Lörz, H.; Dumas, C.; Rogowsky, P.M.

    2001-01-01

    Genes encoding two novel members of the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (LRR-RLK) superfamily have been isolated from maize (Zea mays L.). These genes have been named ZmSERK1 and ZmSERK2 since features such as a putative leucine zipper (ZIP) and five leucine rich repeats in the

  11. Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Down Syndrome: Effects of the Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gina Marie; Spanó, Goffredina; Edgin, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined individual differences in ADHD symptoms and executive function (EF) in children with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene, a gene often linked to ADHD in people without DS. Participants included 68 individuals with DS (7-21 years), assessed through laboratory tasks, caregiver reports, and…

  12. Nebulisation of receptor-targeted nanocomplexes for gene delivery to the airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manunta, Maria D I; McAnulty, Robin J; Tagalakis, Aristides D; Bottoms, Stephen E; Campbell, Frederick; Hailes, Helen C; Tabor, Alethea B; Laurent, Geoffrey J; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Hart, Stephen L

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy mediated by synthetic vectors may provide opportunities for new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF) via aerosolisation. Vectors for CF must transfect the airway epithelium efficiently and not cause inflammation so they are suitable for repeated dosing. The inhaled aerosol should be deposited in the airways since the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) is expressed predominantly in the epithelium of the submucosal glands and in the surface airway epithelium. The aim of this project was to develop an optimised aerosol delivery approach applicable to treatment of CF lung disease by gene therapy. The vector suspension investigated in this study comprises receptor-targeting peptides, cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA that self-assemble by electrostatic interactions to form a receptor-targeted nanocomplex (RTN) of approximately 150 nm with a cationic surface charge of +50 mV. The aerodynamic properties of aerosolised nanocomplexes produced with three different nebulisers were compared by determining aerosol deposition in the different stages of a Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI). We also investigated the yield of intact plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis and densitometry, and transfection efficacies in vitro and in vivo. RTNs nebulised with the AeroEclipse II BAN were the most effective, compared to other nebulisers tested, for gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo. The biophysical properties of the nanocomplexes were unchanged after nebulisation while the deposition of RTNs suggested a range of aerosol aerodynamic sizes between 5.5 µm-1.4 µm cut off (NGI stages 3-6) compatible with deposition in the central and lower airways. RTNs showed their ability at delivering genes via nebulisation, thus suggesting their potential applications for therapeutic interventions of cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders.

  13. Nebulisation of receptor-targeted nanocomplexes for gene delivery to the airway epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D I Manunta

    Full Text Available Gene therapy mediated by synthetic vectors may provide opportunities for new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF via aerosolisation. Vectors for CF must transfect the airway epithelium efficiently and not cause inflammation so they are suitable for repeated dosing. The inhaled aerosol should be deposited in the airways since the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR is expressed predominantly in the epithelium of the submucosal glands and in the surface airway epithelium. The aim of this project was to develop an optimised aerosol delivery approach applicable to treatment of CF lung disease by gene therapy.The vector suspension investigated in this study comprises receptor-targeting peptides, cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA that self-assemble by electrostatic interactions to form a receptor-targeted nanocomplex (RTN of approximately 150 nm with a cationic surface charge of +50 mV. The aerodynamic properties of aerosolised nanocomplexes produced with three different nebulisers were compared by determining aerosol deposition in the different stages of a Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI. We also investigated the yield of intact plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis and densitometry, and transfection efficacies in vitro and in vivo.RTNs nebulised with the AeroEclipse II BAN were the most effective, compared to other nebulisers tested, for gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo. The biophysical properties of the nanocomplexes were unchanged after nebulisation while the deposition of RTNs suggested a range of aerosol aerodynamic sizes between 5.5 µm-1.4 µm cut off (NGI stages 3-6 compatible with deposition in the central and lower airways.RTNs showed their ability at delivering genes via nebulisation, thus suggesting their potential applications for therapeutic interventions of cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders.

  14. Oxytocin and Opioid Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Greeting Behavior in Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enikő Kubinyi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Meeting humans is an everyday experience for most companion dogs, and their behavior in these situations and its genetic background is of major interest. Previous research in our laboratory reported that in German shepherd dogs the lack of G allele, and in Border collies the lack of A allele, of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR 19208A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP was linked to increased friendliness, which suggests that although broad traits are affected by genetic variability, the specific links between alleles and behavioral variables might be breed-specific. In the current study, we found that Siberian huskies with the A allele approached a friendly unfamiliar woman less frequently in a greeting test, which indicates that certain polymorphisms are related to human directed behavior, but that the relationship patterns between polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes differ between populations. This finding was further supported by our next investigation. According to primate studies, endogenous opioid peptide (e.g., endorphins receptor genes have also been implicated in social relationships. Therefore, we examined the rs21912990 of the OPRM1 gene. Firstly, we found that the allele frequencies of Siberian huskies and gray wolves were similar, but differed from that of Border collies and German shepherd dogs, which might reflect their genetic relationship. Secondly, we detected significant associations between the OPRM1 SNP and greeting behavior among German shepherd dogs and a trend in Border collies, but we could not detect an association in Siberian huskies. Although our results with OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants should be regarded as preliminary due to the relatively low sample size, they suggest that (1 OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants in dogs affect human-directed social behavior and (2 their effects differ between breeds.

  15. Oxytocin and Opioid Receptor Gene Polymorphisms Associated with Greeting Behavior in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubinyi, Enikő; Bence, Melinda; Koller, Dora; Wan, Michele; Pergel, Eniko; Ronai, Zsolt; Sasvari-Szekely, Maria; Miklósi, Ádám

    2017-01-01

    Meeting humans is an everyday experience for most companion dogs, and their behavior in these situations and its genetic background is of major interest. Previous research in our laboratory reported that in German shepherd dogs the lack of G allele, and in Border collies the lack of A allele, of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) 19208A/G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was linked to increased friendliness, which suggests that although broad traits are affected by genetic variability, the specific links between alleles and behavioral variables might be breed-specific. In the current study, we found that Siberian huskies with the A allele approached a friendly unfamiliar woman less frequently in a greeting test, which indicates that certain polymorphisms are related to human directed behavior, but that the relationship patterns between polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes differ between populations. This finding was further supported by our next investigation. According to primate studies, endogenous opioid peptide (e.g., endorphins) receptor genes have also been implicated in social relationships. Therefore, we examined the rs21912990 of the OPRM1 gene. Firstly, we found that the allele frequencies of Siberian huskies and gray wolves were similar, but differed from that of Border collies and German shepherd dogs, which might reflect their genetic relationship. Secondly, we detected significant associations between the OPRM1 SNP and greeting behavior among German shepherd dogs and a trend in Border collies, but we could not detect an association in Siberian huskies. Although our results with OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants should be regarded as preliminary due to the relatively low sample size, they suggest that (1) OXTR and OPRM1 gene variants in dogs affect human-directed social behavior and (2) their effects differ between breeds.

  16. Serotonin₂A/C receptors mediate the aggressive phenotype of TLX gene knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Pablo; Valdovinos, Maria G; May, Michael E; Lloyd, Blair P; Couppis, Maria H; Kennedy, Craig H

    2013-11-01

    Deleting the tailless (TLX) gene in mice produces a highly aggressive phenotype yet to be characterized in terms of heterozygous animals or neurotransmitter mechanisms. We sought to establish pharmacological control over aggression and study the role of serotonin (5-HT)(2A/C) receptors in mediating changes in aggression. We analyzed aggression in mice heterozygous (+/-) or homozygous (-/-) for the TLX gene and wild-types (+/+) using a resident-intruder paradigm. No +/+ mice were aggressive, 36% of +/- TLX and 100% of -/- TLX mice showed aggression. Dose-effect functions were established for clozapine (0.1-1.5mg/kg, ip), ketanserin (0.3-1.25 mg/kg, ip), and (±)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane [(±)DOI] (0.5-2.0 mg/kg, ip). Injecting clozapine decreased the frequency and duration of attacks for +/- TLX and -/- TLX mice. Clozapine did not decrease grooming in either +/- TLX or -/- TLX mice but may have increased locomotion for -/- TLX mice. Injecting ketanserin, a 5-HT(2A/C) receptor antagonist, produced differential decreases in frequency and latency to aggression between genotypes and corresponding increases in locomotor behavior. Injecting (±)DOI, a 5-HT(2A/C) receptor agonist, increased the frequency and duration of attacks, decreased the latency to attacks, and decreased locomotion in +/- and -/- TLX mice. Results of the current study suggest aggression displayed by TLX null and heterozygous mice involves 5-HT(2A/C) receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dysregulation of gene expression within the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor pathway in morbidly obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A Katharine; Koury, Jadd; McCaffrey, Tim; Fu, Sidney W; Brody, Fred

    2009-06-01

    The causes of obesity are multifactorial but may include dysregulation of a family of related genes, such as the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma). When activated, the PPARgamma pathway promotes lipid metabolism. This study used microarray technology to evaluate differential gene expression profiles in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The study enrolled six morbidly obese patients with a body mass index (BMI) exceeding 35 and four nonobese individuals. Blood samples were stabilized in PaxGene tubes (PreAnalytiX), and total RNA was extracted. Next, 100 ng of total RNA was amplified and labeled using the Ovation RNA Amplification System V2 with the Ovation whole-blood reagent (NuGen) before it was hybridized to an Affymetrix (Santa Clara, CA) focus array containing more than 8,500 verified genes. The data were analyzed using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) (p < 0.05) in the GeneSpring program, and potential pathways were identified with the Ingenuity program. Real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to validate the array data. A total of 97 upregulated genes and 125 downregulated genes were identified. More than a 1.5-fold change was identified between the morbidly obese patients and the control subjects for a cluster of dysregulated genes involving pathways regulating cell metabolism and lipid formation. Specifically, the PPARgamma pathway showed a plethora of dysregulated genes including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha). In morbidly obese patients, TNFalpha expression was increased (upregulated) 1.6-fold. These findings were confirmed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction with a 2.8-fold change. Microarrays are a powerful tool for identifying biomarkers indicating morbid obesity by analyzing differential gene expression profiles. This study confirms the association of PPARgamma with morbid obesity. Also, these findings in blood support previous work documented in tissue

  18. Cloning and characterization of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor gene in Spodoptera littoralis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Lytle, Christian; Njauw, Ching-Ni; Altstein, Miriam; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2007-05-15

    In noctuid moths cuticular pigmentation is regulated by the pyrokinin/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PK/PBAN) family, which also mediates a variety of other functions in moths and other insects. Numerous studies have shown that these neuropeptides exert their functions through activation of the PBAN receptor (PBAN-R), with subsequent Ca(2+) influx, followed by either activation of cAMP or direct activation of downstream kinases. Recently, several PBAN-Rs have been identified, all of which are from the pheromone gland of adult female moths, but evidence shows that functional PK/PBAN-Rs can also be expressed in insect larvae, where they mediate melanization and possibly other functions (e.g., diapause). Here, we identified a gene encoding a G-protein-coupled receptor from the 5th instar larval tissue of the moth Spodoptera littoralis. The cDNA of this gene contains an open reading frame with a length of 1050 nucleotides, which translates to a 350-amino acid, 42-kDa protein that shares 92% amino acid identity with Helicoverpa zea and Helicoverpa armigera PBAN-R, 81% with Bombyx mori PBAN-R and 72% with Plutella xylostella PBAN-R. The S. littoralis PBAN-R gene was stably expressed in NIH3T3 cells and transiently in HEK293 cells. We show that it mediates the dose-dependent PBAN-induced intracellular Ca(2+) response and activation of the MAP kinase via a PKC-dependent but Galphai-independent signaling mechanism. Other PK/PBAN family peptides (pheromonotropin and a C-terminally PBAN-derived peptide PBAN(28-33)NH(2)) also triggered MAP kinase activation. This receptor, together with the previously cloned PBAN-R, may facilitate our understanding of the cell-specific responses and functional diversities of this diverse neuropeptide family.

  19. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (serotonin 2A receptor gene polymorphism is associated with schizophrenia

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    Subash Padmajeya Sujitha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Schizophrenia, the debilitating neuropsychiatric disorder, is known to be heritable, involving complex genetic mechanisms. Several chromosomal regions associated with schizophrenia have been identified during the past; putative gene (s in question, to be called the global signature for the pathophysiology of the disease, however, seems to evade us. The results obtained from the several population-wise association-non association studies have been diverse. w0 e therefore, undertook the present study on Tamil speaking population in south India to examine the association between the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at the serotonin receptor gene (5HT2A and the occurrence of the disease. Methods: Blood samples collected from 266 cases and 272 controls were subjected to genotyping (PCR amplification of candidate SNPs, RFLP and sequencing. The data on the SNPs were subjected to statistical analysis for assessing the gene frequencies in both the cases and the controls. Results: The study revealed significant association between the genotypic frequencies of the serotonin receptor polymorphism and schizophrenia. SNP analysis revealed that the frequencies of GG (30%, rs6311 and CC genotypes (32%, rs6313, were higher in patients (P<0.05 than in controls. The study also showed presence of G and C alleles in patients. s0 ignificant levels of linkage disequilibrium (LD were found to exist between the genotype frequencies of rs6311 and rs6313. Interpretation & conclusions: This study indicated an association between the SNPs (rs6311 and rs6313 of the serotonin receptor 5HT2A and schizophrenia. HapMap analysis revealed that in its genotype distribution, the Tamil speaking population was different from several other populations across the world, signifying the importance of such ethnicity-based studies to improve our understanding of this complex disease.

  20. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

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    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng, E-mail: oxyccc@163.com

    2015-12-04

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  1. Isolation and characterization of CXC receptor genes in a range of elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goostrey, Anna; Jones, Gareth; Secombes, Christopher J

    2005-01-01

    The CXC group of chemokines exert their cellular effects via the CXCR group of G-protein coupled receptors. Six CXCR genes have been identified in humans (CXCR1-6), and homologues to some of these have been isolated from a range of vertebrate species. Here we isolate and characterize CXCR genes from a range of elasmobranch species. One CXCR1/2 gene fragment isolated from Scyliorhinus caniculus (lesser spotted catshark), and two CXCR1/2 copies from each of the elasmobranchs, Cetorhinus maximus (basking shark), Carcharodon carcharias (great white shark), and Raja naevus (cuckoo ray), exhibit high similarity to both CXCR1 and CXCR2. The two copies evident in the cuckoo ray and lamniform sharks provide strong evidence of CXCR1/2 lineage specific duplication in rays and sharks. A CXCR fragment isolated from Lamna ditropis (salmon shark) shows high similarity to a range of CXCR4 genes and strong clustering with CXCR4 gene homologues was apparent during phylogenetic reconstruction.

  2. Nuclear orphan receptor TLX affects gene expression, proliferation and cell apoptosis in beta cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Xiaoli; Xiong, Xiaokan; Dai, Zhe; Deng, Haohua; Sun, Li; Hu, Xuemei; Zhou, Feng; Xu, Yancheng

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear orphan receptor TLX is an essential regulator of the growth of neural stem cells. However, its exact function in pancreatic islet cells is still unknown. In the present study, gene expression profiling analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in beta cell line MIN6 causes suppression of 176 genes and upregulation of 49 genes, including a cadre of cell cycle, cell proliferation and cell death control genes, such as Btg2, Ddit3 and Gadd45a. We next examined the effects of TLX overexpression on proliferation, apoptosis and insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Proliferation analysis using EdU assay showed that overexpression of TLX increased percentage of EdU-positive cells. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis revealed that overexpression of TLX in MIN6 cells resulted in higher percentage of cells exiting G1 into S-phase, and a 58.8% decrease of cell apoptosis induced by 0.5 mM palmitate. Moreover, TLX overexpression did not cause impairment of insulin secretion. Together, we conclude that TLX is among factors capable of controlling beta cell proliferation and survival, which may serve as a target for the development of novel therapies for diabetes. - Highlights: • TLX overexpression in MIN6 cell causes significant expression changes of 225 genes. • TLX overexpression promotes MIN6 cell proliferation and decreases cell apoptosis. • TLX overexpression does not cause impairment of insulin secretion.

  3. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in Egyptian population

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    Marium M. Shamaa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of essential hypertension (EH is affected by genetic and environmental factors. Mutations in hypertension-related genes can affect blood pressure (BP via alteration of salt and water reabsorption by the nephron. The genes of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS have been extensively studied because of the well documented role of this system in the control of BP. It has been previously shown that Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (ATR1 gene polymorphism could be associated with increased risk of EH. So, in the current study, we evaluated the frequency of ATR1 (A1166C polymorphism in relation to EH in a group of Egyptian population. The study population included 83 hypertensive patients and 60 age and sex matched healthy control subjects. Restriction fragment length polymorphism – Polymerase chain reaction (RFLP – PCR was used for the analysis of A1166C polymorphism of ATR1 genes in peripheral blood samples of all patients and controls. The results revealed that there was a positive risk of developing EH when having the T allele whether in homozygous or heterozygous state. From this work, it was concluded that there was an association between ATR1 (A1166C gene polymorphism and the risk of developing EH.

  4. Global Developmental Gene Programing Involves a Nuclear Form of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-1 (FGFR1.

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    Christopher Terranova

    Full Text Available Genetic studies have placed the Fgfr1 gene at the top of major ontogenic pathways that enable gastrulation, tissue development and organogenesis. Using genome-wide sequencing and loss and gain of function experiments the present investigation reveals a mechanism that underlies global and direct gene regulation by the nuclear form of FGFR1, ensuring that pluripotent Embryonic Stem Cells differentiate into Neuronal Cells in response to Retinoic Acid. Nuclear FGFR1, both alone and with its partner nuclear receptors RXR and Nur77, targets thousands of active genes and controls the expression of pluripotency, homeobox, neuronal and mesodermal genes. Nuclear FGFR1 targets genes in developmental pathways represented by Wnt/β-catenin, CREB, BMP, the cell cycle and cancer-related TP53 pathway, neuroectodermal and mesodermal programing networks, axonal growth and synaptic plasticity pathways. Nuclear FGFR1 targets the consensus sequences of transcription factors known to engage CREB-binding protein, a common coregulator of transcription and established binding partner of nuclear FGFR1. This investigation reveals the role of nuclear FGFR1 as a global genomic programmer of cell, neural and muscle development.

  5. Rapid evolution of chemosensory receptor genes in a pair of sibling species of orchid bees (Apidae: Euglossini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Philipp; Ramírez, Santiago R; Leese, Florian; Quezada-Euan, J Javier G; Tollrian, Ralph; Eltz, Thomas

    2015-08-28

    Insects rely more on chemical signals (semiochemicals) than on any other sensory modality to find, identify, and choose mates. In most insects, pheromone production is typically regulated through biosynthetic pathways, whereas pheromone sensory detection is controlled by the olfactory system. Orchid bees are exceptional in that their semiochemicals are not produced metabolically, but instead male bees collect odoriferous compounds (perfumes) from the environment and store them in specialized hind-leg pockets to subsequently expose during courtship display. Thus, the olfactory sensory system of orchid bees simultaneously controls male perfume traits (sender components) and female preferences (receiver components). This functional linkage increases the opportunities for parallel evolution of male traits and female preferences, particularly in response to genetic changes of chemosensory detection (e.g. Odorant Receptor genes). To identify whether shifts in pheromone composition among related lineages of orchid bees are associated with divergence in chemosensory genes of the olfactory periphery, we searched for patterns of divergent selection across the antennal transcriptomes of two recently diverged sibling species Euglossa dilemma and E. viridissima. We identified 3185 orthologous genes including 94 chemosensory loci from five different gene families (Odorant Receptors, Ionotropic Receptors, Gustatory Receptors, Odorant Binding Proteins, and Chemosensory Proteins). Our results revealed that orthologs with signatures of divergent selection between E. dilemma and E. viridissima were significantly enriched for chemosensory genes. Notably, elevated signals of divergent selection were almost exclusively observed among chemosensory receptors (i.e. Odorant Receptors). Our results suggest that rapid changes in the chemosensory gene family occurred among closely related species of orchid bees. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that strong divergent selection

  6. Disseminated cysticercosis: clinical spectrum, Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms and role of albendazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qavi, Abdul; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita; Kumar, Neeraj; Malhotra, Kiran Preet; Srivastava, Pradeep Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Sharma, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we describe clinical and imaging spectrum, and the natural course of patients with disseminated cysticercosis. How albendazole affects the course of disease has also been evaluated. We assessed the Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms, to know the reason for the apparently higher prevalence of disseminated cysticercosis in India. Sixty consecutive patients with disseminated cysticercosis were enrolled. Sixty age-and-sex-matched healthy controls were also enrolled for the purpose of genetic study. Twenty patients, who gave consent, were treated with albendazole along with corticosteroids. Forty patients did not give consent for antiparasitic therapy. Assessment for Toll-like receptor-4 gene polymorphisms (Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile genes) was done. Patients were followed for 6 months. We also performed a literature search of cases published in English language using PubMed electronic database and analyzed 56 cases thus available. There was an increased risk (6.63 fold and 4.61 fold) of disseminated cysticercosis in the presence of Asp299Gly and Thr399Ile polymorphisms in Toll-like receptor-4, respectively. The allelic frequency of Gly (11% vs. 3%, P = 0.024, odds ratio [OR] = 3.52) and Ile alleles (11% vs. 2%, P = 0.009, OR = 4.738) in disseminated cysticercosis was high. Albendazole resulted in complete disappearance of all cerebral lesions in 35% (7/20) patients and reduction in lesion load in remaining 65% (13/20) patients. No significant change in number of cysticercal lesion was noted in patients who did not receive albendazole. No major adverse reaction following antiparasitic treatment was noted. Three deaths were recorded in patients who did not receive antiparasitic treatment. Of the 56 cases reported in PubMed, 33 patients received antiparasitic treatment with follow-up data available for 31 patients. Most (24) of these patients received albendazole. A significant clinical and/or imaging improvements, on follow up, were observed in

  7. Three neuropeptide Y receptor genes in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, support en bloc duplications in early vertebrate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaneck, Erik; Ardell, David H; Larson, Earl T; Larhammar, Dan

    2003-08-01

    It has been debated whether the increase in gene number during early vertebrate evolution was due to multiple independent gene duplications or synchronous duplications of many genes. We describe here the cloning of three neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor genes belonging to the Y1 subfamily in the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, a cartilaginous fish. The three genes are orthologs of the mammalian subtypes Y1, Y4, and Y6, which are located in paralogous gene regions on different chromosomes in mammals. Thus, these genes arose by duplications of a chromosome region before the radiation of gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates). Estimates of duplication times from linearized trees together with evidence from other gene families supports two rounds of chromosome duplications or tetraploidizations early in vertebrate evolution. The anatomical distribution of mRNA was determined by reverse-transcriptase PCR and was found to differ from mammals, suggesting differential functional diversification of the new gene copies during the radiation of the vertebrate classes.

  8. Opposite roles of the Arabidopsis cytokinin receptors AHK2 and AHK3 in the expression of plastid genes and genes for the plastid transcriptional machinery during senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilova, Maria N; Kudryakova, Natalia V; Doroshenko, Anastasia S; Zabrodin, Dmitry A; Rakhmankulova, Zulfira F; Oelmüller, Ralf; Kusnetsov, Victor V

    2017-03-01

    Cytokinin membrane receptors of the Arabidopsis thaliana AHK2 and AHK3 play opposite roles in the expression of plastid genes and genes for the plastid transcriptional machinery during leaf senescence Loss-of-function mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana were used to study the role of cytokinin receptors in the expression of chloroplast genes during leaf senescence. Accumulation of transcripts of several plastid-encoded genes is dependent on the АНК2/АНК3 receptor combination. АНК2 is particularly important at the final stage of plant development and, unlike АНК3, a positive regulator of leaf senescence. Cytokinin-dependent up-regulation of the nuclear encoded genes for chloroplast RNA polymerases RPOTp and RPOTmp suggests that the hormone controls plastid gene expression, at least in part, via the expression of nuclear genes for the plastid transcription machinery. This is further supported by cytokinin dependent regulation of genes for the nuclear encoded plastid σ-factors, SIG1-6, which code for components of the transcriptional apparatus in chloroplasts.

  9. Role of T cell receptor delta gene in susceptibility to celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschmann, E; Wienker, T F; Volk, B A

    1996-02-01

    There is a strong genetic influence on the susceptibility to celiac disease. Although in the vast majority of patients with celiac disease, the HLA-DQ(alpha1*0501, beta1*0201) heterodimer encoded by the alleles HLA-DQA1*0501 and HLA-DQB1*0201 seems to confer the primary disease susceptibility, it cannot be excluded that other genes contribute to disease susceptibility, as indicated by the difference in concordance rates between monozygotic twins and HLA identical siblings (70% vs. 30%). Obviously other genes involved in the genetic control of T cell mediated immune response could potentially influence susceptibility to celiac disease. The density of T cells using the gammadelta T cell receptor (TCR) is considerably increased in the jejunal epithelium of patients with celiac disease, an abnormality considered to be specific for celiac disease. This suggests an involvement of gammadelta T cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. To ascertain whether the TCR delta (TCRD) gene contributes to celiac disease susceptibility we carried out an association study and genetic linkage analysis using a highly polymorphic microsatellite marker at the TCRD locus on chromosome 14q11.2. The association study demonstrated no significant difference in allele frequencies of the TCRD gene marker between celiac disease patients and controls; accordingly, the relative risk estimates did not reach the level of statistical significance. In the linkage analysis, performed in 23 families, the logarithm of the odds (LOD) scores calculated for celiac disease versus the TCRD gene marker excluded linkage, suggesting that there is no determinant contributing to celiac disease status at or 5 cM distant to the analyzed TCRD gene marker. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide no evidence that the analyzed TCRD gene contributes substantially to celiac disease susceptibility.

  10. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene diversity in the Tibetan ethnic minority group of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bo-feng; Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Deng, Ya-jun; Yang, Guang; Wu, Qing-ju; Xu, Peng; Qin, Hai-xia; Fan, Shuan-liang; Huang, Ping; Deng, Li-bin; Lucas, Rudolf; Wang, Zhen-Yuan

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) gene polymorphisms in the Tibetan ethnic minority of China. To that purpose, we have studied KIR gene frequencies and genotype diversities of 16 KIR genes and three pseudogenes (2DL1, 2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL4, 2DL5A, 2DL5B, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 2DS4*001/002, 2DS4*003-007, 2DS5, 3DL1, 3DL2, 3DL3, 3DS1, 2DP1, 3DP1*001/002/004, and 3DP1*003) in a population sample of 102 unrelated healthy individuals of the Tibetan population living in Lhasa city, Tibet Autonomous Region of China. Tibetans mainly live in "the roof of the world," the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China and surrounding areas stretching from central Asia in the North and West to Myanmar and mainland China in the East, and India, Nepal, and Bhutan to the south. KIR gene frequencies and statistical parameters of Tibetan ethnic minority were calculated. Fifteen KIR genes were observed in the 102 tested Tibetan individuals with different frequencies. The allelic frequencies of the 15 KIR genes ranged from 0.06 to 0.86. In addition, KIR 2DL1, 2DL4, 3DL2, and 3DL3 were found to be present in every individual. Variable gene content, together with allelic polymorphisms, can result in individualized human KIR genotypes and haplotypes, with the A haplotypes being predominantly observed. The results of tested linkage disequilibrium (LD) among KIR genes demonstrated that KIR genes present a wide range of linkage disequilibrium. Moreover, a comparison of the population data of our study with previously published population data of other ethnic groups or areas was performed. The differences of allelic frequency distribution in KIR2DL2, 2DL3, 2DL5, 3DL1, 2DS1, 2DS2, 2DS3, 3DS1, and 2DP1 were statistically significant among different populations using the statistical method of the standard χ(2) test. In conclusion, the results of the present study can be valuable for enriching the Chinese ethnical gene information resources of the KIR gene pool and for

  11. A Single Dose of LSD Does Not Alter Gene Expression of the Serotonin 2A Receptor Gene (HTR2A) or Early Growth Response Genes (EGR1-3) in Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Patrick C.; Grünblatt, Edna; Müller, Felix; Borgwardt, Stefan J.; Liechti, Matthias E.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Renewed interest has been seen in the use of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in psychiatric research and practice. The repeated use of LSD leads to tolerance that is believed to result from serotonin (5-HT) 5-HT2A receptor downregulation. In rats, daily LSD administration for 4 days decreased frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding. Additionally, a single dose of LSD acutely increased expression of the early growth response genes EGR1 and EGR2 in rat and mouse brains through 5-HT2A receptor stimulation. No human data on the effects of LSD on gene expression has been reported. Therefore, we investigated the effects of single-dose LSD administration on the expression of the 5-HT2A receptor gene (HTR2A) and EGR1-3 genes. Methods: mRNA expression levels were analyzed in whole blood as a peripheral biomarker in 15 healthy subjects before and 1.5 and 24 h after the administration of LSD (100 μg) and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Results: LSD did not alter the expression of the HTR2A or EGR1-3 genes 1.5 and 24 h after administration compared with placebo. Conclusion: No changes were observed in the gene expression of LSD’s primary target receptor gene or genes that are implicated in its downstream effects. Remaining unclear is whether chronic LSD administration alters gene expression in humans. PMID:28701958

  12. Genetic polymorphisms at the leptin receptor gene in three beef cattle breeds

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    Sabrina E.M. Almeida

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at the exon 20 (T945M of the leptin receptor gene (LEPR and of three short tandem repeats (STRs BM7225, BMS694, and BMS2145 linked to LEPR was investigated in three beef cattle herds (Brangus Ibagé, Charolais, and Aberdeen Angus. A cheap and effective new method to analyze the T945M polymorphism in cattle populations was developed and the possible role of these polymorphisms in reproduction and weight gain of postpartum cows was evaluated. High levels of genetic diversity were observed with the average heterozygosity of STRs ranging from 0.71 to 0.81. No significant association was detected between LEPR markers and reproductive parameters or daily weight gain. These negative results suggest that the LEPR gene polymorphisms, at least those herein described, do not influence postpartum cows production.

  13. Fatty acid represses insulin receptor gene expression by impairing HMGA1 through protein kinase Cε

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Debleena; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Roy, SibSankar; Bhattacharya, Samir

    2007-01-01

    It is known that free fatty acid (FFA) contributes to the development of insulin resistance and type2 diabetes. However, the underlying mechanism in FFA-induced insulin resistance is still unclear. In the present investigation we have demonstrated that palmitate significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PDK1, the key insulin signaling molecule. Consequently, PDK1 phosphorylation of plasma membrane bound PKCε was also inhibited. Surprisingly, phosphorylation of cytosolic PKCε was greatly stimulated by palmitate; this was then translocated to the nuclear region and associated with the inhibition of insulin receptor (IR) gene transcription. A PKCε translocation inhibitor peptide, εV1, suppressed this inhibitory effect of palmitate, suggesting requirement of phospho-PKCε migration to implement palmitate effect. Experimental evidences indicate that phospho-PKCε adversely affected HMGA1. Since HMGA1 regulates IR promoter activity, expression of IR gene was impaired causing reduction of IR on cell surface and that compromises with insulin sensitivity

  14. Endocrine Parameters and Phenotypes of the Growth Hormone Receptor Gene Disrupted (GHR−/−) Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Edward O.; Sackmann-Sala, Lucila; Berryman, Darlene E.; Funk, Kevin; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S.; Okada, Shigeru; Ding, Juan; Cruz-Topete, Diana

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the GH receptor (GHR) gene eliminates GH-induced intracellular signaling and, thus, its biological actions. Therefore, the GHR gene disrupted mouse (GHR−/−) has been and is a valuable tool for helping to define various parameters of GH physiology. Since its creation in 1995, this mouse strain has been used by our laboratory and others for numerous studies ranging from growth to aging. Some of the most notable discoveries are their extreme insulin sensitivity in the presence of obesity. Also, the animals have an extended lifespan, which has generated a large number of investigations into the roles of GH and IGF-I in the aging process. This review summarizes the many results derived from the GHR−/− mice. We have attempted to present the findings in the context of current knowledge regarding GH action and, where applicable, to discuss how these mice compare to GH insensitivity syndrome in humans. PMID:21123740

  15. Potential mechanisms underlying estrogen-induced expression of the molluscan estrogen receptor (ER) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Thi Kim Anh [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Vinh University, 182 Le Duan St., Vinh City, Nghe An (Viet Nam); MacFarlane, Geoff R. [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia); Kong, Richard Yuen Chong [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China); O’Connor, Wayne A. [New South Wales Department of Primary Industries, Port Stephens Fisheries Institute, Taylors Beach, NSW 2316 (Australia); Yu, Richard Man Kit, E-mail: Richard.Yu@newcastle.edu.au [School of Environmental and Life Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • This is the first report on the putative promoter sequence of a molluscan ER gene. • The gene promoter contains putative binding sites for direct and indirect interaction with ER. • E2 upregulates ER gene expression in the ovary in vitro and in vivo. • E2-induced gene expression may require a novel ligand-dependent receptor. • The ER proximal promoter is hypomethylated regardless of gene expression levels. - Abstract: In vertebrates, estrogens and estrogen mimicking chemicals modulate gene expression mainly through a genomic pathway mediated by the estrogen receptors (ERs). Although the existence of an ER orthologue in the mollusc genome has been known for some time, its role in estrogen signalling has yet to be deciphered. This is largely due to its constitutive (ligand-independent) activation and a limited mechanistic understanding of its regulation. To fill this knowledge gap, we cloned and characterised an ER cDNA (sgER) and the 5′-flanking region of the gene from the Sydney rock oyster Saccostrea glomerata. The sgER cDNA is predicted to encode a 477-amino acid protein that contains a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD) typically conserved among both vertebrate and invertebrate ERs. A comparison of the sgER LBD sequence with those of other ligand-dependent ERs revealed that the sgER LBD is variable at several conserved residues known to be critical for ligand binding and receptor activation. Ligand binding assays using fluorescent-labelled E2 and purified sgER protein confirmed that sgER is devoid of estrogen binding. In silico analysis of the sgER 5′-flanking sequence indicated the presence of three putative estrogen responsive element (ERE) half-sites and several putative sites for ER-interacting transcription factors, suggesting that the sgER promoter may be autoregulated by its own gene product. sgER mRNA is ubiquitously expressed in adult oyster tissues, with the highest expression found in the ovary

  16. No association between oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene polymorphisms and experimentally elicited social preferences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coren L Apicella

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Oxytocin (OXT has been implicated in a suite of complex social behaviors including observed choices in economic laboratory experiments. However, actual studies of associations between oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene variants and experimentally elicited social preferences are rare. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We test hypotheses of associations between social preferences, as measured by behavior in two economic games, and 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the OXTR gene in a sample of Swedish twins (n = 684. Two standard economic games, the dictator game and the trust game, both involving real monetary consequences, were used to elicit such preferences. After correction for multiple hypothesis testing, we found no significant associations between any of the 9 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and behavior in either of the games. CONCLUSION: We were unable to replicate the most significant association reported in previous research between the amount donated in a dictator game and an OXTR genetic variant.

  17. An intron 1 polymorphism in the cholecystokinin-A receptor gene associated with schizophrenia in males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed, P; Hansen, T V O; Woldbye, D P D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify whether a genetic variation (rs1800857; IVS1-5T>C) in the neuropeptide cholecystokinin-A receptor (CCKAR) gene is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. METhod: The variation was analysed in a case-control design comprising 508 patients with schizophrenia...... and 1619 control subjects. A possible functional impact of this variant on CCKAR protein synthesis through alterations in splicing was analysed in an exon-trapping assay. RESULTS: In males only, the risk variant, IVS1-5C, was associated with a significantly increased risk of schizophrenia. Carrying one...... risk allele was associated with an increased risk of 1.74 (Odds Ratio, OR) and homozygosity (CC) was associated with an OR of 3.19. The variation had no impact on protein synthesis of CCKAR. CONCLUSION: This is the first report associating the CCKAR gene variant with schizophrenia specifically in men...

  18. Polymorphic variation in the androgen receptor gene: association with risk of testicular germ cell cancer and metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Västermark, Åke; Giwercman, Yvonne Lundberg; Hagströmer, Oskar

    2011-01-01

    Increasing incidence of testicular germ cell cancer (TGCC) is most probably related to environment and lifestyle. However, an underlying genetic predisposition may play a role and since sex steroids are assumed to be important for the rise and progression of TGCC, a study of androgen receptor (AR...... of endocrine disruptors. From a biological point of view, our findings strengthen the hypothesis of the importance of androgen action in the aetiology and pathogenesis of testicular malignancy. Future studies should focus on the impact of sex hormones on foetal germ cell development and the interaction between...

  19. Multiple thyrotropin β-subunit and thyrotropin receptor-related genes arose during vertebrate evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gersende Maugars

    Full Text Available Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH is composed of a specific β subunit and an α subunit that is shared with the two pituitary gonadotropins. The three β subunits derive from a common ancestral gene through two genome duplications (1R and 2R that took place before the radiation of vertebrates. Analysis of genomic data from phylogenetically relevant species allowed us to identify an additional Tshβ subunit-related gene that was generated through 2R. This gene, named Tshβ2, present in cartilaginous fish, little skate and elephant shark, and in early lobe-finned fish, coelacanth and lungfish, was lost in ray-finned fish and tetrapods. The absence of a second type of TSH receptor (Tshr gene in these species suggests that both TSHs act through the same receptor. A novel Tshβ sister gene, named Tshβ3, was generated through the third genomic duplication (3R that occurred early in the teleost lineage. Tshβ3 is present in most teleost groups but was lostin tedraodontiforms. The 3R also generated a second Tshr, named Tshrb. Interestingly, the new Tshrb was translocated from its original chromosomic position after the emergence of eels and was then maintained in its new position. Tshrb was lost in tetraodontiforms and in ostariophysians including zebrafish although the latter species have two TSHs, suggesting that TSHRb may be dispensable. The tissue distribution of duplicated Tshβs and Tshrs was studied in the European eel. The endocrine thyrotropic function in the eel would be essentially mediated by the classical Tshβ and Tshra, which are mainly expressed in the pituitary and thyroid, respectively. Tshβ3 and Tshrb showed a similar distribution pattern in the brain, pituitary, ovary and adipose tissue, suggesting a possible paracrine/autocrine mode of action in these non-thyroidal tissues. Further studies will be needed to determine the binding specificity of the two receptors and how these two TSH systems are interrelated.

  20. A novel growth hormone receptor gene deletion mutation in a patient with primary growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome).

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    Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Kouhara, Haruhiko; Iida, Keiji; Chihara, Kazuo; Kasayama, Soji

    2008-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) insensitivity syndrome (Laron syndrome) is known to be caused by genetic disorders of the GH-IGF-1 axis. Although many mutations in the GH receptor have been identified, there have been only a few reports of deletions of the GH receptor gene. A Japanese adult female patient with Laron syndrome was subjected to chromosome analysis with basic G-banding and also with a high accuracy technique. Each exon of the GH receptor gene was amplified by means of PCR. Since this patient was diagnosed with osteoporosis, the effects of alendronate on bone mineral density (BMD) were also examined. The chromosome analysis with the high accuracy technique demonstrated a large deletion of the short arm in one allele of chromosome 5 from p11 to p13.1 [46, XX, del (5) (p11-p13.1)]. PCR amplification of exons of the GH receptor gene showed that only exons 2 and 3 were amplified. Low-dose IGF-1 administration (30microg/kg body weight) failed to increase her BMD, whereas alendronate administration resulted in an increase associated with a decrease in urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPD) and serum osteocalcin concentrations. The GH receptor gene of the patient was shown to lack exons 4-10. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case report of Laron syndrome with large GH receptor deletion. Alendronate was effective for the enhancement of BMD.

  1. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pirA gene encodes a second receptor for ferrienterobactin and synthetic catecholate analogues.

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    Ghysels, Bart; Ochsner, Urs; Möllman, Ute; Heinisch, Lothar; Vasil, Michael; Cornelis, Pierre; Matthijs, Sandra

    2005-05-15

    Actively secreted iron chelating agents termed siderophores play an important role in the virulence and rhizosphere competence of fluorescent pseudomonads, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa which secretes a high affinity siderophore, pyoverdine, and the low affinity siderophore, pyochelin. Uptake of the iron-siderophore complexes is an active process that requires specific outer membrane located receptors, which are dependent of the inner membrane-associated protein TonB and two other inner membrane proteins, ExbB and ExbC. P. aeruginosa is also capable of using a remarkable variety of heterologous siderophores as sources of iron, apparently by expressing their cognate receptors. Illustrative of this feature are the 32 (of which 28 putative) siderophore receptor genes observed in the P. aeruginosa PAO1 genome. However, except for a few (pyoverdine, pyochelin, enterobactin), the vast majority of P. aeruginosa siderophore receptor genes still remain to be characterized. Ten synthetic iron chelators of catecholate type stimulated growth of a pyoverdine/pyochelin deficient P. aeruginosa PAO1 mutant under condition of severe iron limitation. Null mutants of the 32 putative TonB-dependent siderophore receptor encoding genes engineered in the same genetic background were screened for obvious deficiencies in uptake of the synthetic siderophores, but none showed decreased growth stimulation in the presence of the different siderophores. However, a double knock-out mutant of ferrienterobactin receptor encoding gene pfeA (PA 2688) and pirA (PA0931) failed to be stimulated by 4 of the tested synthetic catecholate siderophores whose chemical structures resemble enterobactin. Ferric-enterobactin also failed to stimulate growth of the double pfeA-pirA mutant although, like its synthetic analogues, it stimulated growth of the corresponding single mutants. Hence, we confirmed that pirA represents a second P. aeruginosa ferric-enterobactin receptor. The example of these two

  2. Association Analysis of the Leptin and Ghrelin Receptor Gene Polymorphism in the Human with BMI

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    Zuzana Lieskovská

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was identification of Leptin and Ghrelin receptor gene polymorphism in the population. Leptin is a product of obese (ob gene expression that plays a role in energy metabolism and body weight. The human leptin gene is located in the 17 chromosome. The restriction site is located at the position 2549 bp (C→A. Ghrelin, a peptide hormone predominantly produced by the stomach, was isolated as the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. Ghrelin is a potent stimulator of growth hormone (GH secretion and is the only circulatory hormone known to potently enhance feeding and weight gain and to regulate energy homeostasis following central and systemic administration. Therapeutic intervention with ghrelin in catabolic situations may induce a combination of enhanced food intake, increased gastric emptying and nutrient storage, coupled with an increase in GH thereby linking nutrient partitioning with growth and repair processes. The present study included 35 human samples. The average value of BMI was estimate on 24.45. The size of amplified PCR product is 242bp. Subsequently we used the specific restriction enzyme HhaI and length of fragments is 181+61 bp in the homozygote CC, 242+181+61 bp in the heterozygote AC and 242 bp in the homozygote AA. The restriction site is located at the position 171T/C. Examination of the polymorphism of the GHSR gene was accomplished used PCR-RFLP method. We used amplified the 593 bp product, which was subsequently digested with restriction enzyme LweI and length of fragmetnts is 593 bp in the homozygote TT, 593+567+26 bp in the heterozygote TC and 593+26 bp in the homozygote CC. We assume that this mutation has connection with human obesity level.

  3. Vitamin D receptor-mediated control of Soggy, Wise, and Hairless gene expression in keratinocytes.

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    Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Estess, Rudolf C; Kaneko, Ichiro; Whitfield, G Kerr; Jurutka, Peter W; Haussler, Mark R

    2014-02-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR), but not its hormonal ligand, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), is required for the progression of the mammalian hair cycle. We studied three genes relevant to hair cycle signaling, DKKL1 (Soggy), SOSTDC1 (Wise), and HR (Hairless), to determine whether their expression is regulated by VDR and/or its 1,25D ligand. DKKL1 mRNA was repressed 49-72% by 1,25D in primary human and CCD-1106 KERTr keratinocytes; a functional vitamin D responsive element (VDRE) was identified at -9590 bp in murine Soggy. Similarly, SOSTDC1 mRNA was repressed 41-59% by 1,25D in KERTr and primary human keratinocytes; a functional VDRE was located at -6215 bp in human Wise. In contrast, HR mRNA was upregulated 1.56- to 2.77-fold by 1,25D in primary human and KERTr keratinocytes; a VDRE (TGGTGAgtgAGGACA) consisting of an imperfect direct repeat separated by three nucleotides (DR3) was identified at -7269 bp in the human Hairless gene that mediated dramatic induction, even in the absence of 1,25D ligand. In parallel, a DR4 thyroid hormone responsive element, TGGTGAggccAGGACA, was identified at +1304 bp in the human HR gene that conferred tri-iodothyronine (T3)-independent transcriptional activation. Because the thyroid hormone receptor controls HR expression in the CNS, whereas VDR functions in concert with the HR corepressor specifically in skin, a model is proposed wherein unliganded VDR upregulates the expression of HR, the gene product of which acts as a downstream comodulator to feedback-repress DKKL1 and SOSTDC1, resulting in integration of bone morphogenic protein and Wnt signaling to drive the mammalian hair cycle and/or influencing epidermal function.

  4. Quantification of the uncertainties in extrapolating from in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonism to key events in in vivo screening assays and adverse reproductive outcomes in F1 male rats

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    There are multiple molecular initiating events (MIEs) that can disrupt male sexual differentiation including AR antagonism and inhibition of synthesis, and metabolism of fetal testosterone. Disruption of this event by pesticides like vinclozolin that act as AR antagonists and ph...

  5. Distinct gene regulatory programs define the inhibitory effects of liver X receptors and PPARG on cancer cell proliferation.

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    Savic, Daniel; Ramaker, Ryne C; Roberts, Brian S; Dean, Emma C; Burwell, Todd C; Meadows, Sarah K; Cooper, Sara J; Garabedian, Michael J; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M

    2016-07-11

    The liver X receptors (LXRs, NR1H2 and NR1H3) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG, NR1C3) nuclear receptor transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of energy homeostasis. Intriguingly, recent studies suggest that these metabolic regulators also impact tumor cell proliferation. However, a comprehensive temporal molecular characterization of the LXR and PPARG gene regulatory responses in tumor cells is still lacking. To better define the underlying molecular processes governing the genetic control of cellular growth in response to extracellular metabolic signals, we performed a comprehensive, genome-wide characterization of the temporal regulatory cascades mediated by LXR and PPARG signaling in HT29 colorectal cancer cells. For this analysis, we applied a multi-tiered approach that incorporated cellular phenotypic assays, gene expression profiles, chromatin state dynamics, and nuclear receptor binding patterns. Our results illustrate that the activation of both nuclear receptors inhibited cell proliferation and further decreased glutathione levels, consistent with increased cellular oxidative stress. Despite a common metabolic reprogramming, the gene regulatory network programs initiated by these nuclear receptors were widely distinct. PPARG generated a rapid and short-term response while maintaining a gene activator role. By contrast, LXR signaling was prolonged, with initial, predominantly activating functions that transitioned to repressive gene regulatory activities at late time points. Through the use of a multi-tiered strategy that integrated various genomic datasets, our data illustrate that distinct gene regulatory programs elicit common phenotypic effects, highlighting the complexity of the genome. These results further provide a detailed molecular map of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells through LXR and PPARG activation. As ligand-inducible TFs, these nuclear receptors can potentially serve as attractive therapeutic

  6. Evolution of the C-Type Lectin-Like Receptor Genes of the DECTIN-1 Cluster in the NK Gene Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Sattler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors are crucial in initiating and shaping innate and adaptive immune responses and often belong to families of structurally and evolutionarily related proteins. The human C-type lectin-like receptors encoded in the DECTIN-1 cluster within the NK gene complex contain prominent receptors with pattern recognition function, such as DECTIN-1 and LOX-1. All members of this cluster share significant homology and are considered to have arisen from subsequent gene duplications. Recent developments in sequencing and the availability of comprehensive sequence data comprising many species showed that the receptors of the DECTIN-1 cluster are not only homologous to each other but also highly conserved between species. Even in Caenorhabditis elegans, genes displaying homology to the mammalian C-type lectin-like receptors have been detected. In this paper, we conduct a comprehensive phylogenetic survey and give an up-to-date overview of the currently available data on the evolutionary emergence of the DECTIN-1 cluster genes.

  7. [Association of polymorphisms in toll-like receptor genes with atopic dermatitis in the Republic of Bashkortostan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimalova, G F; Karunas, A S; Fedorova, Iu Iu; Gumennaia, É R; Levasheva, S V; Khismatullina, Z R; Prans, E; Koks, S; Étkina, É I; Khusnutdinova, É K

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a prevalent chronic inflammatory skin disease developing as a result of the interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Considerable role in allergic diseases development is played by polymorphisms of genes of pattern-recognition receptors (PRR) which are capable of recognizing conservative standard molecular structures (patterns) unique for large pathogen groups. In this study polymorphic variants of PRR genes--Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, TLR6, TLR9, TLR10), NOD-like receptors (NOD1, NOD2), lipopolysaccharide receptor CD14 gene, and C11orf30 and LRRC32 genes, located in 11q13.5 region, have been investigated in AD patients and control subjects from the Republic of Bashkortostan. An association of TLR1 (rs5743571 and rs5743604), TLR6 (rs5743794) and TLR10 (rs11466617) with AD was found. Our results confirm an important role of the innate immune system in the pathogenesis of AD and the significance of polymorphisms within the Toll-like receptor 2 subfamily genes in AD development.

  8. Characterization and functional analyses of the human G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkamp, Sandra; Telgmann, Ralph; Staessen, Jan A; Hagedorn, Claudia; Dördelmann, Corinna; Bek, Martin; Brand-Herrmann, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva

    2008-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 is involved in renal sodium handling and blood pressure regulation. Missense variants have already been tested functionally and are associated with hypertension, but no data on promoter analyses are yet available. We scanned 94 hypertensive white subjects for genetic variation and performed promoter reporter gene analyses in HEK293T, COS7, and SaOs-2 cells. Transient transfections with various full lengths and wild-type deletion constructs revealed that 1851 bp of the flanking region and 275 bp of the 5'-untranslated region were sufficient for transcriptional activities and composed a powerful cis-active element in the distal 293 bp. The -1702T and +2T alleles resulted in drastic general reductions of promoter function, whereas an activity increasing effect of +268C was cell type specific. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay, supershift, and cotransfection analyses of transcription factor binding sites predicted in silico (Alibaba2.1/Transfac7) resulted in allele-specific binding patterns of nuclear proteins and identified the participation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein transcription factor family members. The G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4 core promoter resides in the first 1851 bp upstream of its transcription start site. The 4 identified genetic variants within this region exert allele-specific impact on both cell type- and stimulation-dependent transcription and may affect the expression balance of renal G protein-coupled receptor kinase 4.

  9. Effects of deletion of the prolactin receptor on ovarian gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Paul A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prolactin (PRL exerts pleiotropic physiological effects in various cells and tissues, and is mainly considered as a regulator of reproduction and cell growth. Null mutation of the PRL receptor (R gene leads to female sterility due to a complete failure of embryo implantation. Pre-implantatory egg development, implantation and decidualization in the mouse appear to be dependent on ovarian rather than uterine PRLR expression, since progesterone replacement permits the rescue of normal implantation and early pregnancy. To better understand PRL receptor deficiency, we analyzed in detail ovarian and corpora lutea development of PRLR-/- females. The present study demonstrates that the ovulation rate is not different between PRLR+/+ and PRLR-/- mice. The corpus luteum is formed but an elevated level of apoptosis and extensive inhibition of angiogenesis occur during the luteal transition in the absence of prolactin signaling. These modifications lead to the decrease of LH