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Sample records for receptor agonist-induced antinociception

  1. Peripheral endothelin B receptor agonist-induced antinociception involves endogenous opioids in mice.

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    Quang, Phuong N; Schmidt, Brian L

    2010-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) produced by various cancers is known to be responsible for inducing pain. While ET-1 binding to ETAR on peripheral nerves clearly mediates nociception, effects from binding to ETBR are less clear. The present study assessed the effects of ETBR activation and the role of endogenous opioid analgesia in carcinoma pain using an orthotopic cancer pain mouse model. mRNA expression analysis showed that ET-1 was nearly doubled while ETBR was significantly down-regulated in a human oral SCC cell line compared to normal oral keratinocytes (NOK). Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell culture treated with an ETBR agonist (10(-4)M, 10(-5)M, and 10(-6) M BQ-3020) significantly increased the production of beta-endorphin without any effects on leu-enkephalin or dynorphin. Cancer inoculated in the hind paw of athymic mice with SCC induced significant pain, as indicated by reduction of paw withdrawal thresholds in response to mechanical stimulation, compared to sham-injected and NOK-injected groups. Intratumor administration of 3mg/kg BQ-3020 attenuated cancer pain by approximately 50% up to 3h post-injection compared to PBS-vehicle and contralateral injection, while intratumor ETBR antagonist BQ-788 treatment (100 and 300microg/kg and 3mg/kg) had no effects. Local naloxone methiodide (500microg/kg) or selective mu-opioid receptor antagonist (CTOP, 500microg/kg) injection reversed ETBR agonist-induced antinociception in cancer animals. We propose that these results demonstrate that peripheral ETBR agonism attenuates carcinoma pain by modulating beta-endorphins released from the SCC to act on peripheral opioid receptors found in the cancer microenvironment. Copyright 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose-dependent effects of celecoxib on CB-1 agonist-induced antinociception in the mice

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    Mohammad Reza Zarrindast

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Endocannabinoid produce analgesia that is comparable which of opioids. The mechanism of antinociceptive effects of (∆ - 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC is suggested to be through cyclooxygenase (COX pathway. In the present work, the effect of two extreme dose ranges of celecoxib (mg/kg and ng/kg, a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 antagonist, on arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA, a selective CB1 agonist induced antinociception in mice was examined. "nMethods: We have investigated the interaction between celecoxib, at the doses of mg/kg (50, 100, 200 and 400 i.p.  and ultra low dose (ULD (25 and 50 ng/kg, i.p., on the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of ACPA (0.004, 0.0625 and 1 μg/mice, using formalin test in mice. "nResults: I.C.V. administration of ACPA induced antinociception. Intraperitoneal administration of celecoxib (mg/kg and its ULD (ng/kg attenuated and potentiated, ACPA antinociceptive effects, respectively. "nConclusion: It is concluded that the mg/kg doses of COX-2 antagonist showed opposite effects compare to the ultra-low dose of the drug.

  3. [Proteomics analysis of adenosine A1 receptor agonist-induced delayed myocardial protection in rabbits].

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    Zhou, Jianmei; Zou, Dingquan; Ran, Ke; Chang, Yetian

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the changes of myocardial protein expression profiles in 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA), an adenosine A1 receptor agonist-induced delayed myocardial protection in New Zealand rabbits . A total of 8 rabbits were randomly divided into a CCPA group (CCPA group) and a normal saline group (NS group). CCPA and NS were infused into rabbits in the CCPA group and the NS group respectively. Twenty-four hours later, the rabbits were subjected to 30 min left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion and were reperfused for 2 hours, then the ischemic zone tissues of left ventricle were sampled for proteomic analysis.A total of 12 other New Zeland rabbits were divided into a sham group (Sham group), a normal saline group (NS group) and a CCPA group (CCPA group). The expression of αB-crystalline, one of the differential proteins, was confirmed by Western blot. Analysis of two dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that the expression of 55 protein spots were different between the two groups, 17 protein spots were preliminarily identified with the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and Mascot and Expasy bioinformatics software. These proteins included stress proteins, metabolism-associated proteins, signal transduction pathway-related proteins, ionophorous proteins, immunity-associated proteins, and so on. Western blot showed that the expression of αB-crystalline was significantly up-regulated in the CCPA group. The myocardial protein expression profiles are changed markedly in the preconditioning late phase of CCPA .The differential proteins might be involved in the delayed cardioprotection induced by CCPA.

  4. beta-agonist-induced constitutive beta(2)-adrenergic receptor activity in bovine tracheal smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, B; Meurs, H; Roffel, AF; Elzinga, CRS; Hoiting, BH; de Vries, MML; Zaagsma, J

    2000-01-01

    1 According to the two state receptor model, the beta (2)-adrenergic receptor (beta (2)-AR) isomerizes between an inactive state and a constitutively active state, which couples to the stimulatory G-protein in the absence of agonist. In bovine tracheal smooth muscle (BTSM), we investigated the

  5. Kinetics of agonist-induced intrinsic fluorescence changes in the Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

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    Kawai, Hideki; Raftery, Michael A

    2010-05-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo electric organs is a ligand-gated ion channel that undergoes conformational transitions for activation and/or desensitization. Earlier work suggested that intrinsic fluorescence changes of the receptor monitors kinetic transitions toward the high-affinity, desensitized state. Here, using highly purified membrane preparations to minimize contaminating fluorescence, we examined kinetic mechanisms of the receptor as monitored by its intrinsic fluorescence. Fluorescence changes were specific to the receptor as they were blocked by alpha-bungarotoxin and were induced by agonists, but not by the antagonist hexamethonium. Acetylcholine, carbamylcholine and suberyldicholine showed only one kinetic phase with relatively fast rates (t(1/2) = 0.2-1.2 s). Effective dissociation constants were at least an order of magnitude higher than the high affinity, equilibrium binding constants for these agonists. A semirigid agonist isoarecolone-methiodide, whose activation constant was approximately 3-fold lower than acetylcholine, induced an additional slow phase (t(1/2) = 4.5-9 s) with apparent rates that increased and then decreased in a concentration dependent manner, revealing a branched mechanism for conformational transitions. We propose that the intrinsic fluorescence changes of the receptor describe a process(es) toward a fast desensitization state prior to the formation of the high affinity state.

  6. Candesartan abrogates G protein-coupled receptors agonist-induced MAPK activation and cardiac myocyte hypertrophy

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    Djamel Lebeche

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS has been identified as a major contributor to the development of cardiac hypertrophy and the subsequent transition to heart failure. G protein-coupled receptors agonists such as angiotensin II (Ang II, endothelin-1 (ET-1 and phenylephrine (PE have been implicated in hypertrophic responses in ventricular myocytes through the activation of several families of MAP kinases. In this study we examined the effect of candesartan, an Ang II type 1-(AT1-receptor antagonist, on cardiac hypertrophy by using cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Stimulation with Ang II (100 nM, ET-1 (100 nM or PE (1 µM induced marked increases in [3H]Leucine incorporation (≥ 50%, compatible with enhanced protein synthesis. The addition of candesartan abrogated the increase in [3H]Leucine incorporation in response not only to Ang II but also to ET-1 and PE. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in this antihypertrophic effect of candesartan, we studied the activation of p38-MAPK, extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 and stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs. Ang II, ET-1 and PE increased the phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p54 SAPK and p46SAPK and p38 in a time-dependent manner. This activation was completely blocked in the case of Ang II by pretreatment with candesartan. ET-1-induced activation of ERKs, SAPKs and p38 was also partially, but significantly, reduced by candesartan. PE-induced activation of SAPKs, but not ERKs and p38, was also reduced by candesartan. These results suggest that the hypertrophic response to ET-1 and PE, along with Ang II, is dependent upon a functioning AT1-receptor and may be mediated by AT 1 activation of the MAP kinases.

  7. (--Pentazocine induces visceral chemical antinociception, but not thermal, mechanical, or somatic chemical antinociception, in μ-opioid receptor knockout mice

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    Satoh Masamichi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background (--Pentazocine has been hypothesized to induce analgesia via the κ-opioid (KOP receptor, although the involvement of other opioid receptor subtypes in the effects of pentazocine remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of the μ-opioid (MOP receptor in thermal, mechanical, and chemical antinociception induced by (--pentazocine using MOP receptor knockout (MOP-KO mice. Results (--Pentazocine-induced thermal antinociception, assessed by the hot-plate and tail-flick tests, was significantly reduced in heterozygous and abolished in homozygous MOP-KO mice compared with wildtype mice. The results obtained from the (--pentazocine-induced mechanical and somatic chemical antinociception experiments, which used the hind-paw pressure and formalin tests, were similar to the results obtained from the thermal antinociception experiments in these mice. However, (--pentazocine retained its ability to induce significant visceral chemical antinociception, assessed by the writhing test, in homozygous MOP-KO mice, an effect that was completely blocked by pretreatment with nor-binaltorphimine, a KOP receptor antagonist. In vitro binding and cyclic adenosine monophosphate assays showed that (--pentazocine possessed higher affinity for KOP and MOP receptors than for δ-opioid receptors. Conclusions The present study demonstrated the abolition of the thermal, mechanical, and somatic chemical antinociceptive effects of (--pentazocine and retention of the visceral chemical antinociceptive effects of (--pentazocine in MOP-KO mice. These results suggest that the MOP receptor plays a pivotal role in thermal, mechanical, and somatic chemical antinociception induced by (--pentazocine, whereas the KOP receptor is involved in visceral chemical antinociception induced by (--pentazocine.

  8. A key agonist-induced conformational change in the cannabinoid receptor CB1 is blocked by the allosteric ligand Org 27569.

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    Fay, Jonathan F; Farrens, David L

    2012-09-28

    Allosteric ligands that modulate how G protein-coupled receptors respond to traditional orthosteric drugs are an exciting and rapidly expanding field of pharmacology. An allosteric ligand for the cannabinoid receptor CB1, Org 27569, exhibits an intriguing effect; it increases agonist binding, yet blocks agonist-induced CB1 signaling. Here we explored the mechanism behind this behavior, using a site-directed fluorescence labeling approach. Our results show that Org 27569 blocks conformational changes in CB1 that accompany G protein binding and/or activation, and thus inhibit formation of a fully active CB1 structure. The underlying mechanism behind this behavior is that simultaneous binding of Org 27569 produces a unique agonist-bound conformation, one that may resemble an intermediate structure formed on the pathway to full receptor activation.

  9. Propofol Modulates Agonist-induced Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Subtype-1 Receptor Desensitization via a Protein Kinase Cε-dependent Pathway in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Sensory Neurons

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    Wickley, Peter J.; Yuge, Ryo; Russell, Mary S.; Zhang, Hongyu; Sulak, Michael A.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The activity of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype-1 (TRPV1) receptors, key nociceptive transducers in dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons, is enhanced by protein kinase C ε (PKCε) activation. The intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to activate PKCε. Our objectives were to examine whether propofol modulates TRPV1 function in dorsal root ganglion neurons via activation of PKCε. Methods Lumbar dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type and PKCε-null mice were isolated and cultured for 24 h. Intracellular free Ca2+ concentration was measured in neurons by using fura-2 acetoxymethyl ester. The duration of pain-associated behaviors was also assessed. Phosphorylation of PKCε and TRPV1 and the cellular translocation of PKCε from cytosol to membrane compartments were assessed by immunoblot analysis. Results In wild-type neurons, repeated stimulation with capsaicin (100 nM) progressively decreased the transient rise in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. After desensitization, exposure to propofol rescued the Ca2+ response. The resensitizing effect of propofol was absent in neurons obtained from PKCε-null mice. Moreover, the capsaicin-induced desensitization of TRPV1 was markedly attenuated in the presence of propofol in neurons from wild-type mice but not in neurons from PKCε-null mice. Propofol also prolonged the duration of agonist-induced pain associated behaviors in wild-type mice. In addition, propofol increased phosphorylation of PKCε as well as TRPV1 and stimulated translocation of PKCε from cytosolic to membrane fraction. Discussion Our results indicate that propofol modulates TRPV1 sensitivity to capsaicin and that this most likely occurs through a PKCε-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1. PMID:20808213

  10. Triton X-100 inhibits agonist-induced currents and suppresses benzodiazepine modulation of GABA(A) receptors in Xenopus oocytes

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    Søgaard, Rikke; Ebert, Bjarke; Klaerke, Dan

    2009-01-01

    effects on gramicidin channel A appearance rate and lifetime in artificial lipid bilayers. In the present study, the pharmacological action of Triton-X 100 on GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes was examined. Triton-X 100 inhibited GABA(A) alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S) receptor currents...... by flunitrazepam at alpha(1)beta(3)gamma(2S) receptors. All effects were independent of the presence of a gamma(2S) subunit in the GABA(A) receptor complex. The present study suggests that Triton X-100 may stabilize open and desensitized states of the GABA(A) receptor through changes in lipid bilayer elasticity....... in a noncompetitive, time- and voltage-dependent manner and increased the apparent rate and extent of desensitization at 10 muM, which is 30 fold below the critical micelle concentration. In addition, Triton X-100 induced picrotoxin-sensitive GABA(A) receptor currents and suppressed allosteric modulation...

  11. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

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    Hansen, G H; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays. It was f......The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays...

  12. Staying awake: a genetic region that hinders α2 adrenergic receptor agonist-induced loss of consciousness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelegen, C.; Gent, T.C.; Ferretti, V.; Zhang, Z.; Yustos, R.; Lan, F.; Yang, Q.; Overington, D.W.U.; Vyssotsky, A.L.; van Lith, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/091342422; Wisden, W.; Franks, N.P.

    2014-01-01

    How external stimuli prevent the onset of sleep has been little studied. This is usually considered to be a non-specific type of phenomenon. However, the hypnotic drug dexmedetomidine, an agonist at a2 adrenergic receptors, has unusual properties that make it useful for investigating this question.

  13. Temporal development of GABA agonist induced alterations in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A

    1987-01-01

    The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays. It was f......The temporal development of the effect of THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) on the ultrastructure composition and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells was investigated by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis) and GABA binding assays....... It was found that the cytoplasmic density of smooth endoplasmic reticulum was decreased, while the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles and coated vesicles was greatly enhanced after exposure of the cells to THIP (150 microM) for only 1 hr. In cerebellar granule cells...

  14. G protein-coupled receptors mediate coronary flow- and agonist-induced responses via lectin-oligosaccharide interactions.

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    Perez-Aguilar, Sandra; Torres-Tirado, David; Martell-Gallegos, Guadalupe; Velarde-Salcedo, Jimena; Barba-de la Rosa, Ana Paulina; Knabb, Maureen; Rubio, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Blood flow acts parallel to the coronary luminal endothelial surface layer (LESL) and modulates multiple parenchymal functions via the release of paracrine agents. Evidence indicates that the LESL may be a flow-sensing organelle and that perhaps through flow-induced lectin (L)·oligosaccharide (O) complex formation (L·O) participates in this process. LESL integrins and selectins are both lectinic and flow sensitive, but the L properties of flow-sensitive G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the presence of L in the LESL and hypothesized that if flow-sensitive GPCRs are L, flow and O will determine their response to receptor activation. The LESL protein fraction isolated from guinea pig hearts was passed through an affinity chromatography column made of three sugars, mannose, galactose, and N-acetylglucosamine, and the lectinic fraction was eluted. Immune dot blot was used to identify L proteins in the LESL fraction. Our results indicate the following. 1) Two-dimensional SDS-PAGE (2D-SDS-PAGE) of the LESL lectinic fraction revealed at least 167 Ls. 2) Among these Ls, we identified three selectins and the GPCRs: angiotensin II, bradykinin (B2-R), adenosine A1 and A2, prolactin, endothelin, α1-adrenergic (α1A-R), thromboxane A2, β1-adrenergic, β3-adrenergic, and insulin receptors; the first six GPCRs are known to be flow sensitive. 3) The amplitude of receptor-induced vascular responses by α1A-R and B2-R activation (phenylephrine or bradykinin, respectively) was a function of flow and O (hyaluronidate). Our results support a novel mechanism of GPCR-mediated responses to flow via L·O interaction.

  15. CRM 1-mediated degradation and agonist-induced down-regulation of beta-adrenergic receptor mRNAs.

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    Bai, Ying; Lu, Huafei; Machida, Curtis A

    2006-10-01

    The beta1-adrenergic receptor (beta1-AR) mRNAs are post-transcriptionally regulated at the level of mRNA stability and undergo accelerated agonist-mediated degradation via interaction of its 3' untranslated region (UTR) with RNA binding proteins, including the HuR nuclear protein. In a previous report [Kirigiti et al. (2001). Mol. Pharmacol. 60:1308-1324], we examined the agonist-mediated down-regulation of the rat beta1-AR mRNAs, endogenously expressed in the rat C6 cell line and ectopically expressed in transfectant hamster DDT1MF2 and rat L6 cells. In this report, we determined that isoproterenol treatment of neonatal rat cortical neurons, an important cell type expressing beta1-ARs in the brain, results in significant decreases in beta1-AR mRNA stability, while treatment with leptomycin B, an inhibitor of the nuclear export receptor CRM 1, results in significant increases in beta1-AR mRNA stability and nuclear retention. UV-crosslinking/immunoprecipitation and glycerol gradient fractionation analyses indicate that the beta1-AR 3' UTR recognize complexes composed of HuR and multiple proteins, including CRM 1. Cell-permeable peptides containing the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) were used as inhibitors of CRM 1-mediated nuclear export. When DDT1MF2 transfectants were treated with isoproterenol and peptide inhibitors, only the co-addition of the NES inhibitor reversed the isoproterenol-induced reduction of beta1-AR mRNA levels. Our results suggest that CRM 1-dependent NES-mediated mechanisms influence the degradation and agonist-mediated down-regulation of the beta1-AR mRNAs.

  16. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

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    Chung, M.-K.; Wang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppressed by cold, it is not known if cold suppresses agonist-induced activation of recombinant TRPV1. We demonstrate that cold strongly suppressed the activation of recombinant TRPV1 by multiple agonists and capsaicin-evoked currents in trigeminal ganglia neurons under normal and phosphorylated conditions. Cold-induced suppression was partially impaired in a TRPV1 mutant that lacked heat-mediated activation and potentiation. These results suggest that cold-induced suppression of TRPV1 may share a common molecular basis with heat-induced potentiation, and that allosteric inhibition may contribute, in part, to the cold-induced suppression. We also show that combination of cold and a specific antagonist of TRPV1 can produce an additive suppression. Our results provide a mechanistic basis for cold therapy and may enhance anti-nociceptive approaches that target TRPV1 for managing pain under inflammation and tissue injury, including that from tooth extraction. PMID:21666106

  17. Involvement of peripheral cannabinoid and opioid receptors in β-caryophyllene-induced antinociception.

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    Katsuyama, S; Mizoguchi, H; Kuwahata, H; Komatsu, T; Nagaoka, K; Nakamura, H; Bagetta, G; Sakurada, T; Sakurada, S

    2013-05-01

    β-caryophyllene (BCP) is a common constitute of the essential oils of numerous spice, food plants and major component in Cannabis. The present study investigated the contribution of peripheral cannabinoid (CB) and opioid systems in the antinociception produced by intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of BCP. The interaction between peripheral BCP and morphine was also examined. The antinociceptive effect of i.pl. BCP was assayed by the capsaicin tests in mice. Antagonists for CB and opioid receptors, and antisera against β-endorphin were injected peripherally prior to i.pl. injection of BCP. Morphine in combination with BCP was injected subcutaneously or intrathecally. The i.pl. injection of BCP dose-dependently attenuated capsaicin-induced nociceptive response. The antinociceptive effect produced by BCP was prevented by pretreatment with AM630, a selective CB2 receptor antagonist, but not by AM251, a selective CB1 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment with naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, and β-funaltrexamine, a selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist, reversed the antinociceptive effect of BCP. Pretreatment with naloxone methiodide, a peripherally acting antagonist for opioid receptors and antisera against β-endorphin, resulted in a significant antagonizing effect on BCP-induced antinociception. Morphine-induced antinociception was increased by a low dose of BCP. The increased effect of morphine in combination with BCP was antagonized significantly by pretreatment with naloxone. The present results demonstrate that antinociception produced by i.pl. BCP is mediated by activation of CB2 receptors, which stimulates the local release from keratinocytes of the endogenous opioid β-endorphin. The combined injection of morphine and BCP may be an alternative in treating chemogenic pain. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  18. Peripheral 5-HT3 Receptors Are Involved in the Antinociceptive Effect of Bunodosine 391

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    Wilson Alves Ferreira Junior

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bunodosine 391 (BDS 391, a low molecular weight compound isolated from the sea anemone Bunodosoma cangicum, increases the nociceptive threshold and inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia. Serotonin receptors are involved in those effects. In this study, we have expanded the characterization of the antinociceptive effect of BDS 391 demonstrating that, in rats: (a the compound inhibits (1.2–12 ng/paw overt pain, in the formalin test, and mechanical hyperalgesia (0.6–6.0 ng/paw detected in a model of neuropathic pain; (b intraplantar administration of ondansetron, a selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, blocks the effect of BDS 391, whereas ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, partially reversed this effect, indicating the involvement of peripheral 5-HT2 and 5-HT3 receptors in BDS 391 antinociception; and (c in binding assay studies, BDS 391 was not able to displace the selective 5-HT receptor antagonists, suggesting that this compound does not directly bind to these receptors. The effect of biguanide, a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist, was also evaluated. The agonist inhibited the formalin’s nociceptive response, supporting an antinociceptive role for 5-HT3 receptors. Our study is the first one to show that a non-peptidic low molecular weight compound obtained from a sea anemone is able to induce antinociception and that activation of peripheral 5-HT3 receptors contributes to this effect.

  19. Clinically employed opioid analgesics produce antinociception via μ-δ opioid receptor heteromers in Rhesus monkeys.

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    Yekkirala, Ajay S; Banks, Matthew L; Lunzer, Mary M; Negus, Stevens S; Rice, Kenner C; Portoghese, Philip S

    2012-09-19

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans.

  20. Clinically Employed Opioid Analgesics Produce Antinociception via μ-δ Opioid Receptor Heteromers in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Morphine and related drugs are widely employed as analgesics despite the side effects associated with their use. Although morphine is thought to mediate analgesia through mu opioid receptors, delta opioid receptors have been implicated in mediating some side effects such as tolerance and dependence. Here we present evidence in rhesus monkeys that morphine, fentanyl, and possibly methadone selectively activate mu-delta heteromers to produce antinociception that is potently antagonized by the delta opioid receptor antagonist, naltrindole (NTI). Studies with HEK293 cells expressing mu-delta heteromeric opioid receptors exhibit a similar antagonism profile of receptor activation in the presence of NTI. In mice, morphine was potently inhibited by naltrindole when administered intrathecally, but not intracerebroventricularly, suggesting the possible involvement of mu-delta heteromers in the spinal cord of rodents. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that, in primates, mu-delta heteromers are allosterically coupled and mediate the antinociceptive effects of three clinically employed opioid analgesics that have been traditionally viewed as mu-selective. Given the known involvement of delta receptors in morphine tolerance and dependence, our results implicate mu-delta heteromers in mediating both antinociception and these side effects in primates. These results open the door for further investigation in humans. PMID:23019498

  1. Activation of membrane estrogen receptors attenuates opioid receptor-like1 receptor-mediated antinociception via an ERK-dependent non-genomic mechanism.

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    Small, K M; Nag, S; Mokha, S S

    2013-01-01

    To our knowledge, the present data are the first to demonstrate that activation of membrane estrogen receptors (mERs) abolishes opioid receptor-like 1 (ORL1) receptor-mediated analgesia via extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent non-genomic mechanisms. Estrogen was shown previously to both attenuate ORL1-mediated antinociception and down-regulate the ORL1 gene expression. The present study investigated whether non-genomic mechanisms contribute to estrogen-induced attenuation of ORL1-mediated antinociception by the mERs GPR30, Gq-coupled mER, ERα, and ERβ. E2BSA [β-estradiol-6-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime: bovine serum albumin] (0.5mM), a membrane impermeant analog of estradiol, injected intrathecally immediately prior to orphanin FQ (OFQ;10 nmol), the endogenous ligand for the ORL1 receptor, abolished OFQ's antinociceptive effect in both male and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats, assessed using the heat-induced tail-flick assay. This effect was not altered by protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin (125 μg), given intrathecally 15 min prior to E2BSA and OFQ. Intrathecal application of selective receptor agonists permitted the relative contributions of various estrogen receptors in mediating this blockade of the antinociceptive response of OFQ. Activation of GPR30, Gq-mER, ERα, but not ERβ abolished ORL1-mediated antinociception in males and OVX females. E2BSA produced a parallel and significant increase in the phosphorylation of ERK 2 only in OVX females, and pre-treatment with MEK/ERK 1/2 inhibitor, U0126 (10 μg), blocked the mER-mediated abolition of ORL1-mediated antinociception in OVX females. Taken together, the data are consistent with the interpretations that mER activation attenuates ORL1-mediated antinociception through a non-genomic, ERK 2-dependent mechanism in females. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. GABA-agonists induce the formation of low-affinity GABA-receptors on cultured cerebellar granule cells via preexisting high affinity GABA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Meier, E; Schousboe, A

    1986-01-01

    -tetrahydroisoxazolo [5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP, 150 microM) or THIP plus the antagonist bicuculline methobromide (150 microM of each) or in the absence of the agonist or antagonist. Membranes isolated from granule cells cultured in a medium without the GABA agonist revealed a single binding site for GABA......The kinetics of specific GABA-binding to membranes isolated from cerebellar granule cells, cultured for 12 days from dissociated cerebella of 7-day-old rats was studied using [3H]GABA as the ligand. The granule cells were cultured in the presence of the specific GABA receptor agonist 4, 5, 6, 7...

  3. Involvement of central and peripheral cannabinoid receptors on antinociceptive effect of tetrahydrocannabinol in muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagüés, Ana; Martín, M Isabel; Sánchez-Robles, Eva M

    2014-12-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors have emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for pain management in recent years and the interest in the use of cannabinoids is gradually increasing, particularly in patients where conventional treatments fail. Muscle pain is a major clinical problem and new pharmacological approaches are being studied. Recently, we have demonstrated that cannabinoid synthetic agonists are useful to reduce muscular pain in two animal models, where the local administration is effective. Now, we want to know if tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid natural derivative with therapeutic use in humans, is also effective in reducing acute muscle pain. The antinociceptive effect of THC by systemic (i.p.) and local (i.m.) administration was tested in two animal models of acute muscle pain, rat masseter and gastrocnemius, induced by hypertonic saline (HS) injection. The drugs used were the non-selective agonist THC and two selective cannabinoid antagonists, AM251 (CB1) and AM630 (CB2). THC, i.p. and i.m. administered, reduced the nociceptive behaviours induced by HS in both muscular pain models. The antinociceptive effect induced by the systemic administration of THC was mediated by CB1 receptors in the masseter muscle whereas in gastrocnemius both CB1 and CB2 receptors participated. When THC was administered locally, only CB2 receptors were involved in the antinociceptive effect in both muscles. This study suggests that THC could be a future pharmacological option in the treatment of muscle pain. The local administration of THC could be an interesting option to treat this type of pain avoiding the central adverse effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Interactions between Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol and mu opioid receptor agonists in rhesus monkeys: discrimination and antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Xu; McMahon, Lance R; Gerak, Lisa R; Becker, Ginger L; France, Charles P

    2008-08-01

    Opioid receptor agonists can enhance some effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists, and cannabinoid receptor agonists can enhance some effects of opioid receptor agonists; however, the generality of these interactions is not established. This study examined interactions between the discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists and Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in rhesus monkeys. Neither heroin nor morphine (intravenous (i.v.) or subcutaneous (s.c.)) altered the discriminative stimulus effects of THC in monkeys (n = 5) discriminating 0.1 mg/kg THC i.v. In contrast, THC (s.c.) markedly attenuated the discriminative stimulus effect of morphine and heroin in nondependent monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 1.78 mg/kg morphine s.c. Doses of THC that attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in nondependent monkeys failed to modify the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in morphine-dependent (5.6 mg/kg/12 h) monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 0.0178 mg/kg naltrexone s.c. THC also failed to modify the discriminative stimulus effects of naltrexone in morphine-dependent monkeys or the effects of midazolam in monkeys (n = 4) discriminating 0.32 mg/kg midazolam s.c. Doses of THC (s.c.) that attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in nondependent monkeys enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine (s.c.) in nondependent monkeys. While mu receptor agonists did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of THC, THC altered the effects of mu receptor agonists in a context-dependent manner. That the same doses of THC enhance, attenuate, or do not affect morphine, depending on the condition, suggests that attenuation of morphine by THC can result from perceptual masking rather than common pharmacodynamic mechanisms or pharmacokinetic interactions.

  5. Beta-adrenergic receptor agonists induce the release of granulocyte chemotactic protein-2, oncostatin M, and vascular endothelial growth factor from macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeckx, K.C.M.; Doornbos, R.P.; Witkamp, R.F.; Greef, de J.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2006-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), oncostatin M (OSM), and granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2/CXCL6) are up-regulated in U937 macrophages and peripheral blood macrophages exposed to LPS, beta-adrenergic receptor (ß2-AR) agonists (e.g. zilpaterol, and clenbuterol) and some other agents

  6. Plasma membrane cholesterol level and agonist-induced internalization of delta-opioid receptors; colocalization study with intracellular membrane markers of Rab family\

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brejchová, Jana; Vošahlíková, Miroslava; Roubalová, Lenka; Parenti, M.; Mauri, M.; Chernyavskiy, Oleksandr; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2016), s. 375-396 ISSN 0145-479X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/12/0919 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : cholesterol * plasma membrane * delta-opioid receptor * internalization * Rab proteins Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.576, year: 2016

  7. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    treatment did not lead to formation of low affinity GABA receptors. Studies of the ultrastructure of the cells (4-day-old cultures) showed that exposure to bromide or valinomycin mimicked the ability of THIP to enhance the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles...

  8. Histamine H4 receptor agonist-induced relief from painful peripheral neuropathy is mediated by inhibition of spinal neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Maria Domenica; Lucarini, Laura; Durante, Mariaconcetta; Ghelardini, Carla; Masini, Emanuela; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is under-treated, with a detrimental effect on quality of life, partly because of low treatment efficacy, but also because pathophysiological mechanisms are not fully elucidated. To clarify the pathobiology of neuropathic pain, we studied the contribution of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in a model of peripheral neuropathy. We also assessed an innovative treatment for neuropathic pain by investigating the effects of histamine H4 receptor ligands in this model. A peripheral mononeuropathy was induced in mice, by spared nerve injury (SNI). Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress parameters were evaluated by spectrophotometry. The mechanical (von Frey test) and thermal (plantar test) nociceptive thresholds were evaluated. SNI mice showed increased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1ß and TNF-α, decreased antioxidant enzyme Mn-containing SOD (MnSOD), increased levels of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, and of PARP, nuclear enzyme activated upon DNA damage. Intrathecal administration of VUF 8430 (H4 receptor agonist) reversed the mechanical and thermal allodynia and was associated with decreased expression of IL-1ß, TNF-α, 8-OHdG and PARP and with restoration of MnSOD activity in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve. These effects were prevented by JNJ 10191584 (H4 receptor antagonist). In the SNI mouse model of neuropathic pain, neuronal H4 receptor stimulation counteracts hyperalgesia and reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress in the spinal cord and sciatic nerve. Targeting both oxidative stress and pro-neuroinflammatory pathways through H4 receptor-mediated mechanisms could have promising therapeutic potential for neuropathic pain management. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Antinociception by systemically-administered acetaminophen (paracetamol) involves spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic, but its sites and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have separately implicated spinal adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs) and serotonin 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in the antinociceptive effects of systemically administered acetaminophen. In the present study, we determined whether these two actions are linked by delivering a selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist to the spinal cord of mice and examining nociception using the formalin 2% model. In normal and A(1)R wild type mice, antinociception by systemic (i.p.) acetaminophen 300mg/kg was reduced by intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970 3μg. In mice lacking A(1)Rs, i.t. SB269970 did not reverse antinociception by systemic acetaminophen, indicating a link between spinal 5-HT(7)R and A(1)R mechanisms. We also explored potential roles of peripheral A(1)Rs in antinociception by acetaminophen administered both locally and systemically. In normal mice, intraplantar (i.pl.) acetaminophen 200μg produced antinociception in the formalin test, and this was blocked by co-administration of the selective A(1)R antagonist DPCPX 4.5μg. Acetaminophen administered into the contralateral hindpaw had no effect, indicating a local peripheral action. When acetaminophen was administered systemically, its antinociceptive effect was reversed by i.pl. DPCPX in normal mice; this was also observed in A(1)R wild type mice, but not in those lacking A(1)Rs. In summary, we demonstrate a link between spinal 5-HT(7)Rs and A(1)Rs in the spinal cord relevant to antinociception by systemic acetaminophen. Furthermore, we implicate peripheral A(1)Rs in the antinociceptive effects of locally- and systemically-administered acetaminophen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GABA agonist induced changes in ultrastructure and GABA receptor expression in cerebellar granule cells is linked to hyperpolarization of the neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1990-01-01

    GABA has been shown to exert a neurotrophic like activity by enhancing the morphological and functional maturation of neurons. Mechanisms involved in this effect of GABA are largely unknown but since GABA has been shown to mediate a hyperpolarizing action on neurons it can be assumed...... that this action might be important. In order to investigate this possibility, the ability to mimic the trophic actions of GABA of different agents known to influence the membrane potential or the GABA gated chloride channels was studied. Hence, GABA receptor expression as well as the ultrastructure of cerebellar...... granule cells were monitored after exposure of the cells in culture to either bromide, valinomycin or picrotoxin. It was found that cells which at early developmental stages (4 days in culture) were exposed to bromide or valinomycin expressed low affinity GABA receptors similar to cells treated...

  11. Opiate-agonist induced taste aversion learning in the Fischer 344 and Lewis inbred rat strains: evidence for differential mu opioid receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Catherine M; Rice, Kenner C; Riley, Anthony L

    2009-10-01

    The Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis (LEW) inbred rat strains react differently to morphine in a number of behavioral and physiological preparations, including the acquisition of aversions induced by this compound. The present experiment tested the ability of various compounds with relative selectivity at kappa, delta and mu receptor subtypes to assess the relative roles of these subtypes in mediating the differential aversive effects of morphine in the two strains. In the assessment of the role of the kappa receptor in morphine-induced aversions, animals in both strains were given access to saccharin followed by varying doses of the kappa agonist (-)-U50,488H (0.0, 0.28, 0.90 and 1.60 mg/kg). Although (-)-U50,488H induced aversions in both strains, no strain differences emerged. A separate subset of subjects was trained with the selective delta opioid agonist, SNC80 (0.0, 5.6, 10.0 and 18.0 mg/kg), and again although SNC80 induced aversions, there were no strain differences. Finally, a third subset of subjects was trained with heroin (0.0, 3.2, 5.6 and 10.0 mg/kg), a compound with activity at all three opiate receptor subtypes. Although heroin induced aversions in both strains, the aversions were significantly greater in the F344 strain, suggesting that differential activation of the mu opioid receptor likely mediates the reported strain differences in morphine-induced aversion learning. These data were discussed in terms of strain differences in opioid system functioning and the implications of such differences for other morphine-induced behavioral effects reported in F344 and LEW rats.

  12. Libidibia ferrea Mature Seeds Promote Antinociceptive Effect by Peripheral and Central Pathway: Possible Involvement of Opioid and Cholinergic Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Armando Sawada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Libidibia ferrea (LF is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF, partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg, naloxone (5 mg/kg in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  13. Libidibia ferrea mature seeds promote antinociceptive effect by peripheral and central pathway: possible involvement of opioid and cholinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Luis Armando; Monteiro, Vanessa Sâmia da Conçeição; Rabelo, Guilherme Rodrigues; Dias, Germana Bueno; Da Cunha, Maura; do Nascimento, José Luiz Martins; Bastos, Gilmara de Nazareth Tavares

    2014-01-01

    Libidibia ferrea (LF) is a medicinal plant that holds many pharmacological properties. We evaluated the antinociceptive effect in the LF aqueous seed extract and Lipidic Portion of Libidibia ferrea (LPLF), partially elucidating their mechanisms. Histochemical tests and Gas chromatography of the LPLF were performed to characterize its fatty acids. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction, formalin-induced pain, and hot-plate test in mice were employed in the study. In all experiments, aqueous extract or LPLF was administered systemically at the doses of 1, 5, and 10 mg/kg. LF aqueous seed extract and LPLF demonstrated a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect in all tests indicating both peripheral anti-inflammatory and central analgesia properties. Also, the use of atropine (5 mg/kg), naloxone (5 mg/kg) in the abdominal writhing test was able to reverse the antinociceptive effect of the LPLF, indicating that at least one of LF lipids components is responsible for the dose related antinociceptive action in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Together, the present results suggested that Libidibia ferrea induced antinociceptive activity is possibly related to its ability to inhibit opioid, cholinergic receptors, and cyclooxygenase-2 pathway, since its main component, linoleic acid, has been demonstrated to produce such effect in previous studies.

  14. The interaction between alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α represents a new antinociceptive signaling pathway in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donvito, Giulia; Bagdas, Deniz; Toma, Wisam; Rahimpour, Elnaz; Jackson, Asti; Meade, Julie A; AlSharari, Shakir; Kulkarni, Abhijit R; Ivy Carroll, F; Lichtman, Aron H; Papke, Roger L; Thakur, Ganesh A; Imad Damaj, M

    2017-09-01

    Recently, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), primarily activated by binding of orthosteric agonists, represent a target for anti-inflammatory and analgesic drug development. These receptors may also be modulated by positive allosteric modulators (PAMs), ago-allosteric ligands (ago-PAMs), and α7-silent agonists. Activation of α7 nAChRs has been reported to increase the brain levels of endogenous ligands for nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors type-α (PPAR-α), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and oleoylethanolamide (OEA), in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Here, we investigated potential crosstalk between α7 nAChR and PPAR-α, using the formalin test, a mouse model of tonic pain. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that PNU282987, a full α7 agonist, attenuated formalin-induced nociceptive behavior in α7-dependent manner. Interestingly, the selective PPAR-α antagonist GW6471 blocked the antinociceptive effects of PNU282987, but did not alter the antinociceptive responses evoked by the α7 nAChR PAM PNU120596, ago-PAM GAT107, and silent agonist NS6740. Moreover, GW6471 administered systemically or spinally, but not via the intraplantar surface of the formalin-injected paw blocked PNU282987-induced antinociception. Conversely, exogenous administration of the naturally occurring PPAR-α agonist PEA potentiated the antinociceptive effects of PNU282987. In contrast, the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist rimonabant and the CB2 antagonist SR144528 failed to reverse the antinociceptive effects of PNU282987. These findings suggest that PPAR-α plays a key role in a putative antinociceptive α7 nicotinic signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. and opioid receptor agonist-induced cardioprotection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This mini-review provides insights into the mechanisms through which the cardioprotection due to inhalational agents and ..... depending on factors such as the amount produced, the type of feedback to the mitochondria, or the nature of ..... species-mediated upregulation of autophagy in isolated guinea pig hearts. J Anesth ...

  16. Antinociceptive Profile of Levo-tetrahydropalmatine in Acute and Chronic Pain Mice Models: Role of spinal sigma-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Wook; Moon, Ji-Young; Choi, Jae-Gyun; Kang, Suk-Yun; Ryu, Yeonhee; Park, Jin Bong; Lee, Jang-Hern; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-12-02

    We have recently reported that repeated systemic treatments of extract from Corydalis yanhusuo alleviate neuropathic pain and levo-tetrahydropalmatine (l-THP) is one of active components from Corydalis. We designed this study to investigate antinociceptive effect of l-THP in acute and chronic pain models and related mechanism within the spinal cord. We found that intraperitoneal pretreatment with l-THP significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin-induced pain behavior. In addition, intrathecal as well as intraperitoneal pretreatment with l-THP reduced the mechanical allodynia (MA) induced by direct activation of sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1). In chronic constriction injury mice, these treatments remarkably suppressed the increase in MA and spinal phosphorylation of the NMDA receptor NR1 subunit expression on day 7 after surgery. Intrathecal treatment with l-THP combined with the Sig-1R antagonist, BD1047 synergistically blocked MA suggesting that l-THP modulates spinal Sig-1R activation. CatWalk gait analysis also supported that antinociceptive effect of l-THP as demonstrated by restoration of percentages of print area and single stance. Meanwhile, intrathecal pretreatment with naloxone, non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, did not affect the effect of l-THP. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that l-THP possesses antinociceptive effects through spinal Sig-1R mechanism and may be a useful analgesic in the management of neuropathic pain.

  17. SPINAL ANTINOCICEPTION BY MORPHINE IN RATS IS ANTAGONIZED BY GALANIN RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REIMANN, W; ENGLBERGER, W; FRIDERICHS, E; SELVE, N; WILFFERT, B

    1994-01-01

    Galanin, a 29 amino acid peptide, has been reported to possess antinociceptive properties at the spinal site and to potentiate opioid-induced antinociception. Our aim was to investigate whether also endogenous galanin interacts with an exogenously administered opioid, morphine, in the rat spinal

  18. Recombinant ecto-5'-nucleotidase (CD73 has long lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on adenosine A1 receptor activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zylka Mark J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, also known as CD73 hydrolyzes extracellular adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP to adenosine in nociceptive circuits. Since adenosine has antinociceptive effects in rodents and humans, we hypothesized that NT5E, an enzyme that generates adenosine, might also have antinociceptive effects in vivo. Results To test this hypothesis, we purified a soluble version of mouse NT5E (mNT5E using the baculovirus expression system. Recombinant mNT5E hydrolyzed AMP in biochemical assays and was inhibited by α,β-methylene-adenosine 5'-diphosphate (α,β-me-ADP; IC50 = 0.43 μM, a selective inhibitor of NT5E. mNT5E exhibited a dose-dependent thermal antinociceptive effect that lasted for two days when injected intrathecally in wild-type mice. In addition, mNT5E had thermal antihyperalgesic and mechanical antiallodynic effects that lasted for two days in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA model of inflammatory pain and the spared nerve injury (SNI model of neuropathic pain. In contrast, mNT5E had no antinociceptive effects when injected intrathecally into adenosine A1 receptor (A1R, Adora1 knockout mice. Conclusion Our data indicate that the long lasting antinociceptive effects of mNT5E are due to hydrolysis of AMP followed by activation of A1R. Moreover, our data suggest recombinant NT5E could be used to treat chronic pain and to study many other physiological processes that are regulated by NT5E.

  19. Antinociceptive effects of mixtures of mu opioid receptor agonists and cannabinoid receptor agonists in rats: impact of drug and fixed-dose ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, David R; France, Charles P

    2017-11-25

    Pain is a significant clinical problem, and there is a need for effective pharmacotherapies with fewer adverse effects than currently available drugs (e.g., mu opioid receptor agonists). Cannabinoid receptor agonists enhance the antinociceptive effects of mu opioid receptor agonists, but it remains unclear which drugs and in what proportion will yield the most effective and safest treatments. The antinociceptive effects of the mu opioid receptor agonists etorphine and morphine alone and in combination with the cannabinoid receptor agonists Δ9-THC and CP55940 were studied in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=16) using a warm water tail withdrawal procedure. The ratio of opioid to cannabinoid (3:1, 1:1, and 1:3) varied for each mixture. Drugs administered alone or as pairwise mixtures of an opioid and a cannabinoid dose-dependently increased tail withdrawal latency. Mixtures with morphine produced supra-additive (CP55940) and additive (Δ9-THC) effects, whereas mixtures with etorphine and either cannabinoid were sub-additive. The interactions were not different among ratios for a particular mixture. The nature of the interaction between opioids and cannabinoids with regard to antinociceptive effects varies with the particular drugs in the mixture, which can have implications for designing combination therapies for pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Involvement of Opioid System, TRPM8, and ASIC Receptors in Antinociceptive Effect of Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC Bureau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Peixoto Rodrigues

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Arrabidaea brachypoda (DC Bureau is a medicinal plant found in Brazil. Known as “cipó-una”, it is popularly used as a natural therapeutic agent against pain and inflammation. This study evaluated the chemical composition and antinociceptive activity of the dichloromethane fraction from the roots of A. brachypoda (DEAB and its mechanism of action. The chemical composition was characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, and this fraction is composed only of dimeric flavonoids. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated in formalin and hot plate tests after oral administration (10–100 mg/kg in male Swiss mice. We also investigated the involvement of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1, TRPM8 (transient receptor potential melastatin 8, and ASIC (acid-sensing ion channel, as well as the opioidergic, glutamatergic, and supraspinal pathways. Moreover, the nociceptive response was reduced (30 mg/kg in the early and late phase of the formalin test. DEAB activity appears to involve the opioid system, TRPM8, and ASIC receptors, clearly showing that the DEAB alleviates acute pain in mice and suggesting the involvement of the TRPM8 and ASIC receptors and the opioid system in acute pain relief.

  1. Neuroanatomical and neuropharmacological approaches to postictal antinociception-related prosencephalic neurons: the role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Bolognesi, Luana Iacovelo; Twardowschy, André; Corrêa, Fernando Morgan Aguiar; Sibson, Nicola R; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested the involvement of the hippocampus in the elaboration of epilepsy. There is evidence that suggests the hippocampus plays an important role in the affective and motivational components of nociceptive perception. However, the exact nature of this involvement remains unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the dorsal hippocampus (dH) in the organization of postictal analgesia. In a neuroanatomical study, afferent connections were found from the somatosensory cortex, the medial septal area, the lateral septal area, the diagonal band of Broca, and the dentate gyrus to the dH; all these areas have been suggested to modulate convulsive activity. Outputs to the dH were also identified from the linear raphe nucleus, the median raphe nucleus (MdRN), the dorsal raphe nucleus, and the locus coeruleus. All these structures comprise the endogenous pain modulatory system and may be involved either in postictal pronociception or antinociception that is commonly reported by epileptic patients. dH-pretreatment with cobalt chloride (1.0 mmol/L CoCl2/0.2 μL) to transiently inhibit local synapses decreased postictal analgesia 10 min after the end of seizures. Pretreatment of the dH with either atropine or mecamylamine (1.0 μg/0.2 μL) attenuated the postictal antinociception 30 min after seizures, while the higher dose (5.0 μg/0.2 μL) decreased postictal analgesia immediately after the end of seizures. These findings suggest that the dH exerts a critical role in the organization of postictal analgesia and that muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptor-mediated mechanisms in the dH are involved in the elaboration of antinociceptive processes induced by generalized tonic-clonic seizures. PMID:23785660

  2. Antinociceptive effect of botulinum toxin A involves alterations in AMPA receptor expression and glutamate release in spinal dorsal horn neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Yao, LingLing; Ni, Linhui; Wang, Li; Hu, XingYue

    2017-08-15

    The use of botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) for various clinical therapeutic applications is increasing. It is widely believed that peripheral therapeutic or toxic effects of BTX-A are exclusively mediated by SNAP-25 cleavage. There is growing evidence of long-distance retrograde axonal transport of BTX-A on entering the central nervous system, subsequent to a local injection of the toxin. However, the prevalence of central antinociceptive effects after BTX-A peripheral application and its underlying mechanisms are unclear. Our results show that (1) BTX-A can undergo retrograde axonal transport to the dorsal horn after peripheral application; (2) Peripheral pretreatment with BTX-A decreases the expression and function of AMPA receptors in the spinal cord dorsal horn neurons; (3) Peripheral pretreatment with BTX-A does not change basal glutamate release, but decreases the effect of formalin-evoked release of glutamate in spinal cord dorsal horn neurons. These results suggest that peripheral application of BTX-A can change AMPA receptor expression in, and glutamate release from, spinal dorsal horn neurons, which may have significance in its central antinociceptive effects. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-nociceptive effect of patchouli alcohol: Involving attenuation of cyclooxygenase 2 and modulation of mu-opioid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuan; Wang, Xin-Pei; Yan, Xiao-Jin; Jiang, Jing-Fei; Lei, Fan; Xing, Dong-Ming; Guo, Yue-Ying; Du, Li-Jun

    2017-08-09

    To explore the anti-nociceptive effect of patchouli alcohol (PA), the essential oil isolated from Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Bent, and determine the mechanism in molecular levels. The acetic acid-induced writhing test and formalin-induced plantar injection test in mice were employed to confifirm the effect in vivo. Intracellular calcium ion was imaged to verify PA on mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and MOR of mouse brain were expressed for determination of PA's target. Cellular experiments were carried out to find out COX2 and MOR expression induced by PA. PA significantly reduced latency period of visceral pain and writhing induced by acetic acid saline solution (Pnociceptive effect. PA showed the characters of enhancing the MOR expression and reducing the intracellular calcium ion similar to opioid effect. Both COX2 and MOR are involved in the mechanism of PA's anti-nociceptive effect, and the up-regulation of the receptor expression and the inhibition of intracellular calcium are a new perspective to PA's effect on MOR.

  4. Curcumin attenuates morphine antinociceptive tolerance through suppressing up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei GAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of curcumin (Cur on activation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and on the chronic antinociceptive tolerance of morphine. Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats with successful intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into four groups (n=15: saline (NS group; morphine (MOR group; curcumin (Cur group and morphine plus curcumin (MOR+Cur group. A morphine tolerance model of rats was induced by intrathecal injection of morphine 15μg, once a day for 7 consecutive days in MOR and MOR+Cur group; 100μg curcumin was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in Cur and MOR+Cur group, 10μl saline was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in NS group. The effect of curcumin intrathecal catheterization on morphine antinociceptive tolerance was explored by the tail flick latency (TFL method and mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT, and then the maximum possible potential effect (MPE was calculated. The immunofluorescence staining method was applied to detect the effect of curcumin on the activation of lumbar spinal microglia. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the expression of mRNA and protein of spinal TLR4. Results The %MPE TFL and %MPE MWT increased significantly in MOR+Cur group than in MOR group (P0.05. The lumbar spinal microglia increased markedly and the expressions of polyclonal antibody IBA-1 and TLR4 were significantly up-regulated in MOR group than in NS group (P0.05. Conclusion Curcumin may attenuate chronic morphine antinociceptive tolerance through inhibiting spinal TLR4 up-regulation. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.12.06

  5. Ursolic acid from Agastache mexicana aerial parts produces antinociceptive activity involving TRPV1 receptors, cGMP and a serotonergic synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verano, Jazmín; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Pellicer, Francisco

    2013-09-01

    Agastache mexicana is a plant that has long been used in large demands in Mexican folk medicine to treat anxiety, insomnia and pain, among others affections. Chromatographic technique was used to identify ursolic acid (UA), 130.7 mg/g and 20.3 mg/g, as an antinociceptive active compound identified in ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of A. mexicana aerial parts, respectively. Temporal course curves of the antinociceptive response demonstrated a dose-dependent and significant activity of UA (1 to 100 mg/kg, i.p.) with an ED50=2 mg/kg in comparison to the efficacy of diclofenac (1 or 30 to 100 mg/kg, i.p.), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, with an ED50=11.56 mg/kg. The antinociceptive response consisted in the reduction of abdominal constrictions induced with 1% acetic acid in mice. Similarly, UA at 2 mg/kg produced significant antinociception in the intracolonic administration of 0.3% capsaicin (a TRPV1 agonist) in mice. It has been reported the inhibition produced by UA on the calcium-flux induced by capsaicin on TRPV1 receptor suggesting the antagonistic activity of this receptor. Finally, an ED50=44 mg/kg was calculated in the neurogenic and inflammatory nociception induced in the formalin test in rats. The antinociceptive response of UA in the formalin test was not modified in presence of naloxone, flumazenil or L-arginine. Nevertheless, it was reverted in presence of 1-H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazolo(4,2-a)quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase) and increased in presence of N(G)-L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase), theophylline (inhibitor of phosphodiesterase) and WAY100635 (an antagonist of 5-HT1A receptors). Current results provide evidence that the antinociceptive response of A. mexicana depends in part on the presence of UA. Moreover, this triterpene may exerts its antinociceptive effect mediated by the presence of cGMP and an additive synergism with 5HT1A receptors, but also an antagonistic

  6. In vitro binding affinities of a series of flavonoids for μ-opioid receptors. Antinociceptive effect of the synthetic flavonoid 3,3-dibromoflavanone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Josefina; Wasowski, Cristina; Loscalzo, Leonardo M; Marder, Mariel

    2013-09-01

    The pharmacotherapy for the treatment of pain is an active area of investigation. There are effective drugs to treat this problem, but there is also a need to find alternative treatments free of undesirable side effects. In the present work the capacity of a series of flavonoids to bind to the μ opioid receptor was evaluated. The most active compound, 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), a synthetic flavonoid, presented a significant inhibition of the binding of the selective μ opioid ligand [(3)H]DAMGO, with a Ki of 0.846 ± 0.263 μM. Flavanone 31 was further synthesized using a simple and cheap procedure with good yield. Its in vivo effects in mice, after acute treatments, were studied using antinociceptive and behavioral assays. It showed no sedative, anxiolytic, motor incoordination effects or inhibition of the gastrointestinal transit in mice at the doses tested. It evidenced antinociceptive activity on the acetic acid-induced nociception, hot plate and formalin tests (at 10 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg). The results showed that the 5-HT2 receptor and the adrenoceptors seem unlikely to be involved in its antinociceptive effects. Naltrexone, a nonselective opioid receptors antagonist, totally blocked compound 31 antinociceptive effects on the hot plate test, but naltrindole (δ opioid antagonist) and nor-binaltorphimine (κ opioid antagonist) did not. These findings demonstrated that 3,3-dibromoflavanone (31), at doses that did not interfere with the motor performance, exerted clear dose dependent antinociception when assessed in the chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice and it seems that its action is related to the activation of the μ opioid receptor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NSAID zaltoprofen possesses novel anti-nociceptive mechanism through blockage of B2-type bradykinin receptor in nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Misaki; Inoue, Makoto; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2006-04-24

    Zaltoprofen, a propionic acid derivative of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), was shown to have more powerful inhibitory effects to bradykinin (BK)-nociception than other NSAIDs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this potent analgesia are not yet fully understood. Here we attempted to clarify the molecular mechanism underlying zaltoprofen-induced analgesia on BK-induced nociception by a novel algogenic-induced paw flexion (APF) test in mice. The intraplantar (i.pl.) injection of zaltoprofen at 1nmol showed strong analgesic action on BK (i.pl.)-induced nociceptive flexor responses, whereas loxoprofen or its active metabolite loxoprofen-SRS did not. Zaltoprofen also inhibited the nociception induced by [Tyr8]-BK, a specific agonist of B2-type BK receptor, but did not affect the nociception by [Lys-des-Arg9]-BK, a specific agonist of B1-type BK receptor. However, zaltoprofen did not affect the substance P-induced nociception, which is mediated by common post-receptor signaling through nociceptive fibers with BK-ones. All these results suggest that NSAID zaltoprofen possesses novel anti-nociceptive mechanism, which inhibits B2-type BK receptor function in nerve endings.

  8. The mechanism of μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-TRPV1 crosstalk in TRPV1 activation involves morphine anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanju; Gao, Yebo; Yang, Liping; Kong, Xiangying; Yu, Jing; Hou, Wei; Hua, Baojin

    2015-01-01

    Initiated by the activation of various nociceptors, pain is a reaction to specific stimulus modalities. The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists, including morphine, remain the most potent analgesics to treat patients with moderate to severe pain. However, the utility of MOR agonists is limited by the adverse effects associated with the use of these drugs, including analgesic tolerance and physical dependence. A strong connection has been suggested between the expression of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) ion channel and the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. TRPV1 is important for thermal nociception induction, and is mainly expressed on sensory neurons. Recent reports suggest that opioid or TRPV1 receptor agonist exposure has contrasting consequences for anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence. Chronic morphine exposure modulates TRPV1 activation and induces the anti-nociception effects of morphine. The regulation of many downstream targets of TRPV1 plays a critical role in this process, including calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P (SP). Additional factors also include capsaicin treatment blocking the anti-nociception effects of morphine in rats, as well as opioid modulation of TRPV1 responses through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway and MAPK signaling pathways. Here, we review new insights concerning the mechanism underlying MOR-TRPV1 crosstalk and signaling pathways and discuss the potential mechanisms of morphine-induced anti-nociception, tolerance and dependence associated with the TRPV1 signaling pathway and highlight how understanding these mechanisms might help find therapeutic targets for the treatment of morphine induced antinociception, tolerance and dependence.

  9. Involvement of prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex in panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour and innate fear-induced antinociception elicited by GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei: role of the endocannabinoid CB1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo de; Salgado-Rohner, Carlos José; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecílio; Crippa, José Alexandre de Souza; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2013-09-01

    It has been shown that GABAA receptor blockade in the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (DMH and VMH, respectively) induces elaborated defensive behavioural responses accompanied by antinociception, which has been utilized as an experimental model of panic attack. Furthermore, the prelimbic (PL) division of the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) has been related to emotional reactions and the processing of nociceptive information. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible involvement of the PL cortex and the participation of local cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the elaboration of panic-like reactions and in innate fear-induced antinociception. Elaborated fear-induced responses were analysed during a 10-min period in an open-field test arena. Microinjection of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline into the DMH/VMH evoked panic-like behaviour and fear-induced antinociception, which was decreased by microinjection of the non-selective synaptic contact blocker cobalt chloride in the PL cortex. Moreover, microinjection of AM251 (25, 100 or 400 pmol), an endocannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist, into the PL cortex also attenuated the defensive behavioural responses and the antinociception that follows innate fear behaviour elaborated by DMH/VMH. These data suggest that the PL cortex plays an important role in the organization of elaborated forward escape behaviour and that this cortical area is also involved in the elaboration of innate fear-induced antinociception. Additionally, CB1 receptors in the PL cortex modulate both panic-like behaviours and fear-induced antinociception elicited by disinhibition of the DMH/VMH through microinjection of bicuculline.

  10. Plasticity of Signaling by Spinal Estrogen Receptor α, κ-Opioid Receptor, and Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors over the Rat Reproductive Cycle Regulates Spinal Endomorphin 2 Antinociception: Relevance of Endogenous-Biased Agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nai-Jiang; Murugaiyan, Vijaya; Storman, Emiliya M; Schnell, Stephen A; Kumar, Arjun; Wessendorf, Martin W; Gintzler, Alan R

    2017-11-15

    We previously showed that intrathecal application of endomorphin 2 [EM2; the highly specific endogenous μ-opioid receptor (MOR) ligand] induces antinociception that varies with stage of the rat estrous cycle: minimal during diestrus and prominent during proestrus. Earlier studies, however, did not identify proestrus-activated signaling strategies that enable spinal EM2 antinociception. We now report that in female rats, increased spinal dynorphin release and κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling, as well as the emergence of glutamate-activated metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1) signaling, are critical to the transition from an EM2 nonresponsive state (during diestrus) to an analgesically responsive state (during proestrus). Differential signaling by mGluR1, depending on its activation by membrane estrogen receptor α (mERα; during diestrus) versus glutamate (during proestrus), concomitant with the ebb and flow of spinal dynorphin/KOR signaling, functions as a switch, preventing or promoting, respectively, spinal EM2 antinociception. Importantly, EM2 and glutamate-containing varicosities appose spinal neurons that express MOR along with mGluRs and mERα, suggesting that signaling mechanisms regulating analgesic effectiveness of intrathecally applied EM2 also pertain to endogenous EM2. Regulation of spinal EM2 antinociception by both the nature of the endogenous mGluR1 activator (i.e., endogenous biased agonism at mGluR1) and changes in spinal dynorphin/KOR signaling represent a novel mechanism for modulating analgesic responsiveness to endogenous EM2 (and perhaps other opioids). This points the way for developing noncanonical pharmacological approaches to pain management by harnessing endogenous opioids for pain relief.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current prescription opioid abuse epidemic underscores the urgency to develop alternative pharmacotherapies for managing pain. We find that the magnitude of spinal endomorphin 2 (EM2) antinociception not only varies

  11. Role of dopamine D2-like receptors within the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens in antinociception induced by lateral hypothalamus stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Marzieh; Yazdanian, Mohamadreza; Haghparast, Abbas

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown that stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) can induce antinociception. It has been indicated that hypothalamic orexinergic neurons send projections throughout the dopamine mesolimbic pathway. Functional interaction between the LH and the main area of the mesolimbic pathway such as the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc) implicates in pain modulation. Thus, in this study, we investigated the role of D2-like dopamine receptors within the VTA and NAc in the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. Male Wistar rats weighing 230-280 g were unilaterally implanted with two separate cannulae into the LH and VTA or NAc. Animals received intra-VTA (0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.3 μl DMSO) and intra-accumbal (0.125, 0.25, 1 and 4 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) infusions of sulpiride as a selective D2-like receptor antagonist, prior to intra-LH carbachol (125 nM/rat) administration. In the tail-flick test, the antinociceptive effects were measured using a tail-flick algesiometer and represented as maximal possible effect (%MPE) within 5, 15, 30, 45 and 60 min after injections. Our results showed that intra-VTA and intra-accumbal sulpiride dose-dependently attenuated the LH stimulation-induced antinociception. However, the blockade of D2-like receptors within the NAc was more significant than that of the VTA. These findings show that D2-like dopamine receptors in these regions play an important role in the LH-mediated modulation of nociceptive information in the acute model of pain in the rats. It seems that this pain modulating system is more relevant to D2-like receptors in the nucleus accumbens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Antinociceptive effects of a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist (N-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethyl)-2-(1-naphthyloxy)acetamide) in two types of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Martínez, Betzabeth Anali; Jaramillo-Morales, Osmar Antonio; Espinosa-Juárez, Josué Vidal; Navarrete-Vázquez, Gabriel; Melo-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Medina-López, José Raúl; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2016-01-15

    Pain has become an active clinical challenge due its etiological heterogeneity, symptoms and mechanisms of action. In the search for new pharmacological therapeutic alternatives, sigma receptors have been proposed as drug targets. This family consists of sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors. The sigma-1 system is involved in nociception through its chaperone activity. Additionally, it has been shown that agonist to these receptors promote related sensitisation and pain hypersensitisation, suggesting the possible use of antagonists for sigma-1 receptors as an alternative therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of a new sigma-1 receptor antagonist N-(2-morpholin-4-yl-ethyl)-2-(1-naphthyloxy)acetamida (NMIN) in two types of pain (arthritic and neuropathic) and to compare its efficacy and potency with reference drugs. The antinociceptive effects of NMIN were quantitatively evaluated using the pain-induced functional impairment model in the rat and the acetone test in a rat model of neuropathic pain. NMIN (sigma-1 receptor affinity of 324nM) did not show any antinociceptive activity in the arthritic pain model but showed a dose-dependent anti-allodynic effect in neuropathic pain. NMIN showed a similar efficacy compared to the effects obtained with morphine and the sigma-1 antagonist BD-1063. However, these reference drugs showed increased potency compared with NMIN. Our results suggest that sigma-1 receptors may play an important direct role in neuropathic pain but not in arthritic pain, supporting the hypothesis that NMIN may be useful for the treatment of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Zolpidem, a selective GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit agonist, induces comparable Fos expression in oxytocinergic neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular and accessory but not supraoptic nuclei in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiss, Alexander; Søderman, Andreas; Bundzikova, Jana

    2006-01-01

    Functional activation of oxytocinergic (OXY) cells in the hypothalamic paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei was investigated in response to acute treatment with Zolpidem (a GABA(A) receptor agonist with selectivity for alpha(1) subunits) utilizing dual Fos/OXY immun...

  14. Paradoxical effect of noradrenaline-mediated neurotransmission in the antinociceptive phenomenon that accompanies tonic-clonic seizures: role of locus coeruleus neurons and α(2)- and β-noradrenergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippotti, Tatiana Tocchini; dos Reis Ferreira, Célio Marcos; de Freitas, Renato Leonardo; de Oliveira, Rithiele Cristina; de Oliveira, Ricardo; Paschoalin-Maurin, Tatiana; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2011-10-01

    The postictal state is generally followed by antinociception. It is known that connections between the dorsal raphe nucleus, the periaqueductal gray matter, and the locus coeruleus, an important noradrenergic brainstem nucleus, are involved in the descending control of ascending nociceptive pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine whether noradrenergic mechanisms in the locus coeruleus are involved in postictal antinociception. Yohimbine (an α(2)-receptor antagonist) or propranolol (a β-receptor antagonist) was microinjected unilaterally into the locus coeruleus, followed by intraperitoneal administration of pentylenetetrazole (PTZ), a noncompetitive antagonist that blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) influx. Although the administration of both yohimbine and propranolol to the locus coeruleus/subcoeruleus area resulted in a significant decrease in tonic or tonic-clonic seizure-induced antinociception, the effect of yohimbine restricted to the locus coeruleus was more distinct compared with that of propranolol, possibly because of the presynaptic localization of α(2)-noradrenergic receptors in locus coeruleus neurons. These effects were related to the modulation of noradrenergic activity in the locus coeruleus. Interestingly, microinjections of noradrenaline into the locus coeruleus also decrease the postictal antinociception. The present results suggest that the mechanism underlying postictal antinociception involves both α(2)- and β-noradrenergic receptors in the locus coeruleus, although the action of noradrenaline on these receptors causes a paradoxical effect, depending on the nature of the local neurotransmission. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evidence for the involvement of MC4 receptors in the central mechanisms of opioid antinociception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starowicz, Katarzyna

    2005-01-01

    The data described in this thesis extend general knowledge of the involvement of the MC4 receptor in mechanisms of analgesia. The following aspects outlined below constitute novel information. Firstly, the MC4R localization in the DRG is demonstrated. The MC4 receptor was assumed to exist

  16. Dopamine D3 receptor dysfunction prevents anti-nociceptive effects of morphine in the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kori L Brewer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA modulates spinal reflexes, including nociceptive reflexes, in part via the D3 receptor subtype. We have previously shown that mice lacking the functional D3 receptor (D3KO exhibit decreased paw withdrawal latencies from painful thermal stimuli. Altering the DA system in the CNS, including D1 and D3 receptor systems, reduces the ability of opioids to provide analgesia. Here, we tested if the increased pain sensitivity in D3KO might result from a modified µ-opioid receptor (MOR function at the spinal cord level. As D1 and D3 receptor subtypes have competing cellular effects and can form heterodimers, we tested if the changes in MOR function may be mediated in D3KO through the functionally intact D1 receptor system.We assessed thermal paw withdrawal latencies in D3KO and wild type (WT mice before and after systemic treatment with morphine, determined MOR and phosphorylated MOR (p-MOR protein expression levels in lumbar spinal cords, and tested the functional effects of DA and MOR receptor agonists in the isolated spinal cord.In vivo, a single morphine administration (2 mg/kg increased withdrawal latencies in WT but not D3KO, and these differential effects were mimicked in vitro, where morphine modulated spinal reflex amplitudes (SRAs in WT but not D3KO. Total MOR protein expression levels were similar between WT and D3KO, but the ratio of phosphorylated MOR (pMOR/total MOR was higher in D3KO. Blocking D3 receptors in the isolated WT cord precluded morphine’s inhibitory effects observed under control conditions. Lastly, we observed an increase in D1 receptor protein expression in the lumbar spinal cord of D3KO.Our data suggest that the D3 receptor modulates the MOR system in the spinal cord, and that a dysfunction of the D3 receptor can induce a morphine-resistant state. We propose that the D3KO mouse may serve as a model to study the onset of morphine resistance at the spinal cord level, the primary processing site of the

  17. Antinociceptive effect of hydroalcoholic extract and isoflavone isolated from Polygala molluginifolia in mice: evidence for the involvement of opioid receptors and TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci-Martins, Catharina; Nascimento, Leandro F; Venzke, Dalila; Brethanha, Lizandra C; Sako, Alysson V F; Oliveira, Aldo S; Brighente, Inês M C; Micke, Gustavo A; Pizzolatti, Moacir G; Santos, Adair R S

    2016-05-15

    The plants of the genus Polygala (Polygalaceae) have been used for a long time in folk medicine to treat pain and inflammation. The species Polygala molluginifolia is native to southern Brazil and is popularly known as "cânfora". The presented study analyzes the antinociceptive effect of hydroalcoholic extract from Polygala molluginifolia (HEPm) and an isoflavone (ISO) isolated from the extract, in behavioral models of pain in mice, as well as the mechanism underlying this effect. The phytochemical analysis of HEPm was performed through a capillary electrophoresis analysis and colorimetric test. The antinociceptive effects of HEPm and ISO (10-1000 mg/kg, i.g.) were evaluated by applying the formalin test; mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to postoperative pain in mice. The possible involvement of opioid receptors, TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels in the antinociceptive effect of HEPm and ISO were also evaluated. Finally, the nonspecific effects of HEPm and ISO were evaluated by measuring locomotor activity (Open-field Test) and corporal temperature. The 5,3',4'-trihydroxy-6″,6″-dimethylpyrano[2″,3″:7,6] isoflavone (ISO) was identified in HEPm by capillary electrophoresis analysis and selected for the experimental tests. The oral administration of HEPm or of ISO significantly inhibited the neurogenic and inflammatory phases of formalin-induced pain, edema formation and local hyperemia, without causing any change to locomotor activity. Acute and repeated treatment of animals with HEPm reduced mechanical and thermal (heat and cold) hyperalgesia in the postoperative pain. In addition, administering HEPm or ISO markedly reduced nociceptive behavior induced by the peripheral and central injection of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels activators. Finally, the antinociception provided by the administration of HEPm or ISO was reversed by the preadministration of naloxone. Taken together, these results provide the first experimental evidence of the significant antinociceptive

  18. GABA(A) receptor blockade in dorsomedial and ventromedial nuclei of the hypothalamus evokes panic-like elaborated defensive behaviour followed by innate fear-induced antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Uribe-Mariño, Andrés; Castiblanco-Urbina, Maria Angélica; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibraim; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2009-12-11

    Dysfunction in the hypothalamic GABAergic system has been implicated in panic syndrome in humans. Furthermore, several studies have implicated the hypothalamus in the elaboration of pain modulation. Panic-prone states are able to be experimentally induced in laboratory animals to study this phenomenon. The aim of the present work was to investigate the involvement of medial hypothalamic nuclei in the organization of panic-like behaviour and the innate fear-induced oscillations of nociceptive thresholds. The blockade of GABA(A) receptors in the neuronal substrates of the ventromedial or dorsomedial hypothalamus was followed by elaborated defensive panic-like reactions. Moreover, innate fear-induced antinociception was consistently elicited after the escape behaviour. The escape responses organized by the dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei were characteristically more elaborated, and a remarkable exploratory behaviour was recorded during GABA(A) receptor blockade in the medial hypothalamus. The motor characteristic of the elaborated defensive escape behaviour and the patterns of defensive alertness and defensive immobility induced by microinjection of the bicuculline either into the dorsomedial or into the ventromedial hypothalamus were very similar. This was followed by the same pattern of innate fear-induced antinociceptive response that lasted approximately 40 min after the elaborated defensive escape reaction in both cases. These findings suggest that dysfunction of the GABA-mediated neuronal system in the medial hypothalamus causes panic-like responses in laboratory animals, and that the elaborated escape behaviour organized in both dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei are followed by significant innate-fear-induced antinociception. Our findings indicate that the GABA(A) receptor of dorsomedial and ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei are critically involved in the modulation of panic-like behaviour.

  19. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  20. Prophylactic Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Vaccines Adjuvanted with Stable Emulsion and Toll-Like Receptor 9 Agonist Induce a Robust HSV-2-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Response, Protect against Symptomatic Disease, and Reduce the Latent Viral Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Michael T; Marshall, Jason D; Dorwart, Michael R; Heeke, Darren S; Rao, Eileen; Tummala, Padmaja; Yu, Li; Cohen, Gary H; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Sloan, Derek D

    2017-05-01

    Several prophylactic vaccines targeting herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) have failed in the clinic to demonstrate sustained depression of viral shedding or protection from recurrences. Although these vaccines have generated high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), their induction of robust CD8 T cells has largely been unreported, even though evidence for the importance of HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cells is mounting in animal models and in translational studies involving subjects with active HSV-2-specific immune responses. We developed a subunit vaccine composed of the NAb targets gD and gB and the novel T cell antigen and tegument protein UL40, and we compared this vaccine to a whole-inactivated-virus vaccine (formaldehyde-inactivated HSV-2 [FI-HSV-2]). We evaluated different formulations in combination with several Th1-inducing Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists in vivo In mice, the TLR9 agonist cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) oligodeoxynucleotide formulated in a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion promoted most robust, functional HSV-2 antigen-specific CD8 T cell responses and high titers of neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating its superiority to vaccines adjuvanted by monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL)-alum. We further established that FI-HSV-2 alone or in combination with adjuvants as well as adjuvanted subunit vaccines were successful in the induction of NAbs and T cell responses in guinea pigs. These immunological responses were coincident with a suppression of vaginal HSV-2 shedding, low lesion scores, and a reduction in latent HSV-2 DNA in dorsal root ganglia to undetectable levels. These data support the further preclinical and clinical development of prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines that contain appropriate antigen and adjuvant components responsible for programming elevated CD8 T cell responses. IMPORTANCE Millions of people worldwide are infected with herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), and to date, an efficacious prophylactic vaccine has not met the rigors

  1. Corticosteroid effects on morphine-induced antinociception as a function of two types of corticosteroid receptors in brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratka, A; Veldhuis, H D; De Kloet, E R

    The antinociceptive effect of parenterally and intracerebroventricularly injected morphine and beta-endorphin in adrenalectomized rats and in adrenalectomized rats treated with adrenal steroids was examined employing the hot-plate method. (1) Adrenalectomy sensitized the rats to an analgesic effect

  2. THIP, a hypnotic and antinociceptive drug, enhances a tonic GABAA receptor mediated conductance in mouse neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Kim Ryun; Jensen, Kimmo

    2006-01-01

    its cellular actions in the neocortex are uncertain, we studied the effects of THIP on neurons in slices of frontoparietal neocortex of 13- to 19-day-old (P13-19) mice. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, we found that the clinically relevant THIP concentration of 1 μM induced a robust tonic GABA......(A)-mediated current in layer 2/3 neurons. In comparison, only a minute tonic current was induced by mimicking in vivo endogenous GABA levels. Miniature IPSCs were not affected by 1 μM THIP suggesting an extrasynaptic site of action. The EC(50) for THIP was 44 μM. In accordance with the stronger expression of delta......-containing receptors in superficial neocortical layers, THIP induced a 44% larger tonic current in layer 2/3 than in layer 5 neurons. Finally, monitoring spontaneously active neocortical neurons, THIP caused an overall depression of inhibitory activity, while enhancing excitatory activity prominently. Our studies...

  3. The role of carbon monoxide on the anti-nociceptive effects and expression of cannabinoid 2 receptors during painful diabetic neuropathy in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-06-01

    The activation of cannabinoid 2 receptors (CB2R) attenuates chronic pain, but the role played by carbon monoxide synthesized by the inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) on the anti-nociceptive effects produced by a selective CB2R agonist, JWH-015, during painful diabetic neuropathy remains unknown. In streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice, the anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects of the subcutaneous administration of JWH-015 alone or combined with the intraperitoneal administration of a carbon monoxide-releasing molecule (tricarbonyldichlororuthenium(II) dimer (CORM-2)) or an HO-1 inducer compound (cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP)) at 10 mg/kg were evaluated. Reversion of JWH-015 anti-nociceptive effects by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP)) and a CB2R antagonist (AM630) was also evaluated. Furthermore, the protein levels of HO-1, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1), and CB2R in diabetic mice treated with CORM-2 and CoPP alone or combined with JWH-015 were also assessed. The administration of JWH-015 dose dependently inhibited hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. The effects of JWH-015 were enhanced by their coadministration with CORM-2 or CoPP and reversed by SnPP or AM630. The increased protein levels of HO-1 induced by CORM-2 and CoPP treatments were further enhanced in JWH-015-treated mice. All treatments similarly enhanced the peripheral expression of CB2R and avoided the spinal cord over-expression of NOS1 induced by diabetes. The activation of HO-1 enhanced the anti-nociceptive effects of JWH-015 in diabetic mice, suggesting that coadministration of JWH-015 with CORM-2 or CoPP might be an interesting approach for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy in mice.

  4. Salvinorin A has antiinflammatory and antinociceptive effects in experimental models of colitis in mice mediated by KOR and CB1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichna, Jakub; Dicay, Michael; Lewellyn, Kevin; Janecka, Anna; Zjawiony, Jordan K; MacNaughton, Wallace K; Storr, Martin A

    2012-06-01

    Salvinorin A (SA) has a potent inhibitory action on mouse gastrointestinal (GI) motility and ion transport, mediated primarily by kappa-opioid receptors (KOR). The aim of the present study was to characterize possible antiinflammatory and antinociceptive effects of SA in the GI tract of mice. Colonic damage scores and myeloperoxidase activity were determined after intraperitoneal (i.p.), intracolonic (i.c.), and oral (p.o.) administration of SA using the trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) models of colitis in mice. Additionally, KOR, cannabinoid (CB)1, and CB2 western blot analysis of colon samples was performed. The antinociceptive effect of SA was examined based on the number of behavioral responses to i.c. instillation of mustard oil (MO). The i.p. (3 mg/kg, twice daily) and p.o. (10 mg/kg, twice daily) administration of SA significantly attenuated TNBS and DSS colitis in mice. The effect of SA was blocked by KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Western blot analysis showed no influence of SA on KOR, CB1, or CB2 levels. SA (3 mg/kg, i.p. and 10 mg/kg, i.c.) significantly decreased the number of pain responses after i.c. instillation of MO in the vehicle- and TNBS-treated mice. The antinociceptive action of SA was blocked by KOR and CB1 antagonists. The analgesic effect of i.c. SA was more potent in TNBS-treated mice compared to controls. Our results suggest that the drugs based on the structure of SA have the potential to become valuable antiinflammatory or analgesic therapeutics for the treatment of GI diseases. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  5. The Antinociceptive Effect of a Tapentadol-Ketorolac Combination in a Mouse Model of Trigeminal Pain is Mediated by Opioid Receptors and ATP-Sensitive K(+) Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreras-Espinoza, Israel; Soto-Zambrano, José Alberto; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Zapata-Morales, Ramón; Alonso-Castro, Ángel; Bologna-Molina, Ronell; Granados-Soto, Vinicio; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A

    2017-02-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinoceptive interaction between the opioid analgesic, tapentadol, and the NSAID, ketorolac, in the mouse orofacial formalin test. Tapentadol or ketorolac were administered ip 15 min before orofacial formalin injection. The effect of the individual drugs was used to calculate their ED50 values and different proportions (tapentadol-ketorolac in 1:1, 3:1, and 1:3) were assayed in the orofacial test using isobolographic analysis and interaction index to evaluate the interaction between the drugs. The combination showed antinociceptive synergistic and additive effects in the first and second phase of the orofacial formalin test. Naloxone and glibenclamide were used to evaluate the possible mechanisms of action and both partially reversed the antinociception produced by the tapentadol-ketorolac combination. These data suggest that the mixture of tapentadol and ketorolac produces additive or synergistic interactions via opioid receptors and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels in the orofacial formalin-induced nociception model in mice. Drug Dev Res 78 : 63-70, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. The intrathecal administration of losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibiton of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemoto, Wataru; Ogata, Yoshiki; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Yaoita, Fukie; Tanado, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2015-01-12

    We have recently reported that an intrathecal (i.t.) administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) into mice induces a nociceptive behavior accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK signaling via AT1 receptors (Nemoto et al., 2013, Mol. Pain 9, 38). These results suggested that Ang II participates in the facilitation of nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. In the present study, we used formalin test to examine the effect of i.t.-administered losartan, an AT1 receptor antagonist, and determine whether Ang II acts as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information. When administered i.t. 5 min before the injection of a 2% formalin solution into the plantar surface of the hindpaw, losartan (30-100 nmol) produced a dose-dependent and significant antinociceptive effect during both the first and second phases of the test. In the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord (laminae I and II), the fluorescence intensities for Ang II and phospho-p38 MAPK were both significantly increased on the ipsilateral side 3 min after the injection of formalin compared to saline-treated controls. Moreover, the increase of phospho-p38 MAPK fluorescence intensity was significantly inhibited by the i.t. administration of losartan (54.8 nmol) 5 min prior to formalin. These results indicate that losartan produces an antinociceptive effect through the inhibition of p38 MAPK phosphorylation in the mouse formalin test and that Ang II may act as a neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the spinal transmission of nociceptive information. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Adrenergic Component of Nicotine Antinociception in Rats | Ibironke ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been widely established that nicotine , the active pharmacological agent in tobacco has antinociceptive effects , but the mechanism of this activity is yet to be fully investigated . The present study examined the effects of two adrenergic receptor antagonists , propranolol and prazosin .on nicotine antinociception using ...

  8. Structural basis for constitutive activity and agonist-induced activation of the enteroendocrine fat sensor GPR119

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelstoft, Maja Storm; Norn, C; Pedersen, Maria Hauge

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: GPR119 is a Gαs-coupled 7TM receptor activated by endogenous lipids such as oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and by the dietary triglyceride metabolite 2-monoacylglycerol. GPR119 stimulates enteroendocrine hormone and insulin secretion. But despite massive drug discovery efforts...... in the field, very little is known about the basic molecular pharmacology of GPR119. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: GPR119 receptor signalling was studied in transfected cells. Mutational mapping (30 mutations in 23 positions) was performed on residues required for ligand-independent and agonist-induced GPR119...... activation (AR231453 and OEA). Novel Rosetta-based receptor modelling was applied, using a composite template approach with segments from different X-ray structures and fully flexible ligand docking. KEY RESULTS: The increased signalling induced by increasing the cell surface expression of GPR119...

  9. Antinociceptive activity of Eupatorium buniifolium aqueous extract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebrahimzadeh

    from aerial parts of Salvia limbata produced a statistically significant inhibition of pain induced by hot ... including analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities .... specific antagonist of opioid receptors. The inhibitory effect of naloxone on the antinociceptive activity of extract suggests a morphine-like activity profile for S. limbata.

  10. Sources of calcium in agonist-induced contraction of rat distal colon smooth muscle in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Kong, De-Hu; Pan, Qun-Wan; Wang, Hai-Hua

    2008-02-21

    To study the origin of calcium necessary for agonist-induced contraction of the distal colon in rats. The change in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) evoked by elevating external Ca2+ was detected by fura 2/AM fluorescence. Contractile activity was measured with a force displacement transducer. Tension was continuously monitored and recorded using a Powerlab 4/25T data acquisition system with an ML110 bridge bioelectric physiographic amplifier. Store depletion induced Ca2+ influx had an effect on [Ca2+]i. In nominally Ca2+-free medium, the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 mumol/L) increased [Ca2+]i from 68 to 241 nmol/L, and to 458 (P source of activator Ca2+ for the contractile response to agonist is extracellular Ca2+, and intracellular Ca2+ has little role to play in mediating excitation-contraction coupling by agonists in rat distal colon smooth muscle in vitro. The influx of extracellular Ca2+ is mainly mediated through voltage-, receptor- and store-operated Ca2+ channels, which can be used as an alternative to develop new drugs targeted on the dysfunction of digestive tract motility.

  11. Investigation of the presence and antinociceptive function of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kristine B.; Krogh-Jensen, Karen; Pickering, Darryl S

    2016-01-01

    with [3H]-N-methylscopolamine. The BLAST test revealed 95 % protein sequence homology showing the naked mole-rat to have the genetic potential to express all five muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes. A significant reduction in pain behavior was demonstrated after administration of 8.4 mg......The present study investigated the cholinergic system in the African naked mole-rat (Heterocephalus glaber) with focus on the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtypes M1 and M4. The protein sequences for the subtypes m 1–5 of the naked mole-rat were compared to that of the house mouse (Mus...... musculus) using basic local alignment search tool (BLAST). The presence and function of M1 and M4 was investigated in vivo, using the formalin test with the muscarinic receptor agonists xanomeline and VU0152100. Spinal cord tissue from the naked mole-rat was used for receptor saturation binding studies...

  12. Antinociceptive and respiratory effects of nalbuphine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; Butelman, E R; Woods, J H; France, C P

    1994-11-01

    Antinociceptive and respiratory effects of nalbuphine and other opioids were studied in rhesus monkeys. In a thermal, tail withdrawal assay, the kappa agonist enadoline and the mu agonists alfentanil and fentanyl produced maximum antinociceptive effects in all subjects and over a wide range of temperatures, whereas nalbuphine produced antinociceptive effects in only some subjects and only when the water temperature was < or = 50 degrees C. Naltrexone antagonized the antinociceptive effects of nalbuphine, alfentanil and enadoline; however, the magnitude of antagonism was not equal among agonists. In subjects that did not show an antinociceptive response to nalbuphine, nalbuphine (3.2-10.0 mg/kg) antagonized the antinociceptive effects of fentanyl but not enadoline. The irreversible opioid antagonist clocinnamox produced a parallel shift to the right in the nalbuphine dose-effect curve 1 hr after administration and decreased the maximum effect produced by nalbuphine 24 and 48 hr after administration. Nalbuphine had modest respiratory-depressant effects in monkeys breathing air and attenuated hyperventilation produced by 5% CO2. In contrast, alfentanil had marked respiratory-depressant effects in monkeys breathing air or 5% CO2 in air and these effects were antagonized by nalbuphine. Taken together, these results suggest nalbuphine has low efficacy at mu opioid receptors; however, quantitative differences between alfentanil and nalbuphine indicate a second (non-enadoline sensitive) receptor might also be important for the antinociceptive effects of nalbuphine.

  13. nor-BNI Antagonism of Kappa Opioid Agonist-Induced Reinstatement of Ethanol-Seeking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Harshberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent work suggests that the dynorphin (DYN/kappa opioid receptor (KOR system may be a key mediator in the behavioral effects of alcohol. The objective of the present study was to examine the ability of the KOR antagonist norbinaltorphimine (nor-BNI to attenuate relapse to ethanol seeking due to priming injections of the KOR agonist U50,488 at time points consistent with KOR selectivity. Male Wistar rats were trained to self-administer a 10% ethanol solution, and then responding was extinguished. Following extinction, rats were injected with U50,488 (0.1–10 mg/kg, i.p. or saline and were tested for the reinstatement of ethanol seeking. Next, the ability of the nonselective opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone (0 or 3.0 mg/kg, s.c. and nor-BNI (0 or 20.0 mg/kg, i.p. to block U50,488-induced reinstatement was examined. Priming injections U50,488 reinstated responding on the previously ethanol-associated lever. Pretreatment with naltrexone reduced the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior. nor-BNI also attenuated KOR agonist-induced reinstatement, but to a lesser extent than naltrexone, when injected 24 hours prior to injections of U50,488, a time point that is consistent with KOR selectivity. While these results suggest that activation of KORs is a key mechanism in the regulation of ethanol-seeking behavior, U50,488-induced reinstatement may not be fully selective for KORs.

  14. Resolvin D1 attenuates activation of sensory transient receptor potential channels leading to multiple anti-nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, S; Yoo, S; Yang, T J; Cho, H; Kim, Y G; Hwang, S W

    2010-10-01

    Temperature-sensitive transient receptor potential ion channels (thermoTRPs) expressed in primary sensory neurons and skin keratinocytes play a crucial role as peripheral pain detectors. Many natural and synthetic ligands have been found to act on thermoTRPs, but little is known about endogenous compounds that inhibit these TRPs. Here, we asked whether resolvin D1 (RvD1), a naturally occurring anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving lipid molecule is able to affect the TRP channel activation. We examined the effect of RvD1 on the six thermoTRPs using Ca(2+) imaging and whole cell electrophysiology experiments using the HEK cell heterologous expression system, cultured sensory neurons and HaCaT keratinocytes. We also checked changes in agonist-specific acute licking/flicking or flinching behaviours and TRP-related mechanical and thermal pain behaviours using Hargreaves, Randall-Selitto and von Frey assay systems with or without inflammation. RvD1 inhibited the activities of TRPA1, TRPV3 and TRPV4 at nanomolar and micromolar levels. Consistent attenuations in agonist-specific acute pain behaviours by immediate peripheral administration with RvD1 were also observed. Furthermore, local pretreatment with RvD1 significantly reversed mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in inflamed tissues. RvD1 was a novel endogenous inhibitor for several sensory TRPs. The results of our behavioural studies suggest that RvD1 has an analgesic potential via these TRP-related mechanisms.

  15. Cold Suppresses Agonist-induced Activation of TRPV1

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, M.-K.; Wang, S.

    2011-01-01

    Cold therapy is frequently used to reduce pain and edema following acute injury or surgery such as tooth extraction. However, the neurobiological mechanisms of cold therapy are not completely understood. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a capsaicin- and heat-gated nociceptive ion channel implicated in thermosensation and pathological pain under conditions of inflammation or injury. Although capsaicin-induced nociception, neuropeptide release, and ionic currents are suppress...

  16. Hepatocyte-specific PPARA expression exclusively promotes agonist-induced cell proliferation without influence from nonparenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocker, Chad N; Yue, Jiang; Kim, Donghwan; Qu, Aijuan; Bonzo, Jessica A; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARA) is a nuclear transcription factor and key mediator of systemic lipid metabolism. Prolonged activation in rodents causes hepatocyte proliferation and hepatocellular carcinoma. Little is known about the contribution of nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) to PPARA-mediated cell proliferation. NPC contribution to PPARA agonist-induced hepatomegaly was assessed in hepatocyte ( Ppara △Hep )- and macrophage ( Ppara △Mac )-specific Ppara null mice. Mice were treated with the agonist Wy-14643 for 14 days, and response of conditional null mice was compared with conventional knockout mice ( Ppara -/- ). Wy-14643 treatment caused weight loss and severe hepatomegaly in wild-type and Ppara △Mac mice, and histological analysis revealed characteristic hepatocyte swelling; Ppara △Hep and Ppara -/- mice were protected from these effects. Ppara △Mac serum chemistries, as well as aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, matched wild-type mice. Agonist-treated Ppara △Hep mice had elevated serum cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides when compared with Ppara -/- mice, indicating a possible role for extrahepatic PPARA in regulating circulating lipid levels. BrdU labeling confirmed increased cell proliferation only in wild-type and Ppara △Mac mice. Macrophage PPARA disruption did not impact agonist-induced upregulation of lipid metabolism, cell proliferation, or DNA damage and repair-related gene expression, whereas gene expression was repressed in Ppara △Hep mice. Interestingly, downregulation of inflammatory cytokines IL-15 and IL-18 was dependent on macrophage PPARA. Cell type-specific regulation of target genes was confirmed in primary hepatocytes and Kupffer cells. These studies conclusively show that cell proliferation is mediated exclusively by PPARA activation in hepatocytes and that Kupffer cell PPARA has an important role in mediating the anti-inflammatory effects of PPARA agonists

  17. Antinociceptive Interactions between the Imidazoline I2 Receptor Agonist 2-BFI and Opioids in Rats: Role of Efficacy at the μ-Opioid Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemian, Justin N.; Obeng, Samuel; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-01-01

    Although μ-opioids have been reported to interact favorably with imidazoline I2 receptor (I2R) ligands in animal models of chronic pain, the dependence on the μ-opioid receptor ligand efficacy on these interactions had not been previously investigated. This study systematically examined the interactions between the selective I2 receptor ligand 2-(2-benzofuranyl)-2-imidazoline hydrochloride (2-BFI) and three μ-opioid receptor ligands of varying efficacies: fentanyl (high efficacy), buprenorphine (medium-low efficacy), and 17-cyclopropylmethyl-3,14β-dihydroxy-4,5α-epoxy-6α-[(3′-isoquinolyl) acetamido] morphine (NAQ; very low efficacy). The von Frey test of mechanical nociception and Hargreaves test of thermal nociception were used to examine the antihyperalgesic effects of drug combinations in complete Freund’s adjuvant–induced inflammatory pain in rats. Food-reinforced schedule-controlled responding was used to examine the rate-suppressing effects of each drug combination. Dose-addition and isobolographical analyses were used to characterize the nature of drug-drug interactions in each assay. 2-BFI and fentanyl fully reversed both mechanical and thermal nociception, whereas buprenorphine significantly reversed thermal but only slightly reversed mechanical nociception. NAQ was ineffective in both nociception assays. When studied in combination with fentanyl, NAQ acted as a competitive antagonist (apparent pA2 value: 6.19). 2-BFI/fentanyl mixtures produced additive to infra-additive analgesic interactions, 2-BFI/buprenorphine mixtures produced supra-additive to infra-additive interactions, and 2-BFI/NAQ mixtures produced supra-additive to additive interactions in the nociception assays. The effects of all combinations on schedule-controlled responding were generally additive. Results consistent with these were found in experiments using female rats. These findings indicate that lower-efficacy μ-opioid receptor agonists may interact more favorably with I2R

  18. Opposite effects of neuropeptide FF on central antinociception induced by endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi-long Wang

    Full Text Available Neuropeptide FF (NPFF is known to be an endogenous opioid-modulating peptide. Nevertheless, very few researches focused on the interaction between NPFF and endogenous opioid peptides. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of NPFF system on the supraspinal antinociceptive effects induced by the endogenous µ-opioid receptor agonists, endomorphin-1 (EM-1 and endomorphin-2 (EM-2. In the mouse tail-flick assay, intracerebroventricular injection of EM-1 induced antinociception via µ-opioid receptor while the antinociception of intracerebroventricular injected EM-2 was mediated by both µ- and κ-opioid receptors. In addition, central administration of NPFF significantly reduced EM-1-induced central antinociception, but enhanced EM-2-induced central antinociception. The results using the selective NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptor agonists indicated that the EM-1-modulating action of NPFF was mainly mediated by NPFF2 receptor, while NPFF potentiated EM-2-induecd antinociception via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. To further investigate the roles of µ- and κ-opioid systems in the opposite effects of NPFF on central antinociception of endomprphins, the µ- and κ-opioid receptors selective agonists DAMGO and U69593, respectively, were used. Our results showed that NPFF could reduce the central antinociception of DAMGO via NPFF2 receptor and enhance the central antinociception of U69593 via both NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. Taken together, our data demonstrate that NPFF exerts opposite effects on central antinociception of endomorphins and provide the first evidence that NPFF potentiate antinociception of EM-2, which might result from the interaction between NPFF and κ-opioid systems.

  19. Mechanisms of the influence of midazolam on morphine antinociception at spinal and supraspinal levels in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, T J; Hayashi, T; Lorenz, I H; Hill, H F

    1994-12-27

    The mechanisms for the combined antinociceptive effect of midazolam and morphine administered at spinal (intrathecal, i.t.) and supraspinal (intracerebroventricular, i.c.v.) levels were investigated in rats. Nociceptive test results showed that co-administration of midazolam and morphine at the spinal level potentiated morphine-induced antinociception, and that this interaction was blocked by intraperitoneal (i.p.) naloxone and reversed by i.t. bicuculline and i.p. flumazenil. Also, bicuculline and flumazenil blocked midazolam-induced antinociception at the spinal level, and naloxone completely reversed morphine antinociception. In contrast, when drugs were injected intracerebroventricularly, midazolam inhibited the antinociceptive effect of morphine (as determined by the hot-plate test). The inhibitory effects of i.c.v. midazolam upon i.c.v. morphine antinociception were partly blocked by flumazenil and bicuculline. Midazolam-induced antinociception was increased by bicuculline and decreased by flumazenil; naloxone i.p. blocked both i.c.v. morphine antinociception and i.c.v. morphine-midazolam antinociception. Results after i.t. injection may be due to an interaction between morphine and midazolam/GABAA receptor-activated systems. At the supraspinal level, this interaction may also activate other systems that are distinct from those governing the individual action of each agonist.

  20. Mildly oxidized HDL decrease agonist-induced platelet aggregation and release of pro-coagulant platelet extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafelmeier, M; Fischer, A; Orsó, E; Konovalova, T; Böttcher, A; Liebisch, G; Matysik, S; Schmitz, G

    2017-05-01

    Stored platelet concentrates (PLCs) for therapeutic purpose, develop a platelet storage lesion (PSL), characterized by impaired platelet (PLT) viability and function, platelet extracellular vesicle (PL-EV) release and profound lipidomic changes. Whereas oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) activates PLTs and promotes atherosclerosis, effects linked to oxidized high-density lipoprotein (oxHDL) are poorly characterized. PLCs from blood donors were treated with native (nHDL) or mildly oxidized HDL (moxHDL) for 5days under blood banking conditions. Flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), aggregometry, immunoblot analysis and mass spectrometry were carried out to analyze PL-EV and platelet exosomes (PL-EX) release, PLT aggregation, protein expression, and PLT and plasma lipid composition. In comparison to total nHDL, moxHDL significantly decreased PL-EV release by -36% after 5days of PLT storage and partially reversed agonist-induced PLT aggregation. PL-EV release positively correlated with PLT aggregation. MoxHDL improved PLT membrane lipid homeostasis through enhanced uptake of lysophospholipids and their remodeling to corresponding phospholipid species. This also appeared for sphingomyelin (SM) and d18:0/d18:1 sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) at the expense of ceramide (Cer) and hexosylceramide (HexCer) leading to reduced Cer/S1P ratio as PLT-viability indicator. This membrane remodeling was associated with increased content of CD36 and maturation of scavenger receptor-B1 (SR-B1) protein in secreted PL-EVs. MoxHDL, more potently than nHDL, improves PLT-membrane lipid homeostasis, partially antagonizes PL-EV release and agonist-induced PLT aggregation. Altogether, this may be the result of more efficient phospho- and sphingolipid remodeling mediated by CD36 and SR-B1 in the absence of ABCA1 on PLTs. As in vitro supplement in PLCs, moxHDL has the potential to improve PLC quality and to prolong storage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The antinociceptive effect of mirtazapine in mice is mediated through serotonergic, noradrenergic and opioid mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Shaul; Rigai, Tova; Katz, Yeshayahu; Pick, Chaim G

    2002-09-30

    The antinociceptive effects of the noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressant (NaSSA) drug mirtazapine and its interaction with various opioid receptor subtypes were evaluated in mice with a hotplate analgesicmeter. Mirtazapine elicited an antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner following doses from 1 to 7.5mg/kg. As the mirtazapine dose increased beyond 10mg/kg latencies returned to baseline, yielding a biphasic dose-response curve. The effect of opioid, adrenergic, and serotonergic receptor antagonists was examined as to their ability to block mirtazapine antinociception. Mirtazapine (at 10mg/kg)-induced antinociception was significantly inhibited by naloxone, nor-BNI, and naltrindole, but neither by beta-FNA nor by naloxonazine, implying the involvement of kappa(1)- and delta-opioid mechanisms. When adrenergic and serotonergic antagonists were used, both metergoline and yohimbine, decreased antinociception elicited by mirtazapine, implying a combined serotonergic and noradrenergic mechanism of antinociception. When mirtazapine was administered together with various agonists of the opioid receptor subtypes, it significantly potentiated antinociception mediated only by kappa(3)-opioid receptor subtypes. Summing up these results we conclude that the antinociceptive effect of mirtazapine is mainly influenced by the kappa(3)-opioid receptor subtype combined with both serotonergic and noradrenergic receptors. These results suggest a potential use of mirtazapine in the management of some pain syndromes, and raise questions regarding a possible indirect opioid-dependence induced by mirtazapine. However, further research is needed in order to establish both the exact clinical indications and the effective doses of mirtazapine when prescribed for pain.

  2. Dissociation between the panicolytic effect of cannabidiol microinjected into the substantia nigra, pars reticulata, and fear-induced antinociception elicited by bicuculline administration in deep layers of the superior colliculus: The role of CB1-cannabinoid receptor in the ventral mesencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Juliana Almeida; Biagioni, Audrey Francisco; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; de Souza Crippa, José Alexandre; Cecílio Hallak, Jaime Eduardo; Zuardi, Antônio Waldo; Coimbra, Norberto Cysne

    2015-07-05

    Many studies suggest that the substantia nigra, pars reticulata (SNpr), a tegmental mesencephalic structure rich in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and cannabinoid receptor-containing neurons, is involved in the complex control of defensive responses through the neostriatum-nigral disinhibitory and nigro-tectal inhibitory GABAergic pathways during imminently dangerous situations. The aim of the present work was to investigate the role played by CB1-cannabinoid receptor of GABAergic pathways terminal boutons in the SNpr or of SNpr-endocannabinoid receptor-containing interneurons on the effect of intra-nigral microinjections of cannabidiol in the activity of nigro-tectal inhibitory pathways. GABAA receptor blockade in the deep layers of the superior colliculus (dlSC) elicited vigorous defensive behaviour. This explosive escape behaviour was followed by significant antinociception. Cannabidiol microinjection into the SNpr had a clear anti-aversive effect, decreasing the duration of defensive alertness, the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, and the frequency and duration of explosive escape behaviour, expressed by running and jumps, elicited by transitory GABAergic dysfunction in dlSC. However, the innate fear induced-antinociception was not significantly changed. The blockade of CB1 endocannabinoid receptor in the SNpr decreased the anti-aversive effect of canabidiol based on the frequency and duration of defensive immobility, the frequency of escape expressed by running, and both the frequency and duration of escape expressed by jumps. These findings suggest a CB1 mediated endocannabinoid signalling in cannabidiol modulation of panic-like defensive behaviour, but not of innate fear-induced antinociception evoked by GABAA receptor blockade with bicuculline microinjection into the superior colliculus, with a putative activity in nigro-collicular GABAergic pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of deoxycholylglycine, a conjugated secondary bile acid, on myogenic tone and agonist-induced contraction in rat resistance arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Khurana

    Full Text Available Bile acids (BAs regulate cardiovascular function via diverse mechanisms. Although in both health and disease serum glycine-conjugated BAs are more abundant than taurine-conjugated BAs, their effects on myogenic tone (MT, a key determinant of systemic vascular resistance (SVR, have not been examined.Fourth-order mesenteric arteries (170-250 µm isolated from Sprague-Dawley rats were pressurized at 70 mmHg and allowed to develop spontaneous constriction, i.e., MT. Deoxycholylglycine (DCG; 0.1-100 µM, a glycine-conjugated major secondary BA, induced reversible, concentration-dependent reduction of MT that was similar in endothelium-intact and -denuded arteries. DCG reduced the myogenic response to stepwise increase in pressure (20 to 100 mmHg. Neither atropine nor the combination of L-NAME (a NOS inhibitor plus indomethacin altered DCG-mediated reduction of MT. K(+ channel blockade with glibenclamide (K(ATP, 4-aminopyradine (K(V, BaCl(2 (K(IR or tetraethylammonium (TEA, K(Ca were also ineffective. In Fluo-2-loaded arteries, DCG markedly reduced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSM Ca(2+ fluorescence (∼50%. In arteries incubated with DCG, physiological salt solution (PSS with high Ca(2+ (4 mM restored myogenic response. DCG reduced vascular tone and VSM cytoplasmic Ca(2+ responses (∼50% of phenylephrine (PE- and Ang II-treated arteries, but did not affect KCl-induced vasoconstriction.In rat mesenteric resistance arteries DCG reduces pressure- and agonist-induced vasoconstriction and VSM cytoplasmic Ca(2+ responses, independent of muscarinic receptor, NO or K(+ channel activation. We conclude that BAs alter vasomotor responses, an effect favoring reduced SVR. These findings are likely pertinent to vascular dysfunction in cirrhosis and other conditions associated with elevated serum BAs.

  4. Delayed inhibition of agonist-induced granulocyte-platelet aggregation after low-dose sevoflurane inhalation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Johannes; Lucchinetti, Eliana; Jamnicki, Marina; Aguirre, José; Härter, Luc; Keel, Marius; Zaugg, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Sevoflurane can be used as sedative-analgesic drug with endothelial protective properties. We tested whether low-dose sevoflurane inhalation provides sustained inhibition of detrimental granulocyte-platelet aggregation in humans. Ten healthy male volunteers were enrolled in this crossover study. Each subject inhaled sevoflurane for 1 h at 0.5-1 vol % end-tidal concentration in oxygen (50 vol %). Inhaling oxygen (50 vol %) alone served as control. Venous blood samples were collected at baseline before inhalation, immediately after inhalation, and 24 h thereafter, and were used for flow cytometry to determine platelet surface marker (CD41, CD42b, CD62P/P-selectin, and PAC-1) on platelets and granulocytes and for kaolin-induced clot formation, as assessed by thromboelastography. In flow cytometry experiments, platelets were stimulated with arachidonic acid (AA, 30 microM), adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 1 microM), and thrombin receptor agonist peptide-6 (TRAP-6, 6 microM). AA, ADP, and TRAP-6 markedly increased the expression of CD62P on platelets, whereas CD42b (shedding) and PAC-1 (heterotypic conjugates) expression decreased. The amount of granulocyte-platelet aggregates increased upon agonist stimulation. Low-dose sevoflurane inhalation reduced ADP-induced CD62P expression on platelets 24 h after inhalation, and inhibited the formation of granulocyte-platelet aggregates under stimulation with AA and ADP after 1 and 24 h, and with TRAP-6 after 24 h compared with control. Inhibition of granulocyte-platelet aggregates was accompanied by reduced clot firmness 24 h after sevoflurane inhalation compared with control. We demonstrated for the first time that inhaling low-dose sevoflurane (<1 vol % end-tidal) inhibits agonist-induced granulocyte-platelet interactions 24 h after administration and thus counteracts thromboinflammatory processes.

  5. Hyptis pectinata: redox protection and orofacial antinociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, M S; Melo, M S; Oliveira, M G B; Santana, M T; Lima, A C B; Damascena, N P; Dias, A S; Araujo, B S; Estevam, C S; Botelho, M A; Quintans, L J

    2013-09-01

    Hyptis pectinata L. Poit, known as 'sambacaitá', is used in Brazil to treat inflammatory and painful disorders. In this study, the antioxidant and orofacial antinociceptive properties of the aqueous extract of H. pectinata leaves (AEPH) were assessed using in vitro and in vivo models. Thus, AEPH reduced the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical up to 72.10% with an EC₅₀ of 14.56 µg/ml. It also inhibited 40.80% of the lipoperoxidation induced by 2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride in the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances assay. The orofacial antinociceptive activity was evaluated in mice pre-treated with AEPH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o.) and morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p.), which received afterwards formalin- (20 µl, 2% solution, s.c.), glutamate- (40 µl, 25 mM, s.c.) and capsaicin- (20 µl, 2.5 µg, s.c.) to induce orofacial nociception. AEPH at all doses reduced (p < 0.001) the nociceptive response in the first (43-62%) and second (47-80%) phases of the formalin test. Besides, the effect of AEPH (400 mg/kg) was not changed in the presence of naloxone (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.), an opioid antagonist. AEPH significantly inhibited mice face rubbing for capsaicin (23-69%, p < 0.05) and glutamate (48-77%, p < 0.001) at all doses. The findings suggested the AEPH has peripheral and central antinociceptive activities, which are not related to opioid receptors. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. β2-Agonist induced cAMP is decreased in asthmatic airway smooth muscle due to increased PDE4D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trian, Thomas; Burgess, Janette K; Niimi, Kyoko; Moir, Lyn M; Ge, Qi; Berger, Patrick; Liggett, Stephen B; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma is associated with airway narrowing in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli and increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition, some studies have suggested impaired β-agonist induced ASM relaxation in asthmatics, but the mechanism is not known. OBJECTIVE:

  7. Antinociceptive activity of methanolic extract of Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Hui Ming; Mohamad, Azam Shah; Makhtar, Nor 'Adilah; Khalid, Mohamed Hanief; Khalid, Syamimi; Perimal, Enoch Kumar; Mastuki, Siti Nurulhuda; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Lajis, Nordin; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan

    2011-01-07

    Acmella uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. is a medicinal herbaceous plant that is commonly used by the Malay community in Malaysia to relieve pain often associated with mouth ulcers, toothache, sore throat, and stomach ache. The study was carried out to investigate the antinociceptive effect of the methanolic extract of A. uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. flowers (MEAU) using murine models of chemicals and thermal nociception. Chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-induced paw licking test) and thermal models (hot plate test) of nociception in mice were employed to evaluate the MEAU analgesic effect. The extract was given via oral administration at doses of 3, 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg. It was demonstrated that MEAU produced significant antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which indicates the presence of both centrally and peripherally mediated activities. Furthermore, the reversal of antinociception of MEAU by naloxone suggests the involvement of opioid system in its centrally mediated analgesic activity. Moreover, MEAU-treated mice did not show any significant motor performance alterations. No mortality and signs of toxicity were recorded following treatment of the MEAU. The results from the present study appear to support the folkloric belief in the medicinal properties of A. uliginosa (Sw.) Cass. which against pain at both central and peripheral levels, in which the central antinociception is probably due to the participation of the opioid receptors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Antinociception induced by systemic administration of local anaesthetics depends on a central cholinergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolini, A; Galli, A; Ghelardini, C; Giotti, A; Malcangio, M; Malmberg-Aiello, P; Zucchi, P L

    1987-12-01

    1 The antinociceptive effects of systemically-administered procaine, lignocaine and bupivacaine were examined in mice and rats by using the hot-plate, writhing and tail flick tests. 2 In both species all three local anaesthetics produced significant antinociception which was prevented by atropine (5 mg kg-1, i.p.) and by hemicholinium-3 (1 microgram per mouse, i.c.v.), but not by naloxone (3 mg kg-1, i.p.), alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (100 mg kg-1, s.c.), reserpine (2 mg kg-1, i.p.) or atropine methylbromide (5.5 mg kg-1, i.p.). 3 Atropine (5 mg kg-1, i.p.) which totally antagonized oxotremorine (40 micrograms kg-1, s.c.) antinociception did not modify morphine (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) or baclofen (4 mg kg-1, s.c.) antinociception. On the other hand, hemicholinium, which antagonized local anaesthetic antinociception, did not prevent oxotremorine, morphine or baclofen antinociception. 4 Intracerebroventricular injection in mice of procaine (200 micrograms), lignocaine (150 microgram) and bupivacaine (25 micrograms), doses which were largely ineffective by parenteral routes, induced an antinociception whose intensity equalled that obtainable subcutaneously. Moreover, the i.c.v. injection of antinociceptive doses did not impair performance on the rota-rod test. 5 Concentrations below 10(-10) M of procaine, lignocaine and bupivacaine did not evoke any response on the isolated longitudinal muscle strip of guinea-pig ileum, or modify acetylcholine (ACh)-induced contractions. On the other hand, they always increased electrically-evoked twitches. 6 The same concentrations of local anaesthetics which induced antinociception did not inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in vitro. 7 On the basis of the above findings and the existing literature, a facilitation of cholinergic transmission by the local anaesthetics is postulated; this could be due to blockade of presynaptic muscarinic receptors.

  9. Assessment of Mechanisms Involved in Antinociception Produced by the Alkaloid Caulerpine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Agra Cavalcante-Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works we showed that oral administration of caulerpine, a bisindole alkaloid isolated from algae of the genus Caulerpa, produced antinociception when assessed in chemical and thermal models of nociception. In this study, we evaluated the possible mechanism of action of this alkaloid in mice, using the writhing test. The antinociceptive effect of caulerpine was not affected by intraperitoneal (i.p. pretreatment of mice with naloxone, flumazenil, l-arginine or atropine, thus discounting the involvement of the opioid, GABAergic, l-arginine-nitric oxide and (muscarinic cholinergic pathways, respectively. In contrast, i.p. pretreatment with yohimbine, an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, or tropisetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, significantly blocked caulerpine-induced antinociception. These results suggest that caulerpine exerts its antinociceptive effect in the writhing test via pathways involving α2-adrenoceptors and 5-HT3 receptors. In summary, this alkaloid could be of interest in the development of new dual-action analgesic drugs.

  10. Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Posterior Insular Cortex Is Altered in Preclinical Models of Neuropathic Pain: Key Role of Muscarinic M2 Receptors in Donepezil-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrier, Jérémy; Bayet-Robert, Mathilde; Dalmann, Romain; El Guerrab, Abderrahim; Aissouni, Youssef; Graveron-Demilly, Danielle; Chalus, Maryse; Pinguet, Jérémy; Eschalier, Alain; Richard, Damien; Daulhac, Laurence; Balayssac, David

    2015-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is one of the most debilitating pain conditions, yet no therapeutic strategy has been really effective for its treatment. Hence, a better understanding of its pathophysiological mechanisms is necessary to identify new pharmacological targets. Here, we report important metabolic variations in brain areas involved in pain processing in a rat model of oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy using HRMAS 1H-NMR spectroscopy. An increased concentration of choline has been evidenced in the posterior insular cortex (pIC) of neuropathic animal, which was significantly correlated with animals' pain thresholds. The screening of 34 genes mRNA involved in the pIC cholinergic system showed an increased expression of the high-affinity choline transporter and especially the muscarinic M2 receptors, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis in oxaliplatin-treated rats and the spared nerve injury model (SNI). Furthermore, pharmacological activation of M2 receptors in the pIC using oxotremorine completely reversed oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistently, systemic treatment with donepezil, a centrally active acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, prevented and reversed oxaliplatin-induced cold and mechanical allodynia as well as social interaction impairment. Intracerebral microdialysis revealed a lower level of acetylcholine in the pIC of oxaliplatin-treated rats, which was significantly increased by donepezil. Finally, the analgesic effect of donepezil was markedly reduced by a microinjection of the M2 antagonist, methoctramine, within the pIC, in both oxaliplatin-treated rats and spared nerve injury rats. These findings highlight the crucial role of cortical cholinergic neurotransmission as a critical mechanism of neuropathic pain, and suggest that targeting insular M2 receptors using central cholinomimetics could be used for neuropathic pain treatment. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Our study describes a decrease in cholinergic neurotransmission in the posterior insular

  11. Peripheral Antinociception Induced by Aripiprazole Is Mediated by the Opioid System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Cristina Mendes Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aripiprazole is an antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia and related disorders. Our previous study showed that this compound also induces antinociceptive effects. The present study aimed to assess the participation of the opioid system in this effect. Methods. Male Swiss mice were submitted to paw pressure test and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 2 μg. Aripiprazole was injected 10 min before the measurement. Naloxone, clocinnamox, naltrindole, nor-binaltorphimine, and bestatin were given 30 min before aripiprazole. Nociceptive thresholds were measured in the 3rd hour after PGE2 injection. Results. Aripiprazole (100 μg/paw injected locally into the right hind paw induced an antinociceptive effect that was blocked by naloxone (50 μg/paw, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist. The role of μ-, δ-, and κ-opioid receptors was investigated using the selective antagonists, clocinnamox (40 μg/paw, naltrindole (15, 30, and 60 μg/paw, and nor-binaltorphimine (200 μg/paw, respectively. The data indicated that only the δ-opioid receptor antagonist inhibited the peripheral antinociception induced by aripiprazole. Bestatin (400 μg, an aminopeptidase-N inhibitor, significantly enhanced low-dose (25 μg/paw aripiprazole-induced peripheral antinociception. Conclusion. The results suggest the participation of the opioid system via δ-opioid receptor in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by aripiprazole.

  12. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mohd. Sani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test and thermal (hot plate test models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P<0.05 antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO donor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS, methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway, or their combination also caused significant (P<0.05 change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway.

  13. The endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago R L; Silva, José Felipe P; Aguiar, Daniele C; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader S; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor D; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced antinociception is widely described in the literature, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Systemic (s.c.) and central (i.t., i.c.v.) pretreatment with CB₁ and CB₂ cannabinoid receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630) blocked the antinociception induced by an aerobic exercise (AE) protocol in both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests. Western blot analysis revealed an increase and activation of CB₁ receptors in the rat brain, and immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increase of activation and expression of CB₁ receptors in neurons of the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) after exercise. Additionally, pretreatment (s.c., i.t. and i.c.v.) with endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors (MAFP and JZL184) and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor (VDM11) prolonged and intensified this antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that exercise could activate the endocannabinoid system, producing antinociception. Supporting this hypothesis, liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry measurements demonstrated that plasma levels of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and of anandamide-related mediators (palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide) were increased after AE. Therefore, these results suggest that the endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception at peripheral and central levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tingenone, a pentacyclic triterpene, induces peripheral antinociception due to opioidergic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Clarice de Carvalho; Rodrigues, Vanessa Gregório; Ferreira, Renata Cristina Mendes; Duarte, Lucienir Pains; Klein, Andre; Duarte, Igor Dimitri; Romero, Thiago Roberto Lima; Perez, Andrea de Castro

    2014-11-01

    Plants belonging to the genus Maytenus are routinely used in folk medicine for the treatment of pain diseases. Our previous phytochemical study of the roots of Maytenus imbricata resulted in the isolation and characterization of tingenone, a pentacyclic triterpene. Natural triterpenoids are of growing interest because they have several biological activities, including analgesic properties. The present study assessed the involvement of the opiodergic pathway in the tingenone-induced antinociceptive effect against hyperalgesia induced by prostaglandin E2 (2 µg) in the peripheral pathway. We evaluated the effect of several antagonists to opioid receptors using the mouse paw pressure test. Tingenone administered into the right hind paw induced a local antinociceptive effect that was antagonized by naloxone, a nonselective antagonist to opioid receptors. Clocinnamox, naltrindole, and nor-binaltorphimine are selective antagonists to µ, δ, and κ receptors, respectively, which reverted the peripheral antinociception induced by tingenone. Bestatine acts as an inhibitor of aminopeptidase, an enzyme that degrades endogenous opioid peptides, and was shown to intensify the antinociceptive effect of tingenone. The results suggest that the opioidergic system participates in the peripheral antinociception induced by tingenone. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Antidepressant, Anxiolytic and Antinociceptive Activities of Constituents from Rosmarinus Officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhalim, Abeer; Karim, Nasiara; Chebib, Mary; Aburjai, Talal; Khan, Imran; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Rosmarinus officinalis, traditionally known as rosemary, has been widely used in traditional medicines and has long been known as the herb of remembrance. However, few studies have investigated the effects of non-volatile components of rosemary on central nervous system function. Fractionation of R. officinalis led to the isolation of salvigenin, rosmanol and cirsimaritin, which were investigated in mouse models of acute toxicity, antinociception (tail immersion and hot plate tests), depression (tail suspension and forced swim tests) and anxiety (elevated plus maze and light/dark box paradigms). Rosmanol, cirsimaritin and salvigenin were not found to exhibit any signs of acute toxicity (50-200 mg/kg), but elicited antinociceptive, antidepressant and anxiolytic activities. Rosmanol, cirsimaritin and salvigenin, all previously shown to have biphasic modulation of GABAA receptors, demonstrated CNS activity in mouse models of antinociception, antidepressant and anxiolysis. The anxiolytic activity of all three compounds was not ameliorated by flumazenil, but was inhibited by pentylenetetrazol, suggesting a mode of action via GABAA receptors at a site other than the high affinity benzodiazepine binding site. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  16. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, B; van Bladel, E R; van Hamersveld, M; Pasker-de Jong, P C M; Korporaal, S J A; Urbanus, R T; Roest, M; Boven, L A; Fijnheer, R

    2017-11-01

    Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric evaluation of platelet function might aid the clinician in identifying patients at risk of bleeding. This evaluation can be performed within the hour and is not hampered by low platelet count. Our objective was to assess a possible correlation between bleeding and platelet function in thrombocytopenic haemato-oncological patients. Inclusion was possible for admitted haemato-oncology patients aged 18 years and above. Furthermore, an expected need for platelet transfusions was necessary. Bleeding was graded according to the WHO bleeding scale. Platelet reactivity to stimulation by either adenosine diphosphate (ADP), cross-linked collagen-related peptide (CRP-xL), PAR1- or PAR4-activating peptide (AP) was measured using flow cytometry. A total of 114 evaluations were available from 21 consecutive patients. Platelet reactivity in response to stimulation by all four studied agonists was inversely correlated with significant bleeding. Odds ratios (OR) for bleeding were 0·28 for every unit increase in median fluorescence intensity (MFI) [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·11-0·73] for ADP; 0·59 [0·40-0·87] for CRP-xL; 0·59 [0·37-0·94] for PAR1-AP; and 0·43 [0·23-0·79] for PAR4-AP. The platelet count was not correlated with bleeding (OR 0·99 [0·96-1·02]). Agonist-induced platelet reactivity was significantly correlated to bleeding. Platelet function testing could provide a basis for a personalized transfusion regimen, in which platelet transfusions are limited to those at risk of bleeding. © 2017 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  17. Evaluation of antinociceptive effects of Tragia plukenetii: A possible mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Sama; Fatima, Saba

    2013-01-01

    Tragia plukenetii R.Smith. (Euphorbiaceae) is an erect, prostate herb with sparsely hispid stinging hairs. In the present study, ethanolic extract and its fractions of T. plukenetii aerial parts were evaluated for antinociceptive and central nervous system (CNS) depressant effects. Among all the extracts, chloroform extract has produced significant analgesic activity at a test dose of 250 mg/kg in acetic acid induced writhing test and Eddy's hotplate test. The analgesic effect of chloroform extract (68.83% inhibition) is comparable with aspirin (72.09% inhibition) in acetic acid induced writhing test. Chloroform extract significantly increased the latency time in hotplate test. In the study of CNS depressant effect, the chloroform extract was found to produce a significant (P < 0.01) reduction of the exploratory capacity and depressant effect in locomotor activity. From the point of CNS depressant and good protective effect on chemical and thermal pain stimuli, indicates that T. plukenetii chloroform extract may have morphinomimetic properties. The naloxone is not able to alter the T. plukenetii induced antinociceptive effect in writhing and hotplate test. Thus, the observed antinociceptive activity of T. plukenetii might have resulted from the activation of peripheral receptors. PMID:24501531

  18. Antinociceptive effect of Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hot water at 550C was used to determine the nociceptive responses of the animals to detect anti-nociceptive effects of Pleurotus ostreatus extracts as compared to the control in hot water inflicted pain. The results suggested that Pleurotus ostreatus aqueous extract exhibits antinociceptive properties against thermal stimulus ...

  19. Anti-nociceptive effect of stigmasterol in mouse models of acute and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Cristiani Isabel Banderó; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Tonello, Raquel; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; da Silva Brum, Evelyne; Ferreira, Juliano; Trevisan, Gabriela

    2017-08-18

    Stigmasterol is a common sterol found in plants, but the anti-nociceptive effect of this compound and its mechanism of action are not fully explored. Thus, in the present study, the anti-nociceptive effect of stigmasterol was investigated in acute and chronic models of pain and its mechanism of action. We used adult male albino Swiss mice (25-35 g) to observe the anti-nociceptive effect of stigmasterol in acetic-acid writhing test or in complete Freund's adjuvant injection, surgical incision in hind paw, or partial sciatic nerve ligation. Moreover, we investigate the involvement of opioid receptors (naloxone, 2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) in stigmasterol anti-nociceptive effect and stigmasterol action on acetylcholinesterase activity. Some possible adverse effects caused by stigmasterol were also investigated. Stigmasterol (0.3-3 mg/kg, orally) exhibited an anti-nociceptive effect on acetic-acid-induced writhing test. Furthermore, it markedly attenuated the mechanical allodynia caused by surgical incision (after acute treatment with stigmasterol, preventive and curative effects were observed) and partial sciatic nerve ligation (after acute treatment with stigmasterol) and complete Freund's adjuvant (after acute or repeated treatment with stigmasterol). The anti-nociceptive effect of stigmasterol was not reversed by naloxone. Moreover, stigmasterol did not alter in vitro acetylcholinesterase activity in spinal cord or brain samples. Also, stigmasterol did not cause gastric ulcers or alter the gastrointestinal transit of mice. Taken together, these results support the potential anti-nociceptive effect of stigmasterol in different models of pain.

  20. Differential effects of whole-body {gamma}-irradiation on antinociception induced by morphine and {beta}-endorphin administered intracerebroventricularly in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, K.M.; Park, T.W.

    2000-05-01

    Two separate lines of evidence suggested the present study. First, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered morphine (a {mu}-opioid receptor agonist) and {beta}-endorphin (an {epsilon}-opioid receptor agonist) produce antinociception by activating different descending pain inhibitory systems. Second, {gamma}-irradiation attenuates the acute antinociceptive action of i.c.v. injected morphine, but not DPLPE (a {delta}-opioid receptor agonist), in mice. These findings prompted us to investigate the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the antinociception produced by i.c.v. injected morphine and {beta}-endorphin in male ICR mice. In one group, mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation at a dose of 5 Gy from a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-source and the antinociceptive effects were tested 5, 30, 60,90 and 180 min after irradiation using the 1% acetic acid-induced writhing test (10 ml/kg). The antinociceptive effect was produced time-dependently and reached its maximum at 90 min after irradiation. Thus, time was fixed in the following studies. In another group, mice were irradiated with 5 Gy and tested 90 minutes later for antinociception produced by i.c.v. administration of morphine (50 and 100 ng/mouse) or {beta}-endorphin (31 ng/mouse). Irradiation significantly potentiated the antinociception produced by {beta}-endorphin. However, the antinociception produced by morphine was not affected by irradiation. These results demonstrate a differential sensitivity of {mu}- and {epsilon}-opioid receptors to {gamma}-irradiation, in addition, support the hypothesis that morphine and {beta}-endorphin administered supraspinally produce antinociception by different neuronal mechanisms. (author)

  1. Antinociceptive activity of methanolic extract of Muntingia calabura leaves: further elucidation of the possible mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin; Mohd Sani, Mohd Hijaz; Cheema, Manraj Singh; Kader, Arifah Abdul; Kek, Teh Lay; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2014-02-20

    Muntingia calabura (Elaecoparceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used, particularly, by the Peruvian people to alleviate headache and cold, pain associated with gastric ulcers or to reduce the prostate gland swelling. Following the recent establishment of antinociceptive activity of M. calabura leaf, the present study was performed to further elucidate on the possible mechanisms of antinociception involved. The methanol extract of M. calabura (MEMC) was prepared in the doses of 100, 250 and 500 mg/kg. The role of bradykinin, protein kinase C, pottasium channels, and various opioid and non-opioid receptors in modulating the extract's antinociceptive activity was determined using several antinociceptive assays. Results are presented as Mean ± standard error of mean (SEM). The one-way ANOVA test with Dunnett's multiple comparison was used to analyze and compare the data, with P opioid receptors (namely 10 mg/kg β-funaltrexamine, 1 mg/kg naltrindole and 1 mg/kg nor-binaltorphimine), and the non-opioid receptor antagonists (namely 3 mg/kg caffeine (a non-selective adenosinergic receptor antagonist), 0.15 mg/kg yohimbine (an α2-noradrenergic antagonist), and 1 mg/kg pindolol (a β-adrenoceptor antagonist)) significantly (p opioid (particularly the μ-, δ- and κ-opioid) and non-opioid (particularly adenosinergic, α2-noradrenergic, and β-adrenergic) receptors, modulation of the ATP-sensitive K+ channel, and inhibition of bradikinin and protein kinase C actions. The discrepancies in MEMC antinociception could be due to the presence of various phytochemicals.

  2. Nitrous oxide produces antinociceptive response via alpha2B and/or alpha2C adrenoceptor subtypes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, T Z; Davies, M F; Kingery, W S; Patterson, A J; Limbird, L E; Maze, M

    1999-02-01

    Opiate receptors in the periaqueductal gray region and alpha2 adrenoceptors in the spinal cord of the rat mediate the antinociceptive properties of nitrous oxide (N2O). The availability of genetically altered mice facilitates the detection of the precise protein species involved in the transduction pathway. In this study, the authors establish the similarity between rats and mice in the antinociceptive action of N2O and investigate which alpha2 adrenoceptor subtypes mediate this response. After obtaining institutional approval, antinociceptive dose-response and time-course to N2O was measured in wild-type and transgenic mice (D79N), with a nonfunctional alpha2A adrenoceptor using tail-flick latency. The antinociceptive effect of N2O was tested after pretreatment systemically with yohimbine (nonselective alpha2 antagonist), naloxone (opiate antagonist), L659,066 (peripheral alpha2-antagonist) and prazosin (alpha2B- and alpha2C-selective antagonist). The tail-flick latency to dexmedetomidine (D-med), a nonselective alpha2 agonist, was tested in wild-type and transgenic mice. N2O produced antinociception in both D79N transgenic and wild-type litter mates, although the response was less pronounced in the transgenic mice. Antinociception from N2O decreased over time with continuing exposure, and the decrement was more pronounced in the transgenic mice. The antinociceptive response could be dose dependently antagonized by opiate receptor and selective alpha2B-/alpha2C-receptor antagonists but not by a central nervous system-impermeant alpha2 antagonist (L659,066). Whereas dexmedetomidine exhibited no antinociceptive response in the D79N mice, the robust antinociceptive response in the wild-type litter mates could not be blocked by a selective alpha2B-/alpha2C-receptor antagonist. These data confirm that the antinociceptive response to an exogenous alpha2-agonist is mediated by an alpha2A adrenoceptor and that there appears to be a role for the alpha2B- or alpha2C

  3. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shen

    Full Text Available Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid

  4. Central Antinociceptive and Mechanism of Action of Pereskia bleo Kunth Leaves Crude Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhon, Carolina Carvalho; Abdul Wahab, Ikarastika Rahayu; Boylan, Fabio; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2015-01-01

    Pereskia bleo (Kunth) DC. (Cactaceae) is a plant commonly used in popular medicine in Malaysia. In this work, we evaluate the antinociceptive effect of P. bleo leaf extracts and isolated compounds in central antinociceptive model. Ethanol extract (E), hexane (H), ethyl acetate (EA), or butanol (B) fractions (30, 50, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), sitosterol (from hexane) and vitexin (from ethyl acetate), were administered to mice. Antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate and capsaicin- or glutamate-induced licking models. Morphine (1 mg/kg, p.o.) was used as reference drug. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p.), atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg, i.p.) were administered 30 min earlier (100 mg/kg, p.o.) in order to evaluate the mechanism of the antinociceptive action. Higher dose of B developed an effect significantly superior to morphine-treated group. Naloxone prevented the antinociceptive effect of all fractions. L-NAME demonstrated effect against E, EA, and B. In all fractions, sitosterol and vitexin reduced the licking time after capsaicin injection. Glutamate-induced licking response was blocked by H, EA, and B. Our results indicate that Pereskia bleo fractions, sitosterol and vitexin, possessed a central antinociceptive effect. Part of this effect is mediated by opioid receptors and nitrergic pathway. PMID:26273315

  5. Central Antinociceptive and Mechanism of Action of Pereskia bleo Kunth Leaves Crude Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Carvalho Guilhon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pereskia bleo (Kunth DC. (Cactaceae is a plant commonly used in popular medicine in Malaysia. In this work, we evaluate the antinociceptive effect of P. bleo leaf extracts and isolated compounds in central antinociceptive model. Ethanol extract (E, hexane (H, ethyl acetate (EA, or butanol (B fractions (30, 50, or 100 mg/kg, p.o., sitosterol (from hexane and vitexin (from ethyl acetate, were administered to mice. Antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate and capsaicin- or glutamate-induced licking models. Morphine (1 mg/kg, p.o. was used as reference drug. Naloxone (1 mg/kg, i.p., atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p., and L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 3 mg/kg, i.p. were administered 30 min earlier (100 mg/kg, p.o. in order to evaluate the mechanism of the antinociceptive action. Higher dose of B developed an effect significantly superior to morphine-treated group. Naloxone prevented the antinociceptive effect of all fractions. L-NAME demonstrated effect against E, EA, and B. In all fractions, sitosterol and vitexin reduced the licking time after capsaicin injection. Glutamate-induced licking response was blocked by H, EA, and B. Our results indicate that Pereskia bleo fractions, sitosterol and vitexin, possessed a central antinociceptive effect. Part of this effect is mediated by opioid receptors and nitrergic pathway.

  6. Antinociceptive Effect of the Essential Oil from Croton conduplicatus Kunth (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimundo Gonçalves de Oliveira Júnior

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants have been widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. In this study, we describe the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from Croton conduplicatus (the EO 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg, i.p., a medicinal plant native to Brazil. Antinociceptive activity was investigated by measuring the nociception induced by acetic acid, formalin, hot plate and carrageenan. A docking study was performed with the major constituents of the EO (E-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, and camphor. The EO reduced nociceptive behavior at all doses tested in the acetic acid-induced nociception test (p < 0.05. The same was observed in both phases (neurogenic and inflammatory of the formalin test. When the hot-plate test was conducted, the EO (50 mg/kg extended the latency time after 60 min of treatment. The EO also reduced leukocyte migration at all doses, suggesting that its antinociceptive effect involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. Pretreatment with glibenclamide and atropine reversed the antinociceptive effect of the EO on the formalin test, suggesting the involvement of KATP channels and muscarinic receptors. The docking study revealed a satisfactory interaction profile between the major components of the EO and the different muscarinic receptor subtypes (M2, M3, and M4. These results corroborate the medicinal use of C. conduplicatus in folk medicine.

  7. An ER? agonist induces browning of subcutaneous abdominal fat pad in obese female mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yi-fei Miao; Wen Su; Yu-bing Dai; Wan-fu Wu; Bo Huang; Barros, Rodrigo P. A.; Hao Nguyen; Laure Maneix; You-fei Guan; Margaret Warner; Jan-Åke Gustafsson

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen, via estrogen receptor alpha (ER?), exerts several beneficial effects on metabolism and energy homeostasis by controlling size, enzymatic activity and hormonal content of adipose tissue. The actions of estrogen on sympathetic ganglia, which are key players in the browning process, are less well known. In the present study we show that ER? influences browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) via its actions both on sympathetic ganglia and on the SAT itself. A 3-day-treatment with ...

  8. Functionally Selective Signaling for Morphine and Fentanyl Antinociception and Tolerance Mediated by the Rat Periaqueductal Gray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Michael M.; Reid, Rachel A.; Saville, Kimber A.

    2014-01-01

    Functionally selective signaling appears to contribute to the variability in mechanisms that underlie tolerance to the antinociceptive effects of opioids. The present study tested this hypothesis by examining the contribution of G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)/Protein kinase C (PKC) and C-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation on both the expression and development of tolerance to morphine and fentanyl microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray of the rat. Microinjection of morphine or fentanyl into the periaqueductal gray produced a dose-dependent increase in hot plate latency. Microinjection of the non-specific GRK/PKC inhibitor Ro 32-0432 into the periaqueductal gray to block mu-opioid receptor phosphorylation enhanced the antinociceptive effect of morphine but had no effect on fentanyl antinociception. Microinjection of the JNK inhibitor SP600125 had no effect on morphine or fentanyl antinociception, but blocked the expression of tolerance to repeated morphine microinjections. In contrast, a microinjection of Ro 32-0432 blocked the expression of fentanyl, but not morphine tolerance. Repeated microinjections of Ro 32-0432 blocked the development of morphine tolerance and inhibited fentanyl antinociception whether rats were tolerant or not. Repeated microinjections of SP600125 into the periaqueductal gray blocked the development of tolerance to both morphine and fentanyl microinjections. These data demonstrate that the signaling molecules that contribute to tolerance vary depending on the opioid and methodology used to assess tolerance (expression vs. development of tolerance). This signaling difference is especially clear for the expression of tolerance in which JNK contributes to morphine tolerance and GRK/PKC contributes to fentanyl tolerance. PMID:25503060

  9. Toxicity and antinociceptive effects of Hamelia patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Josabad Alonso-Castro

    Full Text Available Abstract Many medicinal herbs are used in folk medicine without taking into account their toxicity. Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae, a Mexican endemic species, is used for the empirical treatment of pain. The aim of this work was to evaluate the toxicity and antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extracts of H. patens leaves. The toxicity of H. patens leaves (500–5000 mg/kg was evaluated in acute (14 days and subacute (28 days assays. In the subacute assay, a blood analysis (both hematology and chemistry was carried out. The antinociceptive effects of H. patens leaves (50–200 mg/kg were evaluated using thermal-induced nociception (hot plate and the chemical-induced nociceptive tests (acid acetic and formalin. In the acute toxicity test, the LD50 estimated for H. patens leaves was 2964 mg/kg i.p. and >5000 mg/kg p.o., whereas in the subacute test HPE did not affect hematological or biochemical parameters. In chemical-induced nociception models, H. patens (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. showed antinociceptive effects with similar activity than 100 mg/kg naproxen. In the hot plate test, HPE at 100 mg/kg (17% and 200 mg/kg (25% showed moderate antinociceptive effects. HPE could be a good source of antinociceptive agents because of its good activity and low toxicity.

  10. Mechanisms involved in antinociception induced by a polysulfated fraction from seaweed Gracilaria cornea in the temporomandibular joint of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Vieira, Lorena Vasconcelos; Silveira, Felipe Dantas; Dos Santos Lopes, Fernanda Maxcynne Lino; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2017-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorder is a common clinical condition involving pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. This study assessed the antinociceptive effects of a polysulfated fraction from the red seaweed Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) on the formalin-induced TMJ hypernociception in rats and investigated the involvement of different mechanisms. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with injection (sc) of saline or Gc-FI 1h before intra- TMJ injection of formalin to evaluate the nociception. The results showed that pretreatment with Gc-FI significantly reduced formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was blocked by naloxone (a non-selective opioid antagonist), suggesting the involvement of opioids selective receptors. Thus, the pretreatment with selective opioids receptors antagonists, reversed the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI in the TMJ. The Gc-FI antinociceptive effect depends on the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP/protein kinase G/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (NO/cGMP/PKG/K(+)ATP) pathway because it was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase enzyme, PKG and a K(+)ATP blocker. In addition, after inhibition with a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was not observed. Collectively, these data suggest that the antinociceptive effect induced by Gc-FI is mediated by μ/δ/κ-opioid receptors and by activation NO/cGMP/PKG/K(+)ATP channel pathway, besides of HO-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Blood-brain transfer and antinociception of linear and cyclic N-methyl-guanidine and thiourea-enkephalins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeken, Mathieu; Wynendaele, Evelien; Mauchauffee, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Enkephalins are active in regulation of nociception in the body and are key in development of new synthetic peptide analogs that target centrally located opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated the in vivo blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetration behavior and antinociceptive activity of two...

  12. Suppression of adrenal gland-derived epinephrine enhances the corticosterone-induced antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S Y; Roh, D H; Kim, H W; Han, H J; Beitz, A J; Lee, J H

    2014-05-01

    There is both clinical and experimental evidence to support the application of corticosterone in the management of inflammation and pain. Corticosterone has been used to treat painful inflammatory diseases and can produce antinociceptive effects. Epinephrine is synthesized from norepinephrine by the enzyme phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) and works as an endogenous adrenoceptor ligand secreted peripherally by the adrenal medulla. It is currently unclear whether corticosterone's antinociceptive effect is associated with the modulation of peripheral epinephrine. We first determined whether exogenous corticosterone treatment actually produced an antinociceptive effect in a formalin-induced pain model, and then examined whether this corticosterone-induced antinociceptive effect was altered by suppression of adrenal-derived epinephrine, using the following three suppression methods: (1) inhibition of the PNMT enzyme; (2) blocking peripheral epinephrine receptors; and (3) adrenalectomy. Exogenous treatment with corticosterone at a high dose (50 mg/kg), but not at lower doses (5, 25 mg/kg), significantly reduced pain responses in the late phase. Moreover, injection of 2,3-dichloro-a-methylbenzylamine, a PNMT enzyme inhibitor, (10 mg/kg) before corticosterone treatment caused a leftward shift in the dose-response curve for corticosterone and injection of propranolol (5 mg/kg), but not phentolamine, also shifted the dose-response curve to the left during the late phase. Chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine had no effect on corticosterone-induced antinociceptive effect, but injection of a low dose of corticosterone produced an antinociceptive effect in adrenalectomized animals. These results demonstrate that suppression of epinephrine, derived from adrenal gland, enhances the antinociceptive effect of exogenous corticosterone treatment in an inflammatory pain model. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  13. Do Diuretics have Antinociceptive Actions: Studies of Spironolactone, Eplerenone, Furosemide and Chlorothiazide, Individually and with Oxycodone and Morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokinen, Viljami; Lilius, Tuomas; Laitila, Jouko; Niemi, Mikko; Kambur, Oleg; Kalso, Eija; Rauhala, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Spironolactone, eplerenone, chlorothiazide and furosemide are diuretics that have been suggested to have antinociceptive properties, for example via mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism. In co-administration, diuretics might enhance the antinociceptive effect of opioids via pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Effects of spironolactone (100 mg/kg, i.p.), eplerenone (100 mg/kg, i.p.), chlorothiazide (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and furosemide (100 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied on acute oxycodone (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.)- and morphine (3 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced antinociception using tail-flick and hot plate tests in male Sprague Dawley rats. The diuretics were administered 30 min. before the opioids, and behavioural tests were performed 30 and 90 min. after the opioids. Concentrations of oxycodone, morphine and their major metabolites in plasma and brain were quantified by mass spectrometry. In the hot plate test at 30 and 90 min., spironolactone significantly enhanced the antinociceptive effect (% of maximum possible effect) of oxycodone from 10% to 78% and from 0% to 50%, respectively, and that of morphine from 12% to 73% and from 4% to 83%, respectively. The brain oxycodone and morphine concentrations were significantly increased at 30 min. (oxycodone, 46%) and at 90 min. (morphine, 190%). We did not detect any independent antinociceptive effects with the diuretics. Eplerenone and chlorothiazide did not enhance the antinociceptive effect of either opioid. The results suggest that spironolactone enhances the antinociceptive effect of both oxycodone and morphine by increasing their concentrations in the central nervous system. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  14. Antinociceptive activity of novel amide derivatives of imidazolidine-2,4-dione in a mouse model of acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czopek, Anna; Sałat, Kinga; Byrtus, Hanna; Rychtyk, Joanna; Pawłowski, Maciej; Siwek, Agata; Soluch, Joanna; Mureddu, Valentina; Filipek, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Antiepileptic drugs are commonly used in non-epileptic disorders. For example, phenytoin and levetiracetam demonstrate analgesic properties in rodent models of pain. In order to enhance their antinociceptive activity, structural features of phenytoin and levetiracetam, such as imidazolidine-2,4-dione and amide bond in alkyl chain, were combined in one molecule. Furthermore, in preliminary studies, methoxyphenylpiperazinpropyl derivatives of imidazolidine-2,4-dione acted as antinociceptive agents in several rodent models of acute pain. The final compounds and the reference drugs - levetiracetam and phenytoin were evaluated in the hot plate test to assess their antinociceptive activity in this acute pain model. Furthermore, for the analgesic active compounds the impact on animals' locomotor activity and motor performance were estimated and the affinity to serotonergic (5-HT1A, 5-HT7) and adrenergic (α1) receptors was determined. Three of the tested compounds: 7, 15 and 18 showed statistically significant antinociceptive properties at the dose of 30mg/kg. Among them, compound 18, 1-methyl-3-[1-(morpholin-4-yl)-1-oxobutan-2-yl]imidazolidine-2,4-dione, exhibited the most significant and long-lasting antinociceptive activity. Noteworthy, this activity was not associated with a negative effect on animals' motor functions. Serotonergic or adrenergic neurotransmission is not involved in this antinociceptive effect. Some amide derivatives of imidazolidine-2,4-diones possess antinociceptive properties in mice but further studies are needed to explain their mechanism of action and assess their toxicity. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  15. Study the Antinociceptive Effect of Intracerebroventricular Injection of Aqueous Extract of Origanum Vulgare Leaves in Rat: Possible Involvement of Opioid System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavan, Yasaman; Sepehri, Gholamreza; Sheibani, Vahid; Afarinesh khaki, Mohammadreza; Gojazadeh, Morteza; Pahlavan, Bahare; Pahlavan, Fereshteh

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of study was to investigate the antinociceptive effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV) microinjection of Origanum vulgare (ORG) extract and possible involvement of opioid receptors. Materials and Methods: Cannula was inserted into left ventricle of male rats. Five days after surgery Tail Flick Latency (TFL) was measured after ICV microinjection of, ORG (1, 3 and 6 µg / rat). Effective dose of ORG was injected ICV in concomitant with morphine (2 mg/kg, IP), naloxone (2 mg / kg, IP) and saline (0.5 µl/rat) and TFL was recorded. Results: The co- administration of ORG extract with morphine showed a significant increase in TFL and naloxone, pretreatment significantly inhibited the antinociceptive activity of ORG and morphine. Conclusion: The aqueous extract of ORG possesses antinociceptive activities in the tail-flick test in a dose dependent manner. ORG - induced antinociception may have been mediated by opioid systems. PMID:24379969

  16. Antinociceptive Effect of Promethazine in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Farshchi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sThe present study was undertaken to investigate the nociception activity of promethazine, a tranquillizer devoid of hypnotic activity in mice.Materials and MethodsAntinociception was evaluated, using the acetic acid-induced writhing, tail flick, hot plate and formalin pain tests.ResultsPromethazine (4 and 6 mg/kg and acetylsalicylic acid (100 mg/kg produced a significant inhibition of the second phase response in the formalin pain model (P0.05 and administration of naloxone (0.1 mg/kg couldn't block the antinociceptive effect of promethazine.ConclusionThe data obtained suggest that antinociceptive effects of the promethazine may be mediated via peripheral and not central mechanisms.

  17. Differences in the Antinociceptive Effects and Binding Properties of Propranolol and Bupranolol Enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Loren J; Piltonen, Marjo H; Gauthier, Josee; Convertino, Marino; Acland, Erinn L; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Diatchenko, Luda; Maixner, William

    2015-12-01

    Recent efforts have suggested that the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) system may be a novel and viable therapeutic target for pain reduction; however, most of the work to date has focused on the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (AR). Here, we compared the antinociceptive effects of enantiomeric configurations of propranolol and bupranolol, two structurally similar nonselective β-blocking drugs, against mouse models of inflammatory and chronic pain. In addition, we calculated in silico docking and measured the binding properties of propranolol and bupranolol for all 3 β-ARs. Of the agents examined, S-bupranolol is superior in terms of its antinociceptive effect and exhibited fewer side effects than propranolol or its associated enantiomers. In contrast to propranolol, S-bupranolol exhibited negligible β-AR intrinsic agonist activity and displayed a full competitive antagonist profile at β(1)/β(2)/β(3)-ARs, producing a unique blockade of β(3)-ARs. We have shown that S-bupranolol is an effective antinociceptive agent in mice without negative side effects. The distinctive profile of S-bupranolol is most likely mediated by its negligible β-AR intrinsic agonist activity and unique blockade of β(3)-AR. These findings suggest that S-bupranolol instead of propranolol may represent a new and effective treatment for a variety of painful conditions. The S enantiomer of bupranolol, a β-receptor antagonist, shows greater antinociceptive efficacy and a superior preclinical safety profile and it should be considered as a unique β-adrenergic receptor compound to advance future clinical pain studies. Copyright © 2015 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An ERβ agonist induces browning of subcutaneous abdominal fat pad in obese female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yi-Fei; Su, Wen; Dai, Yu-Bing; Wu, Wan-Fu; Huang, Bo; Barros, Rodrigo P A; Nguyen, Hao; Maneix, Laure; Guan, You-Fei; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2016-12-06

    Estrogen, via estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), exerts several beneficial effects on metabolism and energy homeostasis by controlling size, enzymatic activity and hormonal content of adipose tissue. The actions of estrogen on sympathetic ganglia, which are key players in the browning process, are less well known. In the present study we show that ERβ influences browning of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) via its actions both on sympathetic ganglia and on the SAT itself. A 3-day-treatment with a selective ERβ agonist, LY3201, induced browning of SAT in 1-year-old obese WT and ERα(-/-) female mice. Browning was associated with increased expression of ERβ in the nuclei of neurons in the sympathetic ganglia, increase in tyrosine hydroxylase in both nerve terminals in the SAT and sympathetic ganglia neurons and an increase of β3-adrenoceptor in the SAT. LY3201 had no effect on browning in young female or male mice. In the case of young females browning was already maximal while in males there was very little expression of ERβ in the SAT and very little expression of the β3-adrenoceptor. The increase in both sympathetic tone and responsiveness of adipocytes to catecholamines reveals a novel role for ERβ in controlling browning of adipose tissue.

  19. α1 -AR agonist induced piloerection protects against the development of traction alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Andy; Shapiro, Jerry; Sinclair, Rodney; Kovacevic, Maja; McCoy, John

    2016-05-01

    Traction alopecia is hair loss that occurs after persistent pulling (e.g., during cosmetic procedures) on the roots of hair over time. Unlike plucking, which is painful, persistent pulling may go unnoticed until a patient presents with either bald spots or diffuse telogen shedding. Each hair follicle in the scalp contains an arrector pili muscle that, when contracted, erects the hair. The smooth muscle in the arrector pili expresses α1 adrenergic receptors (α1 -AR). As such, we hypothesized that contraction of the arrector pili muscle via an α1 -AR agonist would increase the threshold of force required to pluck hair during cosmetic procedures. Female subjects, ages 18-40, were recruited to study the effect of topically applied phenylephrine, a selective α1 -AR agonist, on epilation force and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures. In our blinded study, 80% of subjects demonstrated reduced shedding on days using phenylephrine compared to days using a placebo solution. The average reduction in hair loss was approximately 42%. In addition, the force threshold required for epilation increased by approximately 172% following topical phenylephrine application. To our knowledge this is the first study demonstrating the utility of α1 -AR agonists in the treatment of traction alopecia and hair shedding during cosmetic procedures. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mediation by the serotonergic system of U-50,488H-induced antinociception and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Begonia Yeeman.

    1989-01-01

    The antinociceptive action of U-50,488H, a selective {kappa}-opioid receptor agonist, was attenuated by serotonergic but not by noradrenergic receptor antagonists. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered U-50,488H was antagonized by more than two fold by i.c.v. administered pindolol, methysergide, mianserin, ketanserin, pirenperone or ICS-205,930. A similar degree of antagonism of U-50,488H (i.c.v.) was found after intrathecal (i.t.) treatments with pindolol, methysergide or ICS-205,930 but not with mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone. When U-50,488H and the antagonists were both given i.t., its antinociceptive action was attenuated by pindolol or methysergide, potentiated by mianserin, ketanserin or pirenperone and not affected by ICS-205,930. The release of serotonin was further studied directly by using a superfusion system. A naloxone reversible, concentration- and Ca{sup 2+}- dependent enhancement of release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin by U-50,488H was observed in spinal and brain tissues. Tolerance to the antinociceptive action of U-50,488H was induced in mice using slow release preparations of U-50,488H. Serotonergic receptor antagonists (pindolol or ketanserin) were co-administered with U-50,488H to test for their effects on the development of tolerance to U-50,488H.

  1. Changes in nociceptin/orphanin FQ levels in rat brain regions after acute and chronic cannabinoid treatment in conjunction with the development of antinociceptive tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulugol, Ahmet; Topuz, Ruhan D; Gunduz, Ozgur; Kizilay, Gulnur; Karadag, Hakan C

    2016-12-01

    It has been indicated that acute and chronic morphine administrations enhance nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) levels in the brain, which might play role in the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Accordingly, N/OFQ receptor (NOP) antagonists have been shown to prevent the development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine. Our aim is to observe whether cannabinoids, similarly to opioids, enhance N/OFQ levels in pain-related brain regions and whether antagonism of NOP receptors attenuates the development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of cannabinoids. Hot plate and Tail flick tests are used to assess the antinociceptive response in Sprague-Dawley rats. N/OFQ levels are measured in cortex, amygdala, hypothalamus, periaqueductal gray, nucleus raphe magnus and locus coeruleus of rat brains using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Within 9 days, animals became completely tolerant to the antinociceptive effect of the cannabinoid agonist WIN 55,212-2 (2, 4, 6 mg/kg, i.p.). Chronic administration of JTC-801, a NOP receptor antagonist, at a dose that exerted no effect on its own (1 mg/kg, i.p.), attenuated development of tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of WIN 55,212-2 (4 mg/kg, i.p.). Western blotting and immunohistochemistry results showed that N/OFQ levels significantly increased in amygdala, periaqueductal gray, nucleus raphe magnus and locus coeruleus of rat brains when WIN 55,212-2 was combined with JTC-801. We hypothesize that, similar to opioids, chronic cannabinoid + NOP antagonist administration may enhance N/OFQ levels and NOP receptor antagonism prevents development of tolerance to cannabinoid antinociception. © 2016 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  2. TRPV1 in Brain Is Involved in Acetaminophen-Induced Antinociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschalier, Alain; Zygmunt, Peter M.; Högestätt, Edward D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetaminophen, the major active metabolite of acetanilide in man, has become one of the most popular over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic agents, consumed by millions of people daily. However, its mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We have previously shown that acetaminophen is further metabolized to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z -eicosatetraenamide (AM404) by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the rat and mouse brain and that this metabolite is a potent activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in vitro. Pharmacological activation of TRPV1 in the midbrain periaqueductal gray elicits antinociception in rats. It is therefore possible that activation of TRPV1 in the brain contributes to the analgesic effect of acetaminophen. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen at an oral dose lacking hypolocomotor activity is absent in FAAH and TRPV1 knockout mice in the formalin, tail immersion and von Frey tests. This dose of acetaminophen did not affect the global brain contents of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and endocannabinoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of AM404 produced a TRPV1-mediated antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPV1 in the brain by intracerebroventricular capsazepine injection abolished the antinociceptive effect of oral acetaminophen in the same test. Conclusions This study shows that TRPV1 in brain is involved in the antinociceptive action of acetaminophen and provides a strategy for developing central nervous system active oral analgesics based on the coexpression of FAAH and TRPV1 in the brain. PMID:20862299

  3. TRPV1 in brain is involved in acetaminophen-induced antinociception.

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    Christophe Mallet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acetaminophen, the major active metabolite of acetanilide in man, has become one of the most popular over-the-counter analgesic and antipyretic agents, consumed by millions of people daily. However, its mechanism of action is still a matter of debate. We have previously shown that acetaminophen is further metabolized to N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z -eicosatetraenamide (AM404 by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH in the rat and mouse brain and that this metabolite is a potent activator of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV(1 in vitro. Pharmacological activation of TRPV(1 in the midbrain periaqueductal gray elicits antinociception in rats. It is therefore possible that activation of TRPV(1 in the brain contributes to the analgesic effect of acetaminophen. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that the antinociceptive effect of acetaminophen at an oral dose lacking hypolocomotor activity is absent in FAAH and TRPV(1 knockout mice in the formalin, tail immersion and von Frey tests. This dose of acetaminophen did not affect the global brain contents of prostaglandin E(2 (PGE(2 and endocannabinoids. Intracerebroventricular injection of AM404 produced a TRPV(1-mediated antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin test. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPV(1 in the brain by intracerebroventricular capsazepine injection abolished the antinociceptive effect of oral acetaminophen in the same test. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that TRPV(1 in brain is involved in the antinociceptive action of acetaminophen and provides a strategy for developing central nervous system active oral analgesics based on the coexpression of FAAH and TRPV(1 in the brain.

  4. CtBP1/BARS is an activator of phospholipase D1 necessary for agonist-induced macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yuki; Miwa, Noriko; Jahangeer, Saleem; Okada, Taro; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2009-05-06

    Vesicular trafficking such as macropinocytosis is a dynamic process that requires coordinated interactions between specialized proteins and lipids. A recent report suggests the involvement of CtBP1/BARS in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced macropinocytosis. Detailed mechanisms as to how lipid remodelling is regulated during macropinocytosis are still undefined. Here, we show that CtBP1/BARS is a physiological activator of PLD1 required in agonist-induced macropinocytosis. EGF-induced macropinocytosis was specifically blocked by 1-butanol but not by 2-butanol. In addition, stimulation of cells by serum or EGF resulted in the association of CtBP1/BARS with PLD1. Finally, CtBP1/BARS activated PLD1 in a synergistic manner with other PLD activators, including ADP-ribosylation factors as demonstrated by in vitro and intact cell systems. The present results shed light on the molecular basis of how the 'fission protein' CtBP1/BARS controls vesicular trafficking events including macropinocytosis.

  5. Antinociceptive potentiation of pethidine (demerol) by clomipramine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... late phase of formalin test compared to the vehicle treated animals. The combination of pethidine 5mg / kg and clomipramine 0.75mg / kg caused a highly significant antinociceptive effect (P<0.01) in the late phase of formalin test. Conclusion: This study demonstrates a marked reduction in the time spent in pain behaviour ...

  6. Antinociceptive effect of Pleurotus ostreatus (Oyster Mushroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    aqueous extracts and group five treated with 15 mg/kg Aspirin (a standard drug) as positive control. Hot water at 550C was used to determine the nociceptive responses of the animals to detect anti-nociceptive effects of Pleurotus ostreatus extracts as compared to the control in hot water inflicted pain. The results suggested ...

  7. Antinociceptive potential of Parkia platycephala Benth. in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AcOEt 50 mg/kg presented antinociceptive effect in the late phase of formalin test. These findings indicate that E.EtOH and F.AcOEt showed analgesic actions in diabetic rats. Key words: Parkia platycephala, diabetic neuropathy, tactile allodynia, ...

  8. Antinociceptive and antiulcer activities of Pycnanthus angolensis

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    Margaret Oluwatoyin Sofidiya

    Full Text Available AbstractPycnanthus angolensis (Welw Warb., Myristicaceae, is used in Nigeria folk medicine to treat complaints such as toothache, headache, sore throat, ulcers and wounds. The aim of the study was to investigate the antinociceptive and antiulcer activities of the stem bark extract of Pycnanthus angolensis. Acute toxicity was conducted with a single oral dose of 5 g/kg. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated in acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and tail immersion tests in mice while antiulcer activity was evaluated in ethanol and indomethacin-induced models in rats. In acetic acid-induced writhing test, the extract (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg, p.o., significantly reduced the number of writhes (46.75%, 57.28% and 75.69% respectively, compared to control. The extract significantly (p < 0.001 reduced the time spent in licking the hind paw at both phases, in formalin test. In tail immersion test, significant antinociceptive effect was only observed with the dose of 150 mg/kg, with peak effect at 90 min (43.38%. There is no significant change in the spontaneous locomotor activity of animals in the open field. The extract prevented the gastric ulceration caused by ethanol and indomethacin treatments compared to control. The results showed that P. angolensis extract possesses antinociceptive and antiulcer activities supporting the traditional use for relieving pain and ulcers.

  9. Repetitive stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors in vivo : Changes in receptor numbers, G-proteins and A1 receptor agonist-induced hypothermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman, Viktor; Keijser, Johannes; Luiten, Paul G. M.; Meerlo, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine is an important neuromodulator and neuroprotective molecule, which is produced in the brain as a function of neuronal activity, coupling energy expenditure to energy supply. Under conditions of increased need and reduced availability of energy, including hypoxia and prolonged wakefulness,

  10. The anti-nociceptive effect and the possible mechanism of acupoint stimulation caused by chemical irritants in the bee venom pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Sheng; Qu, Fang; He, Xiang; Liao, Dan; Kang, Shuang-Ming; Lu, Su-Jie

    2010-10-08

    Many studies have demonstrated the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of injecting bee venom (BV) into the Zusanli (ZSL) acupoint in rats. The present study was designed to determine whether the injection of other chemical irritants, such as formalin and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), into the ZSL acupoint can produce anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the BV pain model and to determine the possible mechanisms underlying these effects. First, the effects of injecting BV, formalin, CFA, or saline into the ZSL acupoint on intraplantar BV-induced persistent spontaneous pain, mechanical hyperalgesia, and inflammatory swelling of the injected paw were observed. BV, formalin, CFA, and saline injection into the ZSL acupoint significantly inhibited intraplantar BV-induced persistent spontaneous nociception (PSN) and mechanical hyperalgesia but had no effect on intraplantar BV-induced inflammatory swelling. Next, the effects of pretreatment with naloxone (5mg/kg, ip) or injection of 0.15% capsaicin into the ZSL acupoint on the anti-nociceptive effect of BV acupuncture (BVA) were observed. Pretreatment with naloxone had no effect on the BVA-induced anti-nociceptive effect, intraplantar BV-induced PSN, and mechanical hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with capsaicin produced partial blockage of the BVA-induced anti-nociceptive effect on PSN, but it had no effect on BVA-induced anti-nociception of mechanical hyperalgesia. These results suggest that (1) chemical irritant acupuncture produces the anti-nociceptive effect but not the anti-inflammatory effect in the BV pain model, and (2) chemical irritant acupuncture-induced analgesia is a common mechanism that is not specific to BV acupuncture. Our results also suggest that the BVA-induced anti-nociceptive mechanism is partially mediated by capsaicin-sensitive primary afferent fibers but not by endogenous mu opioid receptors in the BV pain model. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antinociceptive Effect of Intrathecal Microencapsulated Human Pheochromocytoma Cell in a Rat Model of Bone Cancer Pain

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    Xiao Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human pheochromocytoma cells, which are demonstrated to contain and release met-enkephalin and norepinephrine, may be a promising resource for cell therapy in cancer-induced intractable pain. Intrathecal injection of alginate-poly (l lysine-alginate (APA microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells leads to antinociceptive effect in a rat model of bone cancer pain, and this effect was blocked by opioid antagonist naloxone and alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine. Neurochemical changes of cerebrospinal fluid are in accordance with the analgesic responses. Taken together, these data support that human pheochromocytoma cell implant-induced antinociception was mediated by met-enkephalin and norepinephrine secreted from the cell implants and acting at spinal receptors. Spinal implantation of microencapsulated human pheochromocytoma cells may provide an alternative approach for the therapy of chronic intractable pain.

  12. Potentiation of Morphine-Induced Antinociception by Propranolol: The Involvement of Dopamine and GABA Systems

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    Elham A. Afify

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine is a major clinical problem which can be managed by co-administration of another drug. This study investigated the ability of propranolol to potentiate the antinociceptive action of morphine and the possible mechanisms underlying this effect. Antinociception was assessed in three nociceptive tests (thermal, hot plate, (visceral, acetic acid, and (inflammatory, formalin test in mice and quantified by measuring the percent maximum possible effect, the percent inhibition of acetic acid-evoked writhing response, and the area under the curve values of number of flinches for treated mice, respectively. The study revealed that propranolol (0.25–20 mg/Kg, IP administration did not produce analgesia in mice. However, 10 mg/Kg propranolol, enhanced the antinociceptive effect of sub-analgesic doses of morphine (0.2, 1, and 2 mg/Kg, IP in the three nociceptive tests. It also shifted the dose response curve of morphine to the left. The combined effect of propranolol and morphine was attenuated by haloperidol (D2 receptor antagonist, 1.5 mg/Kg, IP, and bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist, 2 mg/Kg, IP. Repeated daily administration of propranolol (10 mg/Kg, IP did not alter the nociceptive responses in the three pain tests, but it significantly potentiated morphine-induced antinociception in the hot plate, acetic acid-evoked writhing, and in the second phase of formalin tests. Together, the data suggest that a cross-talk exists between the opioidergic and adrenergic systems and implicate dopamine and GABA systems in this synergistic effect of morphine-propranolol combination. Propranolol may serve as an adjuvant therapy to potentiate the effect of opioid analgesics.

  13. Involvement of endogenous opioid peptides in the peripheral antinociceptive effect induced by the coffee specific diterpene kahweol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Luciana S; Romero, Thiago R L; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Caliari, Marcelo V; Azevedo, Adolfo O; Perez, Andréa C; Duarte, Igor D G

    2015-10-01

    Kahweol is a diterpene present in the oil derived from coffee beans. Although several pharmacological activities of kahweol are already well described in the literature, no study was done in order to assess the analgesic activity of this substance. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible peripheral antinociceptive effect of kahweol. Considering that the opioid peptides have been implicated in peripheral antinociception induced by non-opioidergic compounds, the present study also evaluated the endogenous opioids involvement in this effect. The rat paw pressure test was used, and hyperalgesia was induced by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (2μg/paw). All drugs were administered subcutaneously in the hindpaws of male Wistar rats. The expression of β-endorphin was examined by immunohistochemistry in the skin tissue samples of the plantar surface of rat right hindpaws. Intraplantar injection of kahweol (40 and 80μg) induced significant peripheral antinociception. The antinociceptive effect of kahweol was due to a local peripheral action because the higher dose (80μg/paw) did not produce any effect in the contralateral paw. The opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (50 and 100μg/paw) prevented action of kahweol (80μg/paw) and the aminopeptidases inhibitor bestatin (400μg/paw) potentiated the antinociceptive effect of kahweol (40μg/paw). Furthermore, kahweol treatment increased the intensity of β-endorphin immunoreactivity in the epithelium of rat paws. The results discussed here provide evidence that kahweol treatment has peripheral antinociceptive effect and suggest that this effect is mediated by the release of endogenous opioids. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  14. Ascending nociceptive control contributes to the antinociceptive effect of acupuncture in a rat model of acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldini, Glaucia; Aisengart, Betina; Lima, Marcelo M S; Tambeli, Claudia H; Fischer, Luana

    2014-04-01

    Acupuncture-induced analgesia depends on the activation of endogenous pain modulation pathways. In this study, we asked whether ascending nociceptive control (ANC), a form of pain-induced analgesia, contributes to the antinociceptive effect of acupuncture. To answer this question, we tested the ability of procedures that block ANC-induced analgesia, at peripheral, spinal, nucleus accumbens and rostral ventral medulla levels, to block acupuncture-induced analgesia. Acupuncture at ST36 (Zusanli), a widely used acupoint located in the hind limb, induced potent heterosegmental antinociception in the orofacial formalin test. The magnitude of this antinociceptive effect was similar to that induced by an intraplantar injection of capsaicin, a procedure classically used to activate ANC. The antinociceptive effect of acupuncture was blocked by sciatic C-fibers depletion (1% perineural capsaicin), spinal administration of a μ-opioid (Cys2,Tyr3,Orn5,Pen7amide, .2 μg) or of a GABAA (bicuculline, .3 μg) receptor antagonist, intra-nucleus accumbens administration of a μ-opioid receptor antagonist (Cys2,Tyr3,Orn5,Pen7amide, 1 μg), or intrarostral ventral medulla administration of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist (mecamylamine, .6 μg). In addition, acupuncture at ST36 and/or upper lip formalin induced c-Fos expression in the nucleus accumbens and in rostral ventral medulla. On the basis of these results, we propose that ANC contributes to the antinociceptive effect of acupuncture. This article presents a novel mechanism of acupuncture analgesia, contributing to the understanding of its scientific basis. Because ANC is a pain modulation pathway activated by peripheral noxious stimulation that ascends to supraspinal regions, it could be the link between acupoint stimulation and the central mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential development of antinociceptive tolerance to morphine and fentanyl is not linked to efficacy in the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobeck, Erin N.; Haseman, Rachel A.; Hong, Dana; Ingram, Susan L.; Morgan, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic administration of morphine typically produces greater tolerance than higher efficacy mu-opioid receptor (MOPr) agonists, such as fentanyl. The objective of the present study was to test this relationship by measuring antinociceptive efficacy and tolerance to morphine and fentanyl microinjected into the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (vlPAG). MOPr agonist efficacy was evaluated by microinjecting the irreversible opioid receptor antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (β-FNA) into the vlPAG prior to a dose-response analysis of morphine and fentanyl antinociception. In contrast to systemic administration of morphine and fentanyl, microinjection of these drugs into the vlPAG had similar efficacy as measured by similar reductions in maximal antinociception following β-FNA administration. Analysis of tolerance revealed a rightward shift in the dose-response curve to a single pretreatment with morphine, but not fentanyl. Moreover, the magnitude of tolerance to morphine was comparable following one, four, or eight pretreatments. Tolerance to fentanyl also was evident following four or eight microinjections. These data are surprising in that antinociceptive efficacy appears to vary depending on the site of administration. Moreover, the similar efficacy following microinjection of morphine and fentanyl into the vlPAG was associated with comparable tolerance, with the one exception of no tolerance to acute administration of fentanyl. Perspective These data reveal that antinociceptive tolerance following vlPAG administration of opioids develops rapidly, is evident with both morphine and fentanyl, and the magnitude is relatively consistent regardless of the number of pretreatments. PMID:22766006

  16. Platelet-rich plasma exerts antinociceptive activity by a peripheral endocannabinoid-related mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descalzi, Fiorella; Ulivi, Valentina; Cancedda, Ranieri; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Luongo, Livio; Guida, Francesca; Gatta, Luisa; Maione, Sabatino; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2013-10-01

    In regenerative medicine, platelet by-products containing factors physiologically involved in wound healing, have been successfully used in the form of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) for the topical therapy of various clinical conditions since it produces an improvement in tissue repair as well as analgesic effects. Measurement of endocannabinoids and related compounds in PRP revealed the presence of a significant amount of anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, palmitoylethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide. Investigation of the activity of PRP on the keratinocyte cell line NCTC2544 in physiological and inflammatory conditions showed that, under inflammatory conditions, PRP induced in a statistically significant manner the production of these compounds by the cells suggesting that PRP might induce the production of these analgesic mediators particularly in the physiologically inflamed wounded tissue. Studies in a mouse model of acute inflammatory pain induced by formalin injection demonstrated a potent antinociceptive effect against both early and late nocifensive responses. This effect was observed following intrapaw injection of (1) total PRP; (2) lipids extracted from PRP; and (3) an endocannabinoid-enriched lipid fraction of PRP. In all conditions, antagonists of endocannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, injected in the paw, abrogated the antinociceptive effects strongly suggesting for this preparation a peripheral mechanism of action. In conclusion, we showed that PRP and PRP lipid extract exert a potent antinociceptive activity linked, at least in part, to their endocannabinoids and related compound content, and to their capability of elevating the levels of these lipid mediators in cells.

  17. Evaluation of Antinociceptive Activity of Ethanol Extract of Leaves of Adenanthera pavonina

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    Md. Moniruzzaman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenanthera pavonina is a deciduous tree commonly used in the traditional medicine to treat inflammation and rheumatism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of ethanol extract of leaves of A. pavonina (EEAP. EEAP was investigated using various nociceptive models induced thermally or chemically in mice including hot plate and tail immersion test, acetic acid-induced writhing, and glutamate- and formalin-induced licking tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body weight (p.o.. In addition, to assess the possible mechanisms, involvement of opioid system was verified using naloxone (2 mg/kg and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP signaling pathway by methylene blue (MB; 20 mg/kg. The results have demonstrated that EEAP produced a significant and dose-dependent increment in the hot plate latency and tail withdrawal time. It also reduced the number of abdominal constrictions and paw lickings induced by acetic acid and glutamate respectively. EEAP inhibited the nociceptive responses in both phases of formalin test. Besides, the reversal effects of naloxone indicated the association of opioid receptors on the exertion of EEAP action centrally. Moreover, the enhancement of writhing inhibitory activity by MB suggests the possible involvement of cGMP pathway in EEAP-mediated antinociception. These results prove the antinociceptive activity of the leaves of A. pavonina and support the traditional use of this plant.

  18. Participation of endogenous opioids in the antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats

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    G.S. Galdino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Exercise is a low-cost intervention that promotes health and contributes to the maintenance of the quality of life. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of different resistance exercise protocols on the nociceptive threshold of rats. Female Wistar rats were used to perform exercises in a weight-lifting exercise model. The following groups were examined (N = 6 per group: untrained rats (control group; an acute protocol group consisting of rats submitted to 15 sets of 15 repetitions of resistance exercise (acute group; rats exercised with 3 sets of 10 repetitions, three times per week for 12 weeks (trained group, and a group consisting of trained rats that were further submitted to the acute protocol (trained-acute group. The nociceptive threshold was measured by the paw-withdrawal test, in which the withdrawal threshold (escape reaction was measured by an apparatus applying force to the plantar surface of the animal paw. The opioid antagonist naloxone (2 mg/kg was administered subcutaneously 10 min before the exercise protocols. The trained group demonstrated antinociception only up to day 45 of the 12-week training period. A significant increase (37%, P < 0.05 in the nociceptive threshold was produced immediately after exercise, decreasing to 15% after 15 min, when the acute exercise protocol was used. Naloxone reversed this effect. These data show that the acute resistance exercise protocol was effective in producing antinociception for 15 min. This antinociceptive effect is mediated by the activation of opioid receptors.

  19. Antinociception induced by galanin in anterior cingulate cortex in rats with acute inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng-Lin; Fu, Feng-Hua; Yu, Long-Chuan

    2017-01-18

    The present study was performed to explore the role of galanin in nociceptive modulation in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of rats with acute inflammation, and the changes in galanin and galanin receptor 2 (Gal R2) expressions in rats with acute inflammation. Intra-ACC injection of galanin induced antinociception in rats with acute inflammation, the antinociceptive effects induced by galanin were attenuated significantly by intra-ACC injection of the Gal R2 antagonist M871, indicating an involvement of Gal R2 in nociceptive modulation in ACC in rats with acute inflammation. Furthermore, we found that both the galanin mRNA expression and galanin content increased significantly in ACC in rats with acute inflammation than that in normal rats. Moreover, both the mRNA levels of Gal R2 and the content of Gal R2 in ACC increased significantly in rats with acute inflammation than that in normal rats. These results demonstrated that galanin induced antinociception in ACC in rats with acute inflammation. And there were changes in the expression of galanin and Gal R2 in rats with acute inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Morphine and Clonidine Combination Therapy Improves Therapeutic Window in Mice: Synergy in Antinociceptive but Not in Sedative or Cardiovascular Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Laura S.; German, Jonathan P.; Kitto, Kelly F.; Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Wilcox, George L.

    2014-01-01

    Opioids are used to manage all types of pain including acute, cancer, chronic neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Unfortunately, opioid-related adverse effects such as respiratory depression, tolerance, physical dependence and addiction have led to an underutilization of these compounds for adequate pain relief. One strategy to improve the therapeutic utility of opioids is to co-administer them with other analgesic agents such as agonists acting at α2-adrenergic receptors (α2ARs). Analgesics acting at α2ARs and opioid receptors (ORs) frequently synergize when co-administered in vivo. Multimodal analgesic techniques offer advantages over single drug treatments as synergistic combination therapies produce analgesia at lower doses, thus reducing undesired side effects. This inference presumes, however, that the synergistic interaction is limited to the analgesic effects. In order to test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of α2AR/OR combination therapy in acute antinociception and in the often-undesired side effects of sedation and cardiovascular depression in awake unrestrained mice. Morphine, clonidine or their combination was administered by spinal or systemic injection in awake mice. Antinociception was determined using the warm water tail flick assay (52.5°C). Sedation/motor impairment was evaluated using the accelerating rotarod assay and cardiovascular function was monitored by pulse oximetry. Data were converted to percent maximum possible effect and isobolographic analysis was performed to determine if an interaction was subadditive, additive or synergistic. Synergistic interactions between morphine and clonidine were observed in the antinociceptive but not in the sedative/motor or cardiovascular effects. As a result, the therapeutic window was improved ∼200-fold and antinociception was achieved at non-sedating doses with little to no cardiovascular depression. In addition, combination therapy resulted in greater maximum analgesic efficacy over

  1. Morphine and clonidine combination therapy improves therapeutic window in mice: synergy in antinociceptive but not in sedative or cardiovascular effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S Stone

    Full Text Available Opioids are used to manage all types of pain including acute, cancer, chronic neuropathic and inflammatory pain. Unfortunately, opioid-related adverse effects such as respiratory depression, tolerance, physical dependence and addiction have led to an underutilization of these compounds for adequate pain relief. One strategy to improve the therapeutic utility of opioids is to co-administer them with other analgesic agents such as agonists acting at α2-adrenergic receptors (α2ARs. Analgesics acting at α2ARs and opioid receptors (ORs frequently synergize when co-administered in vivo. Multimodal analgesic techniques offer advantages over single drug treatments as synergistic combination therapies produce analgesia at lower doses, thus reducing undesired side effects. This inference presumes, however, that the synergistic interaction is limited to the analgesic effects. In order to test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of α2AR/OR combination therapy in acute antinociception and in the often-undesired side effects of sedation and cardiovascular depression in awake unrestrained mice. Morphine, clonidine or their combination was administered by spinal or systemic injection in awake mice. Antinociception was determined using the warm water tail flick assay (52.5°C. Sedation/motor impairment was evaluated using the accelerating rotarod assay and cardiovascular function was monitored by pulse oximetry. Data were converted to percent maximum possible effect and isobolographic analysis was performed to determine if an interaction was subadditive, additive or synergistic. Synergistic interactions between morphine and clonidine were observed in the antinociceptive but not in the sedative/motor or cardiovascular effects. As a result, the therapeutic window was improved ∼200-fold and antinociception was achieved at non-sedating doses with little to no cardiovascular depression. In addition, combination therapy resulted in greater maximum analgesic

  2. Synthesis, Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis, Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Evaluation of Palmitoyl Benzamides. H Baba, CO Usifoh, PO Igbinaduwa. Abstract. Purpose: To synthesize and characterize palmitoyl amino benzamides, and to evaluate them for possible anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities. Methods: Palmitoyl amino ...

  3. Antinociceptive properties and acute toxicity of ethanol extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antinociceptive effect of ethanol extract (Bl-EtOH) in mice was carried out using chemical (writhing and formalin) and thermal (hot plate) models of nociception. ... Naloxone (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonized the antinociceptive action of Bl-EtOH (100 mg/kg), and this finding suggests involvement of opioid mechanism.

  4. Antinociceptive Activity and Toxicity Evaluation of the Fatty Oil from Plukenetia polyadenia Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Amanda S; de Lima, Anderson B; Albuquerque, Thayana Lucy F; Silveira, Tiago S; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; da Silva, Joyce Kelly R; Ribeiro, Alcy F; Maia, José Guilherme S; Bastos, Gilmara N T

    2015-04-30

    Seed oil (Pp-oil) of Plukenetia polyadenia is used by native people of the Brazilian Amazon against arthritis and rheumatism, spreading it on the arms and legs to reduce the pain and inflammation. Pp-oil was obtained by pressing dried seeds at room temperature to give a 47.0% yield of oil. It was then subjected to fatty acid composition analysis. The principal fatty acids were linoleic acid (46.5%), α-linolenic acid (34.4%) and oleic acid (13.9%). Then, it was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in mice, using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot plate and formalin test models. Additionally, its toxicity was determined. The Pp-oil proved to have no toxicological effects, showing dose-dependent antinociceptive effect under chemical stimulation. At oral doses of 25-100 mg/kg, Pp-oil significantly reduced the abdominal writhes in the writhing test. A higher oral dose of 200 mg/kg did not induce alterations in the latency time of the hot plate test when compared to the control, suggesting an analgesic activity of peripheral origin. At oral doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, the Pp-oil significantly reduced the second phase of the algic stimulus in the formalin test. In addition, the antinociception of Pp-oil was reversed by naloxone in the evaluation of its mechanism of action. Therefore, the Pp-oil proved to be safe at very high doses and to show significant analgesic properties. The role of Pp-oil is still being investigated with respect the mechanism of action, but the results suggest that opiod receptors could be involved in the antinociception action observed for the oil of P. polyadenia.

  5. Antinociceptive Activity and Toxicity Evaluation of the Fatty Oil from Plukenetia polyadenia Mull. Arg. (Euphorbiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Mota

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seed oil (Pp-oil of Plukenetia polyadenia is used by native people of the Brazilian Amazon against arthritis and rheumatism, spreading it on the arms and legs to reduce the pain and inflammation. Pp-oil was obtained by pressing dried seeds at room temperature to give a 47.0% yield of oil. It was then subjected to fatty acid composition analysis. The principal fatty acids were linoleic acid (46.5%, α-linolenic acid (34.4% and oleic acid (13.9%. Then, it was evaluated for its antinociceptive activity in mice, using the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot plate and formalin test models. Additionally, its toxicity was determined. The Pp-oil proved to have no toxicological effects, showing dose-dependent antinociceptive effect under chemical stimulation. At oral doses of 25–100 mg/kg, Pp-oil significantly reduced the abdominal writhes in the writhing test. A higher oral dose of 200 mg/kg did not induce alterations in the latency time of the hot plate test when compared to the control, suggesting an analgesic activity of peripheral origin. At oral doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg, the Pp-oil significantly reduced the second phase of the algic stimulus in the formalin test. In addition, the antinociception of Pp-oil was reversed by naloxone in the evaluation of its mechanism of action. Therefore, the Pp-oil proved to be safe at very high doses and to show significant analgesic properties. The role of Pp-oil is still being investigated with respect the mechanism of action, but the results suggest that opiod receptors could be involved in the antinociception action observed for the oil of P. polyadenia.

  6. Antinociceptive effect of Encholirium spectabile: A Bromeliaceae from the Brazilian caatinga biome

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Silva, Juliane Cabral; Branco, Carla Rodrigues Cardoso; Branco, Alexsandro; Cavalcanti Amorim, Elba Lúcia; da Silva Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes

    2014-01-01

    Background: Encholirium spectabile is a species found in outcrops rocky throughout the Brazilian Caatinga. Objective: This study was carried out to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extract of the leaves from E. spectabile (Es-EtOH) in mice using chemical and thermal models of nociception. Material and Methods: HPLC was used to determine the fingerprint chromatogram. The Es-EtOH was examined for its antinociceptive activity at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg intraperitoneal (i.p.). The evaluation of antinociceptive activity was carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and hot plate tests in mice. Rota-rod test was used for the evaluation of motor coordination. Results: In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, the Es-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the number of writhings by 68.59, 79.33 and 65.28%, respectively. Additionally, Es-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased by 34.14, 52.61 and 60.97% the paw licking time in the first phase, as well as 89.56, 79.90 and 96.71% in the second phase of the formalin test, respectively. Es-EtOH also showed effect in the hot plate test, since increased the latency time at dose of 100 mg/kg after 60 minutes. In addition, Es-EtOH did not impair motor coordination. The presence of phenolic compounds in the extract was confirmed using HPLC. These results indicate that Es-EtOH has antinociceptive activity, probably of peripheral origin. The mechanism involved is not completely understood but, at least in part there is the participation of opioid receptors. PMID:25298687

  7. Antinociceptive activity of Buddleja globosa (matico) in several models of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, Nadine; Delporte, Carla; Apablaza, Cecia; Farías, Mariela; Goïty, León; Arrau, Sylvia; Negrete, Rosa; Castro, Consuelo; Miranda, Hugo

    2008-09-02

    Leaf extracts of Buddleja globosa (Buddlejaceae) are used in Chilean folk medicine for wound healing. The anti-inflammatory (topic and per os), analgesic (per os) effects and the antioxidant activity of Buddleja globosa were for the first time reported by us. Assess the antinociceptive activity of the methanol sequential and global extracts using complementary chemical and thermal models of pain, characterize pharmacologically the antinociception induced, evaluate seasonal influence to support Buddleja globosa medicinal use. Global methanol, sequential methanol and ethanol (leaves collected in autumn and summer) extracts were evaluated for oral and topic analgesia in tail flick, formalin and writhing models, verbascoside and 7-O-luteolin glucoside were assayed in tail flick and writhing. Ibuprofen was used as reference. For characterization of induced antinociception, naltrexone, naltrindole, tropisetron, nor-binaltorphimine, prazosin, yohimbine, atropine, and N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester were used as antagonists and inhibitors drugs. Seasonal influence was observed since autumn extract resulted less active. Extracts showed a dose-dependent antinociceptive activity in all assays, the highest effects were obtained for the formalin and writhing test. Verbascoside was more active than ibuprofen in the writhing test (67.6% and 50.0% at equimolar doses) and showed similar effects in the tail flick (topic and oral) near 25% at equivalent doses - ED25 or EC25 - to ibuprofen. Luteolin 7-O-glucoside was slightly more active in the tail flick test and nearly half active than verbascoside in the writhing assay. Effectiveness was higher for the sequential than for global alcoholic extracts, and can be increased by selective blocking of opioid receptors. Global methanol extract seems modulated only by naltrexone. Analgesic effect of Buddleja globosa is here demonstrated validating its use in traditional medicine. Season influence is important to be considered.

  8. Treatment with Sulforaphane Produces Antinociception and Improves Morphine Effects during Inflammatory Pain in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Alejandro; Chamorro, Pablo Aníbal Ferreira; Riego, Gabriela; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2017-12-01

    The activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) exerts potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory effects; however, its participation in the modulation of chronic inflammatory pain and on the antinociceptive effects of μ-opioid receptor (MOR) agonists has not been evaluated. We investigated whether the induction of Nrf2 could alleviate chronic inflammatory pain and augment the analgesic effects of morphine and mechanisms implicated. In male C57BL/6 mice with inflammatory pain induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) subplantarly administered, we assessed: 1) antinociceptive actions of the administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of a Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane (SFN); and 2) effects of SFN on the antinociceptive actions of morphine and on protein levels of Nrf2, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1), and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzymes, microglial activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) overexpression, as well as on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MOR expression in the spinal cord and paw of animals with inflammatory pain. Results showed that treatment with SFN inhibited allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by CFA and increased the local antinociceptive actions of morphine. This treatment also augmented the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, NQO1, and MOR, and inhibited NOS2 and CD11b/c overexpression and MAPK phosphorylation induced by inflammation. Thus, this study shows that the induction of Nrf2 might inhibit inflammatory pain and enhance the analgesic effects of morphine by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammatory responses induced by peripheral inflammation. This study suggests the administration of SFN alone and in combination with morphine are potential new ways of treating chronic inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. Fatty acid amide hydrolase-dependent generation of antinociceptive drug metabolites acting on TRPV1 in the brain.

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    David A Barrière

    Full Text Available The discovery that paracetamol is metabolized to the potent TRPV1 activator N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z-eicosatetraenamide (AM404 and that this metabolite contributes to paracetamol's antinociceptive effect in rodents via activation of TRPV1 in the central nervous system (CNS has provided a potential strategy for developing novel analgesics. Here we validated this strategy by examining the metabolism and antinociceptive activity of the de-acetylated paracetamol metabolite 4-aminophenol and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine (HMBA, both of which may undergo a fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH-dependent biotransformation to potent TRPV1 activators in the brain. Systemic administration of 4-aminophenol and HMBA led to a dose-dependent formation of AM404 plus N-(4-hydroxyphenyl-9Z-octadecenamide (HPODA and arvanil plus olvanil in the mouse brain, respectively. The order of potency of these lipid metabolites as TRPV1 activators was arvanil = olvanil>>AM404> HPODA. Both 4-aminophenol and HMBA displayed antinociceptive activity in various rodent pain tests. The formation of AM404, arvanil and olvanil, but not HPODA, and the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA were substantially reduced or disappeared in FAAH null mice. The activity of 4-aminophenol in the mouse formalin, von Frey and tail immersion tests was also lost in TRPV1 null mice. Intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV1 blocker capsazepine eliminated the antinociceptive effects of 4-aminophenol and HMBA in the mouse formalin test. In the rat, pharmacological inhibition of FAAH, TRPV1, cannabinoid CB1 receptors and spinal 5-HT3 or 5-HT1A receptors, and chemical deletion of bulbospinal serotonergic pathways prevented the antinociceptive action of 4-aminophenol. Thus, the pharmacological profile of 4-aminophenol was identical to that previously reported for paracetamol, supporting our suggestion that this drug metabolite contributes to paracetamol's analgesic activity via

  10. Synergistic antinociceptive interaction between palmitoylethanolamide and tramadol in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ramírez-Marín, Pamela Moncerrat; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-15

    Pharmacological synergism has been used to obtain a higher efficacy using drug concentrations at which side effects are minimal. In this study, the pharmacological antinociceptive interaction between N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and tramadol was investigated. The individual concentration-response curves for PEA (0.1-56.2 μg/paw) and tramadol (1-56.2 μg/paw) were evaluated in mice in which nociception was induced by an intraplantar injection of 2% formalin. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between PEA (EC50=23.7±1.6 μg/paw) and tramadol (EC50=26.02±2.96 μg/paw) using the EC50 and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. The isobologram demonstrated that the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction; the experimental values (Zexp=9.5±0.2 μg/paw) were significantly smaller than those calculated theoretically (Zadd=24.8±0.2 μg/paw). The antinociceptive mechanisms of the PEA and tramadol combination involved the opioid receptor, transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). The sedative effect of the combination of PEA and tramadol was less than that generated by individual treatments. These findings suggest that the PEA and tramadol combination produced enhanced antinociceptive efficacy at concentrations at which side effects are minimal. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of estrogen on morphine- and oxycodone-induced antinociception in a female femur bone cancer pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hiroko; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Shinohara, Shunji

    2016-02-15

    Although estrous cycle has been reported to influence antiociceptive effect of morphine in several pain conditions, its effect on cancer pain is not well established. We investigated the effect of estrogen on morphine antinociception using a bone cancer pain model and compared its potency with that of oxycodone. Female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) for preparation of a femur bone cancer pain (FBC) model. β-estradiol was subcutaneously (s.c.) administered and antinociceptive effects of opioids was assessed using the von Frey monofilament test. Although morphine (5-20mg/kg, s.c.) did have significant antinociceptive effects in the FBC-OVX group, its effects in the FBC-OVX+β-estradiol (OVX+E) group was limited. Oxycodone (1-5mg/kg, s.c.) exhibited significant effects in both groups. Expression changes in opioid-related genes (μ-, κ-, δ-opioid receptors, prodynorphin, proenkephalin, proopiomelanocortin) in the spinal and supraspinal sites were examined among the sham-OVX, sham-OVX+E, FBC-OVX, and FBC-OVX+E groups by in situ hybridization. These studies detected a significant increase in prodynorphin in the spinal dorsal horn of the FBC-OVX+E group. Spinal injection of a dynorphin-A antibody to FBC-OVX+E mice restored antinociception of morphine. In conclusion, we detected a differential effect of estrogen on morphine- and oxycodone-induced antinociception in a female FBC model. The effect of morphine was limited with estrogen exposure, which may be due to estrogen- and pain-mediated spinal expression of dynorphin-A. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Peripheral and central antinociceptive effects of the butanolic fraction of Byrsonima verbascifolia leaves on nociception-induced models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, A A; Siqueira, J M; Castro, A H F; Matos, N A; Klein, A; Silva, D B; Carollo, C A; Soares, A C

    2017-02-01

    Byrsonima verbascifolia (Malpighiaceae), commonly known as 'murici', is used in folk medicine, for example, in the treatment of inflammation. The anti-inflammatory activity of the butanolic fraction of B. verbascifolia leaves (BvBF) was previously reported by our group, and the present study was designed to evaluate their antinociceptive effects. BvBF (25, 50, and 100 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) inhibited acetic acid induced abdominal writhing. In the formalin test, BvBF (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a reduction in licking time in both the neurogenic and inflammatory phases. Moreover, we demonstrated that BvBF (30 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) caused an increase in the latency to response in the hot-plate test. These results demonstrate that BvBF possesses marked peripheral and central antinociceptive activities. Pre-treatment with the non-selective receptor antagonist naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p.) abolished the antinociceptive effects of BvBF (100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the neurogenic phase of the formalin and hot-plate tests. The anti-inflammatory activity of BvBF (previously reported) as well as the participation of the opioidergic system seems to be responsible, at least in part, for these antinociceptive effects. Finally, BvBF at the doses investigated (25, 50 and 100 mg/Kg) did not cause any toxicity signals, showing that the antinociceptive activity is devoid of sedative and hypomotility effects.

  13. Mechanisms of the antinociceptive action of (− Epicatechin obtained from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combretum leprosum Mart & Eic in rodents

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    Lopes Luciano da

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms of the antinociceptive activity of (− epicatechin (EPI, a compound isolated from the hydroalcoholic fraction of Combreum leprosum Mart & Eicher. Methods were assessed in the model of chemical nociception induced by glutamate (20 μmol/paw. To evaluate the mechanisms involved, the animals , male Swiss mice (25-30 g, received EPI (50 mg/kg p.o. after pretreatment with naloxone (2 mg/kg s.c. opioid antagonist, glibenclamide (2 mg/kg s.c. antagonist K + channels sensitive to ATP, ketanserin (0.3 mg/kg s.c. antagonist of receptor 5-HT2A, yoimbine (0.15 mg/kg s.c. α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist, pindolol (1 mg/kg s.c. 5-HT1a/1b receptor antagonist, atropine (0.1 mg/kg s.c. muscarinic antagonist and caffeine (3 mg/kg s.c. adenosine receptor antagonist, ondansetron (0.5 mg/kg s.c. for 5-HT3 receptor and L-arginine (600 mg/kg i.p.. Results The antinociceptive effect of EPI was reversed by pretreatment with naloxone and glibenclamide, ketanserin, yoimbine, atropine and pindolol, which demonstrates the involvement of opioid receptors and potassium channels sensitive to ATP, the serotoninergic (receptor 5HT1A and 5HT2A, adrenergic (receptor alpha 2 and cholinergic (muscarinic receptor systems in the activities that were observed. The effects of EPI, however, were not reversed by pretreatment with caffeine, L-arginine or ondansetron, which shows that there is no involvement of 5HT3 receptors or the purinergic and nitrergic systems in the antinociceptive effect of EPI. In the Open Field and Rotarod test, EPI had no significant effect, which shows that there was no central nervous system depressant or muscle relaxant effect on the results. Conclusions This study demonstrates that the antinociceptive activity of EPI in the glutamate model involves the participation of the opioid system, serotonin, adrenergic and cholinergic.

  14. The synergistic antinociceptive effect of lornoxicam in combination with tramadol

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    Amela Saračević

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most important priorities in therapy is pain control. Therefore, many different groups of drugs are being used for this purpose, primarily opioid analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. Opioid analgesic tramadol, by binding to specific receptors, modulates the perception and response to painful stimuli and inhibits transmitting and further processing of pain impulses. Lornoxicam, which belongs to the oxicam class of NSAIDs, is a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor with strong analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, and better tolerance profile. Preliminary research, which requires further verification, suggests that lornoxicam may be a better alternative or adjunctive therapy to opioid analgesics in the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to investigate antinociceptive effects of lornoxicam, as well as the combination of lornoxicam with tramadol.Methods: Analgesic effect of combination of lornoxicam and tramadol or lornoxicam applied alone was examined on female albino mice, using a hot plate method. Measurements were made 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after intraperitoneal and subcutaneous administration, in dose of 10 mg/kg.Results: Combination of lornoxicam and tramadol, applied intraperitoneally, increases the threshold of sensitivity to painful stimuli, which was not the case with subcutaneous administration.Conclusions: Lornoxicam significantly increases analgesic effect when applied intraperitoneally in combination with tramadol. On the other hand, lornoxicam in combination with tramadol, did not increase the threshold of sensitivity to painful stimuli with significant difference, after subcutaneous administration

  15. Combined Treatment with Morphine and Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in Rhesus Monkeys: Antinociceptive Tolerance and Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, L R; France, C P

    2016-05-01

    Opioid receptor agonists are effective for treating pain; however, tolerance and dependence can develop with repeated use. Combining opioids with cannabinoids can enhance their analgesic potency, although it is less clear whether combined treatment alters opioid tolerance and dependence. In this study, four monkeys received 3.2 mg/kg morphine alone or in combination with 1 mg/kg Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) twice daily; the antinociceptive effects (warm water tail withdrawal) of morphine, the cannabinoid receptor agonists WIN 55,212 [(R)-(1)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl)pyrrolo[1,2,3-de]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenylmethanone mesylate] and CP 55,940 (2-[(1R,2R,5R)-5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl) cyclohexyl]-5-(2-methyloctan-2-yl)phenol), and the κ opioid receptor agonist U-50,488 (trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzenacetamide methanesulfonate) were examined before, during, and after treatment. To determine whether concurrent THC treatment altered morphine dependence, behavioral signs indicative of withdrawal were monitored when treatment was discontinued. Before treatment, each drug increased tail withdrawal latency to 20 seconds (maximum possible effect). During treatment, latencies did not reach 20 seconds for morphine or the cannabinoids up to doses 3- to 10-fold larger than those that were fully effective before treatment. Rightward and downward shifts in antinociceptive dose-effect curves were greater for monkeys receiving the morphine/THC combination than monkeys receiving morphine alone. When treatment was discontinued, heart rate and directly observable withdrawal signs increased, although they were generally similar in monkeys that received morphine alone or with THC. These results demonstrated that antinociceptive tolerance was greater during treatment with the combination, and although treatment conditions were sufficient to result in the development of dependence on morphine, withdrawal was not

  16. Antinociception induced by chronic glucocorticoid treatment is correlated to local modulation of spinal neurotransmitter content

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    Almeida Armando

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While acute effects of stress on pain are well described, those produced by chronic stress are still a matter of dispute. Previously we demonstrated that chronic unpredictable stress results in antinociception in the tail-flick test, an effect that is mediated by increased levels of corticosteroids. In the present study, we evaluated nociception in rats after chronic treatment with corticosterone (CORT and dexamethasone (DEX in order to discriminate the role of each type of corticosteroid receptors in antinociception. Results Both experimental groups exhibited a pronounced antinociceptive effect after three weeks of treatment when compared to controls (CONT; however, at four weeks the pain threshold in CORT-treated animals returned to basal levels whereas in DEX-treated rats antinociception was maintained. In order to assess if these differences are associated with altered expression of neuropeptides involved in nociceptive transmission we evaluated the density of substance P (SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, somatostatin (SS and B2-γ-aminobutiric acid receptors (GABAB2 expression in the spinal dorsal horn using light density measurements and stereological techniques. After three weeks of treatment the expression of CGRP in the superficial dorsal horn was significantly decreased in both CORT and DEX groups, while GABAB2 was significantly increased; the levels of SP for both experimental groups remained unchanged at this point. At 4 weeks, CGRP and SP are reduced in DEX-treated animals and GABAB2 unchanged, but all changes were restored to CONT levels in CORT-treated animals. The expression of SS remained unaltered throughout the experimental period. Conclusion These data indicate that corticosteroids modulate nociception since chronic corticosteroid treatment alters the expression of neuropeptides involved in nociceptive transmission at the spinal cord level. As previously observed in some supraspinal areas, the

  17. Antinociceptive activity of extracts and secondary metabolites from wild growing and micropropagated plants of Renealmia alpinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Cortés, Natalie; Benjumea, Dora; Osorio, Edison; León, Francisco; Cutler, Stephen J

    2015-05-13

    Renealmia alpinia is native to the American continent and can be found from Mexico to Brazil, and in the Caribbean islands. It is known as "matandrea" in Colombia, and it has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat painful diseases and ailments. Based on its traditional uses, it is of interest to evaluate the pharmacologic effects of this plant and its secondary metabolites. Methanol and aqueous extracts of wild and micropropagated R. alpinia (leaves) were obtained and chemically compared by High Performance Thin Layer Chromatography (HPTLC). The antinociceptive activity of these extracts was examined using an in vivo assay (Siegmund test). Additionally, the dichloromethane extract of R. alpinia was fractionated and pure compounds were isolated by chromatographic methods. The structure elucidation of isolated compounds was performed by NMR experiments and spectroscopic techniques and comparison with the literature data. Purified compounds were evaluated for their in vitro binding affinity for opioids and cannabinoids receptors. The dichloromethane extract of the plant's aerial part afforded sinostrobin (1), naringenin 7,4'-dimethyl ether (2), 2',6'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxychalcone (3), 4-methoxy-6-(2-phenylethenyl)-2H-pyran-2-one (4), naringenin 7-methyl ether (5) and 3,5-heptanediol, 1,7-diphenyl (6), which were isolated using chromatographic methods. Their chemical structures were established by physical and spectroscopic techniques. The antinociceptive effects observed in mice by extracts of wild and micropropagated plants were similar. The compounds isolated from R. alpinia do not show affinity to opioid or cannabinoid receptors. Aqueous and methanol extracts of R. alpinia provide antinociceptive and analgesic effects in an in vivo model. These results contribute additional insight as to why this plant is traditionally used for pain management. Also, this is the first comprehensive report of a phytochemical study of R. alpinia. Copyright © 2015

  18. Intraventricular gabapentin is antinociceptive and enhances systemic morphine antinociception in rat tail flick test

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    Shamsi Meymandi M.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gabapentin has been recently considered as an analgesic in neurpathic pain through spinal site of action. In addition co-administration of low dose of morphine with gabapentin, is proposed not only to reduce side effects, tolerance, and dependency of morphine but also has some analgesic effects. In this study, the analgesic effect of intracerebroventricular (ICV gabapentin and its effect on morphine antinociception were investigated in tail-flick test.Methods: An intraventricular cannula was surgically inserted into ventricle space of rat brain. The latency time was measured after microinjection of 100,300,600 and 1000 µg of gabapentin or normal saline (sham. After determination of subanalgesic dose of gabapentin (300µg, the combinational groups received subanalgesic and low dose of morphine (2 and 7 mg /kg intraperitoneally, thirty minutes prior to gabapentin administration. Time response curve and Area Under the Curve (AUC, as antinociceptive index, were compared among the groups.Results: Intraventricular gabapentin showed analgesic effects at 600 µg (ICV. The combination of subanalgesic doses of gabapentin (300 µg ICV and morphine (2 mg /kg i.p increased significantly time-response curve and AUC compared to other groups. In addition, the analgesic response following co-administration of gabapentin (300 µg ICV and analgesic dose of morphine was increased significantly compared to the sham and gabapentin group.Conclusion: The results demonstrated that intraventricular gabapentin has analgesic effect in transient model of pain and enhances morphine antinociception through cerebral site of action.

  19. Antinociceptive Effect of Ghrelin in a Rat Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Involves TRPV1/Opioid Systems

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    Yuqing Mao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, defined as recurrent abdominal pain and changes in bowel habits, seriously affects quality of life and ability to work. Ghrelin is a brain-gut hormone, which has been reported to show antinociceptive effects in peripheral pain. We investigated the effect of ghrelin on visceral hypersensitivity and pain in a rat model of IBS. Methods: Maternal deprivation (MD was used to provide a stress-induced model of IBS in Wistar rats. Colorectal distension (CRD was used to detect visceral sensitivity, which was evaluated by abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR scores. Rats that were confirmed to have visceral hypersensitivity after MD were injected with ghrelin (10 µg/kg subcutaneously twice a week from weeks 7 to 8. [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 (100 nmol/L and naloxone (100 nmol/L were administered subcutaneously to block growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1α (GHS-R1α and opioid receptors, respectively. Expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1 and µ and κ opioid receptors (MOR and KOR in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex tissues were detected by western blotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR, immunohistochemical analyses and immunofluorescence. Results: Ghrelin treatment increased expression of opioid receptors and inhibited expression of TRPV1 in colon, dorsal root ganglion (DRG and cerebral cortex. The antinociceptive effect of ghrelin in the rat model of IBS was partly blocked by both the ghrelin antagonist [D-Lys3]-GHRP-6 and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. Conclusion: The results indicate that ghrelin exerted an antinociceptive effect, which was mediated via TRPV1/opioid systems, in IBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Ghrelin might potentially be used as a new treatment for IBS.

  20. Convolutamydine A and synthetic analogues have antinociceptive properties in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Gabriela S M; Zardo, Renata S; Silva, Bárbara V; Violante, Flávio A; Pinto, Angelo C; Fernandes, Patricia D

    2013-01-01

    Convolutamydine A, an oxindole that originated from a marine bryozoan, has several biological effects. In this study, we aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of convolutamydine A and two new synthetic analogues. Convolutamydine A and the two analogues were given orally to assess their ability to induce antinociceptive effects. Formalin-induced licking response, acetic acid-induced contortions, and hot plate models were used to characterize the effects of convolutamydine A and its analogues. Convolutamydine A (4,6-bromo-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole), compound 1 (3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole), and compound 2 (5-bromo-3-(2-oxopropyl)-3-hydroxy-2-oxindole) caused peripheral antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acetic acid-induced contortions and the formalin-induced licking models. Supraspinal effects were also observed in the hot plate model and were similar to those obtained with morphine. The peripheral effects were not mediated by the cholinergic or opioid systems. The antinociceptive effects of convolutamydine A seem to be mediated by all three systems (cholinergic, opioid, and nitric oxide systems), and the mechanism of action of compounds 1 and 2 involved cholinergic and nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms. Convolutamydine A and its analogues (compounds 1 and 2) showed good antinociceptive ability after systemic administration in acute pain models. The antinociceptive action mediated by cholinergic, opioid, and nitric oxide systems could explain why convolutamydine A, compound 1, and compound 2 retained their antinociceptive effects. The doses used were similar to the doses of morphine and were much lower than that of acetylsalicylic acid, the classical analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. In conclusion, convolutamydine A and the two analogues demonstrated antinociceptive effects comparable to morphine's effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Synergism of caffeine on antinociceptive effects of metamizole].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Reval, María Irene; Galván-Orozco, Renato; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Carrillo-Munguía, Norma

    2008-01-01

    Combinations of analgesic drugs have been used as an option for treating pain because some types of pain are difficult to relieve with conventional analgesics. This group of drugs has been combined with analgesics or drugs without analgesic effect and is called adjuvant. One such drug is caffeine. We undertook the present study to analyze if caffeine is able to potentiate the antinociceptive effect of metamizole in the formalin model. Metamizole produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect with ED(50) = 329.61 mg/kg in the formalin model. Caffeine at the following doses (3.16, 10.0, 17.8 and 31.6 mg/kg) also showed antinociceptive effect. When a subeffective dose of metamizole (100 mg/kg) was combined with caffeine (3.16, 10.0, 17.8 or 31.6 mg/kg), higher antinociceptive effects were produced than the corresponding effects produced by metamizole alone. One combination presented potentiation effect; the other combination showed antinociceptive effect that was not different from the effects of metamizole alone. Two combinations showed an effect lower than the corresponding effect produced by metamizole alone. Adjuvant caffeine is able to change the effect of metamizole in the inflammatory pain model, in which caffeine also presents an antinociceptive effect.

  2. Smoke carcinogens cause bone loss through the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and induction of CYP1 enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoking is a major risk factor for osteoporosis and fracture. Here, we show that smoke toxins and environmental chemicals such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD), and 3-methyl cholanthrene, which are well known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists, induce osteocla...

  3. Antinociceptive activity and mechanism of action of hydroalcoholic extract and dichloromethane fraction of Amphilophium crucigerum seeds in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Prá, Samira Dal Toé; Ferro, Paula Ronsani; Milioli, Alessandra Marcon; Rigo, Flávia Karine; Chipindo, Orlando Justo; Camponogara, Camila; Casoti, Rosana; Manfron, Melânia Palermo; de Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Ferreira, Juliano; Trevisan, Gabriela

    2017-01-04

    The medicinal plant generally known as monkey's comb (Amphilophium crucigerum) has been popularly described for the treatment of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, specially seeds preparations. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the crude extract (Crd) and dichloromethane fraction (Dcm) of A. crucigerum seeds, and investigate the involvement of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor in this effect. Male Swiss mice were used in this study. The effects of Crd and Dcm was tested on capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx or the specific binding of [(3)H]-resiniferatoxin. Moreover, after treatment with Crd or Dcm, animals were exposed to acute pain (hot water tail-flick and capsaicin intraplantar test) or chronic pain models (injection of complete Freund's adjuvant or partial ligation of the sciatic nerve). Acute adverse effects were also noted: locomotor activity, corporal temperature, hepatic or renal damage, gastrointestinal transit alteration, and ulcerogenic activity. The oral administration of Crd or Dcm resulted in an antinociceptive effect in the hot water tail-flick (48°C) and capsaicin intraplantar tests. Furthermore, these preparations exhibited antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in a chronic inflammatory pain model, and antinociceptive effects in a neuropathic pain model. Moreover, Crd and Dcm reduced capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) influx and diminished the [(3)H]-resiniferatoxin specific binding to spinal cord membranes. Acute adverse events were not found with Crd or Dcm administration. In conclusion, our results support the analgesic effect of A. crucigerum and suggest the presence of compounds that may act as TRPV1 antagonists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Antinociceptive effect of 7-hydroxymitragynine in mice: Discovery of an orally active opioid analgesic from the Thai medicinal herb Mitragyna speciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Horie, Syunji; Ishikawa, Hayato; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Aimi, Norio; Ponglux, Dhavadee; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2004-03-12

    Mitragynine is an indole alkaloid isolated from the Thai medicinal plant Mitragyna speciosa. We previously reported the morphine-like action of mitragynine and its related compounds in the in vitro assays. In the present study, we investigated the opioid effects of 7-hydroxymitragynine, which is isolated as its novel constituent, on contraction of isolated ileum, binding of the specific ligands to opioid receptors and nociceptive stimuli in mice. In guinea-pig ileum, 7-hydroxymitragynine inhibited electrically induced contraction through the opioid receptors. Receptor-binding assays revealed that 7-hydroxymitragynine has a higher affinity for micro-opioid receptors relative to the other opioid receptors. Administration of 7-hydroxymitragynine (2.5-10 mg/kg, s.c.) induced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in tail-flick and hot-plate tests in mice. Its effect was more potent than that of morphine in both tests. When orally administered, 7-hydroxymitragynine (5-10 mg/kg) showed potent antinociceptive activities in tail-flick and hot-plate tests. In contrast, only weak antinociception was observed in the case of oral administration of morphine at a dose of 20 mg/kg. It was found that 7-hydroxymitragynine is a novel opioid agonist that is structurally different from the other opioid agonists, and has potent analgesic activity when orally administered.

  5. TLR7 agonist induced repression of hepatocellular carcinoma via the TLR7-IKK-NF-?B-IL6 signaling pathway

    OpenAIRE

    REN, XINGBIN; WANG, FEI; JI, BAOJU; GAO, CHUNHAI

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are key members of innate immunity, involved in the defense against diseases, and evidence has revealed that TLR4/5 is involved in the carcinogenesis of hepatic cancer. TLR7 belongs to the TLR family, and its roles in immune-associated hepatic diseases have been well characterized; however, the consequences of agonist targeting of TLR7 in hepatic cancer have not previously been reported. The present study aimed to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of...

  6. Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Nociceptive Effects of Defatted Fruit Extract of Olea europaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahranavard, Shamim; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Faizi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Fruits of Olea europaea L. have been used for centuries in folk medicine to treat many inflammatory diseases. In order to evaluate the anti-nociceptive activities of the methanolic and aqueous extracts of defatted fruits of O. europaea, formalin test was used and for evaluation of anti-inflammatory effects of the extract, the volume of paw edema was measured. The results revealed that both extracts did not exhibit significant analgesic activity in the first phase of formalin test, whereas methanolic extract at the 600 mg/Kg dose and aqueous extract at the 450 and 600 mg/Kg doses could inhibit induced pain in the second phase of formalin test. Furthermore, the results of paw edema volume measurement indicated that the aqueous extract has anti-inflammatory effects at dose of 600 mg/Kg. Induced anti-nociception by aqueous olive extract was not reversed by naloxone, which indicates that the opioid receptors are not involved in the analgesic effects of the extracts. The present data pointed out that the extracts of olive defatted fruit have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in rats but further studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism(s) of action and active components which are involved in analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  7. HPLC-DAD analysis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the ethanolic extract of Hyptis umbrosa in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, Klécia S; Araújo-Filho, Heitor G; Duarte, Marcelo C; Costa, Vicente C O; Tavares, Josean F; Silva, Marcelo S; Almeida, Jackson R G S; Souza, Nathália A C; Rolim, Larissa A; Menezes, Irwin R A; Coutinho, Henrique D M; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J

    2017-01-01

    Hyptis umbrosa (syn. Mesosphaerum sidifolium) (Lamiaceae Family) has been used to treat several conditions such as gastrointestinal disorders, skin infections, nasal congestion, fever and cramps. The objective of this study was to evaluate the chemical composition, analgesic and anti-inflammatory profiles of ethanol extract from leaves of Hyptis umbrosa (EEB). HPLC-DAD was used to determine the fingerprint chromatogram of the extract. Male Swiss mice were orally pretreated with EEB (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg; 60 min before initiating algesic stimulation) and antinociceptive activity was assessed using the acetic acid-induced writhing model, formalin test and hyperalgesia induced by glutamate or capsaicin. Also, peritonitis was induced by the intrathoracic injection of carrageenan to quantify the total number of leukocytes. The presence of phenolic compounds in the extract was confirmed using HPLC-DAD. The treatment with EEB, at all doses, produced a significant analgesic effect against acetic acid-induced antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, only the 400-mg/kg-dose of EEB had a significant effect in the first phase. However, all doses tested were able to reverse nociception in the second phase. The effect of all doses of EEB also showed a significant antinociceptive effect in the glutamate and capsaicin tests and inhibited the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity. The present study suggests that the EEB possesses peripheral analgesic action and showed potential in reducing the spreading of the inflammatory processes. Also, it seems to be related with vanilloid and glutamate receptors.

  8. Opioidergic orofacial antinociception induced by electroacupuncture at acupoint St36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.T. Almeida

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The participation of opioids in the antinociceptive effect of electroacupuncture was evaluated in terms of nociception produced by thermal stimuli applied to the face of male Wistar rats, weighing 180-230 g. Electrical stimulation (bipolar and asymmetric square wave with 0.5 mA intensity for 20 min of acupoint St36, located in the anterior tibial muscle 10 mm distal to the knee joint, induced antinociception in the present model, which was maintained for 150 min. Acupoint LI4, located in the junction of the first and second metacarpal bones, did not achieve antinociception at any frequency studied (5 Hz: 1.7 ± 0.1; 30 Hz: 1.8 ± 0.1; 100 Hz: 1.7 ± 0.1 vs 1.4 ± 0.2. The antinociception obtained by stimulation of acupoint St36 was only achieved when high frequency 100 Hz (3.0 ± 0.2 vs 1.0 ± 0.1 was used, and not with 5 or 30 Hz (1.2 ± 0.2 and 0.7 ± 0.1 vs 1.0 ± 0.1. The antinociceptive effect of acupuncture occurred by opioid pathway activation, since naloxone (1 and 2 mg/kg, subcutaneously antagonized it (1.8 ± 0.2 and 1.7 ± 0.2 vs 3.0 ± 0.1.

  9. "Interaction of different doses of Aspartame with Morphine-induced antinociception in the presence of MK-801, a NMDA antagonist "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahi M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the relative role of sweetness and comparative effects of different taste sensation of the non - caloric sweetener , aspartame on pain and its interaction with MK - 80] as a non - selective MMDA antagonist by formalin - test in mice. The formalin - test was chosen because it measures the response to a long - lasting nociceptive stimulus and closely resembles to the clinical pain. Morphine induced a dose dependent antinociception in the early and late phases of formalin test. Twelve days pretreatment of animals by aspartame ( 0.08% , 0.16% , 0.32% significantly potentiated morphine - induced (1.5-9 mg/kg analgesia in the early phase but significantly antagonized its analgesic effect in the late phase, dose dependently. Aspartame (0.16% alone showed a reduction in pain response . Naloxone (0.4 mg/kg significantly antagonized the antinociceptive effect of morphine in the presence of aspartame (0-0.32% in the early phase. Increasing the dose of aspartame decreased effects of naloxone. MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg as an N- Methyl - D - Aspartate (NMDA antagonist significantly potentiated the effect of aspartame on morphine - induced antinociception in the early phase. In the late phase, naloxone (0.4 mg/kg increased pain response but MK- 801 (0.1 mg/kg induced anti-inflammatory effect significantly. Treatment of animals with MK- 801 alone, significantly induced analgesia in both phases of formalin - test. This effect was potentiated with aspartame dose - dependently. Possible interaction of aspartame with NMDA receptors and its role to facilitate endogenous opioid system are proposed mechanisms of aspartame in modulating morphine - induced antinociception. Furthermore, the resulting association between morphine and aspartame chronic consumption may be explained as an interactive action rather than simple dose combination of both drugs.

  10. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Octacosanol from the Leaves of Sabicea grisea var. grisea in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Barreto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabicea species are used in the Amazon for treatment of fever and malaria, which suggests that its chemical constituents may have some effect on pain and inflammation. Phytochemical analysis of the hexane fraction obtained from the crude ethanol extract from Sabicea grisea var. grisea Cham. & Schltdl (Rubiaceae, an endemic plant in Brazil, resulted in the isolation of octacosanol. This study investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the octacosanol in different experimental models. The crude ethanolic extract and hexane fraction obtained from the leaves of S. grisea produced an inhibition of acetic acid-induced pain. Moreover, octacosanol isolated from the hexane fraction produced a significant inhibition of pain response elicited by acetic acid. Pre-treatment with yohimbine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, notably reversed the antinociceptive activity induced by octacosanol in the abdominal constriction test. Furthermore, mice treated with octacosanol did not exhibit any behavioral alteration during the hot plate and rota-rod tests, indicating non-participation of the supraspinal components in the modulation of pain by octacosanol with no motor abnormality. In the formalin test, octacosanol did not inhibit the licking time in first phase (neurogenic pain, but significantly inhibited the licking time in second phase (inflammatory pain of mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of octacosanol was evaluated using carrageenan-induced pleurisy. The octacosanol significantly reduced the total leukocyte count and neutrophils influx, as well as TNF-α levels in the carrageenan-induced pleurisy. This study revealed that the mechanism responsible for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the octacosanol appears to be partly associated with an inhibition of alpha 2-adrenergic transmission and an inhibition of pathways dependent on pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, these results demonstrated that the

  11. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of extract and isolated compounds from the leaves of Salvia officinalis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Melissa Raboni Alves; Kanazawa, Luiz Kae Sales; das Neves, Thiago Louback Machado; da Silva, Carla Francielle; Horst, Heros; Pizzolatti, Moacir Geraldo; Santos, Adair Roberto Soares; Baggio, Cristiane Hatsuko; Werner, Maria Fernanda de Paula

    2012-01-31

    Salvia officinalis L. has been used as a traditional herbal medicine for gastric disturbances and inflammatory processes. This study investigated the toxicological, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the hydroalcoholic extract (HE) from leaves of Salvia officinalis and its isolated compounds in mice. Mice were treated with HE before the induction of nociceptive response by chemical agents (acetic-acid, formalin, glutamate, capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde). Total leukocytes and plasma extravasation induced by acetic acid and paw oedema induced by glutamate, capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde were also measured. The antinociceptive effect of carnosol and ursolic acid/oleanolic acid were evaluated on formalin and cinnamaldehyde models. In the acute toxicity test the value of estimated LD50 for HE was 44.7579 g/kg. Oral administration of HE (10, 30 and 100 mg/kg) inhibited the number of writhings, total leukocytes and plasma extravasation induced by acetic acid. In the formalin test, HE reduced both neurogenic and inflammatory phases, effect that was affected by naloxone. The glutamate-, capsaicin- and cinnamaldehyde-induced nociception and paw oedema were reduced by HE at doses that did not affect the locomotor activity of mice in the open field test. Carnosol (10mg/kg) and ursolic acid/oleanolic acid (30 mg/kg) inhibited the inflammatory phase of formalin and the nociception and mechanical allodynia induced by cinnamaldehyde. These results demonstrate that HE presents significant anti-inflammatory and also antinociceptive effects on chemical behavioral models of nociception that involves an opioid mechanism. In addition, carnosol and ursolic acid/oleanolic acid contained in this plant appears to contribute for the antinociceptive property of the extract, possibly through a modulatory influence on TRPA1-receptors. However, further studies regarding the precise site and the mechanism of action of HE and carnosol and ursolic acid/oleanolic acid merited exploring

  12. Study of antinociceptive effects on acute pain treated by bioactive fractions of Hyptis suaveolens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azmathunnisa Begum

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the ethanolic extract and its fractions of Hyptis suaveolens (H. suaveolens for antinociceptive and central nervous system depressant effects. Methods: Dried and coarsely powdered aerial parts of plant material were extracted in 80% aqueous ethanol. Further extract was fractionated using solvents of varying polarity. Analgesic properties was assessed using acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate test and locomotor activity were performed in mice using hole board test. Results: The petroleum ether and ethyl acetate extracts had produced significant analgesic properties and were found to be maximum when tested at 400 mg/kg. Both extracts significantly increased the latency time in hot plate test and the action was antagonised by naloxone. The naloxone was not able to alter H. suaveolens induced antinociceptive effect in writhing test. Conclusions: From the point of central nervous system depressant and good protective effect on chemical and thermal pain stimuli, it indicates that H. suaveolens might have resulted from activation of opioid and/or peripheral receptors.

  13. Effect of amantadine on oxymorphone-induced thermal antinociception in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, K T; Pypendop, B H; Escobar, A; Stanley, S D; Ilkiw, J E

    2012-04-01

    This study examined the effect of amantadine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, on the thermal antinociceptive effect of oxymorphone in cats. Six adult healthy cats were used. After baseline thermal threshold determinations, oxymorphone was administered intravenously to maintain plasma oxymorphone concentrations of 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, and 400 ng/mL. In addition, amantadine, or an equivalent volume of saline, was administered intravenously to maintain a plasma amantadine concentration of 1100 ng/mL. Thermal threshold and plasma oxymorphone and amantadine concentrations were determined at each target plasma oxymorphone concentration. Effect maximum models were fitted to the oxymorphone concentration-thermal threshold data, after transformation in % maximum response. Oxymorphone increased skin temperature, thermal threshold, and thermal excursion (i.e., the difference between thermal threshold and skin temperature) in a concentration-dependent manner. No significant difference was found between the amantadine and saline treatments. Mean ± SE oxymorphone EC(50) were 14.2 ± 1.2 and 24.2 ± 7.4 ng/mL in the amantadine and saline groups, respectively. These values were not significantly different. Large differences in oxymorphone EC(50) in the saline and amantadine treatment groups were observed in two cats. These results suggest that amantadine may decrease the antinociceptive dose of oxymorphone in some, but not all, cats. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Post-stroke angiotensin II type 2 receptor activation provides long-term neuroprotection in aged rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennion, Douglas M; Isenberg, Jacob D; Harmel, Allison T

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) by administration of Compound 21 (C21), a selective AT2R agonist, induces neuroprotection in models of ischemic stroke in young adult animals. The mechanisms of this neuroprotective action are varied, and may include direct and indirect effe...

  15. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive properties of Prunus padus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Hyuk; Cha, Dong Seok; Jeon, Hoon

    2012-11-21

    Prunus padus Linne has been widely used as a traditional medicine, with beneficial effects in numerous diseases, including stroke, neuralgia and hepatitis. In this study, we demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of the methylene chloride fraction of P. padus (MPP). In vitro studies, the anti-inflammatory effects of MPP were examined using IFN-γ/LPS-activated murine peritoneal macrophage model. To confirm the anti-inflammatory effects of MPP in vivo, trypsin-induced paw edema test was also conducted. The anti-nociceptive activities of MPP were measured using various experimental pain models including thermal nociception methods such as the tail immersion test and the hot plate test as well as chemical nociception methods like acetic acid-induced writhing test and formalin test. To determine whether analgesic activity of MPP is connected with the opioid receptor, we carried out combination test with naloxone, a nonselective opioid receptor antagonist. In the current study, MPP showed potent inhibitory effect on IFN-γ/LPS-induced NO production. MPP also suppressed not only iNOS enzyme activity but also iNOS expression. Moreover, MPP inhibited COX-2 expression dose dependently. IFN-γ/LPS stimulation induced the translocation of NF-κB to nucleus but it was attenuated in the presence of MPP. In vivo study revealed that MPP could reduce paw volume after subplantar injection of trypsin. In addition, MPP showed potent analgesic activities both thermal and chemical nociception compared to tramadol and indomethacin. Furthermore, pre-treatment of naloxone slightly suppress the analgesic activity of MPP indicating that MPP acts as a partial opioid receptor agonist. In the present study, MPP showed potent anti-inflammatory properties through not only by suppressing various inflammatory mediators in vitro, but reducing the inflammatory edema in vivo. MPP also exhibited strong anti-nociceptive activities via both central and peripheral mechanism by

  16. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Graciela Rocha; Fernandes, Patrícia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP) is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO). The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%). Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP), with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan. PMID:27547225

  17. Antinociceptive Activity of Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Rocha Donald

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Zanthoxylum piperitum DC. (ZP is a traditional medicinal plant used mainly in countries from Asia such as Japan. This study aimed to investigate the antinociceptive effect of ZP essential oil (ZPEO. The major component present in the essential oil was beta-phellandrene (29.39%. Its antinociceptive activity was tested through animal models (formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced paw licking and hot plate. The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated through the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration into the subcutaneous air pouch (SAP, with measurement of cytokines. The results showed antinociceptive effect for ZPEO for the first phase of the formalin-induced licking, glutamate, and hot plate tests. However, ZPEO had no effect on reducing paw licking induced by capsaicin. Finally, ZPEO had no effect against inflammation induced by carrageenan.

  18. Functional plasticity of the N/OFQ-NOP receptor system determines analgesic properties of NOP receptor agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, W; Lambert, D G; Ko, M C; Koch, T

    2014-01-01

    Despite high sequence similarity between NOP (nociceptin/orphanin FQ opioid peptide) and opioid receptors, marked differences in endogenous ligand selectivity, signal transduction, phosphorylation, desensitization, internalization and trafficking have been identified; underscoring the evolutionary difference between NOP and opioid receptors. Activation of NOP receptors affects nociceptive transmission in a site-specific manner, with antinociceptive effects prevailing after peripheral and spinal activation, and pronociceptive effects after supraspinal activation in rodents. The net effect of systemically administered NOP receptor agonists on nociception is proposed to depend on the relative contribution of peripheral, spinal and supraspinal activation, and this may depend on experimental conditions. Functional expression and regulation of NOP receptors at peripheral and central sites of the nociceptive pathway exhibits a high degree of plasticity under conditions of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. In rodents, systemically administered NOP receptor agonists exerted antihypersensitive effects in models of neuropathic and inflammatory pain. However, they were largely ineffective in acute pain while concomitantly evoking severe motor side effects. In contrast, systemic administration of NOP receptor agonists to non-human primates (NHPs) exerted potent and efficacious antinociception in the absence of motor and sedative side effects. The reason for this species difference with respect to antinociceptive efficacy and tolerability is not clear. Moreover, co-activation of NOP and μ-opioid peptide (MOP) receptors synergistically produced antinociception in NHPs. Hence, both selective NOP receptor as well as NOP/MOP receptor agonists may hold potential for clinical use as analgesics effective in conditions of acute and chronic pain. PMID:24762001

  19. Sexual differentiation of rat reproductive versus opioid antinociceptive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Rebecca M; Ulibarri, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that sexual differentiation of opioid analgesic sensitivity may parallel sexual differentiation in reproductive systems. The present study compared organizational and activational roles of testosterone in sexual differentiation in reproductive versus opioid antinociceptive systems in the rat, to assess whether both systems were similarly testosterone dependent. Male rat pups (Sprague-Dawley and Fisher 344 [F344]) were either handled or castrated on postnatal day (PND) 1, and female pups were injected with testosterone propionate (100 or 1000 microg) on PND 2. In adulthood, all rats were gonadectomized (or simply anesthetized) and implanted with either testosterone filled or blank capsules (one 10-mm capsule/100 g of body weight). Two hundred one Sprague-Dawley rats and 178 F344 rats were used. In gonadally intact adults of both rat strains, the antinociceptive potency of subcutaneously injected morphine was significantly greater in males than in females (P defeminization of sexual behavior, ovary weight, and body weight generally met conventional expectations. Compared with male controls, neonatally castrated males gained less body weight, and displayed more lordosis behavior and compromised male sexual behaviors. Compared with female controls, neonatally androgenized females gained more body weight, developed smaller ovaries, and presented less lordosis behavior and more male sexual behaviors. Overall, neonatal testosterone manipulations sufficient to masculinize or defeminize rats in terms of reproductive behavior and physiology also masculinized or defeminized morphine antinociceptive sensitivity. The effects of neonatal castration were reversed by adult testosterone treatment, indicating that sexual differentiation of opioid antinociceptive systems begins before PND 1. Sensitivity to opioid antinociception begins to diverge between males and females early in life. The relationship between gonadal hormone-mediated sexual differentiation of

  20. Antipruritic effect of cold-induced and transient receptor potential-agonist-induced counter-irritation on histaminergic itch in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hjalte H.; Melholt, Camilla; Hilborg, Sigurd D.

    2017-01-01

    (measured by laser-speckle perfusion-imaging). Homotopic thermal counter-irritation was performed with 6 temperatures, ranging from 4°C to 37°C, using a 3 × 3-cm thermal stimulator. Chemical “cold-like” counter-irritation was conducted with 40% L-menthol and 10% trans-cinnamaldehyde, while 5% doxepin...

  1. The antinociceptive potency of N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) and its interaction with endomorphin-1 at the spinal level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Ibolya; Tuboly, Gabor; Benedek, Gyorgy; Horvath, Gyongyi

    2011-10-01

    The endogenous N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA) activates both transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1) and cannabinoid-1 (CB(1)) receptors. The goal of this study was to characterize the antinociceptive potential of NADA on inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia in rats at spinal level, and to determine its interaction with endomorphin-1 (EM) at the spinal level. The effects of NADA and EM on thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated in rats with a unilateral hind paw carrageenan-induced inflammation. Intrathecal injection of either EM (0.03-10 μg) or NADA (1.5-50 μg) caused dose-dependent antihyperalgesia, but NADA was 5.4 times less potent than EM. The antihyperalgesia caused by 15 μg NADA was inhibited by the TRPV1 antagonist AMG9810, but not by CB(1) antagonist/inverse agonist AM 251, whereas the effect of 50 μg NADA was decreased by both drugs. Co-administration of EM with NADA in 1:15 and 1:50 ratios produced a short-lasting potentiation, but isobolographic analysis for the whole investigated period revealed additive interaction between the two endogenous ligands. The results show that both TRPV1 and CB(1) receptor activation play a substantial role in the antinociceptive effects of NADA at spinal level, while co-administration of NADA with EM did not show potentiation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of antinociceptive activity of SSRI (fluoxetine and escitalopram and atypical antidepressants (venlafaxine and mirtazepine and their interaction with morphine and naloxone in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Sikka

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : to study the probable site of antinociceptive action of SSRI (fluoxetine, escitalopram and atypical antidepressants (mirtazapine, venlafaxine and their interaction with morphine and naloxone. Materials and Methods : the study was conducted on albino mice (25-35 grams of either sex. Different doses of morphine (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, fluoxetine (2, 5 and 10 mg/kg, venlafaxine (30, 40 and 50 mg/kg, mirtazapine (3, 5 and 7 mg/kg and escitalopram (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg were administered subcutaneously to obtain their subanalgesic doses using tail flick analgesiometer. Tail flick latencies were obtained at 15, 30, 60 and 120 min. after drug administration. Naloxone (1 mg/kg was administered 10 minutes prior to test drug for testing antagonism. Observations : fluoxetine (5 and 10 mg/kg, mirtazapine (5 and 7 mg/kg and venlafaxine (40 and 50 mg/kg were found to have antinociceptive activity but not at lower doses. Escitalopram failed to show any antinociceptive activity at any of the doses used. The antinociceptive effect of all the drugs was antagonized by naloxone (1 mg/kg. Further, subanalgesic doses of fluoxetine, mirtazapine and venlafaxine showed analgesic activity with suboptimal dose of morphine (0.5 mg/kg. Result and conclusion : fluoxetine, mirtazapine and venlafaxine have antinociceptive activity whereas escitalopram doesn′t; their site of action seems to be the same as that of opioid analgesics (′mue′ receptors. However, other pathways (cholinergic, histaminic, noradrenergic, GABAergic may be involved in mediation of their analgesic activity, deserving further elucidation. Results apparently show that these drugs may be useful in the management of pain as monotherapy or in combination with other opioids.

  3. Effects of oxymorphazone in frogs: long lasting antinociception in vivo, and apparently irreversible binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benyhe, S.; Hoffman, G.; Varga, E.; Hosztafi, S.; Toth, G.; Borsodi, A.; Wollemann, M.

    1989-01-01

    Oxymorphazone was found to be a relatively weak antinociceptive drug in intact frog (Rana esculenta) when acetic acid was used as pain stimulus. Frogs remained analgesic for at least 48 hrs following oxymorphazone administration. The ligand increased the latency of wiping reflex in spinal frogs too. There effects were blocked by naloxone. In equilibrium binding studies (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone had high affinity to the opioid receptors of frog brain and spinal cord as well. Kinetic experiments show that only 25% of the bound (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone is readily dissociable. Preincubation of the membranes with labeled oxymorphazone results in a washing resistant inhibition of the opioid binding sites. At least 70% of the (/sup 3/H)oxymorphazone specific binding is apparently irreversible after reaction at 5 nM ligand concentration, and this can be enhanced by a higher concentration of tritiated ligand.

  4. Opioid neurotransmission modulates defensive behavior and fear-induced antinociception in dangerous environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coimbra, Norberto Cysne; Calvo, Fabrício; Almada, Rafael Carvalho; Freitas, Renato Leonardo; Paschoalin-Maurin, Tatiana; Dos Anjos-Garcia, Tayllon; Elias-Filho, Daoud Hibrahim; Ubiali, Walter Adriano; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Tracey, Irene

    2017-06-23

    The effects of endogenous opioid peptide antagonists on panic-related responses are controversial. Using elevated mazes and a prey-versus-predator paradigm, we investigated the involvement of the endogenous opioid peptide-mediated system in the modulation of anxiety- and panic attack-induced responses and innate fear-induced antinociception in the present work. Wistar rats were intraperitoneally pretreated with either physiological saline or naloxone at different doses and were subjected to either the elevated plus- or T-maze test or confronted by Crotalus durissus terrificus. The defensive behaviors of the rats were recorded in the presence of the predator and at 24h after the confrontation, when the animals were placed in the experimental enclosure without the rattlesnake. The peripheral non-specific blockade of opioid receptors had a clear anxiolytic-like effect on the rats subjected to the elevated plus-maze but not on those subjected to the elevated T-maze; however, a clear panicolytic-like effect was observed, i.e., the defensive behaviors decreased, and the prey-versus-predator interaction responses evoked by the presence of the rattlesnakes increased. A similar effect was noted when the rats were exposed to the experimental context in the absence of the venomous snake. After completing all tests, the naloxone-treated groups exhibited less anxiety/fear-induced antinociception than the control group, as measured by the tail-flick test. These findings demonstrate the anxiolytic and panicolytic-like effects of opioid receptor blockade. In addition, the fearlessness behavior displayed by preys treated with naloxone at higher doses enhanced the defensive behavioral responses of venomous snakes. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background of study: Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances which can be used to treat various infectious diseases. Aim: The study evaluated the in vitro antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Justicia secunda Vahl leaf. Methods: The acute ...

  6. Antinociceptive, Anti-Inflammatory and Antipyretic Activities of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: The leaf methanol extract of Ruta graveolens was evaluated for antinociceptive activity using the acetic acid writhing and hot-plate tests in mice, also anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities using the carrageenan-induced oedema and E. coli-induced pyrexia tests in rats, respectively. Results: R.

  7. Antinociceptive Properties and Acute Toxicity of Ethanol Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elba LC Amorim1 and Jackson RGS Almeida2. 1Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, 50.740-521, Recife, .... coumarin and flavonoid derivatives. These compounds are under investigation. Anti-nociceptive ..... Alexandre-Moreira MS, Piuvezam MR, Araújo CC,. Thomas G. Studies on the anti-inflammatory and analgesic ...

  8. Anti-nociceptive effect of Agrimonia eupatoria extract on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Natural products including Agrimonia eupatoria are considered an incomparable source of molecular diversity that has led to the medicines, especially for pain treatment. To investigate the antinociception of Agrimonia eupatoria, we examined its activity in a rat model of cisplatin neuropathy. Materials and ...

  9. Evaluation of the Antinociceptive Effect of the Ethanolic Extract of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPLC analysis revealed the presence of gallic acid, ellagic acid and Punicalagins A&B. Conclusion: The results demonstrated that ethanol pomegranate extract has an antinociceptive effect that may be related to the presence of identified phytochemicals. Key words: Pain, ethanolic extract of pomegranate, analgesia, ...

  10. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Solvent Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    SGRS College of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmacology, Pune University, Saswad, Tal-Purandar, Pune 412301,. India ... the plant material. Keywords: Tagetes erectus, Antinociceptive, Anti-inflammatory. Received: 30 December 2008. Revised accepted: 18 May 2009 ... solvent extracts of the leaves of this plant for.

  11. Peripheral antinociceptive effects of morphine after burn injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Dahl, J B; Kehlet, H

    1993-01-01

    In a double-blind study, 2 mg of morphine in saline, or saline only, was given subcutaneously into a second-degree bilateral leg-burn injury in 12 volunteers. Heat-pain thresholds and pressure-pain thresholds were significantly increased by local morphine administration. These results confirm exp...... experimental data demonstrating a peripheral antinociceptive effects of opioids in inflamed tissue....

  12. Antinociceptive and anti-Inflammatory effects of the standardized oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Callistemon lanceolatus (Syn. C. citrinus curtis; Family: Myrtaceae) leaf oil was studied for the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity in experimental animals. C. lanceolatus, 25 – 100 mg/kg administered orally for 3 days exhibited graded dose response equivalent to 21.95% - 89.90% protection in the tail ...

  13. Experimental evaluation of anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clove oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) is a light yellowish fluid obtained from dried flower buds. Clove oil is used traditionally to relieve toothache. Aim: The aim of the present work was to study the anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and antipyretic potential of clove oil in mice. Methods: Analgesic activity ...

  14. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of the root extract of Elephantorrhiza elephantina (Burch.) Skeels (Fabaceae) were investigated using wistar rats. The extract was administered intraperitoneally (i.p) to rats at graded doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BWt. Carrageenan and. Histamine were injected into rat ...

  15. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The alcoholic extract of Polygala arvensis (family Polygalaceae) was screened for antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animals. The extract was administered for three consecutive days. Following an oral dose of 25 - 100 mg/kg, the extract exhibited graded dose response equivalent to 16.24% ...

  16. Evaluation of micronutrients level and antinociceptive property of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-02-01

    Feb 1, 2010 ... compared with adequate level of micronutrients for orchid crops. The crude methanol extract and different fractions of E. laciniata were also investigated for in vivo antinociceptive activity using Tail- flick model. Except for boron, all other micronutrients investigated were well in the limits recommended.

  17. Antinociceptive effects of Cremophor EL orally administered to mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Tabarelli

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are frequently used to improve solubilization of lipophilic drugs. Cremophor EL (CrEL is a polyoxyethylated castor oil surfactant used to solubilize water-insoluble drugs such as anesthetic, antineoplastic, immunosuppressive and analgesic drugs, vitamins and new synthetic compounds, including potential analgesics. The antinociceptive effect of CrEL (3.2, 6.4 and 10.6 g/kg, in 10 ml/kg body weight, by gavage on the abdominal writhing response induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid (0.8%, 10 ml/kg body weight and on the tail immersion test was investigated in mice. Control animals received castor oil (10 ml/kg body weight or saline (0.9% NaCl, 10 ml/kg body weight. CrEL reduced nociception in a dose-dependent manner in both tests. At 10.6 g/kg, CrEL caused antinociception similar to that induced by dipyrone (300 mg/kg, by gavage in the abdominal writhing test, and antinociception similar to that induced by morphine (20 mg/kg, by gavage in the tail immersion test. The effect of castor oil was similar to that of saline in both assays. These data indicate that the appropriate controls should be used when evaluating the effects of potential antinociceptive agents dissolved in CrEL.

  18. Antinociceptive Activity of Thymoquinone and its Structural Analogues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: The quinones were prepared by an oxidation procedure using molecular oxygen and catalysis with [CoII(salen)] from the respective phenols. The antinociceptive activity of ... Vehicle (5 % Tween 80) or morphine (10 mg/kg) were used as control group and standard drug, respectively. The amount of time spent ...

  19. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Solvent Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (phenylbutazone). It also increased pain threshold in the oedematous right hind limb paw of the rats. Conclusion: The results obtained show that the extracts of Tagetes erectus L. (Asteraceae) has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. This finding provides a basis for the traditional use of the plant material.

  20. Antipyretic and Antinociceptive properties o the aqueous extract and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vernonia amygdalina is commonly used for food and health purposes. The processing of the leaf for food is usually aimed at removing bitter tasting principles like saponins. This study was designed to determine the antipyretic and antinociceptive properties of the aqueous extract, crude saponin and the chromatographic ...

  1. Chemical composition and antinociceptive effects of essential oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the antinociceptive effect of the essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia. tournefortii (EOGT) in various experimental models. Methods: The essential oil from the aerial parts of Gundelia tournefortii was extracted using steam distillation method median lethal dose (LD50) of EOGT was evaluated ...

  2. Acupuncture manipulation enhances anti-nociceptive effect on formalin-induced pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gun Ho; Yeom, Mijung; Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Hyejung; Shim, Insop; Hong, Mee Sook; Kim, Chang-Ju; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2010-02-01

    In order to apply appropriate acupuncture stimulation, different needle manipulation techniques are required. These manipulations are performed in many ways such as twirling the needle, varying the insertion angle, etc. The present study was designed to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of these manipulations to the acupuncture point ST36 on formalin-induced pain in rats. Animals were divided into four groups: non-treated control (CON), acupuncture without manipulation (AT), acupuncture with twirling manipulation (TM) and acupuncture with lifting-thrusting manipulation (LM) group. Level of pain was measured in formalin-injected rats in the early (0-10 minutes) and the late (10-60 minutes) phase. Several pain-related gene expressions were investigated in the spinal cord using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Formalin-induced pain was significantly reduced in the TM and the LM groups, compared with the CON and the AT groups. TM was more effective than LM in both phases. Needle manipulation was also effective in suppressing the mRNA expression of pain-related genes such as Fos, opioid receptor-like 1, tachykinin 1, tachykinin receptor 1, mu-opioid receptor and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A in the spinal cord. The TM and the LM groups showed enhanced analgesia, compared with the AT group. This effect might be related to the suppression of the transcription of pain-related genes.

  3. Enhanced Chronic Pain Management Utilizing Chemokine Receptor Antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    treatment; Analgesia; Nociception; Antinociception; Inflammation; Chemokines; Chemokine receptor antagonists; Opioid analgesics; Animal models of pain...processes), affect the ability of opioid drugs to counteract pain. We predicted that one way of increasing the effectiveness of the pain-relieving...more chemokine receptors would not only diminish various types of pain, but could also increase the efficacy of given doses of opioid analgesics. Thus

  4. Synergistic interactions between the antinociceptive effect of Rhodiola rosea extract and B vitamins in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Ruiz, Rosa Mariana; González-Trujano, María Eva; Déciga-Campos, Myrna

    2013-11-15

    In this study, the pharmacological interactions between a Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract and B-vitamins such as thiamine (B1), riboflavine (B2), pyridoxine (B6), cyanocobalamin (B12) and a mixture of vitamins B1+B6+B12 was investigated in the mouse formalin test. Individual dose response curves of the Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract, as well as B-vitamins alone or in a mixture were evaluated in mice in which nociception was induced with 2% formalin intraplantarly. The antinociceptive mechanisms of the Rhodiola rosea were investigated by exploring the role of the opioid and serotonin receptors and the nitric oxide pathway. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interactions between the Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract and each B-vitamin individually or the mixture of vitamins B1+B6+B12 by using the ED30 and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. Administration of the Rhodiola rosea extract alone or in combination with all of the vitamins produced a significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive response. The antinociceptive effect of the Rhodiola rosea extract (ED50=81 mg/kg, p.o.) was significant and reverted in the presence of antagonists of the 5-HT1A, GABA/BDZs and opioid receptors and by blocking mediators of the nitric oxide/cGMP/K(+) channels pathway. Isobolograms demonstrate that all of the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction experimental ED30 values were significantly smaller than those calculated theoretically. These results provide evidence that a Rhodiola rosea ethanol extract in combination with B-vitamins produces a significant diminution in the nociceptive response in a synergistic manner, which is controlled by various mechanisms. These findings could aid in the design of clinical studies and suggest that these combinations could be applied for pain therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Antinociceptive activity of the essential oil from Artemisia ludoviciana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Eugenio, Gerardo D; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Bye, Robert; Linares, Edelmira; Mata, Rachel

    2016-02-17

    Aerial parts of Artemisia ludoviciana are widely used in Mexico for treating gastrointestinal disorders, painful complaints and diabetes. To establish the preclinical efficacy as antinociceptive agent of the essential oil (EO) from the aerial parts of A. ludoviciana using well-known animal models. Acute antinociceptive effect of EO (1, 10, 31.6, 100, and 316mg/kg, i.p.) was evaluated using the hot plate and paw formalin models in mice. The motor effects were assessed with the rota-rod and open field assays. The volatile components obtained by headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) and hydrodistillation were determined using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. EO decreased first and second phases of formalin test; in the first stage, the better effect was obtained with the treatment of 316mg/kg but in the second phase, time licking was attenuated at the doses of 31.6, 100 and 316mg/kg. The effectiveness of EO (ED50=25.9mg/kg) for attenuating neurogenic pain was corroborated using the hot plate test. The antinociceptive action of EO was blocked by naloxone suggesting that its mode of action involved an opioid mechanism. Furthermore, EO (316mg/kg) did not affect animal motor and coordination functions when tested by the rota-rod and open field tests. The latter results indicated that the pharmacological effects exerted by EO during the hot plate and formalin test are truly antinociceptive. GC-MS analysis of EO revealed that (±)-camphor, γ-terpineol, 1,8-cineole and borneol were the major volatile compounds of the plant. EO from A. ludoviciana showed significant antinociceptive effect, which appeared to be partially mediated by the opioid system. These findings could support the long-term use of A. ludoviciana for treating painful complaints in Mexican folk medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. β2-Adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle does not modulate disease severity in the rodent meniscectomy model of osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, D.P.; Jones, S.W.; Parr, T.; Bardsley, R.; Doherty, M.; Maciewicz, R.A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective To examine whether β2-adrenergic agonist-induced hypertrophy of the quadriceps skeletal muscle can modulate the severity of osteoarthritis (OA) in the rodent meniscectomy (MNX) model. Methods Male Lewis rats were subcutaneously administered with 1.5 mg/kg/day clenbuterol hydrochloride (n = 15) or saline vehicle (n = 20) for 14 days. Following pre-treatment, five animals from each group were sacrificed to assess the immediate effects of clenbuterol. The remaining animals underwent either invasive knee surgery (clenbuterol pre-treated n = 10; saline pre-treated n = 10) or a sham control surgical procedure (saline pre-treated n = 5). During disease initiation and progression, weight bearing was assessed by hindlimb loading. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) protein isoforms were quantified by silver stained SDS PAGE. OA severity was graded by assessment of toluidine blue stained step coronal sections of the total knee joint. Results Clenbuterol treatment resulted in an increase in total bodyweight, growth rate and in quadriceps skeletal muscle mass. Meniscal surgery resulted in the development of OA-like lesions, changes to weight bearing, and changes in MHC protein expression in the quadriceps. Clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy had no effect on either weight bearing or articular pathology following MNX surgery. Conclusions Our data reveal that clenbuterol-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy is unable to mimic the beneficial clinical effects of increased musculature derived through targeted strength training in humans, in a rodent model of MNX-induced OA. In addition we observed fibre-type switching to “slow twitch” in the quadriceps muscle during the induction of OA that warrants further investigation as to its relationship to joint stability. PMID:20060953

  7. Thymol, a dietary monoterpene phenol abrogates mitochondrial dysfunction in β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoor Meeran, M F; Jagadeesh, G S; Selvaraj, P

    2016-01-25

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been suggested to be one of the important pathological events in isoproterenol (ISO), a synthetic catecholamine and β-adrenergic agonist induced myocardial infarction (MI). In this context, we have evaluated the impact of thymol against ISO induced oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction involved in the pathology of mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5 mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. Isoproterenol (100 mg/kg body weight) was subcutaneously injected into rats on 6th and 7th day to induce MI. To explore the extent of cardiac mitochondrial damage, the activities/levels of cardiac marker enzymes, mitochondrial lipid peroxidation products, antioxidants, lipids, calcium, adenosine triphosphate and multi marker enzymes were evaluated. Isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats showed a significant increase in the activities of cardiac diagnostic markers, heart mitochondrial lipid peroxidation, lipids, calcium, and a significant decrease in the activities/levels of heart mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, isocitrate, malate, α-ketoglutarate and NADH-dehydrogenases, cytochrome-C-oxidase, and adenosine triphosphate. Thymol pre and co-treatment showed near normalized effects on all the biochemical parameters studied. Transmission electron microscopic findings and mitochondrial swelling studies confirmed our biochemical findings. The in vitro study also revealed the potent free-radical scavenging activity of thymol. Thus, thymol attenuates the involvement of ISO against oxidative stress and calcium uniporter malfunction associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Blood-brain transfer and antinociception of linear and cyclic N-methyl-guanidine and thiourea-enkephalins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Mathieu; Wynendaele, Evelien; Mauchauffée, Elodie; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; Bojnik, Engin; Benyhe, Sandor; Peremans, Kathelijne; Polis, Ingeborgh; Burvenich, Christian; Gjedde, Albert; Hernandez, Jean-François; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Enkephalins are active in regulation of nociception in the body and are key in development of new synthetic peptide analogs that target centrally located opioid receptors. In this study, we investigated the in vivo blood-brain barrier (BBB) penetration behavior and antinociceptive activity of two cyclic enkephalin analogs with a thiourea (CycS) or a N-methyl-guanidine bridge (CycNMe), and their linear counterparts (LinS and LinNMe) in mice, as well as their in vitro metabolic stability. (125)I-LinS had the highest blood-brain clearance (K1=3.46μL/gmin), followed by (125)I-LinNMe, (125)I-CycNMe, and (125)I-CycS (K1=1.64, 0.31, and 0.11μL/gmin, respectively). Also, these peptides had a high metabolic stability (t1/2>1h) in mouse serum and brain homogenate, and half-inhibition constant (Ki) values in the nanomolar range with predominantly μ-opioid receptor selectivity. The positively charged NMe-enkephalins showed a higher antinociceptive activity (LinNMe: 298% and CycNMe: 205%), expressed as molar-dose normalized area under the curve (AUC) relative to morphine, than the neutral S-enkephalins (CycS: 122% and LinS: 130%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A mechanistic approach to anti-nociceptive potential of Artemisia macrocephala Jacquem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Mohammad; Shah, Ismail; Ali, Niaz; Shah, Wadood Ali

    2016-05-26

    Artemisia macrocephala Jacquem (A. macrocephala), locally known as "Tarkha", is a perennial plant found abundantly in northern areas of Pakistan. It is widely used in traditional medicine to treat fever, pain, gastrointestinal disorders and diabetes. Till date, no published studies are available regarding the in-vivo antinociceptive potential of the crude extract and sub-fractions from the aerial parts of A. macrocephala. Antinociceptive effects of the crude methanolic extract and its sub-fractions were assessed using experimental pain models, including chemical nociception induced by intraperitoneal acetic acid or subplantar formalin injection and thermal nociception like tail immersion test in-vivo. The administration of various doses of crude extract and its fractions showed a dose-dependent indomethacin like antinociceptive effect in acetic acid induced writhing, subplantar formalin injection animal model suggesting the involvement of central mechanism of pain inhibition. Moreover, the crude extract and sub-fractions, on tail flick model (thermal nociception) demonstrated the involvement of central mechanism and significantly increased the latency time to 66.54, 82.94 and 70.53 %. The antagonistic study proposed the possible involvement of opioid receptor using naloxone as non-selective antagonist. The pharmacologically active chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions were further subjected to column chromatography that lead to the isolation four compounds. These isolated compounds were then subjected to various spectroscopic techniques upon which they were confirmed to be one sterol and three flavonoid derivatives. These findings suggest that Artemisia macrocephala possesses peripheral and central analgesic potentials partially associated with opioid system that support its folkloric use for the management of pain. The isolated compounds are currently under investigation in our laboratory for analgesic activity and its possible mechanism of action. The results

  10. Evaluation of antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic activities of methanolic extract of Terminalia citrina leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narhari Das

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and anxiolytic effects of methanolic extracts of Terminalia citrina (T. citrina leaves (Family: Combretaceae. Methods: The antinociceptive activity was evaluated by acetic acid induced writhing method and radiant heat tail flick method while anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by human red blood cell membrane stabilization method and anxiolytic activity by elevated plus maze model. Results: The methanolic extract of T. citrina leaves showed significant antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anxiolytic effects in dose dependent manner compared to their respective standard drugs. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that T. citrina possesses antinociceptive, antiinflammatory and anxiolytic effects.

  11. Antinociceptive and toxic effects of (+)-epibatidine oxalate attributable to nicotinic agonist activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupniak, N M; Patel, S; Marwood, R; Webb, J; Traynor, J R; Elliott, J; Freedman, S B; Fletcher, S R; Hill, R G

    1994-12-01

    1. Epibatidine is an analgesic substance, isolated from the skin of the poisonous frog Epipedobates tricolor, for which the mechanism of action was previously unknown. 2. The IC50 of synthetic (+)-epibatidine oxalate (the naturally occurring isomer) for [3H]-nicotine binding to rat whole-brain membranes was 0.1 nM. The (-)-isomer also exhibited high affinity (IC50 = 0.2 nM). 3. (+)- and (-)-Epibatidine exhibited much lower affinity for displacement of the muscarinic ligand [3H]-N-methylscopolamine binding to rat cortical membranes (Kapp = 6.9 microM and 16.0 microM respectively). The (+)-enantiomer of epibatidine had an antagonist/agonist (NMS/oxo-M) binding ratio of 4.2 This is consistent with a muscarinic antagonist profile. 4. (+)-Epibatidine oxalate (10 microM) did not cause significant (> 30%) displacement of radioligand binding to opioid, excitatory amino acid, benzodiazepine, 5-HT, dopamine, adrenaline or peptide receptors. 5. (+)- and (-)-Epibatidine (5-20 micrograms kg-1 s.c.) doubled response latency in the mouse hot-plate test. Antinociception and behavioural depression induced by (+)-epibatidine (5 micrograms kg-1) was fully blocked by the nicotinic antagonists mecamylamine (2 mg kg-1 s.c.) or dihydro-beta-erythroidine (2 mg kg-1 s.c.). The muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (0.4 and 10 mg kg-1 s.c.) caused partial reversal of antinociception induced by (+)-epibatidine in mice, but not in rats. 6. These findings demonstrate that (+)-epibatidine oxalate salt is a highly selective and potent nicotinic analgesic agent.

  12. Distinct contributions of Orai1 and TRPC1 to agonist-induced [Ca(2+](i signals determine specificity of Ca(2+-dependent gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwei Ling Ong

    Full Text Available Regulation of critical cellular functions, including Ca(2+-dependent gene expression, is determined by the temporal and spatial aspects of agonist-induced Ca(2+ signals. Stimulation of cells with physiological concentrations of agonists trigger increases [Ca(2+](i due to intracellular Ca(2+ release and Ca(2+ influx. While Orai1-STIM1 channels account for agonist-stimulated [Ca(2+](i increase as well as activation of NFAT in cells such as lymphocytes, RBL and mast cells, both Orai1-STIM1 and TRPC1-STIM1 channels contribute to [Ca(2+](i increases in human submandibular gland (HSG cells. However, only Orai1-mediated Ca(2+ entry regulates the activation of NFAT in HSG cells. Since both TRPC1 and Orai1 are activated following internal Ca(2+ store depletion in these cells, it is not clear how the cells decode individual Ca(2+ signals generated by the two channels for the regulation of specific cellular functions. Here we have examined the contributions of Orai1 and TRPC1 to carbachol (CCh-induced [Ca(2+](i signals and activation of NFAT in single cells. We report that Orai1-mediated Ca(2+ entry generates [Ca(2+](i oscillations at different [CCh], ranging from very low to high. In contrast, TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+ entry generates sustained [Ca(2+](i elevation at high [CCh] and contributes to frequency of [Ca(2+](i oscillations at lower [agonist]. More importantly, the two channels are coupled to activation of distinct Ca(2+ dependent gene expression pathways, consistent with the different patterns of [Ca(2+](i signals mediated by them. Nuclear translocation of NFAT and NFAT-dependent gene expression display "all-or-none" activation that is exclusively driven by local [Ca(2+](i generated by Orai1, independent of global [Ca(2+](i changes or TRPC1-mediated Ca(2+ entry. In contrast, Ca(2+ entry via TRPC1 primarily regulates NFκB-mediated gene expression. Together, these findings reveal that Orai1 and TRPC1 mediate distinct local and global Ca(2+ signals

  13. Antinociceptive Activity of an Ethanol Extract of Justicia spicigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Domínguez, Fabiola; Carranza-Álvarez, Candy; Castellanos, Luis Manuel Orozco; Martínez-Medina, Rosa María; Pérez-Urizar, José

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and sedative activity of an ethanol extract of Justicia spicigera an evergreen used in Mexican traditional medicine for the relief of pain, wounds, fever and inflammation. At 200 mg/kg po, the maximum dose examined, the ethanol extract of J. spicigera (JSE) had analgesic activity in mice in the acetic acid writhing test, the second phase of the formalin test and the tail flick test that was similar in efficacy to the NSAID, naproxen (150 mg/kg po). JSE was inactive in the hot plate test and and the ketamine-induced sleeping time test; it had no sedative effects. These results show that the ethanol extract from the leaves of J. spicigera has antinociceptive effects in mice without inducing sedation. Drug Dev Res 77 : 180-186, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association of terpinolene and diclofenac presents antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory synergistic effects in a model of chronic inflammation

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    E.M.A. Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacological treatment of inflammatory pain is usually done by administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. These drugs present high efficacy, although side effects are common, especially gastrointestinal lesions. One of the pharmacological strategies to minimize such effects is the combination of drugs and natural products with synergistic analgesic effect. The monoterpene terpinolene (TPL is a chemical constituent of essential oils present in many plant species, which have pharmacological activities, such as analgesic and anti-inflammatory. The association of ineffective doses of TPL and diclofenac (DCF (3.125 and 1.25 mg/kg po, respectively presented antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in the acute (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h, after treatment and chronic (10 days inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA in the right hind paw of female Wistar rats (170-230 g, n=6-8. The mechanical hyperalgesia was assessed by the Randall Selitto paw pressure test, which determines the paw withdrawal thresholds. The development of edema was quantified by measuring the volume of the hind paw by plethismography. The TPL/DCF association reduced neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes in the histological analysis of the paw, following a standard staining protocol with hematoxylin and eosin and the counts were performed with the aid of optical microscopy after chronic oral administration of these drugs. Moreover, the TPL/DCF association did not induce macroscopic gastric lesions. A possible mechanism of action of the analgesic effect is the involvement of 5-HT2A serotonin receptors, because ketanserin completely reversed the antinociceptive effect of the TPL/DCF association. These results suggest that the TPL/DCF association had a synergistic anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without causing apparent gastric injury, and that the serotonergic system may be involved in the antinociceptive effect of this

  15. Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-inflammatory and Antinociceptive Effects of the Alcoholic Extract of Indian Polygala arvensis in Experimental Animals. ... time in the hot plate method by 69.55% (p < 0.01) and 107.13% (p < 0.001) respectively as well as in analgesymeter-induced mechanical pain by 28.84% (p < 0.5) and 55.71% (p < 0.05) respectively.

  16. Synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Castro, Angel Josabad; Zapata-Morales, Juan Ramón; Hernández-Munive, Abigail; Campos-Xolalpa, Nimsi; Pérez-Gutiérrez, Salud; Pérez-González, Cuauhtémoc

    2015-05-15

    Porphyrins are natural compounds with several biological activities. We report the synthesis and the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of 4 porphyrins: 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin (TPP), 5,10,15,20-tetra(4'-fluorophenyl)porphyrin (TpFPP), 5,10,15,20-tetra(4'-chlorophenyl)porphyrin (TpClPP), and 5,10,15,20-tetra(4'-bromophenyl)porphyrin (TpBrPP). The in vitro anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated on heat-induced hemolysis. The antinociceptive effects were evaluated using the hot plate and formalin tests. The in vivo anti-inflammatory assays were tested on the acute and chronic TPA (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate) method to induce ear edema. The anti-arthritic effects were evaluated using carrageenan kaolin induced arthritis (CKIA). All porphyrins inhibited hemolysis with similar potency than naproxen (NPX). In the antinociceptive tests, all porphyrins tested at 200mg/kg showed similar effects compared to 100mg/kg NPX. In the in vivo anti-inflammatory acute assay, only three porphyrins (TPP, TpFPP and TpBrPP) decreased inflammation with similar activity than 2mg/ear indomethacin (IND). Further anti-inflammatory experiments were carried out with TPP, TpFPP and TpBrPP. In the in vivo anti-inflammatory chronic assay, porphyrins decreased inflammation with similar activity than 8mg/kg IND. Porphyrins tested at 200mg/kg showed anti-arthritic effects. The antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and arthritic activities of porphyrins suggest that these compounds might be a good alternative for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Antinociceptive effect of extracts of Marrubium astracanicum Jacq. aerial parts

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    Niloofar Kahkeshani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The genus Marrubium is used for treatment of joint pain, gout, stomach-ache and colic in Iranian Traditional Medicine. Marrubium astracanicum Jacq. (M. astracanicum is a native species in the flora of Iran. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive properties of various extracts of aerial parts of M. astracanicum.Materials and Methods: Antinociceptive activities of total hydroalcoholic extract (THE and its n-hexane (non-polar and residual partition (polar fractions were analyzed using formalin test in mice. Morphine (5 mg/kg and normal saline were used as positive and negative controls, respectively.Results: Intraperitoneal administration of THE (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, non-polar fraction (200 mg/kg and polar fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg, 30 min before formalin injection, caused significant analgesic activity in acute phase (0-5 min after formalin injection of formalin test (p0.05 in comparison with morphine.  In chronic phase (15–60 min after formalin injection, non-polar and polar fractions (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg showed significant analgesic activity (p0.05 in comparison with morphine.Conclusion: Different extracts of M. astracanicum demonstrated antinociceptive activity that support the traditional usage of Marrubium genus for the treatment of arthritis, gout and other inflammatory diseases.

  18. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Bowdichia virgilioides (sucupira).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomazzi, S M; Silva, C B; Silveira, D C R; Vasconcellos, C L C; Lira, A F; Cambui, E V F; Estevam, C S; Antoniolli, A R

    2010-02-03

    Bowdichia virgilioides Kunth (Leguminosae Papilonoideae) is a plant with anti-inflammatory activity used in folk medicine. The importance of this plant promoted its inclusion in Brazilian Pharmacopoeia. In order to evaluate the actions of this plant, studies were performed on antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. The aqueous extracts (AE) of Bowdichia virgilioides inner bark and leaves were used at 100, 200, and 400mg/kg. Antinociceptive activity of plant extract was evaluated by writhing, hot-plate and formalin tests. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using paw oedema and peritonitis methods. Oral treatment with the AE of inner bark or leaves elicited inhibitory activity (P400mg/kg, and reduced the formalin effect at the second-phase (200 and 400mg/kg, P400mg/kg (P<0.05), and by the reference compounds aspirin (P<0.001) and dexamethasone (P<0.001), respectively. The AE of Bowdichia virgilioides shows antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, supporting the folkloric usage of the plant to treat various inflammatory diseases. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Citral: a monoterpene with prophylactic and therapeutic anti-nociceptive effects in experimental models of acute and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishijima, Catarine M; Ganev, Ellen G; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Martins, Daniel F; Rocha, Lúcia R M; Santos, Adair R S; Hiruma-Lima, Clelia A

    2014-08-05

    Citral (3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienal) is an open-chain monoterpenoid present in the essential oils of several medicinal plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of orally administered citral in experimental models of acute and chronic nociception, inflammation, and gastric ulcers caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Oral treatment with citral significantly inhibited the neurogenic and inflammatory pain responses induced by intra-plantar injection of formalin. Citral also had prophylactic and therapeutic anti-nociceptive effects against mechanical hyperalgesia in plantar incision surgery, chronic regional pain syndrome, and partial ligation of sciatic nerve models, without producing any significant motor dysfunction. In addition, citral markedly attenuated the pain response induced by intra-plantar injection of glutamate and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator), as well as by intrathecal (i.t.) injection of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid [NMDA] and 1-amino-1,3-dicarboxycyclopentane [trans-ACPD], respectively), substance P, and cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α. However, citral potentiated behaviours indicative of pain caused by i.t., but not intra-plantar, injection of a transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor type 1 (TRPV1) agonist. Finally, the anti-nociceptive action of citral was found to involve significant activation of the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor. The effect of citral was accompanied by a gastro-protective effect against NSAID-induced ulcers. Together, these results show the potential of citral as a new drug for the treatment of pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Antinociceptive action of oxytocin involves inhibition of potassium channel currents in lamina II neurons of the rat spinal cord

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    Darbon Pascal

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing evidence in the literature shows that oxytocin (OT has a strong spinal anti-nociceptive action. Oxytocinergic axons originating from a subpopulation of paraventricular hypothalamic neurons establish synaptic contacts with lamina II interneurons but little is known about the functional role of OT with respect to neuronal firing and excitability. Results Using the patch-clamp technique, we have recorded lamina II interneurons in acute transverse lumbar spinal cord slices of rats (15 to 30 days old and analyzed the OT effects on action potential firing ability. In the current clamp mode, we found that bath application of a selective OT-receptor agonist (TGOT reduced firing in the majority of lamina II interneurons exhibiting a bursting firing profile, but never in those exhibiting a single spike discharge upon depolarization. Interestingly, OT-induced reduction in spike frequency and increase of firing threshold were often observed, leading to a conversion of the firing profile from repetitive and delayed profiles into phasic ones and sometimes further into single spike profile. The observed effects following OT-receptor activation were completely abolished when the OT-receptor agonist was co-applied with a selective OT-receptor antagonist. In current and voltage clamp modes, we show that these changes in firing are strongly controlled by voltage-gated potassium currents. More precisely, transient IA currents and delayed-rectifier currents were reduced in amplitude and transient IA current was predominantly inactivated after OT bath application. Conclusion This effect of OT on the firing profile of lamina II neurons is in good agreement with the antinociceptive and analgesic properties of OT described in vivo.

  1. Restoration of Spermatogenesis Using a New Combined Herbal Formula of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and Angelica gigas Nakai in an Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist-Induced Rat Model of Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jun; Koo, Yean Kyoung; Park, Min Jung; Hwang, Yoon Kyung; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Park, Nam Cheol

    2017-10-25

    We investigated the protective effect of a mixture of 2 herbal extracts, KH-465, which consisted of Epimedium koreanum Nakai and Angelica gigas Nakai, on spermatogenesis in a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist-induced rat model of male infertility. Seventy-five 12-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, containing 15 rats each: a normal control group that received no treatment and 4 experimental groups (I, II, III, and IV) in which an LHRH agonist was administered for 4 weeks to induce spermatogenic failure. Group I received distilled water, and groups II, III, and IV received 200 mg/kg/day of KH-465, 400 mg/kg/day KH-465, and depo-testosterone for 4 weeks, respectively. Weight changes of the testis and epididymis, sperm count motility, and levels of testosterone (T), free T, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were estimated. Body, testis, and epididymis weight showed no significant differences among the control and experimental groups. Treatment with KH-465 increased the sperm count and motility. Serum hormone levels of T, free T, and FSH were not significantly different in the experimental groups, while the LH level was higher than in the LHRH agonist-induced control group, but not to a significant extent. Levels of SOD were higher and 8-OHdG were lower in the groups that received KH-465 than in the LHRH agonist-induced control group. Our results suggest that KH-465 increased sperm production via reducing oxidative stress and had a positive effect in a male infertility model.

  2. The Induction of Heme Oxygenase 1 Decreases Painful Diabetic Neuropathy and Enhances the Antinociceptive Effects of Morphine in Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castany, Sílvia; Carcolé, Mireia; Leánez, Sergi; Pol, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Painful diabetic neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes mellitus which is poorly controlled by conventional analgesics. This study investigates if treatment with an heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin IX (CoPP), could modulate the allodynia and hyperalgesia induced by diabetes and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine. In a diabetic mice model induced by the injection of streptozotocin (STZ), we evaluated the antiallodynic and antihyperalgesic effects produced by the intraperitoneal administration of 5 and 10 mg/kg of CoPP at several days after its administration. The antinociceptive actions produced by the systemic administration of morphine alone or combined with CoPP were also evaluated. In addition, the effects of CoPP treatment on the expression of HO-1, the microglial activation marker (CD11b/c), the inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2) and μ-opioid receptors (MOR), were also assessed. Our results showed that the administration of 10 mg/kg of CoPP during 5 consecutive days completely blocked the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by diabetes. These effects are accompanied by the increased spinal cord, dorsal root ganglia and sciatic nerve protein levels of HO-1. In addition, the STZ-induced activation of microglia and overexpression of NOS2 in the spinal cord were inhibited by CoPP treatment. Furthermore, the antinociceptive effects of morphine were enhanced by CoPP treatment and reversed by the administration of an HO-1 inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin IX (SnPP). The spinal cord expression of MOR was also increased by CoPP treatment in diabetic mice. In conclusion, our data provide the first evidence that the induction of HO-1 attenuated STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy and enhanced the antinociceptive effects of morphine via inhibition of microglia activation and NOS2 overexpression as well as by increasing the spinal cord levels of MOR. This study proposes the administration of CoPP alone or

  3. Anti-nociceptive effect of total alkaloids isolated from the seeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antinociceptive effect of the extract in mice was evaluated by acetic acid writhing reflex test, hot plate test, capsaicin-induced nociception test, tail-flick test and formalin-induced pain test in mice. Furthermore, pretreatment of the animals with naloxone (2 mg/kg) was performed to investigate whether the antinociceptive ...

  4. In vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The petroleum ether fraction (PEF) showed neither anti-inflammatory nor antinociceptive activity at the tested concentrations. The finding supports the traditional use and illustrated the correlation that exists between the popular perception with genuine anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the leaves of C.

  5. Heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) promotes opioid-induced anti-nociception by an ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mechanism in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei; Mullen, Nathan; McCarthy, Sarah; Brann, Courtney; Richard, Philomena; Cormier, James; Edwards, Katie; Bilsky, Edward J; Streicher, John M

    2017-06-23

    Recent advances in developing opioid treatments for pain with reduced side effects have focused on the signaling cascades of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR). However, few such signaling targets have been identified for exploitation. To address this need, we explored the role of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) in opioid-induced MOR signaling and pain, which has only been studied in four previous articles. First, in four cell models of MOR signaling, we found that Hsp90 inhibition for 24 h with the inhibitor 17-N-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) had different effects on protein expression and opioid signaling in each line, suggesting that cell models may not be reliable for predicting pharmacology with this protein. We thus developed an in vivo model using CD-1 mice with an intracerebroventricular injection of 17-AAG for 24 h. We found that Hsp90 inhibition strongly blocked morphine-induced anti-nociception in models of post-surgical and HIV neuropathic pain but only slightly blocked anti-nociception in a naive tail-flick model, while enhancing morphine-induced precipitated withdrawal. Seeking a mechanism for these changes, we found that Hsp90 inhibition blocks ERK MAPK activation in the periaqueductal gray and caudal brain stem. We tested these signaling changes by inhibiting ERK in the above-mentioned pain models and found that ERK inhibition could account for all of the changes in anti-nociception induced by Hsp90 inhibition. Taken together, these findings suggest that Hsp90 promotes opioid-induced anti-nociception by an ERK mechanism in mouse brain and that Hsp90 could be a future target for improving the therapeutic index of opioid drugs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Antinociceptive Effect of Aqueous Extract of Origanum vulgare L. in Male Rats: Possible Involvement of the GABAergic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afarineshe Khaki, Mohammad Reza; Pahlavan, Yasamin; Sepehri, Gholamreza; Sheibani, Vahid; Pahlavan, Bahare

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to assess the possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism in analgesic effect of aqueous extract of Origanum Vulgare (ORG) in a rat model of acute pain test. Sixty-three anaesthetized male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were cannulated into the left ventricle. Five to seven days after the recovery from surgery, ORG extract was intraventricularly injected at dose of 3 μg/rat i.c.v. Then, baclofen (10 mg/Kg, IP), CGP35348 (100 nmol/Kg, i.c.v), muscimol (1 mg/Kg IP) and bicuculline (5 mg/Kg IP) were separately injected 20 min before the injection of ORG. The experimental groups were compared with intact (control) group (n = 7). The response latency of rats to thermal stimulation was recorded using Tail-Flick test. Injection of ORG extract resulted in a significant and dose-dependent increase in the response latency. There was also a significant increase in the response latency after co-administration of ORG extract with baclofen when compared with control group. However, following co-administration of ORG extract/bicuculline, a significant decrease in the response latency was observed compared to control group. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that aqueous extract of Origanum vulgare L. ssp. viridis possesses antinociceptive activity in a dose-dependent manner and ORG-induced antinociception might be mediated, at least in part, by both GABA receptors. PMID:24250616

  7. ASSESSMENT OF ANTI-NOCICEPTIVE EFFICACY OF COSTUS SPECIOSUS RHIZOME IN SWISS ALBINO MICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Nagaich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Present study attempts to evaluate the anti-nociceptive activity of the aqueous andethanol extracts of Costus speciosus rhizome (CPA and CPE in Swiss albino mice. Themaceration extracts were evaluated for anti-nociceptive activity by acetic acid-inducedwrithing and tail flick method in mice. The anti-nociceptive screening revealedsignificant peripheral anti-nociceptive actions of both extracts against acetic acid inducedwrithing in mice. Aqueous extract (CPA significantly inhibited writhes at the dose of 75and 150 mg/kg body weight, while ethanol extract (CPE produced significant protectionat the dose of 150 mg/kg body weight. However, in tail flick method only the ethanolextract (CPE showed significant central analgesic action, while aqueous extract wastotally ineffective. The present investigation demonstrates that the rhizome extracts of C.speciosus exhibited significant anti-nociceptive effects in Swiss albino mice.

  8. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  9. Involvement of the Retinoid X Receptor Ligand in the Anti-Inflammatory Effect Induced by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuki Yamamoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ forms a heterodimeric DNA-binding complex with retinoid X receptors (RXRs. It has been reported that the effect of the PPAR agonist is reduced in hepatocyte RXR-deficient mice. Therefore, it is suggested that the endogenous RXR ligand is involved in the PPARγ agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect. However, the participation of the RXR ligand in the PPARγ-induced anti-inflammatory effect is unknown. Here, we investigated the influence of RXR antagonist on the anti-inflammatory effect of PPARγ agonist pioglitazone in carrageenan test. In addition, we also examined the influence of PPAR antagonist on the anti-inflammatory effect induced by RXR agonist NEt-3IP. The RXR antagonist suppressed the antiedema effect of PPARγ agonist. In addition, the anti-inflammatory effect of RXR agonist was suppressed by PPARγ antagonist. PPARγ agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effects were reversed by the RXR antagonist. Thus, we showed that the endogenous RXR ligand might contribute to the PPARγ agonist-induced anti-inflammatory effect.

  10. Synergistic antinociceptive effects of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Na; Zuo, Xiaochun; Guo, Chao; Li, Yuwen; Cui, Jia; Zhao, Chao; Cao, Shanshan; Wang, Chao; Li, Ruili; Wu, Yin; Wen, Aidong

    2017-04-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the combined analgesic effect of alfentanil and propofol in the formalin test. Diluted formalin was injected into the dorsal surface of the right hind paw in rats. Nociceptive behavior was determined by counting the number of flinches of the injected paw for 1 h after injection; a reduction in formalin‑induced flinching was interpreted as an antinociceptive effect. Isobolographic analysis was used to determine the type of antinociceptive interaction (additivity, antagonism or synergism). Extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK) and c‑fos protein levels were also detected by western blot analysis to determine the potential mechanisms of the synergistic effect. Alfentanil, propofol or an alfentanil‑propofol combination had an antinociceptive effect in the formalin test. The median effective dose (ED50), value of the individual drug was also obtained. The derived theoretical ED50 for the antinociceptive effect (4.36 mg/kg) was different from the observed experimental ED50 value (2.51 mg/kg). The interaction between alfentanil and propofol that produced the antinociceptive effect was synergistic according to isobolographic analysis. Furthermore, the combination of alfentanil and propofol treatments may produce synergistically antinociceptive effects by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and decreasing the expression of c‑fos in the spinal cord. These results demonstrated that combined treatment, with alfentanil and propofol, produced synergistic antinociceptive effects in the formalin test and may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of acute pain.

  11. Oxyntomodulin differentially affects glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor beta-arrestin recruitment and signaling through Galpha(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Rasmus; Kubale, Valentina; Vrecl, Milka

    2007-01-01

    The glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 receptor is a promising target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity, and there is great interest in characterizing the pharmacology of the GLP-1 receptor and its ligands. In the present report, we have applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer...... assays to measure agonist-induced recruitment of betaarrestins and G-protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) 2 to the GLP-1 receptor in addition to traditional measurements of second messenger generation. The peptide hormone oxyntomodulin is described in the literature as a full agonist on the glucagon...

  12. Characterisation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the Hyptis pectinata (L.) Poit essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymundo, Larissa J R P; Guilhon, Carolina C; Alviano, Daniela S; Matheus, Maria Eline; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H; Alves, Péricles B; Alviano, Celuta S; Fernandes, Patrícia D

    2011-04-12

    Hyptis pectinata Poit (Lamiaceae) is grown in the northeastern regions of Brazil and is popularly known as "sambacaitá" or "canudinho". It is extensively used in folk medicine to treat inflammatory conditions, bacterial infections, pain, and cancer. Hyptis pectinata essential oil (EO, 10, 30, and 100mg/kg, p.o.) and the reference drugs morphine (5mg/kg, p.o.) and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 200mg/kg, p.o.) were evaluated using models for analgesia (acetic acid-induced contortions and hot plate) or inflammation (formalin-induced licking response and the subcutaneous air-pouch model). To elucidate the EO's mechanism of action, animals were pre-treated with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (1mg/kg, i.p.), the cholinergic antagonist atropine (1mg/kg, i.p.), or l-nitro arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 3mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min prior to the oral administration of the EO. The EO significantly inhibited the number of writhings and the time the animals spent licking their formalin-injected paws (second phase). The EO, at doses of 30 and 100mg/kg, increased baseline measurements and area under the curve measurements in the hot plate model, respectively. The administration of naloxone reversed the antinociceptive effect of the EO in the hot plate model. l-NAME significantly reversed the effects of the EO in the contortions and hot plate models. Atropine completely reversed the antinociceptive activity of the EO in all models. Additionally, the EO inhibited the inflammatory process induced by subcutaneous carrageenan injection by reducing cell migration, exudate volume, protein concentration, and inflammatory mediators (nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, IL-6, and TNF-α) produced in the pouch. Our results indicate that the Hyptis pectinata essential oil exhibits antinociceptive effects, likely mediated by opioid and cholinergic receptors, and anti-inflammatory activity through the inhibition of nitric oxide and PGE2 production. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  13. Biased G protein-coupled receptor agonism mediates Neu1 sialidase and matrix metalloproteinase-9 crosstalk to induce transactivation of insulin receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxho, Fiona; Haq, Sabah; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2017-12-24

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) can participate in a number of signaling pathways, and this property led to the concept of biased GPCR agonism. Agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators can bind to GPCRs in different ways, creating unique conformations that differentially modulate signaling through one or more G proteins. A unique neuromedin B (NMBR) GPCR-signaling platform controlling mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) crosstalk has been reported in the activation of the insulin receptor (IR) through the modification of the IR glycosylation. Here, we propose that there exists a biased GPCR agonism as small diffusible molecules in the activation of Neu1-mediated insulin receptor signaling. GPCR agonists bombesin, bradykinin, angiotensin I and angiotensin II significantly and dose-dependently induce Neu1 sialidase activity and IR activation in human IR-expressing rat hepatoma cell lines (HTC-IR), in the absence of insulin. Furthermore, the GPCR agonist-induced Neu1 sialidase activity could be specifically blocked by the NMBR inhibitor, BIM-23127. Protein expression analyses showed that these GPCR agonists significantly induced phosphorylation of IRβ and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1). Among these, angiotensin II was the most potent GPCR agonist capable of promoting IRβ phosphorylation in HTC-IR cells. Interestingly, treatment with BIM-23127 and Neu1 inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate were able to block GPCR agonist-induced IR activation in HTC cells in vitro. Additionally, we found that angiotensin II receptor (type I) exists in a multimeric receptor complex with Neu1, IRβ and NMBR in naïve (unstimulated) and stimulated HTC-IR cells with insulin, bradykinin, angiotensin I and angiotensin II. This complex suggests a molecular link regulating the interaction and signaling mechanism between these molecules on the cell surface. These findings uncover a biased GPCR agonist-induced IR transactivation signaling axis

  14. Antinociceptive Interaction of Tramadol with Gabapentin in Experimental Mononeuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo F; Noriega, Viviana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Zanetta, Pilar; Castillo, Rodrigo; Aranda, Nicolás; Sierralta, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is the result of injury to the nervous system, and different animal models have been established to meet the manifestations of neuropathy. The pharmacotherapy for neuropathic pain includes gabapentin and tramadol, but these are only partially effective when given alone. The aim of this study was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between both drugs using the isobolographic analysis and changes of the IL-1β concentration in a mouse model of neuropathic pain (partial sciatic nerve ligation or PSNL). The i.p. administration of gabapentin (5-100 mg/kg) or tramadol (12.5-100 mg/kg) displayed a dose-dependent antinociception in the hot plate assay of PSNL mice, and effects induced by gabapentin with tramadol were synergistic. Administration of gabapentin or tramadol reversed significantly the increase in the concentration of IL-1β induced by PSNL after either 7 or 14 days and their combination was significantly more potent in reversing the elevated concentration of IL-1β. The synergism obtained by the co-administration of gabapentin and tramadol is proposed to result from action on different mechanisms in pain pathways. Gabapentin or tramadol or their combination modulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, in a model of mice PSNL which could be due to an inhibition of glial function. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  15. Discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of dihydroetorphine in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerak, Lisa R; Gauthier, Cheryl R A; France, Charles R A P

    2003-04-01

    Although dihydroetorphine has micro opioid agonist activity there is evidence to suggest that it is not identical to that of morphine. This study compared dihydroetorphine to other opioids under behavioral conditions that are sensitive to micro opioid agonism. The acute effects of dihydroetorphine, etorphine and morphine were evaluated using two procedures. In one procedure, monkeys received 3.2 mg/kg per day of morphine and discriminated naltrexone from saline while responding under a fixed-ratio 5 schedule of stimulus shock termination. In addition, a warm-water, tail-withdrawal procedure was used in untreated monkeys. When acutely deprived of morphine, monkeys responded on the naltrexone lever, and this effect was reversed by dihydroetorphine, etorphine and morphine. Each agonist produced the maximum (20-s latency) antinociceptive effect in 50 degrees C water. Naltrexone antagonized the discriminative stimulus and antinociceptive effects of dihydroetorphine and etorphine, although Schild analyses yielded large variability in slopes and pA(2) values. Naltrexone reversed established effects of dihydroetorphine and morphine in both procedures and pretreatment with dihydroetorphine (2, 6 or 24 h) did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine. Taken together, these data support the notion that dihydroetorphine is a micro agonist with a short duration of action; however, variability in antagonism of dihydroetorphine and morphine might be a manifestation of differences that have been reported for these drugs at the cellular level.

  16. Antinociceptive properties of shikonin: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Bhawana; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Saha, Soumya; Chandel, Sunita Gulabsingh; Baranwal, Atul Kumar; Banerjee, Manish; Chatterjee, Mousumi; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2016-07-01

    Shikonin possess a diverse spectrum of pharmacological properties in multiple therapeutic areas. However, the nociceptive effect of shikonin is not largely known. To investigate the antinociceptive potential of shikonin, panel of GPCRs, ion channels, and enzymes involved in pain pathogenesis were studied. To evaluate the translation of shikonin efficacy in vivo, it was tested in 3 established rat pain models. Our study reveals that shikonin has significant inhibitory effect on pan sodium channel/N1E115 and NaV1.7 channel with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 7.6 μmol/L and 6.4 μmol/L, respectively, in a cell-based assay. Shikonin exerted significant dose dependent antinociceptive activity at doses of 0.08%, 0.05%, and 0.02% w/v in pinch pain model. In mechanical hyperalgesia model, dose of 10 and 3 mg/kg (intraperitoneal) produced dose-dependent analgesia and showed 67% and 35% reversal of hyperalgesia respectively at 0.5 h. Following oral administration, it showed 39% reversal at 30 mg/kg dose. When tested in first phase of formalin induced pain, shikonin at 10 mg/kg dose inhibited paw flinching by ∼71%. In all studied preclinical models, analgesic effect was similar or better than standard analgesic drugs. The present study unveils the mechanistic role of shikonin on pain modulation, predominantly via sodium channel modulation, suggesting that shikonin could be developed as a potential pain blocker.

  17. Dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Mantovani, Fernanda B; Taylor, Polly M; Dixon, Mike J; Luna, Stelio P L

    2009-11-01

    The dose-related antinociceptive effects of intravenous (IV) buprenorphine were evaluated in cats. Thermal (TT) and mechanical threshold (MT) devices were used for nociceptive stimulation. After baseline threshold recordings, buprenorphine was administered IV (0.01, 0.02 or 0.04 mg/kg; B1, B2 and B4, respectively) in a randomised, blinded and cross-over study. Data were analysed by ANOVA (P<0.05) using 95% confidence intervals (CI). TT increased 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.2+/-2.7 degrees C), 2, 3 and 4 h after B1; 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.1+/-3.9 degrees C) and 2 h after B2, and 15, 30, 45 min and 1 (5.4+/-3.3 degrees C), 2, 3, 6 and 8 h after B4. MT increased 15 and 45 min after B2 (260+/-171 mmHg), and 30 (209+/-116 mmHg) and 45 min and 1 and 2 h after B4. At 45 min, MT values were significantly higher after B2 compared to B1 (P<0.05). With MT, B2 and B4 produced more antinociception and longer duration of action than B1, respectively. No dose response to thermal stimulation was detected.

  18. Antinociceptive interaction of gabapentin with minocycline in murine diabetic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, H F; Sierralta, F; Jorquera, V; Poblete, P; Prieto, J C; Noriega, V

    2017-02-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is the most common complication of diabetes and pain is one of the main symptoms of diabetic neuropathy, however, currently available drugs are often ineffective and complicated by adverse events. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the antinociceptive interaction between gabapentin and minocycline in a mice experimental model of DN by streptozocin (STZ). The interaction of gabapentin with minocycline was evaluated by the writhing and hot plate tests at 3 and 7 days after STZ injection or vehicle in male CF1 mice. STZ (150 mg/kg, i.p.) produced a marked increase in plasma glucose levels on day 7 (397.46 ± 29.65 mg/dL) than on day 3 (341.12 ± 35.50 mg/dL) and also developed neuropathic pain measured by algesiometric assays. Gabapentin produced similar antinociceptive activity in both writhing and hot plate tests in mice pretreated with STZ. However, minocycline was more potent in the writhing than in the hot plate test in the same type of mice. The combination of gabapentin with minocycline produced synergistic interaction in both test. The combination of gabapentin with minocycline in a 1:1 proportion fulfills all the criteria of multimodal analgesia and this finding suggests that the combination provide a therapeutic alternative that could be used for human neuropathic pain management.

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Anthraquinone-2-Carboxylic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Gwang Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthraquinone compounds are one of the abundant polyphenols found in fruits, vegetables, and herbs. However, the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity and molecular mechanisms of anthraquinones have not been fully elucidated. We investigated the activity of anthraquinones using acute inflammatory and nociceptive experimental conditions. Anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid (9,10-dihydro-9,10-dioxo-2-anthracenecarboxylic acid, AQCA, one of the major anthraquinones identified from Brazilian taheebo, ameliorated various inflammatory and algesic symptoms in EtOH/HCl- and acetylsalicylic acid- (ASA- induced gastritis, arachidonic acid-induced edema, and acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing without displaying toxic profiles in body and organ weight, gastric irritation, or serum parameters. In addition, AQCA suppressed the expression of inflammatory genes such as cyclooxygenase- (COX- 2 in stomach tissues and lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- treated RAW264.7 cells. According to reporter gene assay and immunoblotting analyses, AQCA inhibited activation of the nuclear factor- (NF- κB and activator protein- (AP- 1 pathways by suppression of upstream signaling involving interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 4 (IRAK1, p38, Src, and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk. Our data strongly suggest that anthraquinones such as AQCA act as potent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive components in vivo, thus contributing to the immune regulatory role of fruits and herbs.

  20. Enhanced BRET technology for the monitoring of agonist-induced and agonist-independent interactions between GPCRs and β-arrestins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eKocan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET technique has become extremely valuable for the real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions in live cells. This method is highly amenable to the detection of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR interactions with proteins critical for regulating their function, such as β-arrestins. Of particular interest to endocrinologists is the ability to monitor interactions involving endocrine receptors, such as orexin receptor 2 (OxR2 or vasopressin type II receptor (V2R. The BRET method utilizes heterologous co-expression of fusion proteins linking one protein of interest (GPCR to a bioluminescent donor enzyme, a variant of Renilla luciferase, and a second protein of interest (β-arrestin to an acceptor fluorophore. If in close proximity, energy resulting from oxidation of the coelenterazine substrate by the donor will transfer to the acceptor, which in turn fluoresces. Using novel luciferase constructs, we were able to monitor interactions not detectable using less sensitive BRET combinations in the same configuration. In particular, we were able to show receptor/β-arrestin interactions in an agonist-independent manner using Rluc8-tagged mutant receptors, in contrast to when using Rluc. Therefore, the enhanced BRET methodology has not only enabled live cell compound screening as we have recently published, it now provides a new level of sensitivity for monitoring specific transient, weak or hardly detectable protein-protein complexes, including agonist-independent GPCR/β-arrestin interactions. This has important implications for the use of BRET technologies in endocrine drug discovery programs as well as academic research.

  1. Effects of inhibitors of protein synthesis and intracellular transport on the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced functional differentiation of cultured cerebellar granule cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Meier, E

    1990-01-01

    preparations. This indicates that the low-affinity receptors were not located in the plasma membrane. This is in good agreement with the corresponding morphological findings, that monensin treatment led to an intense vacuolization of the Golgi apparatus, thereby preventing intracellular transport of the newly...... differentiation and GABA receptor expression was investigated in cultured cerebellar granule cells. After 4 days in culture the neurons were exposed to the inhibitors for 6 h in the simultaneous presence of THIP. Subsequently, cultures were either fixed for electron microscopic examination or used for preparation...

  2. On the G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Heteromers and Their Allosteric Receptor-Receptor Interactions in the Central Nervous System: Focus on Their Role in Pain Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasiel O. Borroto-Escuela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The modulatory role of allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in the pain pathways of the Central Nervous System and the peripheral nociceptors has become of increasing interest. As integrators of nociceptive and antinociceptive wiring and volume transmission signals, with a major role for the opioid receptor heteromers, they likely have an important role in the pain circuits and may be involved in acupuncture. The delta opioid receptor (DOR exerts an antagonistic allosteric influence on the mu opioid receptor (MOR function in a MOR-DOR heteromer. This heteromer contributes to morphine-induced tolerance and dependence, since it becomes abundant and develops a reduced G-protein-coupling with reduced signaling mainly operating via β-arrestin2 upon chronic morphine treatment. A DOR antagonist causes a return of the Gi/o binding and coupling to the heteromer and the biological actions of morphine. The gender- and ovarian steroid-dependent recruitment of spinal cord MOR/kappa opioid receptor (KOR heterodimers enhances antinociceptive functions and if impaired could contribute to chronic pain states in women. MOR1D heterodimerizes with gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR in the spinal cord, mediating morphine induced itch. Other mechanism for the antinociceptive actions of acupuncture along meridians may be that it enhances the cross-desensitization of the TRPA1 (chemical nociceptor-TRPV1 (capsaicin receptor heteromeric channel complexes within the nociceptor terminals located along these meridians. Selective ionotropic cannabinoids may also produce cross-desensitization of the TRPA1-TRPV1 heteromeric nociceptor channels by being negative allosteric modulators of these channels leading to antinociception and antihyperalgesia.

  3. Antinociceptive and Toxicological Effects of Dioclea grandiflora Seed Pod in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Rita de Cássia da Silveira e; de Oliveira, Leandra Eugênia Gomes; de Farias Nóbrega, Franklin Ferreira; Bhattacharyya, Jnanabrata; de Almeida, Reinaldo Nóbrega

    2010-01-01

    The acute treatment of mice with an ethanolic extract from the seed pod of Dioclea grandiflora (EDgP) at doses of 75, 150 and 300 mg/kg by intraperitoneal administration produced a significant antinociceptive effect as displayed by the acetic acid-induced writhing test and the formalin test. The antinociception was observed through the first (neurogenic pain) and second (inflammatory pain) phases in the formalin test. The hot plate test did not show an increase in the antinociceptive latency whereas the motor performance was affected by the administration at 300 mg/kg at the beginning (30 minutes) of the observation period but not at later periods (60 and 120 minutes). These results suggest that EDgP has a central antinociceptive action and a possible anti-inflammatory activity in mice. PMID:20368784

  4. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  5. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Tanacetum parthenium L. extract in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N K; Kulkarni, S K

    1999-12-15

    Oral administration of the feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) extract led to significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects against acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats, respectively. These responses were dose-dependent (10, 20, 40 mg/kg, p.o.). Parthenolide (1, 2 mg/kg i.p.), the active constituent of the extract also produced antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Naloxone (1 mg/kg i.p.), an opiate antagonist, failed to reverse feverfew extract and parthenolide-induced antinociception. Feverfew extract in higher doses (40, 60 mg/kg p.o.) neither altered the locomotor activity nor potentiated the pentobarbitone-induced sleep time in mice. It also did not change the rectal temperature in rats. Feverfew extract exerted antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects without altering the normal behaviour of the animals.

  6. Enhanced Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in the Spinal Dorsal Horn Mediates Antinociceptive Effects of TC-2559

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheng, Long-Zhen; Han, Lei; Fan, Jing; Huang, Lan-Ting; Peng, Li-Chao; Wang, Yun

    2011-01-01

    ...) partial agonist and α4β2 nAChR activation has been related to antinociception. The aim of this study is to investigate the analgesic effect of TC-2559 and its underlying spinal mechanisms. Results: 1...

  7. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of crude methanolic extract of red alga Bryothamnion triquetrum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; da Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito; de Araújo, Morgana Vital; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2012-01-01

    .... In this regard, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a crude methanolic extract of the red alga Bryothamnion triquetrum (BT-MeOH) in murine models...

  8. Antinociceptive effect of ethanolic extract of Selaginella convoluta in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Sá Pedro Guilherme S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selaginella convoluta (Arn. Spring (Selaginellaceae, commonly known as “jericó”, is a medicinal plant found in northeastern Brazil. S. convoluta is used in folk medicine as an antidepressant, aphrodisiac, diuretic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and it is used to combat amenorrhea, coughing and bleeding. This study was performed to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of ethanolic extract from S. convoluta in mice exposed to chemical and thermal models of nociception. Methods Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the ethanolic extract was performed. The ethanolic extract from Selaginella convoluta (Sc-EtOH was examined for its intraperitoneal (i.p. antinociceptive activity at the doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin injection and hot plate tests were used to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of Sc-EtOH extract. The rota-rod test was used to evaluate motor coordination. Results A preliminary analysis of Sc-EtOH revealed that it contained phenols, steroids, terpenoids and flavonoids. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, mice treated with Sc-EtOH (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p. exhibited reduced writhing (58.46, 75.63 and 82.23%, respectively. Secondly, Sc-EtOH treatment (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, i.p. decreased the paw licking time in mice during the first phase of the formalin test (by 44.90, 33.33 and 34.16%, respectively, as well as during the second phase of the test (by 86.44, 56.20 and 94.95%, respectively. Additionally, Sc-EtOH treatment at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg increased the latency time in the hot plate test after 60 and 90 minutes, respectively. In addition, Sc-EtOH did not impair motor coordination. Conclusion Overall, these results indicate that Sc-EtOH is effective as an analgesic agent in various pain models. The activity of Sc-EtOH is most likely mediated via the inhibition of peripheral mediators and central inhibitory mechanisms. This study supports

  9. Antinociceptive and antipyretic activities of Amaranthus viridis Linn. in different experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ashok B.S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The methanolic extract of the whole plant extract of Amaranthus viridis L (MEAV was screened for antinociceptive activity using the acetic acid writhing test, hot plate test and tail immersion test in mice and for antipyretic activity using the yeast-induced pyrexia method in rats, at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight. Significant (p<0.01 dose-dependent antinociceptive and antipyretic properties were observed with 200 and 400 mg/kg.

  10. Neuropathic and inflammatory antinociceptive effects and electrocortical changes produced by Salvia divinorum in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón-Arceo, Karina; González-Trujano, Ma Eva; Coffeen, Ulises; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Mercado, Francisco; Almanza, Angélica; Contreras, Bernardo; Jaimes, Orlando; Pellicer, Francisco

    2017-07-12

    Salvia divinorum is a medicinal plant traditionally used in hallucinogenic ethnopharmacological practices and for its analgesic and antinflammatory properties. Its active compounds include diterpenes known as salvinorins which act as potent κ opioid receptor agonists. Given its effects in acute animal models of pain, as well as its antinflammatory attributes, we decided to investigate the analgesic effects of an SD extract in neuropathic (sciatic loose nerve ligature) and inflammatory (intra plantar carrageenan) pain models in rats. We also determined in this study the electrocorticographic changes to correlate similar hallucinogenic state and behavior as those produced in humans. Mechanical and thermonociceptive responses, plantar test and von Frey assay, respectively, were measured in adult Wistar rats 30min, 3h and 24h after the intraperitoneal administration of saline or an hydroponic SD extract. We also evaluated carbamazepine and celecoxib, as gold reference drugs, to compare its antinociceptive effects. Our results showed that administration of SD extract induced antialgesic effects in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain models. All those effects were blocked by nor-binaltorphimine (a Kappa opioid receptor antagonist). Moreover, it was observed an increase of the anterior power spectral density and a decrease in the posterior region as electrocorticographic changes. The present investigation give evidence that SD is capable to reduce algesic response associated to neuropathic and inflammatory nociception. This study support therapeutic alternatives for a disabling health problem due to the long term pain with high impact on population and personal and social implications. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. PPAR agonist-induced reduction of Mcp1 in atherosclerotic plaques of obese, insulin-resistant mice depends on adiponectin-induced Irak3 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Hulsmans

    Full Text Available Synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR agonists are used to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined molecular mechanisms that explain differential effects of a PPARα agonist (fenofibrate and a PPARγ agonist (rosiglitazone on macrophages during obesity-induced atherogenesis. Twelve-week-old mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency (DKO were treated with fenofibrate, rosiglitazone or placebo for 12 weeks. Only rosiglitazone improved adipocyte function, restored insulin sensitivity, and inhibited atherosclerosis by decreasing lipid-loaded macrophages. In addition, it increased interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase-3 (Irak3 and decreased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp1 expressions, indicative of a switch from M1 to M2 macrophages. The differences between fenofibrate and rosiglitazone were independent of Pparγ expression. In bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM, we identified the rosiglitazone-associated increase in adiponectin as cause of the increase in Irak3. Interestingly, the deletion of Irak3 in BMDM (IRAK3(-/- BMDM resulted in activation of the canonical NFκB signaling pathway and increased Mcp1 protein secretion. Rosiglitazone could not decrease the elevated Mcp1 secretion in IRAK3(-/- BMDM directly and fenofibrate even increased the secretion, possibly due to increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. Furthermore, aortic extracts of high-fat insulin-resistant LDL-receptor deficient mice, with lower adiponectin and Irak3 and higher Mcp1, showed accelerated atherosclerosis. In aggregate, our results emphasize an interaction between PPAR agonist-mediated increase in adiponectin and macrophage-associated Irak3 in the protection against atherosclerosis by PPAR agonists.

  12. Real-Time G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Imaging to Understand and Quantify Receptor Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Aymerich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their regulation by agonists and antagonists is fundamental to develop more effective drugs. Optical methods using fluorescent-tagged receptors and spinning disk confocal microscopy are useful tools to investigate membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. The aim of this study was to develop a method to characterize receptor dynamics using this system which offers the advantage of very fast image acquisition with minimal cell perturbation. However, in short-term assays photobleaching was still a problem. Thus, we developed a procedure to perform a photobleaching-corrected image analysis. A study of short-term dynamics of the long isoform of the dopamine type 2 receptor revealed an agonist-induced increase in the mobile fraction of receptors with a rate of movement of 0.08 μm/s For long-term assays, the ratio between the relative fluorescence intensity at the cell surface versus that in the intracellular compartment indicated that receptor internalization only occurred in cells co-expressing G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. These results indicate that the lateral movement of receptors and receptor internalization are not directly coupled. Thus, we believe that live imaging of GPCRs using spinning disk confocal image analysis constitutes a powerful tool to study of receptor dynamics.

  13. Opioid receptor trafficking and interaction in nociceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Bao, L; Li, S

    2015-01-01

    Opiate analgesics such as morphine are often used for pain therapy. However, antinociceptive tolerance and dependence may develop with long-term use of these drugs. It was found that μ-opioid receptors can interact with δ-opioid receptors, and morphine antinociceptive tolerance can be reduced by blocking δ-opioid receptors. Recent studies have shown that μ- and δ-opioid receptors are co-expressed in a considerable number of small neurons in the dorsal root ganglion. The interaction of μ-opioid receptors with δ-opioid receptors in the nociceptive afferents is facilitated by the stimulus-induced cell-surface expression of δ-opioid receptors, and contributes to morphine tolerance. Further analysis of the molecular, cellular and neural circuit mechanisms that regulate the trafficking and interaction of opioid receptors and related signalling molecules in the pain pathway would help to elucidate the mechanism of opiate analgesia and improve pain therapy. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24611685

  14. Genome-Wide Profiling of Liver X Receptor, Retinoid X Receptor, and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α in Mouse Liver Reveals Extensive Sharing of Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Pedersen, Thomas Åskov; Gross, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The liver X receptors (LXRs) are nuclear receptors that form permissive heterodimers with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and are important regulators of lipid metabolism in the liver. We have recently shown that RXR agonist-induced hypertriglyceridemia and hepatic steatosis in mice are dependent on LXRs...... and correlate with an LXR-dependent hepatic induction of lipogenic genes. To further investigate the roles of RXR and LXR in the regulation of hepatic gene expression, we have mapped the ligand-regulated genome-wide binding of these factors in mouse liver. We find that the RXR agonist bexarotene primarily...... increases the genomic binding of RXR, whereas the LXR agonist T0901317 greatly increases both LXR and RXR binding. Functional annotation of putative direct LXR target genes revealed a significant association with classical LXR-regulated pathways as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR...

  15. L-745,337: a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2 elicits antinociception but not gastric ulceration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, S; Chan, C C; Gordon, R; Li, C S; Rodger, I W; Webb, J K; Rupniak, N M; Hill, R G

    1994-12-01

    L-745,337 [5-methanesulphonamido-6-(2,4-difluorothiophenyl)-1-indan one] a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor reversed hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan in rats without causing gastric ulceration at doses 100 times those causing antinociception. In contrast, piroxicam and indomethacin produced ulcerations at antinociceptive doses. These findings demonstrate that L-745,337 possesses antinociceptive activity but has a reduced liability for gastric ulceration.

  16. Antinociceptive and antioxidant activity of Zanthoxylum budrunga wall (Rutaceae) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Khirul; Biswas, Nripendra Nath; Saha, Sanjib; Hossain, Hemayet; Jahan, Ismet Ara; Khan, Tanzir Ahmed; Awang, Khalijah; Shilpi, Jamil A

    2014-01-01

    Different parts of the medicinal plant Zanthoxylum budrunga Wall enjoy a variety of uses in ethnobotanical practice in Bangladesh. In the present study, a number of phytochemical and pharmacological investigations were done on the ethanol extract of Z. budrunga seeds (ZBSE) to evaluate its antinociceptive and antioxidant potential. ZBSE was also subjected to HPLC analysis to detect the presence of some common antioxidants. In acetic acid induced writhing test in mice, ZBSE showed 65.28 and 74.30% inhibition of writhing at the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg and the results were statistically significant (P Zanthoxylum budrunga seed in traditional medicine for pain management. Constituents including caffeic acid and other phenolics might have some role in the observed activity.

  17. Dissociation of rewarding, anti-aversive and anti-nociceptive effects of different classes of anti-nociceptives in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Kris; De Vry, Jean; Robens, Angela; Tzschentke, Thomas M; van der Kam, Elizabeth L

    2011-03-01

    It was previously shown that morphine more potently reduces the affective as compared to the sensory component of nociception, and this effect is independent of morphine's rewarding properties. Here we investigated whether this finding can be generalized to other classes of anti-nociceptive drugs. The effect of oxycodone (0-10 mg/kg, i.p.), tramadol (0-10 mg/kg, i.p.), ibuprofen (0-300 mg/kg, i.p.) and pregabalin (0-31.6 mg/kg, i.p.) on negative affect and mechanical hypersensitivity accompanying carrageenan-induced (0.5% intraplantar) inflammatory nociception was assessed using conditioned place aversion (CPA) and Randall Selitto paw pressure test, respectively. The rewarding effect of these drugs was assessed using conditioned place preference (CPP). All four anti-nociceptive drugs dose-dependently reduced carrageenan-induced CPA and mechanical hypersensitivity. Furthermore all drugs induced CPP, except for ibuprofen. Similar to morphine, oxycodone and tramadol showed a large dissociation of anti-aversive versus anti-nociceptive potency, i.e. 10 times more potent against the affective versus the sensory component of nociception. Oxycodone and tramadol were 30 and 10 times more potent to produce CPP in animals under normal versus painful conditions. Ibuprofen and pregabalin also showed a dissociation of anti-aversive and anti-nociceptive potency, but less pronounced (i.e. three times more potent against the affective component). However, pregabalin showed no dissociation between rewarding potency under normal versus painful conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that the dissociation of rewarding potency in animals under normal versus painful conditions is limited to drugs with an opioid mechanism of action, while the dissociation of anti-aversive and anti-nociceptive potency applies to anti-nociceptive drugs with different mechanisms of action. Copyright © 2010 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters. Published by

  18. The Antinociceptive Effects of JWH-015 in Chronic Inflammatory Pain Are Produced by Nitric Oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP Pathway Activation Mediated by Opioids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Roger; Hervera, Arnau; Leánez, Sergi; Martín-Campos, Jesús M.; Pol, Olga

    2011-01-01

    Background Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R) agonists attenuate inflammatory pain but the precise mechanism implicated in these effects is not completely elucidated. We investigated if the peripheral nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG)-ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels signaling pathway triggered by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) and modulated by opioids, participates in the local antinociceptive effects produced by a CB2R agonist (JWH-015) during chronic inflammatory pain. Methodology/Principal Findings In wild type (WT) and NOS1 knockout (NOS1-KO) mice, at 10 days after the subplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA), we evaluated the antiallodynic (von Frey filaments) and antihyperalgesic (plantar test) effects produced by the subplantar administration of JWH-015 and the reversion of their effects by the local co-administration with CB2R (AM630), peripheral opioid receptor (naloxone methiodide, NX-ME) or CB1R (AM251) antagonists. Expression of CB2R and NOS1 as well as the antinociceptive effects produced by a high dose of JWH-015 combined with different doses of selective L-guanylate cyclase (ODQ) or PKG (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs) inhibitors or a KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide), were also assessed. Results show that the local administration of JWH-015 dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by CFA which effects were completely reversed by the local co-administration of AM630 or NX-ME, but not AM251. Inflammatory pain increased the paw expression of CB2R and the dorsal root ganglia transcription of NOS1. Moreover, the antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 were absent in NOS1-KO mice and diminished by their co-administration with ODQ, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs or glibenclamide. Conclusions/Significance These data indicate that the peripheral antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain are mainly produced by the local activation of the nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP signaling pathway, triggered

  19. The antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 in chronic inflammatory pain are produced by nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway activation mediated by opioids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Negrete

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid 2 receptor (CB2R agonists attenuate inflammatory pain but the precise mechanism implicated in these effects is not completely elucidated. We investigated if the peripheral nitric oxide-cGMP-protein kinase G (PKG-ATP-sensitive K(+ (KATP channels signaling pathway triggered by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1 and modulated by opioids, participates in the local antinociceptive effects produced by a CB2R agonist (JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In wild type (WT and NOS1 knockout (NOS1-KO mice, at 10 days after the subplantar administration of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, we evaluated the antiallodynic (von Frey filaments and antihyperalgesic (plantar test effects produced by the subplantar administration of JWH-015 and the reversion of their effects by the local co-administration with CB2R (AM630, peripheral opioid receptor (naloxone methiodide, NX-ME or CB1R (AM251 antagonists. Expression of CB2R and NOS1 as well as the antinociceptive effects produced by a high dose of JWH-015 combined with different doses of selective L-guanylate cyclase (ODQ or PKG (Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs inhibitors or a KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide, were also assessed. Results show that the local administration of JWH-015 dose-dependently inhibited the mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity induced by CFA which effects were completely reversed by the local co-administration of AM630 or NX-ME, but not AM251. Inflammatory pain increased the paw expression of CB2R and the dorsal root ganglia transcription of NOS1. Moreover, the antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 were absent in NOS1-KO mice and diminished by their co-administration with ODQ, Rp-8-pCPT-cGMPs or glibenclamide. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that the peripheral antinociceptive effects of JWH-015 during chronic inflammatory pain are mainly produced by the local activation of the nitric oxide-cGMP-PKG-KATP signaling pathway

  20. Role of central opioid on the antinociceptive effect of sulfated polysaccharide from the red seaweed Solieria filiformis in induced temporomandibular joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Pachêco, José Mário; Val, Danielle Rocha; Vieira, Lorena Vasconcelos; Santos, Rodrigo; Freitas, Raul Sousa; Rivanor, Renata Line; Monteiro, Valdécio Silvano; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of sulfated polysaccharide from red seaweed Solieria filiformis (Fraction F II) in the inflammatory hypernociception in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Male Wistar rats were pretreated (30min) with a subcutaneous injection (s.c.) of vehicle or FII (0.03, 0.3 or 3.0mg/kg) followed by intra-TMJ injection of 1.5% Formalin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, 225μg/TMJ). In other set of experiments rats were pretreated (15min) with an intrathecal injection of the non-selective opioid receptors Naloxone, or μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTOP, or δ-opioid receptor Naltridole hydrochloride, or κ-opioid receptor antagonist Nor-Binaltorphimine (Nor-BNI) followed by injection of FII (s.c.). After 30min, the animals were treated with an intra-TMJ injection of 1.5% formalin. After TMJ treatment, behavioral nociception response was evaluated for a 45-min observation period, animals were terminally anesthetized and periarticular tissue, trigeminal ganglion and subnucleus caudalis (SC) were collected plasma extravasation and ELISA analysis. Pretreatment with F II significantly reduced formalin- and serotonin-induced TMJ nociception, inhibit the plasma extravasation and inflammatory cytokines release induced by 1.5% formalin in the TMJ. Pretreatment with intrathecal injection of Naloxone, CTOP, Naltridole or Nor-BNI blocked the antinociceptive effect of F II in the 1.5% formalin-induced TMJ nociception. In addition, F II was able to significantly increase the β-endorphin release in the subnucleus caudalis. The results suggest that F II has a potential antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect in the TMJ mediated by activation of opioid receptors in the subnucleus caudalis and inhibition of the release of inflammatory mediators in the periarticular tissue. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of Rhododendron arboreum bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Muhammad, Naveed; Gillani, Syed N; Shah, Muhmmad R; Khan, Haroon; Maione, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Rhododendron arboreum Smith. (Ericaceae), an evergreen small tree, is one of the 1000 species that belongs to genus Rhododendron distributed worldwide. In folk medicine, as various parts of this plant exhibit medicinal properties, it is used in the treatment of different ailments.The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of methanolic extract of R. arboreum bark, followed by activity-guided fractionation of n-hexane, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions.The ethyl acetate fraction (200 mg/kg i.p.) showed the maximum analgesic effect (82%) in acetic acid-induced writhing, followed, to a less extent, by crude extract and chloroform fraction both at a dose of 200 mg/kg i.p. (65.09% and 67.89%, respectively). In carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, the crude extract and its related fractions displayed in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) an anti-inflammatory activity for all time-courses (1-5 hrs). For the active extract/fractions (200 mg/kg i.p.), the maximum effect was observed 5 h after carrageenan injection. These evidences were also supported by in vitro lipoxygenase inhibitory properties. In conclusion, R. arboreum crude methanolic extract and its fractions exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. For these reasons, this plant could be a promising source of new compounds for the management of pain and inflammatory diseases. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Antinociceptive effect of a novel tosylpyrazole compound in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sara M; Gewehr, Camila; Dalmolin, Gerusa D; Cechinel, Cleber A; Wentz, Alexandre; Lourega, Rogério V; Sehnem, Ronan C; Zanatta, Nilo; Martins, Marcos A P; Rubin, Maribel A; Bonacorso, Helio G; Ferreira, Juliano

    2009-02-01

    Pain is the most common complaint in the medical field and the identification of compounds that can effectively treat painful states without induction of side-effects remains a major challenge in biomedical research. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antinociceptive effect of a novel compound, 3-(4-fluorophenyl)-5-trifluoromethyl-1H-1-tosylpyrazole (compound A) in several models of pain in mice and compare with those produced by the known trifluoromethyl-containing pyrazole compound celecoxib. Compound A or celecoxib were administrated by oral (78-780 micromol/kg), intrathecal (9-22.5 nmol/site) or intracerebroventricular (9-22.5 nmol/site) routes. Oral administration of either compound A or celecoxib abolished the mechanical allodynia, but not the oedema caused by intraplantar injection of carrageenan. Similarly, compound A reduced the overt nociception, but not the oedema, produced by bradykinin or capsaicin. However, compound A (500 micromol/kg, orally) did not alter nociception nor oedema caused by intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E(2 )or glutamate, whereas celecoxib reduced only the nociception induced by the former. Moreover, oral and intrathecal administration of compound A or celecoxib also reduced the nociception induced by acetic acid. However, only celecoxib reduced the acetic acid-induced nociception when it was injected by the intracerebroventricular route. Finally, neither compound A nor celecoxib was able to produce antinociceptive effect in the tail-flick test or to alter the motor performance and the body temperature. Besides, compound A or celecoxib did not induce gastric lesion. Thus, compound A seems to be an interesting prototype for the development of novel analgesic drugs.

  3. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the ethanolic extract of Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae) in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliane C; Araújo, Camila de S; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel G; de Oliveira-Junior, Raimundo G; Diniz, Tâmara C; Wanderley, Carlos Wagner de S; Palheta-Júnior, Raimundo C; Mendes, Rosemairy L; Guimarães, Adriana G; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Almeida, Jackson Roberto G da S

    2015-06-24

    Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae) is a native tree from Caatinga (Brazilian Northeastern savanna biome), popularly known as "araticum" and "pinha da Caatinga". In this study, we investigated the effects of the crude ethanolic extract (Av-EtOH) in models of pain and inflammation in rodents. The evaluation of antinociceptive activity was carried out by the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, hot plate and tail flick tests, while paw edema induced by carrageenan or histamine, and leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity were used for anti-inflammatory profile. Histological analyses also were carried out. Av-EtOH (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o) significantly reduced the number of writhing (P < 0.01) and decreased (P < 0.01) the paw licking time in both phases of the formalin test. In the hot plate and tail flick tests, this extract increased the reaction time, consequently reduced painful behavior. The effects in the formalin and hot plate tests were antagonized by naloxone. Av-EtOH inhibited significantly (P < 0.01) the increase in the edema volume after administration of carrageenan and histamine. In the peritonitis test, acute pre-treatment with Av-EtOH inhibited leukocyte migration. Histological analysis showed less inflammation in the groups treated with the extract when the inflammation was induced by carrageenan or histamine. Thus, Av-EtOH has significant antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties, which are related probably with the activation of opioid receptors and inhibition of release of mediators of the inflammatory process. This specie is a potential target for drug discovery.

  4. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca2+ Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L.; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. Results: SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca2+ channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K+ channels described earlier. Innovation: Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca2+ current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K+ current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. Conclusion: SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233–251. PMID:27306612

  5. Redox-Dependent Modulation of T-Type Ca(2+) Channels in Sensory Neurons Contributes to Acute Anti-Nociceptive Effect of Substance P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Dongyang; Huang, Sha; Gao, Haixia; Liu, Yani; Qi, Jinlong; Chen, Pingping; Wang, Caixue; Scragg, Jason L; Vakurov, Alexander; Peers, Chris; Du, Xiaona; Zhang, Hailin; Gamper, Nikita

    2016-08-10

    Neuropeptide substance P (SP) is produced and released by a subset of peripheral sensory neurons that respond to tissue damage (nociceptors). SP exerts excitatory effects in the central nervous system, but peripheral SP actions are still poorly understood; therefore, here, we aimed at investigating these peripheral mechanisms. SP acutely inhibited T-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in nociceptors. The effect was mediated by neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor-induced stimulation of intracellular release of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as it can be prevented or reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol and mimicked by exogenous or endogenous ROS. This redox-mediated T-type Ca(2+) channel inhibition operated through the modulation of CaV3.2 channel sensitivity to ambient zinc, as it can be prevented or reversed by zinc chelation and mimicked by exogenous zinc. Elimination of the zinc-binding site in CaV3.2 rendered the channel insensitive to SP-mediated inhibition. Importantly, peripherally applied SP significantly reduced bradykinin-induced nociception in rats in vivo; knock-down of CaV3.2 significantly reduced this anti-nociceptive effect. This atypical signaling cascade shared the initial steps with the SP-mediated augmentation of M-type K(+) channels described earlier. Our study established a mechanism underlying the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP whereby this neuropeptide produces ROS-dependent inhibition of pro-algesic T-type Ca(2+) current and concurrent enhancement of anti-algesic M-type K(+) current. These findings will lead to a better understanding of mechanisms of endogenous analgesia. SP modulates T-type channel activity in nociceptors by a redox-dependent tuning of channel sensitivity to zinc; this novel modulatory pathway contributes to the peripheral anti-nociceptive effect of SP. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 233-251.

  6. Discovery of LAS101057: A Potent, Selective, and Orally Efficacious A2B Adenosine Receptor Antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastwood, Paul; Esteve, Cristina; González, Jacob; Fonquerna, Silvia; Aiguadé, Josep; Carranco, Inés; Doménech, Teresa; Aparici, Mònica; Miralpeix, Montserrat; Albertí, Joan; Córdoba, Mónica; Fernández, Raquel; Pont, Mercè; Godessart, Núria; Prats, Neus; Loza, María Isabel; Cadavid, María Isabel; Nueda, Arsenio; Vidal, Bernat

    2011-03-10

    The structure-activity relationships for a series of pyrazine-based A2B adenosine receptor antagonists are described. From this work, LAS101057 (17), a potent, selective, and orally efficacious A2B receptor antagonist, was identified as a clinical development candidate. LAS101057 inhibits agonist-induced IL-6 production in human fibroblasts and is active in an ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mouse model after oral administration, reducing airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine, Th2 cytokine production, and OVA-specific IgE levels.

  7. Antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of leaves of Persicaria hydropiper in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Ambia; Imam, Mohammad Zafar; Rana, Md Sohel

    2015-03-13

    Persicaria hydropiper (Linn.) Delarbre is a common plant of Polygonaceae family commonly called Bishkatali in Bangladesh. Leaves of the plant are traditionally used in the treatment of rheumatic pain, gout, and skin diseases such as ringworms, scabies, boils, abscesses, carbuncles, bites of snakes, dogs or insects. This study evaluated the antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of P. hydropiper leaves (MEPH). The antinociceptive activity of MEPH was investigated using heat-induced (hot-plate and tail-immersion test) and chemical-induced (acetic acid, formalin, glutamic acid, cinnamaldehyde) nociception models in mice at 25, 50, and 75 mg/kg doses. Involvement of opioid system, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, and ATP-sensitive K(+) channel pathway were also tested using naloxone, methylene blue and glibenclamide respectively. MEPH showed antinociceptive activity in both heat- and chemical induced pain models. In both hot plate and tail immersion tests MEPH significantly increases the latency to the thermal stimuli. In acetic acid-induced writhing test the extract inhibited the number of abdominal writhing. Likewise, MEPH produced significant dose-dependent inhibition of paw licking in both neurogenic and inflammatory pain induced by intraplantar injection of formalin. Besides, MEPH also significantly inhibited the glutamate-induced pain and cinnamaldehyde-induced pain in mice. It was also clear that pretreatment with naloxone significantly reversed the antinociception produced by MEPH in hot plate and tail immersion test suggesting the involvement of opioid system in its effect. In addition, administration of methylene blue, a non specific inhibitor of NO/guanylyl cyclase, enhanced MEPH induced antinociception while glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel antagonist, could not reverse antinociceptive activity induced by MEPH. Based on the results of the current study it can be said that MEPH possesses significant antinociceptive activity

  8. Roles of μ-Opioid Receptors and Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ Peptide Receptors in Buprenorphine-Induced Physiological Responses in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeans, Colette M.; Gruley, Erin; Kyle, Donald J.

    2012-01-01

    Buprenorphine is known as a μ-opioid peptide (MOP) receptor agonist, but its antinociception is compromised by the activation of nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptors in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of MOP and NOP receptors in regulating buprenorphine-induced physiological responses in primates (rhesus monkeys). The effects of MOP antagonist (naltrexone), NOP antagonist [(±)-1-[(3R*,4R*)-1-(cyclooctylmethyl)-3-(hydroxymethyl)-4-piperidinyl]-3-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one (J-113397)], and NOP agonists [(1S,3aS)-8-(2,3,3a,4,5,6-hexahydro-1H-phenalen-1-yl)-1-phenyl-1,3,8-triaza-spiro[4.5] decan-4-one (Ro 64-6198) and 3-endo-8-[bis(2-methylphenyl)methyl]-3-phenyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-3-ol (SCH 221510)] on buprenorphine were studied in three functional assays for measuring analgesia, respiratory depression, and itch in primates. Over the dose range of 0.01 to 0.1 mg/kg, buprenorphine dose-dependently produced antinociception, respiratory depression, and itch/scratching responses, and there was a ceiling effect at higher doses (0.1–1 mg/kg). Naltrexone (0.03 mg/kg) produced similar degrees of rightward shifts of buprenorphine's dose-response curves for all three endpoints. Mean pKB values of naltrexone (8.1–8.3) confirmed that MOP receptors mediated mainly buprenorphine-induced antinociception, respiratory depression, and itch/scratching. In contrast, J-113397 (0.1 mg/kg) did not change buprenorphine-induced physiological responses, indicating that there were no functional NOP receptors in buprenorphine-induced effects. More importantly, both NOP agonists, Ro 64-6198 and SCH 221510, enhanced buprenorphine-induced antinociception without respiratory depression and itch/ scratching. The dose-addition analysis revealed that buprenorphine in combination with the NOP agonist synergistically produced antinociceptive effects. These findings provided functional evidence that the activation of NOP receptors did not

  9. Thermal antinociception following oral administration of tapentadol in conscious cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doodnaught, Graeme M; Evangelista, Marina C; Steagall, Paulo V M

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the onset, magnitude and duration of thermal antinociception after oral administration of two doses of tapentadol in cats. Prospective, randomized, blinded, experimental study. Six healthy adult cats weighing 4.4 ± 0.4 kg. Skin temperature (ST) and thermal threshold (TT) were evaluated using a wireless TT device up to 12 hours after treatment. Treatments included placebo (PBO, 50 mg dextrose anhydrase orally), buprenorphine (BUP, 0.02 mg kg(-1)) administered intramuscularly, low-dose tapentadol (LowTAP, 25 mg orally; mean 5.7 mg kg(-)(1)) and high-dose tapentadol (HighTAP, 50 mg orally; mean 11.4 mg kg(-)(1)) in a blinded crossover design with 7 day intervals. Statistical analysis was performed using anova with appropriate post hoc test (p ≤ 0.05). Salivation was observed immediately following 11 out of 12 treatments with tapentadol. The ST was significantly increased at various time points in the opioid treatments. Hyperthermia (≥ 39.5 °C) was not observed. Baseline TT was 45.4 ± 1.4 °C for all treatments. Maximum TT values were 48.8 ± 4.8 °C at 1 hour in LowTAP, 48.5 ± 3.0 °C at 2 hours in HighTAP and 50.2 ± 5.3 °C at 1 hour in BUP. TT significantly increased after LowTAP at 1 hour, after HighTAP at 1-2 hours, and after BUP at 1-2 hours compared with baseline values. TTs were significantly increased in BUP at 1-2 hours compared with PBO. Oral administration of tapentadol increased ST and TT in cats. The durations of thermal antinociception were similar between HighTAP and BUP, both of which were twice as long as that in LowTAP. Studies of different formulations may be necessary before tapentadol can be accepted into feline practice. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the extracts of Stauntonia chinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Chen; Ning, Wu; Ying, Liu; Hao, Gao; Hua-Jin, Dong; Rui-Bin, Su; Xin-Sheng, Yao; Jin, Li

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Stauntonia chinensis (S. chinensis) and the possible action mechanisms of effective fractions. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of S. chinensis extracts, including the 60% EtOH extract (YMG), the n-BuOH extract (YMGB) and the aqueous residue (YMGW) of YMG, and the fractions from YMGB (YMGB1~YMGB7) were investigated by using the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test and the rat formalin test. The effect of these extracts on the PGE2 production was tested as well. In the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing test and the rat formalin test, YMGW and YMGB displayed anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, suggesting that they were the active ingredients of YMG. Among the fractions isolated from YMGB, YMGB1, YMGB3, YMGB4 and YMGB6 were the main active ingredients producing anti-nociceptive activity and YMGB3, YMGB5, YMGB6 and YMGB7 were the main active ingredients producing anti-inflammatory activity. Additionally, YMGW, YMGB and its separations reduced the production of PGE2, which might be the mechanism of them producing anti-inflammatory activity. These results demonstrated the active ingredients of S. chinensis producing anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, which is valuable to validate the substance basis of S. chinensis's pharmacological actions.

  11. Is Hippocampus Susceptible to Antinociceptive Tolerance to NSAIDs Like the Periaqueductal Grey?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Tsiklauri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotional distress is the most undesirable feature of painful experience. Numerous studies have demonstrated the important role of the limbic system in the affective-motivational component of pain. The purpose of this paper was to examine whether microinjection of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, Clodifen, Ketorolac, and Xefocam, into the dorsal hippocampus (DH leads to the development of antinociceptive tolerance in male rats. We found that microinjection of these NSAIDs into the DH induces antinociception as revealed by a latency increase in the tail-flick (TF and hot plate (HP tests compared to controls treated with saline into the DH. Subsequent tests on consecutive three days, however, showed that the antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs progressively decreased, suggesting tolerance developed to this effect of NSAIDs. Both pretreatment and posttreatment with the opioid antagonist naloxone into the DH significantly reduced the antinociceptive effect of NSAIDs in both pain models. Our data indicate that microinjection of NSAIDs into the DH induces antinociception which is mediated via the opioid system and exhibits tolerance.

  12. Involvement of Cholinergic and Opioid System in γ-Terpinene-Mediated Antinociception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Franceli de Brito Passos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that the monoterpenes are great candidates for the development of new drugs for the treatment of various pathological processes, including painful conditions. The gamma terpinene (γ-TPN is a monoterpene present in plant species that have multiple pharmacological properties and has structural similarity to antinociceptive monoterpenes, such as limonene and alpha-phellandrene. The γ-TPN molecular mass was evaluated by mass spectrometry and showed a pseudomolecular ion with m/z 137.0 Da. The animals did not present any signs of acute toxicity at 2 g/kg, p.o. γ-TPN (1.562 to 50 mg/kg, p.o. showed an antinociceptive effect in the formalin, capsaicin, and glutamate tests. γ-TPN has antinociceptive action when administered by others routes in glutamate test. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of γ-TPN, the open field and rota-rod test were conducted and the γ-TPN did not show muscle relaxant activity or central depressant effect. To investigate the mechanisms of action, the animals were pretreated with naloxone, glibenclamide, atropine, mecamylamine, or L-arginine in the glutamate test. γ-TPN antinociception was inhibited in the presence of naloxone, glibenclamide, atropine, and mecamylamine. The results suggest that the γ-TPN (p.o. produced antinociceptive effect in models of chemical nociception through the cholinergic and opioid systems involvement.

  13. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of an aqueous extract of Chiliotrichum diffusum

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    Sandra M. Alcalde Bahamonde

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The flowers of the Chiliotrichum diffusum (G. Forst. Kuntze, Asteraceae, have long been used in traditional medicine and rituals. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of a decoction of the flowers were evaluated and a phytochemical analysis was performed by HPLC-DAD. In order to evaluate the antinociceptive activity, the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and hot plate tests were used. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenaninduced rat paw oedema. The decoction induced a significant anti-inflammatory effect (inhibition of 56.0% at 3 h and produced significant inhibition on nociception in the acetic acid test (ED50 35 mg/kg i.p.; ED50 709 mg/kg p.o.. In the hot plate test, the antinociceptive activity of the extract employed at 500 mg/kg i.p. was significantly suppressed by pretreatment with naloxone (5 mg/kg. HPLC analysis showed the presence of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, quercitrin, afzelin, quercetin, apigenin and kaempferol. The decoction of C. diffusum proved to have antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects that may be related to the presence of the flavones, flavonols and phenolic acids identified. The opiod system seems to be involved in the mechanism of antinociception of the extract.

  14. Physiological Signal Processing for Individualized Anti-nociception Management During General Anesthesia: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonckheere, J; Bonhomme, V; Jeanne, M; Boselli, E; Gruenewald, M; Logier, R; Richebé, P

    2015-08-13

    The aim of this paper is to review existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation during surgery under general anesthesia. General anesthesia combines the use of analgesic, hypnotic and muscle-relaxant drugs in order to obtain a correct level of patient non-responsiveness during surgery. During the last decade, great efforts have been deployed in order to find adequate ways to measure how anesthetic drugs affect a patient's response to surgical nociception. Nowadays, though some monitoring devices allow obtaining information about hypnosis and muscle relaxation, no gold standard exists for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation. Articles from the PubMed literature search engine were reviewed. As this paper focused on surgery under general anesthesia, articles about nociception monitoring on conscious patients, in post-anesthesia care unit or in intensive care unit were not considered. In this article, we present a review of existing technologies for the nociception / anti-nociception balance evaluation, which is based in all cases on the analysis of the autonomous nervous system activity. Presented systems, based on sensors and physiological signals processing algorithms, allow studying the patients' reaction regarding anesthesia and surgery. Some technological solutions for nociception / antinociception balance monitoring were described. Though presented devices could constitute efficient solutions for individualized anti-nociception management during general anesthesia, this review of current literature emphasizes the fact that the choice to use one or the other mainly relies on the clinical context and the general purpose of the monitoring.

  15. PK20, a new opioid-neurotensin hybrid peptide that exhibits central and peripheral antinociceptive effects

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    Tsuda Yuko

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical treatment of various types of pain relies upon the use of opioid analgesics. However most of them produce, in addition to the analgesic effect, several side effects such as the development of dependence and addiction as well as sedation, dysphoria, and constipation. One solution to these problems are chimeric compounds in which the opioid pharmacophore is hybridized with another type of compound to incease antinociceptive effects. Neurotensin-induced antinociception is not mediated through the opioid system. Therefore, hybridizing neurotensin with opioid elements may result in a potent synergistic antinociceptor. Results Using the known structure-activity relationships of neurotensin we have synthesized a new chimeric opioid-neurotensin compound PK20 which is characterized by a very strong antinociceptive potency. The observation that the opioid antagonist naltrexone did not completely reverse the antinociceptive effect, indicates the partial involvement of the nonopioid component in PK20 in the produced analgesia. Conclusions The opioid-neurotensin hybrid analogue PK20, in which opioid and neurotensin pharmacophores overlap partially, expresses high antinociceptive tail-flick effects after central as well as peripheral applications.

  16. NSAID Antinociception Measured in a Chemical and a Thermal Assay in Mice

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    HF Miranda

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The antinociceptive activity of several nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs that were administered either intraperitoneally or intrathecally was assessed in mice by two algesiometric tests. The first was the writhing test, which assessed the abdominal constrictions that were induced by intraperitoneal acetic acid (a chemical test, and the second was the tail flick test, which measured pain responses to heat stimuli. The corresponding effective doses and their relative potencies were compared because these tests use different nociceptive stimuli with different transmission pathways. The intraperitoneal and intrathecal dose-response curves for the antinociception induced by every NSAID that was tested were parallel in the writhing test. In the tail flick test, however, only the intraperitoneal and intrathecal dose-response curves for ketoprofen, piroxicam, naproxen, nimesulide, paracetamol and diclofenac were parallel. The results obtained in this study confirm that NSAIDs possess different abilities to induce inhibition of cyclooxygenase, and they can be indirectly assessed by their different antinociceptive activities, depending on the algesiometric assays that are used. The antinociception of most NSAIDs might involve central mechanisms. The findings demonstrate the increasing importance of the spinal cord in processing and modulating nociceptive input, because intrathecal administration of NSAIDs is always more effective (in terms of potency than systemic administration; thus, the antinociceptive efficacy of NSAIDs strongly depends on the algesiometric assay that is used and on the type of the nociceptive stimulus to which the test subject is exposed.

  17. Antinociceptive, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities of Cleome viscosa leaves

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    Utpal Bose

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The methanol extract of the dried leaves of Cleome viscosa L., Cleomaceae, was investigated for its possible antinociceptive, cytotoxic and antibacterial activities in animal models. The extract produced significant writhing inhibition in acetic acid-induced writhing in mice at the oral doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight (p<0.001 comparable to the standard drug diclofenac sodium at the dose of 25 mg/kg of body weight (p<0.001. The crude extract produced the most prominent cytotoxic activity against brine shrimp Artemia salina (LC50 28.18 μg/mL and LC90 112.20 μg/mL. The extract of C. viscosa L. exhibited significant in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Shigella sonnie, Salmonella typhi, Vibrio cholera, Streptococcus epidermidis, Shigella flexneri and Staphylococcus aureus with the zones of inhibition ranging from 10.76 to 16.34 mm. The obtained results provide a support for the use of this plant in traditional medicine and its further investigation.

  18. Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs of the delta family (GluD1 and GluD2 and synaptogenesis

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    Muhammad Zahid Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate delta-1 (GluD1 and glutamate delta-2 (GluD2 form the delta family of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs and are distinct from other (iGluRs in that they do not exhibit typical agonist-induced ion channel currents. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role of the delta receptors in synapse formation by interacting with presynaptic proteins such as Neurexin1. This review presents current knowledge regarding the expression, structure and function of Glu delta receptors (GluD1, GluD2 in brain, focusing on synapse formation, function and dysfunction.

  19. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Wrightia arborea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Laizuman; Nasrin, Fatema; Zahan, Ronok; Mosaddik, Md Ashik

    2013-05-15

    Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of methanolic extract of Wrightia arborea (MEWA) were examined using different models in rats. MEWA was given to rats orally upto 2000 mg kg(-1) b.wt. for acute toxicity study and observed for 14 days. Anti-nociceptive activity was evaluated in rats against Acetic acid induced writhing (chemically induced pain) and Tail immersion method (thermally induced pain). Acute anti-inflammatory activity of MEWA was also evaluated in Formaline-induced rat paw edema model and Carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in rats. Results demonstrated that no mortality was found upto single dose of 2000 mg kg(-1) b.wt. in rats even after 14 days observation. In comparison to control group MEWA at 100 and 200 mg kg(-1) b.wt. showed highly significant anti-nociceptive activity against chemically (p mechanism.

  20. Antinociceptive properties of conocarpan and orientin obtained from Piper solmsianum C. DC. var. solmsianum (Piperaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Rosi Zanoni; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; de Souza, Márcia Maria; Delle Monache, Franco; Cechinel-Filho, Valdir

    2010-10-01

    The antinociceptive properties of some fractions and two pure compounds, conocarpan and orientin, obtained from P. solmsianum leaves were investigated in several models of pain in mice. The results indicated that this plant exhibits a promising antinociceptive profile, as it produces active principles which are several times more active than some reference drugs used for comparison. The main compound tested, orientin, caused potent and dose-dependent effects against acetic acid-induced writhing and capsaicin- and glutamate-induced nociception, being more effective against the first one, with an ID(50) value of 6.5 mg/kg (14.5 micromol/kg). Orientin was about 20-fold more potent than acetylsalicylic acid and 3.5-fold more active than indomethacin. The antinociceptive effects of this plant may be attributed, at least partially, to the presence of conocarpan and, in particular, to the flavonoid orientin.

  1. The antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine administered through the drinking water of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, L; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Christensen, Sten

    2007-01-01

    such as administration of analgesics in the drinking water would be desirable. However, the efficacy of a chronic oral analgesic treatment via this route has not yet been documented. This study investigated the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine administered ad libitum via the drinking water of laboratory rats....... The antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine in drinking water was compared with repeated subcutaneous injections. A comparison was also made between buprenorphine in drinking water and the combination of one single subcutaneous injection of buprenorphine followed by buprenorphine in drinking water. Antinociception...... was assessed by use of an analgesiometric model measuring the rats' latency time to withdrawal from a noxious heat stimulus applied to the plantar surface of the paw. Results revealed that buprenorphine in drinking water (0.056 mg/mL) induced significant increases in paw withdrawal latency times during a three...

  2. In vivo antinociceptive and muscle relaxant activity of leaf and bark of Buddleja asiatica L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkatullah, -; Ibrar, Muhammad; Ikram, Nazia; Rauf, Abdur; Hadda, Taibi Ben; Bawazeer, Saud; Khan, Haroon; Pervez, Samreen

    2016-09-01

    The current study was designed to assess the antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effect of leaves and barks of Buddleja asiatica in animal models. In acetic acid induced writhing test, pretreatment of ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked marked dose dependent antinociceptive effect with maximum of 70% and 67% pain relief at 300mg/kg i.p. respectively. In chimney test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks evoked maximum of 66.66% and 53.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In traction test, the ethanolic extract of leaves and barks caused maximum of 60% and 73.33% muscle relaxant effect after 90min of treatment at 300mg/kg i.p respectively. In short, both leaves and barks demonstrated profound antinociceptive and skeleton muscle relaxant effects and thus the study provided natural healing agents for the treatment of said disorders.

  3. Antinociceptive Activity of the Chloroform Fraction of Dioclea virgata (Rich. Amshoff (Fabaceae in Mice

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    Vanine Gomes Mota

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute treatment with the chloroform fraction of Dioclea virgata (Rich. Amshoff (CFDv in mice produced decreased ambulation and sedation in the behavioral pharmacological screening. Doses of 125 and 250 mg/kg CFDv decreased latency of sleep onset in the test of sleeping time potentiation. In the open field, animals treated with CFDv reduced ambulation and rearing (250 mg/kg, as well as defecation (125; 250 mg/kg. Regarding the antinociceptive activity, CFDv (125, 250, 500 mg/kg increased latency to first writhing and decreased the number of writhings induced by acetic acid. In the formalin test, CFDv (250 mg/kg decreased paw licking time in the first and second phases indicating antinociceptive activity that can be mediated both peripherally and at the central level. CFDv did not affect motor coordination until 120 minutes after treatment. CFDv shows psychopharmacological effects suggestive of CNS-depressant drugs with promising antinociceptive activity.

  4. Purification and characterization of a novel antinociceptive toxin from Cobra venom (Naja naja atra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei-jian; Liang, Ying-xia; Han, Li-ping; Qiu, Peng-xin; Yuan, Jin; Zhao, Shu-jin

    2008-10-01

    Snake venoms have demonstrated antinociceptive activity, and certain isolated neurotoxins have demonstrated significant analgesia in animal models. Here we report a novel analgesic toxin which was isolated from Naja naja atra and was given the name 'najanalgesin'. The LD(50) of the crude venom and najanalgesin were 0.89mg/kg and 2.69mg/kg, respectively. We used the writhing test and hot plate test to evaluate the antinociceptive properties of the crude venom and najanalgesin after intraperitoneal (ip) administration. The analgesic mechanism of najanalgesin was also studied. The response latency time was significantly prolonged in the hot plate test after ip administration of the crude venom of Naja naja atra (0.111-0.445mg/kg) in a dose-dependent manner. Najanalgesin (1mg/kg) elicited almost the same antinociceptive effect as that of the crude venom of Naja naja atra at the dose of 0.445mg/kg and remained for 6h after intraperitoneal injection, shown by hot plate test. The percentage of increase in the latency time for the venom and the najanalgesin 3h after drug administration was 96.2% and 112%, respectively. The number of writhes decreased to almost 1/3, 1/6, and 1/12 of the NS (physiological saline) group after intraperitoneal administration of najanalgesin at 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0mg/kg, respectively. Pretreatment with atropine (1mg/kg) or naloxone (3mg/kg) blocked the antinociception of najanalgesin in the hot plate test. Based on the sequence information, najanalgesin is found to be highly homologous with the conventional CTXs (cardiotoxins). To our knowledge, no study had previously reported that a toxin which was homologous with CTXs possessed the antinociceptive activity. Thus, this is the first report that the antinociceptive effect induced by najanalgesin is mediated by cholinergic and opioidergic mechanisms.

  5. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activity from Algae of the Genus Caulerpa

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    Bárbara Viviana de Oliveira Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME, acetate (AE, hexanic (HE and chloroform (CE extracts obtained from Caulerpa mexicana, and ME, CE and HE obtained from Caulerpa sertularioides. These marine algae are found all over the world, mainly in tropical regions. Models such as the writhing test, the hot plate test and formalin-induced nociception test were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity in laboratory mice. In the writhing test, all the extracts were administered orally at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, and induced high peripheral antinociceptive activity, with a reduction in the nociception induced by acetic acid above 65%. In the hot plate test, treatment with extracts from C. sertularioides (100 mg/kg, p.o. did not significantly increase the latency of response, although the ME, AE and HE from C. mexicana showed activity in this model. This result suggests that these extracts exhibit antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, it was observed that ME, AE and HE obtained from C. mexicana reduced the effects of formalin in both phases. On the other hand only CE from C. sertularioides induced significant inhibition of the nociceptive response in the first phase. To better assess the potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts, the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test was used to test Caulerpa spp. extracts on cell migration into the peritoneal cavity. In this assay, all extracts evaluated were able to significantly inhibit leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity in comparison with carrageenan. These data demonstrate that extracts from Caulerpa species elicit pronounced antinociceptive and anti-inflamatory activity against several nociception models. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism

  6. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activity from Algae of the Genus Caulerpa

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Matta, Carolina Babosa Brito; de Souza, Éverton Tenório; de Queiroz, Aline Cavalcanti; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Araújo, Morgana Vital; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C.; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2011-01-01

    Marine natural products have been the focus of discovery for new products of chemical and pharmacological interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the methanolic (ME), acetate (AE), hexanic (HE) and chloroform (CE) extracts obtained from Caulerpa mexicana, and ME, CE and HE obtained from Caulerpa sertularioides. These marine algae are found all over the world, mainly in tropical regions. Models such as the writhing test, the hot plate test and formalin-induced nociception test were used to evaluate antinociceptive activity in laboratory mice. In the writhing test, all the extracts were administered orally at a concentration of 100 mg/kg, and induced high peripheral antinociceptive activity, with a reduction in the nociception induced by acetic acid above 65%. In the hot plate test, treatment with extracts from C. sertularioides (100 mg/kg, p.o.) did not significantly increase the latency of response, although the ME, AE and HE from C. mexicana showed activity in this model. This result suggests that these extracts exhibit antinociceptive activity. In the formalin test, it was observed that ME, AE and HE obtained from C. mexicana reduced the effects of formalin in both phases. On the other hand only CE from C. sertularioides induced significant inhibition of the nociceptive response in the first phase. To better assess the potential anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts, the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test was used to test Caulerpa spp. extracts on cell migration into the peritoneal cavity. In this assay, all extracts evaluated were able to significantly inhibit leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity in comparison with carrageenan. These data demonstrate that extracts from Caulerpa species elicit pronounced antinociceptive and anti-inflamatory activity against several nociception models. However, pharmacological and chemical studies are continuing in order to characterize the mechanism(s) responsible for the

  7. Antinociceptive Effect of Some Biuret Derivatives on Formalin Test in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Adibpour, Neda; Poornajjari, Ali; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Rezaee, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The current study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of several biuret derivatives with N, N`-diphenyl, N-phenyl-N`-alkylphenyl, N,N`-bis alkylphenyl, 2-methylquinoline-4-yl, benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylthio and (1-phenyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl)thio substituents on the formalin-evoked pain in mice. Methods: Antinociceptive activity of the nine biurets derivatives were assessed at different doses in mice using formalin test and the results were compared with those of indomet...

  8. Design, Synthesis, Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Novel Piroxicam Analogues

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    Eliezer J. Barreiro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the design, synthesis, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a series of benzothiazine N-acylhydrazones 14a–h, planned by structural modification of piroxicam (1, a non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Among the synthesized analogues, compounds 14f (LASSBio-1637 and 14g (LASSBio-1639 were identified as novel antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory prototypes, active by oral administration, acting by a mechanism of action that seems to be different from that of piroxicam, since they were inactive as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2 at concentrations of 10 mM.

  9. Antioxidant and Antinociceptive Effects of Citrus limon Essential Oil in Mice

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    Lidianne Mayra Lopes Campêlo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and antinociceptive activities of Citrus limon essential oil (EO were assessed in mice or in vitro tests. EO possesses a strong antioxidant potential according to the scavenging assays. Moreover, it presented scavenger activity against all in vitro tests. Orally, EO (50, 100, and 150 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of writhes, and, at highest doses, it reduced the number of paw licks. Whereas naloxone antagonized the antinociceptive action of EO (highest doses, this suggested, at least, the participation of the opioid system. Further studies currently in progress will enable us to understand the action mechanisms of EO.

  10. Antinociceptive effect and acute toxicity of the Hyptis suaveolens leaves aqueous extract on mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Thiago C; Marques, Maxsuel S; Menezes, Igor A C; Dias, Kellyane S; Silva, Aline B L; Mello, Iderjane C M; Carvalho, Ana C S; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Marçal, Rosilene M

    2007-07-01

    The aqueous extract of Hyptis suaveolens leaves was studied for their antinociceptive property in chemical and thermal models of nociception in mice. Oral administration of the aqueous extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) dose-dependently reduced the number of writhings induced by acetic acid, decreased the licking activity of the early phase in formalin test and increased the reaction time in hot-plate test. The antinociceptive effect was significantly antagonized by naloxone (3 mg/kg; i.p.). Preliminary acute toxicity study showed that no animal death with doses up to 5 g/kg (p.o.).

  11. Differential regulation of morphine antinociceptive effects by endogenous enkephalinergic system in the forebrain of mice

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    Sun Wei-Zen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mice lacking the preproenkephalin (ppENK gene are hyperalgesic and show more anxiety and aggression than wild-type (WT mice. The marked behavioral changes in ppENK knock-out (KO mice appeared to occur in supraspinal response to painful stimuli. However the functional role of enkephalins in the supraspinal nociceptive processing and their underlying mechanism is not clear. The aim of present study was to compare supraspinal nociceptive and morphine antinociceptive responses between WT and ppENK KO mice. Results The genotypes of bred KO mice were confirmed by PCR. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive neurons were labeled in the caudate-putamen, intermediated part of lateral septum, lateral globus pallidus, intermediated part of lateral septum, hypothalamus, and amygdala of WT mice. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive neurons were not found in the same brain areas in KO mice. Tail withdrawal and von Frey test results did not differ between WT and KO mice. KO mice had shorter latency to start paw licking than WT mice in the hot plate test. The maximal percent effect of morphine treatments (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg, i.p. differed between WT and KO mice in hot plate test. The current source density (CSD profiles evoked by peripheral noxious stimuli in the primary somatosenstory cortex (S1 and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC were similar in WT and KO mice. After morphine injection, the amplitude of the laser-evoked sink currents was decreased in S1 while the amplitude of electrical-evoked sink currents was increased in the ACC. These differential morphine effects in S1 and ACC were enhanced in KO mice. Facilitation of synaptic currents in the ACC is mediated by GABA inhibitory interneurons in the local circuitry. Percent increases in opioid receptor binding in S1 and ACC were 5.1% and 5.8%, respectively. Conclusion The present results indicate that the endogenous enkephalin system is not involved in acute nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord

  12. Effects of agonist efficacy on desensitization of phosphoinositide hydrolysis mediated by m1 and m3 muscarinic receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, J.; Wang, S.Z.; el-Fakahany, E.E. (Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor agonist-induced desensitization of phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and loss of receptors were studied in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with the m1 and m3 muscarinic receptor genes. Long-term exposure to the full agonist carbamylcholine (CBC) resulted in a time-dependent attenuation of the maximal PI response and a decrease in agonist potency. This desensitization was accompanied by a parallel loss of maximal ligand binding without an alteration of the binding affinity. The time course of both receptor desensitization and down-regulation was similar in m1 and m3 CHO cells. The PI response to the partial agonist McN-A-343 (McN) in m1 cells was more sensitive to desensitization by CBC than the response to the latter agonist, and this desensitization was faster than receptor down-regulation. Desensitization of the PI response to McN was reflected as a decrease in the maximal response without a marked change in potency. McN induced slow desensitization of the PI response to CBC but a much faster desensitization of its own response. Our data provide evidence that although muscarinic agonist-induced desensitization of PI hydrolysis in CHO cells is due mainly to loss of receptors, there are other important factors which play a role in this process, e.g., receptor-effector uncoupling. The relative contribution of these different mechanisms depends on the efficacy of the agonists used for the receptor desensitization and activation steps.

  13. Antinociceptive activity of Rhoifoline A from the ethanol extract of Zanthoxylum nitidum in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiang; Shi, Xiaodong; Mao, Xia; Chen, Jiangang; Zhu, Lei; Zhao, Qingjie

    2013-12-12

    Antinociceptive activity of Rhoifoline A (RA), a benzophenanthridine alkaloid obtained from the ethanol extract of Zanthoxylum nitidum, was evaluated in mice using chemical and thermal models of nociception. RA was evaluated on anti-nociceptive activity in mice using chemical and thermal models of nociception. RA administered intraperitoneally at doses of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg/kg exhibited significant inhibitions on chemical nociception induced by intraperitoneal acetic acid and subplantar formalin, and on thermal nociception in the tail-flick test and the hot plate test. RA neither significantly impaired motor coordination in the rotarod test nor did spontaneous locomotion in the open-field test. RA did not enhance the pentobarbital sodium induced sleep time. These results indicated that the observed antinociceptive activity of RA was unrelated to sedation or motor abnormality. Core body temperature measurement showed that RA did not affect temperature during a 2-hour period. Furthermore, RA-induced antinociception in the hot plate test was insensitive to naloxone or glibenclamide but significantly antagonized by L-NAME, methylene blue and nimodipine. Therefore, it is reasonable that the analgesic mechanism of RA possibly involved the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and L-type Ca(2+) channels. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the ethanolic extract of Bougainvillea xbuttiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez Perez Gil, A L; Barbosa Navarro, L; Patipo Vera, M; Petricevich, V L

    2012-12-18

    Bougainvillea xbuttiana is widely distributed in Mexico and it is used as an analgesic in folk medicine. In the present study the in vivo antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the Bougainvillea xbuttiana ethanolic extract have been studied in mice. The phytochemical analysis was performed. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated through writhing and formalin test in mice. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined with the carrageenan-induced mice paw oedema model. IL-6, IL-10 and IFN-γ levels were determined by enzyme-like immunosorbent assay, whereas TNF and nitrite levels were detected by standard assay with L929 cells and colorimetric Griess reactive, respectively. The results showed that the ethanolic extract of the Bougainvillea xbuttiana has significant anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities, by inhibition of nociception induced by acetic acid and paw oedema. This extract also induced a decrease in TNF levels and an increase of IL-6, IFN-γ and NO levels that we observed up to 2h. The highest levels of IL-10 were observed up to 4h. The ratios of pro-/anti-inflammatory cytokines in sera from mice injected with the ethanolic extract, may be manifesting an anti-inflammatory status. The present study provides convincing evidences that Bougainvillea xbuttiana extract possesses significant anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute stress-induced antinociception is cGMP-dependent but heme oxygenase-independent

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    Carvalho-Costa, P.G. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Branco, L.G.S. [Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leite-Panissi, C.R.A. [Programa de Graduação em Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Morfologia, Fisiologia e Patologia Básica, Faculdade de Odontologia de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-19

    Endogenous carbon monoxide (CO), which is produced by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO), participates as a neuromodulator in physiological processes such as thermoregulation and nociception by stimulating the formation of 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In particular, the acute physical restraint-induced fever of rats can be blocked by inhibiting the enzyme HO. A previous study reported that the HO-CO-cGMP pathway plays a key phasic antinociceptive role in modulating noninflammatory acute pain. Thus, this study evaluated the involvement of the HO-CO-cGMP pathway in antinociception induced by acute stress in male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=8/group) using the analgesia index (AI) in the tail flick test. The results showed that antinociception induced by acute stress was not dependent on the HO-CO-cGMP pathway, as neither treatment with the HO inhibitor ZnDBPG nor heme-lysinate altered the AI. However, antinociception was dependent on cGMP activity because pretreatment with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) blocked the increase in the AI induced by acute stress.

  16. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities A of eugenol essential oil in experimental animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apparecido N. Daniel

    Full Text Available Eugenia caryophyllata, popular name "clove", is grown naturally in Indonesia and cultivated in many parts of the world, including Brazil. Clove is used in cooking, food processing, pharmacy; perfumery, cosmetics and the clove oil (eugenol have been used in folk medicine for manifold conditions include use in dental care, as an antiseptic and analgesic. The objective of this study was evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of eugenol used for dentistry purposes following oral administration in animal models in vivo. The anti-inflammatory activity of eugenol was evaluated by inflammatory exudates volume and leukocytes migration in carrageenan-induced pleurisy and carrageenan-induced paw edema tests in rats. The antinociceptive activity was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing and hot-plate tests in mice. Eugenol (200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the volume of pleural exudates without changing the total blood leukocyte counts. At dose of 200 mg/kg, eugenol significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced edema, 2-4 h after injection of the flogistic agent. In the hot-plate test, eugenol administration (100 mg/kg showed unremarkable activity against the time-to-discomfort reaction, recorded as response latency, which is blocked by meperidine. Eugenol at doses of 50, 75 and 100 mg/kg had a significant antinociceptive effect in the test of acetic-acid-induced abdominal writhing, compared to the control animals. The data suggest that eugenol possesses anti-inflammatory and peripheral antinociceptive activities.

  17. Antinociceptive Effect of Some Biuret Derivatives on Formalin Test in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Adibpour

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The current study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of several biuret derivatives with N, N`-diphenyl, N-phenyl-N`-alkylphenyl, N,N`-bis alkylphenyl, 2-methylquinoline-4-yl, benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylthio and (1-phenyl-1H-tetrazol-5-ylthio substituents on the formalin-evoked pain in mice. Methods: Antinociceptive activity of the nine biurets derivatives were assessed at different doses in mice using formalin test and the results were compared with those of indomethacin(20 mg/kg and vehicle of the compounds. Area under the pain score curve against time (AUEC up to 60 minutes was used as the measure of pain behavior. Results: A rather good analgesic effect was seen for most of the tested biuret derivatives. Significant reduction in median AUEC0-5 minutes was observed at the doses of 50 and 25 mg/kg for biurets with either benzyl and 2-methylquinoline-4-yl (C8 or phenylethyl and benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylthio(C9 moieties, respectively(p-value<0.0044. Antinociceptive activities of compound C7 (with bis phenylropyl substituent, C8 and C9 during the late phase of formaldehyde-induced pain were comparable to that of indomethacin. Conclusion: Unlike indomethacin, the tested biuret compounds are able to induce antinociception in both phases of formalin test and could be considered comparable to indomethacin at the selected doses.

  18. Central antinociceptive effect of tapentadol is increased by nitric oxide synthase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujalska-Zadrożny, Magdalena; Wolińska, Renata; Leśniak, Anna; Sacharczuk, Mariusz

    2016-10-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) have been shown to participate in the mechanism of the antinociceptive action of tapentadol. The results obtained in this study indicate that tapentadol administered intrathecally at a range of doses (30-100 µg) increased nociceptive thresholds in the Randall-Selitto and tail-flick tests in rats; however, this effect was significant only for the higher doses. After intracerebroventricular administration of tapentadol at the same dose range, an antinociceptive effect was observed only in response to mechanical stimuli. In coadministration studies, L-N-nitro arginine (L-NOArg) - a nonselective NOS inhibitor as well as selective inhibitors: 7-Nitroindazole (7-NI), L-N(1-iminoethyl)lysine (L-NIL) or N-(1-iminoethyl)-L-ornithine (L-NIO) for the respective neuronal, inducible, and endothelial NOSs enhanced the antinociceptive activity of intrathecally administered tapentadol in the Randall-Selitto test and to a lesser extent in the tail-flick test. A similar, although less pronounced effect of intracerebroventricular tapentadol was also observed after previous administration of NOS inhibitors in the Randall-Selitto test, but not in the tail-flick test. In conclusion, neuronal NOS, inducible NOS, and endothelial NOS influence the antinociceptive action of tapentadol at the spinal level and to a much lesser extent at the supraspinal level.

  19. Antinociceptive properties of extracts and two flavonoids isolated from leaves of Danae racemosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki-Dizaji, Nasrin; Fathiazad, Fatemeh; Garjani, Alireza

    2007-12-01

    The antinociceptive properties of the hydro-methanolic extract (HME) and two flavonoids isolated from Danae racemosa have been investigated in several nociceptive rat models. The HME from D. racemosa (100-400 mgkg(-1), i.p.) produced significant dose-related inhibition of acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction. In the same dose range, the HME produced dose-related inhibition in both phases of a formalin-test. Treatment of animals with naloxone (5 mgkg(-1), i.p.) completely reversed the antinociceptive effect caused by morphine (5 mgkg(-1), s.c.) and the HME (200 mgkg(-1), i.p.) when assessed against the first phase of the formalin-test, but this effect was less significant for the HME in the second phase. Furthermore, when assessed via a hot-plate test, the HME (100-400 mgkg(-1), i.p.) caused a significant increase in response latency. The HME, given daily for to 7 consecutive days, develop tolerance, but did not induce cross-tolerance to morphine. These data demonstrate that the HME elicites pronounced antinociception against several pain models. The actions of the HME involve, at least in part, an interaction with the opioid system, but does not seem to be related with non-specific peripheral or central depressant actions. Finally, the active principle(s) responsible for the antinociceptive action of D. racemosa is likely to be partially related to the presence of quercetin and kaempferol.

  20. Sesquiterpene lactone! a promising antioxidant, anticancer and moderate antinociceptive agent from Artemisia macrocephala jacquem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoaib, Mohammad; Shah, Ismail; Ali, Niaz; Adhikari, Achyut; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Shah, Syed Wadood Ali; Ishtiaq, Saiqa; Khan, Jahangir; Khan, Shahzeb; Umer, Mohammad Naveed

    2017-01-07

    Sesquiterpene lactones (STLs) make a diverse and huge group of bio-active constituents that have been isolated from several plant families. However, the greatest numbers are present in Asteraceae family having more than 3000 different reported structures. Recently several researchers have reported that STLs have significant antioxidant and anticancer potentials. To investigate the antioxidant, anticancer and antinociceptive potentials of STLs, gravity column chromatography technique was used for isolation from the biologically rich chloroform fraction of Artemisia macrocephala Jacquem. The antioxidant activity of the isolated STLs was determined by DPPH and ABTS free radical scavenging activity, anticancer activity was determined on 3 T3, HeLa and MCF-7 cells by MTT assay while the antinociceptive activity was determined through acetic acid induced writhings, tail immersion method and formalin induced nociception method. The results showed that the STLs of Artemisia macrocephala possesses promising antioxidant activity and also it decreased the viability of 3 T3, HeLa and MCF-7 cells and mild to moderate antinociceptive activity. Sesquiterpenes lactones (STLs) are widely present in numerous genera of the family Asteraceae (compositae). They are described as the active constituents used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various diseases. The present study reveals the significant potentials of STL and may be used as an alternative for the management of cancer. Anyhow, the isolated compound is having no prominent antinociceptive potentials.

  1. Evaluation of Anti-Nociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of a Heterofucan from Dictyota menstrualis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bonciani Nader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Fucan is a term that defines a family of homo- and hetero-polysaccharides containing sulfated l-fucose in its structure. In this work, a heterofucan (F2.0v from the seaweed, Dictyota menstrualis, was evaluated as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agent. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg inhibits 100% of leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity after chemical stimulation. However, F2.0v does not alter the expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-6, as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg has peripheral antinociceptive activity with potency similar to dipyrone. On the other hand, it had no effect on pain response on the hot plate test. Confocal microscopy analysis and flow cytometry showed that F2.0v binds to the surface of leucocytes, which leads us to suggest that the mechanism of action of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive F2.0v is related to its ability to inhibit the migration of leukocytes to the site of tissue injury. In summary, the data show that F2.0v compound has great potential as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory, and future studies will be performed to further characterize the mechanism of action of F2.0v.

  2. Nanoparticles of cationic chimeric peptide and sodium polyacrylate exhibit striking antinociception activity at lower dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kshitij; Singh, Vijay P; Kurupati, Raj K; Mann, Anita; Ganguli, Munia; Gupta, Yogendra K; Singh, Yogendra; Saleem, Kishwar; Pasha, Santosh; Maiti, Souvik

    2009-02-20

    The current study investigates the performance of polyelectrolyte complexes based nanoparticles in improving the antinociceptive activity of cationic chimeric peptide-YFa at lower dose. Size, Zeta potential and morphology of the nanoparticles were determined. Size of the nanoparticles decreases and zeta potential increases with concomitant increase in charge ratio (Z(+/-)). The nanoparticles at Z(+/-)12 are spherical with 70+/-7 nm diameter in AFM and displayed positive surface charge and similar sizes (83+/-8 nm) by Zetasizer. The nanoparticles of Z(+/-) 12 are used in this study. Cytotoxicity by MTT assay on three different mammalian cell lines (liver, neuronal and kidney) revealed lower toxicity of nanoparticles. Hematological parameters were also not affected by nanoparticles compared to normal counts of water treated control group. Nanoparticles containing 10 mg/kg YFa produced increased antinociception, approximately 36%, in tail-flick latency test in mice, whereas the neat peptide at the same concentration did not show any antinociception activity. This enhancement in activity is attributed to the nanoparticle associated protection of peptide from proteolytic degradation. In vitro peptide release study in plasma also supported the antinociception profile of nanoparticles. Thus, our results suggest of a potential nanoparticle delivery system for cationic peptide drug candidates for improving their stability and bioavailability.

  3. Anti-Nociceptive And Anti-Inflammatory Effects Of A Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of a Nigerian Polyherbal Health Tonic tea aqueous extract (PHT) in rodents of both sexes. 100 - 500 mg kg–1 ... PHT was also shown to be more protective than acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in the castor oil- induced diarrhea model, which suggests the ...

  4. Dry needle stimulation of myofascial trigger points evokes segmental anti-nociceptive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srbely, John Z; Dickey, James P; Lee, David; Lowerison, Mark

    2010-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that dry needle stimulation of a myofascial trigger point (sensitive locus) evokes segmental anti-nociceptive effects. Double-blind randomized controlled trial. Forty subjects (21 males, 19 females). Test subjects received intramuscular dry needle puncture to a right supraspinatus trigger point (C4,5); controls received sham intramuscular dry needle puncture. Pain pressure threshold (PPT) readings were recorded from right infraspinatus (C5,6) and right gluteus medius (L4,5S1) trigger points at 0 (pre-needling baseline), 1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 min post-needling and normalized to baseline values. The supraspinatus and infraspinatus trigger points are neurologically linked at C5; the supraspinatus and gluteus medius are segmentally unrelated. The difference between the infraspinatus and gluteus medius PPT values (PPTseg) represents a direct measure of the segmental anti-nociceptive effects acting at the infraspinatus trigger point. Significant increases in PPTseg were observed in test subjects at 3 (p = 0.002) and 5 (p = 0.015) min post-needling, compared with controls. One intervention of dry needle stimulation to a single trigger point (sensitive locus) evokes short-term segmental anti-nociceptive effects. These results suggest that trigger point (sensitive locus) stimulation may evoke anti-nociceptive effects by modulating segmental mechanisms, which may be an important consideration in the management of myofascial pain.

  5. The anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Patrinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study explores the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of Patrinia villosa, a Chinese medicinal plant, and to explore its effects on the proinflammatory cytokines of the rats with pelvic inflammation model. The animals were randomly divided into Patrinia villosa group (PV group), dexamethasone group (DEX ...

  6. Antinociceptive activity of acute and chronic administration of Murraya koenigii L. leaves in experimental animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Rupali Arun; Langade, Padmaja Mukund; Dighade, Pramod Babarao; Hiray, Yogesh Ashok

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the antinociceptive activity of acute and chronic administration of petroleum ether extract of Murraya koenigii L. leaves (PMK) and total alkaloids separated from petroleum ether extract of Murraya koenigii leaves (AMK) in mice. PMK was subjected for isolation of total alkaloid fraction AMK. The antinociceptive activity of PMK (100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o.) and AMK (100 and 300 mg/kg, p.o.), after acute and chronic administration (for 15 days), was evaluated using peripheral model like acetic acid-induced writhing method and central model like hot plate method and tail immersion method. Statistical analysis was carried out by one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's test. In acute studies, PMK and AMK significantly and dose-dependently reduced the number of acetic acid-induced writhing, significantly increased the latency of paw licking in hot plate method, and significantly increased the basal reaction time in tail immersion method. With chronic administration of PMK and AMK, highest activity was observed on day 9 in acetic acid-induced writhing model. In hot plate and tail immersion method, chronic administration of PMK and AMK initially showed fluctuating responses but produced highest degree of antinociception on day 9 of the study. The degree of antinociception produced by PMK and AMK at the end of 15 days study suggest that Murraya koenigii has potential to use as an analgesic.

  7. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil (Olea europeae L.) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eidi, Akram; Moghadam-kia, Sara; Moghadam, Jalal Zarringhalam; Eidi, Maryam; Rezazadeh, Shamsali

    2012-03-01

    Olive [Olea europaea L. (Oleaceae)] is a long-lived evergreen tree that is widespread in different parts of the world. Olive oil has been reported to relieve pain; however, there is still insufficient data in the literature on the subject. Thus, it is considered worthwhile investigating the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil in adult male Balb/C mice. The antinociceptive effects were studied using formalin, hot plate and writhing tests. The acute anti-inflammatory effects of olive oil in mice were studied using xylene ear edema test. Olive oil (1, 5 and 10 ml/kg body wt.) was injected intraperitoneally. Intact animals served as controls. Our results showed that the olive oil only decreased the second phase of formalin-induced pain. In the hot plate test, olive oil did not raise the pain threshold over the 60 min duration of the test. Olive oil exhibited antinociceptive activity against writhing-induced pain by acetic acid. In the xylene ear edema test, olive oil showed significant anti-inflammatory activity in the mice. The present data indicated that olive oil has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects in mice but further investigation of these effects is required to elucidate the mechanism(s) involved in analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Olea europaea oil.

  8. Synergistic antinociceptive interaction of Syzygium aromaticum or Rosmarinus officinalis coadministered with ketorolac in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Villalobos, Karla Lyzet; Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Aguilar-Mariscal, Hidemi; González-Trujano, María Eva; Martínez-Salazar, María Fernanda; Ramírez-Cisneros, María de Los Ángeles; Rios, María Yolanda; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2017-10-01

    Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & L.M. Perry (Mirtaceae) and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Lamiaceae) are both medicinal plants used for centuries to alleviate pain. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the therapeutic potential utility of herb-drug association of S. aromaticum essential oil or R. officinalis ethanolic extract coadministered with ketorolac. Antinociceptive pharmacological interaction was investigated by an isbolographic study using the formalin test in rats. Both alone and in combination with ketorolac; S. aromaticum and R. officinalis produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive response. To plot the isobologram, we used the effective dose 50 of each one component in a fixed 1:1 ratio. The isobolographic analysis showed that, in both combinations, ketorolac plus essential oil S. aromaticum and ketorolac plus ethanolic extract R. officinalis, the experimental value (Zexp) was lower than the theoretical value (Zadd). In addition, this study shows that eugenol, a metabolite present in S. aromaticum, and ursolic acid, a metabolite present in R. officinalis, also synergized the antinociceptive effect of ketorolac. While, the oleanolic acid present in both medicinal species did not show a synergistic antinociceptive effect in combination with ketorolac. No adverse effects were observed with these herb-drug interactions. These findings suggest that essential oil S. aromaticum and ethanolic extract R. officinalis could be useful in combination with ketorolac for the treatment of inflammatory pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Anti-nociceptive effect of total alkaloids isolated from the seeds of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is indexed by Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus,. International Pharmaceutical .... injection, and the time of the animal spent for licking the injected paw was recorded. Tail-flick test. Antinociceptive activity of TA was further assessed using the tail-flick test [17]. Mice were.

  10. Aconitum sp. alkaloids : the modulation of voltage-dependent Na+ channels, toxicity and antinociceptive properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friese, J; Gleitz, J; Gutser, UT; Heubach, JF; Matthiesen, T; Wilffert, B; Selve, N

    1997-01-01

    Alkaloids from Aconitum sp., used as analgesics in traditional Chinese medicine, were investigated to elucidate their antinociceptive and toxic properties considering: (1) binding to Na+ channel epitope site 2, (2) alterations in synaptosomal Na+ and Ca2+ concentration ([Na+](i), [Ca2+](i)), (3)

  11. Evaluation of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a heterofucan from Dictyota menstrualis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Ivan Rui Lopes; Cordeiro, Sara Lima; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Dreyfuss, Juliana Luporini; Filgueira, Luciana Guimarães Alves; Leite, Edda Lisboa; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Rocha, Hugo Alexandre Oliveira

    2013-08-02

    Fucan is a term that defines a family of homo- and hetero-polysaccharides containing sulfated l-fucose in its structure. In this work, a heterofucan (F2.0v) from the seaweed, Dictyota menstrualis, was evaluated as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agent. F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg) inhibits 100% of leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity after chemical stimulation. However, F2.0v does not alter the expression of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), as well as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). F2.0v (20.0 mg/kg) has peripheral antinociceptive activity with potency similar to dipyrone. On the other hand, it had no effect on pain response on the hot plate test. Confocal microscopy analysis and flow cytometry showed that F2.0v binds to the surface of leucocytes, which leads us to suggest that the mechanism of action of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive F2.0v is related to its ability to inhibit the migration of leukocytes to the site of tissue injury. In summary, the data show that F2.0v compound has great potential as an antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory, and future studies will be performed to further characterize the mechanism of action of F2.0v.

  12. Aconitum sp. alkaloids: The modulation of voltage-dependent Na+channels, toxicity and antinociceptive properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friese, Jutta; Gleitz, Johannes; Gutser, Ulrike T.; Heubach, Jürgen F.; Matthiesen, Theo; Wilffert, Bob; Selve, Norma

    1997-01-01

    Alkaloids from Aconitum sp., used as analgesics in traditional Chinese medicine, were investigated to elucidate their antinociceptive and toxic properties considering: (1) binding to Na+channel epitope site 2, (2) alterations in synaptosoml Na+and Ca2+concentration ([Na+](i), [Ca2+](i)), (3)

  13. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potentials of kolaviron: mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onasanwo, Samuel A; Rotu, Rume A

    2016-06-01

    Major attention has been on dietary and medicinal phytochemicals that inhibit or reverse abnormal conditions caused by nociceptive and inflammatory stimuli. Garcinia kola (Guttiferae) seed, known as "bitter kola", plays an important role in African ethno-medicine and traditional hospitality like in the treatment of inflammation, colds, bronchitis, bacterial, and viral infections. A number of useful phytochemicals have been isolated from the seed, and the most prominent of them is kolaviron (Garcinia bioflavonoid), which has been suggested to have antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potentials. The aim of this experiment is to explore the mechanisms of action of the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potentials of kolaviron. The probable mechanisms of action of kolaviron were assessed by using naloxone, prazosin, and atropine to investigate the involvement of adrenergic, opioidergic, and cholinergic systems, respectively, using tail flick, the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin-induced paw licking, and carrageenan-induced paw edema models. Also, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was used to analyze the level of inflammation. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test in mice, pretreatment with naloxone, prazosin, and atropine significantly reversed the antinociception effects of kolaviron (200 mg/kg) when compared with control and kolaviron groups. In the formalin-induced paw licking test in mice, there was a significant decrease on the antinociceptive effects of kolaviron in the late phase when compared with the control, while the pretreatment with naloxone and prazosin significantly reversed the antinociception of kolaviron but atropine did not have any significant decrease when compared with the kolaviron group. In the tail flick latency assay in rats, pretreatment with naloxone and prazosin significantly reversed the antinociception of kolaviron but atropine; however, did not have any significant increase when compared with the control and kolaviron

  14. The peptide hemopressin acts through CB1 cannabinoid receptors to reduce food intake in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Garron T; Mancini, Giacomo; Lutz, Beat; Luckman, Simon M

    2010-05-26

    Hemopressin is a short, nine amino acid peptide (H-Pro-Val-Asn-Phe-Lys-Leu-Leu-Ser-His-OH) isolated from rat brain that behaves as an inverse agonist at the cannabinoid receptor CB(1), and is shown here to inhibit agonist-induced receptor internalization in a heterologous cell model. Since this peptide occurs naturally in the rodent brain, we determined its effect on appetite, an established central target of cannabinoid signaling. Hemopressin dose-dependently decreases night-time food intake in normal male rats and mice, as well as in obese ob/ob male mice, when administered centrally or systemically, without causing any obvious adverse side effects. The normal, behavioral satiety sequence is maintained in male mice fasted overnight, though refeeding is attenuated. The anorectic effect is absent in CB(1) receptor null mutant male mice, and hemopressin can block CB(1) agonist-induced hyperphagia in male rats, providing strong evidence for antagonism of the CB(1) receptor in vivo. We speculate that hemopressin may act as an endogenous functional antagonist at CB(1) receptors and modulate the activity of appetite pathways in the brain.

  15. Antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of fruits of Capparis ovata in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Rana; Bektas, Nurcan; Ozturk, Yusuf

    2010-08-19

    Capparis ovata Desf. and Capparis spinosa L. have wide natural distribution in Turkey and they are consumed in pickled form. Flower buds, root bark, and fruits of the plant are used in folk medicine due to their analgesic, wound healing, cell regeneration, tonic, and diuretic effects. In this study, we attempted to identify the possible antinociceptive action of methanol extract prepared from fruits of Capparis ovata. Using tail immersion, hot plate and writhing tests, the antinociceptive effect of the methanol extract of Capparis ovata (MEC) fruits was assessed after intraperitoneal administration into mice. Morphine sulfate (5mg/kg; i.p.) and diclofenac (10mg/kg; i.p.) were used as reference analgesic agents. Naloxone (5mg/kg; i.p.) was also tested. MEC was studied at the doses of 50, 100, and 200mg/kg (i.p.) and exhibited significant antinociceptive activities in all tests used. The above-mentioned doses of the extract reduced the writhing responses by 32.21, 55.70, and 68.36%, respectively. MPE% were increased by 7.27, 12.07, 14.60% in the tail immersion, and 7.88, 11.71, 16.73% in the hot plate test at the tested doses, respectively. Naloxone antagonized antinociceptive effect at the doses of 100 and 200mg/kg whereas partially antagonized the effect of MEC at the dose of 50mg/kg. Based on the results obtained, it can be concluded that MEC has antinociceptive effects both at the peripheral and central levels. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the central amygdala induces antinociception in the guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite-Panissi C.R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the involvement of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA in the modulation of defensive behavior and in antinociceptive regulation. In a previous study, we demonstrated the existence of a cholinergic-opioidergic interaction in the CEA, modulating the defensive response of tonic immobility in guinea pigs. In the present study, we investigated a similar interaction in the CEA, but now involved in the regulation of the nociceptive response. Microinjection of carbachol (2.7 nmol and morphine (2.2 nmol into the CEA promoted antinociception up to 45 min after microinjection in guinea pigs as determined by a decrease in the vocalization index in the vocalization test. This test consists of the application of a peripheral noxious stimulus (electric shock into the subcutaneous region of the thigh that provokes the emission of a vocalization response by the animal. Furthermore, the present results demonstrated that the antinociceptive effect of carbachol (2.7 nmol; N = 10 was blocked by previous administration of atropine (0.7 nmol; N = 7 or naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 7 into the same site. In addition, the decrease in the vocalization index induced by the microinjection of morphine (2.2 nmol; N = 9 into the CEA was prevented by pretreatment with naloxone (1.3 nmol; N = 11. All sites of injection were confirmed by histology. These results indicate the involvement of the cholinergic and opioidergic systems of the CEA in the modulation of antinociception in guinea pigs. In addition, the present study suggests that cholinergic transmission may activate the release of endorphins/enkephalins from interneurons of the CEA, resulting in antinociception.

  17. Antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities of methanolic extract of Euphorbia thymifolia L. whole plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullah, Mohammed; Hasan, Sumaiyah Kanij; Ali, Zulfiquar; Rahman, Shahnaz; Jahan, Rownak

    2012-02-01

    To study the antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities of methanolic extract of the whole plant of Euphorbia thymifolia L., a plant used in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain. Antihyperglycemic activity studies were conducted in glucose-loaded mice by oral glucose tolerance tests. Mice were given various doses of the extract, followed by glucose (2 g/kg body weight), 1 h after administration of the extract. Serum glucose levels were measured 2 h after glucose administration. Antinociceptive activity studies were conducted in intraperitoneally acetic acid-injected mice through measurement of reductions in abdominal writhing times caused by acetic acid-induced gastric pain. Following a period of 1 h after oral administration of various doses of the extract, all mice received intraperitoneal injection of 1% acetic acid at a dose of 10 mL/kg body weight. To ensure bioavailability of acetic acid, a period of 5 min was given to each animal following which period the number of writhings was counted for 10 min. The extract caused a significant dose-dependent reduction in serum glucose levels in mice, when administered at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight as compared to the control animals (Pweight, lowered serum glucose levels by 48.6%. The extract also demonstrated a significant dose-dependent antinociceptive activity compared to control animals (Pweight, the number of abdominal writhings was inhibited by 40.9% as compared to 49.0% inhibition obtained with a standard antinociceptive drug aspirin, administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. The significant antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activities demonstrated by the extract validate the use of E. thymifolia in folk medicine of Bangladesh for treatment of diabetes and pain, and merit further scientific studies leading to discovery of efficacious drugs.

  18. Enhancement of antinociception but not constipation by combinations containing tramadol and metamizole in arthritic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Rocha, Luis Alfonso; Bravo, Guadalupe; Guevara-López, Uriah; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam; Déciga-Campos, Myrna

    2013-10-01

    The use of a combination of analgesics could provide an optimal pain treatment with minimal side effects. Combinations of tramadol and some nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have demonstrated synergistic antinociceptive effects as well as a significantly reduced occurrence of adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antinociceptive and constipation effects of tramadol and metamizole alone or in combination in rats and to discern among the types of drug interactions that exist using dose-response curves and an isobolographic analysis. The antinociceptive effects of tramadol and metamizole, alone or in various combination ratios, were quantitatively evaluated using the "pain-induced functional impairment model in the rat." Additionally, the constipation effect was evaluated using the charcoal meal test. Tramadol (3.2-56.2 mg/kg) and metamizole (56.2-562.3 mg/kg) demonstrated a dose-dependent response with tramadol being more efficacious and potent than metamizole. Twenty-five different combinations of tramadol with metamizole were analyzed, and the evaluated combinations exhibited antinociceptive effects that were either additive or potentiative. An optimal combination was established with 3.2 mg/kg of tramadol and 316.2 mg/kg of metamizole. However, the constipation observed with this combination was more severe than that observed with the administration of tramadol alone. Our results reveal a possible interaction between the two drugs, which may be pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic in nature. The preclinical antinociceptive interaction and adverse effects produced by the combination of tramadol and metamizole suggests that caution should be exercised when using this combination in the clinical therapy of pain. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bioassay-guided evaluation of Dioscorea villosa - an acute and subchronic toxicity, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lima, Claudio Moreira; Lima, Adriana Karla; Melo, Marcelia G Dória; Serafini, Mairim Russo; Oliveira, Dênisson Lima; de Almeida, Enrik Barbosa; Barreto, Rosana Souza Siqueira; Nogueira, Paulo Cesar de Lima; Moraes, Valéria Regina de Souza; Oliveira, Edica Ramone Andrade; de Albuquerque, Jr, Ricardo Luiz Cavalcanti; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Araújo, Adriano Antunes Souza

    2013-01-01

    .... In this regard, we carried out to evaluated both antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental models and assess the toxic effects of the acute (single dose) and subchronic (30 days...

  20. Importance of constitutive activity and arrestin-independent mechanisms for intracellular trafficking of the ghrelin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holliday, Nicholas D; Holst, Birgitte; Rodionova, Elena A

    2007-01-01

    The ghrelin receptor (GhrelinR) and its related orphan GPR39 each display constitutive signaling, but only GhrelinRs undergo basal internalization. Here we investigate these differences by considering the roles of the C tail receptor domains for constitutive internalization and activity....... Furthermore the interaction between phosphorylated receptors and beta-arrestin adaptor proteins has been examined. Replacement of the FLAG-tagged GhrelinR C tail with the equivalent GPR39 domain (GhR-39 chimera) preserved G(q) signaling. However in contrast to the GhrelinR, GhR-39 receptors exhibited no basal...... and substantially decreased agonist-induced internalization in transiently transfected HEK293 cells. Internalized GhrelinR and GhR-39 were predominantly localized to recycling compartments, identified with transferrin and the monomeric G proteins Rab5 and Rab11. Both the inverse agonist [d-Arg(1), d-Phe(5), d-Trp(7...

  1. Behavioral Consequences of Delta-Opioid Receptor Activation in the Periaqueductal Gray of Morphine Tolerant Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Morgan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic morphine administration shifts delta-opioid receptors (DORs from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. Given that microinjection of morphine into the PAG produces antinociception, it is hypothesized that the movement of DORs to the membrane will allow antinociception to the DOR agonist deltorphin II as a way to compensate for morphine tolerance. Tolerance was induced by twice daily injections of morphine (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg, subcutaneous for 3.5 days. Microinjection of deltorphin into the vPAG 6 hours after the last morphine injection produced a mild antinociception that did not vary in a consistent manner across morphine pretreatment doses or nociceptive tests. In contrast, deltorphin caused a decrease in activity in morphine tolerant rats that was associated with lying in the cage. The decrease in activity and change in behavior indicate that chronic morphine administration alters DORs in the vPAG. However, activation of these receptors does not appear to compensate for the decrease in antinociception caused by morphine tolerance.

  2. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamad Yusof, Mohd. Izwan; Salleh, Mohd. Zaki; Lay Kek, Teh; Ahmat, Norizan; Nik Azmin, Nik Fatini; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC) and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP), ethyl acetate (EAP), and aqueous (AQP) partitions), in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in...

  3. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Izwan Mohamad Yusof

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP, ethyl acetate (EAP, and aqueous (AQP partitions, in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in the respective early and late phase, was further subjected to the fractionation procedures and yielded seven fractions (labelled A to G. These fractions were tested, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, together with distilled water or 10% DMSO (negative controls; morphine and aspirin (positive controls for potential antinociceptive activity. Of all fractions, Fraction D showed the most significant antinociceptive activity, which is considered as equieffective to morphine or aspirin in the early or late phase, respectively. Further isolation and identification processes on fraction D led to the identification of three known and one new compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3,7,8-trimethoxyflavone (1, 3,7-dimethoxy-5-hydroyflavone (2, 2′,4′-dihydroxy-3′-methoxychalcone (3, and calaburone (4. At the dose of 50 mg/kg, compound 3 exhibited the highest percentage of antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of MEMC involved, partly, the synergistic activation of the flavonoid types of compounds.

  4. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Yusof, Mohd Izwan; Salleh, Mohd Zaki; Lay Kek, Teh; Ahmat, Norizan; Nik Azmin, Nik Fatini; Zakaria, Zainul Amiruddin

    2013-01-01

    The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC) and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s) responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP), ethyl acetate (EAP), and aqueous (AQP) partitions), in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in the respective early and late phase, was further subjected to the fractionation procedures and yielded seven fractions (labelled A to G). These fractions were tested, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, together with distilled water or 10% DMSO (negative controls); morphine and aspirin (positive controls) for potential antinociceptive activity. Of all fractions, Fraction D showed the most significant antinociceptive activity, which is considered as equieffective to morphine or aspirin in the early or late phase, respectively. Further isolation and identification processes on fraction D led to the identification of three known and one new compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3,7,8-trimethoxyflavone (1), 3,7-dimethoxy-5-hydroyflavone (2), 2',4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxychalcone (3), and calaburone (4). At the dose of 50 mg/kg, compound 3 exhibited the highest percentage of antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of MEMC involved, partly, the synergistic activation of the flavonoid types of compounds.

  5. The effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine, and antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan, on the spinal cholinergic receptor system in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2004-01-01

    and rilmenidine increased, while yohimbine decreased spinal acetylcholine release. Efaroxan affected acetylcholine release differently depending on concentration. Nicotinic receptor blockade attenuated the effect of all ligands. All ligands showed poor binding affinity for muscarinic receptors. On the other hand......Cholinergic agonists produce spinal antinociception via mechanisms involving an increased release of intraspinal acetylcholine. The cholinergic receptor system interacts with several other receptor types, such as alpha2-adrenergic receptors. To fully understand these interactions, the effects...... of various receptor ligands on the cholinergic system must be investigated in detail. This study was initiated to investigate the effects of the alpha2-adrenergic receptor agonists clonidine and rilmenidine and the alpha2-adrenergic receptor antagonists yohimbine and efaroxan on spinal cholinergic receptors...

  6. The Role of Cannabinoid Receptors in the Descending Modulation of Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Rossi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous antinociceptive descending pathway represents a circuitry of the supraspinal central nervous system whose task is to counteract pain. It includes the periaqueductal grey (PAG-rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM-dorsal horn (DH axis, which is the best characterized pain modulation system through which pain is endogenously inhibited. Thus, an alternative rational strategy for silencing pain is the activation of this anatomical substrate. Evidence of the involvement of cannabinoid receptors (CB in the supraspinal modulation of pain can be found in several studies in which intra-cerebral microinjections of cannabinoid ligands or positive modulators have proved to be analgesic in different pain models, whereas cannabinoid receptor antagonists or antisense nucleotides towards CB1 receptors have facilitated pain. Like opioids, cannabinoids produce centrally-mediated analgesia by activating a descending pathway which includes PAG and its projection to downstream RVM neurons, which in turn send inhibitory projections to the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Indeed, several studies underline a supraspinal regulation of cannabinoids on g-aminobutyric acid (GABA and glutamate release which inhibit and enhance the antinociceptive descending pathway, respectively. Cannabinoid receptor activation expressed on presynaptic GABAergic terminals reduces the probability of neurotransmitter release thus dis-inhibiting the PAG-RVM-dorsal horn antinociceptive pathway. Cannabinoids seem to increase glutamate release (maybe as consequence of GABA decrease and to require glutamate receptor activation to induce antinociception. The consequent outcome is behavioral analgesia, which is reproduced in several pain conditions, from acute to chronic pain models such as inflammatory and neuropathic pain. Taken together these findings would suggest that supraspinal cannabinoid receptors have broad applications, from pain control to closely related central nervous system

  7. Effects of Simvastatin Beyond Dyslipidemia: Exploring Its Antinociceptive Action in an Animal Model of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome-Type I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Vieira

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Simvastatin is a lipid-lowering agent that blocks the production of cholesterol through inhibition of 3-hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase. In addition, recent evidence has suggested its anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive actions during inflammatory and pain disorders. Herein, we investigated the effects of simvastatin in an animal model of complex regional pain syndrome-type I, and its underlying mechanisms. Chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP was induced by ischemia and reperfusion (IR injury of the left hind paw. Our findings showed that simvastatin inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by CPIP model in single and repeated treatment schedules, respectively; however simvastatin did not alter inflammatory signs during CPIP model. The mechanisms underlying those actions are related to modulation of transient receptor potential (TRP channels, especially TRMP8. Moreover, simvastatin oral treatment was able to reduce the nociception induced by acidified saline [an acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs activator] and bradykinin (BK stimulus, but not by TRPA1, TRPV1 or prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2. Relevantly, the antinociceptive effects of simvastatin did not seem to be associated with modulation of the descending pain circuits, especially noradrenergic, serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. These results indicate that simvastatin consistently inhibits mechanical hyperalgesia during neuropathic and inflammatory disorders, possibly by modulating the ascending pain signaling (TRPM8/ASIC/BK pathways expressed in the primary sensory neuron. Thus, simvastatin open-up new standpoint in the development of innovative analgesic drugs for treatment of persistent pain, including CRPS-I.

  8. Anti-nociceptive effects of Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) in a rat model of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shukai; Yin, Yue; Yin, Xin; Cao, Fale; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Ting; Li, Yunqing; Ni, Longxing

    2012-09-01

    Inflammatory pain is an important clinical symptom. The levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and the levels of cytokines such as interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) play important roles in inflammatory pain. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) is an important component of Danshen, a traditional Chinese medicine that has been commonly used to treat cardiovascular disease. In this study, we investigated the potential anti-inflammatory nociceptive effects of TIIA on complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation and inflammatory pain in rats. The effects of TIIA on CFA-induced thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity were investigated using behavioral tests. The levels of ERKs, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the fifth segment of the lumbar spinal cord (L5) ganglia were detected by Western blot, and the levels of mRNA and protein production of IL1-β, IL-6 and TNF-α were detected by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA). In this study, we found that TIIA attenuates the development of CFA-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. In addition, p-ERK and NF-κB expression levels were inhibited by TIIA, and the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were reduced. Finally, we found that the expression level of TRPV1 was significantly decreased after TIIA injection. This study demonstrated that TIIA has significant anti-nociceptive effects in a rat model of CFA-induced inflammatory pain. TIIA can inhibit the activation of ERK signaling pathways and the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results suggest that TIIA may be a potential anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive drug. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chemical composition, acute toxicity, and antinociceptive activity of the essential oil of a plant breeding cultivar of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venâncio, Antônio Medeiros; Onofre, Alexandre Sherlley; Lira, Amintas Figueiredo; Alves, Péricles Barreto; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Antoniolli, Angelo Roberto; Marchioro, Murilo; Estevam, Charles dos Santos; de Araujo, Brancilene Santos

    2011-05-01

    Ocimum basilicum L. is an aromatic herb used in Brazil to treat illnesses such as respiratory and rheumatic problems, vomiting, and pain. In the present study, the chemical composition, acute toxicity, and antinociceptive effects of the essential oil (EO) of the cultivar "Maria Bonita" obtained from O. basilicum L. PI 197442 genotype were evaluated in Swiss mice (20-35 g each). Lethal dose to cause 50 % death (LD50) was calculated from a dose-response curve (100-5000 mg/kg body wt.; n = 6) as 532 mg/kg body wt. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test (0.6 % i. p.), EO (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg body wt., n = 8, s. c.) was effective in reducing the abdominal contractions at all doses (48-78 %). In the hot-plate test, EO significantly increased the latency at 50 mg/kg body wt. at all times (37-52 %, n = 8, s. c.). However, the effects of morphine and EO at 50 mg/kg were reverted in the presence of naloxone, an opioid antagonist. In the formalin test, EO significantly reduced paw licking time in the first and second phases of pain at 200 mg/kg body wt. (38 and 75 %, respectively, n = 8, s. c.). The results suggested that the peripheral and central antinociceptive effects of EO are related to the inhibition of the biosynthesis of pain mediators, such as prostaglandins and prostacyclins, and its ability to interact with opioid receptors. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Discovery of 3-arylpropionic acids as potent agonists of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor-1 (S1P1) with high selectivity against all other known S1P receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Huo, Pei; Doherty, George; Toth, Lesile; Hale, Jeffrey J; Mills, Sander G; Hajdu, Richard; Keohane, Carol A; Rosenbach, Mark J; Milligan, James A; Shei, Gan-Ju; Chrebet, Gary; Bergstrom, James; Card, Deborah; Quackenbush, Elizabeth; Wickham, Alexandra; Mandala, Suzanne M

    2006-07-15

    A series of 3-arylpropionic acids were synthesized as S1P1 receptor agonists. Structure-activity relationship studies on the pendant phenyl ring revealed several structural features offering selectivity of S1P1 binding against S1P2-5. These highly selective S1P1 agonists induced peripheral blood lymphocyte lowering in mice and one of them was found to be efficacious in a rat skin transplantation model, supporting that S1P1 agonism is primarily responsible for the immunosuppressive efficacy observed in preclinical animal models.

  11. Effects of administration of histamine and its H1, H2, and H3 receptor antagonists into the primary somatosensory cortex on inflammatory pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeal Tamaddonfard

    2014-01-01

    These results indicate that at PSC levels, histamine through post-synaptic H1, H2, and pre-synaptic H3 receptors might be involved in pain modulation. The endogenous opioid system may be involved in histamine- and thioperamide-induced antinociception.

  12. In vivo antinociceptive and anticonvulsant activity of extracts of Heliotropium strigosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Khan, Murad Ali; Hussain, Sajid; Gaffar, Rukhsana; Ashraf, Nadeem

    2016-05-01

    Natural healing agents are primarily focused to overcome unwanted side effects with synthetic drugs worldwide. In the proposed study, crude extracts and subsequent solvent fractions of Heliotropium strigosum were evaluated for antinociceptive and anticonvulsant activity in animal paradigms. In post acetic acid-induced writhing test, crude extract and fractions (hexane, ethyl acetate, and aqueous) demonstrated marked attenuation of nociception at test doses (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg i.p.). When challenged against thermally induced pain model, pretreatment of extracts exhibited prominent amelioration at test dose (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg i.p.). In both tests, inhibition of noxious stimulation was in a dose-dependent manner, and ethyl acetate fraction was most dominant. However, extracts did not antagonize the seizures and mortality induced by pentylenetetrazole. In conclusion, the extracts of H. strigosum illustrated significant antinociceptive effect in both centrally and peripherally acting pain models. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Botulinum neurotoxin type-A when utilized in animals with trigeminal sensitization induced a antinociceptive effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcio J Piovesan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose of the study was evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of botulinum neurotoxin type-A (BoNT/A in an experimental model of trigeminal neuralgia. Method Neuropathic pain was induced by surgical constriction of the infraorbital nerve in rats. A control group underwent a sham procedure consisting of surgical exposure of the nerve. Subgroups of each group received either BoNT/A or isotonic saline solution. The clinical response was assessed with the -20°C test. Animals that underwent nerve constriction developed sensitization; the sham group did not. Results The sensitization was reversed by BoNT/A treatment evident 24 hours following application. Pronociceptive effect was observed in the sham group following BoNT/A. Conclusion BoNT/A has an antinociceptive effect in sensitized animals and a pronociceptive effect in non-sensitized animals.

  14. Nalbuphine could decrease the rewarding effect induced by tramadol in mice while enhancing its antinociceptive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Ghany, Rasha; Nabil, Mahmoud; Abdel-Aal, Mohamed; Barakat, Waleed

    2015-07-05

    Nalbuphine, a kappa-opioid agonist and mu-opioid partial agonist, has been used as an analgesic or an adjuvant with morphine to attenuate the development of morphine dependence and rewarding effect. In this study, we investigated the effect of nalbuphine on tramadol rewarding effect and antinociception. Using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm in mice, we demonstrated that co-administration of nalbuphine (7mg/kg, s.c.) with tramadol (70mg/kg, s.c.) during conditioning completely blocked the CPP induced by tramadol. Co-administration of nalbuphine blocked the increase in dopamine level in the nucleus accumbens induced by tramadol. These actions were accompanied by an increase rather than attenuation of the antinociceptive effect of tramadol. These results suggest that nalbuphine could have a great potential as a pharmacotherapy for tramadol abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Antinociceptive activity and preliminary structure-activity relationship of chalcone-like compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Rogério; Fenner, Bruna Proiss; Buzzi, Fátima de Campos; Cechinel Filho, Valdir; Nunes, Ricardo José

    2008-01-01

    Chalcones belong to a class of alpha,beta,-unsaturated aromatic ketones which occur abundantly in nature, especially in plants. They are promising and interesting compounds due to their vast applications in pharmaceuticals, agriculture and industry. Several studies have shown that these compounds exert important biological activities in different experimental models. The present work deals with the antinociceptive activity, evaluated against the writhing test, of three series of chalcone-like compounds obtained by the Claisen-Schmidt condensation, using different aldehydes and substituted acetophenones. The results reveal that the compounds synthesized show a significant antinociceptive effect compared with nonsteroidal drugs such as aspirin, paracetamol and diclofenac. They also show that the electronic demand of the substituents is the dominant factor of the biological activity.

  16. Evaluation of antinociceptive effect of Petiveria alliacea (guiné in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thereza C. M. de Lima

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae is a bush widely distributed in South America including Brazil, where it is popularly known as "guiné", pipi", "tipi" or "erva-de-tipi". Brazilian folk medicine attributes to the hot water infusion of its roots or leaves the following pharmacologicalproperties: antipyretic, antispasmodic, abortifacient, antirrheumatic, diuretic, analgesic and sedative. The present study has evaluated the alleged effects of P. alliacea on central nervous system (CNS, particularly, the sedative and analgesic properties of root crude aqueous extract of this plant in mice and rats. This extract showed an antinociceptive effect in acetic acid - acetylcholine - and hypertonic saline - induced abdominal constrictions, but not in hot-plate and tail flick tests P. alliacea did not produce any CNS depressor effect. Thus its antinociceptive action in animals can be responsible by its poplar use as an analgesic.

  17. Evaluation of antinociceptive effect of Petiveria alliacea (Guiné) in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, T C; Morato, G S; Takahashi, R N

    1991-01-01

    Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae) is a bush widely distributed in South America including Brazil, where it is popularly known as "guiné", "pipi", "tipi" or "erva-de-tipi". Brazilian folk medicine attributes to the hot water infusion of its roots or leaves the following pharmacological properties: antipyretic, antispasmodic, abortifacient, antirrheumatic, diuretic, analgesic and sedative. The present study has evaluated the alleged effects of P. alliacea on central nervous system (CNS), particularly, the sedative and analgesic properties of root crude aqueous extract of this plant in mice and rats. This extract showed an antinociceptive effect in acetic acid--acetylcholine--and hypertonic saline--induced abdominal constrictions, but not in hot-plate and tail flick tests. P. alliacea did not produce any CNS depressor effect. Thus its antinociceptive action in animals can be responsible by its popular use as an analgesic.

  18. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Hestehave; Munro, Gordon; Brønnum Pedersen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    . In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing...... the animal to a thermal stimulus using a hot plate, significant antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine administered in Nutella® were demonstrated. This was evident at doses of 1.0 mg/kg 60 and 120 min post administration (P... as with subcutaneous administration, and had a later onset. It is advised to administer the oral formulation of buprenorphine in Nutella® in a 10-fold higher dose, as well as approximately 60 min earlier, than with the more commonly employed subcutaneous route of administration....

  19. Antinociceptive activity of the volatile oils of Hyptis pectinata L. Poit. (Lamiaceae) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni-Blank, M F; Antoniolli, A R; Caetano, L C; Campos, D A; Blank, A F; Alves, P B

    2008-05-01

    Hyptis pectinata L. Poit (Lamiaceae) is known popularly in Brazil as "sambacaita" or "canudinho" and is used in the treatment of inflammations, bacterial infections and ache. The antinociceptive activity of the volatile oils of six genotypes, at doses of 100, 200 and 400mg/kg body wt., were investigated using abdominal writhe models induced by acetic acid and hot plate tests. The volatile oils of all the genotypes are composed mainly of sesquiterpenoids. All the genotypes showed antinociceptive effects in both models used; the SAM002 genotype showed the major inhibitory effect at dose of 100mg/kg body wt. These results suggest that the volatile oil of H. pectinata has peripheral (writhe reduction) and central (time delay of thermal reaction) effects. These observations indicate that H. pectinata may be useful as an analgesic drug.

  20. Glutamate Receptor Ion Channels: Structure, Regulation, and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollmuth, Lonnie P.; McBain, Chris J.; Menniti, Frank S.; Vance, Katie M.; Ogden, Kevin K.; Hansen, Kasper B.; Yuan, Hongjie; Myers, Scott J.; Dingledine, Ray

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian ionotropic glutamate receptor family encodes 18 gene products that coassemble to form ligand-gated ion channels containing an agonist recognition site, a transmembrane ion permeation pathway, and gating elements that couple agonist-induced conformational changes to the opening or closing of the permeation pore. Glutamate receptors mediate fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system and are localized on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. These receptors regulate a broad spectrum of processes in the brain, spinal cord, retina, and peripheral nervous system. Glutamate receptors are postulated to play important roles in numerous neurological diseases and have attracted intense scrutiny. The description of glutamate receptor structure, including its transmembrane elements, reveals a complex assembly of multiple semiautonomous extracellular domains linked to a pore-forming element with striking resemblance to an inverted potassium channel. In this review we discuss International Union of Basic and Clinical Pharmacology glutamate receptor nomenclature, structure, assembly, accessory subunits, interacting proteins, gene expression and translation, post-translational modifications, agonist and antagonist pharmacology, allosteric modulation, mechanisms of gating and permeation, roles in normal physiological function, as well as the potential therapeutic use of pharmacological agents acting at glutamate receptors. PMID:20716669

  1. Antinociceptive Activity of Trichilia catigua Hydroalcoholic Extract: New Evidence on Its Dopaminergic Effects

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    Alice F. Viana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichilia catigua is a native plant of Brazil; its barks are used by some local pharmaceutical companies to prepare tonic drinks, such as Catuama. The present study was addressed to evaluate the effects of T. catigua hydroalcoholic extract in mouse nociception behavioral models, and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in its actions. Male Swiss mice were submitted to hot-plate, writhing and von Frey tests, after oral treatment with T. catigua extract (200 mg kg−1, p.o.. The extract displayed antinociceptive effect in all three models. For characterization of the mechanisms involved in the antinociceptive action of the extract, the following pharmacological treatments were done: naloxone (2.5 mg kg−1, s.c., SR141716A (10 mg kg−1, i.p., SCH23390 (15 μg kg−1, i.p., sulpiride (50 mg kg−1, i.p., prazosin (1 mg kg−1, i.p., bicuculline (1 mg kg−1, i.p. or dl-p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA, 100 mg kg−1, i.p.. In these experiments, the action of T. catigua extract was evaluated in the hot-plate test. The treatment with SCH23390 completely prevented the antinociceptive effect, while naloxone partially prevented it. The possible involvement of the dopaminergic system in the actions of T. catigua extract was substantiated by data showing the potentiation of apomorphine-induced hypothermia and by the prevention of haloperidol-induced catalepsy. In conclusion, the antinociceptive effects of T. catigua extract seem to be mainly associated with the activation of dopaminergic system and, to a lesser extent, through interaction with opioid pathway.

  2. Analgesic and anti-nociceptive activity of hydroethanolic extract of Drymaria cordata Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Chandana Choudhury; Roy, Jayanti Datta; Buragohain, Bhaben; Barua, Acheenta Gohain; Borah, Prabodh; Lahkar, Mangala

    2011-04-01

    To study the analgesic and anti-nociceptive activity of hydroethanolic extract of Drymaria cordata Willd. Wistar rats and Swiss albino mice were used for studying analgesic and anti-nociceptive activity of Drymaria cordata hydroethanolic extract (DCHE) at doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. Various models viz. acetic acid induced writhing model (female mice), Eddy's hot plate (mice) and tail flick model (rat) for analgesic study and formalin-induced paw licking model (mice) were used for anti-nociceptive study. In acetic acid induced writhing model, effect of DCHE was better than the standard drug- indomethacin 10 mg/kg (p.o.). In the hot plate model, the maximum effect was observed at 60 min at a dose of 200 mg/kg p.o., which was higher than the standard drug morphine sulfate (1.5 mg/kg i.p.), whereas in the tail flick model, effect was comparable with morphine sulfate. In formalin-induced paw licking model, administration of DCHE completely abolished the early phase at 100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. and in the late phase, the effect of DCHE (200 mg/kg p.o.) was higher than indomethacin (10 mg/kg p.o.). DCHE was effective in both non-narcotic and narcotic models of nociception, suggesting its possible action via peripheral and central mechanism. It also abolished the early phase in formalin-induced paw licking model, suggesting complete inactivation of C-fiber at higher dose. The activity can be attributed to the phyto-constituents viz tannins, diterpenes, triterpenes and steroids present in the DCHE extract. In conclusion, DCHE can be developed as a potent analgesic and anti-nociceptive agent in future.

  3. Antinociceptive activity and chemical composition of Wei-Chang-An-Wan extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Zhang, Jingze; Gao, Wenyuan; Liu, Changxiao

    2013-06-01

    Currently, famous traditional Chinese medicine formulas have undergone re-evaluation and development in China. Wei-Chang-An-Wan (WCAW) as one of them has been used for treating various gastrointestinal diseases for several decades. The secondary development of WCAW is in progress so as to interpret the effective material basis or find new pharmacological activity. To evaluate the antinociceptive effect of methanol extract of WCAW (ME) as well as four fractions (P.E., EtOAc, n-BuOH, H2O) and obtain information on the correlation between the contents of the fractions and antinociceptive effect. ME was divided into four parts extracted by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated by three models of acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin and hot-plate test in mice after repetitive administration of ME at 200, 400 or 800 mg/kg, P.E. 132 mg/kg, EtOAc 106 mg/kg, n-BuOH 176 mg/kg and H2O 176 mg/kg for six days. The chemical compounds were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS. ME at 800 mg/kg inhibited acid-induced writhing by 84.69%, and reduced the licking time of second phase in formalin test by 53.23%. The inhibition rates in acid-induced writhing of P.E., EtOAc, n-BuOH and H2O were 27.79, 33.85, 38.97 and 37.69%, respectively, and in formalin test about 50%. They had no effect on the hot-plate test. HPLC-ESI-MS analysis showed that 68 chemical compounds were detected and 41 compounds were identified from ME. The results obtained herein indicate that WCAW possesses the antinociceptive activity that provides a new aspect in clinical application.

  4. Anti-nociceptive and antioxidant activities of an aqueous leaf extract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-nociceptive effect of COE (3x10-2, 1x10-1 and 3x10-1 g kg-1, p.o), and morphine (1x10-3, 3x10-3 and 1x10-2 gkg-1, i.p.) were evaluated using the formalin-induced nociception test. The study showed that C. olitorius has analgesic activity possibly mediated through opioidergic pathway. COE produced significant ...

  5. Antinociceptive activity of the ethanolic extract of the root bark of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both morphine (1 - 5 mg/kg, i.p.) and C. sieberiana extract (10 - 40 mg/kg, p.o.) caused dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in rats on the hotplate. The mean maximal analgesic effects occurred 30 minutes after administration of either morphine (1 - 5 mg/kg, i.p.) or extract. There was no statistical difference between the ...

  6. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of aqueous extract of Chenopodium opulifolium schrad leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Abayomi M.; Tanayen, Julius Khidzee; Magomere, Albert; Ezeonwumelu, Joseph O. C.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Chenopodium opulifolium is a specie of the Chenopodiaceae commonly used as vegetables in local diet and for treating different ailment in Uganda. This study was conducted to evaluate the antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the aqueous extract of C. opulifolium leaves (AECO). Materials and Methods: The dried leaf of the plant was extracted by maceration in water. Qualitative and quantitative phytochemical analysis, antioxidants, and membrane stabilizing effects were determined in the extract. The extract was then investigated for acute toxicity, antinociceptive (writhing, hot plate and open field test), and anti-inflammatory (egg albumin-induced paw edema) effects in rodents. Results: Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, phlobatannins, flavonoids, and saponins in AECO. Total caffeic acid derivatives and total flavonoids content were 91.7 mgCAE/g sample and 94.7 mgRE/g sample, respectively. AECO demonstrated antioxidant effects in both 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl and NO assays. Significant membrane stabilizing activity was observed in both the heat and hypotonic solution-induced lysis of erythrocytes. The acute toxicity test showed that AECO (5000 mg/kg) did not cause any significant change in behavior or death in rats. AECO (100-400 mg/kg) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in both the writhing and hot plate tests, but no significant reduction in the locomotory activity in mice. Furthermore, the extract significantly (P egg albumin-induced rat paw edema by 44.2%, 44.5%, and 51.2%, respectively, after 120 min. Conclusion: The results showed that C. opulifolium extract possesses significant antioxidant, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects, and these affirm the reasons for its folkloric use. PMID:28163955

  7. Antinociceptive effect on mice of the hydroalcoholic fraction and (- epicatechin obtained from Combretum leprosum Mart & Eich

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    L.S. Lopes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies on Combretum leprosum, a tree growing in the Northeastern states of Brazil, have shown antinociceptive effects of the ethanol extract of its leaves and bark, but studies examining its constituents are rare. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of the hydroalcoholic fraction (HF of one of its constituents, the flavonoid (- epicatechin (EPI, administered orally to mice (20-30 g in models of chemical nociception, and the possible mechanisms involved. Different doses of HF (62.5 to 500 mg/kg and EPI (12.5 to 50 mg/kg were evaluated in models of abdominal writhing, glutamate, capsaicin, and formalin in animals pretreated with different antagonists: naloxone, ondansetron, yohimbine, ketanserin, pindolol, atropine, and caffeine in the abdominal writhing test. To determine the role of nitric oxide, the animals were pretreated with L-arginine (600 mg/kg, ip in the glutamate test. The HF was effective (P < 0.05 in all protocols at different doses and EPI was effective in the abdominal writhing, capsaicin and glutamate tests (P < 0.05 at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg. However, in the formalin test it was only effective in the second phase at a dose of 25 mg/kg. The antinociceptive effect of HF was inhibited when HF was associated with yohimbine (0.15 mg/kg, ketanserine (0.03 mg/kg, and L-arginine (600 mg/kg, but not with the other antagonists. HF and EPI were effective in models of chemical nociception, with the suggested participation of the adrenergic, serotonergic and nitrergic systems in the antinociceptive effect of HF.

  8. Role of opioid system in verapamil-induced antinociception in a rat model of orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddonfard, Esmaeal; Erfanparast, Amir; Taati, Mina; Dabbaghi, Milad

    2014-01-01

    Calcium, through its various channels involves in local, spinal and supra-spinal transmission of pain. In the present study, we investigated the separate and combined treatment effects of verapamil (a calcium channel blocker), morphine (an opioid agonist) and naloxone (an opioid antagonist) on pain in the orofacial region of rats. Orofacial pain was induced by subcutaneous (SC) injection of formalin (50 µL, 1.5%) into the left upper lip side, and the time durations spent face rubbing with epsilateral forepaw were recorded in three min blocks for a period of 45 min. Formalin induced a biphasic pattern (first phase: 0-3 min; second phase: 15-33 min) of pain. Intraperitoneal (IP) injections of verapamil (2 and 8 mg kg(-1)) and morphine (2 and 4 mg kg(-1)) suppressed orofacial pain. Co-administration of sub-analgesic doses of verapamil (0.5 mg kg(-1)) and morphine (1 mg kg(-1)) produced second phase analgesia. Both phases of formalin-induced pain were suppressed when an analgesic dose (2 mg kg(-1)) of verapamil co-administered with a sub-analgesic dose (1 mg kg(-1)) of morphine. The SC injection of naloxone (2 mg kg(-1)) alone with no effect on pain intensity, prevented the antinociceptive effects induced by morphine (2 mg kg(-1)), but not verapamil (2 mg kg(-1)). The obtained results showed antinociceptive effects for verapamli and morphine on orofacial pain. Co-administrations of verapamil and morphine produced antinociceptive effects. It seems that opioid analgesic system may not have a role in the verapamil-induced antinociception.

  9. The 15-amino acid motif of the C terminus of the beta2-adrenergic receptor is sufficient to confer insulin-stimulated counterregulation to the beta1-adrenergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavi, Shai; Yin, Dezhong; Shumay, Elena; Wang, Hsien-Yu; Malbon, Craig C

    2005-01-01

    Insulin counterregulates catecholamine action in part by inducing the sequestration of beta2-adrenergic receptors. Although similar to agonist-induced sequestration, insulin-induced internalization of beta2-adrenergic receptors operates through a distinct and better-understood cellular pathway. The effects of insulin treatment on the function and trafficking of both beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors were tested. The beta2-adrenergic receptors were counterregulated and internalized in response to insulin. The beta1-adrenergic receptors, in sharp contrast, are shown to be resistant to the ability of insulin to counterregulate function and induce receptor internalization. Using chimeric receptors composed of beta1-/beta2-adrenergic receptors in tandem with mutagenesis, we explored the role of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the beta2-adrenergic receptors for insulin-induced counterregulation. Substitution of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail of the beta2-adrenergic receptor on the beta1-adrenergic receptor enabled the chimeric G protein-coupled receptor to be functionally and spatially regulated by insulin. Truncation of the beta2-adrenergic receptor C-terminal cytoplasmic tail to a 15-amino acid motif harboring a potential Src homology 2-binding domain at Y350 and an Akt phosphorylation site at S345,346 was sufficient to enable receptor regulation by insulin.

  10. Evaluation of antinociceptive and antimicrobial activities of galbanum plant (Ferula gumosa Boiss

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    B. S. Fazly Bazzaz

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the antinociceptive and antimicrobial activities of galbanum plant (Ferula gumosa, various parts of the plant were collected at specific seasons. Aerial parts and root of the plant were dried in shady place and grinded to desirable. Unnatural and natural gum resins did not have the drying and grinding stages. The alcohol-aqueous (33%extract was obtained by masuration and the solvent was removed by rotary evaporator at low temperature and vaccum condition. The essential oil was extracted by water and steam distillation. Its antinociceptive effect was investigated in mice using hot plate method. Antibacterial effect was determined using paper disk method. The results suggest that the maximum antinociceptive effect (efficacy of root and aerial parts extract was higher than morphine and maximum effect of unnatural and natural gum resins extract was equal to morphine. The maximum effect of essential oil and unnatural gum resin was less than morphine but potency of these preparations were less than morphine. The amount of microbial growth inhibition of all extracts was less than chloramphenicol (30 ;ug on gram positive bacteria, but these extracts have not any growth inhibitory effect on gram negative baceria. These extracts inhibited fungus growth equal to nystatin (100units. "nThese results in conjunction with economic considerations suggest the usefulness of aerial parts of plant for medical treatment.

  11. Antinociceptive and anti-ulcerogenic activities of the ethanolic extract of Annona muricata leaf

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    Roslida Abd Hamid

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethanolic extract of Annona muricata L., Annonaceae, leaf (AML was used to investigate its antinociceptive and anti-ulcerogenic activities and the involvement of the mechanism of ethanolic leaves extract of AML in various animal models. Antinociceptive activity of AML extract was done using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing in mice, formalin test in rats and hot plate test in mice. Furthermore, the anti-ulcerogenic effect of AML extract was studied in ethanol-induced ulcer model in rats, ethanol-induced gastric lesions in L-NAME-pre-treated rats as well as ethanol-induced gastric lesions in NEM-pre-treated rats test model to determine its mechanism. AML exhibited significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive activity. It also significantly decreased the ulcerative lesion produced by ethanol in rats in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with N-ethymaleimide, a thiol blocker, including mucosal nonprotein sulfhydryl groups, reduced the anti-ulcerogenic effect of AML extract in the same ulcer model, suggesting that AML extract may have active substances such as tannins, flavanoids and triterpenes that increase the mucosal nonprotein sulfhydryl group content.

  12. Antinociceptive effect of some biuret derivatives on formalin test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adibpour, Neda; Poornajjari, Ali; Khodayar, Mohammad Javad; Rezaee, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to investigate the antinociceptive effects of several biuret derivatives with N, N`-diphenyl, N-phenyl-N`-alkylphenyl, N,N`-bis alkylphenyl, 2-methylquinoline-4-yl, benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylthio and (1-phenyl-1H-tetrazol-5-yl)thio substituents on the formalin-evoked pain in mice. Antinociceptive activity of the nine biurets derivatives were assessed at different doses in mice using formalin test and the results were compared with those of indomethacin(20 mg/kg) and vehicle of the compounds. Area under the pain score curve against time (AUEC) up to 60 minutes was used as the measure of pain behavior. A rather good analgesic effect was seen for most of the tested biuret derivatives. Significant reduction in median AUEC0-5 minutes was observed at the doses of 50 and 25 mg/kg for biurets with either benzyl and 2-methylquinoline-4-yl (C8) or phenylethyl and benzo[d]thiazol-2-ylthio(C9) moieties, respectively(p-valuetested biuret compounds are able to induce antinociception in both phases of formalin test and could be considered comparable to indomethacin at the selected doses.

  13. Antinociceptive Effect of Hydroalcoholic Leaf Extract of Hedera helix in Male Rat

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    S. Shahidi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The consumption of chemical compounds and medicinal herbs are different ways to control pain. On the other hand, the complications of chemical drugs and their expensiveness cause people to use herbal medicines The aim of this study was to inves-tigate the antinociceptive effect of hydroalcoholic leaf extract of Hedera helix in male rats. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study, 36 adult male rats were divided into 6 groups: control, morphine (1mg/kg, Hedera helix extract (100, 200, 300mg/kg, i.p. and naloxone (1mg/kg with Hedera helix extract (200 mg/kg. The analgesic effects of Hedera helix ex-tract were assessed with writhing and tail flick tests. Results: The results of this study showed that doses of 200 and 300mg/kg of Hedera helix ex-tract decreased pain significantly. However, dose of 300mg/kg of Hedera helix extract showed more antinociceptive effect of Hedera helix extract. The naloxone and Hedera helix extract combination increased the number of writhing compared with the Hedera helix ex-tract group. Conclusion: In this study analgesic effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of Hedera helix was observed. The antinociceptive effect of extract was probably occurred by activation of opioid system. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2013; 20 (2:119-125

  14. Comparative evaluation of the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of Turkish Eryngium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpeli, Esra; Kartal, Murat; Aslan, Sinem; Yesilada, Erdem

    2006-08-11

    Extracts obtained from the root and aerial parts of various Eryngium (Apiaceae) species are used as folk remedy worldwide for the treatment of various inflammatory disorders. Ethanolic and aqueous extracts obtained from either aerial parts or roots of eight Eryngium species growing in Turkey, i.e., were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Eryngium campestre, Eryngium creticum, Eryngium davisii, Eryngium falcatum, Eryngium isauricum, Eryngium kotschyi, Eryngium maritimum, and Eryngium trisectum. For the antinociceptive activity assessment p-benzoquinone-induced writhing test, and for anti-inflammatory activity carrageenan-induced hind paw oedema and TPA-induced ear oedema tests were employed in mice. According to the results of investigations, except Eryngium falcatum extracts, ethanol extracts either from the aerial parts or roots of Eryngium species showed apparent anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity. In spite of potent activity of the ethanol extract from Eryngium isauricum aerial parts was induced gastric damage. Aerial parts and roots of Eryngium maritimum and Eryngium kotschyi were found to possess most promising activities without including any apparent gastric damage.

  15. Ortho-eugenol exhibits anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonsêca, Diogo V; Salgado, Paula R R; Aragão Neto, Humberto de C; Golzio, Adriana M F O; Caldas Filho, Marcelo R D; Melo, Cynthia G F; Leite, Fagner C; Piuvezam, Marcia R; Pordeus, Liana Clébia de Morais; Barbosa Filho, José M; Almeida, Reinaldo N

    2016-09-01

    Ortho-eugenol is a much used phenylpropanoid whose ability to reduce pain and inflammation has never been studied. Researching ortho-eugenol's antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity, and its possible mechanisms of action is therefore of interest. The administration of vehicle, ortho-eugenol (50, 75 and 100mg/kg i.p.), morphine (6mg/kg, i.p.) or dexamethasone (2mg/kg, s.c.) occurred 30min before the completion of pharmacological tests. Pretreatment with ortho-eugenol did not change motor coordination test results, but reduced the number of writhes and licking times in the writhing test and glutamate test, respectively. The reaction time from thermal stimulus was significantly increased in the hot plate test after administration of ortho-eugenol. Treatment with yohimbine reversed the antinociceptive effect of ortho-eugenol, suggesting involvement of the adrenergic system. In anti-inflammatory tests, ortho-eugenol inhibited acetic acid induced vascular permeability and leukocyte migration, reducing TNF-α and IL-1β by virtue of its suppression of NF-κB and p38 phosphorylated forms in the peritonitis test. From these results, ortho-eugenol antinociceptive effects mediated by the adrenergic system and anti-inflammatory activity through regulation of proinflammatory cytokines and phosphorylation of NF-kB and p38 become evident for the first time. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity of Xanthium indicum stem extract in Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Xanthium indicum stem is used in folk medicine of Bangladesh to control sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain. The objective of the study was to evaluate antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive activity of methanolic extract of Xanthium indicum stems (XISE) in mice. Methods Antihyperglycemic activity was measured by oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice. Antinociceptive activity was determined by observed decreases in abdominal constrictions in acetic acid-induced gastric pain model in mice. Results The methanol extract of stems showed dose-dependent and statistically significant antihyperglycemic activity at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight (p values, respectively, afore-mentioned four doses, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in mice, respectively, by 41.7, 50.0, 54.2, and 61.0%. In comparison, a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight, reduced the number of abdominal constrictions by 37.5%. Conclusion The experimental results obtained in the present study validate the use of X. indicum stems in folk medicines of Bangladesh to lower blood sugar in diabetic patients and to alleviate pain. PMID:24171758

  17. Orofacial antinociceptive effect and antioxidant properties of the hydroethanol extract of Hyptis fruticosa salmz ex Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Amanda C B; Paixão, Monica S; Melo, Mônica; de Santana, Marilia T; Damascena, Nicole P; Dias, Antonio S; Porto, Yasmin C B S; Fernandes, Ximene A; Santos, Clisiane C S; Lima, Clésio A; Quintans Júnior, Lucindo J; dos S Estevam, Charles; Araújo, Brancilene S

    2013-03-07

    Hyptis fruticosa is a plant native to Brazil with antinociceptive and antiinflamatory properties. This study evaluated the antinociceptive activity of the hydroethanol extract of the plant leaves (CHEE) against orofacial pain as well as its in vitro effect against lipid peroxidation. The antinociceptive activity was investigated in mice orally treated with different doses of the CHEE (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) and morphine (5 mg/kg) using formalin, glutamate, and capsaicin orofacial pain models using. Lipoperoxidation was induced in egg yolk by AAPH and FeSO4 in the absence and presence of the CHEE (5, 50, 100, and 150 μg/mL). CHEE (200 mg/kg) significantly reduced (ρHyptis fruticosa leaf CHEE is of pharmacological interest because it was able to inhibit the peripheral and central transmission of orofacial pain, while reducing the spreading of the inflammatory processes by neutralizing reactive oxygen species, which are by-products in the biosynthesis of pain mediators. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Lantana camara L. extract in mice

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    T.S.C. SILVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT:he Lantana camara L. belongs to the family Verbenaceae, which contains several active compounds in leaves and roots and which are reported to have medicinal and insecticidal properties. Studies of plants within the same family show the existence of anti-inflammatory activity in paw edema induced by carrageenan, serotonin and histamine and analgesic activity in the acetic acid writhing and tail-flick tests. The present study investigated whether the L. camara extract (ACE also exerts these effects. The ACE toxicity was studied in male mice, and the percentage of mortality recorded 7 days after treatment was assessed. The ACE was evaluated as an antinociceptive agent in the hot plate, tail-flick and acetic acid writhing tests at a nontoxic dose of 1.0 g/Kg. The results showed that 1.5 g/Kg of ACE was not able to cause death, and doses of 3.0 and 4.0 g/Kg caused 50% and 60% death, respectively, in male mice. In all of the antinociceptive tests, 1 g/Kg of ACE markedly reduced responses to pain. Our findings suggest that ACE may have active anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties in much smaller doses than toxic.

  19. The Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae

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    Anansa Bezerra de Aquino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE, its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100% at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100 μmol/kg, p.o. was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  20. The antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino, Anansa Bezerra de; Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito da; Epifânio, Willians Antônio do Nascimento; Aquino, Pedro Gregório Vieira; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana; de Araújo-Júnior, João Xavier

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the crude ethanolic extract (CEE), its fractions, and the flavonoid isorhamnetin from Aspidosperma tomentosum using models of nociception and inflammation in mice. In the writhing test, the CEE and its fractions (except for soluble phase, CHCl3 100% and EtAcO 100%) at 100 mg/kg p.o. induced antinociceptive activity. Isorhamnetin (100  μ mol/kg, p.o.) was also active. In the hot plate test, only the treatment with the fractions Hex : CHCl3 50%, CHCl3 100%, and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% (100 mg/kg, p.o.) increased the latency time, reversed by the opioid antagonist naloxone. Fractions that were active in the hot plate test did not show catalepsy condition. It was observed that CEE, all fractions, and isorhamnetin reduced the formalin effects in the neurogenic phase. In the inflammatory phase, only CEE, isorhamnetin, and CHCl3 100% and CHCl3 : MeOH 5% fractions were active. CEE and all fractions, except for CHCl3 : MeOH 10% fraction, isorhamnetin, and soluble fraction were able to produce an antioedematogenic activity in the ear capsaicin-induced edema test. In the thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, only EtAcO 100% fraction was not active. The results demonstrate that A. tomentosum has antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in animal models.

  1. Anti-inflammatory, and antinociceptive effects of Campomanesia adamantium microencapsulated pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli Z. Viscardi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Guavira fruits have antimicrobial, antioxidant, antinociceptive, and anti-inflammatory activities. Spray drying has been widely used in the food industry presenting good retention in bioactive compounds used to transform the pulp/fruit juice into powder form. Therefore, the present study has evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the microencapsulated pulp of Campomanesia adamantium (Cambess. O.Berg, Myrtaceae, by spray drying. Different groups of mice were treated with the doses of 100 and 300 mg/kg of microencapsulated "guavira" pulp and inflammatory parameters were assessed in a carrageenan paw edema-model and leukocyte migration with pleurisy model, while the antinociceptive activity was assessed using the formalin method and CFA-induced hyperalgesia model. A significant reduction in leukocyte migration and in paw edema was observed in rodents in all time after carrageenan injection for both doses of microencapsulated pulp of C. adamantium when compared with control group. Microencapsulated pulp of C. adamantium also reduced licking time at the first (nociceptive and second (inflammatory phases in the formalin model. In CFA-induced cold and mechanical hyperalgesia, depressive behavior, and knee edema, all parameters analyzed were significantly inhibited by microencapsulated pulp of C. adamantium. Microencapsulation by spray drying proved to be a technique that promotes bioavailability and the preservation of bioactive components in guavira pulp.

  2. Orofacial antinociceptive effect of the ethanolic extract of Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Juliane C; Macedo, Larissa A R O; Souza, Grasielly R; Oliveira-Junior, Raimundo G; Lima-Saraiva, Sarah R G; Lavor, Érica M; Silva, Mariana G; Souza, Marilia T S; Bonjardim, Leonardo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Mendes, Rosemairy L; Almeida, Jackson R G S

    Annona vepretorum Mart. (Annonaceae) is a species popularly known in Brazil as "araticum" and "pinha da Caatinga". We have evaluated the antinociceptive effects of A. vepretorum in formalin-, capsaicin-, and glutamate-induced orofacial nociception in mice. Male Swiss mice were pretreated with either saline (p.o.), A. vepretorum ethanol extract (Av-EtOH 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.), or morphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), before formalin, capsaicin, or glutamate was injected into the right upper lip. Pre-treatment with Av-EtOH at all doses produced a reduction in face-rubbing behavior induced by formalin in both phases, and these pre-treatments also produced a significant antinociceptive effect in the capsaicin and glutamate tests. Pre-treatment with naloxone (1.5 mg/kg, i.p.) did not reverse the antinociceptive activity of the extract at the dose of 100 mg/kg in the first phase of this test. Our results suggest that Av-EtOH might be useful in the treatment of orofacial pain.

  3. Modulation by insulin rather than blood glucose of the pain threshold in acute physiological and flavone induced antinociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, N N; Thirugnanasambandam, P; Parvathavarthini, S; Viswanathan, S; Ramaswamy, S

    2001-10-01

    The present study investigated the cause effect relationship between glycemic and algesic states. The hypo- and hyperglycemic conditions were induced physiologically through exercise (3 min swim at room temperature 28 degrees - 30 degrees C) and external dextrose (2 g/kg, ip) administration respectively in mice. Besides, flavone (50 mg/kg, sc) a known antinociceptive drug was chosen to study such a cause effect relationship. The anti-nociception was assessed by acetic acid assay, blood glucose measured using glucometer (Ames) and serum insulin by radioimmunoassay. The findings revealed that irrespective of the glycemic state whether hypo-, hyper, or euglycemic induced by swim stress, dextrose or flavone per se respectively, significant antinociceptive response was recorded. Pretreatment with flavone (50 mg/kg, sc) always exhibited a tendency to reverse the hyperglycemia, if any, but enhanced the antinociceptive response either after swim stress or after dextrose. These data support the contention that changes in the glycemic state in acute condition is not responsible for antinociceptive response and thereby suggesting dissociation between these two parameters. Extended studies estimating serum insulin level after the above mentioned maneuvers showed a significant rise whenever antinociceptive response was recorded irrespective of the glycemic state. It is suggested that serum insulin level, a hormonal parameter rather than the blood glucose level, which is a metabolic parameter, appears more reliable. It appears that the changes in serum insulin level produced by various treatments may have a relationship with the antinociceptive response. However, this study has the limitation that the results can apply only for acute conditions and extrapolation to clinical conditions is debatable.

  4. Anti-inflammatory, Antinociceptive, and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol and Aqueous Extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouze, Houria; Bouchatta, Otmane; Gadhi, A Chemseddoha; Bennis, Mohammed; Sokar, Zahra; Ba-M'hamed, Saadia

    2017-01-01

    Anacyclus pyrethrum (L.) is a plant widely used in Moroccan traditional medicine to treat inflammatory and painful diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of aqueous and methanol extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum roots (AEAPR and MEAPR). The anti-inflammatory effect of AEAPR and MEAPR was determined in xylene-induced ear edema and Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)-induced paw edema. The antinociceptive activity of AEAPR and MEAPR (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) administered by gavage was examined in mice by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate, and formalin tests, and the mechanical allodynia were assessed in CFA-induced paw edema. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, ferric reducing power and β-carotene-linoleic acid assay systems. AEAPR and MEAPR produced significant reductions in CFA-induced paw edema and xylene-induced ear edema. A single oral administration of these extracts at 250 and 500 mg/kg significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity induced by CFA, which had begun 1 h 30 after the treatment, and was maintained till 7 h. Chronic treatment with both extracts significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in persistent pain conditions induced by CFA. Acute pretreatment with AEAPR or MEAPR at high dose caused a significant decrease in the number of abdominal writhes induced by acetic acid injection (52.2 and 56.7%, respectively), a marked increase of the paw withdrawal latency in the hot plate test, and also a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test. This antinociceptive effect was partially reversed by naloxone pretreatment in the hot plate and formalin tests. Additionally, a significant scavenging activity in DPPH, reducing power and protection capacity of β-carotene was observed in testing antioxidant assays. The present

  5. Anti-inflammatory, Antinociceptive, and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol and Aqueous Extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houria Manouze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Anacyclus pyrethrum (L. is a plant widely used in Moroccan traditional medicine to treat inflammatory and painful diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of aqueous and methanol extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum roots (AEAPR and MEAPR. The anti-inflammatory effect of AEAPR and MEAPR was determined in xylene–induced ear edema and Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA-induced paw edema. The antinociceptive activity of AEAPR and MEAPR (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg administered by gavage was examined in mice by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate, and formalin tests, and the mechanical allodynia were assessed in CFA-induced paw edema. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging method, ferric reducing power and β-carotene-linoleic acid assay systems. AEAPR and MEAPR produced significant reductions in CFA-induced paw edema and xylene-induced ear edema. A single oral administration of these extracts at 250 and 500 mg/kg significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity induced by CFA, which had begun 1 h 30 after the treatment, and was maintained till 7 h. Chronic treatment with both extracts significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in persistent pain conditions induced by CFA. Acute pretreatment with AEAPR or MEAPR at high dose caused a significant decrease in the number of abdominal writhes induced by acetic acid injection (52.2 and 56.7%, respectively, a marked increase of the paw withdrawal latency in the hot plate test, and also a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test. This antinociceptive effect was partially reversed by naloxone pretreatment in the hot plate and formalin tests. Additionally, a significant scavenging activity in DPPH, reducing power and protection capacity of β-carotene was observed in testing antioxidant assays

  6. Anti-inflammatory, Antinociceptive, and Antioxidant Activities of Methanol and Aqueous Extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouze, Houria; Bouchatta, Otmane; Gadhi, A. Chemseddoha; Bennis, Mohammed; Sokar, Zahra; Ba-M’hamed, Saadia

    2017-01-01

    Anacyclus pyrethrum (L.) is a plant widely used in Moroccan traditional medicine to treat inflammatory and painful diseases. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of aqueous and methanol extracts of Anacyclus pyrethrum roots (AEAPR and MEAPR). The anti-inflammatory effect of AEAPR and MEAPR was determined in xylene–induced ear edema and Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA)-induced paw edema. The antinociceptive activity of AEAPR and MEAPR (125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) administered by gavage was examined in mice by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate, and formalin tests, and the mechanical allodynia were assessed in CFA-induced paw edema. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant activities of the extracts were determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging method, ferric reducing power and β-carotene-linoleic acid assay systems. AEAPR and MEAPR produced significant reductions in CFA-induced paw edema and xylene-induced ear edema. A single oral administration of these extracts at 250 and 500 mg/kg significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity induced by CFA, which had begun 1 h 30 after the treatment, and was maintained till 7 h. Chronic treatment with both extracts significantly reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in persistent pain conditions induced by CFA. Acute pretreatment with AEAPR or MEAPR at high dose caused a significant decrease in the number of abdominal writhes induced by acetic acid injection (52.2 and 56.7%, respectively), a marked increase of the paw withdrawal latency in the hot plate test, and also a significant inhibition of both phases of the formalin test. This antinociceptive effect was partially reversed by naloxone pretreatment in the hot plate and formalin tests. Additionally, a significant scavenging activity in DPPH, reducing power and protection capacity of β-carotene was observed in testing antioxidant assays. The present

  7. Interaction between Mu and Delta Opioid Receptor Agonists in an Assay of Capsaicin-Induced Thermal Allodynia in Rhesus Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Stevens Negus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Delta opioid agonists enhance antinociceptive effects of mu-opioid agonists in many preclinical assays of acute nociception, but delta/mu interactions in preclinical models of inflammation-associated pain have not been examined. This study examined interactions between the delta agonist SNC80 [(+-4-[(αR-α-((2S,5R-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] and the mu agonist analgesics methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine in an assay of capsaicin-induced thermal allodynia in rhesus monkeys. Thermal allodynia was produced by topical application of capsaicin to the tail. Antiallodynic effects of methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine were evaluated alone or in combination with fixed proportions of SNC80 identical to proportions previously shown to enhance acute thermal antinociceptive effects of these mu agonists in rhesus monkeys (0.9 : 1 SNC80/methadone; 0.29 : 1 SNC80/morphine; 3.6 : 1 SNC80/nalbuphine. Methadone, morphine, and nalbuphine each produced dose-dependent antiallodynia. SNC80 produced partial antiallodynia up to the highest dose tested (5.6 mg/kg. SNC80 produced a modest, enantioselective, and naltrindole-reversible enhancement of methadone-induced antiallodynia. However, SNC80 did not enhance morphine antiallodynia and only weakly enhanced nalbuphine antiallodynia. Overall, SNC80 produced modest or no enhancement of the antiallodynic effects of the three mu agonists evaluated. These results suggest that delta agonist-induced enhancement of mu agonist antiallodynia may be weaker and less reliable than previously demonstrated enhancement of mu agonist acute thermal nociception.

  8. The glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist exendin-4 reduces cocaine self-administration in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Gunnar; Reddy, India A.; Weikop, Pia

    2015-01-01

    tegmental area (VTA) and the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dopaminergic neurons in the VTA project to the NAc, and these neurons play a pivotal role in the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse. Based on the anatomical distribution of GLP-1 receptors in the brain and the well-established effects of GLP-1 on food...... implicating central GLP-1 receptors in these responses. The present results demonstrate that the GLP-1 system modulates cocaine's effects on behavior and dopamine homeostasis, indicating that the GLP-1 receptor may be a novel target for the pharmacological treatment of drug addiction....... reward, we decided to investigate the effect of the GLP-1 analogue exendin-4 on cocaine- and dopamine D1-receptor agonist-induced hyperlocomotion, on acute and chronic cocaine self-administration, on cocaine-induced striatal dopamine release in mice and on cocaine-induced c-fos activation. Here, we...

  9. Evaluation of antinociceptive activity of aqueous extract of bark of psidium guajava in albino rats and albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekhar, N Chandra; Jayasree, T; Ubedulla, Shaikh; Dixit, Rohit; V S, Manohar; J, Shankar

    2014-09-01

    Psidium guajava is commonly known as guava. Psidium guajava is a medium sized tree belonging to the family Myrtaceae found throughout the tropics. All the parts of the plant, the leaves, followed by the fruits, bark and the roots are used in traditional medicine. The traditional uses of the plant are Antidiarrheal, Antimicrobial Activity, Antimalarial/Antiparasitic Activity, Antitussive and antihyperglycaemic. Leaves are used as Anti-inflammatory, Analgesic and Antinociceptive effects. To evaluate the antinociceptive activity of aqueous extract of bark of Psidium guajava in albino rats with that of control and standard analgesic drugs aspirin and tramadol. Mechanical (Tail clip method) and thermal (Tail flick method using Analgesiometer), 0.6% solution of acetic acid writhing models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. Six groups of animals, each consists of 10 animals, first one as control, second and third as standard drugs, Aspirin and Tramadol, fourth, fifth and sixth groups as text received the extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/ kg) orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that aqueous extract of bark of Psidium guajava produced significant antinociceptive response in all the mechanical and thermal-induced nociception models. AEPG antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms.

  10. Antinociceptive Effect of the Essential Oil Obtained from the Leaves of Croton cordiifolius Baill. (Euphorbiaceae in Mice

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    Lenise de Morais Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Croton cordiifolius Baill. is a shrub known as “quebra-faca” and is used to treat inflammation, pain, wounds, and gastrointestinal disturbances in the semiarid region in the northeast of Brazil. In an ethnobotanical survey in the state of Pernambuco, “quebra-faca” use was cited in 33% of the interviews. Thus, we decided to evaluate the antinociceptive effects of the essential oil from C. cordiifolius (CcEO. Chemical analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed 1,8-cineole (25.09% and α-phellandrene (15.43% as major constituents. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using murine models of chemically induced pain (writhing induced by acetic acid, formalin, capsaicin, and glutamate tests. Opioid and central nervous systems (CNS involvement were also investigated. Regarding antinociceptive activity, CcEO (50 and 100 mg/kg reduced the number of writhing responses induced by acetic acid and decreased the licking times in both phases of the formalin test. CcEO also was evaluated in capsaicin- and glutamate-induced nociception. While no effect was observed in the capsaicin test, CcEO (100 mg/kg was effective in the glutamate test. Naloxone, an opioid antagonist, did not affect the antinociceptive activity of CcEO in writhing test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive effect of CcEO could be explained, at least in part, by inhibition of the glutamatergic system.

  11. Blockade of Adrenal Medulla-Derived Epinephrine Potentiates Bee Venom-Induced Antinociception in the Mouse Formalin Test: Involvement of Peripheral β-Adrenoceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk-Yun Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The injection of diluted bee venom (DBV into an acupoint has been used traditionally in eastern medicine to treat a variety of inflammatory chronic pain conditions. We have previously shown that DBV had a potent antinociceptive efficacy in several rodent pain models. However, the peripheral mechanisms underlying DBV-induced antinociception remain unclear. The present study was designed to investigate the role of peripheral epinephrine on the DBV-induced antinociceptive effect in the mouse formalin assay. Adrenalectomy significantly enhanced the antinociceptive effect of DBV during the late phase of the formalin test, while chemical sympathectomy had no effect. Intraperitoneal injection of epinephrine blocked this adrenalectomy-induced enhancement of the DBV-induced antinociceptive effect. Moreover, injection of a phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT inhibitor enhanced the DBV-induced antinociceptive effect. Administration of nonselective β-adrenergic antagonists also significantly potentiated this DBV-induced antinociception, in a manner similar to adrenalectomy. These results demonstrate that the antinociceptive effect of DBV treatment can be significantly enhanced by modulation of adrenal medulla-derived epinephrine and this effect is mediated by peripheral β-adrenoceptors. Thus, DBV acupoint stimulation in combination with inhibition of peripheral β-adrenoceptors could be a potentially novel strategy for the management of inflammatory pain.

  12. (-)-Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol antagonizes the peripheral cannabinoid receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayewitch, M; Rhee, M H; Avidor-Reiss, T; Breuer, A; Mechoulam, R; Vogel, Z

    1996-04-26

    (-)-Delta9-Tetrahydrocannabinol ((-)-Delta9-THC) is the major active psychotropic component of the marijuana plant, Cannabis sativa. The membrane proteins that have been found to bind this material or its derivatives have been called the cannabinoid receptors. Two GTP-binding protein-coupled cannabinoid receptors have been cloned. CB1 or the neuronal cannabinoid receptor is found mostly in neuronal cells and tissues while CB2 or the peripheral cannabinoid receptor has been detected in spleen and in several cells of the immune system. It has previously been shown that activation of CB1 or CB2 receptors by cannabinoid agonists inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity. Utilizing Chinese hamster ovary cells and COS cells transfected with the cannabinoid receptors we report that (-)-Delta9-THC binds to both receptors with similar affinity. However, in contrast to its capacity to serve as an agonist for the CB1 receptor, (-)-Delta9-THC was only able to induce a very slight inhibition of adenylyl cyclase at the CB2 receptor. Morever, (-)-Delta9-THC antagonizes the agonist-induced inhibition of adenylyl cyclase mediated by CB2. Therefore, we conclude that (-)-Delta9-THC constitutes a weak antagonist for the CB2 receptor.

  13. Antinociceptive effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Thymus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Abbas Ali; Babaei, Mahdi; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Jarrahi, Morteza; Jadidi, Majid; Sadeghi, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Previous investigation has shown that Thymus Vulgaris (TV) modulates pain. The aim of this work was to examine the role of TV on acute and chronic pain and compares its effect with dexamethasone (DEX) and stress (ST) by using hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests in mice. In this study male albino mice (25-30 g.) in 21 groups (n=147) were used. TV (100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg), DEX (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) and vehicle (VEH) were injected 30 minutes before pain assessment tests. Stress was applied by 1 min swimming in cold water (18-22 degrees ). Acute and chronic pain was assessed by hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests. For assessment of the role of opioid receptors in antinoceception of TV extract, Naloxon (NAL, 2mg/kg, ip) as opioid receptor antagonist was injected before the injection of the more effective dose (500 mg/kg) of TV extract. Results indicated that TV, DEX and ST have analgesic effects in all tests (P<0.01 in comparison with control group). Above findings showed that TV extract, DEX and ST have modulatory effects on acute and chronic pain. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which TV extract has an inhibitory effect on pain sensation.

  14. Neuronal nicotinic receptors as analgesic targets: It’s a winding road

    OpenAIRE

    Umana, Iboro C.; Daniele, Claire A.; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Along with their well known role in nicotine addiction and autonomic physiology, neuronal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) also have profound analgesic effects in animal models and humans. This is not a new idea, even in the early 1500s, soon after tobacco was introduced to the new world, its proponents listed pain relief among the beneficial properties of smoking. In recent years, analgesics that target specific nAChR subtypes have shown highly efficacious antinociceptive properties in acute and...

  15. Antinociceptive effect of Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil. independent of anti-inflammatory activity of ellagic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Marcus Vinícius Mariano; Galdino, Pablinny Moreira; Florentino, Iziara Ferreira; Sampaio, Bruno Leite; Vanderlinde, Frederico Argollo; de Paula, José Realino; Costa, Elson Alves

    2011-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanolic extract of Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil. (PEtExt) stem bark and its fractions using various animal models such as acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, formalin-induced pain and croton oil-induced ear edema tests. The PEtExt inhibited the acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, reduced the pain reaction time on both phases of the formalin test and decreased the edema in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with naloxone did not reverse the antinociceptive effect. Only the ethyl acetate fraction showed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Our results also showed that this extract contains compounds with analgesic action independent of anti-inflammatory activity.

  16. Dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors induces fos expression within restricted regions of the neonatal female rat brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Olesen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen.

  17. Dopaminergic Activation of Estrogen Receptors Induces Fos Expression within Restricted Regions of the Neonatal Female Rat Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Kristin M.; Auger, Anthony P.

    2008-01-01

    Steroid receptor activation in the developing brain influences a variety of cellular processes that endure into adulthood, altering both behavior and physiology. Recent data suggests that dopamine can regulate expression of progestin receptors within restricted regions of the developing rat brain by activating estrogen receptors in a ligand-independent manner. It is unclear whether changes in neuronal activity induced by dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors are also region specific. To investigate this question, we examined where the dopamine D1-like receptor agonist, SKF 38393, altered Fos expression via estrogen receptor activation. We report that dopamine D1-like receptor agonist treatment increased Fos protein expression within many regions of the developing female rat brain. More importantly, prior treatment with an estrogen receptor antagonist partially reduced D1-like receptor agonist-induced Fos expression only within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the central amygdala. These data suggest that dopaminergic activation of estrogen receptors alters neuronal activity within restricted regions of the developing rat brain. This implies that ligand-independent activation of estrogen receptors by dopamine might organize a unique set of behaviors during brain development in contrast to the more wide spread ligand activation of estrogen receptors by estrogen. PMID:18478050

  18. Role of prefrontal cortical calcium-independent phospholipase A2 in antinociceptive effect of the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor antidepresssant maprotiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Wee-Siong; Shalini, Suku-Maran; Torta, Federico; Wenk, Markus R; Stohler, Christian; Yeo, Jin-Fei; Herr, Deron R; Ong, Wei-Yi

    2017-01-06

    The prefrontal cortex is essential for executive functions such as decision-making and planning. There is also accumulating evidence that it is important for the modulation of pain. In this study, we investigated a possible role of prefrontal cortical calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) in antinociception induced by the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (NRI) and tetracyclic (tricyclic) antidepressant, maprotiline. Intraperitoneal injections of maprotiline increased iPLA2 mRNA and protein expression in the prefrontal cortex. This treatment also reduced grooming responses to von-Frey hair stimulation of the face after facial carrageenan injection, indicating decreased sensitivity to pain. The antinociceptive effect of maprotiline was abrogated by iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide injection to the prefrontal cortex, indicating a role of this enzyme in antinociception. In contrast, injection of iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide to the somatosensory cortex did not reduce the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline. Lipidomic analysis of the prefrontal cortex showed decrease in phosphatidylcholine species, but increase in lysophosphatidylcholine species, indicating increased PLA2 activity, and release of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) after maprotiline treatment. Differences in sphingomyelin/ceramide were also detected. These changes were not observed in maprotiline-treated mice that received iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide to the prefrontal cortex. Metabolites of DHA and EPA may help to strengthen a known supraspinal antinociceptive pathway from the prefrontal cortex to the periaqueductal gray. Together, results indicate a role of prefrontal cortical iPLA2 and its enzymatic products in the antinociceptive effect of maprotiline. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Acyl-CoA esters antagonize the effects of ligands on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha conformation, DNA binding, and interaction with Co-factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, M; Dam, I; Jorgensen, C

    2001-01-01

    palmitoyl-CoA analog, antagonizes the effects of agonists on PPARalpha conformation and function in vitro. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, S-hexadecyl-CoA prevented agonist-induced binding of the PPARalpha-retinoid X receptor alpha heterodimer to the acyl-CoA oxidase peroxisome proliferator...... to the buffering effect of high affinity acyl-CoA-binding proteins, especially the acyl-CoA-binding protein. By using PPARalpha expressed in Sf21 cells for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we demonstrate that S-hexadecyl-CoA was able to increase the mobility of the PPARalpha-containing heterodimer even...

  20. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Rhodiola rosea L. extract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncheva, Nina D; Mihaylova, Anita St; Getova, Damianka P

    2013-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea (golden root) is a unique phytoadaptagen with immunomodulatory, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the alcohol/water extract of Rhodiola rosea roots in rats. Thirty male Wistar rats were used in the study. They were divided in 3 groups (n = 10), treated respectively with saline (controls), Rhodiola rosea extract 50 mg/kg bw and 100 mg/kg bw orally. The antinociceptive effect was evaluated using the hot-plate test, Randall-Sellito test and the formalin test. The hot-plate test evaluates the reaction time of rats which are dropped on a heated surface. The analgesy-meter test exerts a force increased at constant rate. In the formalin test we measured the total time spent in licking the injected paw during the early (0-10 min) and late phase (20-30 min) of test. To study anti-inflammatory effect the carrageenan-induced paw edema was used. The paw volume was measured plethysmometrically at 2, 3 and 4 hours. In the hot-plate test Rhodiola rosea increased in both doses the latency reaction compared with that in the controls. In analgesy-meter test Rhodiola rosea in a dose of 50 mg/kg showed a significant increase of pressure reaction compared with the controls. In the formalin test Rhodiola rosea in a dose of 100 mg/kg significantly decreased the paw licking time during the first phase. In the plethysmometer test Rhodiola rosea extract significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema when compared with the saline-induced edema. The studied extract of Rhodiola rosea exhibited significant analgesic activity in all the pain models used--inhibition of thermal pain, mechanical hyperalgesia and formalin-induced pain behavior. Significant anti-inflammatory activity was observed from Rhodiola rosea extract in carrageenan induced paw edema in rats.

  1. In vivo hypoglycemic, antinociceptive and in vitro antioxidant activities of methanolic bark extract of Crataeva nurvala

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    Uddin Jalal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To rationalize the folkloric use of hypoglycemic, antinociceptive and antioxidant potentials with phytochemical screening of methanolic bark extract of Crataeva nurvala (C. nurvala in vivo and in vitro. Methods: The collected bark was dried and grinded. The coarse powder was soaked in 2 000 mL of 90% methanol for several days then filtrated. At 40 °C the volume of crude methanolic extract (CME was reduced by a vacuum rotary evaporator, then the aqueous methanol extract was separated into petroleum ether, carbon tetrachloride, and aqueous soluble fractions by Kupchan protocol. Then the extracts were subjected to evaluate in vivo analgesic, hypoglycemic activities in Swiss albino mice model and antioxidant in vitro. Results: In quantitative phytochemical analysis, total phenolic content was found maximum (235.94 mg of GAE/g in aqueous soluble fraction; in case of antioxidant potentials, DPPH free radical scavenging assay showed IC50 value of 9.25 μg/mL exhibited by aqueous soluble fraction in comparison to ascorbic acid (8.27 μg/mL as a reference standard. The CMEs potentially (P < 0.05 reduced the acetic acid-induced writhing and increased (P < 0.05; P < 0.01 latency period in the tail immersion method at a dose dependent manner. The CME significantly reduced blood sugar level of diabetic rat induced by alloxan monohydrate. Conclusions: This study was conducted to validate the extensive use of C. nurvala bark as folk medicine with antinociceptive, hypoglycemic and antioxidant effects. It can be concluded that the bark of C. nurvala possesses good antinociceptive, moderate hypoglycemic and antioxidant activities. However, further chemical and pharmacological revise are needed to elucidate the detail mode of action behind this and identify the responsible active principles.

  2. Tabernaemontana catharinensis ethyl acetate fraction presents antinociceptive activity without causing toxicological effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Brum, Evelyne; da Rosa Moreira, Laís; da Silva, Andreia Regina Haas; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Carvalho, Fabiano Barbosa; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Brandão, Ricardo; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan

    2016-09-15

    Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of painful and inflammatory disorders. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive potential of the ethyl acetate fraction (Eta) from T. catharinensis leaves and assessed its toxic effects in mice to validate its popular use. Adult male Swiss mice (30-35g) were used. The Eta antinociceptive effect (200-800mg/kg, oral route (p.o.)) was evaluated in the acetic acid, formalin, capsaicin and tail-immersion tests. Adverse effects were analyzed using rotarod and open-field tests, body temperature, biochemical analysis and gastric lesions assessment. To evaluate the acute (OECD 423) or sub-acute (OECD 407) toxicity of the Eta, it was administered orally at a single (2000mg/kg) or repeated doses (100-400mg/kg/day for 28 days), respectively. Mortality, behavioral changes, biochemical and hematological parameters were evaluated. The Eta effect on cellular viability also was evaluated. Eta (200-800mg/kg) inhibited the nociception caused by acetic acid (93.9±1.5%), formalin (86.2±10.8%) or capsaicin (75.4±3.3%) without inducing gastric lesions. Moreover, Eta neither altered the body temperature, biochemical parameters, nor forced or spontaneous locomotor activity of mice. The acute administration of the Eta (2000mg/kg) promoted a decrease in blood glucose levels and alanine aminotransferase activity. In the sub-acute toxicity study, Eta increased the aspartate aminotransferase activity (400mg/kg) and platelet distribution width (200mg/kg). Furthermore, Eta did not alter the cellular viability in cortical slices. Eta presents antinociceptive effects and mild toxicity in mice. These results support its traditional use as a potential analgesic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ulcerogenic activity of a zinc-diclofenac complex in rats

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    Santos L.H.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and ulcerogenic activity of a zinc-diclofenac complex (5.5 or 11 mg/kg in male Wistar rats (180-300 g, N = 6 and compared it to free diclofenac (5 or 10 mg/kg and to the combination of diclofenac (5 or 10 mg/kg and zinc acetate (1.68 or 3.5 mg/kg. The carrageenin-induced paw edema and the cotton pellet-induced granulomatous tissue formation models were used to assess the anti-inflammatory activity, and the Hargreaves model of thermal hyperalgesia was used to assess the antinociceptive activity. To investigate the effect of orally or intraperitoneally (ip administered drugs on cold-induced gastric lesions, single doses were administered before exposing the animals to a freezer (-18ºC for 45 min in individual cages. We also evaluated the gastric lesions induced by multiple doses of the drugs. Diclofenac plus zinc complex had the same anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects as diclofenac alone. Gastric lesions induced by a single dose administered per os and ip were reduced in the group treated with zinc-diclofenac when compared to the groups treated with free diclofenac or diclofenac plus zinc acetate. In the multiple dose treatment, the complex induced a lower number of the most severe lesions when compared to free diclofenac and diclofenac plus zinc acetate. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that the zinc-diclofenac complex may represent an important therapeutic alternative for the treatment of rheumatic and inflammatory conditions, as its use may be associated with a reduced incidence of gastric lesions.

  4. Antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antiulcerogenic activities of ethanol root extract of Strophanthus hispidus DC (Apocynaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, Ismail O; Awodele, Olufunsho; Oreagba, Ibrahim A; Murtala, Abdulahi A; Chijioke, Micah C

    2013-01-01

    Strophanthus hispidus DC (Apocynaceae) is a medicinal plant widely used in traditional African medicine in the treatment of rheumatic afflictions, ulcer, conjunctivitis, leprosy and skin diseases. This study sought to investigate the antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antiulcer properties of the ethanol root extract of S. hispidus. Antinociceptive activity was evaluated using acetic acid-induced writhing and formalin tests in mice. The carrageenan- and egg albumin-induced rat paw edema tests were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory actions, whereas the antiulcer activity was investigated using ethanol-, HCl- and pyloric ligation-induced gastric ulcer models in rats. S. hispidus [100-800 mg/kg orally (po)] produced significant (p<0.05) inhibition of writhing reflex with peak effect of 74.13% inhibition observed at 800 mg/kg. Similarly, S. hispidus significantly (p<0.05) attenuated formalin-induced early and late phase of nociception with peak effect of 61.84% and 89.43%, respectively, at 200 mg/kg. S. hispidus (25-800 mg/kg po) caused significant (p<0.05) inhibition of edema development in the carrageenan and egg albumin models with peak effect (93.40% and 90.10% inhibition of edema formation) observed at 50 mg/kg. With respect to antiulcer activity, S. hispidus (100-800 mg/kg) showed potent antiulcer activity with respective peak effects of 96% (ethanol-induced), 99% (HCl-induced) and 70.60% inhibition of ulcer. The findings in this study suggest that the ethanol root extract of S. hispidus possesses antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antiulcerogenic activities. This justifies the use of the extract in folklore medicine for the treatment of ulcer and inflammatory disorders.

  5. The use of the antimicrobial peptide piscidin (PCD)-1 as a novel anti-nociceptive agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Fu; Huang, Shi-Ying; Liao, Chang-Yi; Sung, Chun-Sung; Chen, Jyh-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-06-01

    The antimicrobial peptide piscidin (PCD)-1 has been reported to have antibacterial and immunomodulatory functions. Here, we investigated the anti-neuropathic properties of PCD-1, in order to determine its potential as a compound to alleviate pain. Treatment with PCD-1 suppressed the inflammatory proteins COX-2 and iNOS in murine macrophage (RAW264.7) and microglial (BV2) cell lines stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For studies of the effect of PCD-1 in vivo, mononeuropathy in rats was induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI), and the resulting anti-nociceptive behaviors were compared between CCI controls and CCI rats given intrathecal injections of PCD-1. Much like gabapentin, PCD-1 exerts anti-nociceptive effects against thermal hyperalgesia, with a median effective dose (ED50) of 9.5 μg in CCI rats. In CCI rats, PCD-1 exerted effects against mechanical and cold allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, and weight-bearing deficits. Furthermore, CCI-mediated activation of microglia and astrocytes in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord were decreased by PCD-1. In addition, PCD-1 suppressed up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (phospho-mTOR) in CCI rats. Finally, CCI-induced down-regulation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in rats was attenuated by injection of PCD-1. Taken together, the present findings demonstrate that the marine antimicrobial peptide PCD-1 has anti-nociceptive effects, and thus may have potential for development as an alternative pain-alleviating agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Phytochemical screening, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Chrysopogon zizanioides essential oil

    OpenAIRE

    Gabrielle M. Lima; Quintans-Júnior,Lucindo J.; Thomazzi, Sara M; Almeida,Emyle M. S. A.; Mônica S. Melo; Mairim R. Serafini; Cavalcanti,Sócrates C.H.; Daniel P. Gelain; Santos,João Paulo A.; Blank,Arie F.; Alves,Péricles B.; Oliveira Neta,Paulina M.; Lima,Julianeli T.; Rocha,Ricardo F.; José Claúdio F. Moreira

    2012-01-01

    Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, Poaceae, is a plant widely used in northeast Brazil in folk medicine for the treatment of various pathological conditions, including inflammatory pain. The present study evaluated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of C. zizanioides essential oil (EO) in rodents. EO was further characterized by GC/MS. The major components of EO were identified as khusimol (19.57%), E-isovalencenol (13.24%), α-vetivone (5.25%), β-vetivone (4.87%) a...

  7. An immunohistochemical study of the antinociceptive effect of calcitonin in ovariectomized rats

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    Sekiguchi Miho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin is used as a treatment to reduce the blood calcium concentration in hypercalcemia and to improve bone mass in osteoporosis. An analgesic effect of calcitonin has been observed and reported in clinical situations. Ovariectomaized (OVX rats exhibit the same hormonal changes as observed in humans with osteoporosis and are an animal model of postmenopousal osteoporosis. The aim of this study to investigate antinociceptive effect of calcitonin in OVX rats using the immunohistochemical study. Methods We assessed the antinociceptive effects of calcitonin in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model, which exhibit osteoporosis and hyperalgesia, using the immunohistochemical method. Fifteen rats were ovariectomized bilaterally, and ten rats were received the same surgery expected for ovariectomy as a sham model. We used five groups: the OVX-CT (n = 5, the sham-CT (n = 5, and the OVX-CT-pcpa (n = 5 groups recieved calcitonin (CT: 4 U/kg/day, while OVX-vehi (n = 5 and the sham-vehi (n = 5 groups received vehicle subcutaneously 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The OVX-CT-pcpa-group was given traperitoneal injection of p-chlorophenylalanine (pcpa; an inhibitor of serotonin biosynthesis (100 mg/kg/day in the last 3 days of calcitonon injection. Two hours after 5% formalin (0.05 ml subcutaneously into the hind paw, the L5 spinal cord were removed and the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir neurons were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney-U test. Results The numbers of Fos-ir neurons in the OVX-CT and sham-CT groups were significantly less than in the OVX-vehi and sham-vehi groups, respectively (p = 0.0090, p = 0.0090. The number of Fos-ir neurons in the OVX-CT-pcpa-group was significantly more than that of the OVX-CT-group (p = 0.0283, which means pcpa inhibits calcitonin induced reduction of c-Fos production. Conclusion The results in this study demonstrated that 1 the increase of c-Fos might be related to hyperalgesia in OVX-rats. 2 Calcitonin has

  8. Topical glucocorticoid has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Møiniche, S; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    injuries were induced with a thermode, which was heated to 49 degrees C for 5 min under standardized pressure. Clobetasol propionate or placebo cream was applied to the skin 1 h before burn injury, immediately after the injury and every 12 h for the next 3 days. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), heat......We have studied the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of topical glucocorticoids in human thermal injury. The right and left legs of 12 healthy volunteers were allocated randomly to be treated with either 0.05% clobetasol propionate cream or placebo in a double-blind trial. Thermal...

  9. Antioxidant, total phenolic contents and antinociceptive potential of Teucrium stocksianum methanolic extract in different animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and analgesia are connected with different pathological conditions. The drug candidates from synthetic sources are associated with various side effects; therefore, researchers are giving priority to find novel, effective and safe phytomedicines. Teucrium species possesses antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities. The essential oils of Teucrium stocksianum have shown strong antinociceptive potential. Our current study is designed to embark total phenolic content (TPC), antioxidant and antinociceptive potential of the methanolic extract of Teucrium stocksianum (METS). Method Phytochemical composition was determined by using standard methods. Free radical scavenging potential and TPC of METS were assessed by using 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) and Folin-Ciocalteu Reagent (FCR) respectively. Antinociceptive potential was determined by acetic acid induced abdominal writhing, formalin induced paw licking and tail immersion tests. Different test dose 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight of METS were administered intra peritonealy (i.p) to various groups of mice for the evaluation of analgesic potential. Results Phytochemical screening confirmed the presence of flavonoids, tannins, saponins, anthraquinone, steroid, phlobatannin, terpenoid, glycoside and reducing sugars. METS was found safe at a dose of 1000 mg/kg body weight. A concentration dependent free radical scavenging effect was observed with methanolic aerial parts extract of Teucrium stocksianum (MAPETS) and methanolic roots extracts of Teucrium stocksianum (MRETS). MAPETS and MRETS have shown highest antioxidant activity 91.72% and 86.19% respectively at 100 μg/ml. MAPETS was found more rich (115.32 mg of GAE/g of dry material) in TPC as compared to MAPETS (105.41 mg of GAE/g). METS demonstrated a dose dependent antinociceptive potential in different pain models, like in acetic acid, formalin and tail immersion showing 83.103%, 80.872% and 67

  10. Antinociceptive effect and acute toxicity of the essential oil of Hyptis fruticosa in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Igor A C; Marques, Maxsuel S; Santos, Thiago C; Dias, Kellyane S; Silva, Aline B L; Mello, Iderjane C M; Lisboa, Ana C C D; Alves, Péricles B; Cavalcanti, Sócrates C H; Marçal, Rosilene M; Antoniolli, Angelo R

    2007-04-01

    The essential oil of the Hyptis fruticosa leaves was analyzed by GC/MS and evaluated for antinociceptive property as well as acute toxicity in mice. The essential oil, at doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg (s.c.), produced significant inhibition of acetic acid-induced writhing, but did not manifest a significant effect in hot-plate test. There was no acute toxicity at doses up to 5 g/kg. Bicyclogermacrene, 1,8-cineole, alpha-pinene, and beta-caryophyllene were the major compounds detected in the essential oil.

  11. 14-O-Methylmorphine: A Novel Selective Mu-Opioid Receptor Agonist with High Efficacy and Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zádor, Ferenc; Balogh, Mihály; Váradi, András; Zádori, Zoltán S; Király, Kornél; Szűcs, Edina; Varga, Bence; Lázár, Bernadette; Hosztafi, Sándor; Riba, Pál; Benyhe, Sándor; Fürst, Susanna; Al-Khrasani, Mahmoud

    2017-11-05

    14-O-methyl (14-O-Me) group in morphine-6-O-sulfate (M6SU) or oxymorphone has been reported to be essential for enhanced affinity, potency and antinociceptive effect of these opioids. Herein we report on the pharmacological properties (potency, affinity and efficacy) of the new compound, 14-O-methylmorphine (14-O-MeM) in in vitro. Additionally, we also investigated the antinociceptive effect of the novel compound, as well as its inhibitory action on gastrointestinal transit in in vivo. The potency and efficacy of test compound were measured by [(35)S]GTPγS binding, isolated mouse vas deferens (MVD) and rat vas deferens (RVD) assays. The affinity of 14-O-MeM for opioid receptors was assessed by radioligand binding and MVD assays. The antinociceptive and gastrointestinal effects of the novel compound were evaluated in the rat tail-flick test and charcoal meal test, respectively. Morphine, DAMGO, Ile(5,6) deltorphin II, deltorphin II and U-69593 were used as reference compounds. 14-O-MeM showed higher efficacy (Emax) and potency (EC50) than morphine in MVD, RVD or [(35)S]GTPγS binding. In addition, 14-O-MeM compared to morphine showed higher affinity for μ-opioid receptor (MOR). In vivo, in rat tail-flick test 14-O-MeM proved to be stronger antinociceptive agent than morphine after peripheral or central administration. Additionally, both compounds inhibited the gastrointestinal peristalsis. However, when the antinociceptive and antitransit doses for each test compound are compared, 14-O-MeM proved to have slightly more favorable pharmacological profile. Our results affirm that 14-O-MeM, an opioid of high efficacy and affinity for MOR can be considered as a novel analgesic agent of potential clinical value. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Methanolic Extract from Murraya koenigii L. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism

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    Nushrat Sharmin Ani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant’s leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly (p<0.01 inhibited the pain thresholds induced by formalin and acetic acid in a dose-dependent manner. MEMK also significantly (p<0.01 suppressed glutamate-induced pain. Moreover, pretreatment with glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker at 10 mg/kg significantly (p<0.05 reversed the MEMK-mediated antinociception. These revealed that MEMK might have the potential to interact with glutamatergic system and the ATP-sensitive potassium channels to exhibit its antinociceptive activities. Therefore, our results strongly support the antinociceptive effects of M. koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine.

  13. Antinociceptive effects of tramadol hydrochloride after intravenous administration to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Saskia; Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Souza, Marcy J; Cox, Sherry; Keuler, Nicholas S; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2013-02-01

    To determine the antinociceptive and sedative effects of tramadol in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) following IV administration. 11 healthy Hispaniolan Amazon parrots of unknown sex. Tramadol hydrochloride (5 mg/kg, IV) and an equivalent volume (≤ 0.34 mL) of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution were administered to parrots in a complete crossover study design. Foot withdrawal response to a thermal stimulus was determined 30 to 60 minutes before (baseline) and 15, 30, 60, 120, and 240 minutes after treatment administration; agitation-sedation scores were determined for parrots at each of those times. The estimated mean changes in temperature from the baseline value that elicited a foot withdrawal response were 1.65° and -1.08°C after administration of tramadol and saline solution, respectively. Temperatures at which a foot withdrawal response was elicited were significantly higher than baseline values at all 5 evaluation times after administration of tramadol and were significantly lower than baseline values at 30, 120, and 240 minutes after administration of saline solution. No sedation, agitation, or other adverse effects were observed in any of the parrots after administration of tramadol. Tramadol hydrochloride (5 mg/kg, IV) significantly increased the thermal nociception threshold for Hispaniolan Amazon parrots in the present study. Sedation and adverse effects were not observed. These results are consistent with results of other studies in which the antinociceptive effects of tramadol after oral administration to parrots were determined.

  14. Antinociceptive and wound healing activities of Croton adamantinus Müll. Arg. essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Morais Nogueira, Lenise; Cassundé, Nathalia Maria Rodrigues; Jorge, Roberta Jeane Bezerra; dos Santos, Simone Maria; Magalhães, Lucimere Paulino Machado; Silva, Monalisa Ribeiro; de Barros Viana, Glauce Socorro; Araújo, Renata Mendonça; de Sena, Kêsia Xisto da Fonseca Ribeiro; de Albuquerque, Julianna Ferreira Cavalcanti; Martins, René Duarte

    2013-10-01

    Leaves of Croton adamantinus have been used to treat inflammation and skin wounds in the semi-arid area of the Northeast of Brazil. In order to evaluate if the essential oil (EO) was responsible for the claimed activities; antinociceptive, wound healing and antimicrobial tests were carried out. Twenty constituents were identified in C. adamantinus EO by GC-MS, ¹H-NMR and ¹³C-NMR, the major compounds being methyl-eugenol (14.81%) and 1,8-cineol (13.74%). Antinociceptive activity was evaluated by the formalin test and the abdominal contortion assay in mice. The EO (50 and 100 mg/kg) decreased the licking time of both phases of the formalin test when compared to the vehicle, but not to morphine (7.5 mg/kg). In the abdominal contortion assay, the EO (50 and 100 mg/kg) reduced the number of contortions compared to the vehicle and to indometacin (10 mg/kg). The wound healing activity was verified also using two experimental models: excisional wound and dead space. Topical treatment with the EO (1%) increased the wound contraction from the third day of treatment (compared with nitrofurazone 0.2%), while systemic treatment (50 mg/kg/day) increased granulation tissue formation and reduced the water content. C. adamantinus EO also showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus in disk diffusion method. These results corroborate the ethnobotanical use of this specie by Brazilian population.

  15. First isolation and antinociceptive activity of a lipid transfer protein from noni (Morinda citrifolia) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Dyély C O; Costa, Andrea S; Lima, Amanda D R; Silva, Fredy D A; Lobo, Marina D P; Monteiro-Moreira, Ana Cristina O; Moreira, Renato A; Leal, Luzia K A M; Miron, Diogo; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, Hermógenes D

    2016-05-01

    In this study a novel heat-stable lipid transfer protein, designated McLTP1, was purified from noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) seeds, using four purification steps which resulted in a high-purified protein yield (72 mg McLTP1 from 100g of noni seeds). McLTP1 exhibited molecular masses of 9.450 and 9.466 kDa, determined by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of McLTP1 (AVPCGQVSSALSPCMSYLTGGGDDPEARCCAGV), as analysed by NCBI-BLAST database, revealed a high degree of identity with other reported plant lipid transfer proteins. In addition, this protein proved to be resistant to pepsin, trypsin and chymotrypsin digestion. McLTP1 given intraperitoneally (1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/kg) and orally (8 mg/kg) caused an inhibition of the writhing response induced by acetic acid in mice. This protein displayed thermostability, retaining 100% of its antinociceptive activity after 30 min incubation at 80 °C. Pretreatment of mice with McLTP1 (8 mg/kg, i.p. and p.o.) also decreased neurogenic and inflammatory phases of nociception in the formalin test. Naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) antagonised the antinociceptive effect of McLTP1 suggesting that the opioid mechanisms mediate the analgesic properties of this protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of antinociceptive effect of isolated fractions from Petiveria alliacea L. (tipi) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Patrícia Bezerra; Oliveira, Maria Mirele da Silva; Nogueira, Carlos Renato Alves; Noronha, Emmanuelle Coelho; Carneiro, Lyvia Maria Vasconcelos; Bezerra, José Noberto Sousa; Neto, Manoel Andrade; Vasconcelos, Silvania Maria Mendes; Fonteles, Marta Maria França; Viana, Glauce Socorro Barros; de Sousa, Francisca Clea Florenço

    2005-01-01

    The acetate (FA), hexanic (FH), hydroalcoholic (FHA) and precipitated hydroalcoholic (FHAppt) fractions from the root of Petiveria alliacea L. were evaluated for antinociceptive effect using the abdominal constriction induced by acetic acid, hot-plate, formalin tests. The open field and rota rod tests were used to evaluate psychomotor function and myorelaxant activity. The fractions were administered intraperitoneally in mice at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg. Inhibitions of abdominal constrictions were observed with all doses of the fractions, as compared to control. FH and FHAppt, at both doses, reduced the nociception produced by formalin in the 1st (0-5 min) and 2nd (20-25 min) phases, however FHA (100, 200 mg/kg) and FA 200 mg/kg presented significant inhibition on the 1st and 2nd phases, respectively, of this test. A reduction of the locomotor activity was observed in the open field test with all the fractions. These fractions failed to affect the motor coordination in the rota rod test. Results showed that the different fractions of Petiveria alliacea L. have different antinociceptive potentials as demonstrated in the experimental models of nociception in mice, supporting folk medicine use of this plant.

  17. Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onifer, Stephen M; Reed, William R; Sozio, Randall S; Long, Cynthia R

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing pain relief resulting from spinal manipulative therapies, including low velocity variable amplitude spinal manipulation (LVVA-SM), requires determining their mechanisms. Pain models that incorporate simulated spinal manipulative therapy treatments are needed for these studies. The antinociceptive effects of a single LVVA-SM treatment on rat nociceptive behavior during the commonly used formalin test were investigated. Dilute formalin was injected subcutaneously into a plantar hindpaw. Licking behavior was video-recorded for 5 minutes. Ten minutes of LVVA-SM at 20° flexion was administered with a custom-made device at the lumbar (L5) vertebra of isoflurane-anesthetized experimental rats (n = 12) beginning 10 minutes after formalin injection. Hindpaw licking was video-recorded for 60 minutes beginning 5 minutes after LVVA-SM. Control rats (n = 12) underwent the same methods except for LVVA-SM. The mean times spent licking the formalin-injected hindpaw of both groups 1-5 minutes after injection were not different. The mean licking time during the first 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM of experimental rats was significantly less than that of control rats (P < 0.001). The mean licking times of both groups during the second and third 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM were not different. Administration of LVVA-SM had a short-term, remote antinociceptive effect similar to clinical findings. Therefore, mechanistic investigations using this experimental approach are warranted.

  18. Antinociceptive Effects of Spinal Manipulative Therapy on Nociceptive Behavior of Adult Rats during the Formalin Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M. Onifer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing pain relief resulting from spinal manipulative therapies, including low velocity variable amplitude spinal manipulation (LVVA-SM, requires determining their mechanisms. Pain models that incorporate simulated spinal manipulative therapy treatments are needed for these studies. The antinociceptive effects of a single LVVA-SM treatment on rat nociceptive behavior during the commonly used formalin test were investigated. Dilute formalin was injected subcutaneously into a plantar hindpaw. Licking behavior was video-recorded for 5 minutes. Ten minutes of LVVA-SM at 20° flexion was administered with a custom-made device at the lumbar (L5 vertebra of isoflurane-anesthetized experimental rats (n=12 beginning 10 minutes after formalin injection. Hindpaw licking was video-recorded for 60 minutes beginning 5 minutes after LVVA-SM. Control rats (n=12 underwent the same methods except for LVVA-SM. The mean times spent licking the formalin-injected hindpaw of both groups 1–5 minutes after injection were not different. The mean licking time during the first 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM of experimental rats was significantly less than that of control rats (P<0.001. The mean licking times of both groups during the second and third 20 minutes post-LVVA-SM were not different. Administration of LVVA-SM had a short-term, remote antinociceptive effect similar to clinical findings. Therefore, mechanistic investigations using this experimental approach are warranted.

  19. Evaluation of thermal antinociceptive effects after intramuscular administration of buprenorphine hydrochloride to American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceulemans, Susanne M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Olsen, Glenn H; Beaufrère, Hugues; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the thermal antinociceptive effects and duration of action of buprenorphine hydrochloride after IM administration to American kestrels (Falco sparverius). 12 healthy 3-year-old American kestrels. Buprenorphine hydrochloride (0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg) and a control treatment (saline [0.9% NaCl] solution) were administered IM in a randomized crossover experimental design. Foot withdrawal response to a thermal stimulus was determined 1 hour before (baseline) and 1.5, 3, and 6 hours after treatment administration. Agitation-sedation scores were determined 3 to 5 minutes before each thermal stimulus. Adverse effects were monitored for 6 hours after treatment administration. Buprenorphine hydrochloride at 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg, IM, increased thermal threshold for 6 hours, compared with the response for the control treatment. There were no significant differences among buprenorphine treatments. A mild sedative effect was detected at a dose of 0.6 mg of buprenorphine/kg. At the doses tested, buprenorphine hydrochloride resulted in thermal antinociception in American kestrels for at least 6 hours, which suggested that buprenorphine has analgesic effects in this species. Further studies with longer evaluation periods and additional forms of noxious stimuli, formulations, dosages, and routes of administration are needed to fully evaluate the analgesic effects of buprenorphine in American kestrels.

  20. Antinociceptive effect of buprenorphine and evaluation of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex in foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risberg, Åse I; Spadavecchia, Claudia; Ranheim, Birgit; Hendrickson, Eli H S; Lervik, Andreas; Haga, Henning A

    2015-05-01

    To elicit and evaluate the NWR (nociceptive withdrawal reflex) in 2 and 11 day old foals, to investigate if buprenorphine causes antinociception and determine if the NWR response changes with increasing age. The effect of buprenorphine on behaviour was also evaluated. Prospective, experimental cross-over trial. Nine Norwegian Fjord research foals. Buprenorphine, 10 μg kg(-1) was administered intramuscularly (IM) to the same foal at 2 days and at 11 days of age. The NWR and the effect of buprenorphine were evaluated by electromyograms recorded from the left deltoid muscle following electrical stimulation of the left lateral palmar nerve at the level of the pastern. Mentation, locomotor activity and respiratory rate were recorded before and after buprenorphine administration. We were able to evoke the NWR and temporal summation in foals using this model. Buprenorphine decreased the root mean square amplitude following single electrical stimulation (p buprenorphine. These findings indicate that buprenorphine has antinociceptive effect in foals. Opioid side effects often recognized in adult horses also occur in foals. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  1. Sedative and antinociceptive effects of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal or intramuscular administration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; Bosmans, Tim; Debille, Mariëlla; de Rooster, Hilde; Duchateau, Luc; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2014-01-01

    To compare sedation and antinociception after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (IM) administration of a dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine combination in healthy adult cats. Randomized, 'blinded' crossover study, with 1 month washout between treatments. Six healthy neutered female cats, weighing 5.3-7.5 kg. A combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg kg(-1) ) and buprenorphine (20 μg kg(-1) ) was administered by either the OTM (buccal cavity) or IM (quadriceps muscle) route. Sedation was measured using a numerical rating scale, at baseline and at various time points until 6 hours after treatment. At the same time points, analgesia was scored using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale, based on the response to an ear pinch, and by the cat's response to a mechanical stimulus exerted by a pressure rate onset device. Physiological and adverse effects were recorded, and oral pH measured. Signed rank tests were performed, with significance set at p buprenorphine resulted in comparable levels of sedation and antinociception to IM dosing. The OTM administration may offer an alternative route to administer this sedative-analgesic combination in cats. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  2. Antinociceptive effect of amygdalin isolated from Prunus armeniaca on formalin-induced pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hye-Jeong; Kim, Pil; Kim, Chang-Ju; Lee, Hye-Jung; Shim, Insop; Yin, Chang Shik; Yang, Young; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2008-08-01

    Amygdalin is a plant glucoside isolated from the stones of rosaceous fruits, such as apricots, peaches, almond, cherries, and plums. To investigate the pain-relieving activity of amygdalin, we induced pain in rats through intraplantar injection of formalin, and evaluated the antinociceptive effect of amygdalin at doses of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 10.0 mg/kg-body weight by observing nociceptive behavior such as licking, biting and shaking, the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the spinal cord, and the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines in the plantar skin. The intramuscular injection of amygdalin significantly reduced the formalin-induced tonic pain in both early (the initial 10 min after formalin injection) and late phases (10-30 min following the initial formalin injection). During the late phase, amygdalin did reduce the formalin-induced pain in a dose-dependent manner in a dose range less than 1 mg/kg. Molecular analysis targeting c-Fos and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) also showed a significant effect of amygdalin, which matched the results of the behavioral pain analysis. These results suggest that amygdalin is effective at alleviating inflammatory pain and that it can be used as an analgesic with anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities.

  3. Experimental evaluation of anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and antipyretic activities of clove oil in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taher, Yousef A; Samud, Awatef M; El-Taher, Fathy E; ben-Hussin, Ghazala; Elmezogi, Jamal S; Al-Mehdawi, Badryia F; Salem, Hanan A

    2015-01-01

    Clove oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) is a light yellowish fluid obtained from dried flower buds. Clove oil is used traditionally to relieve toothache. The aim of the present work was to study the anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive and antipyretic potential of clove oil in mice. Analgesic activity was examined using acetic-acid-induced abdominal constrictions and the hot plate test. Carrageenan-induced paw edema and brewer's-yeast-induced pyrexia were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity and the antipyretic effects, respectively. The oil was administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) at a dose of 33 mg/kg body weight and the effects were compared with reference drugs. In the antinociceptive test, mice treated with clove oil exhibited significantly decreased acetic-acid-induced writhing movements by a maximum of 87.7% (pclove oil significantly increased the reaction latency to pain after 60 min by 82.3% (pclove oil and indomethacin produced anti-inflammatory effects, as demonstrated by respectively 50.6% (pclove oil significantly attenuated the hyperthermia induced by yeast at ΔT-max by 2.7°C (pclove oil was 161.9 mg/kg. Phytochemical screening of the oil showed the presence of eugenol. The present findings demonstrate the potential pharmacological properties of clove oil and provide further a support for its reported use in folk medicine.

  4. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis

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    Ting-Yi Chien

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP, the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment.

  5. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Zerumbone against Mono-Iodoacetate-Induced Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Ting-Yi; Huang, Steven Kuan-Hua; Lee, Chia-Jung; Tsai, Po-Wei; Wang, Ching-Chiung

    2016-02-18

    The fresh rhizome of Zingiber zerumbet Smith (Zingiberaceae) is used as a food flavoring and also serves as a folk medicine as an antipyretic and for analgesics in Taiwan. Zerumbone, a monocyclic sesquiterpene was isolated from the rhizome of Z. zerumbet and is the major active compound. In this study, the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of zerumbone on arthritis were explored using in vitro and in vivo models. Results showed that zerumbone inhibited inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expressions, and NO and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production, but induced heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. When zerumbone was co-treated with an HO-1 inhibitor (tin protoporphyrin (SnPP)), the NO inhibitory effects of zerumbone were recovered. The above results suggest that zerumbone inhibited iNOS and COX-2 through induction of the HO-1 pathway. Moreover, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 and COX-2 expressions of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated primary rat chondrocytes were inhibited by zerumbone. In an in vivo assay, an acetic acid-induced writhing response in mice was significantly reduced by treatment with zerumbone. Furthermore, zerumbone reduced paw edema and the pain response in a mono-iodoacetate (MIA)-induced rat osteoarthritis model. Therefore, we suggest that zerumbone possesses anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects which indicate zerumbone could be a potential candidate for osteoarthritis treatment.

  6. Evaluation of antinociceptive and antiinflammatory effects of Croton pullei var. glabrior Lanj. (Euphorbiaceae

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    Fábio F. Rocha

    Full Text Available Croton pullei var. glabrior Lanj. (Euphorbiaceae is a liana, vastly distributed in the Amazonian Forest. In the folk medicine, several plants of the Croton genus have been used with therapeutic purposes in pathologies that involve painful and inflammatory diseases which justify this work. The aim of this study was to investigate the antinociceptive and antiinflammatory activities of the C. pullei leaves methanol extract (MECP. MECP reduced in a dose-dependent manner the number of acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing (1.2% in mice, suggesting an antinociceptive activity of the plant. On the other hand, MECP did not significantly modify the reactivity to the thermal stimulation in the hot-plate test and the reactivity to the chemical stimulation in the formalin test first phase, indicating a non-opioid mechanism. MECP reduced the formalin-induced nociception in the second phase, inhibited the croton oil-induced ear edema and reduced the leukocytes migration in the test of the carrageenan-induced peritonitis, indicating an antiinflammatory activity. Although the mechanisms that underlie these plant effects are not completely elucidated, these results appear to support the potential medicinal use of Croton pullei var. glabrior Lanj. against painful and inflammatory diseases.

  7. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties of blueberry extract (Vaccinium corymbosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, Eliane; Lemos, Marivane; Caliari, Vinícius; Kassuya, Cândida A L; Bastos, Jairo K; Andrade, Sérgio F

    2007-04-01

    Blueberries are among the edible fruits that are recognized best for their potential health benefits. The crude extract from Vaccinium corymbosum was assessed in anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive models. The crude hydroalcoholic extract was administered orally at doses of 100, 200 or 300 mg kg (-1) for all the assays. In the carrageenan test, the crude extract reduced rat paw oedema by 9.8, 28.5 and 65.9%, respectively. For the histamine assay, the reductions of oedema were 70.1, 71.7 and 81.9%, respectively. In the myeloperoxidase (MPO) assay, 300 mg kg (-1) crude extract produced a significant inhibition of the MPO activity, at 6 h and 24 h after injection of carrageenan, by 42.8 and 46.2%, respectively. With the granulomatous tissue assay dexamethasone displayed significant activity, whereas the blueberry extract was inactive. For the abdominal constriction test, inhibitions of 49.0, 54.5, 53.5%, respectively, were observed for the crude extract, and 61.4% for indometacin. In the formalin test, the crude extract (200 and 300 mg kg (-1)) and indometacin inhibited only the second phase by 36.2, 35.3 and 45.8%, respectively. Considering that the crude extract of blueberry displayed antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity, its consumption may be helpful for the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  8. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Telfairia occidentalis Hydroethanolic Leaf Extract (Cucurbitaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladimeji-Salami, Joy Awulika; Usuwah, Blessing Amarachi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Telfairia occidentalis (Cucurbitaceae) is a tropical vine grown in West Africa as a leaf vegetable and for its edible seeds. The plant is noted to have healing properties. It is used as a blood tonic to revive weak/ill individuals and its use by sickle cell patients has been documented. In this study, the antinociceptive activity of the hydroethanolic leaf extract of Telfairia occidentalis (TO) was evaluated using the acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, tail clip, and hot plate tests in mice. The carrageenan- and egg albumin-induced rat paw edema tests were used to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action. The extract (50–400 mg/kg, p.o.) produced significant (Pegg albumin tests. Peak effects of TO in the models were generally comparable with the effects of the standard drugs (acetylsalicylic acid, morphine, indomethacin, and chlorpheniramine) used. Phytochemical screening of the extract revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, phlobatannins, and anthraquinones. The extract did not produce any mortality and visible signs of delayed toxicity when administered orally up to 2000 mg/kg. The LD50 (i.p.) was estimated to be 4073.80 mg/kg. The results obtained in this study suggest that TO possesses antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities possibly mediated through peripheral and central mechanisms involving inhibition of release and/or actions of vasoactive substances and prostaglandins. PMID:25961368

  9. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models

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    Valiollah Hajhashemi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study was aimed to examine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract of the plant leaves was prepared by percolation method. Male Swiss mice (25-35 g and male Wistar rats (180-200 g were randomly distributed in control, standard drug, and three experimental groups (n=6 in each group. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test, and carrageenan-induced paw edema were used to assess the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Results: The extract dose-dependently reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal twitches. In formalin test, the extract at any of applied doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg could not suppress the licking behavior of first phase while doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin test. In carrageenan test, the extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the paw edema by 26%. Conclusion: The results confirm the folkloric use of the plant extract in painful and inflammatory conditions. Further studies are needed to characterize the active constituents and the mechanism of action of the plant extract.  

  10. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Klooshani, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models. Hydroalcoholic extract of the plant leaves was prepared by percolation method. Male Swiss mice (25-35 g) and male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were randomly distributed in control, standard drug, and three experimental groups (n=6 in each group). Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test, and carrageenan-induced paw edema were used to assess the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. The extract dose-dependently reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal twitches. In formalin test, the extract at any of applied doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) could not suppress the licking behavior of first phase while doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin test. In carrageenan test, the extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the paw edema by 26%. The results confirm the folkloric use of the plant extract in painful and inflammatory conditions. Further studies are needed to characterize the active constituents and the mechanism of action of the plant extract.

  11. Discrete Pattern of Burst Stimulation in the Ventrobasal Thalamus for Anti-Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Yeowool; Cho, Jeiwon

    2013-01-01

    The thalamus has been proposed to play a role in sensory modulation via switching between tonic and burst dual firing of individual neurons. Of the two firing modes, altered burst firing has been repeatedly implicated with pathological pain conditions, which suggests that maintaining a certain form of thalamic burst could be crucial for controlling pain. However, specific elements of burst firing that may contribute to pain control have not yet been actively investigated. Utilizing the deep brain stimulation (DBS) technique, we explored the effects of bursting properties in pain control by electrically stimulating the ventrobasal (VB) thalamus in forms of burst patterned to test different aspects of bursts during the formalin induced nociception in mice. Our results demonstrated that electrical stimulations mimicking specific burst firing properties are important in producing an anti-nociceptive effect and found that the ≤3 ms interval between burst pluses (intra-burst-interval: IntraBI) and ≥3 pulses per burst were required to reliably reduce formalin induced nociceptive responses in mice. Periodicity of IntraBI was also suggested to contribute to anti-nociception to a limited extent. PMID:23950787

  12. Assessment of antinociceptive, antipyretic and antimicrobial activity of Piper cubeba L. essential oil in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothana, Ramzi; Alsaid, Mansour; Khaled, Jamal M; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Alatar, Abdulrahman; Raish, Mohammad; Al-Yahya, Mohammed; Rafatullah, Syed; Parvez, Mohammad Khalid; Ahamad, Syed Rizwan

    2016-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the possible antiniciceptive, antipyretic and antimicrobial activities of the essential oil obtained from the fruits of Piper Cubeba (L.). To assess the antinociceptive and antipyretic activities, three doses (150, 300 and 600 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested in acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, tail flick reaction and hot-plate and Brewer's yeast-induced hyperpyrexia test models in animals. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity was examined using agar diffusion method and broth micro-dilution assay for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). The Piper Cubeba essential oil (PCEO) showed a marked antinociception (17, 30 and 54%) and an increase in reaction time in mice in the flick tailed and hot-plate tests. The brewer's yeast induced hyperpyrexia was decreased in a dose dependent manner. PCEO also exhibited a strong antimicrobial potential. These findings confirm the traditional analgesic indications of P. cubeba oil and provide persuasive evidence and support its use in Arab traditional medicine.

  13. Peripheral antinociception and anti-inflammatory effects of sulphated polysaccharides from the alga Caulerpa mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, José Gerardo; Rodrigues, José Ariévilo Gurgel; de Sousa Oliveira Vanderlei, Edfranck; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Quinderé, Ana Luíza Gomes; Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; de Araújo, Ianna Wivianne Fernandes; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2014-10-01

    Sulphated polysaccharides from marine algae are widely used in biotechnological and pharmaceutical areas. In this study, we evaluated the effects of sulphated polysaccharides from the green marine alga Caulerpa mexicana (Cm-SPs) in nociceptive and inflammatory models in rodents. Cm-SPs (10 or 20 mg/kg), administered i.v. in Swiss mice, significantly reduced nociceptive responses, as measured by the number of writhes in response to acetic acid. Cm-SPs (10 or 20 mg/kg) also reduced second-phase responses in the formalin test, but did not exhibit a significant antinociceptive effect in the hot plate test, suggesting that its antinociceptive action occurs through a peripheral mechanism. Cm-SPs (5, 10 or 20 mg/kg), administered s.c. in wistar rats 1 hr before carrageenan, dextran, histamine or serotonin, were tested in paw oedema models. Cm-SPs (10 or 20 mg/kg) reduced carrageenan-induced paw oedema and myeloperoxidase activity in the paw. In addition, Cm-SPs (20 mg/kg) inhibited dextran- or histamine-induced paw oedema, but not serotonin-induced oedema, suggesting that histamine is the major target of Cm-SPs anti-oedematogenic activity. Finally, Cm-SPs (20 mg/kg) administered in mice did not show significant signs of toxicity. In conclusion, Cm-SPs appear to be promising natural modulatory agents for pain and inflammatory conditions. © 2014 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  14. Evaluation of anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities of Artemisia scoparia hydromethanolic extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Muheet; Waheed, Ishrat

    2013-01-09

    Artemisia scoparia (redstem wormwood) locally known as jhahoo or jaukay, is traditionally used in pain, inflammation and febrile conditions. So far, little or no scientific work has been reported to validate its folk uses in the alleviation of pain, fever and inflammation. The present study was designed to explore the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of the Artemisia scoparia hydromethanolic extract (ASHME), and to validate its traditional use in Asia. This study made use of thermal (hot plate induced) and chemical (acetic acid induced) nociception models in mice. In addition, the mechanism of antinociception in hot plate test was further evaluated in the presence of caffeine (10mg/kg), naloxone (2mg/kg) and monosodium glutamate (1g/kg). While carrageenan induced rat paw edema and yeast induced mouse pyrexia models were used to test the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic activities. Administration of single intraperitoneal doses (400mg/kg and 800 mg/kg) of ASHME significantly reduced the carrageenan induced paw edema in rats (P400mg/kg). These findings suggest that the Artemisia scoparia hydromethanolic extract of ASHME possesses anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic potentials, which support its use, for the said conditions, in traditional medicine and should be further exploited for its use in clinical medicine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Antinociceptive synergistic interaction between Achillea millefolium and Origanum vulgare L. extract encapsulated in liposome in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh-Kiabi, Farshad; Negahdari, Babak

    2017-07-18

    This study aims to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of combined Achillea millefolium and Origanum extract encapsulated in liposome. The effect of Achillea millefolium and Origanum vulgare L. extract, and their liposome-incorporated form was assessed using 3% formalin test in rat. 12 male Wistar rats, 4 in each group, were used in this study, and increasing doses of Achillea millefolium (31.6, 100, 178, and 316 mg/kg) and Origanum vulgare L. extract (5.6, 10, 17.8, and 31.6 mg/kg), and co-administered extract were i.p. administered 10 min before 3% formalin. The mechanisms of action were evaluated for the liposomal encapsulated co-administered extract using N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (3 mg/kg) and naloxone (1 mg/kg). The interaction index and isobolographic analysis revealed a synergistic effect of the extracts. We observed a lower experimental ED30 as compared to the theoretical ED30. Naloxone also reduced the antinociceptive effect of the liposome encapsulated co-administered extract. These data suggest that the Achillea millefolium and Origanum vulgare L. extract encapsulated in liposome gave a synergistic effect.

  16. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Klooshani, Vahid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to examine the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of Urtica dioica leaf extract in animal models. Materials and Methods: Hydroalcoholic extract of the plant leaves was prepared by percolation method. Male Swiss mice (25-35 g) and male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were randomly distributed in control, standard drug, and three experimental groups (n=6 in each group). Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test, and carrageenan-induced paw edema were used to assess the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. Results: The extract dose-dependently reduced acetic acid-induced abdominal twitches. In formalin test, the extract at any of applied doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg) could not suppress the licking behavior of first phase while doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the second phase of formalin test. In carrageenan test, the extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg significantly inhibited the paw edema by 26%. Conclusion: The results confirm the folkloric use of the plant extract in painful and inflammatory conditions. Further studies are needed to characterize the active constituents and the mechanism of action of the plant extract. PMID:25050274

  17. Additive antinociceptive effects of a combination of vitamin C and vitamin E after peripheral nerve injury.

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    Ruirui Lu

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS contributes to the development of exaggerated pain hypersensitivity during persistent pain. In the present study, we investigated the antinociceptive efficacy of the antioxidants vitamin C and vitamin E in mouse models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We show that systemic administration of a combination of vitamins C and E inhibited the early behavioral responses to formalin injection and the neuropathic pain behavior after peripheral nerve injury, but not the inflammatory pain behavior induced by Complete Freund's Adjuvant. In contrast, vitamin C or vitamin E given alone failed to affect the nociceptive behavior in all tested models. The attenuated neuropathic pain behavior induced by the vitamin C and E combination was paralleled by a reduced p38 phosphorylation in the spinal cord and in dorsal root ganglia, and was also observed after intrathecal injection of the vitamins. Moreover, the vitamin C and E combination ameliorated the allodynia induced by an intrathecally delivered ROS donor. Our results suggest that administration of vitamins C and E in combination may exert synergistic antinociceptive effects, and further indicate that ROS essentially contribute to nociceptive processing in special pain states.

  18. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Activity of Ruthenium Complexes with Isonicotinic and Nicotinic Acids (Niacin) as Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cristina S; Roveda, Antonio C; Truzzi, Daniela R; Garcia, André C; Cunha, Thiago M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Franco, Douglas W

    2015-06-11

    This work evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of ruthenium(II) complexes trans-[Ru(NO(+))(NH3)4(L)](BF4)3 and [Ru(NH3)5(L)](BF4)3 containing the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs nicotinic acid (Hnic) and its isomer isonicotinic acid (ina) as ligands (L). The anti-nociceptive potential of these complexes and the free ligands (noncoordinated to ruthenium) was tested in different models with doses ranging from 1 to 100 μmol/kg. The ligands themselves were inactive; however, the ruthenium complexes containing Hnic and ina inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia induced by prostaglandin E2, carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia, and antigen-induced arthritis. Moreover, the ruthenium complexes inhibited overt nociception induced by formalin, acetic acid, capsaicin, and cinnamaldehyde. The mechanism involved in the anti-nociceptive effects of the ruthenium complexes suggested that ATP-sensitive K(+) channel pathways were not involved because glibenclamide did not affect their anti-nociceptive activities. However, the anti-nociceptive effect appears to be a consequence of the reduction in neutrophil migration and inhibition of the protein kinase C pathway.

  19. Anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of methanolic leaf extract of Indigofera cassioides Rottl. Ex. DC.

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    Raju Senthil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All the results obtained revealed that the extract MEIC showed potent anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activity against all the tested models and the results obtained were comparable with the standards used. The activity of the extract may be due to the presence of terpenoids, flavonoids and other phytochemicals.

  20. From selective to highly selective SSRIs: a comparison of the antinociceptive properties of fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram and escitalopram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Shaul; Pick, Chaim G

    2006-08-01

    Most Serotonin Selective Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) have been found to possess secondary binding properties, while citalopram and its S-enantiomer (escitalopram) have been reconfirmed "purest SSRIs". Using the mouse model of acute pain hotplate analgesia meter, we evaluated the antinociceptive properties of fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram and escitalopram, injected i.p. Fluvoxamine induced a dose-dependent clear antinociceptive effect (with an ED(50) value of 6.4 mg/kg). Both fluoxetine and citalopram induced (separately) only a weak antinociceptive effect with an inverse "U" shape curve. All three drug's effects were not abolished by naloxone. Escitalopram did not elicit any effect at quasi-equipotent doses. These findings show that fluoxetine, fluvoxamine and citalopram given i.p. are weak antinociceptors, (not mediated through opioid mechanisms), while escitalopram possesses no antinociceptive properties when injected i.p. This difference between citalopram and escitalopram calls for further studies in order to assess the various differences between the two enantiomers of citalopram, and between each enantiomer and the racemic mixture.

  1. Bioassay-guided evaluation of antinociceptive properties and chemical variability of the essential oil of Hyptis fruticosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Clóvis R P; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Guimarães, Adriana G; Andrade, Daniela M; Jesus, Hugo C R; Alves, Péricles B; Bannet, Leonard Edward; Patrus, Ana Helena; Azevedo, Eduardo G; Queiroz, Dinalva B; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Botelho, Marco Antonio

    2011-11-01

    The composition of three samples of essential oil (EO) extracted from the leaves and flowers of Hyptis fruticosa (Lamiaceae) were investigated by GC/MS and GC-FID. The variability of the constituents and biological activity were evaluated in the oil samples. Acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions and formalin-induced pain tests in mice were used for screening the antinociceptive activity. The possible antagonism of the essential oils or morphine (MOR) antinociceptive effects by pretreatment with naloxone, showed no influence on the antinociceptive action of the oils in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. All examined oil samples presented antinociceptive activity. The oil sample obtained from the leaves collected during the vegetative growth stage, near São Cristóvão at Sítio Tujubeba exhibited the highest effect. The same oil sample had a main percentage of 1,8-cineole (18.70%). Nevertheless, the oil obtained from flowers collected at the same location, showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) in the response intensity in the first phase of paw licking (100 mg/kg) possibly due to the higher contents of α-pinene (20.51%) and β-pinene (13.64%). The results provide evidence for the use of H. fruticosa by traditional medicine practitioners in the management of pain. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of Sterculia striata A. St.-Hil. & Naudin (Malvaceae) in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Francilene V; Oliveira, Irisdalva S; Figueiredo, Kayo A; Júnior, Francisco B Melo; Costa, Danielly A; Chaves, Mariana H; Amaral, Maurício P M; Almeida, Fernanda R C; Oliveira, Francisco A; Oliveira, Rita C M

    2014-06-01

    The present work reports the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the ethanol extract obtained from the stem bark of Sterculia striata A. St.-Hil. & Naudin (Ss-EtOH) in the experimental models of edema induced by carrageenan, dextran, or histamin and nociception induced by chemical stimuli, such as acetic acid, formalin, capsaicin, or glutamate. The Ss-EtOH (50 mg/kg) promoted a marked inhibition on the hind paw edema induced by carrageenan or dextran (30% and 73%, respectively). Besides, Ss-EtOH (25 mg/kg) exhibited a slight activity (30%) on the hind paw edema induced by histamin. The Ss-EtOH (12.5 and 25 mg/kg) showed the antinociceptive activity on chemical stimuli induced by acetic acid (65.59% and 38.37%, respectively), formalin, in the initial (35.08% and 31.5%, respectively) and late phases (44.09% and 83.57%, respectively), capsaicin (43.77% and 51.31%, respectively), or glutamate (36.6% and 52.12%, respectively). Regarding the possible mechanism involved in the antinociceptive effect, Ss-EtOH (12.5 mg/kg) showed a decrease in the antinociceptive effect (65.8%) in the acetic acid model after pretreatment with naloxone. Thus, opioid mechanisms might be underlying this response.

  3. BU08073 a buprenorphine analogue with partial agonist activity at μ-receptors in vitro but long-lasting opioid antagonist activity in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khroyan, T V; Wu, J; Polgar, W E; Cami-Kobeci, G; Fotaki, N; Husbands, S M; Toll, L

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a potent analgesic with high affinity at μ, δ and κ and moderate affinity at nociceptin opioid (NOP) receptors. Nevertheless, NOP receptor activation modulates the in vivo activity of buprenorphine. Structure activity studies were conducted to design buprenorphine analogues with high affinity at each of these receptors and to characterize them in in vitro and in vivo assays. Compounds were tested for binding affinity and functional activity using [(35) S]GTPγS binding at each receptor and a whole-cell fluorescent assay at μ receptors. BU08073 was evaluated for antinociceptive agonist and antagonist activity and for its effects on anxiety in mice. BU08073 bound with high affinity to all opioid receptors. It had virtually no efficacy at δ, κ and NOP receptors, whereas at μ receptors, BU08073 has similar efficacy as buprenorphine in both functional assays. Alone, BU08073 has anxiogenic activity and produces very little antinociception. However, BU08073 blocks morphine and U50,488-mediated antinociception. This blockade was not evident at 1 h post-treatment, but is present at 6 h and remains for up to 3-6 days. These studies provide structural requirements for synthesis of 'universal' opioid ligands. BU08073 had high affinity for all the opioid receptors, with moderate efficacy at μ receptors and reduced efficacy at NOP receptors, a profile suggesting potential analgesic activity. However, in vivo, BU08073 had long-lasting antagonist activity, indicating that its pharmacokinetics determined both the time course of its effects and what receptor-mediated effects were observed. This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Antinociceptive Effect of Rat D-Serine Racemase Inhibitors, L-Serine-O-Sulfate, and L-Erythro-3-Hydroxyaspartate in an Arthritic Pain Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Laurido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAr activation requires the presence of D-serine, synthesized from L-serine by a pyridoxal 5′-phosphate-dependent serine racemase (SR. D-serine levels can be lowered by inhibiting the racemization of L-serine. L-serine-O-sulfate (LSOS and L-erythro-3-hydroxyaspartate (LEHA, among others, have proven to be effective in reducing the D-serine levels in culture cells. It is tempting then to try these compounds in their effectiveness to decrease nociceptive levels in rat arthritic pain. We measured the C-reflex paradigm and wind-up potentiation in the presence of intrathecally injected LSOS (100 μg/10 μL and LEHA (100 μg/10 μL in normal and monoarthritic rats. Both compounds decreased the wind-up activity in normal and monoarthritic rats. Accordingly, all the antinociceptive effects were abolished when 300 μg/10 μL of D-serine were injected intrathecally. Since no in vivo results have been presented so far, this constitutes the first evidence that SR inhibitions lower the D-serine levels, thus decreasing the NMDAr activity and the consequent development and maintenance of chronic pain.

  5. Structure of the agonist-bound neurotensin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jim F; Noinaj, Nicholas; Shibata, Yoko; Love, James; Kloss, Brian; Xu, Feng; Gvozdenovic-Jeremic, Jelena; Shah, Priyanka; Shiloach, Joseph; Tate, Christopher G; Grisshammer, Reinhard

    2012-10-25

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13-amino-acid peptide that functions as both a neurotransmitter and a hormone through the activation of the neurotensin receptor NTSR1, a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In the brain, NTS modulates the activity of dopaminergic systems, opioid-independent analgesia, and the inhibition of food intake; in the gut, NTS regulates a range of digestive processes. Here we present the structure at 2.8 Å resolution of Rattus norvegicus NTSR1 in an active-like state, bound to NTS(8-13), the carboxy-terminal portion of NTS responsible for agonist-induced activation of the receptor. The peptide agonist binds to NTSR1 in an extended conformation nearly perpendicular to the membrane plane, with the C terminus oriented towards the receptor core. Our findings provide, to our knowledge, the first insight into the binding mode of a peptide agonist to a GPCR and may support the development of non-peptide ligands that could be useful in the treatment of neurological disorders, cancer and obesity.

  6. Anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the Agastache mexicana extracts by using several experimental models in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramírez, Adriana; González-Trujano, María Eva; Pellicer, Francisco; López-Muñoz Francisco, J

    2012-08-01

    Agastache mexicana is a plant that has long been used in large demand in Mexican folk medicine to treat pain, among others affections. Nevertheless, no scientific data confirming its use have been reported. The aim of this investigation was to examine the spectrum of antinociceptive activity of A. mexicana by using different experimental models of nociception in rodents. Nociceptive activity was induced 30 min post treatment of different doses of hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts from A. mexicana aerial parts. The writhing test in mice, and the formalin and plantar tests as well as the pain-induced functional impairment assay in rats (PIFIR model) were the experimental nociceptive models used. Antinociceptive response of the organic extracts was compared to that observed with the analgesic drug tramadol. A. mexicana organic extracts produced a dose-dependent and significant inhibition of the abdominal constrictions caused by 1% acetic acid injection (i.p.) in mice. A maximal antinociceptive effectiveness obtained with tramadol was also observed with the administration of hexane and ethyl acetate extracts in comparison to less effectiveness obtained with the methanol extract. At the same range of doses, A. mexicana organic extracts inhibited the behavioral responses in both phases of the formalin pain test, in which a more intense effect was observed in the inflammatory phase than in the neurogenic stage. With regard to the plantar test and PIFIR model, a significant but not dose-dependent antinociceptive response was observed at specific doses that depended on the organic extract evaluated. The antinociceptive activity of A. mexicana aerial parts depends on the intensity of the painful stimulus induced and involves different kinds of constituents. Our present results reinforce the use of this species in traditional medicine and its utility for pain treatment mainly associated with inflammation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nootropic α7 nicotinic receptor allosteric modulator derived from GABAA receptor modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Herman J.; Whittemore, Edward R.; Tran, Minhtam B.; Hogenkamp, Derk J.; Broide, Ron S.; Johnstone, Timothy B.; Zheng, Lijun; Stevens, Karen E.; Gee, Kelvin W.

    2007-01-01

    Activation of brain α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7 nAChRs) has broad therapeutic potential in CNS diseases related to cognitive dysfunction, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. In contrast to direct agonist activation, positive allosteric modulation of α7 nAChRs would deliver the clinically validated benefits of allosterism to these indications. We have generated a selective α7 nAChR-positive allosteric modulator (PAM) from a library of GABAA receptor PAMs. Compound 6 (N-(4-chlorophenyl)-α-[[(4-chloro-phenyl)amino]methylene]-3-methyl-5-isoxazoleacet-amide) evokes robust positive modulation of agonist-induced currents at α7 nAChRs, while preserving the rapid native characteristics of desensitization, and has little to no efficacy at other ligand-gated ion channels. In rodent models, it corrects sensory-gating deficits and improves working memory, effects consistent with cognitive enhancement. Compound 6 represents a chemotype for allosteric activation of α7 nAChRs, with therapeutic potential in CNS diseases with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:17470817

  8. The Methanolic Extract fromMurraya koenigiiL. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin Ani, Nushrat; Chakraborty, Sudip; Moniruzzaman, Md

    2016-01-01

    Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant's leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK) leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly ( p koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine.

  9. The Methanolic Extract from Murraya koenigii L. Inhibits Glutamate-Induced Pain and Involves ATP-Sensitive K+ Channel as Antinociceptive Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin Ani, Nushrat; Chakraborty, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Murraya koenigii L. is a perennial shrub, belonging to the family Rutaceae. Traditionally, the leaves of this plant are extensively used in treatment of a wide range of diseases and disorders including pain and inflammation. Although researchers have revealed the antinociceptive effects of this plant's leaves during past few years, the mechanisms underlying these effects are still unknown. Therefore, the present study evaluated some antinociceptive mechanisms of the methanolic extract of M. koenigii (MEMK) leaves along with its antinociceptive potential using several animal models. The antinociceptive effects of MEMK were evaluated using formalin-induced licking and acetic acid-induced writhing tests at the doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg. In addition, we also justified the possible participations of glutamatergic system and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the observed activities. Our results demonstrated that MEMK significantly (p koenigii leaves and provide scientific basis of their analgesic uses in the traditional medicine. PMID:27812367

  10. Comparisons of Electroencephalographically Derived Measures of Hypnosis and Antinociception in Response to Standardized Stimuli During Target-Controlled Propofol-Remifentanil Anesthesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoushtarian, Mehrnaz; Sahinovic, Marko M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Kalmar, Alain F.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Liley, David T. J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    BACKGROUND: Current electroencephalogram (EEG)-derived measures provide information on cortical activity and hypnosis but are less accurate regarding subcortical activity, which is expected to vary with the degree of antinociception. Recently, the neurophysiologically based EEG measures of cortical

  11. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nóbrega Neto, Pedro I; Luna, Stelio P L; Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Mama, Khursheed R; Steffey, Eugene P; Carregaro, Adriano B

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index...

  12. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Crude Methanolic Extract of Red Alga Bryothamnion triquetrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcante-Silva, Luiz Henrique Agra; da Matta, Carolina Barbosa Brito; de Araújo, Morgana Vital; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; de Lira, Daysianne Pereira; de Oliveira Santos, Bárbara Viviana; de Miranda, George Emmanuel C.; Alexandre-Moreira, Magna Suzana

    2012-01-01

    The marine environment is an extraordinary reservoir of bioactive natural products, many of which exhibit chemical and structural features not found in terrestrial natural products. In this regard, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a crude methanolic extract of the red alga Bryothamnion triquetrum (BT-MeOH) in murine models. Groups of Swiss mice of both sexes (25–30 g) were used throughout the experiments. The potential antinociceptive of BT-MeOH was evaluated by means of the following tests: acetic acid-induced writhing, hot-plate test and glutamate- and formalin-induced nociception. The anti-inflammatory activity of BT-MeOH was investigated using the zymosan A-induced peritonitis test. The tests were conducted using 100 mg/kg (p.o.) BT-MeOH, 33.3 mg/kg (p.o.) dipyrone, 35.7 mg/kg (p.o.) indomethacin and 5.7 mg/kg (s.c.) morphine. The extract and all standard drugs were administered 40 min before the nociceptive/inflammatory stimulus. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, BT-MeOH and dipyrone inhibited the nociceptive response by 55.9% (22.2 ± 2.0 writhings; p < 0.01) and 80.9% (9.6 ± 2.1 writhings; p < 0.01). In the hot-plate test, BT-MeOH did not increase the latency time of the animals in the time evaluated. In addition, BT-MeOH inhibited glutamate-induced nociception by 50.1%. While BT-MeOH did not inhibit the neurogenic phase in formalin-induced nociception, the inflammatory phase was inhibited by 53.1% (66.8 ± 14.2 s; p < 0.01). Indomethacin inhibited the inflammatory phase by 60.2% (56.8 ± 8.7 s; p < 0.01). In the zymosan-induced peritonitis test, BT-MeOH inhibited 55.6% (6.6 ± 0.2 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01) of leukocyte migration, while indomethacin inhibited 78.1% (3.2 ± 0.1 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01). Based on the results obtained in this study, we conclude that BT-MeOH has peripheral antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, more studies need

  13. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Crude Methanolic Extract of Red Alga Bryothamnion triquetrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Agra Cavalcante-Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The marine environment is an extraordinary reservoir of bioactive natural products, many of which exhibit chemical and structural features not found in terrestrial natural products. In this regard, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of a crude methanolic extract of the red alga Bryothamnion triquetrum (BT-MeOH in murine models. Groups of Swiss mice of both sexes (25–30 g were used throughout the experiments. The potential antinociceptive of BT-MeOH was evaluated by means of the following tests: acetic acid-induced writhing, hot-plate test and glutamate- and formalin-induced nociception. The anti-inflammatory activity of BT-MeOH was investigated using the zymosan A-induced peritonitis test. The tests were conducted using 100 mg/kg (p.o. BT-MeOH, 33.3 mg/kg (p.o. dipyrone, 35.7 mg/kg (p.o. indomethacin and 5.7 mg/kg (s.c. morphine. The extract and all standard drugs were administered 40 min before the nociceptive/inflammatory stimulus. In the acetic acid-induced writhing test, BT-MeOH and dipyrone inhibited the nociceptive response by 55.9% (22.2 ± 2.0 writhings; p < 0.01 and 80.9% (9.6 ± 2.1 writhings; p < 0.01. In the hot-plate test, BT-MeOH did not increase the latency time of the animals in the time evaluated. In addition, BT-MeOH inhibited glutamate-induced nociception by 50.1%. While BT-MeOH did not inhibit the neurogenic phase in formalin-induced nociception, the inflammatory phase was inhibited by 53.1% (66.8 ± 14.2 s; p < 0.01. Indomethacin inhibited the inflammatory phase by 60.2% (56.8 ± 8.7 s; p < 0.01. In the zymosan-induced peritonitis test, BT-MeOH inhibited 55.6% (6.6 ± 0.2 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01 of leukocyte migration, while indomethacin inhibited 78.1% (3.2 ± 0.1 × 106 leukocytes/mL; p < 0.01. Based on the results obtained in this study, we conclude that BT-MeOH has peripheral antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities. However, more

  14. The Antinociceptive Effects of Tualang Honey in Male Sprague-Dawley Rats: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Badariah Abd Aziz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tualang honey (蜂蜜 Fēng Mì is known to have anti-inflammatory property, but its antinociceptive property has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we examined the preemptive effects on administering different doses of Tualang honey and prednisolone on the nociceptive response in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Thirty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into five groups (n=7 and each group received either distilled water, Tualang honey (0.2, 1.2 or 2.4 g/kg or prednisolone (10 mg/kg for 10 days. The response to noxious thermal stimulus was assessed using tail flick test on Day 10. The well-being of the rats was also assessed by monitoring their food intake and body weight. Data were analyzed using one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA with post-hoc Scheffe's test and P value less than 0.05 was considered significant. In tail flick test, the tail flick latency time was significantly higher in the groups that received 1.2 g/kg and 2.4 g/kg of Tualang honey and 10 mg/kg of prednisolone, compared to the control group (P<0.05. There was significant reduction in the total food pellet intake in the groups receiving prednisolone and Tualang honey (1.2 g/kg and 2.4 g/kg compared to controls; however, the body weight gain was only significantly reduced in the prednisolone group. All the parameters were not significantly affected in the group receiving 0.2 g/kg of Tualang honey. In conclusion, preemptive administration of Tualang honey (1.2 g/kg and 2.4 g/kg and prednisolone (10 mg/kg had reduced the pain responses. The reduced weight gain in the prednisolone group is an unwanted effect due to its metabolic and central actions. Further studies are required to confirm the antinociceptive effects and elucidate the mechanism of antinociceptive action of Tualang honey in the rats.

  15. Delivery System For Mefenamic Acid Based On The Nanocarrier Layered Double Hydroxide: Physicochemical Characterization And Evaluation Of Anti-inflammatory And Antinociceptive Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha; Vanessa R. R.; Guilherme; Viviane A.; de Paula; Eneida; de Araujo; Daniele R.; Silva; Renan O.; Medeiros; Jand V. R.; Leite; Jose R. S. A.; Petersen; Philippe A. D.; Foldvari; Marianna; Petrilli; Helena M.; Constantino; Vera R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The anionic form of the drug mefenamic acid intercalated into the nanocarrier layered double hydroxide (LDH-Mef) was evaluated by anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive assays. Methods: The LDH-Mef material was characterized by a set of physicochemical techniques, which was supported by Density Functional Theory calculations. The pharmacological effects of LDH-Mef (40 wt% of drug) were evaluated by hemolytic, anti-inflammatory activity and antinociceptive assays. Results: In vivo assa...

  16. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of antinociceptive activity of novel isoxazolyl-aryl-hydrazones; Sintese e avaliacao preliminar de atividade antinociceptiva de novas isoxazolil-aril-hidrazonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Silvio Leandro Goncalves Bomfim; Almeida, Valderes Moraes de; Almeida, Gleybson Correia de; Boaviagem, Karinna Moura; Mendes, Charles Christophe du Barriere; Faria, Antonio Rodolfo de, E-mail: rodolfo@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Goes, Alexandre Jose da Silva; Magalhaes, Laudelina Rodrigues; Silva, Teresinha Goncalves da [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Antibioticos

    2011-07-01

    New 2-isoxazoline aldehydes were synthesized, in good yields, from cycloadduct of the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction between endocyclic enecarbamate and carboethoxyformonitrile oxide (CEFNO). Condensation of these 2-isoxazoline aldehydes with several phenyl-hydrazines produced new isoxazolyl-aryl-hydrazones, which showed low toxicity and excellent antinociceptive activity, when compared to dipyrone. The antinociceptive activity of isoxazolyl-aryl-hydrazones was performed using the acetic acid-induced mice abdominal constrictions test. (author)

  17. Early single Aspirin-triggered Lipoxin blocked morphine anti-nociception tolerance through inhibiting NALP1 inflammasome: Involvement of PI3k/Akt signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Liu, Ming; Mao-Ying, Qi-Liang; Liu, Huan; Wang, Zhi-Fu; Zhang, Meng-Ting; Wang, Jun; Li, Qian; Liu, Shen-Bin; Mi, Wen-Li; Ma, Hong-Jian; Wu, Gen-Cheng; Wang, Yan-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Clinical usage of opioids in pain relief is dampened by analgesic tolerance after chronic exposure, which is related to opioid-associated neuroinflammation. In the current study, which is based on a chronic morphine tolerance rat model and sustained morphine treatment on primary neuron culture, it was observed that Akt phosphorylation, cleaved-Caspase-1-dependent NALP1 inflammasome activation and IL-1β maturation in spinal cord neurons were significantly enhanced by morphine. Moreover, treatment with LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3k/Akt signaling, significantly reduced Caspase-1 cleavage, NALP1 inflammasome activation and attenuated morphine tolerance. Tail-flick tests demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition on Caspase-1 activation or antagonizing IL-1β dramatically blocked the development of morphine tolerance. The administration of an exogenous analogue of lipoxin, Aspirin-triggered Lipoxin (ATL), caused a decline in Caspase-1 cleavage, inflammasome activation and mature IL-1β production and thus attenuated the development of morphine tolerance by inhibiting upstream Akt phosphorylation. Additionally, treatment with DAMGO, a selective μ-opioid receptor peptide, significantly induced Akt phosphorylation, Caspase-1 cleavage and anti-nociception tolerance, all of which were attenuated by ATL treatment. Taken together, the present study revealed the involvement of spinal NALP1 inflammasome activation in the development of morphine tolerance and the role of the μ-receptor/PI3k-Akt signaling/NALP1 inflammasome cascade in this process. By inhibiting this signaling cascade, ATL blocked the development of morphine tolerance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroactive Steroids: Receptor Interactions and Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kald Beshir Tuem

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuroactive steroids (NASs are naturally occurring steroids, which are synthesized centrally as de novo from cholesterol and are classified as pregnane, androstane, and sulfated neurosteroids (NSs. NASs modulate many processes via interacting with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, N-methyl-d-aspartate, serotonin, voltage-gated calcium channels, voltage-dependent anion channels, α-adrenoreceptors, X-receptors of the liver, transient receptor potential channels, microtubule-associated protein 2, neurotrophin nerve growth factor, and σ1 receptors. Among these, NSs (especially allopregnanolone have high potency and extensive GABA-A receptors and hence demonstrate anticonvulsant, anesthetic, central cytoprotectant, and baroreflex inhibitory effects. NSs are also involved in mood and learning via serotonin and anti-nociceptive activity via T-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Moreover, they are modulators of mitochondrial function, synaptic plasticity, or regulators of apoptosis, which have a role in neuroprotective via voltage-dependent anion channels receptors. For proper functioning, NASs need to be in their normal level, whereas excess and deficiency may lead to abnormalities. When they are below the normal, NSs could have a part in development of depression, neuro-inflammation, multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalitis, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. On the other hand, stress and attention deficit disorder could occur during excessive level. Overall, NASs are very important molecules with major neuropsychiatric activity.

  19. Multivariate analysis in the evaluation of the antinociceptive activity of irradiated essential oil of nutmeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Marcelo C.; Lima, Keila S.C.; Oliveira, Sergio E.M.; Lima, Antonio L.S., E-mail: marcelocdossantos@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Jose C.C., E-mail: pinto@peq.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao do Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Otniel F., E-mail: otniel.freitas@embrapa.br [Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (EMBRAPA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Used in spices and for medicinal purposes, nutmeg is the seed of the nutmeg tree, Myristica Fragans Houttyn. This species is reported to contain 25-30% fixed oils, 5-15% volatile oils and several chemical substances. Among these substances, there are isosafrole, the elemicida and myristicin, known to be hallucinogenic and toxic, when in large quantities. Irradiation is a technique that consists in submitting products to ionizing radiation, in order to get technological improvements. In this context, the process of gamma radiation was used to investigate its effects on the antinociceptive activity of the nutmeg essential oil. Employing low doses of radiation, the objective was to verify possible changes in this activity, by performing in vivo tests. In this work the essential oil was analyzed by GC-GC/MS using the MDGC technique. The essential oil extraction was carried out by steam distillation, using the modified Clevenger apparatus. The samples were irradiated in a research irradiator with cesium-137 source, at doses of 1.0, 3.0 and 5.0 kGy, with dose rate 1.8 kGy / h. The Shimadzu MDGC system consisted of two GC-2010 gas chromatographs (defined as GC 1 and GC 2), an MS-QP2010 quadrupole mass spectrometer. The MDGC transfer device, located in GC 1, is connected to an advanced pressure control (APC) unit which supplies carrier gas (He), at constant pressure. In the first GC it was used an HP-FFAP 25m x 0,20 mm i.d. x 0,33μm (Agilent) and in the second GC a Rtx-5MS 30m x 0,25mm i.d. x 0,25μm (Restek) as columns. Mass Ion source: 250 deg C; interface temp: 250 deg C, interval scan: 40-400 m/z; scan speed: 2000 amu/s. The in vivo tests were performed using injection of an acetic acid solution 0,6%. Five minutes after the stimulus the counting was initiated, continuing for the subsequent 10 minutes. Thirty-five substances were identified in the extracted essential oil. After induction of pain in mice by injection of acetic acid, the antinociceptive effects of a

  20. Spasmolytic and antinociceptive activities of ursolic acid and acacetin identified in Agastache mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Trujano, María Eva; Ventura-Martínez, Rosa; Chávez, Marco; Díaz-Reval, Irene; Pellicer, Francisco

    2012-05-01

    Agastache mexicana is a plant in high demand that has long been used in Mexican folk medicine to treat anxiety, insomnia, and stomachache, among other afflictions. Ursolic acid and acacetin were isolated and identified as two possible active compounds of A. mexicana aerial parts. An antinociceptive response was demonstrated in a significant and dose-dependent manner with ursolic acid and acacetin (i. p. and p. o.) in comparison to the analgesic diclofenac by using the writhing test in mice. Moreover, acacetin also produced a significant concentration-dependent spasmolytic response with major efficacy compared to ursolic acid and papaverine by using rings from the isolated guinea pig ileum. These results provide evidence of the presence of two active constituents of Agastache mexicana reinforcing its utility as a therapy for visceral pain as used in traditional medicine. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Synthesis and antinociceptive behaviors of new methyl and hydroxyl derivatives of phencyclidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A; Kermani, M; Naderi, N; Hajikhani, R; Rezaee, N M; Javadi, M; Niknafs, B N

    2012-01-01

    Phencyclidine (I) and its derivatives show such pharmacological behaviors as analgesic, anticonsulvant, anti-anxiety and antidepressant, while interacting with central nervous system. In this study, new methyl and hydroxyl derivatives of PCP were synthesized and their antinociceptive behaviors in animals were examined by measuring the number of writhing in a writhing test of visceral pain and the pain scores in Formalin test. Compared to control and PCP groups, findings in experimental groups indicated the new synthesized analogues (compounds II, III and V, 10 mg/kg) of PCP were able to produce more analgesic effects in formalin and writhing tests, especially for compound V. It was concluded that the new synthesized derivatives of PCP could substantially and respectively diminish acute and chronic pains.

  2. Topical ketorolac has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in human thermal injury. Twelve healthy unmedicated volunteers had identical burn injuries produced on the medial side of both calves with a 49 degrees C 15 x 25 mm thermode....... and MPDT, an increase in EI and development of mechanical hyperalgesia (P nociceptive or inflammatory variables studies (P > 0.2)........ Ketorolac gel or placebo were randomly applied on the right or left calf 1.5 h before burn injury, immediately after burn injury and 6 and 12 h later in a double-blind trial where every subject served as his own control. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), head pain tolerance (HPT), mechanical pain...

  3. Synthesis and antinociception activity of new substituted phenothiazines and ethylenediamines as antihistaminic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, A; Naderi, N; Souri, M; Shirkavand, F; Nahri-Niknafs, B

    2014-11-01

    Antihistamines play an important role in medicine when it comes to relieving seasonal or non-seasonal rhinitis, the common cold, and itching. They have also shown many various combinations of pharmacological properties such as anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. Phenothiazines and ethylenediamines are 2 important classes of antihistamines with analgesic activities in addition to other pharmacological effects. In this study, some new derivatives of these compounds (V-IX) were synthesized and their antinociceptive behaviors were examined by pharmacological tests. The results indicated that new analogue with methyl groups produced a better analgesic activity than chlorine atoms but less than III (without any substitutions) in ethylenediamine class. Also in phenothiazine class, adding pyrimidine and pyridine substituted showed the better analgesic activity compared to other groups. Moreover, the analgesic activities proved that dimethylamine is the best group in amino alkyl side chain of these molecules relative to the substituted piperazines in new analogues. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. NK-3 receptor activation depolarizes and induces an after-depolarization in pyramidal neurons in gerbil cingulate cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2004-01-01

    M), a selective NK3 receptor agonist, induced a transient increase in spontaneous EPSPs in layer V pyramidal neurons, accompanied by a small depolarization ( approximately 4 mV). EPSPs during senktide had a larger amplitude and faster 10-90% rise time than during control. Senktide induced a transient...... depolarization in layer II/III pyramidal neurons, which often reached threshold for spikes. The depolarization ( approximately 6 mV) persisted in TTX, and was accompanied by an increase in input resistance. Senktide also transiently induced a slow after-depolarization, which appeared following a depolarizing...... pulse. The slow after-depolarization persisted in TTX. These data suggest that activation of NK3 receptors on layer II/III pyramidal neurons induce post-synaptic depolarization and an after-depolarization, which could be mediated by blockade of a leak potassium conductance and a non-selective cation...

  5. Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulate matrix metalloproteinase 1-dependent invasion of human colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raufman, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jraufman@medicine.umaryland.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cheng, Kunrong; Saxena, Neeraj; Chahdi, Ahmed; Belo, Angelica; Khurana, Sandeep; Xie, Guofeng [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscarinic receptor agonists stimulated robust human colon cancer cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-matrix metalloproteinase1 antibody pre-treatment blocks cell invasion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acids stimulate MMP1 expression, cell migration and MMP1-dependent invasion. -- Abstract: Mammalian matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which degrade extracellular matrix facilitate colon cancer cell invasion into the bloodstream and extra-colonic tissues; in particular, MMP1 expression correlates strongly with advanced colon cancer stage, hematogenous metastasis and poor prognosis. Likewise, muscarinic receptor signaling plays an important role in colon cancer; muscarinic receptors are over-expressed in colon cancer compared to normal colon epithelial cells. Muscarinic receptor activation stimulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human colon cancer cells. In mouse intestinal neoplasia models genetic ablation of muscarinic receptors attenuates carcinogenesis. In the present work, we sought to link these observations by showing that MMP1 expression and activation plays a mechanistic role in muscarinic receptor agonist-induced colon cancer cell invasion. We show that acetylcholine, which robustly increases MMP1 expression, stimulates invasion of HT29 and H508 human colon cancer cells into human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers - this was abolished by pre-incubation with atropine, a non-selective muscarinic receptor inhibitor, and by pre-incubation with anti-MMP1 neutralizing antibody. Similar results were obtained using a Matrigel chamber assay and deoxycholyltaurine (DCT), an amidated dihydroxy bile acid associated with colon neoplasia in animal models and humans, and previously shown to interact functionally with muscarinic receptors. DCT treatment of human colon cancer cells resulted in time-dependent, 10-fold increased MMP1 expression, and DCT-induced cell invasion was also blocked by pre

  6. Preliminary investigation of the thermal antinociceptive effects of codeine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steagall, Paulo V M; Monteiro, Beatriz P; Lavoie, Anne-Marie; Troncy, Eric

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential thermal antinociceptive effects of oral administration of a single dose of codeine in cats compared with positive (buprenorphine) and negative (saline 0.9%) controls. Six adult healthy cats weighing 5.14 ± 0.6 kg were used. Skin temperature and thermal thresholds (TTs) were evaluated using a wireless device (Topcat Metrology) at baseline, 0.5, 1, 3, 6 and 10 h after treatment. In period 1, TTs were evaluated after subcutaneous administration of saline 0.9%. In period 2, cats were administered either oral codeine (10 mg total, 2.0 ± 0.2 mg/kg) or buccal buprenorphine (0.04 mg/kg) in a cross-over, blinded study design. Half of the volume of buprenorphine was administered into each cheek pouch. Δ TT (difference between TTs after and before treatment) was used for data comparison. Mean ± SD data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Dunnett's or Tukey's test when appropriate (P codeine. Buprenorphine increased Δ TT at 3 h (2.7 ± 3.3°C) when compared with baseline or saline (P 47.6°C at any time point in four cats. The mean highest temperature recorded in the two other cats in that group was 54.5 and 52.8°C at 3 h. At the dose administered, codeine did not produce thermal antinociception. Mild increases in TT after buccal buprenorphine might be related to the first-pass effect after drug swallowing, drug spillage during administration and/or individual variability. These factors should be taken in to consideration when administering buprenorphine by this route in the clinical setting. © ISFM and AAFP 2015.

  7. Antinociceptive effects after oral administration of tramadol hydrochloride in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, David; Souza, Marcy J; Braun, Jana M; Cox, Sherry K; Keuler, Nicholas S; Paul-Murphy, Joanne R

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate antinociceptive effects on thermal thresholds after oral administration of tramadol hydrochloride to Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis). Animals-15 healthy adult Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. 2 crossover experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, 15 parrots received 3 treatments (tramadol at 2 doses [10 and 20 mg/kg] and a control suspension) administered orally. In the second experiment, 11 parrots received 2 treatments (tramadol hydrochloride [30 mg/kg] and a control suspension) administered orally. Baseline thermal foot withdrawal threshold was measured 1 hour before drug or control suspension administration; thermal foot withdrawal threshold was measured after administration at 0.5, 1.5, 3, and 6 hours (both experiments) and also at 9 hours (second experiment only). For the first experiment, there were no overall effects of treatment, hour, period, or any interactions. For the second experiment, there was an overall effect of treatment, with a significant difference between tramadol hydrochloride and control suspension (mean change from baseline, 2.00° and -0.09°C, respectively). There also was a significant change from baseline for tramadol hydrochloride at 0.5, 1.5, and 6 hours after administration but not at 3 or 9 hours after administration. Tramadol at a dose of 30 mg/kg, PO, induced thermal antinociception in Hispaniolan Amazon parrots. This dose was necessary for induction of significant and sustained analgesic effects, with duration of action up to 6 hours. Further studies with other types of noxious stimulation, dosages, and intervals are needed to fully evaluate the analgesic effects of tramadol hydrochloride in psittacines.

  8. Tanshinone IIA Exerts an Antinociceptive Effect in Rats with Cancer-induced Bone Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei; Chen, Lei; Wu, Li-Fang; Yang, Fan; Niu, Jian-Xiang; Kaye, Alan D; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a common chronic pain characterized by 2 components, ongoing pain and breakthrough pain. Tanshinone IIA (TSN IIA) is a bioactive constituent of the traditional Chinese medicine Danshen, which has been reported to have an antinociceptive effect on neuropathic and inflammatory pain through downregulation of the late proinflammatory cytokine high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). To assess the antinociceptive effect of TSN IIA on CIBP. A randomized, double-blind, controlled animal trial was performed. University lab in China. A rat CIBP model was established by injecting Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells into the intramedullary cavity of the tibia. Both ongoing pain, e.g., flinching and guarding, and breakthrough pain, e.g., limb use and von Frey threshold, were evaluated. The effects of intraperitoneally administered TSN IIA on pain behavior and the expression levels of spinal HMGB1, interleukin (IL)-1beta, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and IL-6 were determined. The effect of TSN IIA on the electrically evoked response of spinal wide-dynamic range (WDR) neurons was performed in vivo. TSN IIA dose-dependently inhibited cancer-induced ongoing pain and breakthrough pain. The expression levels of spinal HMGB1 and other inflammatory factors (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, and IL-6) were increased in the rat model, but they were suppressed by TSN IIA in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, TSN IIA significantly inhibited the neuronal responses of WDR neurons in spinal deep layers. Further studies are warranted to ascertain how TSN IIA attenuates cancer-induced ongoing pain. Our results indicate that TSN IIA attenuates cancer-induced ongoing pain and breakthrough pain, possibly via suppression of central sensitization in CIBP rats. Therefore, we have provided strong evidence supporting TSN IIA as a potential and effective therapy for relieving CIBP. Cancer-induced bone pain, high-mobility group protein B1, Tanshinone IIA, ongoing pain

  9. Reversal by naloxone of the spinal antinociceptive actions of a systemically-administered NSAID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, J. F.; Headley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endogenous opioids were examined in electrophysiological experiments in alpha-chloralose anaesthetized spinalized rats without or with carrageenan-induced acute inflammation of one hindpaw. Spinal reflex responses, monitored as single motor unit discharges, were elicited by noxious pinch and electrical stimuli. 2. The mu-opioid agonist, fentanyl, was an effective depressant of reflexes under all conditions (ED50 6-14 micrograms kg-1, i.v.). In rats without peripheral inflammation the NSAID, flunixin, a niflumic acid derivative, had only a small effect that was not dose-dependent. However, in animals with unilateral inflammation, flunixin reduced spinal reflexes evoked both by noxious pinch stimuli (that activate peripheral nociceptors; ID50 4 mg kg-1, i.v.) and by electrical stimuli (that bypass nociceptor endings; ID50 6.5- 11 mg kg-1, i.v.), indicating that it has a central site of action at doses comparable to those used clinically. 3. The opioid antagonist, naloxone (1 mg kg-1, i.v.), reversed all actions of fentanyl. It did not reverse the small effects that flunixin had in rats without inflammation, showing that the NSAID is not a direct opioid agonist. In rats with carrageenan-induced inflammation of the hindpaw, however, naloxone fully reversed or prevented the antinociception by flunixin, but not that by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, medetomidine. 4. We conclude that under conditions of peripheral inflammation and the resultant central changes, the NSAID, flunixin, has antinociceptive actions that are mediated by endogenous opioids acting within the spinal cord. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8799570

  10. Antinociceptive Effects of Transcytosed Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A on Trigeminal Nociception in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Jin; Lee, Geun-Woo; Kim, Min-Ji; Yang, Kui-Ye; Kim, Seong-Taek; Bae, Yong-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of peripherally or centrally administered botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT-A) on orofacial inflammatory pain to evaluate the antinociceptive effect of BoNT-A and its underlying mechanisms. The experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly inhibited the formalin-induced nociceptive response in the second phase. Both subcutaneous (1 or 3 U/kg) and intracisternal (0.3 or 1 U/kg) injection of BoNT-A increased the latency of head withdrawal response in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated rats. Intracisternal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evoked nociceptive behavior via the activation of trigeminal neurons, which was attenuated by the subcutaneous or intracisternal injection of BoNT-A. Intracisternal injection of NMDA up-regulated c-Fos expression in the trigeminal neurons of the medullary dorsal horn. Subcutaneous (3 U/kg) or intracisternal (1 U/kg) administration of BoNT-A significantly reduced the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the NMDA-treated rats. These results suggest that the central antinociceptive effects the peripherally or centrally administered BoNT-A are mediated by transcytosed BoNT-A or direct inhibition of trigeminal neurons. Our data suggest that central targets of BoNT-A might provide a new therapeutic tool for the treatment of orofacial chronic pain conditions. PMID:26170739

  11. Interaction of Plant Extracts with Central Nervous System Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Lundstrom

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Plant extracts have been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of various maladies including neurological diseases. Several central nervous system receptors have been demonstrated to interact with plant extracts and components affecting the pharmacology and thereby potentially playing a role in human disease and treatment. For instance, extracts from Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort targeted several CNS receptors. Similarly, extracts from Piper nigrum, Stephania cambodica, and Styphnolobium japonicum exerted inhibition of agonist-induced activity of the human neurokinin-1 receptor. Methods: Different methods have been established for receptor binding and functional assays based on radioactive and fluorescence-labeled ligands in cell lines and primary cell cultures. Behavioral studies of the effect of plant extracts have been conducted in rodents. Plant extracts have further been subjected to mood and cognition studies in humans. Results: Mechanisms of action at molecular and cellular levels have been elucidated for medicinal plants in support of standardization of herbal products and identification of active extract compounds. In several studies, plant extracts demonstrated affinity to a number of CNS receptors in parallel indicating the complexity of this interaction. In vivo studies showed modifications of CNS receptor affinity and behavioral responses in animal models after treatment with medicinal herbs. Certain plant extracts demonstrated neuroprotection and enhanced cognitive performance, respectively, when evaluated in humans. Noteworthy, the penetration of plant extracts and their protective effect on the blood-brain-barrier are discussed. Conclusion: The affinity of plant extracts and their isolated compounds for CNS receptors indicates an important role for medicinal plants in the treatment of neurological disorders. Moreover, studies in animal and human models have confirmed a scientific basis for the

  12. Does the kappa opioid receptor system contribute to pain aversion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Cahill

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The kappa opioid receptor (KOR and the endogenous peptide-ligand dynorphin have received significant attention due the involvement in mediating a variety of behavioral and neurophysiological responses, including opposing the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse including opioids. Accumulating evidence indicates this system is involved in regulating states of motivation and emotion. Acute activation of the KOR produces an increase in motivational behavior to escape a threat, however, KOR activation associated with chronic stress leads to the expression of symptoms indicative of mood disorders. It is well accepted that KOR can produce analgesia and is engaged in chronic pain states including neuropathic pain. Spinal studies have revealed KOR-induced analgesia in reversing pain hypersensitivities associated with peripheral nerve injury. While systemic administration of KOR agonists attenuates nociceptive sensory transmission, this effect appears to be a stress-induced effect as anxiolytic agents, including delta opioid receptor agonists, mitigate KOR agonist-induced analgesia. Additionally, while the role of KOR and dynorphin in driving the dysphoric and aversive components of stress and drug withdrawal has been well characterized, how this system mediates the negative emotional states associated with chronic pain is relatively unexplored. This review provides evidence that dynorphin and the KOR system contribute to the negative affective component of pain and that this receptor system likely contributes to the high comorbidity of mood disorders associated with chronic neuropathic pain.

  13. The Peptide PnPP-19, a Spider Toxin Derivative, Activates μ-Opioid Receptors and Modulates Calcium Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. N. Freitas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthetic peptide PnPP-19 comprehends 19 amino acid residues and it represents part of the primary structure of the toxin δ-CNTX-Pn1c (PnTx2-6, isolated from the venom of the spider Phoneutria nigriventer. Behavioural tests suggest that PnPP-19 induces antinociception by activation of CB1, μ and δ opioid receptors. Since the peripheral and central antinociception induced by PnPP-19 involves opioid activation, the aim of this work was to identify whether this synthetic peptide could directly activate opioid receptors and investigate the subtype selectivity for μ-, δ- and/or κ-opioid receptors. Furthermore, we also studied the modulation of calcium influx driven by PnPP-19 in dorsal root ganglion neurons, and analyzed whether this modulation was opioid-mediated. PnPP-19 selectively activates μ-opioid receptors inducing indirectly inhibition of calcium channels and hereby impairing calcium influx in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. Interestingly, notwithstanding the activation of opioid receptors, PnPP-19 does not induce β-arrestin2 recruitment. PnPP-19 is the first spider toxin derivative that, among opioid receptors, selectively activates μ-opioid receptors. The lack of β-arrestin2 recruitment highlights its potential for the design of new improved opioid agonists.

  14. Involvement of cholinergic nicotinic receptors in the menthol-induced gastric relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Antonella; Serio, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-12-15

    We have previously demonstrated that menthol reduces murine gastric tone in part through a neural mechanism, involving adrenergic pathways and reduction of ongoing release of acetylcholine from enteric nerves. In the present study we aimed to verify whether the gastric relaxation to menthol may be triggered by interaction with neural receptors or ionic channels proteins, such as transient receptor potential (TRP)-melastatin8 (TRPM8), TRP-ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), 5-hydroxytriptamine 3 (5-HT3) receptor or cholinergic nicotinic receptors. Spontaneous mechanical activity was detected in vitro as changes in intraluminal pressure from isolated mouse stomach. Menthol (0.3-30 mM) induced gastric relaxation which was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine, a TRPM8 receptor antagonist, HC030031, a TRPA1 channel blocker. In addition, allylisothiocyanate, a TRPA1 agonist, but not (2S,5R)-2-Isopropyl-N-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methylcyclohexanecarboximide, a selective TRPM8 agonist, induced gastric relaxation. Genic expression of TRPA1, but not of TRPM8, was revealed in mouse stomach. Indeed, menthol-induced gastric relaxation was significantly reduced by hexamethonium, cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist. Menthol, at concentrations that failed to affect gastric tone, reduced the contraction induced by dimethylphenylpiperazinium, nicotinic receptor agonist. The joint application of hexamethonium and atropine, muscarinc receptor antagonist, or hexamethonium and phentholamine, α-adrenergic receptor antagonist, did not produce any additive reduction of the relaxant response to menthol. Lastly, ondansetron, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, was ineffective. In conclusion, our study suggests that nicotinic receptors, but not TRP and 5-HT3 receptors, are molecular targets for menthol inducing murine gastric relaxation, ultimately due to the reduction of acetylcholine release from enteric nerves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Spinal vasopressin alleviates formalin-induced nociception by enhancing GABAA receptor function in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang; Qu, Zu-Wei; Qiu, Chun-Yu; Liao, Min; Hu, Wang-Ping

    2015-04-23

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays a regulatory role in nociception. Intrathecal administration of AVP displays an antinociceptive effect. However, little is understood about the mechanism underlying spinal AVP analgesia. Here, we have found that spinal AVP dose dependently reduced the second, but not first, phase of formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in mice. The AVP analgesia was completely blocked by intrathecal injected SR 49059, a vasopressin-1A (V1A) receptor antagonist. However, spinal AVP failed to exert its antinociceptive effect on the second phase formalin-induced spontaneous nociception in V1A receptor knock-out (V1A-/-) mice. The AVP analgesia was also reversed by bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist. Moreover, AVP potentiated GABA-activated currents in dorsal root ganglion neurons from wild-type littermates, but not from V1A-/- mice. Our results may reveal a novel spinal mechanism of AVP analgesia by enhancing the GABAA receptor function in the spinal cord through V1A receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leukotriene D4 receptor-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoinositide and mobilization of calcium in sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mong, S.; Miller, J.; Wu, H.L.; Crooke, S.T.

    1988-02-01

    A sheep tracheal smooth muscle primary culture cell system was developed to characterize leukotriene D4 (LTD4) receptor-mediated biochemical and pharmacological effects. (/sup 3/H)LTD4 binding to the enriched plasma membrane receptor was specific, stereoselective and saturable. LTE4 and high affinity receptor antagonists bound to the receptors with a rank-order potency that was expected from previous smooth muscle contraction studies. In the (/sup 3/H)myoinositol labeled cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-trisphosphate was rapid and the induction of biosynthesis of (/sup 3/H)inositol-monophosphate by LTs was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited specifically by a receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. In the fura-2 loaded smooth muscle cells, LTD4 and LTE4 induced transient intracellular Ca++ mobilization. The fura-2/Ca++ transient was stereoselective and specific and was inhibited by receptor antagonist, SKF 104353. These results suggest that the cultured sheep tracheal smooth muscle cells have plasma membrane receptors for LTD4. These receptors were coupled to a phospholipase C that, when activated by agonists, induced hydrolysis of inositol containing phospholipids. The hydrolysis products, e.g. diacylglycerol and inositol-trisphosphate, may serve as intracellular messengers that trigger or contribute to the contractile effect in sheep tracheal smooth muscle.

  17. The Efficacy of Eslicarbazepine Acetate in Models of Trigeminal, Neuropathic, and Visceral Pain: The Involvement of 5-HT1B/1D Serotonergic and CB1/CB2 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomić, Maja A; Pecikoza, Uroš B; Micov, Ana M; Stepanović-Petrović, Radica M

    2015-12-01

    Many clinical pain states that are difficult to treat share a common feature of sensitization of nociceptive pathways. Drugs that could normalize hyperexcitable neural activity (e.g., antiepileptic drugs) may be useful in relieving these pain states. Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a novel antiepileptic drug derived from carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine with a more favorable metabolic profile and potentially better tolerability. We examined the efficacy of ESL in models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and the potential mechanism involved in its action. The antinociceptive effects of ESL were assessed in mice models of trigeminal (orofacial formalin test), neuropathic (streptozotocin-induced diabetic neuropathy model), and visceral pain (writhing test). The influence of 5-HT1B/1D serotonin receptor (GR 127935) and CB1 (AM251) and CB2 cannabinoid receptor (AM630) antagonists on the antinociceptive effect of ESL was tested in the model of trigeminal pain. ESL exhibited significant and dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the second phase of the orofacial formalin test (P ≤ 0.011), in the tail-flick test in diabetic mice (P ≤ 0.013), and in the writhing test (P ≤ 0.003). GR 127935 (P ≤ 0.038) and AM251 and AM630 (P ≤ 0.013 for both antagonists) significantly inhibited the antinociceptive effect of ESL in a dose-related manner. ESL exhibited efficacy in models of trigeminal, neuropathic, and visceral pain. In the trigeminal pain model, the antinociceptive effect of ESL is, at least in part, mediated by 5-HT1B/1D serotonin and CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptors. This study indicates that ESL could be useful in the clinical treatment of inflammatory and neuropathic pain.

  18. Antinociceptive and hypothermic evaluation of the leaf essential oil and isolated terpenoids from Eugenia uniflora L. (Brazilian Pitanga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Ana Carolina L; Lima, Cleverton Kleiton F; Hovell, Ana Maria C; Miranda, Ana Luisa P; Rezende, Claudia M

    2009-10-01

    Eugenia uniflora L. (Myrtaceae), known as Brazilian cherry tree, is a fruity tree spread all over Brazil used in popular medicine to treat inflammations, rheumatic pain and fever, as hypoglycemic, diuretic and has been widely used in the cosmetics industry. The present study discusses the chemical composition, the antinociceptive and hypothermic profile of the essential oil of pitangueira leaves. The chemical composition was evaluated by GC-MS and the main constituent of the oil was characterized, after isolation, as a mixture of atractylone (1) and 3-furanoeudesmene (2). The essential oil, its pentane fraction and the isolated mixture of sesquiterpenes (1 and 2), given orally, significantly inhibited the acetic acid-induced abdominal constrictions, increased the latency time in hot plate test and showed a hypothermic effect. The results suggest that the responsible for the antinociceptive and hypothermic effect were the isolated furanosesquiterpenes. These findings provided additional pharmacological information and may contribute for the use of Brazilian cherry tree as a phytomedicine.

  19. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil of Eugenia candolleana DC., Myrtaceae, on mice

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    Adriana G. Guimarães

    Full Text Available Eugenia candolleana DC. (Myrtaceae, commonly known as "murta" or "murtinha", is a plant species without any chemical or pharmacological study described in the literature. It has been popularly used for the treatment of pain and fever. This report aimed to investigate the possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oil extracted from fresh leaves of Eugenia candolleana DC. (EOEc in rodents. Following intraperitoneal injection, EOEc (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg reduced the number of writhes significantly in a writhing test and the number of paw licks during phase two of formalin test (p < 0.001. However, administration of EOEc did not alter the time of reaction in hot plate test. Furthermore, EOEc inhibited (p < 0.01 the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity. These results indicate antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of EOEc probably mediated via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis or other peripherally pathway.

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors in the brain: controlling food intake and body weight.

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    Baggio, Laurie L; Drucker, Daniel J

    2014-10-01

    The peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) enhances glucose-induced insulin secretion and inhibits both gastric emptying and glucagon secretion. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists control glycemia via glucose-dependent mechanisms of action and promote weight loss in obese and diabetic individuals. Nevertheless, the mechanisms and cellular targets transducing the weight loss effects remain unclear. Two recent studies in the JCI provide insight into the neurons responsible for this effect. Sisley et al. reveal that GLP-1R agonist-induced weight loss requires GLP-1Rs in the CNS, while Secher et al. reveal that a small peptide GLP-1R agonist penetrates the brain and activates a subset of GLP-1R-expressing neurons in the arcuate nucleus to produce weight loss. Together, these two studies elucidate pathways that inform strategies coupling GLP-1R signaling to control of body weight in patients with diabetes or obesity.

  1. Anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative activities of the extracts and chemical constituents of Diospyros lotus L.

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    Uddin, Ghias; Rauf, Abdur; Siddiqui, Bina S; Muhammad, Naveed; Khan, Ajmal; Shah, Syed Uzair Ali

    2014-06-15

    Diospyros lotus L. is traditionally used in various diseases including pain and sleep disorders. The pain and inflammation are the common problems, which are treated with various synthetic analgesic drugs, and associated the side effects. The natural products have gained significant importance over synthetic drugs. The importance of phyto-medicine the current study has been designed with the aim to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of Diospyros lotus and bioassay guided isolation from its crude fractions. Seven known compounds; lupeol (1), 7-methyljuglone (2), β-Sitosterol (3), stigmasterol (4) betulinic acid (5), diospyrin (6; DS) and 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin (7; HDS) which were hitherto unreported from D. lotus. The chloroform fraction (CFDL) and isolated compounds DS and HDS were evaluated for anti-nociceptive, sedative and anti-inflammatory effects. The acetic acid induced writing was significantly (pmechanism of action. The CFDL, DS and HDS were also proved sedative in open field animal models. In acute toxicity study the chloroform fraction [CFDL (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg)], DS (5 and 10 mg/kg) and HDS (5 and 10 mg/kg) were found safe. Our study concluded that CFDL, DS and HDS have marked anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative effect. The anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the roots of D. lotus are partially attributed due to the presence of analgesic constituents like diospyrin (DS), 8-hydroxyisodiospyrin (HDS) and strongly supports the ethno-pharmacological uses of D. lotus as anti-nociceptive, anti-inflammatory and sedative. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. A Study of Chemistry and Antinociceptive Properties of Medicinal Plant Allium Jesdianum Leaves and the Probable Role of Opioidergic System

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    mojtaba Khaksarian

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Khaksarian M1, Meshkatosadat MH2, Farzi R3, Safarpour F3 1. Instructor, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences 2. Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Basic sciences, Lorestan University 3. M.Sc of Physiology, Staff member of Neurology Sciences Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: In previous studies, antinociceptive activity of Allium Jesdianum (AJ has been evaluated using Formalin and Tail Flick tests. Therefore, the aim of this research is to study and analyze substances in extract and probable role of the opioidergic system. Materials and methods: AJ was collected from Lorestan province and was coded in Agriculture College of Lorestan University, and by the use of rotary device, it was extracted. The sample of the study was a group of 120 male Sprague-Dawely rats weighing 180-220gr. and 50 other mice. AJ extract was administrated intra-peritoneally for the evaluation of its antinociceptive effects. Pain models selected were Tail Flick and Hot Plate. For the evaluation of the probable role of opioidergic Naloxone an opioidergic antagonist was used in two pain models. Sensory motor performance was evaluated using Rotarod apparatus. Substances of extract using GC/Mass apparatus were analyzed. Results: Results of experiments showed that AJ administration increased Tail Flick and Hot Plate latencies. Naloxone pre-treatment inhibited antinociceptive effects of AJ in both pain models. Sensory motor performance was not seen. IN extract analysis Morphin Cylerit, Ethyl cinamate, Isocoinoline, Neomantol and long chain alcohol were founded. Conclusion: In general, the experiments showed that AJ extract has antinociceptive effects that is opposite to Naloxone, and extract analysis proposed that Morphine Cylerit or Etyi Cinamate is suitable for this role.

  3. Antidepressant, anxiolytic and anti-nociceptive activities of ethanol extract of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch leaves in mice model

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    Mohammad Shah Hafez Kabir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the antidepressant, anxiolytic and antinociceptive activities of ethanol extract of Steudnera colocasiifolia K. Koch (S. colocasiifolia leaves. Methods: Swiss albino mice treated with 1% Tween solution, standard drugs and ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia, respectively, were subjected to the neurological and antinociceptive investigations. The tail suspension test and forced swimming test were used for testing antidepressant activity, where the parameter is the measurement of immobility time. Anxiolytic activity was evaluated by hole board model. Anti-nociceptive potential of the extract was also screened for centrally acting analgesic activity by using formalin induced licking response model and acetic acid induced writhing test was used for testing peripheral analgesic action. Results: Ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia significantly decreased the period of immobility in both tested models (tail suspension and forced swimming models of antidepressant activity. In the hole board model, there was a dose dependant (at 100 and 200 mg/kg and a significant increase in the number of head dipping by comparing with control (1% Tween solution (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. In formalin induced licking model, a significant inhibition of pain compared to standard diclofenac sodium was observed (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. In acetic acid induced test, there was a significant reduction of writhing response and pain in mice treated with leaves extract of S. colocasiifolia at 200 mg/kg body weight (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001. Conclusions: The results proofed the prospective antidepressant, anxiolytic and antinociceptive activities of ethanol extract of S. colocasiifolia leaves.

  4. The antinociceptive effects of Monechma ciliatum and changes in EEG waves following oral and intrathecal administration in rats

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    Meraiyebu, Ajibola B.; Adelaiye, Alexander B.; O, Odeh S.

    2010-02-01

    The research work was carried out to study the effect of Oral and Intrathecal Monechma Ciliatum on antinociception and EEG readings in Wistar Rats. Traditionally the extract is given to women in labour believed to reduce pain and ease parturition, though past works show that it has oesteogenic and oxytotic effects. The rats were divided into 5 major groups. Group 1 served as oral control group while groups 2 and 3 served as oral experimental groups and were treated with 500mg/kg and 1000mg/kg monechma ciliatum respectively. Group 4 served as intrathecal control group treated with intrathecal dextrose and group 5 received 1000mg/kg Monechma Ciliatrum intrathecally. The antinociceptive effect was analysed using a Von Frey's aesthesiometer. Monechma Ciliatum showed significant antinociceptive effect both orally and intrathecally, although it had a greater effect orally and during the first 15 minutes of intrathecal administration. EEG readings were also taken for all the groups and there was a decrease in amplitude and an increase in frequency for high dose (1000mg/ml) experimental groups and the mid brain electrodes produced a change from theta waves (3.5 - 7 waves per second) to alpha waves (7.5 - 13 waves per second) as seen in relaxed persons and caused decreased amplitudes an