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Sample records for receptor a1 allele

  1. Lack of association between TaqI A1 Allele of dopamine D2 receptor gene and alcohol-use disorders in Atayal natives of Taiwan

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    Chia-Hsiang Chen [Cheng Hsin Rehabilitation and Medical Center, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Shih-Hsiang Chien; Hai-Gwo Hwu [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-09-20

    Association studies between the A1 allele of the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene TaqI A polymorphism and alcoholism remain controversial. A recent study from Japan demonstrated that the A1 allele is associated with severe alcoholism in the Japanese population. We were interested in knowing if this association also exists in the Atayals of Taiwan, who were found to have a higher prevalence of alcohol-use disorders than the Han Chinese in Taiwan. Genotype and allele frequencies were determined in alcohol-abusing, alcohol-dependent, and nonalcoholic control Atayal natives in Taiwan. A1 allele frequencies in alcohol-dependent, alcohol-abusing, and normal control Atayals were 0.39, 0.42, and 0.39, respectively. No difference in A1 allele frequency was found among these three groups. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the A1 allele of the TaqI A polymorphism of the DRD2 gene increases susceptibility to alcohol-use disorders in the Atayals of Taiwan. 18 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Allelic association of the D2 dopamine receptor gene with receptor-binding characteristics in alcoholism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noble, E.P.; Blum, K.; Ritchie, T.; Montgomery, A.; Sheridan, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The allelic association of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene with the binding characteristics of the D2 dopamine receptor was determined in 66 brains of alcoholic and non-alcoholic subjects. In a blinded experiment, DNA from the cerebral cortex was treated with the restriction endonuclease Taql and probed with a 1.5-kilobase (kb) digest of a clone (lambda hD2G1) of the human D2 dopamine receptor gene. The binding characteristics (Kd [binding affinity] and Bmax [number of binding sites]) of the D2 dopamine receptor were determined in the caudate nuclei of these brains using tritiated spiperone as the ligand. The adjusted Kd was significantly lower in alcoholic than in nonalcoholic subjects. In subjects with the A1 allele, in whom a high association with alcoholism was found, the Bmax was significantly reduced compared with the Bmax of subjects with the A2 allele. Moreover, a progressively reduced Bmax was found in subjects with A2/A2, A1/A2, and A1/A1 alleles, with subjects with A2/A2 having the highest mean values, and subjects with A1/A1, the lowest. The polymorphic pattern of the D2 dopamine receptor gene and its differential expression of receptors suggests the involvement of the dopaminergic system in conferring susceptibility to at least one subtype of severe alcoholism

  3. DRD4 dopamine receptor allelic diversity in various primate species

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    Adamson, M.; Higley, D. [NIAAA, Rockville, MD (United States); O`Brien, S. [NCI, Frederick, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The DRD4 dopamine receptor is uniquely characterized by a 48 bp repeating segment within the coding region, located in exon III. Different DRD4 alleles are produced by the presence of additional 48 bp repeats, each of which adds 16 amino acids to the length of the 3rd intracytoplasmic loop of the receptor. The DRD4 receptor is therefore an intriguing candidate gene for behaviors which are influenced by dopamine function. In several human populations, DRD4 alleles with 2-8 and 10 repeats have previously been identified, and the 4 and 7 repeat alleles are the most abundant. We have determined DRD4 genotypes in the following nonhuman primate species: chimpanzee N=2, pygmy chimpanzee N=2, gorilla N=4, siamang N=2, Gelada baboon N=1, gibbon N=1, orangutan (Bornean and Sumatran) N=62, spider monkey N=4, owl monkey N=1, Colobus monkey N=1, Patas monkey N=1, ruffed lemur N=1, rhesus macaque N=8, and vervet monkey N=28. The degree of DRD4 polymorphism and which DRD4 alleles were present both showed considerable variation across primate species. In contrast to the human, rhesus macaque monkeys were monomorphic. The 4 and 7 repeat allels, highly abundant in the human, may not be present in certain other primates. For example, the four spider monkeys we studied showed the 7, 8 and 9 repeat length alleles and the only gibbon we analyzed was homozygous for the 9 repeat allele (thus far not observed in the human). Genotyping of other primate species and sequencing of the individual DRD4 repeat alleles in different species may help us determine the ancestral DRD4 repeat length and identify connections between DRD4 genotype and phenotype.

  4. Association between the DRD2 A1 allele and response to methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2006-06-05

    The TaqI A polymorphism (A(1)) of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2), although not a specific predictor of opioid dependence, has been strongly associated with high levels of prior heroin use and poor treatment outcomes among methadone maintenance patients. The aims of this study were to confirm these findings via a retrospective analysis of A(1) allele frequency in methadone (n = 46) and buprenorphine (n = 25) patients, and non-opioid-dependent controls (n = 95). Subjects were genotyped at the DRD2 TaqI A locus using PCR amplification followed by TaqI restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. For methadone and buprenorphine subjects, heroin use (prior to treatment), treatment outcomes, and withdrawal occurrence were determined from comprehensive case notes. No significant differences in A(1) allele frequency (%) were observed between: methadone (19.6%), buprenorphine (18.0%), and control (17.9%) groups (P > 0.7); successful and poor treatment outcome groups, methadone: 20.0% and 19.2%, respectively (P = 1.0); buprenorphine: 18.4% and 20.0%, respectively (P = 1.0). Also, there were no significant relationships between TaqI A genotype and prior heroin use (P = 0.47). However, among the successful methadone subjects, significantly fewer A(1) allele carriers experienced withdrawal than non-A(1) carriers (P = 0.04). In conclusion, the DRD2 genotype effects did not affect opioid maintenance treatment outcomes. This suggests the need for a further prospective investigation into the role of the DRD2 A(1) allele in heroin use and response to maintenance pharmacotherapies for opioid dependence.

  5. Allelic barley MLA immune receptors recognize sequence-unrelated avirulence effectors of the powdery mildew pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xunli; Kracher, Barbara; Saur, Isabel M L; Bauer, Saskia; Ellwood, Simon R; Wise, Roger; Yaeno, Takashi; Maekawa, Takaki; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2016-10-18

    Disease-resistance genes encoding intracellular nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat proteins (NLRs) are key components of the plant innate immune system and typically detect the presence of isolate-specific avirulence (AVR) effectors from pathogens. NLR genes define the fastest-evolving gene family of flowering plants and are often arranged in gene clusters containing multiple paralogs, contributing to copy number and allele-specific NLR variation within a host species. Barley mildew resistance locus a (Mla) has been subject to extensive functional diversification, resulting in allelic resistance specificities each recognizing a cognate, but largely unidentified, AVR a gene of the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh). We applied a transcriptome-wide association study among 17 Bgh isolates containing different AVR a genes and identified AVR a1 and AVR a13 , encoding candidate-secreted effectors recognized by Mla1 and Mla13 alleles, respectively. Transient expression of the effector genes in barley leaves or protoplasts was sufficient to trigger Mla1 or Mla13 allele-specific cell death, a hallmark of NLR receptor-mediated immunity. AVR a1 and AVR a13 are phylogenetically unrelated, demonstrating that certain allelic MLA receptors evolved to recognize sequence-unrelated effectors. They are ancient effectors because corresponding loci are present in wheat powdery mildew. AVR A1 recognition by barley MLA1 is retained in transgenic Arabidopsis, indicating that AVR A1 directly binds MLA1 or that its recognition involves an evolutionarily conserved host target of AVR A1 Furthermore, analysis of transcriptome-wide sequence variation among the Bgh isolates provides evidence for Bgh population structure that is partially linked to geographic isolation.

  6. Complete COL1A1 allele deletions in osteogenesis imperfecta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Huizer, Margriet; Kariminejad, Ariana; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Plomp, Astrid S.; Terhal, Paulien A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    Purpose: To identify a molecular genetic cause in patients with a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I/IV. Methods: The authors performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of the COL1A1 gene in a group of 106 index patients. Results: In four families with

  7. Complete COL1A1 allele deletions in osteogenesis imperfecta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Fleur S.; Huizer, Margriet; Kariminejad, Ariana; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Plomp, Astrid S.; Terhal, Paulien A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Weiss, Marjan M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Cobben, Jan M.; Pals, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    To identify a molecular genetic cause in patients with a clinical diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I/IV. The authors performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of the COL1A1 gene in a group of 106 index patients. In four families with mild osteogenesis

  8. HindIII identifies a two allele DNA polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor gene (CNR)

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    Caenazzo, L.; Hoehe, M.R.; Hsieh, W.T.; Berrettini, W.H.; Bonner, T.I.; Gershon, E.S. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1991-09-11

    HCNR p5, a 0.9 kb BamHI/EcoRI fragment from the human cannabinoid receptor gene inserted into pUC19, was used as probe. The fragment is located in an intron approximately 14 kb 5{prime} of the initiation codon. This fragment is a clean single copy sequence by genomic blotting. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with HindIII identified a two allele RFLP with bands at 5.5 (A1) and 3.3 kb (A2). The human cannabinoid receptor gene has been genetically mapped in CEPH reference pedigrees to the centromeric/q region of chromosome 6. In situ hybridization localizes it to 6q14-q15. Codominant segregation has been observed in 26 informative two- and three-generation CEPH pedigrees and in 14 medium-sized disease families.

  9. Genotypic and allelic variability in CYP19A1 among populations of African and European ancestry.

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    Athena Starlard-Davenport

    Full Text Available CYP19A1 facilitates the bioconversion of estrogens from androgens. CYP19A1 intron single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may alter mRNA splicing, resulting in altered CYP19A1 activity, and potentially influencing disease susceptibility. Genetic studies of CYP19A1 SNPs have been well documented in populations of European ancestry; however, studies in populations of African ancestry are limited. In the present study, ten 'candidate' intronic SNPs in CYP19A1 from 125 African Americans (AA and 277 European Americans (EA were genotyped and their frequencies compared. Allele frequencies were also compared with HapMap and ASW 1000 Genomes populations. We observed significant differences in the minor allele frequencies between AA and EA in six of the ten SNPs including rs10459592 (p<0.0001, rs12908960 (p<0.0001, rs1902584 (p = 0.016, rs2470144 (p<0.0001, rs1961177 (p<0.0001, and rs6493497 (p = 0.003. While there were no significant differences in allele frequencies between EA and CEU in the HapMap population, a 1.2- to 19-fold difference in allele frequency for rs10459592 (p = 0.004, rs12908960 (p = 0.0006, rs1902584 (p<0.0001, rs2470144 (p = 0.0006, rs1961177 (p<0.0001, and rs6493497 (p = 0.0092 was observed between AA and the Yoruba (YRI population. Linkage disequilibrium (LD blocks and haplotype clusters that is unique to the EA population but not AA was also observed. In summary, we demonstrate that differences in the allele frequencies of CYP19A1 intron SNPs are not consistent between populations of African and European ancestry. Thus, investigations into whether CYP19A1 intron SNPs contribute to variations in cancer incidence, outcomes and pharmacological response seen in populations of different ancestry may prove beneficial.

  10. DRD2 A1 allele and P300 abnormalities in obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, K. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)]|[PATH Foundation, Princeton, NJ (United States); Wood, R.; Sheridan, L.P.J. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous and prevalent disorder having both inheritable and environmental components. The role of the dopamine system in P300 has been implicated. We genotyped 193 neuropsychiatrically ill patients with and without comorbid drug and alcohol/abuse/dependence and obesity for the prevalence of the A1 allele of the DRD2 gene. We found a significant linear trend ({chi}{sup 2} = 40.4, df=1, p<0.00001) where the percent prevalence of the A1 increased with increasing polysubstance abuse. Where the A1 allele was found in 44% of 40 obese subjects, the A1 allele prevalence was found in as much as 91% of 11 obese subjects with comorbid polysubstance abuse. 53 obese subjects having a mean body weight (BMI) of 34.6{+-}8.2 were mapped for brain electrical activity and compared with 15 controls with a BMI of 22.3{+-}3.0 (P<.001). The P3 amplitude was significantly different (two tailed; t=3.24, df=16.2, P = 0.005), whereas P3 latency was not significant. Preliminarily, we found a significant decreased P3 amplitude correlated with parental polysubstance abuse (p=0.4) with prolongation of P3 latency correlated with the three risk factors of parental substance abuse, chemical dependency and carbohydrate bingeing (P<0.02). Finally, in a small sample, the A1 allele was present in 25% of probands having 0 risk compared to 66% in those obese subjects with any risk. This work represents the first electrophysiological data to implicate P3 abnormalities in a subset of obesity and further confirms an association of the DRD2 gene and a electrophysiological marker previously indicated to have predictive value in vulnerability to addictive behaviors.

  11. Distortion of maternal-fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor allele transmission in pre-eclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L; Crawshaw, S; Baker, P N; Brookfield, J F; Broughton Pipkin, F; Kalsheker, N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the fetal angiotensin II type 1 receptor genotype in pre-eclampsia. DESIGN: Case-control study. POPULATION: Forty-one maternal-fetal pairs from pre-eclamptic pregnancies and 80 maternal-fetal pairs from normotensive pregnancies. METHODS: Maternal and fetal DNA was genotyped at three diallelic polymorphisms, at nucleotides 573, 1062, and 1166, in the coding exon of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene, and at a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism in its 3' flanking region. RESULTS: Allele and genotype frequencies at the four polymorphic regions investigated did not differ between pre-eclamptic and normotensive groups, in either fetal or maternal samples. Mothers heterozygous for the dinucleotide repeat allele designated A4 transmitted this allele to the fetus in 15 of 18 informative pre-eclamptic pregnancies and in eight of 26 normotensive pregnancies. This was greater than the expected probability in pre-eclamptic pregnancies (p=0.04) and less than expected in normotensive pregnancies (p<0.005). The 573T variant, which is in partial linkage disequilibrium with the A4 allele, showed a similar distortion of maternal-fetal transmission. CONCLUSION: Angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene expression in the fetus may contribute to the aetiology of pre-eclampsia. It is unclear whether susceptibility is conferred by the fetal genotype acting alone, or by allele sharing by mother and fetus. Possible mechanisms for the effect of the angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene are suggested by the association of the 573T variant with low levels of surface receptor expression on platelets. If receptor expression is similarly genetically determined in the placenta, responsiveness to angiotensin II may be affected, with the potential to influence placentation or placental prostaglandin secretion. PMID:9719367

  12. Sensory Gating and Alpha-7 Nicotinic Receptor Gene Allelic Variants in Schizoaffective Disorder, Bipolar Type

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    Martin, Laura F.; Leonard, Sherry; Hall, Mei-Hua; Tregellas, Jason R.; Freedman, Robert; Olincy, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Single nucleotide allelic variants in the promoter region of the chromosome 15 alpha-7 acetylcholine nicotinic receptor gene (CHRNA7) are associated with both schizophrenia and the P50 auditory evoked potential sensory gating deficit. The purpose of this study was to determine if CHRNA7 promoter allelic variants are also associated with abnormal P50 ratios in persons with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. Methods P50 auditory evoked potentials were recorded in a paired stimulus paradigm in 17 subjects with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type. The P50 test to conditioning ratio was used as the measure of sensory gating. Mutation screening of the CHRNA7 promoter region was performed on the subjects’ DNA samples. Comparisons to previously obtained data from persons with schizophrenia and controls were made. Results Subjects with schizophrenia, regardless of allele status, had an abnormal mean P50 ratio. Subjects with schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type and a variant allele had an abnormal mean P50 ratio, whereas those schizoaffective subjects with the common alleles had a normal mean P50 ratio. Normal control subjects had a normal mean ratio, but controls with variant alleles had higher P50 ratios. Conclusions In persons with bipolar type schizoaffective disorder, CHRNA7 promoter region allelic variants are linked to the capacity to inhibit the P50 auditory evoked potential and thus are associated with a type of illness genetically and biologically more similar to schizophrenia. PMID:17192894

  13. Beta2-adrenergic receptor allele frequencies in the Quechua, a high altitude native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Monsalve, M V; Devine, D V; Hochachka, P W

    2000-03-01

    The beta2-adrenergic receptor is involved in the control of numerous physiological processes and, as the primary catecholamine receptor in the lungs, is of particular importance in the regulation of pulmonary function. There are several polymorphic loci in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene that have alleles that alter receptor function, including two (A/G46, G/C79) that increase agonist sensitivity. As such a phenotype may increase vaso and bronchial dilation, thereby facilitating air and blood flow through the lungs, we hypothesized that selection may have favoured these alleles in high altitude populations as part of an adaptive strategy to deal with the hypoxic conditions characteristic of such environments. We tested this hypothesis by determining the allele frequencies for these two polymorphisms, as well one additional missense mutation (C/T491) and two silent mutations (G/A252 and C/A523) in 63 Quechua speaking natives from communities located between 3200 and 4200 m on the Peruvian altiplano. These frequencies were compared with those of two lowland populations, one native American (Na-Dene from the west coast of Canada) and one Caucasian of Western European descent. The Quechua manifest many of the pulmonary characteristics of high altitude populations and differences in allele frequencies between the Quechua and lowlanders could be indicative of a selective advantage conferred by certain genotypes in high altitude environments. Allele frequencies varied between populations at some loci and patterns of linkage disequilibrium differed between the old-world and new-world samples; however, as these populations are not closely related, significant variation would be expected due to stochastic effects alone. Neither of the alleles associated with increased receptor sensitivity (A46, G79) was significantly over-represented in the Quechua compared with either lowland group. The Quechua were monomorphic for the C allele at base 79. This variant has been

  14. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R) and weight loss in obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    L. Santos, José; De la Cruz, Rolando; Holst, Claus

    2011-01-01

    receptor gene (MC3R) have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets.......The melanocortin system plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Mice genetically deficient in the melanocortin-3 receptor gene have a normal body weight with increased body fat, mild hypophagia compared to wild-type mice. In humans, Thr6Lys and Val81Ile variants of the melanocortin-3...

  15. Killer Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor Allele Determination Using Next-Generation Sequencing Technology

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    Bercelin Maniangou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of natural killer (NK cell alloreactivity on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT outcome is still debated due to the complexity of graft parameters, HLA class I environment, the nature of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR/KIR ligand genetic combinations studied, and KIR+ NK cell repertoire size. KIR genes are known to be polymorphic in terms of gene content, copy number variation, and number of alleles. These allelic polymorphisms may impact both the phenotype and function of KIR+ NK cells. We, therefore, speculate that polymorphisms may alter donor KIR+ NK cell phenotype/function thus modulating post-HSCT KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity. To investigate KIR allele polymorphisms of all KIR genes, we developed a next-generation sequencing (NGS technology on a MiSeq platform. To ensure the reliability and specificity of our method, genomic DNA from well-characterized cell lines were used; high-resolution KIR typing results obtained were then compared to those previously reported. Two different bioinformatic pipelines were used allowing the attribution of sequencing reads to specific KIR genes and the assignment of KIR alleles for each KIR gene. Our results demonstrated successful long-range KIR gene amplifications of all reference samples using intergenic KIR primers. The alignment of reads to the human genome reference (hg19 using BiRD pipeline or visualization of data using Profiler software demonstrated that all KIR genes were completely sequenced with a sufficient read depth (mean 317× for all loci and a high percentage of mapping (mean 93% for all loci. Comparison of high-resolution KIR typing obtained to those published data using exome capture resulted in a reported concordance rate of 95% for centromeric and telomeric KIR genes. Overall, our results suggest that NGS can be used to investigate the broad KIR allelic polymorphism. Hence, these data improve our knowledge, not only on KIR+ NK cell alloreactivity in

  16. CYP1A1, CYP1A2, SULT1A1 AND SULT1E1 ALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN CASE OF GENITAL ENDOMETRIOSIS

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    Konstantin Sergeevich Kublinskiy

    2016-02-01

    Up-to-date molecular and genetic analyses reveal that women predisposed to genital endometriosis possess Allele G and Genotypes AG and GG of the polymorphic option A-4889G of the CYP1A1 gene and Allele A and Genotypes CA and AA of the polymorphic option C-734A of the CYP1A2 gene. The polymorphism of the promoter regions of the SULT1A1 (G-638A and SULT1E1 (C-174T genes is not associated with genital endometriosis in women.

  17. Dynamic ligand modulation of EPO receptor pools, and dysregulation by polycythemia-associated EPOR alleles.

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    Seema Singh

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO and its cell surface receptor (EPOR are essential for erythropoiesis; can modulate non-erythroid target tissues; and have been reported to affect the progression of certain cancers. Basic studies of EPOR expression and trafficking, however, have been hindered by low-level EPOR occurrence, and the limited specificity of anti-EPOR antibodies. Consequently, these aspects of EPOR biology are not well defined, nor are actions of polycythemia- associated mutated EPOR alleles. Using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies to intracellular, PY- activated and extracellular EPOR domains, the following properties of the endogenous hEPOR in erythroid progenitors first are unambiguously defined. 1 High- Mr EPOR forms become obviously expressed only when EPO is limited. 2 EPOR-68K plus -70K species sequentially accumulate, and EPOR-70K comprises an apparent cell surface EPOR population. 3 Brefeldin A, N-glycanase and associated analyses point to EPOR-68K as a core-glycosylated intracellular EPOR pool (of modest size. 4 In contrast to recent reports, EPOR inward trafficking is shown (in UT7epo cells, and primary proerythroblasts to be sharply ligand-dependent. Beyond this, when C-terminal truncated hEPOR-T mutant alleles as harbored by polycythemia patients are co-expressed with the wild-type EPOR in EPO-dependent erythroid progenitors, several specific events become altered. First, EPOR-T alleles are persistently activated upon EPO- challenge, yet are also subject to apparent turn-over (to low-Mr EPOR products. Furthermore, during exponential cell growth EPOR-T species become both over-represented, and hyper-activated. Interestingly, EPOR-T expression also results in an EPO dose-dependent loss of endogenous wild-type EPOR's (and, therefore, a squelching of EPOR C-terminal- mediated negative feedback effects. New knowledge concerning regulated EPOR expression and trafficking therefore is provided, together with new insight into mechanisms via

  18. Dynamic Ligand Modulation of EPO Receptor Pools, and Dysregulation by Polycythemia-Associated EPOR Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Seema; Verma, Rakesh; Pradeep, Anamika; Leu, Karen; Mortensen, R. Bruce; Young, Peter R.; Oyasu, Miho; Schatz, Peter J.; Green, Jennifer M.; Wojchowski, Don M.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its cell surface receptor (EPOR) are essential for erythropoiesis; can modulate non-erythroid target tissues; and have been reported to affect the progression of certain cancers. Basic studies of EPOR expression and trafficking, however, have been hindered by low-level EPOR occurrence, and the limited specificity of anti-EPOR antibodies. Consequently, these aspects of EPOR biology are not well defined, nor are actions of polycythemia- associated mutated EPOR alleles. Using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies to intracellular, PY- activated and extracellular EPOR domains, the following properties of the endogenous hEPOR in erythroid progenitors first are unambiguously defined. 1) High- Mr EPOR forms become obviously expressed only when EPO is limited. 2) EPOR-68K plus -70K species sequentially accumulate, and EPOR-70K comprises an apparent cell surface EPOR population. 3) Brefeldin A, N-glycanase and associated analyses point to EPOR-68K as a core-glycosylated intracellular EPOR pool (of modest size). 4) In contrast to recent reports, EPOR inward trafficking is shown (in UT7epo cells, and primary proerythroblasts) to be sharply ligand-dependent. Beyond this, when C-terminal truncated hEPOR-T mutant alleles as harbored by polycythemia patients are co-expressed with the wild-type EPOR in EPO-dependent erythroid progenitors, several specific events become altered. First, EPOR-T alleles are persistently activated upon EPO- challenge, yet are also subject to apparent turn-over (to low-Mr EPOR products). Furthermore, during exponential cell growth EPOR-T species become both over-represented, and hyper-activated. Interestingly, EPOR-T expression also results in an EPO dose-dependent loss of endogenous wild-type EPOR's (and, therefore, a squelching of EPOR C-terminal- mediated negative feedback effects). New knowledge concerning regulated EPOR expression and trafficking therefore is provided, together with new insight into mechanisms via which

  19. The human pregnane X receptor: genomic structure and identification and functional characterization of natural allelic variants.

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    Zhang, J; Kuehl, P; Green, E D; Touchman, J W; Watkins, P B; Daly, A; Hall, S D; Maurel, P; Relling, M; Brimer, C; Yasuda, K; Wrighton, S A; Hancock, M; Kim, R B; Strom, S; Thummel, K; Russell, C G; Hudson, J R; Schuetz, E G; Boguski, M S

    2001-10-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR)/steroid and xenobiotic receptor (SXR) transcriptionally activates cytochrome P4503A4 (CYP3A4) when ligand activated by endobiotics and xenobiotics. We cloned the human PXR gene and analysed the sequence in DNAs of individuals whose CYP3A phenotype was known. The PXR gene spans 35 kb, contains nine exons, and mapped to chromosome 13q11-13. Thirty-eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified including six SNPs in the coding region. Three of the coding SNPs are non-synonymous creating new PXR alleles [PXR*2, P27S (79C to T); PXR*3, G36R (106G to A); and PXR*4, R122Q (4321G to A)]. The frequency of PXR*2 was 0.20 in African Americans and was never found in Caucasians. Hepatic expression of CYP3A4 protein was not significantly different between African Americans homozygous for PXR*1 compared to those with one PXR*2 allele. PXR*4 was a rare variant found in only one Caucasian person. Homology modelling suggested that R122Q, (PXR*4) is a direct DNA contact site variation in the third alpha-helix in the DNA binding domain. Compared with PXR*1, and variants PXR*2 and PXR*3, only the variant PXR*4 protein had significantly decreased affinity for the PXR binding sequence in electromobility shift assays and attenuated ligand activation of the CYP3A4 reporter plasmids in transient transfection assays. However, the person heterozygous for PXR*4 is normal for CYP3A4 metabolism phenotype. The relevance of each of the 38 PXR SNPs identified in DNA of individuals whose CYP3A basal and rifampin-inducible CYP3A4 expression was determined in vivo and/or in vitro was demonstrated by univariate statistical analysis. Because ligand activation of PXR and upregulation of a system of drug detoxification genes are major determinants of drug interactions, it will now be useful to extend this work to determine the association of these common PXR SNPs to human variation in induction of other drug detoxification gene targets.

  20. Neural correlate of autistic-like traits and a common allele in the oxytocin receptor gene.

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    Saito, Yuki; Suga, Motomu; Tochigi, Mamoru; Abe, Osamu; Yahata, Noriaki; Kawakubo, Yuki; Liu, Xiaoxi; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kasai, Kiyoto; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2014-10-01

    Sub-clinical autistic-like traits (ALTs) are continuously distributed in the general population and genetically linked to autism. Although identifying the neurogenetic backgrounds of ALTs might enhance our ability to identify those of autism, they are largely unstudied. Here, we have examined the neuroanatomical basis of ALTs and their association with the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) rs2254298A, a known risk allele for autism in Asian populations which has also been implicated in limbic-paralimbic brain structures. First, we extracted a four-factor structure of ALTs, as measured using the Autism-Spectrum Quotient, including 'prosociality', 'communication', 'details/patterns' and 'imagination' in 135 neurotypical adults (79 men, 56 women) to reduce the genetic heterogeneity of ALTs. Then, in the same population, voxel-based morphometry revealed that lower 'prosociality', which indicates strong ALTs, was significantly correlated to smaller regional grey matter volume in the right insula in males. Males with lower 'prosociality' also had less interregional structural coupling between the right insula and the ventral anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, males with OXTR rs2254298A had significantly smaller grey matter volume in the right insula. These results show that decreased volume of the insula is a neuroanatomical correlate of ALTs and a potential intermediate phenotype linking ALTs with OXTR in male subjects. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Allele-specific expression at the androgen receptor alpha gene in a hybrid unisexual fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangjun Zhu

    Full Text Available The all-female Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa is the result of a hybridization of the Atlantic molly (P. mexicana and the sailfin molly (P. latipinna approximately 120,000 years ago. As a gynogenetic species, P. formosa needs to copulate with heterospecific males including males from one of its bisexual ancestral species. However, the sperm only triggers embryogenesis of the diploid eggs. The genetic information of the sperm donor typically will not contribute to the next generation of P. formosa. Hence, P. formosa possesses generally one allele from each of its ancestral species at any genetic locus. This raises the question whether both ancestral alleles are equally expressed in P. formosa. Allele-specific expression (ASE has been previously assessed in various organisms, e.g., human and fish, and ASE was found to be important in the context of phenotypic variability and disease. In this study, we utilized Real-Time PCR techniques to estimate ASE of the androgen receptor alpha (arα gene in several distinct tissues of Amazon mollies. We found an allelic bias favoring the maternal ancestor (P. mexicana allele in ovarian tissue. This allelic bias was not observed in the gill or the brain tissue. Sequencing of the promoter regions of both alleles revealed an association between an Indel in a known CpG island and differential expression. Future studies may reveal whether our observed cis-regulatory divergence is caused by an ovary-specific trans-regulatory element, preferentially activating the allele of the maternal ancestor.

  2. Cerebral adenosine A1 receptors are upregulated in rodent encephalitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Souman; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Boersma, Wytske; Sijbesma, Jurgen W.; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Elsinga, Philip H.; Meerlo, Peter; Doorduin, Janine; Dierckx, Rudi A.; van Waarde, Aren

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1) Rs) are implied in the modulation of neuroinflammation. Activation of cerebral A(1) Rs acts as a brake on the microglial response after traumatic brain injury and has neuroprotective properties in animal models of Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.

  3. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  4. Influence of allelic variations in relation to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on psychopathic traits: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Durand

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Past findings support a relationship between abnormalities in the amygdala and the presence of psychopathic traits. Among other genes and biomarkers relevant to the amygdala, norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors might both play a role in psychopathy due to their association with traits peripheral to psychopathy. The purpose is to examine if allelic variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors play a role in the display of psychopathic traits and executive functions. Methods Fifty-seven healthy participants from the community provided a saliva sample for SNP sampling of rs5522 and rs5569. Participants then completed the Psychopathic Personality Inventory–Short Form (PPI-SF and the Tower of Hanoi. Results Allelic variations of both rs5522 and rs5569 were significant when compared to PPI-SF total score and the fearless dominance component of the PPI-SF. A significant result was also obtained between rs5522 and the number of moves needed to complete the 5-disk Tower of Hanoi. Conclusion This pilot study offers preliminary results regarding the effect of allelic variations in SNPs related to norepinephrine and mineralocorticoid receptors on the presence of psychopathic traits. Suggestions are provided to enhance the reliability and validity of a larger-scale study.

  5. Novel deletion alleles carrying CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric genes in Brazilian patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerra-Júnior Gil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by deletions, large gene conversions or mutations in CYP21A2 gene. The human gene is located at 6p21.3 within a locus containing the genes for putative serine/threonine Kinase RP, complement C4, steroid 21-hydroxylase CYP21 tenascin TNX, normally, in a duplicated cluster known as RCCX module. The CYP21 extra copy is a pseudogene (CYP21A1P. In Brazil, 30-kb deletion forming monomodular alleles that carry chimeric CYP21A1P/A2 genes corresponds to ~9% of disease-causing alleles. Such alleles are considered to result from unequal crossovers within the bimodular C4/CYP21 locus. Depending on the localization of recombination breakpoint, different alleles can be generated conferring the locus high degree of allelic variability. The purpose of the study was to investigate the variability of deleted alleles in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Methods We used different techniques to investigate the variability of 30-kb deletion alleles in patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Alleles were first selected after Southern blotting. The composition of CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric genes was investigated by ASO-PCR and MLPA analyses followed by sequencing to refine the location of recombination breakpoints. Twenty patients carrying at least one allele with C4/CYP21 30-kb deletion were included in the study. Results An allele carrying a CYP21A1P/A2 chimeric gene was found unusually associated to a C4B/C4A Taq I 6.4-kb fragment, generally associated to C4B and CYP21A1P deletions. A novel haplotype bearing both p.P34L and p.H62L, novel and rare mutations, respectively, was identified in exon 1, however p.P30L, the most frequent pseudogene-derived mutation in this exon, was absent. Four unrelated patients showed this haplotype. Absence of p.P34L in CYP21A1P of normal controls indicated that it is not derived from pseudogene. In addition, the combination of different

  6. Readressing the role of Toll-like receptor-4 alleles in inflammatory bowel disease: colitis, smoking, and seroreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolakis, Anastassios C; Kapsoritakis, Andreas N; Kapsoritaki, Anastasia; Tiaka, Elisavet K; Oikonomou, Konstantinos A; Lotis, Vassilis; Vamvakopoulou, Dimitra; Davidi, Ioanna; Vamvakopoulos, Nikolaos; Potamianos, Spyros P

    2013-02-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) polymorphisms, and especially TLR-4 Asp299Gly and TLR-4 Thr399Ile, have been linked with Crohn's disease (CD) and to a lesser extent with ulcerative colitis (UC), CD behavior, and compromised seroreactivity to microbial antigens. Available data, however, are conflicting. To address these issues, the distribution of TLR-4 polymorphic alleles was assessed in patients with UC, CD, and healthy controls (HC), considering patient and disease characteristics as well as related serological markers. TLR-4 Asp299Gly and TLR-4 Thr399Ile polymorphisms were determined in 187 UC and 163 CD patients and 274 randomly selected HC. C reactive protein, anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae mannan antibodies, anti-mannobioside carbohydrate antibodies, anti-laminariobioside carbohydrate antibodies IgG, and anti-chitobioside carbohydrate antibodies (ACCA) IgA levels were also assessed. UC and especially pancolitis patients carried the mutant alleles more frequently compared to CD patients and HC or UC patients with different disease extents (P = 0.002 and P ACCA IgA were lower in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients carrying the mutant compared to those with wild-type alleles (0.075 ACCA IgA levels. Smoking reduces the extent of UC, even in the presence of mutant alleles.

  7. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  8. Association between allelic variants of the human glucocorticoid receptor gene and autoimmune diseases: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Cristian; Marcos, Miguel; Carbonell, Cristina; Mirón-Canelo, José Antonio; Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard; Chamorro, Antonio-Javier

    2018-05-01

    The human glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1) is considered to play a role in the differences and sensitivities of the glucocorticoid response in individuals with autoimmune diseases. The objective of this study was to examine by means of a systematic review previous findings regarding allelic variants of NR3C1 in relation to the risk of developing systemic autoimmune diseases. Studies that analysed the genotype distribution of NR3C1 allelic variants among patients with systemic autoimmune diseases were retrieved. A meta-analysis was conducted with a random effects model. Odds ratios (ORs) and their confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. In addition, sub-analysis by ethnicity, sensitivity analysis and tests for heterogeneity of the results were performed. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria for meta-analysis. We found no evidence that the analysed NR3C1 polymorphisms, rs6198, rs56149945, and rs6189/rs6190, modulate the risk of developing a systemic autoimmune disease. Nonetheless, a protective role for the minor allele of rs41423247 was found among Caucasians (OR=0.78; 95% CI: 0.65, 0.92; P=0.004). A subgroup analysis according to underlying diseases revealed no significant association either for Behçet's disease or rheumatoid arthritis, while correlations between NR3C1 polymorphisms and disease activity or response to glucocorticoids could not be evaluated due to insufficient data. There is no clear evidence that the analysed NR3C1 allelic variants confer a risk for developing systemic autoimmune diseases although the minor G allele of rs41423247 may be protective among Caucasians. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Distribution of photoperiod-insensitive allele Ppd-A1a and its effect on heading time in Japanese wheat cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Masako; Chono, Makiko; Nishimura, Tsutomu; Sato, Mikako; Yoshimura, Yasuhiro; Matsunaka, Hitoshi; Fujita, Masaya; Oda, Shunsuke; Kubo, Katashi; Kiribuchi-Otobe, Chikako; Kojima, Hisayo; Nishida, Hidetaka; Kato, Kenji

    2013-09-01

    The Ppd-A1 genotype of 240 Japanese wheat cultivars and 40 foreign cultivars was determined using a PCR-based method. Among Japanese cultivars, only 12 cultivars, all of which were Hokkaido winter wheat, carried the Ppd-A1a allele, while this allele was not found in Hokkaido spring wheat cultivars or Tohoku-Kyushu cultivars. Cultivars with a photoperiod-insensitive allele headed 6.9-9.8 days earlier in Kanto and 2.5 days earlier in Hokkaido than photoperiod-sensitive cultivars. The lower effect of photoperiod-insensitive alleles observed in Hokkaido could be due to the longer day-length at the spike formation stage compared with that in Kanto. Pedigree analysis showed that 'Purple Straw' and 'Tohoku 118' were donors of Ppd-A1a and Ppd-D1a in Hokkaido wheat cultivars, respectively. Wheat cultivars recently developed in Hokkaido carry photoperiod-insensitive alleles at a high frequency. For efficient utilization of Ppd-1 alleles in the Hokkaido wheat-breeding program, the effect of Ppd-1 on growth pattern and grain yield should be investigated. Ppd-A1a may be useful as a unique gene source for fine tuning the heading time in the Tohoku-Kyushu region since the effect of Ppd-A1a on photoperiod insensitivity appears to differ from the effect of Ppd-B1a and Ppd-D1a.

  10. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Firas M.; Chitu, Violeta; Sloane, Jennifer; Axelrod, Matthew; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Stanley, E. Richard; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine regulates a wide variety of physiological processes via interaction with one or more G-protein-coupled receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R). Because A1R occupancy promotes fusion of human monocytes to form giant cells in vitro, we determined whether A1R occupancy similarly promotes osteoclast function and formation. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) were harvested from C57Bl/6 female mice or A1R-knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates and differentiated into osteoclasts in the presence of colony stimulating factor-1 and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand in the presence or absence of the A1R antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine (DPCPX). Osteoclast morphology was analyzed in tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase or F-actin-stained samples, and bone resorption was evaluated by toluidine blue staining of dentin. BMCs from A1R-knockout mice form fewer osteoclasts than BMCs from WT mice, and the A1R antagonist DPCPX inhibits osteoclast formation (IC50=1 nM), with altered morphology and reduced ability to resorb bone. A1R blockade increased ubiquitination and degradation of TRAF6 in RAW264.7 cells induced to differentiate into osteoclasts. These studies suggest a critical role for adenosine in bone homeostasis via interaction with adenosine A1R and further suggest that A1R may be a novel pharmacologic target to prevent the bone loss associated with inflammatory diseases and menopause.—Kara, F. M., Chitu, V., Sloane, J., Axelrod, M., Fredholm, B. B., Stanley, R., Cronstein, B. N. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function. PMID:20181934

  11. Adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs) play a critical role in osteoclast formation and function

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Firas M.; Chitu, Violeta; Sloane, Jennifer; Axelrod, Matthew; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Stanley, E. Richard; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2010-01-01

    Adenosine regulates a wide variety of physiological processes via interaction with one or more G-protein-coupled receptors (A1R, A2AR, A2BR, and A3R). Because A1R occupancy promotes fusion of human monocytes to form giant cells in vitro, we determined whether A1R occupancy similarly promotes osteoclast function and formation. Bone marrow cells (BMCs) were harvested from C57Bl/6 female mice or A1R-knockout mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates and differentiated into osteoclasts in the pre...

  12. Cerebral A1 adenosine receptors (A1AR) in liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boy, Christian; Meyer, Philipp T.; Kircheis, Gerald; Haussinger, Dieter; Holschbach, Marcus H.; Coenen, Heinz H.; Herzog, Hans; Elmenhorst, David; Kaiser, Hans J.; Zilles, Karl; Bauer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The cerebral mechanisms underlying hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are poorly understood. Adenosine, a neuromodulator that pre- and postsynaptically modulates neuronal excitability and release of classical neurotransmitters via A 1 adenosine receptors (A 1 AR), is likely to be involved. The present study investigates changes of cerebral A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients by means of positron emission tomography (PET) and [ 18 F]CPFPX, a novel selective A 1 AR antagonist. PET was performed in cirrhotic patients (n = 10) and healthy volunteers (n = 10). Quantification of in vivo receptor density was done by Logan's non-invasive graphical analysis (pons as reference region). The outcome parameter was the apparent binding potential (aBP, proportional to B max /K D ). Cortical and subcortical regions showed lower A 1 AR binding in cirrhotic patients than in controls. The aBP changes reached statistical significance vs healthy controls (p 1 AR binding may further aggravate neurotransmitter imbalance at the synaptic cleft in cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. Different pathomechanisms may account for these alterations including decrease of A 1 AR density or affinity, as well as blockade of the A 1 AR by endogenous adenosine or exogenous xanthines. (orig.)

  13. The chemokine receptor CCR5 Δ32 allele in natalizumab-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, M; Søndergaard, Helle B; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The chemokine receptor CCR5 may be important for the recruitment of pathogenic T cells to the CNS in multiple sclerosis (MS). We hypothesized that this chemokine receptor might still be important for T-cell migration during treatment with anti-very late antigen (VLA)-4 antibody. We...... impact on the frequency of relapses 1 year prior to natalizumab treatment or during the first 48 weeks of treatment. The multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) was significantly lower at baseline in patients carrying CCR5 Δ32 (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: CCR5 Δ32 is not associated with lower disease...

  14. Allelic exchange of pheromones and their receptors reprograms sexual identity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynne C Stanton

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell type specification is a fundamental process that all cells must carry out to ensure appropriate behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. In fungi, cell identity is critical for defining "sexes" known as mating types and is controlled by components of mating type (MAT loci. MAT-encoded genes function to define sexes via two distinct paradigms: 1 by controlling transcription of components common to both sexes, or 2 by expressing specially encoded factors (pheromones and their receptors that differ between mating types. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has two mating types (a and alpha that are specified by an extremely unusual MAT locus. The complex architecture of this locus makes it impossible to predict which paradigm governs mating type. To identify the mechanism by which the C. neoformans sexes are determined, we created strains in which the pheromone and pheromone receptor from one mating type (a replaced the pheromone and pheromone receptor of the other (alpha. We discovered that these "alpha(a" cells effectively adopt a new mating type (that of a cells; they sense and respond to alpha factor, they elicit a mating response from alpha cells, and they fuse with alpha cells. In addition, alpha(a cells lose the alpha cell type-specific response to pheromone and do not form germ tubes, instead remaining spherical like a cells. Finally, we discovered that exogenous expression of the diploid/dikaryon-specific transcription factor Sxi2a could then promote complete sexual development in crosses between alpha and alpha(a strains. These data reveal that cell identity in C. neoformans is controlled fully by three kinds of MAT-encoded proteins: pheromones, pheromone receptors, and homeodomain proteins. Our findings establish the mechanisms for maintenance of distinct cell types and subsequent developmental behaviors in this unusual human fungal pathogen.

  15. Allelic exchange of pheromones and their receptors reprograms sexual identity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Brynne C; Giles, Steven S; Staudt, Mark W; Kruzel, Emilia K; Hull, Christina M

    2010-02-26

    Cell type specification is a fundamental process that all cells must carry out to ensure appropriate behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. In fungi, cell identity is critical for defining "sexes" known as mating types and is controlled by components of mating type (MAT) loci. MAT-encoded genes function to define sexes via two distinct paradigms: 1) by controlling transcription of components common to both sexes, or 2) by expressing specially encoded factors (pheromones and their receptors) that differ between mating types. The human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans has two mating types (a and alpha) that are specified by an extremely unusual MAT locus. The complex architecture of this locus makes it impossible to predict which paradigm governs mating type. To identify the mechanism by which the C. neoformans sexes are determined, we created strains in which the pheromone and pheromone receptor from one mating type (a) replaced the pheromone and pheromone receptor of the other (alpha). We discovered that these "alpha(a)" cells effectively adopt a new mating type (that of a cells); they sense and respond to alpha factor, they elicit a mating response from alpha cells, and they fuse with alpha cells. In addition, alpha(a) cells lose the alpha cell type-specific response to pheromone and do not form germ tubes, instead remaining spherical like a cells. Finally, we discovered that exogenous expression of the diploid/dikaryon-specific transcription factor Sxi2a could then promote complete sexual development in crosses between alpha and alpha(a) strains. These data reveal that cell identity in C. neoformans is controlled fully by three kinds of MAT-encoded proteins: pheromones, pheromone receptors, and homeodomain proteins. Our findings establish the mechanisms for maintenance of distinct cell types and subsequent developmental behaviors in this unusual human fungal pathogen.

  16. Generation and Characterization of Mice Expressing a Conditional Allele of the Interleukin-1 Receptor Type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Robson

    Full Text Available The cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β exert powerful pro-inflammatory actions throughout the body, mediated primarily by the intracellular signaling capacity of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R1. Although Il1r1 knockout mice have been informative with respect to a requirement for IL-1R1 signaling in inflammatory events, the constitutive nature of gene elimination has limited their utility in the assessment of temporal and spatial patterns of cytokine action. To pursue such questions, we have generated C57Bl/6J mice containing a floxed Il1r1 gene (Il1r1loxP/loxP, with loxP sites positioned to flank exons 3 and 4 and thereby the ability to spatially and temporally eliminate Il1r1 expression and signaling. We found that Il1r1loxP/loxP mice breed normally and exhibit no gross physical or behavioral phenotypes. Moreover, Il1r1loxP/loxP mice exhibit normal IL-1R1 receptor expression in brain and spleen, as well as normal IL-1R1-dependent increases in serum IL-6 following IL-1α injections. Breeding of Il1r1loxP/loxP mice to animals expressing a cytomegalovirus (CMV-driven Cre recombinase afforded efficient excision at the Il1r1 locus. The Il1r1loxP/loxP line should be a valuable tool for the assessment of contributions made by IL-1R1 signaling in diverse cell types across development.

  17. T-cell receptor Vα and Cα alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L.; Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C.; Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A.

    1989-01-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the α chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR α cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V α and C α markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals

  18. Allelic Variation in KIR2DL3 Generates a KIR2DL2-like Receptor with Increased Binding to Its HLA-C Ligand12

    OpenAIRE

    Frazier, William R.; Steiner, Noriko; Hou, Lihua; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2013-01-01

    Although extensive homology exists between their extracellular domains, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2*001 and KIR2DL3*001 have previously been shown to differ substantially in their HLA-C binding avidity. To explore the largely uncharacterized impact of allelic diversity, the most common KIR2DL2/3 allelic products in European American and African American populations were evaluated for surface expression and binding affinity to their HLA-C group 1 and 2 ligands. Although no...

  19. Next-generation sequencing technology a new tool for killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor allele typing in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniangou, B; Retière, C; Gagne, K

    2018-02-01

    Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptor (KIR) genes are a family of genes located together within the leukocyte receptor cluster on human chromosome 19q13.4. To date, 17 KIR genes have been identified including nine inhibitory genes (2DL1/L2/L3/L4/L5A/L5B, 3DL1/L2/L3), six activating genes (2DS1/S2/S3/S4/S5, 3DS1) and two pseudogenes (2DP1, 3DP1) classified into group A (KIR A) and group B (KIR B) haplotypes. The number and the nature of KIR genes vary between the individuals. In addition, these KIR genes are known to be polymorphic at allelic level (907 alleles described in July 2017). KIR genes encode for receptors which are predominantly expressed by Natural Killer (NK) cells. KIR receptors recognize HLA class I molecules and are able to kill residual recipient leukemia cells, and thus reduce the likelihood of relapse. KIR alleles of Hematopoietic Stem Cell (HSC) donor would require to be known (Alicata et al. Eur J Immunol 2016) because the KIR allele polymorphism may affect both the KIR + NK cell phenotype and function (Gagne et al. Eur J Immunol 2013; Bari R, et al. Sci Rep 2016) as well as HSCT outcome (Boudreau et al. JCO 2017). The introduction of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) has overcome current conventional DNA sequencing method limitations, known to be time consuming. Recently, a novel NGS KIR allele typing approach of all KIR genes was developed by our team in Nantes from 30 reference DNAs (Maniangou et al. Front in Immunol 2017). This NGS KIR allele typing approach is simple, fast, reliable, specific and showed a concordance rate of 95% for centromeric and telomeric KIR genes in comparison with high-resolution KIR typing obtained to those published data using exome capture (Norman PJ et al. Am J Hum Genet 2016). This NGS KIR allele typing approach may also be used in reproduction and to better study KIR + NK cell implication in the control of viral infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. The miR9863 family regulates distinct Mla alleles in barley to attenuate NLR receptor-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Liu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Mla alleles encode coiled-coil (CC, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors that trigger isolate-specific immune responses against the powdery mildew fungus, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh. How Mla or NB-LRR genes in grass species are regulated at post-transcriptional level is not clear. The microRNA family, miR9863, comprises four members that differentially regulate distinct Mla alleles in barley. We show that miR9863 members guide the cleavage of Mla1 transcripts in barley, and block or reduce the accumulation of MLA1 protein in the heterologous Nicotiana benthamiana expression system. Regulation specificity is determined by variation in a unique single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP in mature miR9863 family members and two SNPs in the Mla miR9863-binding site that separates these alleles into three groups. Further, we demonstrate that 22-nt miR9863s trigger the biogenesis of 21-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs and together these sRNAs form a feed-forward regulation network for repressing the expression of group I Mla alleles. Overexpression of miR9863 members specifically attenuates MLA1, but not MLA10-triggered disease resistance and cell-death signaling. We propose a key role of the miR9863 family in dampening immune response signaling triggered by a group of MLA immune receptors in barley.

  1. Linkage disequilibrium between an allele at the dopamine D4 receptor locus and Tourette syndrome, by the transmission-disequilibrium test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grice, D.E.; Gelernter, J. [Veterans Administration Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT (United States); Leckman, J.F.; Pauls, D.L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    Dopaminergic abnormalities are implicated in the pathogenesis of Tourette syndrome (TS) and chronic multiple tics. We used the transmission-disequilibrium test (TDT) method to test for linkage disequilibrium between a specific allele (the seven-repeat allele (DRD4*7R) of the exon 3 VNTR polymorphic site) at the D4 dopamine receptor locus (DRD4) and expression of chronic multiple tics and TS. This particular allele had been shown in functional studies to have different binding properties compared with the other common alleles in this DRD4 polymorphic system. We studied 64 family trios (consisting of an affected person and two parents, at least one heterozygous for DRD4*7R), including 12 nuclear family trios and 52 trios from four large TS kindreds. The DRD4*7R allele was transmitted significantly more frequently than expected ({chi}{sup 2}{sub TDT} ranging from 8.47 [P < .004] to 10.80 [P = .001], depending on breadth of disease definition and inclusion or exclusion of inferred genotypes). Confirmation of this finding will depend on either replication in other samples or the identification of a transmitted functional mutation within this sample. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Allelic variation in KIR2DL3 generates a KIR2DL2-like receptor with increased binding to its HLA-C ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William R; Steiner, Noriko; Hou, Lihua; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2013-06-15

    Although extensive homology exists between their extracellular domains, NK cell inhibitory receptors killer Ig-like receptor (KIR) 2DL2*001 and KIR2DL3*001 have previously been shown to differ substantially in their HLA-C binding avidity. To explore the largely uncharacterized impact of allelic diversity, the most common KIR2DL2/3 allelic products in European American and African American populations were evaluated for surface expression and binding affinity to their HLA-C group 1 and 2 ligands. Although no significant differences in the degree of cell membrane localization were detected in a transfected human NKL cell line by flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and KIR binding to a panel of HLA allotypes demonstrated that KIR2DL3*005 differed significantly from other KIR2DL3 allelic products in its ability to bind HLA-C. The increased affinity and avidity of KIR2DL3*005 for its ligand was also demonstrated to have a larger impact on the inhibition of IFN-γ production by the human KHYG-1 NK cell line compared with KIR2DL3*001, a low-affinity allelic product. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the combination of arginine at residue 11 and glutamic acid at residue 35 in KIR2DL3*005 were critical to the observed phenotype. Although these residues are distal to the KIR/HLA-C interface, molecular modeling suggests that alteration in the interdomain hinge angle of KIR2DL3*005 toward that found in KIR2DL2*001, another strong receptor of the KIR2DL2/3 family, may be the cause of this increased affinity. The regain of inhibitory capacity by KIR2DL3*005 suggests that the rapidly evolving KIR locus may be responding to relatively recent selective pressures placed upon certain human populations.

  3. Sortilin-Related Receptor Expression in Human Neural Stem Cells Derived from Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Carrying the APOE Epsilon 4 Allele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen Zollo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the most common form of dementia in the elderly; important risk factors are old age and inheritance of the apolipoprotein E4 (APOE4 allele. Changes in amyloid precursor protein (APP binding, trafficking, and sorting may be important AD causative factors. Secretase-mediated APP cleavage produces neurotoxic amyloid-beta (Aβ peptides, which form lethal deposits in the brain. In vivo and in vitro studies have implicated sortilin-related receptor (SORL1 as an important factor in APP trafficking and processing. Recent in vitro evidence has associated the APOE4 allele and alterations in the SORL1 pathway with AD development and progression. Here, we analyzed SORL1 expression in neural stem cells (NSCs from AD patients carrying null, one, or two copies of the APOE4 allele. We show reduced SORL1 expression only in NSCs of a patient carrying two copies of APOE4 allele with increased Aβ/SORL1 localization along the degenerated neurites. Interestingly, SORL1 binding to APP was largely compromised; this could be almost completely reversed by γ-secretase (but not β-secretase inhibitor treatment. These findings may yield new insights into the complex interplay of SORL1 and AD pathology and point to NSCs as a valuable tool to address unsolved AD-related questions in vitro.

  4. Influence of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) Alleles and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptors (KIR) Types on Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia (HIT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnes, Jason H; Shaffer, Christian M; Cronin, Robert; Bastarache, Lisa; Gaudieri, Silvana; James, Ian; Pavlos, Rebecca; Steiner, Heidi E; Mosley, Jonathan D; Mallal, Simon; Denny, Joshua C; Phillips, Elizabeth J; Roden, Dan M

    2017-09-01

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is an unpredictable, life-threatening, immune-mediated reaction to heparin. Variation in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes is now used to prevent immune-mediated adverse drug reactions. Combinations of HLA alleles and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) are associated with multiple autoimmune diseases and infections. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association of HLA alleles and KIR types, alone or in the presence of different HLA ligands, with HIT. HIT cases and heparin-exposed controls were identified in BioVU, an electronic health record coupled to a DNA biobank. HLA sequencing and KIR type imputation using Illumina OMNI-Quad data were performed. Odds ratios for HLA alleles and KIR types and HLA*KIR interactions using conditional logistic regressions were determined in the overall population and by race/ethnicity. Analysis was restricted to KIR types and HLA alleles with a frequency greater than 0.01. The p values for HLA and KIR association were corrected by using a false discovery rate qHIT cases and 350 matched controls were identified. No statistical differences in baseline characteristics were observed between cases and controls. The HLA-DRB3*01:01 allele was significantly associated with HIT in the overall population (odds ratio 2.81 [1.57-5.02], p=2.1×10 -4 , q=0.02) and in individuals with European ancestry, independent of other alleles. No KIR types were associated with HIT, although a significant interaction was observed between KIR2DS5 and the HLA-C1 KIR binding group (p=0.03). The HLA-DRB3*01:01 allele was identified as a potential risk factor for HIT. This class II HLA gene and allele represent biologically plausible candidates for influencing HIT pathogenesis. We found limited evidence of the role of KIR types in HIT pathogenesis. Replication and further study of the HLA-DRB3*01:01 association is necessary. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  5. No association between the TaqI A1 RFLP of the D2 receptor gene and alcoholism in a Mexican population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz-Fuentes, C.; Carmarena, B.; Eroza, V. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The suggested association of the A1 allele of the D2 dopamine receptor (DRD2) human gene with alcoholism was studied by comparing the DRD2/TaqI genotypes of 36 healthy controls and 38 individuals who met the DSM-III-R diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence. All subjects were unrelated, with parents and grandparents of Mexican origin. The alcoholics in our sample suffered one of the following conditions: delirium tremens (16.6%), alcohol hallucinosis (56.6%) or uncomplicated alcohol withdrawal (26.4%). Eight-eight percent of the controls carried the A1 allele. The frequency of the DRD2 A1 allele in the Mexican urban sample (pA1 = 0.61) was 2 to 3-fold higher than reported in Caucasian populations from the USA and Europe, but similar to the allele frequencies found in defined Amerindian populations. There were not significant differences in the prevalence or allele frequency between alcoholics (pA1 = 0.64) and controls, regardless if the alcoholics were subtyped accordingly to severity, age of onset or positive family history. Alcoholics had higher scores than controls in the neuroticism (N) and psychoticism (P) subscales on the Eysenck personality test: alcoholics P = 6.2 {+-} 2.9, N = 16.0 {+-} 4.2 vs. controls P = 2.5 {+-} 2.3, N = 5.7 {+-} 5.1; p<0.001 and p<0.001, respectively. However, no relationship between personality traits and genotypes was found. Our results do not support a consistent association between the TaqI A1 RFLP for the DRD2 gene and alcoholism.

  6. REDUCTION OF ADENOSINE-A1-RECEPTORS IN THE PERFORANT PATHWAY TERMINAL ZONE IN ALZHEIMER HIPPOCAMPUS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JAARSMA, D; SEBENS, JB; KORF, J

    1991-01-01

    The cells of origin of the perforant pathway are destroyed in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In rat the adenosine A1-receptors are specifically localized on the perforant path terminals in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. In the present study the density of A1-receptors in the hippocampus of

  7. Allelic Variation in KIR2DL3 Generates a KIR2DL2-like Receptor with Increased Binding to Its HLA-C Ligand12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, William R.; Steiner, Noriko; Hou, Lihua; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Hurley, Carolyn Katovich

    2013-01-01

    Although extensive homology exists between their extracellular domains, natural killer cell inhibitory receptors KIR2DL2*001 and KIR2DL3*001 have previously been shown to differ substantially in their HLA-C binding avidity. To explore the largely uncharacterized impact of allelic diversity, the most common KIR2DL2/3 allelic products in European American and African American populations were evaluated for surface expression and binding affinity to their HLA-C group 1 and 2 ligands. Although no significant differences in the degree of cell membrane localization were detected in a transfected human NKL cell line by flow cytometry, surface plasmon resonance and KIR binding to a panel of HLA allotypes demonstrated that KIR2DL3*005 differed significantly from other KIR2DL3 allelic products in its ability to bind HLA-C. The increased affinity and avidity of KIR2DL3*005 for its ligand was also demonstrated to have a larger impact on the inhibition of IFN-γ production by the human KHYG-1 NK cell line compared to KIR2DL3*001, a low affinity allelic product. Site-directed mutagenesis established that the combination of arginine at residue 11 and glutamic acid at residue 35 in KIR2DL3*005 were critical to the observed phenotype. Although these residues are distal to the KIR/HLA-C interface, molecular modeling suggests that alteration in the interdomain hinge angle of KIR2DL3*005 towards that found in KIR2DL2*001, another strong receptor of the KIR2DL2/3 family, may be the cause of this increased affinity. The regain of inhibitory capacity by KIR2DL3*005 suggests that the rapidly evolving KIR locus may be responding to relatively recent selective pressures placed upon certain human populations. PMID:23686481

  8. Allelic sequence variations in the hypervariable region of a T-cell receptor β chain: Correlation with restriction fragment length polymorphism in human families and populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Direct sequence analysis of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) V β1 variable gene identified a single base-pair allelic variation (C/G) located within the coding region. This change results in substitution of a histidine (CAC) for a glutamine (CAG) at position 48 of the TCR β chain, a position predicted to be in the TCR antigen binding site. The V β1 polymorphism was found by DNA sequence analysis of V β1 genes from seven unrelated individuals; V β1 genes were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, the amplified fragments were cloned into M13 phage vectors, and sequences were determined. To determined the inheritance patterns of the V β1 substitution and to test correlation with V β1 restriction fragment length polymorphism detected with Pvu II and Taq I, allele-specific oligonucleotides were constructed and used to characterize amplified DNA samples. Seventy unrelated individuals and six families were tested for both restriction fragment length polymorphism and for the V β1 substitution. The correlation was also tested using amplified, size-selected, Pvu II- and Taq I-digested DNA samples from heterozygotes. Pvu II allele 1 (61/70) and Taq I allele 1 (66/70) were found to be correlated with the substitution giving rise to a histidine at position 48. Because there are exceptions to the correlation, the use of specific probes to characterize allelic forms of TCR variable genes will provide important tools for studies of basic TCR genetics and disease associations

  9. Effects of targeted deletion of A1 adenosine receptors on postischemic cardiac function and expression of adenosine receptor subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, R Ray; Teng, Bunyen; Oldenburg, Peter J; Katwa, Laxmansa C; Schnermann, Jurgen B; Mustafa, S Jamal

    2006-10-01

    To examine ischemic tolerance in the absence of A(1) adenosine receptors (A(1)ARs), isolated wild-type (WT) and A(1)AR knockout (A(1)KO) murine hearts underwent global ischemia-reperfusion, and injury was measured in terms of functional recovery and efflux of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Hearts were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR both at baseline and at intervals during ischemia-reperfusion to determine whether compensatory expression of other adenosine receptor subtypes occurs with either A(1)AR deletion and/or ischemia-reperfusion. A(1)KO hearts had higher baseline coronary flow (CF) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) than WT hearts, whereas heart rate was unchanged by A(1)AR deletion. After 20 min of ischemia, CF was attenuated in A(1)KO compared with WT hearts, and this reduction persisted throughout reperfusion. Final recovery of LVDP was decreased in A(1)KO hearts (54.4 +/- 5.1 vs. WT 81.1 +/- 3.4% preischemic baseline) and correlated with higher diastolic pressure during reperfusion. Postischemic efflux of LDH was greater in A(1)KO compared with WT hearts. Real-time RT-PCR demonstrated the absence of A(1)AR transcript in A(1)KO hearts, and the message for A(2A), A(2B), and A(3) adenosine receptors was similar in uninstrumented A(1)KO and WT hearts. Ischemia-reperfusion increased A(2B) mRNA expression 2.5-fold in both WT and A(1)KO hearts without changing A(1) or A(3) expression. In WT hearts, ischemia transiently doubled A(2A) mRNA, which returned to preischemic level upon reperfusion, a pattern not observed in A(1)KO hearts. Together, these data affirm the cardioprotective role of A(1)ARs and suggest that induced expression of other adenosine receptor subtypes may participate in the response to ischemia-reperfusion in isolated murine hearts.

  10. Endogenous activation of adenosine A(1) receptors accelerates ischemic suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilie, Andrei; Ciocan, Dragos; Zagrean, Ana-Maria

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia induces a rapid suppression of spontaneous brain rhythms prior to major alterations in ionic homeostasis. It was found in vitro during ischemia that the rapidly formed adenosine, resulting from the intracellular breakdown of ATP, may inhibit synaptic transmission via the A(1......) receptor subtype. The link between endogenous A(1) receptor activation during ischemia and the suppression of spontaneous electrocortical activity has not yet been established in the intact brain. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the effects of A(1) receptor antagonism by 8-cyclopentyl-1...

  11. M1 muscarinic receptor facilitates cognitive function by interplay with AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lan-Xue; Ge, Yan-Hui; Xiong, Cai-Hong; Tang, Ling; Yan, Ying-Hui; Law, Ping-Yee; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan

    2018-03-06

    M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (M1 mAChRs) are the most abundant muscarinic receptors in the hippocampus and have been shown to have procognitive effects. AMPA receptors (AMPARs), an important subtype of ionotropic glutamate receptors, are key components in neurocognitive networks. However, the role of AMPARs in procognitive effects of M1 mAChRs and how M1 mAChRs affect the function of AMPARs remain poorly understood. Here, we found that basal expression of GluA1, a subunit of AMPARs, and its phosphorylation at Ser845 were maintained by M1 mAChR activity. Activation of M1 mAChRs promoted membrane insertion of GluA1, especially to postsynaptic densities. Impairment of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory by antagonism of M1 mAChRs paralleled the reduction of GluA1 expression, and improvement of learning and memory by activation of M1 mAChRs was accompanied by the synaptic insertion of GluA1 and its increased phosphorylation at Ser845. Furthermore, abrogation of phosphorylation of Ser845 residue of GluA1 ablated M1 mAChR-mediated improvement of learning and memory. Taken together, these results show a functional correlation of M1 mAChRs and GluA1 and the essential role of GluA1 in M1 mAChR-mediated cognitive improvement.-Zhao, L.-X., Ge, Y.-H., Xiong, C.-H., Tang, L., Yan, Y.-H., Law, P.-Y., Qiu, Y., Chen, H.-Z. M1 muscarinic receptor facilitates cognitive function by interplay with AMPA receptor GluA1 subunit.

  12. Association between the seven-repeat allele of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4) and spontaneous food intake in pre-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Portella, André Krumel; Kennedy, James L; Gaudreau, Hélène; Davis, Caroline; Steiner, Meir; Soares, Claudio N; Matthews, Stephen G; Sokolowski, Marla B; Dubé, Laurette; Loucks, Eric B; Hamilton, Jill; Meaney, Michael J; Levitan, Robert D

    2014-02-01

    Studies in adults show associations between the hypofunctional seven-repeat allele (7R) of the dopamine-4 receptor gene (DRD4), increased eating behaviour and/or obesity, particularly in females. We examined whether 7R is associated with total caloric intake and/or food choices in pre-schoolers. 150 four-year-old children taking part in a birth cohort study in Canada were administered a snack test meal in a laboratory setting. Mothers also filled out a food frequency questionnaire to address childrens' habitual food consumption. Total caloric and individual macronutrient intakes during the snack meal and specific types of foods as reported in the food diaries were compared across 7R allele carriers vs. non-carriers, using current BMI as a co-variate. We found significant sex by genotype interactions for fat and protein intake during the snack test. Post hoc testing revealed that in girls, but not boys, 7R carriers ate more fat and protein than did non-carriers. Based on the food diaries, across both sexes, 7R carriers consumed more portions of ice cream and less vegetables, eggs, nuts and whole bread, suggesting a less healthy pattern of habitual food consumption. The 7R allele of DRD4 influences macronutrient intakes and specific food choices as early as four years of age. The specific pattern of results further suggests that prior associations between the 7R allele and adult overeating/obesity may originate in food choices observable in the preschool years. Longitudinal follow-up of these children will help establish the relevance of these findings for obesity risk and prevention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E.; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R−/−) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction siz...

  14. Functional characterization of a full length pregnane X receptor, expression in vivo, and identification of PXR alleles, in Zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bainy, Afonso C.D. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Departamento de Bioquímica, CCB, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900 (Brazil); Kubota, Akira; Goldstone, Jared V. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Lille-Langøy, Roger [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Karchner, Sibel I. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Celander, Malin C. [Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Gothenburg, SE 405 30 Göteborg (Sweden); Hahn, Mark E. [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Goksøyr, Anders [Department of Biology, University of Bergen, N-5020 Bergen (Norway); Stegeman, John J., E-mail: jstegeman@whoi.edu [Biology Department, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Full-length pxr has been cloned from zebrafish. •Alleles of pxr were identified in zebrafish. •Full length Pxr was activated less strongly than ligand binding domain in cell-based reporter assays. •High levels of pxr expression were found in eye and brain as well as in liver. •TCPOBOP and PB did not significantly alter expression of pxr in liver. -- Abstract: The pregnane X receptor (PXR) (nuclear receptor NR1I2) is a ligand activated transcription factor, mediating responses to diverse xenobiotic and endogenous chemicals. The properties of PXR in fish are not fully understood. Here we report on cloning and characterization of full-length PXR of zebrafish, Danio rerio, and pxr expression in vivo. Initial efforts gave a cDNA encoding a 430 amino acid protein identified as zebrafish pxr by phylogenetic and synteny analysis. The sequence of the cloned Pxr DNA binding domain (DBD) was highly conserved, with 74% identity to human PXR-DBD, while the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the cloned sequence was only 44% identical to human PXR-LBD. Sequence variation among clones in the initial effort prompted sequencing of multiple clones from a single fish. There were two prominent variants, one sequence with S183, Y218 and H383 and the other with I183, C218 and N383, which we designate as alleles pxr*1 (nr1i2*1) and pxr*2 (nr1i2*2), respectively. In COS-7 cells co-transfected with a PXR-responsive reporter gene, the full-length Pxr*1 (the more common variant) was activated by known PXR agonists clotrimazole and pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile but to a lesser extent than the full-length human PXR. Activation of full-length Pxr*1 was only 10% of that with the Pxr*1 LBD. Quantitative real time PCR analysis showed prominent expression of pxr in liver and eye, as well as brain and intestine of adult zebrafish. The pxr was expressed in heart and kidney at levels similar to that in intestine. The expression of pxr in liver was weakly induced by ligands for

  15. Antinociception by systemically-administered acetaminophen (paracetamol) involves spinal serotonin 5-HT7 and adenosine A1 receptors, as well as peripheral adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jean; Reid, Allison R; Sawynok, Jana

    2013-03-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used analgesic, but its sites and mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. Recent studies have separately implicated spinal adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)Rs) and serotonin 5-HT(7) receptors (5-HT(7)Rs) in the antinociceptive effects of systemically administered acetaminophen. In the present study, we determined whether these two actions are linked by delivering a selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist to the spinal cord of mice and examining nociception using the formalin 2% model. In normal and A(1)R wild type mice, antinociception by systemic (i.p.) acetaminophen 300mg/kg was reduced by intrathecal (i.t.) delivery of the selective 5-HT(7)R antagonist SB269970 3μg. In mice lacking A(1)Rs, i.t. SB269970 did not reverse antinociception by systemic acetaminophen, indicating a link between spinal 5-HT(7)R and A(1)R mechanisms. We also explored potential roles of peripheral A(1)Rs in antinociception by acetaminophen administered both locally and systemically. In normal mice, intraplantar (i.pl.) acetaminophen 200μg produced antinociception in the formalin test, and this was blocked by co-administration of the selective A(1)R antagonist DPCPX 4.5μg. Acetaminophen administered into the contralateral hindpaw had no effect, indicating a local peripheral action. When acetaminophen was administered systemically, its antinociceptive effect was reversed by i.pl. DPCPX in normal mice; this was also observed in A(1)R wild type mice, but not in those lacking A(1)Rs. In summary, we demonstrate a link between spinal 5-HT(7)Rs and A(1)Rs in the spinal cord relevant to antinociception by systemic acetaminophen. Furthermore, we implicate peripheral A(1)Rs in the antinociceptive effects of locally- and systemically-administered acetaminophen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Food cravings, food addiction, and a dopamine-resistant (DRD2 A1) receptor polymorphism in Asian American college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Joanna; Trang, Amy; Henning, Susanne M; Wilhalme, Holly; Carpenter, Catherine; Heber, David; Li, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    In an era where obesity remains an important public health concern, food addiction has emerged as a possible contributor to obesity. The DRD2 gene is the most studied polymorphism. The aim of this study was to investigate a relationship between food addiction questionnaires, body composition measurements, and a dopamine- resistant receptor polymorphism (DRD2 A1) among Asian Americans. A total of 84 Asian American college students were recruited. Participants underwent body composition measurement via bioelectrical impedance, answered questionnaires (Food Craving Inventory and Power of Food Scale), and had blood drawn for genotyping (PCR). There was no difference in body composition (BMI, percent body fat) between the A1 (A1A1 or A1A2) and A2 (A2A2) groups. There were statistically significant differences in food cravings of carbohydrates and fast food on the Food Craving Inventory between the A1 and A2 groups (p=0.03), but not for sugar or fat. Among Asian college females, there was also a difference on the Power of Food questionnaire (p=0.04), which was not seen among men. 13 out of 55 women also had >30% body fat at a BMI of 21.4 to 28.5 kg/m2. Greater carbohydrate and fast food craving was associated with the DRD2 A1 versus A2 allele among Asian Americans. Further studies examining the ability of dopamine agonists to affect food craving and to reduce body fat in Asian American are warranted. More studies in food addiction among obese Asian Americans are needed with careful definition of obesity, specifically for Asian women.

  17. Regulation of Hippocampal Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Actions by Adenosine A1 Receptors and Chronic Caffeine Administration: Implications for the Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol on Spatial Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Vasco C; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Pratt, Judith A; Brett, Ros R; Sebastião, Ana M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated modulation of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons is important for the integrity of hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Although adenosine A1 receptors have a central role in fine-tuning excitatory transmission in the hippocampus, A1 receptors localized in GABAergic cells do not directly influence GABA release. CB1 and A1 receptors are the main targets for the effects of two of the most heavily consumed ps...

  18. Allelic association, DNA resequencing and copy number variation at the metabotropic glutamate receptor GRM7 gene locus in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandaswamy, Radhika; McQuillin, Andrew; Curtis, David; Gurling, Hugh

    2014-06-01

    Genetic markers at the GRM7 gene have shown allelic association with bipolar disorder (BP) in several case-control samples including our own sample. In this report, we present results of resequencing the GRM7 gene in 32 bipolar samples and 32 random controls selected from 553 bipolar cases and 547 control samples (UCL1). Novel and potential etiological base pair changes discovered by resequencing were genotyped in the entire UCL case-control sample. We also report on the association between GRM7 and BP in a second sample of 593 patients and 642 controls (UCL2). The three most significantly associated SNPs in the original UCL1 BP GWAS sample were genotyped in the UCL2 sample, of which none were associated. After combining the genotype data for the two samples only two (rs1508724 and rs6769814) of the original three SNP markers remained significantly associated with BP. DNA sequencing revealed mutations in three cases which were absent in control subjects. A 3'-UTR SNP rs56173829 was found to be significantly associated with BP in the whole UCL sample (P = 0.035; OR = 0.482), the rare allele being less common in cases compared to controls. Bioinformatic analyses predicted a change in the centroid secondary structure of RNA and alterations in the miRNA binding sites for the mutated base of rs56173829. We also validated two deletions and a duplication within GRM7 using quantitative-PCR which provides further support for the pre-existing evidence that copy number variants at GRM7 may have a role in the etiology of BP. © 2014 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Dynamic Regulation of FoxA1 by Steroid Receptors | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a key regulator in breast cancer initiation and progression. A widely discussed model proposes that forkhead box protein A1 (FoxA1) acts as a pioneer factor in cancer by binding and penetrating closed chromatin to allow access by transcription factors (TFs), including ER.

  20. A candidate subspecies discrimination system involving a vomeronasal receptor gene with different alleles fixed in M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C Karn

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Assortative mating, a potentially efficient prezygotic reproductive barrier, may prevent loss of genetic potential by avoiding the production of unfit hybrids (i.e., because of hybrid infertility or hybrid breakdown that occur at regions of secondary contact between incipient species. In the case of the mouse hybrid zone, where two subspecies of Mus musculus (M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus meet and exchange genes to a limited extent, assortative mating requires a means of subspecies recognition. We based the work reported here on the hypothesis that, if there is a pheromone sufficiently diverged between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus to mediate subspecies recognition, then that process must also require a specific receptor(s, also sufficiently diverged between the subspecies, to receive the signal and elicit an assortative mating response. We studied the mouse V1R genes, which encode a large family of receptors in the vomeronasal organ (VNO, by screening Perlegen SNP data and identified one, Vmn1r67, with 24 fixed SNP differences most of which (15/24 are nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions between M. m. domesticus and M. m. musculus. We observed substantial linkage disequilibrium (LD between Vmn1r67 and Abpa27, a mouse salivary androgen-binding protein gene that encodes a proteinaceous pheromone (ABP capable of mediating assortative mating, perhaps in conjunction with its bound small lipophilic ligand. The LD we observed is likely a case of association rather than residual physical linkage from a very recent selective sweep, because an intervening gene, Vmn1r71, shows significant intra(subspecific polymorphism but no inter(subspecific divergence in its nucleotide sequence. We discuss alternative explanations of these observations, for example that Abpa27 and Vmn1r67 are coevolving as signal and receptor to reinforce subspecies hybridization barriers or that the unusually divergent Vmn1r67 allele was not a product of fast positive

  1. Age-dependent changes of presynaptic neuromodulation via A1-adenosine receptors in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlágh, B; Zsilla, G; Baranyi, M; Kékes-Szabó, A; Vizi, E S

    1997-10-01

    The presynaptic neuromodulation of stimulation-evoked release of [3H]-acetylcholine by endogenous adenosine, via A1-adenosine receptors, was studied in superfused hippocampal slices taken from 4-, 12- and 24-month-old rats. 8-Cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (0.25 microM), a selective A1-receptor antagonist, increased significantly the electrical field stimulation-induced release of [3H]-acetylcholine in slices prepared from 4- and 12-month-old rats, showing a tonic inhibitory action of endogenous adenosine via stimulation of presynaptic A1-adenosine receptors. In contrast, 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine had no effect in 24-month-old rats. 2-Chloroadenosine (10 microM), an adenosine receptor agonist decreased the release of [3H]-acetylcholine in slices taken from 4- and 12-month-old rats, and no significant change was observed in slices taken from 24-month-old rats. In order to show whether the number/or affinity of the A1-receptors was affected in aged rats, [3H]-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine binding was studied in hippocampal membranes prepared from rats of different ages. Whereas the Bmax value was significantly lower in 2-year-old rats than in younger counterparts, the dissociation constant (Kd) was not affected by aging, indicating that the density rather than the affinity of adenosine receptors was altered. Endogenous adenosine levels present in the extracellular space were also measured in the superfusate by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with ultraviolet detection, and an age-related increase in the adenosine level was found. In summary, our results indicate that during aging the level of adenosine in the extracellular fluid is increased in the hippocampus. There is a downregulation and reduced responsiveness of presynaptic adenosine A1-receptors, and it seems likely that these changes are due to the enhanced adenosine level in the extracellular space.

  2. 125I-labeled 8-phenylxanthine derivatives: antagonist radioligands for adenosine A1 receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, J.; Patel, A.; Earl, C.Q.; Craig, R.H.; Daluge, S.M.

    1988-01-01

    A series of 8-phenylxanthine derivatives has been synthesized with oxyacetic acid on the para phenyl position to increase aqueous solubility and minimize nonspecific binding and iodinatable groups on the 1- or 3-position of the xanthine ring. The structure-activity relationship for binding of these compounds to A1 adenosine receptors of bovine and rat brain and A2 receptors of human platelets was examined. The addition of arylamine or photosensitive aryl azide groups to the 3-position of xanthine had little effect on A1 binding affinity with or without iodination, whereas substitutions at the 1-position caused greatly reduced A1 binding affinity. The addition of an aminobenzyl group to the 3-position of the xanthine had little effect on A2 binding affinity, but 3-aminophenethyl substitution decreased A2 binding affinity. Two acidic 3-(arylamino)-8-phenylxanthine derivatives were labeled with 125 I and evaluated as A1 receptor radioligands. The new radioligands bound to A1 receptors with KD values of 1-1.25 nM. Specific binding represented over 80% of total binding. High concentrations of NaCl or other salts increased the binding affinity of acidic but not neutral antagonists, suggesting that interactions between ionized xanthines and receptors may be affected significantly by changes in ionic strength. On the basis of binding studies with these antagonists and isotope dilution with the agonist [ 125 I]N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)adenosine, multiple agonist affinity states of A1 receptors have been identified

  3. Cortical NMDA receptor expression in human chronic alcoholism: influence of the TaqIA allele of ANKK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge, Justin P; Dodd, Peter R

    2009-10-01

    Real-time RT-PCR normalized to GAPDH was used to assay N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1, NR2A and NR2B subunit mRNA in human autopsy cortex tissue from chronic alcoholics with and without comorbid cirrhosis of the liver and matched controls. Subunit expression was influenced by the subject's genotype. The TaqIA polymorphism selectively modulated NMDA receptor mean transcript expression in cirrhotic-alcoholic superior frontal cortex, in diametrically opposite ways in male and female subjects. Genetic make-up may differentially influence vulnerability to brain damage by altering the excitation: inhibition balance, particularly in alcoholics with comorbid cirrhosis of the liver. The TaqIA polymorphism occurs within the poorly characterised ankyrin-repeat containing kinase 1 (ANKK1) gene. Using PCR, ANKK1 mRNA transcript was detected in inferior temporal, occipital, superior frontal and primary motor cortex of control human brain. ANKK1 expression may mediate the influence of the TaqIA polymorphism on phenotype.

  4. The Leu33/Pro polymorphism (PlA1/PlA2) of the glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) receptor is not related to myocardial infarction in the ECTIM Study. Etude Cas-Temoins de l'Infarctus du Myocarde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, S M; Poirier, O; Marques-Vidal, P; Evans, A; Arveiler, D; Luc, G; Emmerich, J; Cambien, F

    1997-06-01

    The GPIIb/IIIa receptor complex may contribute to acute coronary syndromes by mediating platelet aggregation. The Leu33/Pro polymorphism (PlA1/PlA2) of the GPIIIa has recently been shown to be associated with CHD in a small case-control study. We have investigated this polymorphism in a large multicenter study of patients with myocardial infarction and controls and found no difference in the distribution of allele and genotype frequencies between cases and controls.

  5. T-cell receptor V sub. alpha. and C sub. alpha. alleles associated with multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksenberg, J.R.; Cavalli-Sforza, L.L.; Steinman, L. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA)); Sherritt, M.; Bernard, C.C. (LaTrobe Univ., Victoria (Australia)); Begovich, A.B.; Erlich, H.A. (Cetus Corporation, Emeryville, CA (USA))

    1989-02-01

    Polymorphic markers in genes encoding the {alpha} chain of the human T-cell receptor (TcR) have been detected by Southern blot analysis in Pss I digests. Polymorphic bands were observed at 6.3 and 2.0 kilobases (kb) with frequencies of 0.30 and 0.44, respectively, in the general population. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, the authors amplified selected sequences derived from the full-length TcR {alpha} cDNA probe. These PcR products were used as specific probes to demonstrate that the 6.3-kb polymorphic fragment hybridizes to the variable (V)-region probe and the 2.0-kb fragment hybridizes to the constant (C)-region probe. Segregation of the polymorphic bands was analyzed in family studies. To look for associations between these markers and autoimmune diseases, the authors have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism distribution of the Pss I markers in patients with multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, and Graves disease. Significant differences in the frequency of the polymorphic V{sub {alpha}} and C{sub {alpha}} markers were identified between patients and healthy individuals.

  6. Cysteine 893 is a target of regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 AMPA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotta von Ossowski

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that glutamatergic signaling involves, and is regulated by, thiol modifying and redox-active compounds. In this study, we examined the role of a reactive cysteine residue, Cys-893, in the cytosolic C-terminal tail of GluA1 AMPA receptor as a potential regulatory target. Elimination of the thiol function by substitution of serine for Cys-893 led to increased steady-state expression level and strongly reduced interaction with SAP97, a major cytosolic interaction partner of GluA1 C-terminus. Moreover, we found that of the three cysteine residues in GluA1 C-terminal tail, Cys-893 is the predominant target for S-nitrosylation induced by exogenous nitric oxide donors in cultured cells and lysates. Co-precipitation experiments provided evidence for native association of SAP97 with neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and for the potential coupling of Ca2+-permeable GluA1 receptors with nNOS via SAP97. Our results show that Cys-893 can serve as a molecular target for regulatory thiol modifications of GluA1 receptors, including the effects of nitric oxide.

  7. Adenosine A1 receptors contribute to immune regulation after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winerdal, Max; Winerdal, Malin E; Wang, Ying-Qing; Fredholm, Bertil B; Winqvist, Ola; Ådén, Ulrika

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal brain hypoxic ischemia (HI) often results in long-term motor and cognitive impairments. Post-ischemic inflammation greatly effects outcome and adenosine receptor signaling modulates both HI and immune cell function. Here, we investigated the influence of adenosine A1 receptor deficiency (A1R(-/-)) on key immune cell populations in a neonatal brain HI model. Ten-day-old mice were subjected to HI. Functional outcome was assessed by open locomotion and beam walking test and infarction size evaluated. Flow cytometry was performed on brain-infiltrating cells, and semi-automated analysis of flow cytometric data was applied. A1R(-/-) mice displayed larger infarctions (+33%, p beam walking tests (44% more mistakes, p < 0.05) than wild-type (WT) mice. Myeloid cell activation after injury was enhanced in A1R(-/-) versus WT brains. Activated B lymphocytes expressing IL-10 infiltrated the brain after HI in WT, but were less activated and did not increase in relative frequency in A1R(-/-). Also, A1R(-/-) B lymphocytes expressed less IL-10 than their WT counterparts, the A1R antagonist DPCPX decreased IL-10 expression whereas the A1R agonist CPA increased it. CD4(+) T lymphocytes including FoxP3(+) T regulatory cells, were unaffected by genotype, whereas CD8(+) T lymphocyte responses were smaller in A1R(-/-) mice. Using PCA to characterize the immune profile, we could discriminate the A1R(-/-) and WT genotypes as well as sham operated from HI-subjected animals. We conclude that A1R signaling modulates IL-10 expression by immune cells, influences the activation of these cells in vivo, and affects outcome after HI.

  8. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R. (Univ. of Trieste (Italy))

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-({sup 3}H)adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system.

  9. Circadian rhythm in adenosine A1 receptor of mouse cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florio, C.; Rosati, A.M.; Traversa, U.; Vertua, R.

    1991-01-01

    In order to investigate diurnal variation in adenosine A1 receptors binding parameters, Bmax and Kd values of specifically bound N6-cyclohexyl-[ 3 H]adenosine were determined in the cerebral cortex of mice that had been housed under controlled light-dark cycles for 4 weeks. Significant differences were found for Bmax values measured at 3-hr intervals across a 24-h period, with low Bmax values during the light period and high Bmax values during the dark period. The amplitude between 03.00 and 18.00 hr was 33%. No substantial rhythm was found in the Kd values. It is suggested that the changes in the density of A1 receptors could reflect a physiologically-relevant mechanism by which adenosine exerts its modulatory role in the central nervous system

  10. Allele-specific primer polymerase chain reaction for a single nucleotide polymorphism (C1205T) of swine Toll-like receptor 5 and comparison of the allelic frequency among several pig breeds in Japan and the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Muneta, Y.; Minagawa, Y.; Kusumoto, M.; Shinkai, H.; Uenishi, H.; Šplíchal, Igor

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 6 (2012), s. 385-391 ISSN 0385-5600 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/09/0365 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : allele-specific PCR * Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis * single nucleotide polymorphism Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 1.545, year: 2012

  11. Lost P1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B Z; Zhang, Z J; Butrón, A; Widstrom, N W; Snook, M E; Lynch, R E; Plaisted, D

    2004-12-01

    In the United States, insecticide is used extensively in the production of sweet corn due to consumer demand for zero damage to ears and to a sweet corn genetic base with little or no resistance to ear-feeding insects. Growers in the southern United States depend on scheduled pesticide applications to control ear-feeding insects. In a study of quantitative genetic control over silk maysin, AM-maysin (apimaysin and methoxymaysin), and chlorogenic acid contents in an F2 population derived from GE37 (dent corn, P1A1) and 565 (sh2 sweet corn, p1a1), we demonstrate that the P1 allele from field corn, which was selected against in the development of sweet corn, has a strong epistatic interaction with the a1 allele in sh2 sweet corn. We detected that the p1 gene has significant effects (P silk maysin concentrations but also on AM-maysin, and chlorogenic acid concentrations. The a1 gene also has significant (P silk antibiotic chemicals. Successful selection from the fourth and fifth selfed backcrosses for high-maysin individuals of sweet corn homozygous for the recessive a1 allele (tightly linked to sh2) and the dominant P1 allele has been demonstrated. These selected lines have much higher (2 to 3 times) concentrations of silk maysin and other chemicals (AM-maysin and chlorogenic acid) than the donor parent GE37 and could enhance sweet corn resistance to corn earworm and reduce the number of applications of insecticide required to produce sweet corn.

  12. The second extracellular loop of the adenosine A1 receptor mediates activity of allosteric enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Dylan P; McRobb, Fiona M; Leonhardt, Susan A; Purdy, Michael; Figler, Heidi; Marshall, Melissa A; Chordia, Mahendra; Figler, Robert; Linden, Joel; Abagyan, Ruben; Yeager, Mark

    2014-02-01

    Allosteric enhancers of the adenosine A1 receptor amplify signaling by orthosteric agonists. Allosteric enhancers are appealing drug candidates because their activity requires that the orthosteric site be occupied by an agonist, thereby conferring specificity to stressed or injured tissues that produce adenosine. To explore the mechanism of allosteric enhancer activity, we examined their action on several A1 receptor constructs, including (1) species variants, (2) species chimeras, (3) alanine scanning mutants, and (4) site-specific mutants. These findings were combined with homology modeling of the A1 receptor and in silico screening of an allosteric enhancer library. The binding modes of known docked allosteric enhancers correlated with the known structure-activity relationship, suggesting that these allosteric enhancers bind to a pocket formed by the second extracellular loop, flanked by residues S150 and M162. We propose a model in which this vestibule controls the entry and efflux of agonists from the orthosteric site and agonist binding elicits a conformational change that enables allosteric enhancer binding. This model provides a mechanism for the observations that allosteric enhancers slow the dissociation of orthosteric agonists but not antagonists.

  13. Basal Levels of AMPA Receptor GluA1 Subunit Phosphorylation at Threonine 840 and Serine 845 in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiec, Walter E.; Guglietta, Ryan; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Dephosphorylation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluA1 subunits at two sites, serine 845 (S845) and threonine 840 (T840), is thought to be involved in NMDA receptor-dependent forms of long-term depression (LTD). Importantly, the notion that dephosphorylation of these sites contributes to LTD assumes that a significant fraction of GluA1 subunits are…

  14. SPARC and GluA1-Containing AMPA Receptors Promote Neuronal Health Following CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma V. Jones

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The proper formation and maintenance of functional synapses in the central nervous system (CNS requires communication between neurons and astrocytes and the ability of astrocytes to release neuromodulatory molecules. Previously, we described a novel role for the astrocyte-secreted matricellular protein SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic and Rich in Cysteine in regulating α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs and plasticity at developing synapses. SPARC is highly expressed by astrocytes and microglia during CNS development but its level is reduced in adulthood. Interestingly, SPARC has been shown to be upregulated in CNS injury and disease. However, the role of SPARC upregulation in these contexts is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of chronic SPARC administration on glutamate receptors on mature hippocampal neuron cultures and following CNS injury. We found that SPARC treatment increased the number of GluA1-containing AMPARs at synapses and enhanced synaptic function. Furthermore, we determined that the increase in synaptic strength induced by SPARC could be inhibited by Philanthotoxin-433, a blocker of homomeric GluA1-containing AMPARs. We then investigated the effect of SPARC treatment on neuronal health in an injury context where SPARC expression is upregulated. We found that SPARC levels are increased in astrocytes and microglia following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO in vivo and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD in vitro. Remarkably, chronic pre-treatment with SPARC prevented OGD-induced loss of synaptic GluA1. Furthermore, SPARC treatment reduced neuronal death through Philanthotoxin-433 sensitive GluA1 receptors. Taken together, this study suggests a novel role for SPARC and GluA1 in promoting neuronal health and recovery following CNS damage.

  15. Regulation of hippocampal cannabinoid CB1 receptor actions by adenosine A1 receptors and chronic caffeine administration: implications for the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol on spatial memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Vasco C; Assaife-Lopes, Natália; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Pratt, Judith A; Brett, Ros R; Sebastião, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB(1) receptor-mediated modulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from inhibitory interneurons is important for the integrity of hippocampal-dependent spatial memory. Although adenosine A(1) receptors have a central role in fine-tuning excitatory transmission in the hippocampus, A(1) receptors localized in GABAergic cells do not directly influence GABA release. CB(1) and A(1) receptors are the main targets for the effects of two of the most heavily consumed psychoactive substances worldwide: Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, a CB(1) receptor agonist) and caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist). We first tested the hypothesis that an A(1)-CB(1) interaction influences GABA and glutamate release in the hippocampus. We found that A(1) receptor activation attenuated the CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release and this interaction was manifested at the level of G-protein activation. Using in vivo and in vitro approaches, we then investigated the functional implications of the adenosine-cannabinoid interplay that may arise following chronic caffeine consumption. Chronic administration of caffeine in mice (intraperitoneally, 3 mg/kg/day, for 15 days, >12 h before trials) led to an A(1)-mediated enhancement of the CB(1)-dependent acute disruptive effects of THC on a short-term spatial memory task, despite inducing a reduction in cortical and hippocampal CB(1) receptor number and an attenuation of CB(1) coupling with G protein. A(1) receptor levels were increased following chronic caffeine administration. This study shows that A(1) receptors exert a negative modulatory effect on CB(1)-mediated inhibition of GABA and glutamate release, and provides the first evidence of chronic caffeine-induced alterations on the cannabinoid system in the cortex and hippocampus, with functional implications in spatial memory.

  16. Involvement of A1 adenosine receptors and neural pathways in adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Erikson, Christopher J; Chason, Kelly D; Rosebrock, Craig N; Deshpande, Deepak A; Penn, Raymond B; Tilley, Stephen L

    2007-07-01

    High levels of adenosine can be measured from the lungs of asthmatics, and it is well recognized that aerosolized 5'AMP, the precursor of adenosine, elicits robust bronchoconstriction in patients with this disease. Characterization of mice with elevated adenosine levels secondary to the loss of adenosine deaminase (ADA) expression, the primary metabolic enzyme for adenosine, further support a role for this ubiquitous mediator in the pathogenesis of asthma. To begin to identify pathways by which adenosine can alter airway tone, we examined adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction in four mouse lines, each lacking one of the receptors for this nucleoside. We show, using direct measures of airway mechanics, that adenosine can increase airway resistance and that this increase in resistance is mediated by binding the A(1) receptor. Further examination of this response using pharmacologically, surgically, and genetically manipulated mice supports a model in which adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction occurs indirectly through the activation of sensory neurons.

  17. Allelic variants of melanocortin 3 receptor gene (MC3R and weight loss in obesity: a randomised trial of hypo-energetic high- versus low-fat diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L Santos

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The melanocortin system plays an important role in energy homeostasis. Mice genetically deficient in the melanocortin-3 receptor gene have a normal body weight with increased body fat, mild hypophagia compared to wild-type mice. In humans, Thr6Lys and Val81Ile variants of the melanocortin-3 receptor gene (MC3R have been associated with childhood obesity, higher BMI Z-score and elevated body fat percentage compared to non-carriers. The aim of this study is to assess the association in adults between allelic variants of MC3R with weight loss induced by energy-restricted diets. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This research is based on the NUGENOB study, a trial conducted to assess weight loss during a 10-week dietary intervention involving two different hypo-energetic (high-fat and low-fat diets. A total of 760 obese patients were genotyped for 10 single nucleotide polymorphisms covering the single exon of MC3R gene and its flanking regions, including the missense variants Thr6Lys and Val81Ile. Linear mixed models and haplotype-based analysis were carried out to assess the potential association between genetic polymorphisms and differential weight loss, fat mass loss, waist change and resting energy expenditure changes. RESULTS: No differences in drop-out rate were found by MC3R genotypes. The rs6014646 polymorphism was significantly associated with weight loss using co-dominant (p = 0.04 and dominant models (p = 0.03. These p-values were not statistically significant after strict control for multiple testing. Haplotype-based multivariate analysis using permutations showed that rs3827103-rs1543873 (p = 0.06, rs6014646-rs6024730 (p = 0.05 and rs3746619-rs3827103 (p = 0.10 displayed near-statistical significant results in relation to weight loss. No other significant associations or gene*diet interactions were detected for weight loss, fat mass loss, waist change and resting energy expenditure changes. CONCLUSION: The study

  18. Small-animal PET study of adenosine A(1) receptors in rat brain: blocking receptors and raising extracellular adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Soumen; Khanapur, Shivashankar; Rybczynska, Anna A; Kwizera, Chantal; Sijbesma, Jurgen W A; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Willemsen, Antoon T M; Elsinga, Philip H; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; van Waarde, Aren

    2011-08-01

    Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors (A(1)R) in the brain causes sedation, reduces anxiety, inhibits seizures, and promotes neuroprotection. Cerebral A(1)R can be visualized using 8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-(11)C-methyl-3-propyl-xanthine ((11)C-MPDX) and PET. This study aims to test whether (11)C-MPDX can be used for quantitative studies of cerebral A(1)R in rodents. (11)C-MPDX was injected (intravenously) into isoflurane-anesthetized male Wistar rats (300 g). A dynamic scan of the central nervous system was obtained, using a small-animal PET camera. A cannula in a femoral artery was used for blood sampling. Three groups of animals were studied: group 1, controls (saline-treated); group 2, animals pretreated with the A(1)R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 1 mg, intraperitoneally); and group 3, animals pretreated (intraperitoneally) with a 20% solution of ethanol in saline (2 mL) plus the adenosine kinase inhibitor 4-amino-5-(3-bromophenyl)-7-(6-morpholino-pyridin-3-yl)pyrido[2,3-d] pyrimidine dihydrochloride (ABT-702) (1 mg). DPCPX is known to occupy cerebral A(1)R, whereas ethanol and ABT-702 increase extracellular adenosine. In groups 1 and 3, the brain was clearly visualized. High uptake of (11)C-MPDX was noted in striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum. In group 2, tracer uptake was strongly suppressed and regional differences were abolished. The treatment of group 3 resulted in an unexpected 40%-45% increase of the cerebral uptake of radioactivity as indicated by increases of PET standardized uptake value, distribution volume from Logan plot, nondisplaceable binding potential from 2-tissue-compartment model fit, and standardized uptake value from a biodistribution study performed after the PET scan. The partition coefficient of the tracer (K(1)/k(2) from the model fit) was not altered under the study conditions. (11)C-MPDX shows a regional distribution in rat brain consistent with binding to A(1)R. Tracer binding is blocked by the selective A

  19. Cross sectional PET study of cerebral adenosine A1 receptors in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matusch, Andreas; Elmenhorst, David; Saft, Carsten; Kraus, Peter H.; Gold, Ralf; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Bauer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    To study cerebral adenosine receptors (AR) in premanifest and manifest stages of Huntington's disease (HD). We quantified the cerebral binding potential (BP ND ) of the A 1 AR in carriers of the HD CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion using the radioligand [ 18 F]CPFPX and PET. Four groups were investigated: (i) premanifest individuals far (preHD-A; n = 7) or (ii) near (preHD-B; n = 6) to the predicted symptom onset, (iii) manifest HD patients (n = 8), and (iv) controls (n = 36). Cerebral A 1 AR values of preHD-A subjects were generally higher than those of controls (by up to 31 %, p 1 AR BP ND was observed to the levels of controls in preHD-B and undercutting controls in manifest HD by down to 25 %, p 1 AR BP ND and years to onset. Before onset of HD, the assumed annual rates of change of A 1 AR density were -1.2 % in the caudatus, -1.7 % in the thalamus and -3.4 % in the amygdala, while the corresponding volume losses amounted to 0.6 %, 0.1 % and 0.2 %, respectively. Adenosine receptors switch from supra to subnormal levels during phenoconversion of HD. This differential regulation may play a role in the pathophysiology of altered energy metabolism. (orig.)

  20. Activation of adenosine A(1) receptors alters behavioral and biochemical parameters in hyperthyroid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Fontella, Fernanda Urruth; Bonan, Carla Denise; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Dalmaz, Carla; Sarkis, João José Freitas

    2006-02-28

    Adenosine acting on A(1) receptors has been related with neuroprotective and neuromodulatory actions, protection against oxidative stress and decrease of anxiety and nociceptive signaling. Previous studies demonstrated an inhibition of the enzymes that hydrolyze ATP to adenosine in the rat central nervous system after hyperthyroidism induction. Manifestations of hyperthyroidism include increased anxiety, nervousness, high O(2) consumption and physical hyperactivity. Here, we investigated the effects of administration of a specific agonist of adenosine A(1) receptor (N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine; CPA) on nociception, anxiety, exploratory response, locomotion and brain oxidative stress of hyperthyroid rats. Hyperthyroidism was induced by daily intraperitoneal injections of l-thyroxine (T4) for 14 days. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus and exploratory behavior, locomotion and anxiety were analyzed by open-field and plus-maze tests. We verified the total antioxidant reactivity (TAR), lipid peroxide levels by the thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) reaction and the free radicals content by the DCF test. Our results demonstrated that CPA reverted the hyperalgesia induced by hyperthyroidism and decreased the exploratory behavior, locomotion and anxiety in hyperthyroid rats. Furthermore, CPA decreased lipid peroxidation in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control rats and in cerebral cortex of hyperthyroid rats. CPA also increased the total antioxidant reactivity in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control and hyperthyroid rats, but the production of free radicals verified by the DCF test was changed only in cerebral cortex. These results suggest that some of the hyperthyroidism effects are subjected to regulation by adenosine A(1) receptor, demonstrating the involvement of the adenosinergic system in this pathology.

  1. Harman induces CYP1A1 enzyme through an aryl hydrocarbon receptor mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Gendy, Mohamed A.M.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.

    2010-01-01

    Harman is a common compound in several foods, plants and beverages. Numerous studies have demonstrated its mutagenic, co-mutagenic and carcinogenic effects; however, the exact mechanism has not been fully identified. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a transcription factor regulating the expression of the carcinogen-activating enzyme; cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1). In the present study, we examined the ability of harman to induce AhR-mediated signal transduction in human and rat hepatoma cells; HepG2 and H4IIE cells. Our results showed that harman significantly induced CYP1A1 mRNA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, harman significantly induced CYP1A1 at protein and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the AhR antagonist, resveratrol, inhibited the increase in CYP1A1 activity by harman. The RNA polymerase inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely abolished the CYP1A1 mRNA induction by harman, indicating a transcriptional activation. The role of AhR in CYP1A1 induction by harman was confirmed by using siRNA specific for human AhR. The ability of harman to induce CYP1A1 was strongly correlated with its ability to stimulate AhR-dependent luciferase activity and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. At post-transcriptional and post-translational levels, harman did not affect the stability of CYP1A1 at the mRNA and the protein levels, excluding other mechanisms participating in the obtained effects. We concluded that harman can directly induce CYP1A1 gene expression in an AhR-dependent manner and may represent a novel mechanism by which harman promotes mutagenicity, co-mutagenicity and carcinogenicity.

  2. Retinoids repress Ah receptor CYP1A1 induction pathway through the SMRT corepressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallone, Frederique; Villard, Pierre-Henri; Seree, Eric; Rimet, Odile; Nguyen, Quock Binh; Bourgarel-Rey, Veronique; Fouchier, Francis; Barra, Yves; Durand, Alain; Lacarelle, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    CYP1A1 isoform is mainly regulated by the transcription factor AhR and to a lesser extent by the nuclear receptor RAR. The effect of a coexposure with 3MC, a AhR ligand, and RA, a RAR ligand, which are, respectively, strong and weak CYP1A1 inducers, is poorly known. We showed in Caco-2 cells that addition of RA significantly decreased 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression by -55% for mRNA level and -30% for promoter and enzymatic activities. We further showed that RA decreased AhR protein level. Moreover, a physical interaction between AhR and the RAR-corepressor SMRT has been described in vitro. Using the corepressor inhibitor TSA, transfected-cells with SMRT cDNA, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments, we demonstrated that RA addition repressed AhR function through a marked AhR/SMRT physical interaction. This interaction explains the decrease of 3MC-induced CYP1A1 expression. This new mechanism involving the repression of AhR-induced CYP1A1 expression by retinoids allows better knowledge of the CYP1A1 regulation

  3. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  4. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New Drug Candidate Targeting the 4A1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor for Medullary Thyroid Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC is a relatively rare thyroid cancer responsible for a substantial fraction of thyroid cancer mortality. More effective therapeutic drugs with low toxicity for MTC are urgently needed. Orphan nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1 plays a pivotal role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of tumor cells. Based on the NR4A1 protein structure, 2-imino-6-methoxy-2H-chromene-3-carbothioamide (IMCA was identified from the Specs compounds database using the protein structure-guided virtual screening approach. Computationally-based molecular modeling studies suggested that IMCA has a high affinity for the ligand binding pocket of NR4A1. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] and apoptosis assays demonstrated that IMCA resulted in significant thyroid cancer cell death. Immunofluorescence assays showed that IMCA induced NR4A1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in thyroid cancer cell lines, which may be involved in the cell apoptotic process. In this study, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the IMCA-induced upregulation of sestrin1 and sestrin2 was dose-dependent in thyroid cancer cell lines. Western blot showed that IMCA increased phosphorylation of adenosine 5′-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K, which is the key enzyme in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. The experimental results suggest that IMCA is a drug candidate for MTC therapy and may work by increasing the nuclear export of NR4A1 to the cytoplasm and the tumor protein 53 (p53-sestrins-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

  6. New Drug Candidate Targeting the 4A1 Orphan Nuclear Receptor for Medullary Thyroid Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Wen; Wang, Qun; Li, Qinpei; Wang, Huijuan; Wang, Jun; Teng, Tieshan; Chen, Mingliang; Ji, Ailing; Li, Yanzhang

    2018-03-02

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is a relatively rare thyroid cancer responsible for a substantial fraction of thyroid cancer mortality. More effective therapeutic drugs with low toxicity for MTC are urgently needed. Orphan nuclear receptor 4A1 (NR4A1) plays a pivotal role in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of a variety of tumor cells. Based on the NR4A1 protein structure, 2-imino-6-methoxy-2H-chromene-3-carbothioamide (IMCA) was identified from the Specs compounds database using the protein structure-guided virtual screening approach. Computationally-based molecular modeling studies suggested that IMCA has a high affinity for the ligand binding pocket of NR4A1. MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide] and apoptosis assays demonstrated that IMCA resulted in significant thyroid cancer cell death. Immunofluorescence assays showed that IMCA induced NR4A1 translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in thyroid cancer cell lines, which may be involved in the cell apoptotic process. In this study, the quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed that the IMCA-induced upregulation of sestrin1 and sestrin2 was dose-dependent in thyroid cancer cell lines. Western blot showed that IMCA increased phosphorylation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and decreased phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), which is the key enzyme in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The experimental results suggest that IMCA is a drug candidate for MTC therapy and may work by increasing the nuclear export of NR4A1 to the cytoplasm and the tumor protein 53 (p53)-sestrins-AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway.

  7. 164Ile allele in the beta2-Adrenergic receptor gene is associated with risk of elevated blood pressure in women. The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sethi, AA; Tybjærg-Hansen, A; Jensen, Gorm Boje

    2005-01-01

    Since beta2-adrenergic receptors are important regulators of blood pressure, genetic variation in this receptor could explain risk of elevated blood pressure in selected individuals. We tested the hypothesis that Gly16Arg, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile in the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene associated w...

  8. The Combined Inhibitory Effect of the Adenosine A1 and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors on cAMP Accumulation in the Hippocampus Is Additive and Independent of A1 Receptor Desensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Serpa, Andr?; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Sebasti?o, Ana M.; Cascalheira, Jos? F.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3?30??M) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6 ? 2.7??M and an E max? of 31% ? 2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10?150?nM), an EC50 of 35 ? 19?nM, an...

  9. A novel allele of TaGW2-A1 is located in a finely mapped QTL that increases grain weight but decreases grain number in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Huijie; Feng, Zhiyu; Du, Xiaofen; Song, Yane; Liu, Xinye; Qi, Zhongqi; Song, Long; Li, Jiang; Li, Linghong; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Yao, Yingyin; Xin, Mingming; Xiao, Shihe; Sun, Qixin; Ni, Zhongfu

    2018-03-01

    A novel TaGW2-A1 allele was identified from a stable, robust QTL region, which is pleiotropic for thousand grain weight, grain number per spike, and grain morphometric parameters in wheat. Thousand grain weight (TGW) and grain number per spike (GNS) are two crucial determinants of wheat spike yield, and genetic dissection of their relationships can help to fine-tune these two components and maximize grain yield. By evaluating 191 recombinant inbred lines in 11 field trials, we identified five genomic regions on chromosomes 1B, 3A, 3B, 5B, or 7A that solely influenced either TGW or GNS, and a further region on chromosome 6A that concurrently affected TGW and GNS. The QTL of interest on chromosome 6A, which was flanked by wsnp_BE490604A_Ta_2_1 and wsnp_RFL_Contig1340_448996 and designated as QTgw/Gns.cau-6A, was finely mapped to a genetic interval shorter than 0.538 cM using near isogenic lines (NILs). The elite NILs of QTgw/Gns.cau-6A increased TGW by 8.33%, but decreased GNS by 3.05% in six field trials. Grain Weight 2 (TaGW2-A1), a well-characterized gene that negatively regulates TGW and grain width in wheat, was located within the finely mapped interval of QTgw/Gns.cau-6A. A novel and rare TaGW2-A1 allele with a 114-bp deletion in the 5' flanking region was identified in the parent with higher TGW, and it reduced TaGW2-A1 promoter activity and expression. In conclusion, these results expand our knowledge of the genetic and molecular basis of TGW-GNS trade-offs in wheat. The QTLs and the novel TaGW2-A1 allele are likely useful for the development of cultivars with higher TGW and/or higher GNS.

  10. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome type IV: a multi-exon deletion in one of the two COL3A1 alleles affecting structure, stability, and processing of type III procollagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superti-Furga, A.; Gugler, E.; Gitzelmann, R.; Steinmann, B.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied a patient with severe, dominantly inherited Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV. The results indicate that this patient carries a deletion of 3.3 kilobase pairs in the triple helical coding domain of one of the two alleles for the pro-α-chains of type III collagen (COL3A1). His cultured skin fibroblasts contain equal amounts of normal length mRNA and of mRNA shortened by approximately 600 bases, and synthesize both normal and shortened pro-α1(III)-chains. In procollagen molecules containing one or more shortened chains, a triple helix is formed with a length of only about 780 amino acids. The mutant procollagen molecules have decreased thermal stability, are less efficiently secreted, and are not processed as their normal counterpart. The deletion in this family is the first mutation to be described in COL3A1

  11. Mapping adenosine A1 receptors in the cat brain by positron emission tomography with [11C]MPDX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yuhei; Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kiyosawa, Motohiro; Nariai, Tadashi; Oda, Keiichi; Toyama, Hinako; Suzuki, Fumio; Ono, Kenichirou; Senda, Michio

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the potential of [ 11 C]MPDX as a radioligand for mapping adenosine A 1 receptors in comparison with previously proposed [ 11 C]KF15372 in cat brain by PET. Two tracers showed the same brain distribution. Brain uptake of [ 11 C]MPDX (Ki=4.2 nM) was much higher and washed out faster than that of [ 11 C]KF15372 (Ki=3.0 nM), and was blocked by carrier-loading or displaced with an A 1 antagonist. The regional A 1 receptor distribution evaluated with kinetic analysis is consistent with that previously measured in vitro. [ 11 C]MPDX PET has a potential for mapping adenosine A 1 receptors in brain

  12. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Alters the Expression of Short-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, David J.; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit selectively impairs short-term memory for spatial locations. We further investigated this deficit by examining memory for discrete nonspatial visual stimuli in an operant chamber. Unconditioned suppression of magazine responding to visual stimuli was measured in wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice.…

  13. The Annexin A1 Receptor FPR2 Regulates the Endosomal Export of Influenza Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryad Rahman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The Formyl Peptide Receptor 2 (FPR2 is a novel promising target for the treatment of influenza. During viral infection, FPR2 is activated by annexinA1, which is present in the envelope of influenza viruses; this activation promotes virus replication. Here, we investigated whether blockage of FPR2 would affect the genome trafficking of influenza virus. We found that, upon infection and cell treatment with the specific FPR2 antagonist WRW4 or the anti-FPR2 monoclonal antibody, FN-1D6-AI, influenza viruses were blocked into endosomes. This effect was independent on the strain and was observed for H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. In addition, blocking FPR2signaling in alveolar lung A549 epithelial cells with the monoclonal anti-FPR2 antibody significantly inhibited virus replication. Altogether, these results show that FPR2signaling interferes with the endosomal trafficking of influenza viruses and provides, for the first time, the proof of concept that monoclonal antibodies directed against FPR2 inhibit virus replication. Antibodies-based therapeutics have emerged as attractive reagents in infectious diseases. Thus, this study suggests that the use of anti-FPR2 antibodies against influenza hold great promise for the future.

  14. Transient receptor potential A1 channel contributes to activation of the muscle reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Satoshi; Hayes, Shawn G; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2011-01-01

    This study was undertaken to elucidate the role played by transient receptor potential A1 channels (TRPA1) in activating the muscle reflex, a sympathoexcitatory drive originating in contracting muscle. First, we tested the hypothesis that stimulation of the TRPA1 located on muscle afferents reflexly increases sympathetic nerve activity. In decerebrate rats, allyl isothiocyanate, a TRPA1 agonist, was injected intra-arterially into the hindlimb muscle circulation. This led to a 33% increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). The effect of allyl isothiocyanate was a reflex because the response was prevented by sectioning the sciatic nerve. Second, we tested the hypothesis that blockade of TRPA1 reduces RSNA response to contraction. Thirty-second continuous static contraction of the hindlimb muscles, induced by electrical stimulation of the peripheral cut ends of L(4) and L(5) ventral roots, increased RSNA and blood pressure. The integrated RSNA during contraction was reduced by HC-030031, a TRPA1 antagonist, injected intra-arterially (163 ± 24 vs. 95 ± 21 arbitrary units, before vs. after HC-030031, P reflex. Increases in RSNA in response to injection into the muscle circulation of arachidonic acid, bradykinin, and diprotonated phosphate, which are metabolic by-products of contraction and stimulants of muscle afferents during contraction, were reduced by HC-030031. These observations suggest that the TRPA1 located on muscle afferents is part of the muscle reflex and further support the notion that arachidonic acid metabolites, bradykinin, and diprotonated phosphate are candidates for endogenous agonists of TRPA1.

  15. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S; Fakira, Amanda K; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H Thomas; Russo, Scott J; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A

    2011-11-09

    Glutamatergic systems, including AMPA receptors (AMPARs), are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic AMPAR expression in the hippocampus, a brain area that is critically involved in learning and memory. These changes could be observed 1 week after the treatment, but only when mice developed context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine in which morphine treatment was associated with drug administration environment. Context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine was also associated with increased basal synaptic transmission and disrupted hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), whereas these effects were less robust when morphine administration was not paired with the drug administration environment. Interestingly, some effects may be related to the prior history of morphine exposure in the drug-associated environment, since alterations of AMPAR expression, basal synaptic transmission, and LTP were observed in mice that received a saline challenge 1 week after discontinuation of morphine treatment. Furthermore, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of GluA1 AMPAR subunit plays a critical role in the acquisition and expression of context-dependent behavioral sensitization, as this behavior is blocked by a viral vector that disrupts GluA1 phosphorylation. These data provide evidence that glutamatergic signaling in the hippocampus plays an important role in context-dependent sensitization to morphine and supports further investigation of glutamate-based strategies for treating opiate addiction.

  16. Orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is a negative regulator of DHT-induced rat preantral follicular growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Kai; Liu, Jia-yin; Murphy, Bruce D; Tsang, Benjamin K

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear receptor subfamily 4 group A member1 (NR4A1), an orphan nuclear receptor, is involved in the transcriptional regulation of thecal cell androgen biosynthesis and paracrine factor insulin-like 3 (INSL3) expression. Androgens are known to play an important regulatory role in ovarian follicle growth. Using a chronically androgenized rat model, a preantral follicle culture model and virus-mediated gene delivery, we examined the role and regulation of NR4A1 in the androgenic control of preantral follicular growth. In the present study, Ki67 staining was increased in preantral follicles on ovarian sections from 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated rats. Preantral follicles from DHT-treated rats cultured for 4 d exhibited increased growth and up-regulation of mRNA abundance of G(1)/S-specific cyclin-D2 (Ccnd2) and FSH receptor (Fshr). Similarly, DHT (1 μm) increased preantral follicular growth and Ccnd2 and Fshr mRNA abundance in vitro. The NR4A1 expression was high in theca cells and was down-regulated by DHT in vivo and in vitro. Forced expression of NR4A1 augmented preantral follicular growth, androstenedione production, and Insl3 expression in vitro. Inhibiting the action of androgen (with androgen receptor antagonist flutamide) or INSL3 (with INSL3 receptor antagonist INSL3 B-chain) reduced NR4A1-induced preantral follicular growth. Furthermore, NR4A1 overexpression enhanced DHT-induced preantral follicular growth, a response attenuated by inhibiting INSL3. In conclusion, DHT promotes preantral follicular growth and attenuates thecal NR4A1 expression in vivo and in vitro. Our findings are consistent with the notion that NR4A1 serves as an important point of negative feedback to minimize the excessive preantral follicle growth in hyperandrogenism.

  17. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Allele frequencies in the VRN-A1, VRN-B1 and VRN-D1 vernalization response and PPD-B1 and PPD-D1 photoperiod sensitivity genes, and their effects on heading in a diverse set of wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Tibor; Balla, Krisztina; Veisz, Ottó; Láng, László; Bedő, Zoltán; Griffiths, Simon; Isaac, Peter; Karsai, Ildikó

    2014-01-01

    Heading of cereals is determined by complex genetic and environmental factors in which genes responsible for vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity play a decisive role. Our aim was to use diagnostic molecular markers to determine the main allele types in VRN - A1 , VRN - B1 , VRN - D1 , PPD - B1 and PPD - D1 in a worldwide wheat collection of 683 genotypes and to investigate the effect of these alleles on heading in the field. The dominant VRN - A1 , VRN - B1 and VRN - D1 alleles were present at a low frequency. The PPD - D1a photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 57 % of the cultivars and was most frequent in Asian and European cultivars. The PPD - B1 photoperiod-insensitive allele was carried by 22 % of the genotypes from Asia, America and Europe. Nine versions of the PPD - B1 -insensitive allele were identified based on gene copy number and intercopy structure. The allele compositions in PPD - D1 , PPD - B1 and VRN - D1 significantly influenced heading and together explained 37.5 % of the phenotypic variance. The role of gene model increased to 39.1 % when PPD - B1 intercopy structure was taken into account instead of overall PPD - B1 type (sensitive vs. insensitive). As a single component, PPD - D1 had the most important role (28.0 % of the phenotypic variance), followed by PPD - B1 (12.3 % for PPD - B1 _overall, and 15.1 % for PPD - B1 _intercopy) and VRN - D1 (2.2 %). Significant gene interactions were identified between the marker alleles within PPD - B1 and between VRN - D1 and the two PPD1 genes. The earliest heading genotypes were those with the photoperiod-insensitive allele in PPD - D1 and PPD - B1 , and with the spring allele for VRN - D1 and the winter alleles for VRN - A1 and VRN - B1 . This combination could only be detected in genotypes from Southern Europe and Asia. Late-heading genotypes had the sensitivity alleles for both PPD1 genes, regardless of the allelic composition of the VRN1 genes. There was a 10-day difference in

  19. Activation of the chemosensing transient receptor potential channel A1 (TRPA1) by alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, Bernhard; Zehfuss, Franziska; Mückter, Harald; Schmidt, Annette; Balszuweit, Frank; Schäfer, Eva; Büch, Thomas; Gudermann, Thomas; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) cation channel is expressed in different tissues including skin, lung and neuronal tissue. Recent reports identified TRPA1 as a sensor for noxious substances, implicating a functional role in the molecular toxicology. TRPA1 is activated by various potentially harmful electrophilic substances. The chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM) is a highly reactive alkylating agent that binds to numerous biological targets. Although SM is known for almost 200 years, detailed knowledge about the pathophysiology resulting from exposure is lacking. A specific therapy is not available. In this study, we investigated whether the alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl-ethylsulfide (CEES, a model substance for SM-promoted effects) and SM are able to activate TRPA1 channels. CEES induced a marked increase in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in TRPA1-expressing but not in TRPA1-negative cells. The TRP-channel blocker AP18 diminished the CEES-induced calcium influx. HEK293 cells permanently expressing TRPA1 were more sensitive toward cytotoxic effects of CEES compared with wild-type cells. At low CEES concentrations, CEES-induced cytotoxicity was prevented by AP18. Proof-of-concept experiments using SM resulted in a pronounced increase in [Ca(2+)]i in HEK293-A1-E cells. Human A549 lung epithelial cells, which express TRPA1 endogenously, reacted with a transient calcium influx in response to CEES exposure. The CEES-dependent calcium response was diminished by AP18. In summary, our results demonstrate that alkylating agents are able to activate TRPA1. Inhibition of TRPA1 counteracted cellular toxicity and could thus represent a feasible approach to mitigate SM-induced cell damage.

  20. Modulation of short-term social memory in rats by adenosine A1 and A(2A) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Rui D S; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-03-16

    The recognition of an unfamiliar juvenile rat by an adult rat has been shown to imply short-term memory processes. The present study was designed to examine the role of adenosine receptors in the short-term social memory of rats using the social recognition paradigm. Adenosine (5.0-10.0 mg/kg), the selective adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA, 0.025-0.05 mg/kg) and the selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-(2-methylphenyl)ethyl]adenosine (DPMA, 1.0-5.0 mg/kg), given by i.p. route 30 min before the test, disrupted the juvenile recognition ability of adult rats. This negative effect of adenosine (5.0 mg/kg, i.p.) on social memory was prevented by pretreatment with the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (10.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the adenosine A1 antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX, 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the adenosine A(2A) antagonist 4-(2-[7-amino-2-{2-furyl}{1,2,4}triazolo-{2,3-a}{1,3,5}triazin-5-yl-amino]ethyl)phenol (ZM241385, 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.). Furthermore, acute administration of caffeine (10.0-30.0 mg/kg, i.p.), DPCPX (1.0-3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) or ZM241385 (0.5-1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) improved the short-term social memory in a specific manner. These results indicate that adenosine modulates the short-term social memory in rats by acting on both A1 and A(2A) receptors, with adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists, respectively, disrupting and enhancing the social memory.

  1. Pharmacological delayed preconditioning against ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias: effect of an adenosine A1-receptor agonist

    OpenAIRE

    Tissier, Renaud; Souktani, Rachid; Parent de Curzon, Olivier; Lellouche, Nicolas; Henry, Patrick; Giudicelli, Jean-François; Berdeaux, Alain; Ghaleh, Bijan

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of the delayed pharmacological preconditioning produced by an adenosine A1-receptor agonist (A1-DPC) against ventricular arrhythmias induced by ischaemia and reperfusion, compared to those of ischaemia-induced delayed preconditioning (I-DPC).Eighty-nine instrumented conscious rabbits underwent a 2 consecutive days protocol. On day 1, rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: ‘Control' (saline, i.v.), ‘I-DPC' (six 4-min coronary arter...

  2. Theobromine-Induced Changes in A1 Purinergic Receptor Gene Expression and Distribution in a Rat Brain Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola-Precoma, Jesus; Padilla, Karla; Rodríguez-Cruz, Alfredo; Berumen, Laura C; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly characterized by accumulation in the brain of extra- and intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins, respectively, which selectively affect specific regions, particularly the neocortex and the hippocampus. Sporadic AD is mainly caused by an increase in apolipoprotein E, a component of chylomicrons, which are cholesterol transporters in the brain. Recent studies have shown that high lipid levels, especially cholesterol, are linked to AD. Adenosine is an atypical neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological functions by activating four P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) and P2 purinergic receptors that are G protein-coupled. A1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, which could be related to AD. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a lard-enriched diet (LED) on cognitive and memory processes in adult rats (6 months of age) as well as the effect of theobromine on these processes. The results indicated that the fat-enriched diet resulted in a long-term deterioration in cognitive and memory functions. Increased levels of Aβ protein and IL-1β were also observed in the rats fed with a high-cholesterol diet, which were used to validate the AD animal model. In addition, the results of qPCR and immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease in gene expression and distribution of A1 purinegic receptor, respectively, in the hippocampus of LED-fed rats. Interestingly, theobromine, at both concentrations tested, restored A1 receptor levels and improved cognitive functions and Aβ levels for a dose of 30 mg/L drinking water.

  3. The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (Nur77) regulates oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Syng-Ook; Jin, Un-Ho; Kang, Jeong Han; Kim, Sang Bae; Guthrie, Aaron S; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Lee, Ju-Seog; Safe, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    NR4A1 (Nur77, TR3) is an orphan nuclear receptor that is overexpressed in pancreatic cancer and exhibits pro-oncogenic activity. RNA interference of NR4A1 expression in Panc-1 cells induced apoptosis and subsequent proteomic analysis revealed the induction of several markers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, including glucose-related protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP), and activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4). Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with the NR4A1 antagonist 1,1-bis(3'-indolyl)-1-(p-hydroxyphenyl)methane (DIM-C-pPhOH) gave similar results. Moreover, both NR4A1 knockdown and DIM-C-pPhOH induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and induction of ROS and endoplasmic reticulum stress by these agents was attenuated after cotreatment with antioxidants. Manipulation of NR4A1 expression coupled with gene expression profiling identified a number of ROS metabolism transcripts regulated by NR4A1. Knockdown of one of these transcripts, thioredoxin domain containing 5 (TXNDC5), recapitulated the elevated ROS and endoplasmic reticulum stress; thus, demonstrating that NR4A1 regulates levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress and ROS in pancreatic cancer cells to facilitate cell proliferation and survival. Finally, inactivation of NR4A1 by knockdown or DIM-C-pPhOH decreased TXNDC5, resulting in activation of the ROS/endoplasmic reticulum stress and proapoptotic pathways. The NR4A1 receptor is pro-oncogenic, regulates the ROS/endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways, and inactivation of the receptor represents a novel pathway for inducing cell death in pancreatic cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 12(4); 527-38. ©2014 AACR.

  4. Therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) against organophosphate intoxication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bueters, T.J.H.; Groen, B.; Danhof, M.; IJzerman, A.P.; Helden, H.P.M. van

    2002-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate whether reduction of central acetylcholine (ACh) accumulation by adenosine receptor agonists could serve as a generic treatment against organophosphate (OP) poisoning. The OPs studied were tabun (O-ethyl-N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), sarin

  5. Identification of a cys-ser substitution in the 5-HT{sub 2C} (HTR2C) receptor gene and allelic association to violent behavior and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lappalainen, J.; Ozaki, N.; Goldman, D. [National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Rockville, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that brain serotonergic functions, including behavioral and neurochemical responses to 5-HT{sub 2C} agonist, are abnormal in some individuals with alcoholism and aggressive behaviors. The aim of the present study was to identify coding sequence variants in the human 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor gene which may cause abnormal or variant function of this receptor. Using SSCP analysis, a non-conservative cys-ser substitution was found in the 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor (designated 5-HT{sub 2Ccys} and 5-HT{sub 2Cser}). The polymorphism was typed in CEPH families to genetically map the gene. To test for association of the variant to alcoholism, violent behavior and serotonin function, the 5-HT{sub 2C} genotypes of 151 non-related Finnish male alcoholic violent offenders and impulsive fire setters and 127 Finnish psychiatrically interviewed healthy male volunteers were determined. CSF 5-HIAA concentrations were available for 74 alcoholic violent offenders and 25 healthy volunteers. Linkage analysis placed the 5-HT{sub 2C} gene on Xq21, a region that has been previously shown to contain genes for several mental retardation syndromes. The 5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} genotype frequencies in alcoholic violent offenders and controls differed significantly (0.90/0.10 and 0.82/0.18, respectively, P=0.048). The association was found to be strongest in the violent offenders who did not fulfill the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (5-HT{sub 2Ccys}/5-HT{sub 2Cser} 0.93/0.07, p=0.021). No association was found between CSF 5-HIAA concentrations and 5-HT{sub 2C} genotype. These results implicate a 5-HT{sub 2C} receptor amino acid substitution in predisposition to alcohol abuse and violent behavior in a subgroup of alcoholics.

  6. A biallelic RFLP of the human. alpha. 2-C4 adrenergic receptor gene (ADRA2RL2) localized on the short arm of chromosome 4 and encoding the putative. alpha. 2B receptor is identified with Bsu 36 L using a 1. 5 kb probe (p ADRA2RL2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeche, M.R.; Berrettini, W.H. (Clinical Neurogenetics Branch, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Regan, J.W. (Duke Univ. Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1989-12-11

    A 1.5 kb Eco RI cDNA fragment representing the human alpha2-C4 adrenergic receptor (AR) gene encoding the putative alpha2B-AR, containing approximately 1270 bp of the coding and 240 bp of the 3{prime}flanking region, inserted into pSP65, was used as a probe (p ADRA2RL2). This clone was obtained by screening a human kidney lambda GT10 cDNA library with the 0.95 kb Pst I restriction fragment derived from the coding block of the gene for the human platelet alpha2-AR. Hybridization of human genomic DNA digested with Bsu 36 I identifies a two allele polymorphism with bands at 12 kb and 5.8 kb. 20 unrelated North American caucasian subjects were evaluated with frequencies of: A allele, 0.45; B allele, 0.55, heterozygosity (obs), 0.5. This alpha2-AR gene has been mapped in a separation effort in 59 CEPH reference pedigrees to the tip of the short arm of chromosome 4 just proximal to GB (4p 16.3) reported to be linked to the Huntingston's disease gene. Codominant inheritance was observed in seven families with two and three generations, respectively. The number of meioses scored was 95.

  7. Hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors mediate context-dependent sensitization to morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Yan; Portugal, George S.; Fakira, Amanda K.; Melyan, Zara; Neve, Rachael; Lee, H. Thomas; Russo, Scott J.; Liu, Jie; Morón, Jose A.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamatergic systems, including α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are involved in opiate-induced neuronal and behavioral plasticity, although the mechanisms underlying these effects are not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of repeated morphine administration on AMPAR expression, synaptic plasticity, and context-dependent behavioral sensitization to morphine. We found that morphine treatment produced changes of synaptic...

  8. Ischaemic tolerance in aged mouse myocardium: the role of adenosine and effects of A1 adenosine receptor overexpression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, John P; Willems, Laura; Ashton, Kevin J; Holmgren, Kirsten; Peart, Jason; Matherne, G Paul

    2003-01-01

    The genesis of the ischaemia intolerant phenotype in aged myocardium is poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that impaired adenosine-mediated protection contributes to ischaemic intolerance, and examined whether this is countered by A1 adenosine receptor (A1AR) overexpression. Responses to 20 min ischaemia and 45 min reperfusion were assessed in perfused hearts from young (2–4 months) and moderately aged (16–18 months) mice. Post-ischaemic contractility was impaired by ageing with elevated ventricular diastolic (32 ± 2 vs. 18 ± 2 mmHg in young) and reduced developed (37 ± 3 vs. 83 ± 6 mmHg in young) pressures. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) loss was exaggerated (27 ± 2 vs. 16 ± 2 IU g−1in young) whereas the incidence of tachyarrhythmias was similar in young (15 ± 1 %) and aged hearts (16 ± 1 %). Functional analysis confirmed equipotent effects of 50 μm adenosine at A1 and A2 receptors in young and aged hearts. Nonetheless, while 50 μm adenosine improved diastolic (5 ± 1 mmHg) and developed pressures (134 ± 7 mmHg) and LDH loss (6 ± 2 IU g−1) in young hearts, it did not alter these variables in the aged group. Adenosine did attenuate arrhythmogenesis for both ages (to ∼10 %). In contrast to adenosine, 50 μm diazoxide reduced ischaemic damage and arrhythmogenesis for both ages. Contractile and anti-necrotic effects of adenosine were limited by 100 μm 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and 3 μm chelerythrine. Anti-arrhythmic effects were limited by 5-HD but not chelerythrine. Non-selective (100 μm 8-sulfophenyltheophylline) and A1-selective (150 nm 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine) adenosine receptor antagonism impaired ischaemic tolerance in young but not aged hearts. Quantitative real-time PCR and radioligand analysis indicated that impaired protection is unrelated to changes in A1AR mRNA transcription, or receptor density (∼8 fmol mg−1 protein in both age groups). However, A1AR overexpression improved tolerance for both ages, restoring

  9. Adenosine A1 receptors in human sleep regulation studied by electroencephalography (EEG) and positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissler, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep is an essential physiological process. However, the functions of sleep and the endogenous mechanisms involved in sleep regulation are only partially understood. Convergent lines of evidence support the hypothesis that the build-up of sleep propensity during wakefulness and its decline during sleep are associated with alterations in brain adenosine levels and adenosine receptor concentrations. The non-selective A 1 and A 2A adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine stimulates alertness and is known to attenuate changes in the waking and sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) typically observed after prolonged waking. Several findings point to an important function of the adenosine A 1 receptor (A 1 AR) in the modulation of vigilance states. The A 1 AR is densely expressed in brain regions involved in sleep regulation, and pharmacological manipulations affecting the A 1 AR were shown to influence sleep propensity and sleep depth. However, an involvement of the A 2A adenosine receptor (A 2A AR) is also assumed. The distinct functions of the A 1 and A 2A receptor subtypes in sleep-wake regulation and in mediating the effects of caffeine have not been identified so far. The selective adenosine A 1 receptor antagonist, 8-cyclopentyl-3-(3- 18 Ffluoropropyl)- 1-propylxanthine ( 18 F-CPFPX), offers the opportunity to get further insights into adenosinergic mechanisms by in vivo imaging of the A 1 AR subtype with positron emission tomography (PET). The aim of this thesis was to elucidate the role of adenosine A 1 receptors in human sleep regulation, combining 18 F-CPFPX PET brain imaging and EEG recordings, the gold standard in sleep research. It was hypothesized that sleep deprivation would induce adenosine accumulation and/or changes in A 1 AR density. Thus, the question was addressed whether these effects of prolonged wakefulness can be visualized by altered 18 F-CPFPX binding. Moreover, it was investigated whether radioligand uptake might be influenced by caffeine, since

  10. Importance of GluA1 subunit-containing AMPA glutamate receptors for morphine state-dependency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teemu Aitta-aho

    Full Text Available In state-dependency, information retrieval is most efficient when the animal is in the same state as it was during the information acquisition. State-dependency has been implicated in a variety of learning and memory processes, but its mechanisms remain to be resolved. Here, mice deficient in AMPA-type glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits were first conditioned to morphine (10 or 20 mg/kg s.c. during eight sessions over four days using an unbiased procedure, followed by testing for conditioned place preference at morphine states that were the same as or different from the one the mice were conditioned to. In GluA1 wildtype littermate mice the same-state morphine dose produced the greatest expression of place preference, while in the knockout mice no place preference was then detected. Both wildtype and knockout mice expressed moderate morphine-induced place preference when not at the morphine state (saline treatment at the test; in this case, place preference was weaker than that in the same-state test in wildtype mice. No correlation between place preference scores and locomotor activity during testing was found. Additionally, as compared to the controls, the knockout mice showed unchanged sensitization to morphine, morphine drug discrimination and brain regional μ-opioid receptor signal transduction at the G-protein level. However, the knockout mice failed to show increased AMPA/NMDA receptor current ratios in the ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons of midbrain slices after a single injection of morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c., sliced prepared 24 h afterwards, in contrast to the wildtype mice. The results indicate impaired drug-induced state-dependency in GluA1 knockout mice, correlating with impaired opioid-induced glutamate receptor neuroplasticity.

  11. Liver Receptor Homolog-1 Is Critical for Adequate Up-regulation of Cyp7a1 Gene Transcription and Bile Salt Synthesis During Bile Salt Sequestration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Out, Carolien; Hageman, Jurre; Bloks, Vincent W.; Gerrits, Han; Gelpke, Maarten D. Sollewijn; Bos, Trijnie; Havinga, Rick; Smit, Martin J.; Kuipers, Folkert; Groen, Albert K.

    Liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) is a nuclear receptor that controls a variety of metabolic pathways. In cultured cells, LRH-1 induces the expression of CYP7A1 and CYP8B1, key enzymes in bile salt synthesis. However, hepatic Cyp7a1 mRNA levels were not reduced upon hepatocyte-specific Lrh-1 deletion

  12. The Gly16 allele of the G16R single nucleotide polymorphism in the β2-adrenergic receptor gene augments the glycemic response to adrenaline in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, Kim Z.; Staalsø, Jonatan M.; Zaar, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Cerebral non-oxidative carbohydrate consumption may be driven by a ß2-adrenergic mechanism. This study tested whether the 46G > A (G16R) single nucleotide polymorphism of the ß2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) influences the metabolic and cerebrovascular responses to administration of adrenaline....... Forty healthy Caucasian men were included from a group of genotyped individuals. Cardio- and cerebrovascular variables at baseline and during a 60-min adrenaline infusion (0.06 μg kg-1 min-1) were measured by Model flow, near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler sonography. Blood samples were...... obtained from an artery and a retrograde catheter in the right internal jugular vein. The ADRB2 G16R variation had no effect on baseline arterial glucose, but during adrenaline infusion plasma glucose was up to 1.2 mM (CI95: 0.36-2.1, P

  13. Non-genomic effects of the NR4A1/Nur77/TR3/NGFIB orphan nuclear receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Alicja; Strzadala, Leon; Kalas, Wojciech

    2015-03-01

    The orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1/Nur77/TR3/NGFIB acts primarily as a transcription factor to regulate the expression of multiple genes. However, increasing research attention has recently been given to non-genomic activities of NR4A1. The first description of a non-genomic action of NR4A1 referred to the conversion of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 into a pro-apoptotic protein by direct interaction with NR4A1. In response to certain apoptotic stimuli, NR4A1 translocates from the nucleus to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it associates with Bcl-2 and thereby causes apoptosis. Afterwards, it appeared that NR4A1 could also bind and convert other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members. The latest studies indicate a significant role of NR4A1 in the process of autophagy. For example, a new NR4A1-mediated pathway specific for melanoma cells has been described where NR4A1 interacts with the adenine nucleotide translocase 1 (ANT1) on the mitochondrial inner membrane (MIM) leading to induction of the autophagy pathway. Moreover, NR4A1 interaction with cytoplasmic p53 may also contribute to the induction of autophagy. In addition to mitochondria, NR4A1 could be translocated to the outer membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and associate with Bcl-2 or translocon-associated protein subunit γ (TRAPγ) causing ER stress-induced apoptosis. NR4A1 also contributes to the proteasomal degradation of β-catenin in colon cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as to the stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) under non-hypoxic conditions. This review summarizes research findings on non-genomic effects of NR4A1 in normal and cancer cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Structural determinants of a conserved enantiomer-selective carvone binding pocket in the human odorant receptor OR1A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithe, Christiane; Protze, Jonas; Kreuchwig, Franziska; Krause, Gerd; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2017-11-01

    Chirality is a common phenomenon within odorants. Most pairs of enantiomers show only moderate differences in odor quality. One example for enantiomers that are easily discriminated by their odor quality is the carvones: humans significantly distinguish between the spearmint-like (R)-(-)-carvone and caraway-like (S)-(+)-carvone enantiomers. Moreover, for the (R)-(-)-carvone, an anosmia is observed in about 8% of the population, suggesting enantioselective odorant receptors (ORs). With only about 15% de-orphaned human ORs, the lack of OR crystal structures, and few comprehensive studies combining in silico and experimental approaches to elucidate structure-function relations of ORs, knowledge on cognate odorant/OR interactions is still sparse. An adjusted homology modeling approach considering OR-specific proline-caused conformations, odorant docking studies, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis, site-directed mutagenesis, and subsequent functional studies with recombinant ORs in a cell-based, real-time luminescence assay revealed 11 amino acid positions to constitute an enantioselective binding pocket necessary for a carvone function in human OR1A1 and murine Olfr43, respectively. Here, we identified enantioselective molecular determinants in both ORs that discriminate between minty and caraway odor. Comparison with orthologs from 36 mammalian species demonstrated a hominid-specific carvone binding pocket with about 100% conservation. Moreover, we identified loss-of-function SNPs associated with the carvone binding pocket of OR1A1. Given carvone enantiomer-specific receptor activation patterns including OR1A1, our data suggest OR1A1 as a candidate receptor for constituting a carvone enantioselective phenotype, which may help to explain mechanisms underlying a (R)-(-)-carvone-specific anosmia in humans.

  15. Ethanol-induced increase in portal blood flow: Role of acetate and A1- and A2-adenosine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, F.J.; Saldivia, V.; Varghese, G.A.; Israel, Y.; Orrego, H.

    1988-01-01

    The increase in portal blood flow induced by ethanol appears to be adenosine mediated. Acetate, which is released by the liver during ethanol metabolism, is known to increase adenosine levels in tissues and in blood. The effects of acetate on portal blood flow were investigated in rats using the microsphere technique. The intravenous infusion of acetate resulted in vasodilation of the preportal vasculature and in a dose-dependent increase in portal blood flow. This acetate-induced increase in portal blood flow was suppressed by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. Using the A 1 -adenosine receptor agonist N-6-cyclohexyl adenosine and the A 2 -agonist 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine, we demonstrate that the effect of adenosine on the preportal vasculature is mediated by the A 2 -subtype of adenosine receptors. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that the increase in portal blood flow after ethanol administration results from a preportal vasodilatory effect of adenosine formed from acetate metabolism in extrahepatic tissues

  16. Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit impairs recency-dependent object recognition memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, David J.; Hindley, Emma; Smeaton, Emily; Denny, Nick; Taylor, Amy; Barkus, Chris; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Bannerman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Deletion of the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit impairs short-term spatial recognition memory. It has been suggested that short-term recognition depends upon memory caused by the recent presentation of a stimulus that is independent of contextual–retrieval processes. The aim of the present set of experiments was to test whether the role of GluA1 extends to nonspatial recognition memory. Wild-type and GluA1 knockout mice were tested on the standard object recognition task and a context-independent recognition task that required recency-dependent memory. In a first set of experiments it was found that GluA1 deletion failed to impair performance on either of the object recognition or recency-dependent tasks. However, GluA1 knockout mice displayed increased levels of exploration of the objects in both the sample and test phases compared to controls. In contrast, when the time that GluA1 knockout mice spent exploring the objects was yoked to control mice during the sample phase, it was found that GluA1 deletion now impaired performance on both the object recognition and the recency-dependent tasks. GluA1 deletion failed to impair performance on a context-dependent recognition task regardless of whether object exposure in knockout mice was yoked to controls or not. These results demonstrate that GluA1 is necessary for nonspatial as well as spatial recognition memory and plays an important role in recency-dependent memory processes. PMID:21378100

  17. Adenosine A1 Receptor Protects Against Cisplatin Ototoxicity by Suppressing the NOX3/STAT1 Inflammatory Pathway in the Cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Borse, Vikrant; Sheth, Sandeep; Sheehan, Kelly; Ghosh, Sumana; Tupal, Srinivasan; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2016-04-06

    Cisplatin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent that produces ototoxicity that is mediated in part by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the NOX3 NADPH oxidase pathway in the cochlea. Recent studies implicate ROS generation in mediating inflammatory and apoptotic processes and hearing loss by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1). In this study, we show that the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) protects against cisplatin ototoxicity by suppressing an inflammatory response initiated by ROS generation via NOX3 NADPH oxidase, leading to inhibition of STAT1. Trans-tympanic administration of the A1AR agonist R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA) inhibited cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, as measured by auditory brainstem responses and scanning electron microscopy in male Wistar rats. This was associated with reduced NOX3 expression, STAT1 activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis in the cochlea. In vitro studies in UB/OC-1 cells, an organ of Corti immortalized cell line, showed that R-PIA reduced cisplatin-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 Ser(727) (but not Tyr(701)) and STAT1 luciferase activity by suppressing the ERK1/2, p38, and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways.R-PIA also decreased the expression of STAT1 target genes, such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and reduced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. These data suggest that the A1AR provides otoprotection by suppressing NOX3 and inflammation in the cochlea and could serve as an ideal target for otoprotective drug therapy. Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. Its use results in significant and permanent hearing loss, for which no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment is currently available. In this study, we targeted the cochlear adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) by trans-tympanic injections of the agonist R

  18. Adenosine A1 Receptor Protects Against Cisplatin Ototoxicity by Suppressing the NOX3/STAT1 Inflammatory Pathway in the Cochlea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Tejbeer; Borse, Vikrant; Sheth, Sandeep; Sheehan, Kelly; Ghosh, Sumana; Tupal, Srinivasan; Jajoo, Sarvesh; Mukherjea, Debashree; Rybak, Leonard P.

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used antineoplastic agent that produces ototoxicity that is mediated in part by increasing levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via the NOX3 NADPH oxidase pathway in the cochlea. Recent studies implicate ROS generation in mediating inflammatory and apoptotic processes and hearing loss by activating signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1). In this study, we show that the adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) protects against cisplatin ototoxicity by suppressing an inflammatory response initiated by ROS generation via NOX3 NADPH oxidase, leading to inhibition of STAT1. Trans-tympanic administration of the A1AR agonist R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA) inhibited cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, as measured by auditory brainstem responses and scanning electron microscopy in male Wistar rats. This was associated with reduced NOX3 expression, STAT1 activation, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels, and apoptosis in the cochlea. In vitro studies in UB/OC-1 cells, an organ of Corti immortalized cell line, showed that R-PIA reduced cisplatin-induced phosphorylation of STAT1 Ser727 (but not Tyr701) and STAT1 luciferase activity by suppressing the ERK1/2, p38, and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. R-PIA also decreased the expression of STAT1 target genes, such as TNF-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and reduced cisplatin-mediated apoptosis. These data suggest that the A1AR provides otoprotection by suppressing NOX3 and inflammation in the cochlea and could serve as an ideal target for otoprotective drug therapy. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of solid tumors. Its use results in significant and permanent hearing loss, for which no US Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment is currently available. In this study, we targeted the cochlear adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) by trans-tympanic injections of the agonist R

  19. Activity-dependent ubiquitination of GluA1 mediates a distinct AMPA receptor endocytosis and sorting pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Lindsay A; Hall, Benjamin J; Patrick, Gentry N

    2010-12-08

    The accurate trafficking of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) to and from the synapse is a critical component of learning and memory in the brain, whereas dysfunction of AMPAR trafficking is hypothesized to be an underlying mechanism of Alzheimer's disease. Previous work has shown that ubiquitination of integral membrane proteins is a common posttranslational modification used to mediate endocytosis and endocytic sorting of surface proteins in eukaryotic cells. Here we report that mammalian AMPARs become ubiquitinated in response to their activation. Using a mutant of GluA1 that is unable to be ubiquitinated at lysines on its C-terminus, we demonstrate that ubiquitination is required for internalization of surface AMPARs and their trafficking to the lysosome in response to the AMPAR agonist AMPA but not for internalization of AMPARs in response to the NMDA receptor agonist NMDA. Through overexpression or RNA interference-mediated knockdown, we identify that a specific E3 ligase, Nedd4-1 (neural-precursor cell-expressed developmentally downregulated gene 4-1), is necessary for this process. Finally, we show that ubiquitination of GluA1 by Nedd4-1 becomes more prevalent as neurons mature. Together, these data show that ubiquitination of GluA1-containing AMPARs by Nedd4-1 mediates their endocytosis and trafficking to the lysosome. Furthermore, these results provide insight into how hippocampal neurons regulate AMPAR trafficking and degradation with high specificity in response to differing neuronal signaling cues and suggest that changes to this pathway may occur as neurons mature.

  20. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  1. Distribution of HIV-1 resistance-conferring polymorphic alleles SDF ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymorphic allelic variants of chemokine receptors CCR2 and CCR5, as well as of stromal-derived factor-1 SDF-1, the ligand for the chemokine receptor CXCR4, are known to have protective effects against HIV-1 infection and to be involved with delay in disease progression. We have studied the DNA polymorphisms at ...

  2. Adenosine A1 receptor antagonist mitigates deleterious effects of sleep deprivation on adult neurogenesis and spatial reference memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, G; Ray, K; Sahu, S; Roy, K; Jain, V; Wadhwa, M; Panjwani, U; Kishore, K; Singh, S B

    2016-11-19

    Sleep deprivation (SD) upsurges intracellular levels of adenosine, impairs adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) and cognition while caffeine, a non-selective adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) antagonist improves cognition and adult NCP during SD. We examined the selective antagonistic effects of adenosine A1R using 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine (8-CPT) on impairment of spatial reference memory and adult NCP during 48h SD. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were sleep deprived for 48h, using an automatic cage vibrating stimulus based on animal activity. Spatial reference memory was tested as a measure of cognitive performance employing Morris Water Maze. Rats were given 8-CPT dissolved in 50% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), twice daily (10mg/kg, i.p.) along with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) (50mg/kg/day, i.p.). The rats treated with 8-CPT showed significantly short mean latency and path-length to reach the platform compared to the SD rats. Consistent with these findings, 8-CPT-treated group was found to have significantly increased the number of BrdU, Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX) positive cells. However, no significant difference was seen in NeuN expression in the Dentate Gyrus (DG). Brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF) expression in the DG and CA1 region was observed to decrease significantly after SD and be rescued by 8-CPT treatment. Furthermore, latency to reach platform showed a negative correlation with number of BrdU, DCX type-1 cells and BDNF expression in DG. Thus, it may be concluded that treatment with 8-CPT, an adenosine A1R antagonist during SD mitigates SD induced decline in spatial reference memory and adult NCP possibly via up regulation of BDNF levels in DG and CA1 regions. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The amphiphilic peptide adenoregulin enhances agonist binding to A1-adenosine receptors and [35S]GTP gamma S to brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, R W; Romero, F S; Daly, J W

    1995-08-01

    1. Adenoregulin is an amphilic peptide isolated from skin mucus of the tree frog, Phyllomedusa bicolor. Synthetic adenoregulin enhanced the binding of agonists to several G-protein-coupled receptors in rat brain membranes. 2. The maximal enhancement of agonist binding, and in parentheses, the concentration of adenoregulin affording maximal enhancement were as follows: 60% (20 microM) for A1-adenosine receptors, 30% (100 microM) for A2a-adenosine receptors, 20% (2 microM) for alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, and 30% (10 microM) for 5HT1A receptors. High affinity agonist binding for A1-, alpha 2-, and 5HT1A-receptors was virtually abolished by GTP gamma S in the presence of adenoregulin, but was only partially abolished in its absence. Magnesium ions increased the binding of agonists to receptors and reduced the enhancement elicited by adenoregulin. 3. The effect of adenoregulin on binding of N6-cyclohexyladenosine ([3H]CHA) to A1-receptors was relatively slow and was irreversible. Adenoregulin increased the Bmax value for [3H]CHA binding sites, and the proportion of high affinity states, and slowed the rate of [3H]CHA dissociation. Binding of the A1-selective antagonist, [3H]DPCPX, was maximally enhanced by only 13% at 2 microM adenoregulin. Basal and A1-adenosine receptor-stimulated binding of [35S]GTP gamma S were maximally enhanced 45% and 23%, respectively, by 50 microM adenoregulin. In CHAPS-solubilized membranes from rat cortex, the binding of both [3H]CHA and [3H]DPCPX were enhanced by adenoregulin. Binding of [3H]CHA to membranes from DDT1 MF-2 cells was maximally enhanced 17% at 20 microM adenoregulin. In intact DDT1 MF-2 cells, 20 microM adenoregulin did not potentiate the inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation mediated via the adenosine A1 receptor. 4. It is proposed that adenoregulin enhances agonist binding through a mechanism involving enhancement of guanyl nucleotide exchange at G-proteins, resulting in a conversion of receptors into a high affinity state

  4. Recombinant mouse PAP has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity and acts through A(1-adenosine receptors to mediate antinociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Sowa

    Full Text Available Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP is expressed in nociceptive neurons and functions as an ectonucleotidase. When injected intraspinally, the secretory isoforms of human and bovine PAP protein have potent and long-lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on A(1-adenosine receptor (A(1R activation. In this study, we purified the secretory isoform of mouse (mPAP using the baculovirus expression system to determine if recombinant mPAP also had antinociceptive properties. We found that mPAP dephosphorylated AMP, and to a much lesser extent, ADP at neutral pH (pH 7.0. In contrast, mPAP dephosphorylated all purine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP at an acidic pH (pH 5.6. The transmembrane isoform of mPAP had similar pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. A single intraspinal injection of mPAP protein had long-lasting (three day antinociceptive properties, including antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA inflammatory pain model. These antinociceptive effects were transiently blocked by the A(1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (CPX, suggesting mPAP dephosphorylates nucleotides to adenosine to mediate antinociception just like human and bovine PAP. Our studies indicate that PAP has species-conserved antinociceptive effects and has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. The ability to metabolize nucleotides in a pH-dependent manner could be relevant to conditions like inflammation where tissue acidosis and nucleotide release occur. Lastly, our studies demonstrate that recombinant PAP protein can be used to treat chronic pain in animal models.

  5. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of in vitro prolactin secretion from the rat anterior pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L.W. Picanço-Diniz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we demonstrated biphasic purinergic effects on prolactin (PRL secretion stimulated by an adenosine A2 agonist. In the present study, we investigated the role of the activation of adenosine A1 receptors by (R-N6-(2-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA at the pituitary level in in vitro PRL secretion. Hemipituitaries (one per cuvette in five replicates from adult male rats were incubated. Administration of R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 µM induced a reduction of PRL secretion into the medium in a U-shaped dose-response curve. The maximal reduction was obtained with 0.1 µM R-PIA (mean ± SEM, 36.01 ± 5.53 ng/mg tissue weight (t.w. treatment compared to control (264.56 ± 15.46 ng/mg t.w.. R-PIA inhibition (0.01 µM = 141.97 ± 15.79 vs control = 244.77 ± 13.79 ng/mg t.w. of PRL release was blocked by 1 µM cyclopentyltheophylline, a specific A1 receptor antagonist (1 µM = 212.360 ± 26.560 ng/mg t.w., whereas cyclopentyltheophylline alone (0.01, 0.1, 1 µM had no effect. R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 µM produced inhibition of PRL secretion stimulated by both phospholipase C (0.5 IU/mL; 977.44 ± 76.17 ng/mg t.w. and dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM; 415.93 ± 37.66 ng/mg t.w. with nadir established at the dose of 0.1 µM (225.55 ± 71.42 and 201.9 ± 19.08 ng/mg t.w., respectively. Similarly, R-PIA (0.01 µM decreased (242.00 ± 24.00 ng/mg t.w. the PRL secretion stimulated by cholera toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 1050.00 ± 70.00 ng/mg t.w.. In contrast, R-PIA had no effect (468.00 ± 34.00 ng/mg t.w. on PRL secretion stimulation by pertussis toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 430.00 ± 26.00 ng/mg t.w.. These results suggest that inhibition of PRL secretion after A1 receptor activation by R-PIA is mediated by a Gi protein-dependent mechanism.

  6. β-Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide acts at prejunctional adenosine A1 receptors to suppress inhibitory musculomotor neurotransmission in guinea pig colon and human jejunum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Du; Wang, Xi-Yu; Liu, Sumei; Xia, Yun; Zou, Fei; Qu, Meihua; Needleman, Bradley J.; Mikami, Dean J.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrodes were used to record neurogenic inhibitory junction potentials in the intestinal circular muscle coat. Electrical field stimulation was used to stimulate intramural neurons and evoke contraction of the smooth musculature. Exposure to β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD) did not alter smooth muscle membrane potential in guinea pig colon or human jejunum. ATP, ADP, β-NAD, and adenosine, as well as the purinergic P2Y1 receptor antagonists MRS 2179 and MRS 2500 and the adenosine A1 receptor agonist 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, each suppressed inhibitory junction potentials in guinea pig and human preparations. β-NAD suppressed contractile force of twitch-like contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in guinea pig and human preparations. P2Y1 receptor antagonists did not reverse this action. Stimulation of adenosine A1 receptors with 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine suppressed the force of twitch contractions evoked by electrical field stimulation in like manner to the action of β-NAD. Blockade of adenosine A1 receptors with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine suppressed the inhibitory action of β-NAD on the force of electrically evoked contractions. The results do not support an inhibitory neurotransmitter role for β-NAD at intestinal neuromuscular junctions. The data suggest that β-NAD is a ligand for the adenosine A1 receptor subtype expressed by neurons in the enteric nervous system. The influence of β-NAD on intestinal motility emerges from adenosine A1 receptor-mediated suppression of neurotransmitter release at inhibitory neuromuscular junctions. PMID:25813057

  7. Autoradiographic visualization of A 1-adenosine receptors in brain and peripheral tissues of rat and guinea pig using 125I-HPIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.G.; Lohse, M.J.; Jones, C.R.; Palacios, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A 1 -adenosine receptors were identified in sections of rat brain and guinea pig kidney with the radioiodinated agonist 1 25I-N 6 -p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine ( 1 25I-HPIA) using in vitro autoradiography. The affinities of adenosine receptor ligands in competing with 1 25I-HPIA binding to tissue sections were in good agreement with those found in membranes and indicate that the binding site represents an A 1 pattern of [ 3 H]N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine ([ 3 H]CHA) binding sites determined previously, with highest densities in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the cerebellar cortex, some thalamic nuclei and certain layers of the cerebral cortex. In the guinea pig kidney 1 25I-HPIA labelled longitudinal structures in the medulla. This study demonstrates that 1 25I-HPIA allows the autoradiographic detection of A-1 adenosine receptors in the brain and peripheral organs and has the advantage of short exposure times (author)

  8. Theobromine suppresses adipogenesis through enhancement of CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein β degradation by adenosine receptor A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Takakazu; Watanabe, Shun; Yoshioka, Yasukiyo; Katayama, Shigeru; Nakamura, Soichiro; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2017-12-01

    Theobromine, a methylxanthine derived from cacao beans, reportedly has various health-promoting properties but molecular mechanism by which effects of theobromine on adipocyte differentiation and adipogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of the anti-adipogenic effect of theobromine in vitro and in vivo. ICR mice (4week-old) were administered with theobromine (0.1g/kg) for 7days. Theobromine administration attenuated gains in body and epididymal adipose tissue weights in mice and suppressed expression of adipogenic-associated genes in mouse adipose tissue. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, theobromine caused degradation of C/EBPβ protein by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Pull down assay showed that theobromine selectively interacts with adenosine receptor A1 (AR1), and AR1 knockdown inhibited theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Theobromine increased sumoylation of C/EBPβ at Lys133. Expression of the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-specific protease 2 (SENP2) gene, coding for a desumoylation enzyme, was suppressed by theobromine. In vivo knockdown studies showed that AR1 knockdown in mice attenuated the anti-adipogenic effects of theobromine in younger mice. Theobromine suppresses adipocyte differentiation and induced C/EBPβ degradation by increasing its sumoylation. Furthermore, the inhibition of AR1 signaling is important for theobromine-induced C/EBPβ degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A1 adenosine receptor-induced phosphorylation and modulation of transglutaminase 2 activity in H9c2 cells: A role in cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Falguni S; Hargreaves, Alan J; Bonner, Philip L R; Boocock, David J; Coveney, Clare; Dickenson, John M

    2016-05-01

    The regulation of tissue transglutaminase (TG2) activity by the GPCR family is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the modulation of TG2 activity by the A1 adenosine receptor in cardiomyocyte-like H9c2 cells. H9c2 cells were lysed following stimulation with the A1 adenosine receptor agonist N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA). Transglutaminase activity was determined using an amine incorporating and a protein cross linking assay. TG2 phosphorylation was assessed via immunoprecipitation and Western blotting. The role of TG2 in A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection was investigated by monitoring hypoxia-induced cell death. CPA induced time and concentration-dependent increases in amine incorporating and protein crosslinking activity of TG2. CPA-induced increases in TG2 activity were attenuated by the TG2 inhibitors Z-DON and R283. Responses to CPA were blocked by PKC (Ro 31-8220), MEK1/2 (PD 98059), p38 MAPK (SB 203580) and JNK1/2 (SP 600125) inhibitors and by removal of extracellular Ca(2+). CPA triggered robust increases in the levels of TG2-associated phosphoserine and phosphothreonine, which were attenuated by PKC, MEK1/2 and JNK1/2 inhibitors. Fluorescence microscopy revealed TG2-mediated biotin-X-cadaverine incorporation into proteins and proteomic analysis identified known (Histone H4) and novel (Hexokinase 1) protein substrates for TG2. CPA pre-treatment reversed hypoxia-induced LDH release and decreases in MTT reduction. TG2 inhibitors R283 and Z-DON attenuated A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection. TG2 activity was stimulated by the A1 adenosine receptor in H9c2 cells via a multi protein kinase dependent pathway. These results suggest a role for TG2 in A1 adenosine receptor-induced cytoprotection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Odor preference learning and memory modify GluA1 phosphorylation and GluA1 distribution in the neonate rat olfactory bulb: testing the AMPA receptor hypothesis in an appetitive learning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T; Howland, John G; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H; Harley, Carolyn W

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in the neonate rat. Rat pups were given a single pairing of peppermint and 2 mg/kg isoproterenol, which produces a 24-h, but not a 48-h, peppermint preference in the 7-d-old rat pup. GluA1 PKA-dependent phosphorylation peaked 10 min after the 10-min training trial and returned to baseline within 90 min. At 24 h, GluA1 subunits did not change overall but were significantly increased in synaptoneurosomes, consistent with increased membrane insertion. Immunohistochemistry revealed a significant increase in GluA1 subunits in olfactory bulb glomeruli, the targets of olfactory nerve axons. Glomerular increases were seen at 3 and 24 h after odor exposure in trained pups, but not in control pups. GluA1 increases were not seen as early as 10 min after training and were no longer observed 48 h after training when odor preference is no longer expressed behaviorally. Thus, the pattern of increased GluA1 membrane expression closely follows the memory timeline. Further, blocking GluA1 insertion using an interference peptide derived from the carboxyl tail of the GluA1 subunit inhibited 24 h odor preference memory providing causative support for our hypothesis. PKA-mediated GluA1 phosphorylation and later GluA1 insertion could, conjointly, provide increased AMPA function to support both short-term and long-term appetitive memory.

  11. Transporter Protein-Coupled DPCPX Nanoconjugates Induce Diaphragmatic Recovery after SCI by Blocking Adenosine A1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minic, Zeljka; Zhang, Yanhua; Mao, Guangzhao; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2016-03-23

    Respiratory complications in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) are common and have a negative impact on the quality of patients' lives. Systemic administration of drugs that improve respiratory function often cause deleterious side effects. The present study examines the applicability of a novel nanotechnology-based drug delivery system, which induces recovery of diaphragm function after SCI in the adult rat model. We developed a protein-coupled nanoconjugate to selectively deliver by transsynaptic transport small therapeutic amounts of an A1 adenosine receptor antagonist to the respiratory centers. A single administration of the nanoconjugate restored 75% of the respiratory drive at 0.1% of the systemic therapeutic drug dose. The reduction of the systemic dose may obviate the side effects. The recovery lasted for 4 weeks (the longest period studied). These findings have translational implications for patients with respiratory dysfunction after SCI. The leading causes of death in humans following SCI are respiratory complications secondary to paralysis of respiratory muscles. Systemic administration of methylxantines improves respiratory function but also leads to the development of deleterious side effects due to actions of the drug on nonrespiratory sites. The importance of the present study lies in the novel drug delivery approach that uses nanotechnology to selectively deliver recovery-inducing drugs to the respiratory centers exclusively. This strategy allows for a reduction in the therapeutic drug dose, which may reduce harmful side effects and markedly improve the quality of life for SCI patients. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/363441-12$15.00/0.

  12. Adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression and the effects of systemic theophylline administration on respiratory function 4 months after C2 hemisection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantwi, Kwaku D; Basura, Gregory J; Goshgarian, Harry G

    2003-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that in an animal model of acute cervical spinal cord injury (SCI), respiratory function can be restored by theophylline. We also have shown that respiratory recovery occurs spontaneously after prolonged postinjury survival periods when a hemidiaphragm is paralyzed by an ipsilateral upper cervical (C2) spinal cord hemisection. Theophylline mediates functional recovery by central nervous system adenosine A1 receptor antagonism; however, it is unclear whether adenosine receptors are altered after prolonged postinjury periods and whether theophylline can further enhance restored respiratory function that occurs spontaneously. To assess putative effects of systemic theophylline administration on further enhancing spontaneous respiratory muscle recovery 4 months after C2 hemisection in rats and to determine whether adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression is altered in these animals. Electrophysiologic assessment of respiratory activity in the phrenic nerves was conducted in C2 hemisected rats 4 months after hemisection under standardized conditions. Immediately thereafter, rats were killed and the cervical spinal cords were prepared for adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression by in situ hybridization. Spontaneous recovery of respiratory activity in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve was detected in a majority (15/20) of C2 hemisected animals and amounted to 44.06% +/- 2.38% when expressed as a percentage of activity in the homolateral phrenic nerve in noninjured animals. At the optimal dosage used in the acute studies, theophylline (15 mg/kg) did not enhance, but rather unexpectedly blocked, recovered respiratory activity in 4 out of 5 animals tested. At dosages of 5 mg/kg and 2.5 mg/kg, the drug blocked recovered respiratory activity in 3 out of 4 and 3 out of 5 animals tested, respectively. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A1 receptor mRNA expression did not reveal a significant difference between experimental animals

  13. CYP19A1 polymorphisms and clinical outcomes in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer in the BIG 1-98 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leyland-Jones, Brian; Gray, Kathryn P; Abramovitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether CYP19A1 polymorphisms are associated with abnormal activity of aromatase and with musculoskeletal and bone side effects of aromatase inhibitors. DNA was isolated from tumor specimens of 4861 postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer enrolled in the BIG 1...

  14. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Ole F

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call this centered allele coding. This study considered effects of different allele coding methods on inference. Both marker-based and equivalent models were considered, and restricted maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were used in inference. Results Theoretical derivations showed that parameter estimates and estimated marker effects in marker-based models are the same irrespective of the allele coding, provided that the model has a fixed general mean. For the equivalent models, the same results hold, even though different allele coding methods lead to different genomic relationship matrices. Calculated genomic breeding values are independent of allele coding when the estimate of the general mean is included into the values. Reliabilities of estimated genomic breeding values calculated using elements of the inverse of the coefficient matrix depend on the allele coding because different allele coding methods imply different models. Finally, allele coding affects the mixing of Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms, with the centered coding being

  15. Allele coding in genomic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standen, Ismo; Christensen, Ole Fredslund

    2011-01-01

    Genomic data are used in animal breeding to assist genetic evaluation. Several models to estimate genomic breeding values have been studied. In general, two approaches have been used. One approach estimates the marker effects first and then, genomic breeding values are obtained by summing marker...... effects. In the second approach, genomic breeding values are estimated directly using an equivalent model with a genomic relationship matrix. Allele coding is the method chosen to assign values to the regression coefficients in the statistical model. A common allele coding is zero for the homozygous...... genotype of the first allele, one for the heterozygote, and two for the homozygous genotype for the other allele. Another common allele coding changes these regression coefficients by subtracting a value from each marker such that the mean of regression coefficients is zero within each marker. We call...

  16. Autoradiographic localization of adenosine A1 receptors in rat brain using [3H]XCC, a functionalized congener of 1,3-dipropylxanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, M.J.; Williams, M.; Jacobson, K.A.

    1987-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to visualize the anatomical distribution of adenosine receptors labeled by the carboxylic acid congener of 1,3-dipropylxanthine, [ 3 Hi](8-(p-carbonxymethyloxy) phenyl-1,3 dipropylxanthine)([ 3 H]XCC) in rat brain. [ 3 H]XCC was observed to specifically bind to rat brain sagittal sections in a heterogenous pattern. Saturation experiments revealed that [ 3 H]XCC binds with nanomolar affinity to 20μm frozen tissue sections with the highest binding densities occurring in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Both the binding characteristics and regional receptor distribution obtained with [ 3 H]XCC demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new ligand in the study of adenosine A 1 receptors. 13 refs. (Author)

  17. Quantitative analysis of adenosine A1 receptors in human brain using positron emission tomography and [1 -methyl-11C]8-dicyclopropylmethyl-1-methyl-3-propylxanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Yuichi; Ishii, Kenji; Fukumitsu, Nobuyoshi; Oda, Keiichi; Sasaki, Toru; Kawamura, Kazunori; Ishiwata, Kiichi

    2004-01-01

    Fully quantitative analysis of the adenosine A 1 receptor (A1R) in the brain with 11 C-MPDX and positron emission tomography is reported. The kinetics is described using a two-tissue three-compartment model, and estimated binding potentials correspond well with the estimates made by Logan plot. The image of the binding potential of the MPDX is physiologically reasonable. We conclude that MPDX is applicable to the visualization of the A1Rs in the brain with Logan plot

  18. A1 not A2A adenosine receptors play a role in cortical epileptic afterdischarges in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 11 (2014), s. 1329-1336 ISSN 0300-9564 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : adenosine receptors * epileptic afterdischarges * cerebral cortex * ontogeny * rat Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.402, year: 2014

  19. Liver X receptor alpha mediated genistein induction of human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) in Hep G2 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shunfen [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Zhou, Tianyan [Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100083 (China); Huang, Chaoqun; McLaughlin, Alicia [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Chen, Guangping, E-mail: guangping.chen@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Cytosolic sulfotransferases are one of the major families of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes. Sulfotransferase-catalyzed sulfonation regulates hormone activities, metabolizes drugs, detoxifies xenobiotics, and bioactivates carcinogens. Human dehydroepiandrosterone sulfotransferase (hSULT2A1) plays important biological roles by sulfating endogenous hydroxysteroids and exogenous xenobiotics. Genistein, mainly existing in soy food products, is a naturally occurring phytoestrogen with both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic potential. Our previous studies have shown that genistein significantly induces hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 and Caco-2 cells. In this study, we investigated the roles of liver X receptor (LXRα) in the genistein induction of hSULT2A1. LXRs have been shown to induce expression of mouse Sult2a9 and hSULT2A1 gene. Our results demonstrate that LXRα mediates the genistein induction of hSULT2A1, supported by Western blot analysis results, hSULT2A1 promoter driven luciferase reporter gene assay results, and mRNA interference results. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay results demonstrate that genistein increase the recruitment of hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter. These results suggest that hLXRα plays an important role in the hSULT2A1 gene regulation. The biological functions of phytoestrogens may partially relate to their induction activity toward hydroxysteroid SULT. - Highlights: ► Liver X receptor α mediated genistein induction of hSULT2A1 in Hep G2 cells. ► LXRα and RXRα dimerization further activated this induction. ► Western blot results agreed well with luciferase reporter gene assay results. ► LXRs gene silencing significantly decreased hSULT2A1 expression. ► ChIP analysis suggested that genistein enhances hLXRα binding to the hSULT2A1 promoter.

  20. Frequency of the allelic variant c.1150T > C in exon 10 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is not increased in patients with pathogenic mutations and related chondrodysplasia phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiane Yoshie Kanazawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the FGFR3 gene cause the phenotypic spectrum of FGFR3 chondrodysplasias ranging from lethal forms to the milder phenotype seen in hypochondroplasia (Hch. The p.N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene occurs in ~70% of individuals with Hch, and nearly 30% of individuals with the Hch phenotype have no mutations in the FGFR3, which suggests genetic heterogeneity. The identification of a severe case of Hch associated with the typical mutation c.1620C > A and the occurrence of a c.1150T > C change that resulted in a p.F384L in exon 10, together with the suspicion that this second change could be a modulator of the phenotype, prompted us to investigate this hypothesis in a cohort of patients. An analysis of 48 patients with FGFR3 chondrodysplasia phenotypes and 330 healthy (control individuals revealed no significant difference in the frequency of the C allele at the c.1150 position (p = 0.34. One patient carrying the combination `pathogenic mutation plus the allelic variant c.1150T > C' had a typical achondroplasia (Ach phenotype. In addition, three other patients with atypical phenotypes showed no association with the allelic variant. Together, these results do not support the hypothesis of a modulatory role for the c.1150T > C change in the FGFR3 gene.

  1. Caffeine reverses age-related deficits in olfactory discrimination and social recognition memory in rats. Involvement of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Rui D S; Batista, Luciano C; Takahashi, Reinaldo N

    2005-06-01

    Caffeine, a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist, has been suggested as a potential drug to counteract age-related cognitive decline since critical changes in adenosinergic neurotransmission occur with aging. In the present study, olfactory discrimination and short-term social memory of 3, 6, 12 and 18 month-old rats were assessed with the olfactory discrimination and social recognition tasks, respectively. The actions of caffeine (3.0, 10.0 and 30.0 mg/kg, i.p.), the A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, i.p.) and the A2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 (0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) in relation to age-related effects on olfactory functions were also studied. The 12 and 18 month-old rats exhibited significantly impaired performance in both models, demonstrating deficits in their odor discrimination and in their ability to recognize a juvenile rat after a short period of time. Acute treatment with caffeine or ZM241385, but not with DPCPX, reversed these age-related olfactory deficits. The present results suggest the participation of adenosine receptors in the control of olfactory functions and confirm the potential of caffeine for the treatment of aged-related cognitive decline.

  2. The role of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors in the caffeine effect on MDMA-induced DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górska, A M; Gołembiowska, K

    2015-04-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, "ecstasy") popular as a designer drug is often used with caffeine to gain a stronger stimulant effect. MDMA induces 5-HT and DA release by interaction with monoamine transporters. Co-administration of caffeine and MDMA may aggravate MDMA-induced toxic effects on DA and 5-HT terminals. In the present study, we determined whether caffeine influences DA and 5-HT release induced by MDMA. We also tried to find out if adenosine A1 and A2A receptors play a role in the effect of caffeine by investigating the effect of the selective adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists, DPCPX and KW 6002 on DA and 5-HT release induced by MDMA. Mice were treated with caffeine (10 mg/kg) and MDMA (20 or 40 mg/kg) alone or in combination. DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum was measured using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine exacerbated the effect of MDMA on DA and 5-HT release. DPCPX or KW 6002 co-administered with MDMA had similar influence as caffeine, but KW 6002 was more potent than caffeine or DPCPX. To exclude the contribution of MAO inhibition by caffeine in the caffeine effect on MDMA-induced increase in DA and 5-HT, we also tested the effect of the nonxanthine adenosine receptor antagonist CGS 15943A lacking properties of MAO activity modification. Our findings indicate that adenosine A1 and A2A receptor blockade may account for the caffeine-induced exacerbation of the MDMA effect on DA and 5-HT release and may aggravate MDMA toxicity.

  3. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Young Chul [Department of Food Science and Culinary, International University of Korea, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  4. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-01-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression

  5. Rho-kinase signaling controls nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) and transcriptional activation of orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compagnucci, Claudia; Barresi, Sabina [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Petrini, Stefania [Research Laboratories, Confocal Microscopy Core Facility, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Bertini, Enrico [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy); Zanni, Ginevra, E-mail: ginevra.zanni@opbg.net [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Disorders, Department of Neurosciences, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, Rome (Italy)

    2015-04-03

    Rho-kinase (ROCK) has been well documented to play a key role in RhoA-induced actin remodeling. ROCK activation results in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation either by direct action on MLC kinase (MLCK) or by inhibition of MLC phosphatase (MLCP), modulating actin–myosin contraction. We found that inhibition of the ROCK pathway in induced pluripotent stem cells, leads to nuclear export of HDAC7 and transcriptional activation of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 while in cells with constitutive ROCK hyperactivity due to loss of function of the RhoGTPase activating protein Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1), the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 is downregulated. Our study identify a new target of ROCK signaling via myosin phosphatase subunit (MYPT1) and Histone Deacetylase (HDAC7) at the nuclear level and provide new insights in the cellular functions of ROCK. - Highlights: • ROCK regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of HDAC7 via phosphorylation of MYPT1. • Nuclear export of HDAC7 and upregulation of NR4A1 occurs with low ROCK activity. • High levels of ROCK activity due to OPHN1 loss of function downregulate NR4A1.

  6. Propranolol decreases retention of fear memory by modulating the stability of surface glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Luo, Yi; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Li, Ming-Xing; Wang, Can-Ming; Guan, Xin-Lei; Wu, Peng-Fei; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Jin, You; Ni, Lan; Wang, Fang; Chen, Jian-Guo

    2015-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder with enhanced retention of fear memory and has profound impact on quality of life for millions of people worldwide. The β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol has been used in preclinical and clinical studies for the treatment of PTSD, but the mechanisms underlying its potential efficacy on fear memory retention remain to be elucidated. We investigated the action of propranolol on the retention of conditioned fear memory, the surface expression of glutamate receptor GluA1 subunits of AMPA receptors and synaptic adaptation in the lateral amygdala (LA) of rats. Propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced strengthening of fear retention while reducing enhanced surface expression of GluA1 subunits and restoring the impaired long-term depression in LA. These effects of propranolol were mediated by antagonizing reactivation-induced enhancement of adrenergic signalling, which activates PKA and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and then regulates the trafficking of AMPA receptors via phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits at the C-terminus. Both i.p. injection and intra-amygdala infusion of propranolol attenuated reactivation-induced enhancement of fear retention. Reactivation strengthens fear retention by increasing the level of noradrenaline and promotes the surface expression of GluA1 subunits and the excitatory synaptic transmission in LA. These findings uncover one mechanism underlying the efficiency of propranolol on retention of fear memories and suggest that β-adrenoceptor antagonists, which act centrally, may be more suitable for the treatment of PTSD. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  7. Delimiting Allelic Imbalance of TYMS by Allele-Specific Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balboa-Beltrán, Emilia; Cruz, Raquel; Carracedo, Angel; Barros, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Allelic imbalance of thymidylate synthase (TYMS) is attributed to polymorphisms in the 5'- and 3'-untranslated region (UTR). These polymorphisms have been related to the risk of suffering different cancers, for example leukemia, breast or gastric cancer, and response to different drugs, among which are methotrexate glutamates, stavudine, and specifically 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), as TYMS is its direct target. A vast literature has been published in relation to 5-FU, even suggesting the sole use of these polymorphisms to effectively manage 5-FU dosage. Estimates of the extent to which these polymorphisms influence in TYMS expression have in the past been based on functional analysis by luciferase assays and quantification of TYMS mRNA, but both these studies, as the association studies with cancer risk or with toxicity or response to 5-FU, are very contradictory. Regarding functional assays, the artificial genetic environment created in luciferase assay and the problems derived from quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCRs), for example the use of a reference gene, may have distorted the results. To avoid these sources of interference, we have analyzed the allelic imbalance of TYMS by allelic-specific analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients.Allelic imbalance in PBMCs, taken from 40 patients with suspected myeloproliferative haematological diseases, was determined by fluorescent fragment analysis (for the 3'-UTR polymorphism), Sanger sequencing and allelic-specific qPCR in multiplex (for the 5'-UTR polymorphisms).For neither the 3'- nor the 5'-UTR polymorphisms did the observed allelic imbalance exceed 1.5 fold. None of the TYMS polymorphisms is statistically associated with allelic imbalance.The results acquired allow us to deny the previously established assertion of an influence of 2 to 4 fold of the rs45445694 and rs2853542 polymorphisms in the expression of TYMS and narrow its allelic imbalance to 1.5 fold, in our population

  8. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  9. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Timm, Sally; Wang, August G

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  10. Epigenetic Determinants of CYP1A1 Induction by the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Agonist 3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine U. Vorrink

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Many enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1, are regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR. 3,3',4,4',5-Penta chlorobiphenyl (PCB 126 is a potent ligand for AhR and can thus induce the expression of CYP1A1. Interestingly, we observed that human carcinoma cell lines derived from different types of epithelial cells displayed divergent degrees of CYP1A1 induction after exposure to PCB 126. Since epigenetic mechanisms are known to be involved in cell type-specific gene expression, we sought to assess the epigenetic determinants of CYP1A1 induction in these carcinoma cell lines. In contrast to HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells, HeLa cervical carcinoma cells showed significantly lower levels of CYP1A1 mRNA expression following PCB 126 exposure. Our results show that the two cell lines maintained differences in the chromatin architecture along the CYP1A1 promoter region. Furthermore, treatment with the epigenetic modifiers, trichostatin A (TSA and 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC, significantly increased the expression of CYP1A1 after PCB 126 treatment in HeLa cells. However, we did not observe apparent differences in methylation levels or specific location of CpG DNA methylation between the two cell lines in the analyzed CYP1A1 promoter region. Taken together, our findings suggest that the differences in CYP1A1 expression between HepG2 and HeLa cells are due to differences in the chromatin architecture of the CYP1A1 promoter and thus establish a role of epigenetic regulation in cell-specific CYP1A1 expression.

  11. Computer simulations and modeling-assisted ToxR screening in deciphering 3D structures of transmembrane α-helical dimers: ephrin receptor A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volynsky, P E; Mineeva, E A; Goncharuk, M V; Ermolyuk, Ya S; Arseniev, A S; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-spanning segments of numerous proteins (e.g. receptor tyrosine kinases) represent a novel class of pharmacologically important targets, whose activity can be modulated by specially designed artificial peptides, the so-called interceptors. Rational construction of such peptides requires understanding of the main factors driving peptide–peptide association in lipid membranes. Here we present a new method for rapid prediction of the spatial structure of transmembrane (TM) helix–helix complexes. It is based on computer simulations in membrane-like media and subsequent refinement/validation of the results using experimental studies of TM helix dimerization in a bacterial membrane by means of the ToxR system. The approach was applied to TM fragments of the ephrin receptor A1 (EphA1). A set of spatial structures of the dimer was proposed based on Monte Carlo simulations in an implicit membrane followed by molecular dynamics relaxation in an explicit lipid bilayer. The resulting models were employed for rational design of wild-type and mutant genetic constructions for ToxR assays. The computational and the experimental data are self-consistent and provide an unambiguous spatial model of the TM dimer of EphA1. The results of this work can be further used to develop new biologically active 'peptide interceptors' specifically targeting membrane domains of proteins

  12. Ethanol and Caffeine effects on social interaction and recognition in mice: Involvement of adenosine A2A and A1 receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura López-Cruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A1 and A2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0-1.5 g/kg reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0-60.0 mg/kg, and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0-60.0 mg/kg. The A1 antagonist CPT (3-9 mg/kg did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5-6 mg/kg increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5-1.0 g/kg was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0-30.0 mg/kg. Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol impairs the formation of social

  13. Ethanol and Caffeine Effects on Social Interaction and Recognition in Mice: Involvement of Adenosine A2A and A1 Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cruz, Laura; San-Miguel, Noemí; Bayarri, Pilar; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D; Correa, Mercé

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol and caffeine are frequently consumed in combination and have opposite effects on the adenosine system: ethanol metabolism leads to an increase in adenosine levels, while caffeine is a non-selective adenosine A 1 /A 2A receptor antagonist. These receptors are highly expressed in striatum and olfactory tubercle, brain areas involved in exploration and social interaction in rodents. Ethanol modulates social interaction processes, but the role of adenosine in social behavior is still poorly understood. The present work was undertaken to study the impact of ethanol, caffeine and their combination on social behavior, and to explore the involvement of A 1 and A 2A receptors on those actions. Male CD1 mice were evaluated in a social interaction three-chamber paradigm, for preference of conspecific vs. object, and also for long-term recognition memory of familiar vs. novel conspecific. Ethanol showed a biphasic effect, with low doses (0.25 g/kg) increasing social contact and higher doses (1.0-1.5 g/kg) reducing social interaction. However, no dose changed social preference; mice always spent more time sniffing the conspecific than the object, independently of the ethanol dose. Ethanol, even at doses that did not change social exploration, produced amnestic effects on social recognition the following day. Caffeine reduced social contact (15.0-60.0 mg/kg), and even blocked social preference at higher doses (30.0-60.0 mg/kg). The A 1 antagonist Cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT; 3-9 mg/kg) did not modify social contact or preference on its own, and the A 2A antagonist MSX-3 (1.5-6 mg/kg) increased social interaction at all doses. Ethanol at intermediate doses (0.5-1.0 g/kg) was able to reverse the reduction in social exploration induced by caffeine (15.0-30.0 mg/kg). Although there was no interaction between ethanol and CPT or MSX-3 on social exploration in the first day, MSX-3 blocked the amnestic effects of ethanol observed on the following day. Thus, ethanol impairs the

  14. Peripheral subnuclear positioning suppresses Tcrb recombination and segregates Tcrb alleles from RAG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elizabeth A W; Teng, Grace; Corbett, Elizabeth; Choudhury, Kingshuk Roy; Bassing, Craig H; Schatz, David G; Krangel, Michael S

    2013-11-26

    Allelic exclusion requires that the two alleles at antigen-receptor loci attempt to recombine variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) gene segments [V(D)J recombination] asynchronously in nuclei of developing lymphocytes. It previously was shown that T-cell receptor β (Tcrb) alleles frequently and stochastically associate with the nuclear lamina and pericentromeric heterochromatin in CD4(-)CD8(-) thymocytes. Moreover, rearranged alleles were underrepresented at these locations. Here we used 3D immunofluorescence in situ hybridization to identify recently rearranged Tcrb alleles based on the accumulation of the DNA-repair protein 53BP1. We found that Tcrb alleles recombine asynchronously in double-negative thymocytes and that V(D)J recombination is suppressed on peripheral as compared with central Tcrb alleles. Moreover, the recombination events that did take place at the nuclear periphery preferentially occurred on Tcrb alleles that were partially dissociated from the nuclear lamina. To understand better the mechanism by which V(D)J recombination is suppressed at the nuclear periphery, we evaluated the subnuclear distribution of recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2) protein. We found that RAG2 abundance was reduced at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, RAG2 was distributed differently from RNA polymerase II and histone H3K4 trimethylation. Our data suggest that the nuclear periphery suppresses V(D)J recombination, at least in part, by segregating Tcrb alleles from RAG proteins.

  15. The effect of the Taq1A variant in the dopamine D2 receptor gene and common CYP2D6 alleles on prolactin levels in risperidone-treated boys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roke, Y.; Harten, P.N. van; Franke, B.; Galesloot, T.E.; Boot, A.M.; Buitelaar, J.K.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of the Taq1A variant in the Dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) and common functional genetic variants in the cytochrome P450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6) on prolactin levels in risperidone-treated boys with autism spectrum disorders and disruptive behavior disorders. METHODS:

  16. The effect of the Taq1A variant in the dopamine D-2 receptor gene and common CYP2D6 alleles on prolactin levels in risperidone-treated boys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roke, Yvette; van Harten, Peter N.; Franke, Barbara; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Boot, Annemieke M.; Buitelaar, Jan K.

    Objective To investigate the effect of the Taq1A variant in the Dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) and common functional genetic variants in the cytochrome P450 2D6 gene (CYP2D6) on prolactin levels in risperidone-treated boys with autism spectrum disorders and disruptive behavior disorders.Methods

  17. Effects of Long-Term Caffeine Consumption on the Adenosine A1 Receptor in the Rat Brain: an In Vivo PET Study with [18F]CPFPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabbi-Schroeter, Danje; Elmenhorst, David; Oskamp, Angela; Laskowski, Stefanie; Bauer, Andreas; Kroll, Tina

    2018-04-01

    Caffeine, a nonselective antagonist of adenosine receptors, is the most popular psychostimulant worldwide. Recently, a protective role of moderate chronic caffeine consumption against neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease has been discussed. Thus, aim of the present study was an in vivo investigation of effects of long-term caffeine consumption on the adenosine A 1 receptor (A 1 AR) in the rat brain. Sixteen adult, male rats underwent five positron emission tomography (PET) scans with the highly selective A 1 AR radioligand [ 18 F]CPFPX in order to determine A 1 AR availability. After the first baseline PET scan, the animals were assigned to two groups: Caffeine treatment and control group. The caffeine-treated animals received caffeinated tap water (30 mg/kg bodyweight/day, corresponding to 4-5 cups of coffee per day in humans) for 12 weeks. Subsequently, caffeine was withdrawn and repeated PET measurements were performed on day 1, 2, 4, and 7 of caffeine withdrawal. The control animals were measured according to the same time schedule. At day 1, after 4.4 h of caffeine withdrawal, a significant decrease (- 34.5%, p < 0.001) of whole brain A 1 AR availability was observed. Unlike all other investigated brain regions in caffeine-treated rats, the hypothalamus and nucleus accumbens showed no significant intraindividual differences between baseline and first withdrawal PET scan. After approximately 27 h of caffeine withdrawal, the region- and group-specific effects disappeared and A 1 AR availability settled around baseline. The present study provides evidence that chronic caffeine consumption does not lead to persistent changes in functional availability of cerebral A 1 ARs which have previously been associated with neuroprotective effects of caffeine. The acute and region-specific decrease in cerebral A 1 AR availability directly after caffeine withdrawal is most likely caused by residual amounts of caffeine metabolites

  18. The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine increases both catecholamine release in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and decreases motivation for reward and "waiting" impulsivity, but increases "stopping" impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S. Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; van den Bergh, Filip S.; Oosting, Ronald S.; Dupree, Rudy; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A. H.; Westphal, Koen G. C.; Olivier, Berend; Denys, Damiaan A.; Garland, Alexis; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-01-01

    The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine has a behavioral drug signature that resembles that of a variety of psychostimulant drugs, despite the differences in receptor binding profile. These psychostimulants are effective in treating impulsivity disorders, most likely because they increase

  19. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV...

  20. Odor Preference Learning and Memory Modify GluA1 Phosphorylation and GluA1 Distribution in the Neonate Rat Olfactory Bulb: Testing the AMPA Receptor Hypothesis in an Appetitive Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Darby-King, Andrea; Grimes, Matthew T.; Howland, John G.; Wang, Yu Tian; McLean, John H.; Harley, Carolyn W.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in synaptic AMPA receptors is hypothesized to mediate learning and memory. AMPA receptor increases have been reported in aversive learning models, although it is not clear if they are seen with memory maintenance. Here we examine AMPA receptor changes in a cAMP/PKA/CREB-dependent appetitive learning model: odor preference learning in…

  1. The Nuclear Orphan Receptor NR4A1 is Involved in the Apoptotic Pathway Induced by LPS and Simvastatin in RAW 264.7 Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Chan; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Sang Kyu; Park, Sang Min; Kim, Young Sang

    2014-04-01

    Macrophage death plays a role in several physiological and inflammatory pathologies such as sepsis and arthritis. In our previous work, we showed that simvastatin triggers cell death in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells through both caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic pathways. Here, we show that the nuclear orphan receptor NR4A1 is involved in a caspase-independent apoptotic process induced by LPS and simvastatin. Simvastatin-induced NR4A1 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages and ectopic expression of a dominant-negative mutant form of NR4A1 effectively suppressed both DNA fragmentation and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) during LPS- and simvastatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, apoptosis was accompanied by Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) translocation to the mitochondria. Our findings suggest that NR4A1 expression and mitochondrial translocation of Bax are related to simvastatin-induced apoptosis in LPS-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

  2. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Kaas, A.; Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated...... longitudinally circulating concentrations of CCR5 ligands of 256 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes. CCR5 ligands were differentially associated with beta-cell function and clinical remission. CCL5 was decreased in remitters and positively associated with HbA1c suggestive of a Th1 associated...... of CCR5 by therapeutic agents such as maraviroc may provide a new therapeutic target to ameliorate disease progression in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  3. Pharmacological Blockade of Adenosine A2A but Not A1 Receptors Enhances Goal-Directed Valuation in Satiety-Based Instrumental Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The balance and smooth shift between flexible, goal-directed behaviors and repetitive, habitual actions are critical to optimal performance of behavioral tasks. The striatum plays an essential role in control of goal-directed versus habitual behaviors through a rich interplay of the numerous neurotransmitters and neuromodulators to modify the input, processing and output functions of the striatum. The adenosine receptors (namely A2AR and A1R, with their high expression pattern in the striatum and abilities to interact and integrate dopamine, glutamate and cannabinoid signals in the striatum, may represent novel therapeutic targets for modulating instrumental behavior. In this study, we examined the effects of pharmacological blockade of the A2ARs and A1Rs on goal-directed versus habitual behaviors in different information processing phases of instrumental learning using a satiety-based instrumental behavior procedure. We found that A2AR antagonist acts at the coding, consolidation and expression phases of instrumental learning to modulate animals’ sensitivity to goal-directed valuation without modifying action-outcome contingency. However, pharmacological blockade and genetic knockout of A1Rs did not affect acquisition or sensitivity to goal-valuation of instrumental behavior. These findings provide pharmacological evidence for a potential therapeutic strategy to control abnormal instrumental behaviors associated with drug addiction and obsessive-compulsive disorder by targeting the A2AR.

  4. Functional interaction and cross-tolerance between ethanol and Δ9-THC: possible modulation by mouse cerebellar adenosinergic A1/GABAergic-A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, M Saeed

    2014-08-15

    We have previously shown a functional motor interaction between ethanol and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) that involved cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAergic A receptor modulation. We now report the development of cross-tolerance between intracerebellar Δ(9)-THC and intraperitoneal ethanol using ataxia as the test response in male CD-1 mice. The drugs [Δ(9)-THC (20 μg), N(6)-cyclohexyladenosine, CHA (12 ng), muscimol (20 ng)] used in the study were directly microinfused stereotaxically via guide cannulas into the cerebellum except ethanol. Δ(9)-THC, infused once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last infusion by acute ethanol (2g/kg) and Rotorod evaluation, virtually abolished ethanol ataxia indicating development of cross-tolerance. The cross-tolerance was also observed when the order of ethanol and Δ(9)-THC treatment was reversed, i.e., ethanol injected once daily for 5 days followed 16 h after the last ethanol injection by Δ(9)-THC infusion. The cross-tolerance appeared within 24-48 h, lasted over 72 h and was maximal in 5-day ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-treated animals. Finally, tolerance in chronic ethanol/Δ(9)-THC/-treated animals developed not only to ethanol/Δ(9)-THC-induced ataxia, respectively, but also to the ataxia potentiating effect of CHA and muscimol, indicating modulation by cerebellar adenosinergic A1 and GABAA receptors. A practical implication of these results could be that marijuana smokers may experience little or no negative effects such as ataxia following alcohol consumption. Clinically, such antagonism of ethanol-induced ataxia can be observed in marijuana users thereby encouraging more alcohol consumption and thus may represent a risk factor for the development of alcoholism in this segment of population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonism Abolished the Anti-seizure Effects of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kovács

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The state of therapeutic ketosis can be achieved by using the ketogenic diet (KD or exogenous ketone supplementation. It was suggested previously that the adenosinergic system may be involved in the mediating effect of KD on suppressing seizure activity in different types of epilepsies, likely by means of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs. Thus, we tested in the present study whether exogenous ketone supplements (ketone ester: KE, 2.5 g/kg/day; ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT: KSMCT, 2.5 g/kg/day applied sub-chronically (for 7 days by intragastric gavage can modulate absence epileptic activity in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats. The number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs significantly and similarly decreased after both KE and KSMCT treatment between 3rd and 7th days of gavage. Moreover, blood beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB levels were significantly increased alike after KE and KSMCT gavage, compared to control levels. The SWD number and βHB levels returned to the baseline levels on the first day without ketone supplementation. To determine whether A1Rs can modify ketone supplement-evoked changes in absence epileptic activity, we applied a non-pro-epileptic dose of a specific A1R antagonist DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (intraperitoneal/i.p. 0.2 mg/kg in combination with KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day, gavage. As expected, DPCPX abolished the KSMCT-evoked decrease in SWD number. Thus, we concluded that application of exogenous ketone supplements may decrease absence epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats. Moreover, our results suggest that among others the adenosinergic system, likely via A1Rs, may modulate the exogenous ketone supplements-evoked anti-seizure effects.

  6. Changes of Cerebral and/or Peripheral Adenosine A1 Receptor and IGF-I Concentrations under Extended Sleep Duration in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mounir Chennaoui

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Extended sleep improves sustained attention and reduces sleep pressure in humans. Downregulation of adenosine A1 receptor (A1R and modulation of the neurotrophic factor insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-I in brain structures controlling attentional capacities could be involved. In the frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats, we measured adenosine A1R and IGF-I protein concentrations after photoperiod-induced sleep extension. Two groups of twelve rats were adapted over 14 days to a habitual (CON 12:12 light–dark (LD schedule and an extended (EXT 16:8 LD schedule. IGF-I content was also measured in plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle. In EXT, compared to CON rats, A1R content in the frontal cortex was significantly lower (p < 0.05, while IGF-I content was higher (p < 0.001, and no significant change was observed in the hippocampus. IGF-I content in plasma and muscle was higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, while it was lower in liver (p < 0.001. The absolute weight and weight gain were higher in EXT rats (p < 0.01. These data suggest that 14 days under a 16:8 LD photoperiod respectively down- and upregulated cortical A1R and IGF-I levels. This photoperiod induced an anabolic profile with increased weight gain and circulating and muscular IGF-I levels. An extension of sleep duration might favor cerebral and peripheral anabolism, which may help attentional and physical capacities.

  7. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorrink, Sabine U. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Severson, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Kulak, Mikhail V. [Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Futscher, Bernard W. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Domann, Frederick E., E-mail: frederick-domann@uiowa.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  8. A risk allele for nicotine dependence in CHRNA5 is a protective allele for cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grucza, Richard A; Wang, Jen C; Stitzel, Jerry A; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Saccone, Scott F; Saccone, Nancy L; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Cloninger, C Robert; Neuman, Rosalind J; Budde, John P; Fox, Louis; Bertelsen, Sarah; Kramer, John; Hesselbrock, Victor; Tischfield, Jay; Nurnberger, John I; Almasy, Laura; Porjesz, Bernice; Kuperman, Samuel; Schuckit, Marc A; Edenberg, Howard J; Rice, John P; Goate, Alison M; Bierut, Laura J

    2008-12-01

    A nonsynonymous coding polymorphism, rs16969968, of the CHRNA5 gene that encodes the alpha-5 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) has been found to be associated with nicotine dependence. The goal of this study was to examine the association of this variant with cocaine dependence. Genetic association analysis was performed in two independent samples of unrelated case and control subjects: 1) 504 European Americans participating in the Family Study on Cocaine Dependence (FSCD) and 2) 814 European Americans participating in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). In the FSCD, there was a significant association between the CHRNA5 variant and cocaine dependence (odds ratio = .67 per allele, p = .0045, assuming an additive genetic model), but in the reverse direction compared with that previously observed for nicotine dependence. In multivariate analyses that controlled for the effects of nicotine dependence, both the protective effect for cocaine dependence and the previously documented risk effect for nicotine dependence were statistically significant. The protective effect for cocaine dependence was replicated in the COGA sample. In COGA, effect sizes for habitual smoking, a proxy phenotype for nicotine dependence, were consistent with those observed in FSCD. The minor (A) allele of rs16969968, relative to the major G allele, appears to be both a risk factor for nicotine dependence and a protective factor for cocaine dependence. The biological plausibility of such a bidirectional association stems from the involvement of nAChRs with both excitatory and inhibitory modulation of dopamine-mediated reward pathways.

  9. Presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine autoreceptors (M1, M2 and M4 subtypes), adenosine receptors (A1 and A2A) and tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) modulate the developmental synapse elimination process at the neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Laura; Garcia, Neus; Hurtado, Erica; Simó, Anna; Tomàs, Marta; Lanuza, Maria A; Santafé, Manel; Tomàs, Josep

    2016-06-23

    The development of the nervous system involves an initially exuberant production of neurons that make an excessive number of synaptic contacts. The initial overproduction of synapses promotes connectivity. Hebbian competition between axons with different activities (the least active are punished) leads to the loss of roughly half of the overproduced elements and this refines connectivity and increases specificity. The neuromuscular junction is innervated by a single axon at the end of the synapse elimination process and, because of its relative simplicity, has long been used as a model for studying the general principles of synapse development. The involvement of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors may allow for the direct competitive interaction between nerve endings through differential activity-dependent acetylcholine release in the synaptic cleft. Then, the most active ending may directly punish the less active ones. Our previous results indicate the existence in the weakest axons on the polyinnervated neonatal NMJ of an ACh release inhibition mechanism based on mAChR coupled to protein kinase C and voltage-dependent calcium channels. We suggest that this mechanism plays a role in the elimination of redundant neonatal synapses. Here we used confocal microscopy and quantitative morphological analysis to count the number of brightly fluorescent axons per endplate in P7, P9 and P15 transgenic B6.Cg-Tg (Thy1-YFP)16 Jrs/J mice. We investigate the involvement of individual mAChR M1-, M2- and M4-subtypes in the control of axonal elimination after the Levator auris longus muscle had been exposed to agonist and antagonist in vivo. We also analysed the role of adenosine receptor subtypes (A1 and A2A) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor. The data show that postnatal axonal elimination is a regulated multireceptor mechanism that guaranteed the monoinnervation of the neuromuscular synapses. The three receptor sets considered (mAChR, AR and TrkB receptors

  10. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... to a psychiatric hospital department served as a measure of disease onset. RESULTS: Patients and comparison subjects differed marginally in their genotype distribution, with a slightly higher frequency of the deletion allele seen in the patients. The authors found the deletion allele to be associated with higher......-onset schizophrenia) and healthy subjects differed significantly. This was reflected in an increased frequency of the deletion allele in the patient subgroup. Patients with ages at first admission below and above 40 years significantly differed in distribution of genotypes and alleles, with an overrepresentation...

  11. Assessment of the myostatin Q204X allele using an allelic discrimination assay

    OpenAIRE

    Sifuentes-Rincón,Ana M.; Puentes-Montiel,Herlinda E.; Moreno-Medina,Víctor R.; Rosa-Reyna,Xóchitl F. de la

    2006-01-01

    An allelic discrimination assay was designed and used to determine the genotypic and allelic frequencies of the myostatin (MSTN) gene Q204X allele from two Mexican Full-French herds. The assay is a simple high throughput genotyping method that could be applied to investigate the effect of the Q204X allele on the Charolais breed.

  12. Carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, but not eslicarbazepine, enhance excitatory synaptic transmission onto hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells through an antagonist action at adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Sam A; Pires, Nuno; Cobb, Stuart; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício; Vida, Imre

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the anticonvulsant and seizure generation effects of carbamazepine (CBZ), oxcarbazepine (OXC) and eslicarbazepine (S-Lic) in wild-type mice. Electrophysiological recordings were made to discriminate potential cellular and synaptic mechanisms underlying anti- and pro-epileptic actions. The anticonvulsant and pro-convulsant effects were evaluated in the MES, the 6-Hz and the Irwin tests. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were used to investigate the effects on fast excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal area CA1. The safety window for CBZ, OXC and eslicarbazepine (ED50 value against the MES test and the dose that produces grade 5 convulsions in all mice), was 6.3, 6.0 and 12.5, respectively. At high concentrations the three drugs reduced synaptic transmission. CBZ and OXC enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) at low, therapeutically-relevant concentrations. These effects were associated with no change in inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) resulting in altered balance between excitation and inhibition. S-Lic had no effect on EPSC or IPSC amplitudes over the same concentration range. The CBZ mediated enhancement of EPSCs was blocked by DPCPX, a selective antagonist, and occluded by CCPA, a selective agonist of the adenosine A1 receptor. Furthermore, reduction of endogenous adenosine by application of the enzyme adenosine deaminase also abolished the CBZ- and OXC-induced increase of EPSCs, indicating that the two drugs act as antagonists at native adenosine receptors. In conclusion, CBZ and OXC possess pro-epileptic actions at clinically-relevant concentrations through the enhancement of excitatory synaptic transmission. S-Lic by comparison has no such effect on synaptic transmission, explaining its lack of seizure exacerbation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced Long-Term and Impaired Short-Term Spatial Memory in GluA1 AMPA Receptor Subunit Knockout Mice: Evidence for a Dual-Process Memory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, David J.; Good, Mark A.; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Bannerman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of…

  14. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Zsolt; D'Agostino, Dominic P; Ari, Csilla

    2018-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil) by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A 1 receptors (A 1 Rs) influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A 1 Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A 1 R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine) to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days) applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM) test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day) alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg). Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day). After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB), as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A 1 R inhibition modified (decreased) the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A 1 Rs, may modulate the

  15. Anxiolytic Effect of Exogenous Ketone Supplementation Is Abolished by Adenosine A1 Receptor Inhibition in Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Kovács

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental health problems worldwide, but the exact pathophysiology remains largely unknown. It has been demonstrated previously that administration of exogenous ketone supplement KSMCT (ketone salt/KS + medium chain triglyceride/MCT oil by intragastric gavage for 7 days decreased the anxiety level in genetically absence epileptic Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk (WAG/Rij rats. To investigate the potential role of the adenosinergic system in the pathomechanism of anxiety we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs influence the anxiolytic effect of the exogenous ketone supplement. As A1Rs may mediate such an effect, in the present study we used a specific A1R antagonist, DPCPX (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine to test whether it modulates the anxiolytic effect of sub-chronically (7 days applied KSMCT in the previously tested animal model by using elevated plus maze (EPM test. We administered KSMCT (2.5 g/kg/day alone by intragastric gavage and in combination with intraperitoneally (i.p. injected of DPCPX in two doses (lower: 0.15 mg/kg, higher: 0.25 mg/kg. Control groups represented i.p saline and water gavage with or without i.p. DPCPX administration (2.5 g/kg/day. After treatments, the level of blood glucose and beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHB, as well as body weight were recorded. KSMCT alone significantly increased the time spent in the open arms and decreased the time spent in the closed arms, supporting our previous results. Injection of lower dose of DPCPX decreased, while higher dose of DPCPX abolished the effect of KSMCT administration on EPM. Blood βHB levels were significantly increased after administration of KSMCT, while DPCPX did not change the KSMCT induced increase in blood βHB levels. These results demonstrate that A1R inhibition modified (decreased the anti-anxiety effect of KSMCT administration implying that the adenosinergic system, likely via A1Rs, may modulate the

  16. Regulation of cAMP Responsive Element Binding Protein 3-Like 1 (Creb3l1 Expression by Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nr4a1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Greenwood

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP inducible transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding protein 3 like 1 (Creb3l1 is strongly activated in the hypothalamus in response to hyperosmotic cues such as dehydration (DH. We have recently shown that Creb3l1 expression is upregulated by cAMP pathways in vitro, however the exact mechanisms are not known. Here we show that increasing Creb3l1 transcription by raising cAMP levels in mouse pituitary AtT20 cells automatically initiates cleavage of Creb3l1, leading to a greater abundance of the transcriptionally active N-terminal portion. Inhibiting protein synthesis indicated that de novo protein synthesis of an intermediary transcription factor was required for Creb3l1 induction. Strategic mining of our microarray data from dehydrated rodent hypothalamus revealed four candidates, reduced to two by analysis of acute hyperosmotic-induced transcriptional activation profiles in the hypothalamus, and one, orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a1, by direct shRNA mediated silencing in AtT20 cells. We show that activation of Creb3l1 transcription by Nr4a1 involves interaction with a single NBRE site in the promoter region. The ability to activate Creb3l1 transcription by this pathway in vitro is dictated by the level of methylation of a CpG island within the proximal promoter/5′UTR of this gene. We thus identify a novel cAMP-Nr4a1-Creb3l1 transcriptional pathway in AtT20 cells and also, our evidence would suggest, in the hypothalamus.

  17. Characterization of the pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A1 receptor partial agonist 2'-deoxy-N6-cyclopentyladenosine in sarin-poisoned rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueters, Tjerk J.H.; IJzerman, Ad P.; Helden, Herman P.M. van; Danhof, Meindert

    2003-01-01

    Characterization of the pharmacokinetics, brain distribution, and therapeutic efficacy of the adenosine A 1 receptor partial agonist 2'-deoxy-N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine in sarin-poisoned rats. Bueters, T.J.H., IJzerman, A.P., Van Helden, H.P.M., and Danhof, M. (2003). The objective of the present study was to determine (1) the influence of sarin poisoning (144 μg/kg sc) on the pharmacokinetics and brain distribution of the adenosine A 1 receptor partial agonist 2'-deoxy-N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (2'dCPA), and (2) the effect of 2'dCPA (20 mg/kg iv) on the central acetylcholine (ACh) release and protection against sarin toxicity. A five-compartment model successfully described the pharmacokinetic profile of 2'dCPA in blood and brain microdialysate. A covariate analysis revealed that the volume of distribution of 2'dCPA in blood was different in sarin-poisoned rats, 177 ± 7 versus 148 ± 8 ml in control rats. However, the transport of 2'dCPA from blood to the brain was unaffected as reflected by the values of the intercompartmental transport clearances, 0.21 ± 0.02 and 0.21 ± 0.04 μl/min in control and sarin-poisoned rats, respectively. Also the area-under-curve (AUC) ratios of brain microdialysate and blood were identical with values of 0.02 ± 0.001 and 0.02 ± 0.002, respectively, demonstrating the restricted transport of 2'dCPA into the brain in both treatment groups. Treatment of sarin-poisoned rats by 2'dCPA did not adequately prevent the accumulation of ACh in the central nervous system. 2'dCPA delayed the emergence of concomitant symptoms compared to untreated rats, but eventually only 29% of the animals survived 24 h. In conclusion, the pharmacokinetic profile of 2'dCPA in blood was slightly changed by sarin, but not the distribution of 2'dCPA into the brain. The therapeutic efficacy of 2'dCPA against sarin was limited, presumably due to insufficient quantities of 2'dCPA reaching the brain

  18. The Hypocholesterolemic Effect of Germinated Brown Rice Involves the Upregulation of the Apolipoprotein A1 and Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Umar Imam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Germinated brown rice (GBR is rich in bioactive compounds, which confer GBR with many functional properties. Evidence of its hypocholesterolemic effects is emerging, but the exact mechanisms of action and bioactive compounds involved have not been fully documented. Using type 2 diabetic rats, we studied the effects of white rice, GBR, and brown rice (BR on lipid profile and on the regulation of selected genes involved in cholesterol metabolism. Our results showed that the upregulation of apolipoprotein A1 and low-density lipoprotein receptor genes was involved in the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR. Additionally, in vitro studies using HEPG2 cells showed that acylated steryl glycoside, gamma amino butyric acid, and oryzanol and phenolic extracts of GBR contribute to the nutrigenomic regulation of these genes. Transcriptional and nontranscriptional mechanisms are likely involved in the overall hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR suggesting that it may have an impact on the prevention and/or management of hypercholesterolemia due to a wide variety of metabolic perturbations. However, there is need to conduct long-term clinical trials to determine the clinical relevance of the hypocholesterolemic effects of GBR determined through animal studies.

  19. Three cysteine residues of SLC52A1, a receptor for the porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), play a critical role in cell surface expression and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Moran, Winston; Argaw, Takele; Wilson, Carolyn A

    2017-07-01

    Porcine endogenous retrovirus-A (PERV-A), a gammaretrovirus, infects human cells in vitro, thus raising the potential risk of cross-species transmission in xenotransplantation. Two members of the solute carrier family 52 (SLC52A1 and SLC52A2) are PERV-A receptors. Site-directed mutagenesis of the cDNA encoding SLC52A1 identified that only one of two putative glycosylation signals is occupied by glycans. In addition, we showed that glycosylation of SLC52A1 is not necessary for PERV-A receptor function. We also identified that at a minimum, three cysteine residues are sufficient for SLC52A1 cell surface expression. Mutation of cysteine at position 365 and either of the two cysteine residues in the C-terminal tail at positions 442 or 446 reduced SLC52A1 surface expression and PERV-A infection suggesting that these residues may contribute to overall structural stability and receptor function. Understanding interactions between PERV-A and its cellular receptor may provide novel strategies to prevent zoonotic infection in the setting of xenotransplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Analgesic effect of paeoniflorin in rats with neonatal maternal separation-induced visceral hyperalgesia is mediated through adenosine A(1) receptor by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Hong-Li; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Hong-Qi; Xu, Hong-Xi; Sung, Joseph J Y; Bian, Zhao-Xiang

    2009-11-01

    Paeoniflorin (PF), a chief active ingredient in the root of Paeonia lactiflora Pall (family Ranunculaceae), is effective in relieving colorectal distention (CRD)-induced visceral pain in rats with visceral hyperalgesia induced by neonatal maternal separation (NMS). This study aimed at exploring the underlying mechanisms of PF's analgesic effect on CRD-evoked nociceptive signaling in the central nervous system (CNS) and investigating whether the adenosine A(1) receptor is involved in PF's anti-nociception. CRD-induced visceral pain as well as phosphorylated-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (p-ERK) and phospho-cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) expression in the CNS structures of NMS rats were suppressed by NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) and ERK phosphorylation inhibitor U0126. PF could similarly inhibit CRD-evoked p-ERK and c-Fos expression in laminae I-II of the lumbosacral dorsal horn and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). PF could also reverse the CRD-evoked increased glutamate concentration by CRD as shown by dynamic microdialysis monitoring in ACC, whereas, DPCPX, an antagonist of adenosine A(1) receptor, significantly blocked the analgesic effect of PF and PF's inhibition on CRD-induced p-ERK and p-CREB expression. These results suggest that PF's analgesic effect is possibly mediated by adenosine A(1) receptor by inhibiting CRD-evoked glutamate release and the NMDA receptor dependent ERK signaling.

  1. Adenosine A1 receptor activation increases myocardial protein S-nitrosothiols and elicits protection from ischemia-reperfusion injury in male and female hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Shao

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays an important role in cardioprotection, and recent work from our group and others has implicated protein S-nitrosylation (SNO as a critical component of NO-mediated protection in different models, including ischemic pre- and post-conditioning and sex-dependent cardioprotection. However, studies have yet to examine whether protein SNO levels are similarly increased with pharmacologic preconditioning in male and female hearts, and whether an increase in protein SNO levels, which is protective in male hearts, is sufficient to increase baseline protection in female hearts. Therefore, we pharmacologically preconditioned male and female hearts with the adenosine A1 receptor agonist N6-cyclohexyl adenosine (CHA. CHA administration prior to ischemia significantly improved functional recovery in both male and female hearts compared to baseline in a Langendorff-perfused heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury (% of preischemic function ± SE: male baseline: 37.5±3.4% vs. male CHA: 55.3±3.2%; female baseline: 61.4±5.7% vs. female CHA: 76.0±6.2%. In a separate set of hearts, we found that CHA increased p-Akt and p-eNOS levels. We also used SNO-resin-assisted capture with LC-MS/MS to identify SNO proteins in male and female hearts, and determined that CHA perfusion induced a modest increase in protein SNO levels in both male (11.4% and female (12.3% hearts compared to baseline. These findings support a potential role for protein SNO in a model of pharmacologic preconditioning, and provide evidence to suggest that a modest increase in protein SNO levels is sufficient to protect both male and female hearts from ischemic injury. In addition, a number of the SNO proteins identified with CHA treatment were also observed with other forms of cardioprotective stimuli in prior studies, further supporting a role for protein SNO in cardioprotection.

  2. The expression of ferritin, lactoferrin, transferrin receptor and solute carrier family 11A1 in the host response to BCG-vaccination and Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, R E; Elmore, M J; Williams, A; Andrews, S C; Drobniewski, F; Marsh, P D; Tree, J A

    2012-05-02

    Iron is an essential cofactor for both mycobacterial growth during infection and for a successful protective immune response by the host. The immune response partly depends on the regulation of iron by the host, including the tight control of expression of the iron-storage protein, ferritin. BCG vaccination can protect against disease following Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but the mechanisms of protection remain unclear. To further explore these mechanisms, splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated guinea pigs were stimulated ex vivo with purified protein derivative from M. tuberculosis and a significant down-regulation of ferritin light- and heavy-chain was measured by reverse-transcription quantitative-PCR (P≤0.05 and ≤0.01, respectively). The mechanisms of this down-regulation were shown to involve TNFα and nitric oxide. A more in depth analysis of the mRNA expression profiles, including genes involved in iron metabolism, was performed using a guinea pig specific immunological microarray following ex vivo infection with M. tuberculosis of splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated and naïve guinea pigs. M. tuberculosis infection induced a pro-inflammatory response in splenocytes from both groups, resulting in down-regulation of ferritin (P≤0.05). In addition, lactoferrin (P≤0.002), transferrin receptor (P≤0.05) and solute carrier family 11A1 (P≤0.05), were only significantly down-regulated after infection of the splenocytes from BCG-vaccinated animals. The results show that expression of iron-metabolism genes is tightly regulated as part of the host response to M. tuberculosis infection and that BCG-vaccination enhances the ability of the host to mount an iron-restriction response which may in turn help to combat invasion by mycobacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracellular ATP influences synaptic plasticity in area CA1 of rat hippocampus via metabolism to adenosine and activity-dependent activation of adenosine A1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    zur Nedden, Stephanie; Hawley, Simon; Pentland, Naomi; Hardie, D Grahame; Doney, Alexander S; Frenguelli, Bruno G

    2011-04-20

    The extent to which brain slices reflect the energetic status of the in vivo brain has been a subject of debate. We addressed this issue to investigate the recovery of energetic parameters and adenine nucleotides in rat hippocampal slices and the influence this has on synaptic transmission and plasticity. We show that, although adenine nucleotide levels recover appreciably within 10 min of incubation, it takes 3 h for a full recovery of the energy charge (to ≥ 0.93) and that incubation of brain slices at 34°C results in a significantly higher ATP/AMP ratio and a threefold lower activity of AMP-activated protein kinase compared with slices incubated at room temperature. Supplementation of artificial CSF with d-ribose and adenine (Rib/Ade) increased the total adenine nucleotide pool of brain slices, which, when corrected for the influence of the dead cut edges, closely approached in vivo values. Rib/Ade did not affect basal synaptic transmission or paired-pulse facilitation but did inhibit long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by tetanic or weak theta-burst stimulation. This decrease in LTP was reversed by strong theta-burst stimulation or antagonizing the inhibitory adenosine A(1) receptor suggesting that the elevated tissue ATP levels had resulted in greater activity-dependent adenosine release during LTP induction. This was confirmed by direct measurement of adenosine release with adenosine biosensors. These observations provide new insight into the recovery of adenine nucleotides after slice preparation, the sources of loss of such compounds in brain slices, the means by which to restore them, and the functional consequences of doing so.

  4. Pyramiding of transgenic Pm3 alleles in wheat results in improved powdery mildew resistance in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Teresa; Brunner, Susanne; Herren, Gerhard; Hurni, Severine; Keller, Beat

    2018-04-01

    The combined effects of enhanced total transgene expression level and allele-specificity combination in transgenic allele-pyramided Pm3 wheat lines result in improved powdery mildew field resistance without negative pleiotropic effects. Allelic Pm3 resistance genes of wheat confer race-specific resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) and encode nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) receptors. Transgenic wheat lines overexpressing alleles Pm3a, b, c, d, f, and g have previously been generated by transformation of cultivar Bobwhite and tested in field trials, revealing varying degrees of powdery mildew resistance conferred by the transgenes. Here, we tested four transgenic lines each carrying two pyramided Pm3 alleles, which were generated by crossbreeding of lines transformed with single Pm3 alleles. All four allele-pyramided lines showed strongly improved powdery mildew resistance in the field compared to their parental lines. The improved resistance results from the two effects of enhanced total transgene expression levels and allele-specificity combinations. In contrast to leaf segment tests on greenhouse-grown seedlings, no allelic suppression was observed in the field. Plant development and yield scores of the pyramided lines were similar to the mean scores of the corresponding parental lines, and thus, the allele pyramiding did not cause any negative effects. On the contrary, in pyramided line, Pm3b × Pm3f normal plant development was restored compared to the delayed development and reduced seed set of parental line Pm3f. Allele-specific RT qPCR revealed additive transgene expression levels of the two Pm3 alleles in the pyramided lines. A positive correlation between total transgene expression level and powdery mildew field resistance was observed. In summary, allele pyramiding of Pm3 transgenes proved to be successful in enhancing powdery mildew field resistance.

  5. Severe complications in a child with achondroplasia and two FGFR3 mutations on the same allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rump, P; Letteboer, TGW; Gille, JJP; Torringa, MJL; Baerts, W; van Gestel, JPJ; Verheij, JBGM; van Essen, AJ

    2006-01-01

    We describe a unique case of achondroplasia with associated complications, including severe respiratory problems. Molecular analysis of the fibroblast growth factor receptor type 3 (FGFR3) gene in this patient showed the common p.G380R mutation and a second novel p.L377R Mutation. An allele-specific

  6. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Chris T; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Davis, Gordon O; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-04-15

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Role of transglutaminase 2 in A1 adenosine receptor- and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning against hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death in H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Falguni S; Nelson, Carl P; Dickenson, John M

    2018-01-15

    Pharmacologically-induced pre- and post-conditioning represent attractive therapeutic strategies to reduce ischaemia/reperfusion injury during cardiac surgery and following myocardial infarction. We have previously reported that transglutaminase 2 (TG2) activity is modulated by the A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts. The primary aim of this study was to determine the role of TG2 in A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning in the H9c2 cells. H9c2 cells were exposed to 8h hypoxia (1% O 2 ) followed by 18h reoxygenation, after which cell viability was assessed by monitoring mitochondrial reduction of MTT, lactate dehydrogenase release and caspase-3 activation. N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; A 1 adenosine receptor agonist), formoterol (β 2 -adrenoceptor agonist) or isoprenaline (non-selective β-adrenoceptor agonist) were added before hypoxia/reoxygenation (pre-conditioning) or at the start of reoxygenation following hypoxia (post-conditioning). Pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning with CPA and isoprenaline significantly reduced hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell death. In contrast, formoterol did not elicit protection. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (G i/o -protein inhibitor), DPCPX (A 1 adenosine receptor antagonist) or TG2 inhibitors (Z-DON and R283) attenuated the A 1 adenosine receptor-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning. Similarly, pertussis toxin, ICI 118,551 (β 2 -adrenoceptor antagonist) or TG2 inhibition attenuated the isoprenaline-induced cell survival. Knockdown of TG2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated CPA and isoprenaline-induced pharmacological pre- and post-conditioning. Finally, proteomic analysis following isoprenaline treatment identified known (e.g. protein S100-A6) and novel (e.g. adenine phosphoribosyltransferase) protein substrates for TG2. These results have shown that A 1 adenosine receptor and β 2 -adrenoceptor

  8. Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Egyptian Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Journal Home ... Microangiopathic complications related to different alleles of manganese superoxide dismutase gene in diabetes mellitus type 1. TM EL Masry ... 23(2) 2005: 155-167 ...

  9. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C; Kaas, A; Hansen, L

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated lo...

  10. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-01-01

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca 2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  11. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Thorsten; Wissenbach, Ulrich; Grobholz, Rainer; Flockerzi, Veit

    2009-10-26

    The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6) is a Ca(2+) selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6 alleles in healthy control individuals and prostate cancer patients

  12. TRPV6 alleles do not influence prostate cancer progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flockerzi Veit

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transient receptor potential, subfamily V, member 6 (TRPV6 is a Ca2+ selective cation channel. Several studies have shown that TRPV6 transcripts are expressed in locally advanced prostatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic and androgen-insensitive prostatic lesions but are undetectable in healthy prostate tissue and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Two allelic variants of the human trpv6 gene have been identified which are transcribed into two independent mRNAs, TRPV6a and TRPV6b. We now asked, whether the trpv6a allele is correlated with the onset of prostate cancer, with the Gleason score and the tumour stage. Methods Genomic DNA of prostate cancer patients and control individuals was isolated from resections of prostatic adenocarcinomas and salivary fluid respectively. Genotyping of SNPs of the TRPV6 gene was performed by restriction length polymorphism or by sequencing analysis. RNA used for RT-PCR was isolated from prostate tissue. Data sets were analyzed by Chi-Square test. Results We first characterized in detail the five polymorphisms present in the protein coding exons of the trpv6 gene and show that these polymorphisms are coupled and are underlying the TRPV6a and the TRPV6b variants. Next we analysed the frequencies of the two TRPV6 alleles using genomic DNA from saliva samples of 169 healthy individuals. The homozygous TRPV6b genotype predominated with 86%, whereas no homozygous TRPV6a carriers could be identified. The International HapMap Project identified a similar frequency for an Utah based population whereas in an African population the a-genotype prevailed. The incidence of prostate cancer is several times higher in African populations than in non-African and we then investigated the TRPV6a/b frequencies in 141 samples of prostatic adenocarcinoma. The TRPV6b allele was found in 87% of the samples without correlation with Gleason score and tumour stage. Conclusion Our results show that the frequencies of trpv6

  13. Allele Workbench: transcriptome pipeline and interactive graphics for allele-specific expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A Soderlund

    Full Text Available Sequencing the transcriptome can answer various questions such as determining the transcripts expressed in a given species for a specific tissue or condition, evaluating differential expression, discovering variants, and evaluating allele-specific expression. Differential expression evaluates the expression differences between different strains, tissues, and conditions. Allele-specific expression evaluates expression differences between parental alleles. Both differential expression and allele-specific expression have been studied for heterosis (hybrid vigor, where the hybrid has improved performance over the parents for one or more traits. The Allele Workbench software was developed for a heterosis study that evaluated allele-specific expression for a mouse F1 hybrid using libraries from multiple tissues with biological replicates. This software has been made into a distributable package, which includes a pipeline, a Java interface to build the database, and a Java interface for query and display of the results. The required input is a reference genome, annotation file, and one or more RNA-Seq libraries with optional replicates. It evaluates allelic imbalance at the SNP and transcript level and flags transcripts with significant opposite directional allele-specific expression. The Java interface allows the user to view data from libraries, replicates, genes, transcripts, exons, and variants, including queries on allele imbalance for selected libraries. To determine the impact of allele-specific SNPs on protein folding, variants are annotated with their effect (e.g., missense, and the parental protein sequences may be exported for protein folding analysis. The Allele Workbench processing results in transcript files and read counts that can be used as input to the previously published Transcriptome Computational Workbench, which has a new algorithm for determining a trimmed set of gene ontology terms. The software with demo files is available

  14. Abnormal segregation of alleles in CEPH pedigree DNAs arising from allele loss in lymphoblastoid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, N J; Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1993-01-01

    Somatic events that result in the reduction to hemi- or homozygosity at all loci affected by the event have been identified in lymphoblastoid DNA from mothers of two CEPH families. Using suitably informative probes, the allele deficiencies were detected by the abnormal transmission of alleles from grandparents to grandchildren, with the apparent absence of the alleles from the parent. Undetected somatic deficiencies in family DNAs could result in misscoring of recombination events and consequently introduce errors into linkage analysis.

  15. Estimated allele substitution effects underlying genomic evaluation models depend on the scaling of allele counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, Aniek C.; Hayes, Ben J.; Calus, Mario P.L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Genomic evaluation is used to predict direct genomic values (DGV) for selection candidates in breeding programs, but also to estimate allele substitution effects (ASE) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Scaling of allele counts influences the estimated ASE, because scaling of

  16. Adenosine A1, A2a, A2B, and A3 receptors in hematopoiesis. 2. Expression of receptor mRNA in resting and lipopolysaccharide-activated mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štreitová, Denisa; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jiřina; Vacek, Antonín; Pospíšil, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2010), s. 139-144 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0015; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : adenosine receptors * macrophage * mRNA expression Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  17. Allelic genealogies in sporophytic self-incompatibility systems in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1998-01-01

    , alleles act codominantly in both pollen and style, in the SSIdom model, alleles form a dominance hierarchy, and in SSIdomcod, alleles are codominant in the style and show a dominance hierarchy in the pollen. Coalescence times of alleles rarely differ more than threefold from those under gametophytic self...

  18. Characterization of new allele influencing flowering time in bread wheat introgressed from Triticum militinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaničová, Zuzana; Jakobson, Irena; Reis, Diana; Šafář, Jan; Milec, Zbyněk; Abrouk, Michael; Doležel, Jaroslav; Järve, Kadri; Valárik, Miroslav

    2016-09-25

    Flowering time variation was identified within a mapping population of doubled haploid lines developed from a cross between the introgressive line 8.1 and spring bread wheat cv. Tähti. The line 8.1 carried introgressions from tetraploid Triticum militinae in the cv. Tähti genetic background on chromosomes 1A, 2A, 4A, 5A, 7A, 1B and 5B. The most significant QTL for the flowering time variation was identified within the introgressed region on chromosome 5A and its largest effect was associated with the VRN-A1 locus, accounting for up to 70% of phenotypic variance. The allele of T. militinae origin was designated as VRN-A1f-like. The effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele was verified in two other mapping populations. QTL analysis identified that in cv. Tähti and cv. Mooni genetic background, VRN-A1f-like allele incurred a delay of 1.9-18.6 days in flowering time, depending on growing conditions. Sequence comparison of the VRN-A1f-like and VRN-A1a alleles from the parental lines of the mapping populations revealed major mutations in the promoter region as well as in the first intron, including insertion of a MITE element and a large deletion. The sequence variation allowed construction of specific diagnostic PCR markers for VRN-A1f-like allele determination. Identification and quantification of the effect of the VRN-A1f-like allele offers a useful tool for wheat breeding and for studying fine-scale regulation of flowering pathways in wheat. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. ABA renewal involves enhancements in both GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor activity and GluA1 phosphorylation in the lateral amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyungjoon Park

    Full Text Available Fear renewal, the context-specific relapse of fear following fear extinction, is a leading animal model of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD and fear-related disorders. Although fear extinction can diminish fear responses, this effect is restricted to the context where the extinction is carried out, and the extinguished fear strongly relapses when assessed in the original acquisition context (ABA renewal or in a context distinct from the conditioning and extinction contexts (ABC renewal. We have previously identified Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 subunit in the lateral amygdala (LA as a key molecular mechanism for ABC renewal. However, molecular mechanisms underlying ABA renewal remain to be elucidated. Here, we found that both the excitatory synaptic efficacy and GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity at thalamic input synapses onto the LA (T-LA synapses were enhanced upon ABA renewal. GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity was also increased during low-threshold potentiation, a potential cellular substrate of renewal, at T-LA synapses. The microinjection of 1-naphtylacetyl-spermine (NASPM, a selective blocker of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, into the LA attenuated ABA renewal, suggesting a critical role of GluA2-lacking AMPARs in ABA renewal. We also found that Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 in the LA was increased upon ABA renewal. We developed a short peptide mimicking the Ser831-containing C-tail region of GluA1, which can be phosphorylated upon renewal (GluA1S; thus, the phosphorylated GluA1S may compete with Ser831-phosphorylated GluA1. This GluA1S peptide blocked the low-threshold potentiation when dialyzed into a recorded neuron. The microinjection of a cell-permeable form of GluA1S peptide into the LA attenuated ABA renewal. In support of the GluA1S experiments, a GluA1D peptide (in which the serine at 831 is replaced with a phosphomimetic amino acid, aspartate attenuated ABA renewal when microinjected into the LA. These findings suggest that enhancements

  20. ABA renewal involves enhancements in both GluA2-lacking AMPA receptor activity and GluA1 phosphorylation in the lateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyungjoon; Song, Beomjong; Kim, Jeongyeon; Hong, Ingie; Song, Sangho; Lee, Junuk; Park, Sungmo; Kim, Jihye; An, Bobae; Lee, Hyun Woo; Lee, Seungbok; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Justin C; Lee, Sukwon; Choi, Sukwoo

    2014-01-01

    Fear renewal, the context-specific relapse of fear following fear extinction, is a leading animal model of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and fear-related disorders. Although fear extinction can diminish fear responses, this effect is restricted to the context where the extinction is carried out, and the extinguished fear strongly relapses when assessed in the original acquisition context (ABA renewal) or in a context distinct from the conditioning and extinction contexts (ABC renewal). We have previously identified Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 subunit in the lateral amygdala (LA) as a key molecular mechanism for ABC renewal. However, molecular mechanisms underlying ABA renewal remain to be elucidated. Here, we found that both the excitatory synaptic efficacy and GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity at thalamic input synapses onto the LA (T-LA synapses) were enhanced upon ABA renewal. GluA2-lacking AMPAR activity was also increased during low-threshold potentiation, a potential cellular substrate of renewal, at T-LA synapses. The microinjection of 1-naphtylacetyl-spermine (NASPM), a selective blocker of GluA2-lacking AMPARs, into the LA attenuated ABA renewal, suggesting a critical role of GluA2-lacking AMPARs in ABA renewal. We also found that Ser831 phosphorylation of GluA1 in the LA was increased upon ABA renewal. We developed a short peptide mimicking the Ser831-containing C-tail region of GluA1, which can be phosphorylated upon renewal (GluA1S); thus, the phosphorylated GluA1S may compete with Ser831-phosphorylated GluA1. This GluA1S peptide blocked the low-threshold potentiation when dialyzed into a recorded neuron. The microinjection of a cell-permeable form of GluA1S peptide into the LA attenuated ABA renewal. In support of the GluA1S experiments, a GluA1D peptide (in which the serine at 831 is replaced with a phosphomimetic amino acid, aspartate) attenuated ABA renewal when microinjected into the LA. These findings suggest that enhancements in both the

  1. RHD alleles in the Tunisian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchari, Mouna; Jemni-Yaacoub, Saloua; Chakroun, Taher; Abdelkefi, Saida; Houissa, Batoul; Hmida, Slama

    2013-01-01

    Background: A comprehensive survey of RHD alleles in Tunisia population was lacking. The aim of this study was to use a multiplex RHD typing assay for simultaneous detection of partial D especially with RHD/RHCE deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequence exchange mechanism and some weak D alleles. Materials and Methods: Six RHD specific primer sets were designed to amplify RHD exons 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 9. DNA from 2000 blood donors (1777 D+ and 223 D-) from several regions was selected for RHD genotyping using a PCR multiplex assay. Further molecular investigations were done to characterize the RHD variants that were identified by the PCR multiplex assay. Results: In the 1777 D+ samples, only 10 individuals showed the absence of amplification of exons 4 and 5 that were subsequently identified by PCR-SSP as weak D type 4 variants. No hybrid allele was detected. In the 223 D-, RHD amplification of some exons was observed only in 5 samples: 4 individuals expressed only RHD exon 9, and one subject lacking exons 4 and 5. These samples were then screened by PCR-SSPs on d(C) ces and weak D type 4, respectively. Conclusion: The weak D type 4 appears to be the most common D variant allele. We have not found any partial D variant. Findings also indicated that RHD gene deletion is the most prevalent cause of the D- phenotype in the Tunisian population. PMID:24014941

  2. Diversity of Lactase Persistence Alleles in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, BL; Raga, TO; Liebert, Anke

    2013-01-01

    The persistent expression of lactase into adulthood in humans is a recent genetic adaptation that allows the consumption of milk from other mammals after weaning. In Europe, a single allele (−13910∗T, rs4988235) in an upstream region that acts as an enhancer to the expression of the lactase gene ...

  3. Estimating the probability of allelic drop-out of STR alleles in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2009-01-01

    In crime cases with available DNA evidence, the amount of DNA is often sparse due to the setting of the crime. In such cases, allelic drop-out of one or more true alleles in STR typing is possible. We present a statistical model for estimating the per locus and overall probability of allelic drop......-out using the results of all STR loci in the case sample as reference. The methodology of logistic regression is appropriate for this analysis, and we demonstrate how to incorporate this in a forensic genetic framework....

  4. The geographic spread of the CCR5 Delta32 HIV-resistance allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Novembre

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The Delta32 mutation at the CCR5 locus is a well-studied example of natural selection acting in humans. The mutation is found principally in Europe and western Asia, with higher frequencies generally in the north. Homozygous carriers of the Delta32 mutation are resistant to HIV-1 infection because the mutation prevents functional expression of the CCR5 chemokine receptor normally used by HIV-1 to enter CD4+ T cells. HIV has emerged only recently, but population genetic data strongly suggest Delta32 has been under intense selection for much of its evolutionary history. To understand how selection and dispersal have interacted during the history of the Delta32 allele, we implemented a spatially explicit model of the spread of Delta32. The model includes the effects of sampling, which we show can give rise to local peaks in observed allele frequencies. In addition, we show that with modest gradients in selection intensity, the origin of the Delta32 allele may be relatively far from the current areas of highest allele frequency. The geographic distribution of the Delta32 allele is consistent with previous reports of a strong selective advantage (>10% for Delta32 carriers and of dispersal over relatively long distances (>100 km/generation. When selection is assumed to be uniform across Europe and western Asia, we find support for a northern European origin and long-range dispersal consistent with the Viking-mediated dispersal of Delta32 proposed by G. Lucotte and G. Mercier. However, when we allow for gradients in selection intensity, we estimate the origin to be outside of northern Europe and selection intensities to be strongest in the northwest. Our results describe the evolutionary history of the Delta32 allele and establish a general methodology for studying the geographic distribution of selected alleles.

  5. Orphan Nuclear Receptor NR4A1 Binds a Novel Protein Interaction Site on Anti-apoptotic B Cell Lymphoma Gene 2 Family Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoi, Paulo H C; Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Hishiki, Asami; Sano, Renata; Matsuzawa, Yasuko; Yanagi, Hiroko; Munte, Claudia E; Chen, Ya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M; Kalbitzer, Hans R; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Reed, John C

    2016-07-01

    B cell lymphoma gene 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins are key regulators of programmed cell death and important targets for drug discovery. Pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins reciprocally modulate their activities in large part through protein interactions involving a motif known as BH3 (Bcl-2 homology 3). Nur77 is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor family that lacks a BH3 domain but nevertheless binds certain anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bfl-1, and Bcl-B), modulating their effects on apoptosis and autophagy. We used a combination of NMR spectroscopy-based methods, mutagenesis, and functional studies to define the interaction site of a Nur77 peptide on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins and reveal a novel interaction surface. Nur77 binds adjacent to the BH3 peptide-binding crevice, suggesting the possibility of cross-talk between these discrete binding sites. Mutagenesis of residues lining the identified interaction site on Bcl-B negated the interaction with Nur77 protein in cells and prevented Nur77-mediated modulation of apoptosis and autophagy. The findings establish a new protein interaction site with the potential to modulate the apoptosis and autophagy mechanisms governed by Bcl-2 family proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. The 5-HT1A/1B-receptor agonist eltoprazine increases both catecholamine release in the prefrontal cortex and dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and decreases motivation for reward and "waiting" impulsivity, but increases "stopping" impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, S Mechiel; Prins, Jolanda; Van den Bergh, Filip S; Oosting, Ronald S; Dupree, Rudy; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Olivier, Berend; Denys, Damiaan A; Garland, Alexis; Güntürkün, Onur

    2017-01-05

    The 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor agonist eltoprazine has a behavioral drug signature that resembles that of a variety of psychostimulant drugs, despite the differences in receptor binding profile. These psychostimulants are effective in treating impulsivity disorders, most likely because they increase norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) levels in the prefrontal cortex. Both amphetamine and methylphenidate, however, also increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), which has a significant role in motivation, pleasure, and reward. How eltoprazine affects monoamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), and the NAc is unknown. It is also unknown whether eltoprazine affects different forms of impulsivity and brain reward mechanisms. Therefore, in the present study, we investigate the effects of eltoprazine in rats in the following sequence: 1) the activity of the monoaminergic systems using in vivo microdialysis, 2) motivation for reward measured using the intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) procedure, and finally, 3) "waiting" impulsivity in the delay-aversion task, and the "stopping" impulsivity in the stop-signal task. The microdialysis studies clearly showed that eltoprazine increased DA and NE release in both the mPFC and OFC, but only increased DA concentration in the NAc. In contrast, eltoprazine decreased 5-HT release in the mPFC and NAc (undetectable in the OFC). Remarkably, eltoprazine decreased impulsive choice, but increased impulsive action. Furthermore, brain stimulation was less rewarding following eltoprazine treatment. These results further support the long-standing hypothesis that "waiting" and "stopping" impulsivity are regulated by distinct neural circuits, because 5-HT 1A/1B -receptor activation decreases impulsive choice, but increases impulsive action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... the normal cellular process of replication of DNA molecules. ... probability of a certain genetic variant (alleles) occuring in ... have preservatives that hinder spoilage and are easily packaged .... Allele distribution at Nine STR.

  8. A new electrophoresis technique to separate microsatellite alleles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A new electrophoresis technique to separate microsatellite alleles* ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... with the CEQTM 8000 Genetic Analysis System and ABI 3130xl DNA Sequencer easily separated products and determined allelic size, ...

  9. Allele specific expression and methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoë Lonsdale

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The social hymenoptera are emerging as models for epigenetics. DNA methylation, the addition of a methyl group, is a common epigenetic marker. In mammals and flowering plants methylation affects allele specific expression. There is contradictory evidence for the role of methylation on allele specific expression in social insects. The aim of this paper is to investigate allele specific expression and monoallelic methylation in the bumblebee, Bombus terrestris. We found nineteen genes that were both monoallelically methylated and monoallelically expressed in a single bee. Fourteen of these genes express the hypermethylated allele, while the other five express the hypomethylated allele. We also searched for allele specific expression in twenty-nine published RNA-seq libraries. We found 555 loci with allele-specific expression. We discuss our results with reference to the functional role of methylation in gene expression in insects and in the as yet unquantified role of genetic cis effects in insect allele specific methylation and expression.

  10. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gourab Dewan

    2015-02-18

    Feb 18, 2015 ... desh and having borders with India and Myanmar (Fig. 1). It is a hilly area with ..... calculated allelic frequencies for ABO/Rh systems previously. Therefore, allelic .... in backward caste population of Uttar Pradesh, India. Not Sci.

  11. Association mapping and favourable QTL alleles for fibre quality ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cheng-Guang Dong

    A total of 201 markers were polymorphic and generated 394 allele loci, and 403 ... identified as containing favourable allele loci related to fibre quality traits. The identified .... environment. Field management followed respective local practices.

  12. Sex-specific allelic transmission bias suggests sexual conflict at MC1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducret, Valérie; Gaigher, Arnaud; Simon, Céline; Goudet, Jérôme; Roulin, Alexandre

    2016-09-01

    Sexual conflict arises when selection in one sex causes the displacement of the other sex from its phenotypic optimum, leading to an inevitable tension within the genome - called intralocus sexual conflict. Although the autosomal melanocortin-1-receptor gene (MC1R) can generate colour variation in sexually dichromatic species, most previous studies have not considered the possibility that MC1R may be subject to sexual conflict. In the barn owl (Tyto alba), the allele MC1RWHITE is associated with whitish plumage coloration, typical of males, and the allele MC1RRUFOUS is associated with dark rufous coloration, typical of females, although each sex can express any phenotype. Because each colour variant is adapted to specific environmental conditions, the allele MC1RWHITE may be more strongly selected in males and the allele MC1RRUFOUS in females. We therefore investigated whether MC1R genotypes are in excess or deficit in male and female fledglings compared with the expected Hardy-Weinberg proportions. Our results show an overall deficit of 7.5% in the proportion of heterozygotes in males and of 12.9% in females. In males, interannual variation in assortative pairing with respect to MC1R explained the year-specific deviations from Hardy-Weinberg proportions, whereas in females, the deficit was better explained by the interannual variation in the probability of inheriting the MC1RWHITE or MC1RRUFOUS allele. Additionally, we observed that sons inherit the MC1RRUFOUS allele from their fathers on average slightly less often than expected under the first Mendelian law. Transmission ratio distortion may be adaptive in this sexually dichromatic species if males and females are, respectively, selected to display white and rufous plumages. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Allele frequencies of AVPR1A and MAOA in the Afrikaner population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Christoff Erasmus

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Afrikaner population was founded mainly by European immigrants that arrived in South Africa from 1652. However, female slaves from Asia and Africa and local KhoeSan women may have contributed as much as 7% to this population’s genes. We quantified variation at two tandem repeats to see if this historical founder effect and/or admixture could be detected. The two loci were chosen because they are in the promoters of genes of neurotransmitters that are known to be correlated with social behaviour. Specifically, arginine vasopressin receptor 1A’s (AVPR1A RS3 locus has been shown to correlate with age of sexual onset and happiness in monogamous relationships while the tandem repeat in the promoter of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA gene correlates with reactive aggression. The Afrikaner population contained more AVPR1A RS3 alleles than other Caucasoid populations, potentially reflecting a history of admixture. Even though Afrikaners have one of the lowest recorded non-paternity rates in the world, the population did not differ at AVPR1A RS3 locus form other European populations, suggesting a non-genetic explanation, presumably religion, for the low non-paternity rate. By comparing population allele-frequency spectra it was found that different studies have confused AVPR1A RS3 alleles and we make some suggestions to rectify these mistakes in future studies. While MAOA allele frequencies differed between racial groups, the Afrikaner population showed no evidence of admixture. In fact, Afrikaners had more 4-repeat alleles than other populations of European origin, not fewer. The 4-repeat allele may have been selected for during colonisation.

  14. Allele and genotype frequencies of -β lactoglobulin gene in Iranian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Blood samples were supplied from 80 Najdi cattle and 80 buffalo from different cities of Khouzestan province. ... The allele B of β-Lactoglobulin occurred at a higher frequency than the allele A in both. Najdi cattle and buffalo. .... that of the B allele in both groups of animals studied. Expected heterozygosity ...

  15. Directional Positive Selection on an Allele of Arbitrary Dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Teshima, Kosuke M.; Przeworski, Molly

    2006-01-01

    Most models of positive directional selection assume codominance of the beneficial allele. We examine the importance of this assumption by implementing a coalescent model of positive directional selection with arbitrary dominance. We find that, for a given mean fixation time, a beneficial allele has a much weaker effect on diversity at linked neutral sites when the allele is recessive.

  16. Enhanced long-term and impaired short-term spatial memory in GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit knockout mice: evidence for a dual-process memory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, David J; Good, Mark A; Skelton, Kathryn; Sprengel, Rolf; Seeburg, Peter H; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Bannerman, David M

    2009-06-01

    The GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit is a key mediator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity and is especially important for a rapidly-induced, short-lasting form of potentiation. GluA1 gene deletion impairs hippocampus-dependent, spatial working memory, but spares hippocampus-dependent spatial reference memory. These findings may reflect the necessity of GluA1-dependent synaptic plasticity for short-term memory of recently visited places, but not for the ability to form long-term associations between a particular spatial location and an outcome. This hypothesis is in concordance with the theory that short-term and long-term memory depend on dissociable psychological processes. In this study we tested GluA1-/- mice on both short-term and long-term spatial memory using a simple novelty preference task. Mice were given a series of repeated exposures to a particular spatial location (the arm of a Y-maze) before their preference for a novel spatial location (the unvisited arm of the maze) over the familiar spatial location was assessed. GluA1-/- mice were impaired if the interval between the trials was short (1 min), but showed enhanced spatial memory if the interval between the trials was long (24 h). This enhancement was caused by the interval between the exposure trials rather than the interval prior to the test, thus demonstrating enhanced learning and not simply enhanced performance or expression of memory. This seemingly paradoxical enhancement of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning may be caused by GluA1 gene deletion reducing the detrimental effects of short-term memory on subsequent long-term learning. Thus, these results support a dual-process model of memory in which short-term and long-term memory are separate and sometimes competitive processes.

  17. Frequency of the GPR7 Tyr135Phe allelic variant in lean and obese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelosini, C; Maffei, M; Ceccarini, G; Marchi, M; Marsili, A; Galli, G; Scartabelli, G; Tamberi, A; Latrofa, F; Fierabracci, P; Vitti, P; Pinchera, A; Santini, F

    2013-10-01

    GPR7, the endogenous coupled receptor for neuropeptide B and neuropeptide W, is expressed in several regions of the central nervous system, which are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. GPR7 affects the regulation of energy balance through a mechanism independent of leptin and melanocortin pathways. Aim of this study was to investigate whether GPR7 gene mutations can be detected in human subjects and, in that event, if they are differently distributed among lean and obese subjects. The coding region of GPR7 were sequenced in 150 obese patients and 100 normal-weight unrelated controls. Functional studies of the allelic variants were performed. One genetic GPR7 variant was found (Tyr135Phe - rs33977775) in obese subjects (13.3%) and lean control (25%). Functional studies did not reveal significant differences between the wild type and the Tyr135Phe allelic variants in their NPW-mediated capacity to inhibit forskolin-induced cAMP production. Screening of GPR7 gene mutations among lean and obese subjects revealed a Tyr135Phe allelic variant that was fairly common in the study population. As indicated by in vitro and in silico studies, this variant is unlikely to cause a functional derangement of the receptor.

  18. The Frog Skin-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 Promotes the Migration of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in an EGF Receptor-Dependent Manner: A Novel Promoter of Human Skin Wound Healing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Grazia, Antonio; Cappiello, Floriana; Imanishi, Akiko; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Picardo, Mauro; Paus, Ralf; Mangoni, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    One of the many functions of skin is to protect the organism against a wide range of pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by the skin epithelium provide an effective chemical shield against microbial pathogens. However, whereas antibacterial/antifungal activities of AMPs have been extensively characterized, much less is known regarding their wound healing-modulatory properties. By using an in vitro re-epithelialisation assay employing special cell-culture inserts, we detected that a derivative of the frog-skin AMP esculentin-1a, named esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2, significantly stimulates migration of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) over a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.025-4 μM), and this notably more efficiently than human cathelicidin (LL-37). This activity is preserved in primary human epidermal keratinocytes. By using appropriate inhibitors and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we found that the peptide-induced cell migration involves activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3 protein. These results suggest that esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 now deserves to be tested in standard wound healing assays as a novel candidate promoter of skin re-epithelialisation. The established ability of esculentin-1a(1-21)NH2 to kill microbes without harming mammalian cells, namely its high anti-Pseudomonal activity, makes this AMP a particularly attractive candidate wound healing promoter, especially in the management of chronic, often Pseudomonas-infected, skin ulcers.

  19. The Frog Skin-Derived Antimicrobial Peptide Esculentin-1a(1-21NH2 Promotes the Migration of Human HaCaT Keratinocytes in an EGF Receptor-Dependent Manner: A Novel Promoter of Human Skin Wound Healing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Di Grazia

    Full Text Available One of the many functions of skin is to protect the organism against a wide range of pathogens. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs produced by the skin epithelium provide an effective chemical shield against microbial pathogens. However, whereas antibacterial/antifungal activities of AMPs have been extensively characterized, much less is known regarding their wound healing-modulatory properties. By using an in vitro re-epithelialisation assay employing special cell-culture inserts, we detected that a derivative of the frog-skin AMP esculentin-1a, named esculentin-1a(1-21NH2, significantly stimulates migration of immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells over a wide range of peptide concentrations (0.025-4 μM, and this notably more efficiently than human cathelicidin (LL-37. This activity is preserved in primary human epidermal keratinocytes. By using appropriate inhibitors and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay we found that the peptide-induced cell migration involves activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor and STAT3 protein. These results suggest that esculentin-1a(1-21NH2 now deserves to be tested in standard wound healing assays as a novel candidate promoter of skin re-epithelialisation. The established ability of esculentin-1a(1-21NH2 to kill microbes without harming mammalian cells, namely its high anti-Pseudomonal activity, makes this AMP a particularly attractive candidate wound healing promoter, especially in the management of chronic, often Pseudomonas-infected, skin ulcers.

  20. Plasminogen alleles influence susceptibility to invasive aspergillosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimee K Zaas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis (IA is a common and life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals. A number of environmental and epidemiologic risk factors for developing IA have been identified. However, genetic factors that affect risk for developing IA have not been clearly identified. We report that host genetic differences influence outcome following establishment of pulmonary aspergillosis in an exogenously immune suppressed mouse model. Computational haplotype-based genetic analysis indicated that genetic variation within the biologically plausible positional candidate gene plasminogen (Plg; Gene ID 18855 correlated with murine outcome. There was a single nonsynonymous coding change (Gly110Ser where the minor allele was found in all of the susceptible strains, but not in the resistant strains. A nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (Asp472Asn was also identified in the human homolog (PLG; Gene ID 5340. An association study within a cohort of 236 allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT recipients revealed that alleles at this SNP significantly affected the risk of developing IA after HSCT. Furthermore, we demonstrated that plasminogen directly binds to Aspergillus fumigatus. We propose that genetic variation within the plasminogen pathway influences the pathogenesis of this invasive fungal infection.

  1. Binding of β4γ5 by adenosine A1 and A2A receptors determined by stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture and mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler Wang, Dora; Sherman, Nicholas E; Shannon, John D; Leonhardt, Susan A; Mayeenuddin, Linnia H; Yeager, Mark; McIntire, William E

    2011-01-18

    Characterization of G protein βγ dimer isoform expression in different cellular contexts has been impeded by low levels of protein expression, broad isoform heterogeneity, and antibodies of limited specificity, sensitivity, or availability. As a new approach, we used quantitative mass spectrometry to characterize native βγ dimers associated with adenosine A(1):α(i1) and adenosine A(2A):α(S) receptor fusion proteins expressed in HEK-293 cells. Cells expressing A(1):α(i1) were cultured in media containing [(13)C(6)]Arg and [(13)C(6)]Lys and βγ labeled with heavy isotopes purified. Heavy βγ was combined with either recombinant βγ purified from Sf9 cells, βγ purified from the A(2A):α(S) expressed in HEK-293 cells cultured in standard media, or an enriched βγ fraction from HEK-293 cells. Samples were separated by SDS-PAGE, protein bands containing β and γ were excised, digested with trypsin, and separated by HPLC, and isotope ratios were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Three β isoforms, β(1), β(2), and β(4), and seven γ isoforms, γ(2), γ(4), γ(5), γ(7), γ(10), γ(11), and γ(12), were identified in the analysis. β(1) and γ(5) were most abundant in the enriched βγ fraction, and this βγ profile was generally mirrored in the fusion proteins. However, both A(2A):α(S) and A(1):α(i1) bound more β(4) and γ(5) compared to the enriched βγ fraction; also, more β(4) was associated with A(2A):α(S) than A(1):α(i1). Both fusion proteins also contained less γ(2), γ(10), and γ(12) than the enriched βγ fraction. These results suggest that preferences for particular βγ isoforms may be driven in part by structural motifs common to adenosine receptor family members.

  2. Identification and distribution of three serologically undetected alleles of HLA-DR by oligonucleotide x DNA typing analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiercy, J.M.; Gorski, J.; Jeannet, M.; Mach, B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the molecular biology of human major histocompatibility complex class II genes (HLA-DP, -DQ, -DR) have shown that the genetic complexity and allelic polymorphism are greater than expected. In the case of HLA-DR, three DR β-chain loci have been identified and linked, two of which (DR βI and DR βIII, now assigned names HLA-DR1B and HLA-DR3B) are functional. The authors have shown that the HLA micropolymorphism detected at the DNA sequence level can easily be analyzed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides (HLA oligotyping). In the case of the HLA DRw52 supertypic specificity, which includes the DR3, DR5, DRw6, and DRw8 haplotypes, three alleles, referred to as DRw52a, DRw52b, and DRw52c, have recently been identified at the HLA-DR3B locus by DNA sequencing. Hybridization with locus- and allele-specific oligonucleotide probes (designated 52a, 52b, and 52c) has been performed on DNA from normal individuals forming a panel of 82 haplotypes to establish the distribution of these three alleles. Individuals of the DR3 haplotype had either the DRw52a or DRw52b allele, and individuals of extended haplotype HLA-A1,B8,DR3 had only the DRw52a allele. DR5 individuals all had the DRw52b allele, while individuals of DRw6 haplotype had the DRw52a, -52b, or -52c allele. None of these three alleles are found in DRw8 individuals. Analysis of this micropolymorphism, undetectable by common typing procedures, is therefore now operational for more accurate HLA matching for transplantation and for improving correlations between HLA and disease susceptibility

  3. DQB1*06:02 allele-specific expression varies by allelic dosage, not narcolepsy status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiner Lachmi, Karin; Lin, Ling; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2012-01-01

    The association of narcolepsy-cataplexy, a sleep disorder caused by the loss of hypocretin/orexin neurons in the hypothalamus, with DQA1*01:02-DQB1*06:02 is one of the tightest known single-allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. In this study, we explored genome-wide expression...

  4. Attenuated Expression of DFFB is a Hallmark of Oligodendrogliomas with 1p-Allelic Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Gregory N

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allelic loss of chromosome 1p is frequently observed in oligodendroglioma. We screened 177 oligodendroglial tumors for 1p deletions and found 6 tumors with localized 1p36 deletions. Several apoptosis regulation genes have been mapped to this region, including Tumor Protein 73 (p73, DNA Fragmentation Factor subunits alpha (DFFA and beta (DFFB, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor Superfamily Members 9 and 25 (TNFRSF9, TNFRSF25. We compared expression levels of these 5 genes in pairs of 1p-loss and 1p-intact tumors using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (QRTPCR to test if 1p deletions had an effect on expression. Only the DFFB gene demonstrated decreased expression in all tumor pairs tested. Mutational analysis did not reveal DFFB mutations in 12 tested samples. However, it is possible that DFFB haploinsufficiency from 1p allelic loss is a contributing factor in oligodendroglioma development.

  5. Allele-Specific Chromatin Recruitment and Therapeutic Vulnerabilities of ESR1 Activating Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeselsohn, Rinath; Bergholz, Johann S; Pun, Matthew; Cornwell, MacIntosh; Liu, Weihan; Nardone, Agostina; Xiao, Tengfei; Li, Wei; Qiu, Xintao; Buchwalter, Gilles; Feiglin, Ariel; Abell-Hart, Kayley; Fei, Teng; Rao, Prakash; Long, Henry; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Zhang, Tinghu; Gray, Nathanael; Melchers, Diane; Houtman, Rene; Liu, X Shirley; Cohen, Ofir; Wagle, Nikhil; Winer, Eric P; Zhao, Jean; Brown, Myles

    2018-02-12

    Estrogen receptor α (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD) mutations are found in a substantial number of endocrine treatment-resistant metastatic ER-positive (ER + ) breast cancers. We investigated the chromatin recruitment, transcriptional network, and genetic vulnerabilities in breast cancer models harboring the clinically relevant ER mutations. These mutants exhibit both ligand-independent functions that mimic estradiol-bound wild-type ER as well as allele-specific neomorphic properties that promote a pro-metastatic phenotype. Analysis of the genome-wide ER binding sites identified mutant ER unique recruitment mediating the allele-specific transcriptional program. Genetic screens identified genes that are essential for the ligand-independent growth driven by the mutants. These studies provide insights into the mechanism of endocrine therapy resistance engendered by ER mutations and potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association analysis of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene in Tourette`s syndrome using the haplotype relative risk method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noethen, M.M.; Cichon, S.; Propping, P. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Comings et al. have recently reported a highly significant association between Tourette`s syndrome (TS) and a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor gene (DRD2) locus. The A1 allele of the DRD2 Taq I RFLP was present in 45% of the Tourette patients compared with 25% of controls. We tried to replicate this finding by using the haplotype relative risk (HRR) method for association analysis. This method overcomes a major problem of conventional case-control studies, where undetected ethnic differences between patients and controls may result in a false-positive finding, by using parental alleles not inherited by the proband as control alleles. Sixty-one nuclear families encompassing an affected child and parents were typed for the DRD2 Taq I polymorphism. No significant differences in DRD2 A1 allele frequency were observed between TS probands, sub-populations of probands classified according to tic severity, or parental control alleles. Our data do not support the hypothesis that the DRD2 locus may act as a modifying gene in the expression of the disorder in TS probands. 40 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase gene G298 allele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagib El-Kilany, Galal E.; Nayel, Ehab; Hazzaa, Sahar

    2004-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide (NO) has an important effect on blood pressure, arterial wall, and the basal release of endothelial NO in hypertension (HPN) may be reduced. Until now, there is no solid data revealing the potential role of the polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase gene (NOS) in patients with HPN and microvascular angina. Aim: The aim of the present study is to investigate the gene of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), as the polymorphism of this gene may be a putative candidate for HPN and initiate the process of atherosclerosis. Methods: Sixty participants were recruited for this study; 50 were hypertensive patients complaining of chest pain [30 of them have electrocardiogram (EKG) changes of ischemia], 20 had isolated HPN, and 10 healthy volunteers served as control. All patients underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary angiography. Genotyping of eNOS for all patients and controls was performed. The linkages between HPN, microvascular angina and eNOS gene polymorphism were investigated. Results: MPI and coronary angiography revealed that 15 patients had chest pain with true ischemia and reversible myocardial perfusion defects (multiple and mild) but normal epicardial coronary arteries (microvascular angina), while 15 patients had significant coronary artery disease (CAD), and 20 hypertensive patients showed normal perfusion scan and coronary angiography. The prevalence of the NOS G 298 allele was higher in the hypertensive group with microvascular angina (documented by MPI) than it was among the control participants (P<.005). The eNOS allele was significantly higher in the hypertensive group than in the control participants, but there was no significant difference in homozygote mutants among hypertensive participants, x-syndrome and patients with CAD. Conclusion: eNOS gene polymorphism is proved to be an important etiology in microvascular angina (x-syndrome) among hypertensive patients. In addition, the eNOS mutant

  8. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Adler

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12% and lower in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%. Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Hercegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy subjects from Bosnia and Herzegovina (DNA collected 2011-2013.  Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7 years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. 

  9. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maayah, Zaid H. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ghebeh, Hazem [Stem Cell & Tissue Re-Engineering, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh 11211 (Saudi Arabia); Alhaider, Abdulqader A. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Camel Biomedical Research Unit, College of Pharmacy and Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); El-Kadi, Ayman O.S. [Faculty of Pharmacy & Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S. [Department of Environmental Toxicology, University of California at Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Korashy, Hesham M., E-mail: hkorashy@ksu.edu.sa [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-04-15

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  10. Metformin inhibits 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced breast carcinogenesis and adduct formation in human breast cells by inhibiting the cytochrome P4501A1/aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maayah, Zaid H.; Ghebeh, Hazem; Alhaider, Abdulqader A.; El-Kadi, Ayman O.S.; Soshilov, Anatoly A.; Denison, Michael S.; Ansari, Mushtaq Ahmad; Korashy, Hesham M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have established that metformin (MET), an oral anti-diabetic drug, possesses antioxidant activity and is effective against different types of cancer in several carcinogen-induced animal models and cell lines. However, whether MET can protect against breast cancer has not been reported before. Therefore, the overall objectives of the present study are to elucidate the potential chemopreventive effect of MET in non-cancerous human breast MCF10A cells and explore the underlying mechanism involved, specifically the role of cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1)/aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway. Transformation of the MCF10A cells into initiated breast cancer cells with DNA adduct formation was conducted using 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA), an AhR ligand. The chemopreventive effect of MET against DMBA-induced breast carcinogenesis was evidenced by the capability of MET to restore the induction of the mRNA levels of basic excision repair genes, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease1 (APE1), and the level of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Interestingly, the inhibition of DMBA-induced DNA adduct formation was associated with proportional decrease in CYP1A1 and in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) gene expression. Mechanistically, the involvements of AhR and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) in the MET-mediated inhibition of DMBA-induced CYP1A1 and NQO1 gene expression were evidenced by the ability of MET to inhibit DMBA-induced xenobiotic responsive element and antioxidant responsive element luciferase reporter gene expression which suggests an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent transcriptional control. However, the inability of MET to bind to AhR suggests that MET is not an AhR ligand. In conclusion, the present work shows a strong evidence that MET inhibits the DMBA-mediated carcinogenicity and adduct formation by inhibiting the expression of CYP1A1 through an AhR ligand-independent mechanism

  11. A meta-analysis of the relationship between brain dopamine receptors and obesity: a matter of changes in behavior rather than food addiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, D; Young, H A

    2016-03-01

    Addiction to a wide range of substances of abuse has been suggested to reflect a 'Reward Deficiency Syndrome'. That is, drugs are said to stimulate the reward mechanisms so intensely that, to compensate, the population of dopamine D2 receptors (DD2R) declines. The result is that an increased intake is necessary to experience the same degree of reward. Without an additional intake, cravings and withdrawal symptoms result. A suggestion is that food addiction, in a similar manner to drugs of abuse, decrease DD2R. The role of DD2R in obesity was therefore examined by examining the association between body mass index (BMI) and the Taq1A polymorphism, as the A1 allele is associated with a 30-40% lower number of DD2R, and is a risk factor for drug addiction. If a lower density of DD2R is indicative of physical addiction, it was argued that if food addiction occurs, those with the A1 allele should have a higher BMI. A systematic review found 33 studies that compared the BMI of those who did and did not have the A1 allele. A meta-analysis of the studies compared those with (A1/A1 and A1/A2) or without (A2/A2) the A1 allele; no difference in BMI was found (standardized mean difference 0.004 (s.e. 0.021), variance 0.000, Z=0.196, Pfood addiction. In contrast, there are several reports that those with the A1 allele are less able to benefit from an intervention that aimed to reduce weight, possibly a reflection of increased impulsivity.

  12. Allele Frequency - JSNP | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nd 39 SNPs are assayed in three (POP_*) and two (RIKEN_japanese_*) panels, respectively. Derived from Flat f... assay (JBIC-allele and RIKEN_japanese_*), TaqMan assay (RIKEN-allele) or direct sequencing / allelic discri...unteers under informed consent RIKEN_japanese_normal_weight - 711 unrelated japanese normal weight volunteer...s ( body mass index RIKEN_japanese_obese - 796 unrelated japanese obese patients

  13. Database for the ampC alleles in Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Karah

    Full Text Available Acinetobacter baumannii is a troublesome opportunistic pathogen with a high capacity for clonal dissemination. We announce the establishment of a database for the ampC locus in A. baumannii, in which novel ampC alleles are differentiated based on the occurrence of ≥ 1 nucleotide change, regardless of whether it is silent or missense. The database is openly accessible at the pubmlst platform for A. baumannii (http://pubmlst.org/abaumannii/. Forty-eight distinctive alleles of the ampC locus have so far been identified and deposited in the database. Isolates from clonal complex 1 (CC1, according to the Pasteur multilocus sequence typing scheme, had a variety of the ampC locus alleles, including alleles 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 13, 14, 17, and 18. On the other hand, isolates from CC2 had the ampC alleles 2, 3, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, and 46. Allele 3 was characteristic for sequence types ST3 or ST32. The ampC alleles 10, 16, and 25 were characteristic for CC10, ST16, and CC25, respectively. Our study points out that novel gene databases, in which alleles are numbered based on differences in their nucleotide identities, should replace traditional records that use amino acid substitutions to define new alleles.

  14. Family-Based Association Study Between SLC2A1, HK1, and LEPR Polymorphisms With Myelomeningocele in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suazo, José; Castillo, Silvia; Martin, Luz Maria; Rojas, Francisca; Santos, José Luis; Rotter, Karin; Solar, Margarita; Tapia, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Obese/diabetic mothers present a higher risk to develop offspring with myelomeningocele (MM), evidence supporting the role of energy homeostasis-related genes in neural tube defects. Using polymerase chain reaction–restriction fragment length polymorphism, we have genotyped SLC2A1, HK1, and LEPR single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 105 Chilean patients with MM and their parents in order to evaluate allele–phenotype associations by means of allele/haplotype transmission test (TDT) and parent-of-origin effects. We detected an undertransmission for the SLC2A1 haplotype T-A (rs710218-rs2229682; P = .040), which was not significant when only lower MM (90% of the cases) was analyzed. In addition, the leptin receptor rs1137100 G allele showed a significant increase in the risk of MM for maternal-derived alleles in the whole sample (2.43-fold; P = .038) and in lower MM (3.20-fold; P = .014). Our results support the role of genes involved in energy homeostasis in the risk of developing MM, thus sustaining the hypothesis of diverse pathways and genetic mechanisms acting in the expression of such birth defect. PMID:23427181

  15. AllelicImbalance: An R/ bioconductor package for detecting, managing, and visualizing allele expression imbalance data from RNA sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gådin, Jesper R.; van't Hooft, Ferdinand M.; Eriksson, Per

    2015-01-01

    the possible biases. Results: We present AllelicImblance, a software program that is designed to detect, manage, and visualize allelic imbalances comprehensively. The purpose of this software is to allow users to pose genetic questions in any RNA sequencing experiment quickly, enhancing the general utility...... of RNA sequencing. The visualization features can reveal notable, non-trivial allelic imbalance behavior over specific regions, such as exons. Conclusions: The software provides a complete framework to perform allelic imbalance analyses of aligned RNA sequencing data, from detection to visualization...

  16. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  17. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  18. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Hiraku; Morishita, Soji; Araki, Marito; Edahiro, Yoko; Sunami, Yoshitaka; Hironaka, Yumi; Noda, Naohiro; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Ohsaka, Akimichi; Komatsu, Norio

    2014-01-01

    A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL) gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system)-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5%) of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  19. Detection of MPLW515L/K mutations and determination of allele frequencies with a single-tube PCR assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiraku Takei

    Full Text Available A gain-of-function mutation in the myeloproliferative leukemia virus (MPL gene, which encodes the thrombopoietin receptor, has been identified in patients with essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, subgroups of classic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. The presence of MPL gene mutations is a critical diagnostic criterion for these diseases. Here, we developed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective method of detecting two major MPL mutations, MPLW515L/K, in a single PCR assay; we termed this method DARMS (dual amplification refractory mutation system-PCR. DARMS-PCR is designed to produce three different PCR products corresponding to MPLW515L, MPLW515K, and all MPL alleles. The amplicons are later detected and quantified using a capillary sequencer to determine the relative frequencies of the mutant and wild-type alleles. Applying DARMS-PCR to human specimens, we successfully identified MPL mutations in MPN patients, with the exception of patients bearing mutant allele frequencies below the detection limit (5% of this method. The MPL mutant allele frequencies determined using DARMS-PCR correlated strongly with the values determined using deep sequencing. Thus, we demonstrated the potential of DARMS-PCR to detect MPL mutations and determine the allele frequencies in a timely and cost-effective manner.

  20. Linked expression of Ah receptor, ARNT, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 in rat mammary epithelia, in vitro, is each substantially elevated by specific extracellular matrix interactions that precede branching morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Michele Campaigne; Brake, Paul B; Pollenz, Richard S; Jefcoate, Colin R

    2004-11-01

    Cytochrome P4501B1 (CYP1B1), the major constitutively expressed CYP in the rat mammary gland, is induced by Ah-receptor (AhR) ligands, while CYP1A1 is predominantly expressed only after induction. These CYPs contribute to carcinogenic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). AhR, ARNT, and CYP1B1 were only weakly expressed, even after 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induction, when rat mammary epithelial cells (RMEC) were cultured on plastic. RMEC cultured on the extracellular matrix (ECM), Matrigel, or on a floating gel of collagen I demonstrated branching morphogenesis and substantially increased basal CYP1B1 and induced CYP1A1 expression, in parallel with large increases in AhR and ARNT expression. Branching was more pronounced in the Wistar Kyoto than in the Wistar Furth rat strain. Although EGF enhanced branching, neither strain nor growth factor treatment substantially impacted CYP expression. Increased AhR and ARNT expression is observed within 24 h of dispersal on Matrigel, substantially prior to branch formation. Culture on thin layers of collagen I, collagen IV, and laminin, respectively, failed to reproduce the branching morphogenesis or increases in AhR, ARNT, or CYP expression. However, adherent, gelled collagen I recapitulated the increased protein expression, without supporting branching. This increased protein expression was closely paralleled by enhanced expression of beta-catenin and E-cadherin, components of cell-cell adhesion complexes. A synthetic peptide that selectively antagonizes integrin-ECM interactions reduced branch formation, without diminishing AhR, ARNT, and CYP expression. These data demonstrate that early ECM surface adhesion interactions mediate AhR and ARNT expression, which enhances CYP expression, independent of branching morphogenesis.

  1. Dopamine receptor genetic polymorphisms and body composition in undernourished pastoralists: An exploration of nutrition indices among nomadic and recently settled Ariaal men of northern Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Peter B

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minor alleles of the human dopamine receptor polymorphisms, DRD2/TaqI A and DRD4/48 bp, are related to decreased functioning and/or numbers of their respective receptors and have been shown to be correlated with body mass, height and food craving. In addition, the 7R minor allele of the DRD4 gene is at a higher frequency in nomadic compared to sedentary populations. Here we examine polymorphisms in the DRD2 and DRD4 genes with respect to body mass index (BMI and height among men in two populations of Ariaal pastoralists, one recently settled (n = 87 and the other still nomadic (n = 65. The Ariaal live in northern Kenya, are chronically undernourished and are divided socially among age-sets. Results Frequencies of the DRD4/7R and DRD2/A1 alleles were 19.4% and 28.2%, respectively and did not differ between the nomadic and settled populations. BMI was higher in those with one or two DRD4/7R alleles in the nomadic population, but lower among the settled. Post-hoc analysis suggests that the DRD4 differences in BMI were due primarily to differences in fat free body mass. Height was unrelated to either DRD2/TaqI A or DRD4/48 bp genotypes. Conclusion Our results indicate that the DRD4/7R allele may be more advantageous among nomadic than settled Ariaal men. This result suggests that a selective advantage mediated through behaviour may be responsible for the higher frequency of the 7R alleles in nomadic relative to sedentary populations around the world. In contrast to previous work, we did not find an association between DRD2 genotypes and height. Our results support the idea that human phenotypic expression of genotypes should be rigorously evaluated in diverse environments and genetic backgrounds.

  2. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION .... while if the allelic replacement is being made on an Aa individual the ...

  3. Low Penetrance Alleles in Colorectal Cancer: the arachidonic acid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.E. Siezen

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, we can conclude that we have successfully identified low penetrance alleles in the PPAR., PLA2G2A and ALOX15 genes, conferring differential colorectal adenoma risk, and two such alleles in the PTGS2 gene, one of which is also involved in colorectal cancer risk. These

  4. Comparison of bovine lymphocyte antigen DRB3.2 allele ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-08-04

    Aug 4, 2008 ... The bovine lymphocyte antigen (BoLA-DRB3) gene encodes cell ... alleles were more resistant to clinical mastitis. ... DRB3.2 allele pattern in two Iranian Holstein cow .... observed and the number of immune parameters with.

  5. Evolutionary dynamics of sporophytic self-incompatibility alleles in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide; Vekemans, Xavier; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1997-01-01

    codominantly in both pollen and style (SSIcod), in the second, alleles form a dominance hierarchy in pollen and style (SSIdom). In the third model, alleles interact codominantly in the style and form a dominance hierarchy in the pollen (SSIdomcod). The SSIcod model behaves similarly to the model...

  6. Human minisatellite alleles detectable only after PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, J A; Crosier, M; Jeffreys, A J

    1992-01-01

    We present evidence that a proportion of alleles at two human minisatellite loci is undetected by standard Southern blot hybridization. In each case the missing allele(s) can be identified after PCR amplification and correspond to tandem arrays too short to detect by hybridization. At one locus, there is only one undetected allele (population frequency 0.3), which contains just three repeat units. At the second locus, there are at least five undetected alleles (total population frequency 0.9) containing 60-120 repeats; they are not detected because these tandem repeats give very poor signals when used as a probe in standard Southern blot hybridization, and also cross-hybridize with other sequences in the genome. Under these circumstances only signals from the longest tandemly repeated alleles are detectable above the nonspecific background. The structures of these loci have been compared in human and primate DNA, and at one locus the short human allele containing three repeat units is shown to be an intermediate state in the expansion of a monomeric precursor allele in primates to high copy number in the longer human arrays. We discuss the implications of such loci for studies of human populations, minisatellite isolation by cloning, and the evolution of highly variable tandem arrays.

  7. Comparative frequency and allelic distribution of ABO and Rh (D ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Allelic distribution of major blood groups (ABO and rhesus) has not been defined in Bangladeshi population. Determinants of blood group frequency in this region have not been studied properly. Aim: To determine ABO and rhesus blood group frequency and allelic distribution in a multiethnic area of ...

  8. Apolipoprotein E4 allele does not influence serum triglyceride ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated how the APOε4 allele affects the serum triglyceride response after a fatmeal in apparently healthy black South African young adults. Sixty students were successfully screened for APOE genotype using Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and were divided into four groups; the ε2 allele ...

  9. Analysis of HLA-A, HLA-B, HLA-DRB1 allelic, genotypic, and haplotypic frequencies in colombian population

    OpenAIRE

    Yazmin Rocío Árias-Murillo; Miguel Ángel Castro-Jiménez; María Fernanda Ríos-Espinosa; Juan Javier López-Rivera; Sandra Johanna Echeverry-Coral; Oscar Martínez-Nieto

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The high polymorphism of the HLA system allows its typification to be used as valuable tool in establishing association to various illnesses, immune and genetic profiles; it also provides a guide to identifying compatibility among donors and receptors of organs transplants. Objective: To establish HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA.DRB1 allele, genotype and haplotype frequencies among patients treated at Clinica Colsanitas SA. Methods: 561 patients coming from different regions in Col...

  10. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civelli, Olivier (Portland, OR); Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie (Toronto, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  11. The UGT1A1*28 allele and disease in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Padkær

    2014-01-01

    Baggrund: Bilirubin er slutproduktet i hæms metabolisme. Ukonjugeret bilirubin er neuro-toksisk, men også en potent antioxidant af mulig klinisk relevans. Fortolkningen af observationelle bilirubin studier vanskeliggøres af potentiel revers kausalitet og adskillige tænkelige confoundere. En måde ...

  12. Quality of synthetic hexaploid wheat containing null alleles at Glu-A1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-02

    Aug 2, 2013 ... Xinkun Hu and Shoufen Dai contributed equally to this work. been recognized ... 87 (PE company, USA) in 50 μL reaction volumes contain- ing 200–300 ng .... flours for the food industry and the balance between these.

  13. Quality of synthetic hexaploid wheat containing null alleles at Glu-A1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GSs. However, incorporation of HMW-GS from Ae. tauschii in six synthetic hexaploid wheat lines significantly increased most quality related parameters. The potential values of these wheat lines in improving the quality of wheat are discussed.

  14. Assigning breed origin to alleles in crossbred animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Jérémie; Calus, Mario P L; Sevillano, Claudia A; Windig, Jack J; Bastiaansen, John W M

    2016-08-22

    For some species, animal production systems are based on the use of crossbreeding to take advantage of the increased performance of crossbred compared to purebred animals. Effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may differ between purebred and crossbred animals for several reasons: (1) differences in linkage disequilibrium between SNP alleles and a quantitative trait locus; (2) differences in genetic backgrounds (e.g., dominance and epistatic interactions); and (3) differences in environmental conditions, which result in genotype-by-environment interactions. Thus, SNP effects may be breed-specific, which has led to the development of genomic evaluations for crossbred performance that take such effects into account. However, to estimate breed-specific effects, it is necessary to know breed origin of alleles in crossbred animals. Therefore, our aim was to develop an approach for assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals (termed BOA) without information on pedigree and to study its accuracy by considering various factors, including distance between breeds. The BOA approach consists of: (1) phasing genotypes of purebred and crossbred animals; (2) assigning breed origin to phased haplotypes; and (3) assigning breed origin to alleles of crossbred animals based on a library of assigned haplotypes, the breed composition of crossbred animals, and their SNP genotypes. The accuracy of allele assignments was determined for simulated datasets that include crosses between closely-related, distantly-related and unrelated breeds. Across these scenarios, the percentage of alleles of a crossbred animal that were correctly assigned to their breed origin was greater than 90 %, and increased with increasing distance between breeds, while the percentage of incorrectly assigned alleles was always less than 2 %. For the remaining alleles, i.e. 0 to 10 % of all alleles of a crossbred animal, breed origin could not be assigned. The BOA approach accurately assigns

  15. The frequency of allelic lethals and complementation maps in natural populations of drosophila melanogaster from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Victor M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Departing from a previous study on the genetic loads affecting the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster in four natural populations, 171 lethal chromosomes were recovered and maintained as a balanced stocks in the condition Cy L / 1 (l=lethal; of those lethais 24 correspond to population A, 50 to populations B and C and 47 to population D. later on an intra-population allelism test for the four populations was performed for each one. A total of 3807 inter lethal crosses were done yielding a total of i 10 allelic combinations, from them the respective percentage of allelism for each population was calculated and they are as follow: 3.98 % for population A, 1.80 % for population B, 3.67 % for population C and 2.96 % for population D. the observed values for the frequency of allelism in these populations are not significantly different from those reported by other authors in similar studies in natural and/or experimental populations. Beside these values the frequency for singles, doubles, triplets and even quadruplets present in each population were determined, they shown the presence of various complementation maps due to the clustering of few different lethals: also a large complementation map formed by a large cluster involving the presence of 26 different lethals found in population D all of them combined constituting a single unit was found.

  16. A novel reporter allele for monitoring Dll4 expression within the embryonic and adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander M. Herman

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Canonical Notch signaling requires the presence of a membrane bound ligand and a corresponding transmembrane Notch receptor. Receptor engagement induces multiple proteolytic cleavage events culminating in the nuclear accumulation of the Notch intracellular domain and its binding to a transcriptional co-factor to mediate gene expression. Notch signaling networks are essential regulators of vascular patterning and angiogenesis, as well as myriad other biological processes. Delta-like 4 (Dll4 encodes the earliest Notch ligand detected in arterial cells, and is enriched in sprouting endothelial tip cells. Dll4 expression has often been inferred by proxy using a lacZ knockin reporter allele. This is problematic, as a single copy of Dll4 is haploinsufficient. Additionally, Notch activity regulates Dll4 transcription, making it unclear whether these reporter lines accurately reflect Dll4 expression. Accordingly, precisely defining Dll4 expression is essential for determining its role in development and disease. To address these limitations, we generated a novel BAC transgenic allele with a nuclear-localized β-galactosidase reporter (Dll4-BAC-nlacZ. Through a comparative analysis, we show the BAC line overcomes previous issues of haploinsufficiency, it recapitulates Dll4 expression in vivo, and allows superior visualization and imaging. As such, this novel Dll4 reporter is an important addition to the growing Notch toolkit.

  17. Effects of dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonism on human planning and spatial working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naef, M; Müller, U; Linssen, A; Clark, L; Robbins, T W; Eisenegger, C

    2017-04-25

    Psychopharmacological studies in humans suggest important roles for dopamine (DA) D2 receptors in human executive functions, such as cognitive planning and spatial working memory (SWM). However, studies that investigate an impairment of such functions using the selective DA D2/3 receptor antagonist sulpiride have yielded inconsistent results, perhaps because relatively low doses were used. We believe we report for the first time, the effects of a higher (800 mg p.o.) single dose of sulpiride as well as of genetic variation in the DA receptor D2 gene (DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism), on planning and working memory. With 78 healthy male volunteers, we apply a between-groups, placebo-controlled design. We measure outcomes in the difficult versions of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery One-Touch Stockings of Cambridge and the self-ordered SWM task. Volunteers in the sulpiride group showed significant impairments in planning accuracy and, for the more difficult problems, in SWM. Sulpiride administration speeded response latencies in the planning task on the most difficult problems. Volunteers with at least one copy of the minor allele (A1+) of the DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism showed better SWM capacity, regardless of whether they received sulpiride or placebo. There were no effects on blood pressure, heart rate or subjective sedation. In sum, a higher single dose of sulpiride impairs SWM and executive planning functions, in a manner independent of the DA receptor D2 Taq1A polymorphism.

  18. Activation of liver X receptor decreases atherosclerosis in Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice in the absence of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 in myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappus, Mojdeh S; Murphy, Andrew J; Abramowicz, Sandra; Ntonga, Vusisizwe; Welch, Carrie L; Tall, Alan R; Westerterp, Marit

    2014-02-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) activators decrease atherosclerosis in mice. LXR activators (1) directly upregulate genes involved in reverse cholesterol transport and (2) exert anti-inflammatory effects mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-κB target genes. We investigated whether myeloid cell deficiency of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 (ABCA1/G1), principal targets of LXR that promote macrophage cholesterol efflux and initiate reverse cholesterol transport, would abolish the beneficial effects of LXR activation on atherosclerosis. LXR activator T0901317 substantially reduced inflammatory gene expression in macrophages lacking ABCA1/G1. Ldlr(-/-) mice were transplanted with Abca1(-/-)Abcg1(-/-) or wild-type bone marrow (BM) and fed a Western-type diet for 6 weeks with or without T0901317 supplementation. Abca1/g1 BM deficiency increased atherosclerotic lesion complexity and inflammatory cell infiltration into the adventitia and myocardium. T0901317 markedly decreased lesion area, complexity, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the Abca1(-/-)Abcg1(-/-) BM-transplanted mice. To investigate whether this was because of macrophage Abca1/g1 deficiency, Ldlr(-/-) mice were transplanted with LysmCreAbca1(fl/fl)Abcg1(fl/fl) or Abca1(fl/fl)Abcg1(fl/fl) BM and fed Western-type diet with or without the more specific LXR agonist GW3965 for 12 weeks. GW3965 decreased lesion size in both groups, and the decrease was more prominent in the LysmCreAbca1(fl/fl)Abcg1(fl/fl) group. The results suggest that anti-inflammatory effects of LXR activators are of key importance to their antiatherosclerotic effects in vivo independent of cholesterol efflux pathways mediated by macrophage ABCA1/G1. This has implications for the development of LXR activators that lack adverse effects on lipogenic genes while maintaining the ability to transrepress inflammatory genes.

  19. Population and pedigree studies reveal a lack of association between the dopamine D sub 2 receptor gene and alcoholism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolos, A.M.; Goldman, D.; Brown, G.L. (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Lucas-Derse, S.; Ramsburg, M. (Program Resources Inc., Frederick, MD (USA))

    1990-12-26

    Using the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor clone {lambda}hD2G1, Blum et al recently found that the D{sub 2}/Taq 1 allele (A1) was present in 69{percent} of 35 deceased alcoholics but in only 20{percent} of an equal number of controls. To assess this association further, the authors evaluated the D{sub 2}/Taq 1 polymorphism and a single-strand conformation polymorphism detected by polymerase chain reaction and nondenaturing gel electrophoresis (PCR-SSCP) of the 3{prime} noncoding region of the D{sub 2} receptor gene. They studied 40 unrelated white alcoholics, 127 racially matched controls, and two white pedigrees. The Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia-Lifetime Version (SADS-L) clinical diagnostic interviews were rated blindly by two clinicians. Alcoholics were subtyped according to age of onset, severity, presence of antisocial personality, and family history. No significant differences in either D{sub 2}/Taq 1 or PCR-SSCP allele frequencies were observed between alcoholics, subpopulations of alcoholics, or controls. The PCR-SSCP polymorphism provided independent information against linkage at the D{sub 2} receptor locus. This study does not support a widespread or consistent association between the D{sub 2} receptor gene and alcoholism.

  20. Ancient DNA Investigation of a Medieval German Cemetery Confirms Long-Term Stability of CCR5-Δ32 Allele Frequencies in Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Abigail; Shved, Natallia; Akgül, Gülfirde; Rühli, Frank; Warinner, Christina

    2017-04-01

    The CCR5-Δ32 mutation present in European populations is among the most prominently debated cases of recent positive selection in humans. This allele, a 32-bp deletion that renders the T-cell CCR5 receptor nonfunctional, has important epidemiological and public health significance, as homozygous carriers are resistant to several HIV strains. However, although the function of this allele in preventing HIV infection is now well described, its human evolutionary origin is poorly understood. Initial attempts to determine the emergence of the CCR5-Δ32 allele pointed to selection during the 14th-century Black Death pandemic; however, subsequent analyses suggest that the allele rose in frequency more than 5,000 years ago, possibly through drift. Recently, three studies have identified populations predating the 14th century CE that are positive for the CCR5-Δ32 allele, supporting the claim for a more ancient origin. However, these studies also suggest poorly understood regional differences in the recent evolutionary history of the CCR5-Δ32 allele. Here a new hydrolysis-probe-based real-time PCR assay was designed to ascertain CCR5 allele frequency in 53 individuals from a 10th- to 12th-century CE church and convent complex in central Germany that predates outbreaks of the Black Death pandemic. High-confidence genotypes were obtained for 32 individuals, and results show that CCR5-Δ32 allele frequency has remained unchanged in this region of Central Europe over the last millennium, suggesting that there has been no strong positive selective pressure over this time period and confirming a more ancient origin for the allele.

  1. Synthesis of [[sup 123]I]tert-Butyl 8-iodo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiaze pine 3-carboxylate, a potential SPECT imaging agent for diazepam-intensive (DI) benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaoshu; Matecka, Dorota; Gu, Ziqiang; Rice, K C; Costa, B.R. de [National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, K S [National Inst. of Mental Health, Washington, DC (United States); Wong, Garry; Skolnick, Phil [National Inst. of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Neuroscience

    1994-01-01

    [[sup 123]I]tert-Butyl 8-iodo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo [1,5-a] [1,4]benzodiazepine 3-carboxylate ([[sup 123]I]3), a high affinity and selective radioligand for the diazepam insensitive (DI) benzodiazepine receptor was synthesized in 2 steps from tert-butyl 8-bromo-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiaz epine 3-carboxylate. (Author).

  2. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles are associated with giant cell arteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Soren; Baslund, Bo; Madsen, Hans O.

    2002-01-01

    /GCA, MBL variant alleles were associated with signs of increased inflammatory activity and clinical signs of arteritic manifestations. This was not found for HLA-DR4 alleles. These findings indicate that HLA-DR4 and MBL are contributing to the pathophysiology of GCA at different levels in the disease...... alleles in controls, patients with PMR only, and patients with GCA was 37, 32, and 53% (p = 0.01), respectively. HLA-DRB1*04 was found in 47% of patients with PMR only and in 54% of patients with GCA, which differed significantly from the 35% found in controls (p = 0.01). HLA-DR4 alleles were...... not associated with any clinical phenotypes of PMR/GCA, whereas MBL variant alleles were associated with cranial arteritis, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and low B-hemoglobin. CONCLUSION: We found MBL variant alleles and HLA-DR4 alleles to be weak susceptibility markers for GCA. In patients with PMR...

  3. Frequency of the CCRD32 allele in Brazilians: a study in colorectal cancer and in HTLV-I infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Rinaldo W.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification of a 32-bp deletion in the cc-chemokine receptor-5 gene (CCR5delta32 allele that renders homozygous individuals highly resistant to HIV infection has prompted worldwide investigations of the frequency of the CCR5delta32 allele in regional populations. It is important to ascertain if CCR5delta32 is a factor to be considered in the overall epidemiology of HIV in individual populations. With this in mind we determined the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in a large sample (907 individuals of the southeastern Brazilian urban population, stratified as follows: 322 healthy unrelated individuals, 354 unselected colorectal cancer patients, and 229 blood donors. The three groups displayed essentially identical allelic frequencies of CCR5delta32 and pairwise comparisons did not show significant differences. Thus, our results can be pooled to provide a reliable estimate of the CCR5delta32 allele frequency in the southeastern Brazil of 0.053 ± 0.005. The blood donors comprised 50 HTLV-I serologically negative individuals, 115 non-symptomatic individuals HTLV-I positive by ELISA but with indeterminate Western blot results, 49 healthy blood donors HTLV-I positive both at ELISA and Western blot and 15 patients with clinical spinal cord disease (HAM. A suggestive trend was observed, with the CCR5delta32 frequencies decreasing progressively in these four categories. However, when we applied Fischer's exact test no significant differences emerged. We believe that further studies in larger cohorts should be performed to ascertain whether the CCR5delta32 allele influences the chance of becoming infected or developing clinical symptoms of HTLV-I infection.

  4. allelic variation of hmw glutenin subunits of ethiopian bread wheat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    journal

    High molecular weight glutenins are often effective in identifying wheat (Triticum ... There were highly significant differences between genotypes and banding ... was without deliberate selection pressure towards high Glu-1 scoring alleles ...

  5. Association mapping and favorable QTL alleles for fiber quality traits ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A total of 201 markers were polymorphic and generated 394 ... identified favorable QTL alleles and typical accessions for fiber quality are excellent genetic resources for future cotton .... Field management followed respective local practices.

  6. Apolipoprotein e4 allele and cognitive decline in elderly men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, E.J.M.; Havekes, L.M.; Kalmijn, S.; Knijff, P. de; Launer, L.J.; Kromhout, D.

    1994-01-01

    Objectives - To determine whether polymorphism of apolipoprotein E - notably, the e4 allele - predicts cognitive deterioration in the general population. Design - Population based cohort investigated in 1990 and in 1993. Setting - Zutphen, the Netherlands. Subjects - Representative cohort of 538

  7. Allele frequency distribution for 21 autosomal STR loci in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, T; van Driem, G L; Opgenort, J R M L; Tuladhar, N M; de Knijff, P

    2007-05-24

    The allele frequency distributions of 21 autosomal loci contained in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler, the Powerplex 16 and the FFFL multiplex PCR kits, was studied in 953 unrelated individuals from Nepal. Several new alleles (i.e. not yet reported in the NIST Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet DataBase [http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/]) have been detected in the process.

  8. ALEA: a toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younesy, Hamid; Möller, Torsten; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Cheng, Jeffrey B; Costello, Joseph F; Lorincz, Matthew C; Karimi, Mohammad M; Jones, Steven J M

    2014-04-15

    The assessment of expression and epigenomic status using sequencing based methods provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify and correlate allelic differences with epigenomic status. We present ALEA, a computational toolbox for allele-specific epigenomics analysis, which incorporates allelic variation data within existing resources, allowing for the identification of significant associations between epigenetic modifications and specific allelic variants in human and mouse cells. ALEA provides a customizable pipeline of command line tools for allele-specific analysis of next-generation sequencing data (ChIP-seq, RNA-seq, etc.) that takes the raw sequencing data and produces separate allelic tracks ready to be viewed on genome browsers. The pipeline has been validated using human and hybrid mouse ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data. The package, test data and usage instructions are available online at http://www.bcgsc.ca/platform/bioinfo/software/alea CONTACT: : mkarimi1@interchange.ubc.ca or sjones@bcgsc.ca Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Allele-specific MMP-3 transcription under in vivo conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaoyong, Zhu [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Odeberg, Jacob [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Biotechnology, AlbaNova University Center, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Hamsten, Anders [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, Per [Atherosclerosis Research Unit, King Gustav V Research Institute, Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-09-29

    A common matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3) -1612 5A/6A promoter polymorphism is associated with risk for cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and other diseases. Here we used the haplotype chromatin immunoprecipitation method to study allele-specific MMP-3 expression under in vivo conditions in heterozygous THP-1 cells. Pyrosequencing was used to analyse the ratio of 5A-allele to 6A-allele after chromatin immunoprecipitation using an antibody against phosphorylated active RNA polymerase II. There was no allele-specific difference in transcriptional activity during basal conditions, i.e., in unstimulated monocytic THP-1 cells. However, after stimulation of MMP-3 expression by monocyte differentiation or incubation with IL-1{beta}, the haplotype containing the 5A-allele was associated with higher transcriptional activity compared with the 6A-containing haplotype. Electromobility shift assay demonstrated increased binding of nuclear proteins to the 5A-allele after monocyte differentiation. In conclusion, the common MMP-3 5A/6A promoter polymorphism appears to be functional only during specific environmental conditions involving inflammation.

  10. SSR allelic variation in almond (Prunus dulcis Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua; Sui, Yi; Chang, Feng-Qi; Xu, Yong; Ma, Rong-Cai

    2006-01-01

    Sixteen SSR markers including eight EST-SSR and eight genomic SSRs were used for genetic diversity analysis of 23 Chinese and 15 international almond cultivars. EST- and genomic SSR markers previously reported in species of Prunus, mainly peach, proved to be useful for almond genetic analysis. DNA sequences of 117 alleles of six of the 16 SSR loci were analysed to reveal sequence variation among the 38 almond accessions. For the four SSR loci with AG/CT repeats, no insertions or deletions were observed in the flanking regions of the 98 alleles sequenced. Allelic size variation of these loci resulted exclusively from differences in the structures of repeat motifs, which involved interruptions or occurrences of new motif repeats in addition to varying number of AG/CT repeats. Some alleles had a high number of uninterrupted repeat motifs, indicating that SSR mutational patterns differ among alleles at a given SSR locus within the almond species. Allelic homoplasy was observed in the SSR loci because of base substitutions, interruptions or compound repeat motifs. Substitutions in the repeat regions were found at two SSR loci, suggesting that point mutations operate on SSRs and hinder the further SSR expansion by introducing repeat interruptions to stabilize SSR loci. Furthermore, it was shown that some potential point mutations in the flanking regions are linked with new SSR repeat motif variation in almond and peach.

  11. Origin of allelic diversity in antirrhinum S locus RNases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Y; Carpenter, R; Dickinson, H G; Coen, E S

    1996-01-01

    In many plant species, self-incompatibility (SI) is genetically controlled by a single multiallelic S locus. Previous analysis of S alleles in the Solanaceae, in which S locus ribonucleases (S RNases) are responsible for stylar expression of SI, has demonstrated that allelic diversity predated speciation within this family. To understand how allelic diversity has evolved, we investigated the molecular basis of gametophytic SI in Antirrhinum, a member of the Scrophulariaceae, which is closely related to the Solanaceae. We have characterized three Antirrhinum cDNAs encoding polypeptides homologous to S RNases and shown that they are encoded by genes at the S locus. RNA in situ hybridization revealed that the Antirrhinum S RNase are primarily expressed in the stylar transmitting tissue. This expression is consistent with their proposed role in arresting the growth of self-pollen tubes. S alleles from the Scrophulariaceae form a separate group from those of the Solanaceae, indicating that new S alleles have been generated since these families separated (approximately 40 million years). We propose that the recruitment of an ancestral RNase gene into SI occurred during an early stage of angiosperm evolution and that, since that time, new alleles subsequently have arisen at a low rate. PMID:8672882

  12. Polymorphisms of the glucocorticoid receptor and avascular necrosis of the femoral heads after treatment with corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bouamar (Rachida); J.W. Koper (Jan); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth); W. Weimar (Willem); T. van Gelder (Teun)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractA female patient developed avascular necrosis of the femoral heads after receiving low doses of glucocorticosteroids (GC) for 3 months. Genotyping of the GC receptor (GR) showed that she was heterozygous for the Bcl-1 allele and heterozygous for the N363S allele. Interestingly, these GR

  13. Functional coupling between adenosine A1 receptors and G-proteins in rat and postmortem human brain membranes determined with conventional guanosine-5'-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS) binding or [35S]GTPγS/immunoprecipitation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Yuji; Kinoshita, Masakazu; Ota, Toshio; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F; Matsuoka, Isao; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2018-06-01

    Adenosine signaling plays a complex role in multiple physiological processes in the brain, and its dysfunction has been implicated in pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and affective disorders. In the present study, the coupling between adenosine A 1 receptor and G-protein was assessed by means of two [ 35 S]GTPγS binding assays, i.e., conventional filtration method and [ 35 S]GTPγS binding/immunoprecipitation in rat and human brain membranes. The latter method provides information about adenosine A 1 receptor-mediated Gα i-3 activation in rat as well as human brain membranes. On the other hand, adenosine-stimulated [ 35 S]GTPγS binding determined with conventional assay derives from functional activation of Gα i/o proteins (not restricted only to Gα i-3 ) coupled to adenosine A 1 receptors. The determination of adenosine concentrations in the samples used in the present study indicates the possibility that the assay mixture under our experimental conditions contains residual endogenous adenosine at nanomolar concentrations, which was also suggested by the results on the effects of adenosine receptor antagonists on basal [ 35 S]GTPγS binding level. The effects of adenosine deaminase (ADA) on basal binding also support the presence of adenosine. Nevertheless, the varied patterns of ADA discouraged us from adding ADA into assay medium routinely. The concentration-dependent increases elicited by adenosine were determined in 40 subjects without any neuropsychiatric disorders. The increases in %E max values determined by conventional assay according to aging and postmortem delay should be taken into account in future studies focusing on the effects of psychiatric disorders on adenosine A 1 receptor/G-protein interaction in postmortem human brain tissue.

  14. Procedures for identifying S-allele genotypes of Brassica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, D H

    1979-11-01

    Procedures are described for efficient selection of: (1) homozygous and heterozygous S-allele genotypes; (2) homozygous inbreds with the strong self- and sib-incompatibility required for effective seed production of single-cross F1 hybrids; (3) heterozygous genotypes with the high self- and sib-incompatibility required for effective seed production of 3- and 4-way hybrids.From reciprocal crosses between two first generation inbred (I1) plants there are three potential results: both crosses are incompatible; one is incompatible and the other compatible; and both are compatible. Incompatibility of both crosses is useful information only when combined with data from other reciprocal crosses. Each compatible cross, depending on whether its reciprocal is incompatible or compatible, dictates alternative reasoning and additional reciprocal crosses for efficiently and simultaneously identifying: (A) the S-allele genotype of all individual I1 plants, and (B) the expressions of dominance or codominance in pollen and stigma (sexual organs) of an S-allele heterozygous genotype. Reciprocal crosses provide the only efficient means of identifying S-allele genotypes and also the sexual-organ x S-allele-interaction types.Fluorescent microscope assay of pollen tube penetration into the style facilitates quantitation within 24-48 hours of incompatibility and compatibility of the reciprocal crosses. A procedure for quantitating the reciprocal difference is described that maximizes informational content of the data about interactions between S alleles in pollen and stigma of the S-allele-heterozygous genotype.Use of the non-inbred Io generation parent as a 'known' heterozygous S-allele genotype in crosses with its first generation selfed (I1) progeny usually reduces at least 7 fold the effort required for achieving objectives 1, 2, and 3, compared to the method of making reciprocal crosses only among I1 plants.Identifying the heterozygous and both homozygous S-allele genotypes during

  15. Activation of liver X receptor decreases atherosclerosis in Ldlr⁻/⁻ mice in the absence of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1 in myeloid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappus, Mojdeh S.; Murphy, Andrew J.; Abramowicz, Sandra; Ntonga, Vusisizwe; Welch, Carrie L.; Tall, Alan R.; Westerterp, Marit

    2014-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) activators decrease atherosclerosis in mice. LXR activators (1) directly upregulate genes involved in reverse cholesterol transport and (2) exert anti-inflammatory effects mediated by transrepression of nuclear factor-κB target genes. We investigated whether myeloid cell

  16. Degarelix: A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) Receptor Blocker-Results from a 1-yr, Multicentre, Randomised, Phase 2 Dosage-Finding Study in the Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, Hendrik; Tombal, Bertrand; de la Rosette, Jean J.; Persson, Bo-Eric; Jensen, Jens-Kristian; Kold Olesen, Tine

    2008-01-01

    Background: Degarelix is a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist (GnRH receptor blocker) with immediate onset of action, suppressing gonadotropins, testosterone, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in prostate cancer. Objective: To determine the efficacy and safety of initial doses of 200 mg or

  17. The TGFBR1*6A allele is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in a Spanish population: a case-control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, Adela; Guillén-Ponce, Carmen; Carrato, Alfredo; Soto, José-Luís; Mata-Balaguer, Trinidad; Montenegro, Paola; Ochoa, Enrique; Lázaro, Rafael; Martínez-Cantó, Ana; Castillejo, María-Isabel; Guarinos, Carla; Barberá, Víctor-Manuel

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β receptor type I is a mediator of growth inhibitory signals. TGFBR1*6A (rs11466445) is a common polymorphic variant of the TGF-β receptor I gene and has been associated with tumour susceptibility. Nevertheless, the role of this polymorphism as a risk factor for colorectal cancer is controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the association between TGFBR1*6A and colorectal cancer, age, sex, tumour location and tumour stage in a Spanish population. The case-control study involved 800 Spanish subjects: 400 sporadic colorectal cancer patients and 400 age-, sex-, and ethnic-matched controls. The odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for the TGFBR1*6A polymorphism were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age and sex. Analysis of somatic mutations at the GCG repeat of TGFBR1 exon 1 and germline allele-specific expression were also conducted to obtain further information on the contribution of the TGFBR1*6A allele to CRC susceptibility. There was no statistically significant association between the TGFBR1*6A allele and CRC (p > 0.05). The OR was 1.147 (95% CI: 0.799–1.647) for carriers of the TGFBR1*6A allele and 0.878 (95% CI: 0.306–2.520) for homozygous TGFBR1*6A individuals compared with the reference. The frequency of the polymorphism was not affected by age, sex or tumour stage. The TGFBR1*6A allele was more prevalent among colon tumour patients than among rectal tumour patients. Tumour somatic mutations were found in only two of 69 cases (2.9%). Both cases involved a GCG deletion that changed genotype 9A/9A in normal DNA to genotype 9A/8A. Interestingly, these two tumours were positive for microsatellite instability, suggesting that these mutations originated because of a deficient DNA mismatch repair system. Allele-specific expression of the 9A allele was detected in seven of the 14 heterozygous 9A/6A tumour cases. This could have been caused by linkage disequilibrium of the TGFBR1*6A allele with

  18. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    functional units, receptors co-operate. The total receptor apparatus of individual cell types is composed of different-ligand receptors (e.g. SRIF and non-SRIF receptors) and co-expressed receptor subtypes (e.g. sst(2) and sst(5) receptors) in characteristic proportions. In other words, levels of individual......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  19. Detecting imbalanced expression of SNP alleles by minisequencing on microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahlgren Andreas

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each of the human genes or transcriptional units is likely to contain single nucleotide polymorphisms that may give rise to sequence variation between individuals and tissues on the level of RNA. Based on recent studies, differential expression of the two alleles of heterozygous coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs may be frequent for human genes. Methods with high accuracy to be used in a high throughput setting are needed for systematic surveys of expressed sequence variation. In this study we evaluated two formats of multiplexed, microarray based minisequencing for quantitative detection of imbalanced expression of SNP alleles. We used a panel of ten SNPs located in five genes known to be expressed in two endothelial cell lines as our model system. Results The accuracy and sensitivity of quantitative detection of allelic imbalance was assessed for each SNP by constructing regression lines using a dilution series of mixed samples from individuals of different genotype. Accurate quantification of SNP alleles by both assay formats was evidenced for by R2 values > 0.95 for the majority of the regression lines. According to a two sample t-test, we were able to distinguish 1–9% of a minority SNP allele from a homozygous genotype, with larger variation between SNPs than between assay formats. Six of the SNPs, heterozygous in either of the two cell lines, were genotyped in RNA extracted from the endothelial cells. The coefficient of variation between the fluorescent signals from five parallel reactions was similar for cDNA and genomic DNA. The fluorescence signal intensity ratios measured in the cDNA samples were compared to those in genomic DNA to determine the relative expression levels of the two alleles of each SNP. Four of the six SNPs tested displayed a higher than 1.4-fold difference in allelic ratios between cDNA and genomic DNA. The results were verified by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridisation and

  20. Drop-out probabilities of IrisPlex SNP alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg; Tvedebrink, Torben; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2013-01-01

    In certain crime cases, information about a perpetrator's phenotype, including eye colour, may be a valuable tool if no DNA profile of any suspect or individual in the DNA database matches the DNA profile found at the crime scene. Often, the available DNA material is sparse and allelic drop-out...... of true alleles is possible. As part of the validation of the IrisPlex assay in our ISO17025 accredited, forensic genetic laboratory, we estimated the probability of drop-out of specific SNP alleles using 29 and 30 PCR cycles and 25, 50 and 100 Single Base Extension (SBE) cycles. We observed no drop-out...... when the amount of DNA was greater than 125 pg for 29 cycles of PCR and greater than 62 pg for 30 cycles of PCR. With the use of a logistic regression model, we estimated the allele specific probability of drop-out in heterozygote systems based on the signal strength of the observed allele...

  1. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    general population were followed in Danish health registries for up to 21 years after blood sampling. After genotyping 72 breast cancer risk loci, each with 0-2 alleles, the sum for each individual was calculated. We used the simple allele sum instead of the conventional polygenic risk score......, as it is likely more sensitive in detecting associations with risks of other endpoints than breast cancer. RESULTS: Breast cancer incidence in the 19,010 women was increased across allele sum quintiles (log-rank trend test; p=1*10(-12)), but not incidence of other cancers (p=0.41). Age- and study-adjusted hazard...... ratio for the 5(th) vs. 1(st) allele sum quintile was 1.82(95% confidence interval;1.53-2.18). Corresponding hazard ratios per allele were 1.04(1.03-1.05) and 1.05(1.02-1.08) for breast cancer incidence and mortality, similar across risk factors. In 50-year old women, the starting age for screening...

  2. A strategy to discover genes that carry multi-allelic or mono-allelic risk for common diseases: A cohort allelic sums test (CAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgenthaler, Stephan; Thilly, William G.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described to discover if a gene carries one or more allelic mutations that confer risk for any specified common disease. The method does not depend upon genetic linkage of risk-conferring mutations to high frequency genetic markers such as single nucleotide polymorphisms. Instead, the sums of allelic mutation frequencies in case and control cohorts are determined and a statistical test is applied to discover if the difference in these sums is greater than would be expected by chance. A statistical model is presented that defines the ability of such tests to detect significant gene-disease relationships as a function of case and control cohort sizes and key confounding variables: zygosity and genicity, environmental risk factors, errors in diagnosis, limits to mutant detection, linkage of neutral and risk-conferring mutations, ethnic diversity in the general population and the expectation that among all exonic mutants in the human genome greater than 90% will be neutral with regard to any effect on disease risk. Means to test the null hypothesis for, and determine the statistical power of, each test are provided. For this 'cohort allelic sums test' or 'CAST', the statistical model and test are provided as an Excel (TM) program, CASTAT (C) at http://epidemiology.mit.edu. Based on genetics, technology and statistics, a strategy of enumerating the mutant alleles carried in the exons and splice sites of the estimated ∼25,000 human genes in case cohort samples of 10,000 persons for each of 100 common diseases is proposed and evaluated: A wide range of possible conditions of multi-allelic or mono-allelic and monogenic, multigenic or polygenic (including epistatic) risk are found to be detectable using the statistical criteria of 1 or 10 ''false positive'' gene associations per 25,000 gene-disease pair-wise trials and a statistical power of >0.8. Using estimates of the distribution of both neutral and gene-inactivating nondeleterious mutations in humans and

  3. Two alleles of the AtCesA3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana display intragenic complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysh, Leonard D

    2015-09-01

    Cellulose is the most abundant biomolecule on the planet, yet the mechanism by which it is synthesized by higher plants remains largely unknown. In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, synthesis of cellulose in the primary cell wall requires three different cellulose synthase genes (AtCesA1, AtCesA3, and AtCesA6-related genes [AtCesA2, AtCesA5, and AtCesA6]). The multiple response expansion1 (mre1) mutant contains a hypomorphic AtCesA3 allele that results in significantly shorter, expanded roots. Crosses between mre1 and another allele of AtCesA3 (constitutive expression of VSP1, cev1) yielded an F1 with roots considerably longer and thinner than either parent, suggesting intragenic complementation. The F2 generation resulting from self-crossing these F1 showed three different root phenotypes: roots like mre1, roots like cev1, and roots like the F1. The segregation patterns of the three root phenotypes in multiple F2 and F3 generations were determined. Multiple characteristics of the roots and shoots were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively at different developmental stages, both on plates and on soil. The trans-heterozygous plants differed significantly from the parental mre1 and cev1 lines. The two alleles display intragenic complementation. A classic genetic interpretation of these results would suggest that cellulose synthesis requires homo-multimerization of cellulose synthase monomers. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  4. Allele-specific marker generation and linkage mapping on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolcock, B; Kazianis, S; Lucito, R; Walter, R B; Kallman, K D; Morizot, D C; Vielkind, J R

    2006-01-01

    There is great interest in the sex chromosomes of Xiphophorus fishes because both WY/YY and XX/XY sex-determining mechanisms function in these species, with at least one taxon possessing all three types of sex chromosomes, and because in certain interspecific hybrids melanoma arises as a consequence of inheritance of the sex-linked macromelanophore determining locus (MDL). Representational difference analysis (RDA) has been used to clone two sequences from the sex-determining region of X. maculatus, including a cholinergic receptor, nicotinic, delta polypeptide (CHRND) orthologue. Allele-specific assays for these sequences, as well as for the sex-linked XMRK1 and XMRK2 genes, were developed to distinguish W, X, and Y chromosomes derived from a X. maculatus (XX/XY) strain and a X. helleri (WY/YY) strain. Linkage mapping localized these markers to linkage group (LG) 24. No recombinants were observed between XMRK2 and MDL, confirming a role for XMRK2 in macromelanophore development. Although the master sex-determining (SD) locus certainly resides on Xiphophorus LG 24, autosomal loci are probably involved in sex determination as well, as indicated by the abnormal sex ratios in the backcross hybrids that contrast theoretical predictions based on LG 24 genotyping. Marker development and allelic discrimination on the Xiphophorus sex chromosomes should prove highly useful for studies that utilize this genus as an animal model.

  5. Implication of HLA-DMA Alleles in Corsican IDDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Cucchi-Mouillot

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The HLA-DM molecule catalyses the CLIP/antigen peptide exchange in the classical class II peptide-binding groove. As such, DM is an antigen presentation regulator and may be linked to autoimmune diseases. Using PCR derived methods, a relationship was revealed between DM gene polymorphism and IDDM, in a Corsican population. The DMA*0101 allele was observed to confer a significant predisposition to this autoimmune disease while the DMA*0102 allele protected significantly. Experiments examining polymorphism of the HLA-DRB1 gene established that these relationships are not a consequence of linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 alleles implicated in this pathology. The study of the DMA gene could therefore be an additional tool for early IDDM diagnosis in the Corsican population.

  6. Infrequent detection of germline allele-specific expression of TGFBR1 in lymphoblasts and tissues of colon cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guda, Kishore

    2009-06-15

    Recently, germline allele-specific expression (ASE) of the gene encoding for transforming growth factor-beta type I receptor (TGFBR1) has been proposed to be a major risk factor for cancer predisposition in the colon. Germline ASE results in a lowered expression of one of the TGFBR1 alleles (>1.5-fold), and was shown to occur in approximately 20% of informative familial and sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) cases. In the present study, using the highly quantitative pyrosequencing technique, we estimated the frequency of ASE in TGFBR1 in a cohort of affected individuals from familial clusters of advanced colon neoplasias (cancers and adenomas with high-grade dysplasia), and also from a cohort of individuals with sporadic CRCs. Cases were considered positive for the presence of ASE if demonstrating an allelic expression ratio <0.67 or >1.5. Using RNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines, we find that of 46 informative Caucasian advanced colon neoplasia cases with a family history, only 2 individuals display a modest ASE, with allelic ratios of 1.65 and 1.73, respectively. Given that ASE of TGFBR1, if present, would likely be more pronounced in the colon compared with other tissues, we additionally determined the allele ratios of TGFBR1 in the RNA derived from normal-appearing colonic mucosa of sporadic CRC cases. We, however, found no evidence of ASE in any of 44 informative sporadic cases analyzed. Taken together, we find that germline ASE of TGFBR1, as assayed in lymphoblastoid and colon epithelial cells of colon cancer patients, is a relatively rare event.

  7. Population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Linyong; Fang, Yayin; Campbell, Michael; Southerland, William M

    2017-11-10

    Obesity is emerging as a global health problem, with more than one-third of the world's adult population being overweight or obese. In this study, we investigated worldwide population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms). We collected a total of 225 obesity-associated SNPs from a public database. Their population-level allele frequencies were derived based on the genotype data from 1000 Genomes Project (phase 3). We used hypergeometric model to assess whether the effect allele at a given SNP is significantly enriched or depleted in each of the 26 populations surveyed in the 1000 Genomes Project with respect to the overall pooled population. Our results indicate that 195 out of 225 SNPs (86.7%) possess effect alleles significantly enriched or depleted in at least one of the 26 populations. Populations within the same continental group exhibit similar allele enrichment/depletion patterns whereas inter-continental populations show distinct patterns. Among the 225 SNPs, 15 SNPs cluster in the first intron region of the FTO gene, which is a major gene associated with body-mass index (BMI) and fat mass. African populations exhibit much smaller blocks of LD (linkage disequilibrium) among these15 SNPs while European and Asian populations have larger blocks. To estimate the cumulative effect of all variants associated with obesity, we developed the personal composite genetic risk score for obesity. Our results indicate that the East Asian populations have the lowest averages of the composite risk scores, whereas three European populations have the highest averages. In addition, the population-level average of composite genetic risk scores is significantly correlated (R 2 = 0.35, P = 0.0060) with obesity prevalence. We have detected substantial population differentiation in allele frequencies of obesity-associated SNPs. The results will help elucidate the genetic basis which may contribute to population

  8. A common mutation associated with the Duarte galactosemia allele

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Dembure, P.P.; Langley, S.; Paulk, E.M.; Hjelm, L.N.; Fridovich-Keil, J. (Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1994-06-01

    The human cDNA and gene for galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) have been cloned and sequenced. A prevalant mutation (Q188R) is known to cause classic galactosemia (G/G). G/G galactosemia has an incidence of 1/38,886 in 1,396,766 Georgia live-born infants, but a more common variant of galactosemia, Duarte, has an unknown incidence. The proposed Duarte biochemical phenotypes of GALT are as follows: D/N, D/D, and D/G, which have [approximately]75%, 50%, and 25% of normal GALT activity, respectively. In addition, the D allele has isoforms of its enzyme that have more acidic pI than normal. Here the authors systematically determine (a) the prevalence of an A-to-G transition at base pair 2744 of exon 10 in the GALT gene, a transition that produces a codon change converting asparagine to aspartic acid at position 314 (N314D), and (b) the association of this mutation with the Duarte biochemical phenotype. The 2744G nucleotide change adds an AvaII (SinI) cut site, which was identified in PCR-amplified DNA. In 111 biochemically unphenotyped controls with no history of galactosemia, 13 N314D alleles were identified (prevalence 5.9%). In a prospective study, 40 D alleles were biochemically phenotyped, and 40 N314D alleles were found. By contrast, in 36 individuals known not to have the Duarte biochemical phenotype, no N314D alleles were found. The authors conclude that the N314D mutation is a common allele that probably causes the Duarte GALT biochemical phenotype and occurs in a predominantly Caucasian, nongalactosemic population, with a prevalence of 5.9%. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Distribution of a pseudodeficiency allele among Tay-Sachs carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomczak, J.; Grebner, E.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)); Boogen, C. (Univ. of Essen Medical School (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    Recently Triggs-Raine et al. (1992) identified a new mutation in the gene coding for the [alpha]-subunit of [beta]-hexosaminidase A (hex A), the enzyme whose deficiency causes Tay-Sachs disease. This mutation, a C[sub 739]-to-T transition in exon 7, results in an altered enzyme that is active (albeit at reduced levels) in cells but that has essentially no activity in serum. This so-called pseudodeficient allele was first detected in compound heterozygotes who also carried a Tay-Sachs disease allele and therefore had no detectable hex A in their serum but who were in good health. Carriers of this apparently benign mutation are generally indistinguishable from carriers of a lethal mutation by means of routine enzyme-based screening tests, because the product of the pseudodeficient allele is not detectable in serum and has decreased activity in cells. This suggests that some individuals who have been classified as Tay-Sachs carriers are actually carriers of the pseudodeficient allele and are not at risk to have a child affected with Tay-Sachs disease. The pseudodeficient allele may also be responsible for some inconclusive diagnoses, where leukocyte values fall below the normal range but are still above the carrier range. The fact that there are now two mutant alleles (the psuedodeficient and the adult) that are indistinguishable from the lethal infantile mutations by means of enzyme assay yet that are phenotypically very different and that together may account for as much as 12% of enzyme-defined carriers on the basis of the data here suggests that DNA analysis should be part of a comprehensive screening program. It will be particularly useful to identify the mutations in couples at risk, before they undergo prenatal diagnosis. DNA analysis will also resolve some inconclusive diagnoses.

  10. Reduced Height (Rht Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Casebow

    Full Text Available The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall, Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12. Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (P<0.05 reduced grain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there

  11. Reduced Height (Rht) Alleles Affect Wheat Grain Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casebow, Richard; Hadley, Caroline; Uppal, Rajneet; Addisu, Molla; Loddo, Stefano; Kowalski, Ania; Griffiths, Simon; Gooding, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The effects of dwarfing alleles (reduced height, Rht) in near isogenic lines on wheat grain quality are characterised in field experiments and related to effects on crop height, grain yield and GA-sensitivity. Alleles included those that conferred GA-insensitivity (Rht-B1b, Rht-B1c, Rht-D1b, Rht-D1c) as well as those that retained GA-sensitivity (rht(tall), Rht8, Rht8 + Ppd-D1a, Rht12). Full characterisation was facilitated by including factors with which the effects of Rht alleles are known to interact for grain yield (i.e. system, [conventional or organic]; tillage intensity [plough-based, minimum or zero]; nitrogen fertilizer level [0-450 kg N/ha]; and genetic backgrounds varying in height [cvs Maris Huntsman, Maris Widgeon, and Mercia]. Allele effects on mean grain weight and grain specific weight were positively associated with final crop height: dwarfing reduced these quality criteria irrespective of crop management or GA-sensitivity. In all but two experiments the effects of dwarfing alleles on grain nitrogen and sulphur concentrations were closely and negatively related to effects on grain yield, e.g. a quadratic relationship between grain yield and crop height manipulated by the GA-insensitive alleles was mirrored by quadratic relationships for nitrogen and sulphur concentrations: the highest yields and most dilute concentrations occurred around 80cm. In one of the two exceptional experiments the GA-insensitive Rht-B1b and Rht-B1c significantly (Pgrain nitrogen concentration in the absence of an effect on yield, and in the remaining experiment the GA-sensitive Rht8 significantly reduced both grain yield and grain nitrogen concentration simultaneously. When Rht alleles diluted grain nitrogen concentration, N:S ratios and SDS-sedimentation volumes were often improved. Hagberg falling number (HFN) was negatively related to crop height but benefits from dwarfing were only seen for GA-insensitive alleles. For HFN, therefore, there was the strongest evidence for

  12. A common allele on chromosome 9 associated with coronary heartdisease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, Ruth; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Kavaslar, Nihan; Stewart, Alexandre; Roberts, Robert; Cox, David R.; Hinds, David; Pennachio, Len; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Folsom, Aaron R.; Boerwinkle,Eric; Hobbs, Helen H.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2007-03-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major cause of death in Western countries. Here we used genome-wide association scanning to identify a 58 kb interval on chromosome 9 that was consistently associated with CHD in six independent samples. The interval contains no annotated genes and is not associated with established CHD risk factors such as plasma lipoproteins, hypertension or diabetes. Homozygotes for the risk allele comprise 20-25% of Caucasians and have a {approx}30-40% increased risk of CHD. These data indicate that the susceptibility allele acts through a novel mechanism to increase CHD risk in a large fraction of the population.

  13. A retinoic acid receptor cDNA probe (RAR2) identifies a moderately frequent RFLP on chromosome 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, A E; Weinberger, C; McBride, O W [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1988-08-11

    RAR2, a 0.72 kb EcoRI, PvuII fragment from the 5{prime} end of the retinoic acid receptor cDNA probe was isolated. PstI identifies a constant band at 0.87 kb and a simple two allele polymorphism with a band at either 3.3 kb (A1) or 2.9 kb (A2). In 38 random blood donors, the frequency of the 3.3 kb allele (A1) was 0.29 and of the 2.9 kb allele (A2) was 0.71. The polymorphic bands and the 0.87 kb constant band segregated with chromosome 17 in 88 human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. Co-dominant inheritance was shown in 35 individuals from 5 informative families. Weak constant bands at 6.4 kb, 4.0 kb and 1.4 kb did not cosegregate with the polymorphic bands in somatic cell hybrids and could be eliminated by increasing the wash stringency.

  14. Functional consequences of the macrophage stimulating protein 689C inflammatory bowel disease risk allele.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven E Kauder

    Full Text Available Macrophage stimulating protein (MSP is a serum growth factor that binds to and activates the receptor tyrosine kinase, Recepteur d'Origine Nantais (RON. A non-synonymous coding variant in MSP (689C has been associated with genetic susceptibility to both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, two major types of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD characterized by chronic inflammation of the digestive tract. We investigated the consequences of this polymorphism for MSP-RON pathway activity and IBD pathogenesis.RON expression patterns were examined on mouse and human cells and tissues under normal and disease conditions to identify cell types regulated by MSP-RON. Recombinant MSP variants were tested for their ability to bind and stimulate RON and undergo proteolytic activation. MSP concentrations were quantified in the serum of individuals carrying the MSP 689R and 689C alleles.In intestinal tissue, RON was primarily expressed by epithelial cells under normal and disease conditions. The 689C polymorphism had no impact on the ability of MSP to bind to or signal through RON. In a cohort of normal individuals and IBD patients, carriers of the 689C polymorphism had lower concentrations of MSP in their serum.By reducing the quantities of circulating MSP, the 689C polymorphism, or a variant in linkage disequilibrium with this polymorphism, may impact RON ligand availability and thus receptor activity. Given the known functions of RON in regulating wound healing and our analysis of RON expression patterns in human intestinal tissue, these data suggest that decreased RON activity may impact the efficiency of epithelial repair and thus underlie the increased IBD susceptibility associated with the MSP 689C allele.

  15. An allelic polymorphism within the human tumor necrosis factor alpha promoter region is strongly associated with HLA A1, B8, and DR3 alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilson, A. G.; de Vries, N. [=Niek; Pociot, F.; di Giovine, F. S.; van der Putte, L. B.; Duff, G. W.

    1993-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha gene lies within the class III region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), telomeric to the class II and centromeric to the class I region. We have recently described the first polymorphism within the human TNF-alpha locus. This is biallelic and lies

  16. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  17. Novel HLA Class I Alleles Associated with Indian Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Shankarkumar

    2003-01-01

    A*0101, Cw*04011, and Cw*0602 leprosy patients was observed when compared to the controls. Further haplotype A*1102-B*4006-Cw*1502 was significantly increased among the lepromatous leprosy patients when compared to the controls. It seems that HLA class I alleles play vital roles in disease association/pathogenesis with leprosy among Indians.

  18. Molecular monitoring of resistant dhfr and dhps allelic haplotypes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The present study assesses the frequency of resistant dhfr and dhps alleles in Morogoro-Mvomero district in south eastern Tanzania and contrast their rate of change during 17 years of SP second line use against five years of SP first line use. Methodology: Cross sectional surveys of asymptomatic infections were ...

  19. Multifragment alleles in DNA fingerprints of the parrot, Amazona ventralis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, M.K.; White, B.N.

    1991-01-01

    Human DNA probes that identify variable numbers of tandem repeat loci are being used to generate DNA fingerprints in many animal and plant species. In most species the majority of the sc rable autoradiographic bands of the DNA fingerprint represent alleles from numerous unlinked loci. This study was initiated to use DNA fingerprints to determine the amount of band-sharing among captive Hispaniolan parrots (Amazona ventralis) with known genetic relationships. This would form the data base to examine DNA fingerprints of the closely related and endangered Puerto Rican parrot (A. vittata) and to estimate the degree of inbreeding in the relic population. We found by segregation analysis of the bands scored in the DNA fingerprints of the Hispaniolan parrots that there may be as few as two to five loci identified by the human 33.15 probe. Furthermore, at one locus we identified seven alleles, one of which is represented by as many as 19 cosegregating bands. It is unknown how common multiband alleles might be in natural populations, and their existence will cause problems in the assessment of relatedness by band-sharing analysis. We believe, therefore, that a pedigree analysis should be included in all DNA fingerprinting studies, where possible, in order to estimate the number of loci identified by a minisatellite DNA probe and to examine the nature of their alleles.

  20. Allele frequency distribution for 21 autosomal STR loci in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; van Driem, George L; Tshering of Gaselô, Karma; de Knijff, Peter

    2007-07-20

    We studied the allele frequency distribution of 21 autosomal STR loci contained in the AmpFlSTR Identifiler (Applied Biosystems), the Powerplex 16 (Promega) and the FFFL (Promega) multiplex PCR kits among 936 individuals from the Royal Kingdom of Bhutan. As such these are the first published autosomal DNA results from this country.

  1. Allelic prevalence of intron 3 insertion/deletion genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leila Fallahzadeh-Abarghooei

    2015-03-18

    Mar 18, 2015 ... Tabriz (East Azerbaijan province; belong to Azaris), and Yasuj (Kohgiluyeh va Boyer-Ahmad pro- vince; belong to Lurs), respectively. Genotypic analysis of the Ins/Del XRCC4 polymorphism was detected by the PCR method. Results: The prevalence of the Del allele in Shiraz, Abarku, Tabriz, and Yasuj was ...

  2. Allele frequency analysis of Chinese chestnut ( Castanea mollissima ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to establish a method for allele frequency detection in bulk samples. The abundance of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products in bulk leaf samples was detected using fluorescent labeled Simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers and an Applied biosystems (AB) automatic DNA analyzer.

  3. Association of LEI0258 microsatellite alleles with antibody response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-03-18

    Mar 18, 2008 ... (MHC) B region on chicken Micro-chromosome 16 has been demonstrated by many workers to be ... promising DNA markers in characterizing MHC B genes. Identifying marker alleles (bands) ..... SAS/STAT Users' Guide,. Release 6.12 Edition, SAS Institute Inc, Cary, North Carolina. USA. Taylor RL (2004).

  4. HLA-A alleles differentially associate with severity to Plasmodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA), particularly HLA-B and class II alleles have been differentially associated with disease outcomes in different populations following infection with the malaria Plasmodium falciparum. However, the effect of HLA-A on malaria infection and/or disease is not fully understood. Recently, HLA-A ...

  5. Clonal Ordering of 17p and 5q Allelic Losses in Barrett Dysplasia and Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Patricia L.; Meltzer, Stephen J.; Yin, Jing; Huang, Ying; Krasna, Mark J.; Reid, Brian J.

    1993-04-01

    Both 17p and 5q allelic losses appear to be involved in the pathogenesis or progression of many human solid tumors. In colon carcinogenesis, there is strong evidence that the targets of the 17p and 5q allelic losses are TP53, the gene encoding p53, and APC, respectively. It is widely accepted that 5q allelic losses precede 17p allelic losses in the progression to colonic carcinoma. The data, however, supporting this proposed order are largely based on the prevalence of 17p and 5q allelic losses in adenomas and unrelated adenocarcinomas from different patients. We investigated the order in which 17p and 5q allelic losses developed during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus by evaluating multiple aneuploid cell populations from the same patient. Using DNA content flow cytometric cell sorting and polymerase chain reaction, 38 aneuploid cell populations from 14 patients with Barrett esophagus who had high grade dysplasia, cancer or both were evaluated for 17p and 5q allelic losses. 17p allelic losses preceded 5q allelic losses in 7 patients, both 17p and 5q allelic losses were present in all aneuploid populations of 4 patients, and only 17p (without 5q) allelic losses were present in the aneuploid populations of 3 patients. In no patient did we find that a 5q allelic loss preceded a 17p allelic loss. Our data suggest that 17p allelic losses typically occur before 5q allelic losses during neoplastic progression in Barrett esophagus.

  6. Segregation of male-sterility alleles across a species boundary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, S G; Sakai, A K; Culley, T M; Duong, L; Danielson, R E

    2014-02-01

    Hybrid zones may serve as bridges permitting gene flow between species, including alleles influencing the evolution of breeding systems. Using greenhouse crosses, we assessed the likelihood that a hybrid zone could serve as a conduit for transfer of nuclear male-sterility alleles between a gynodioecious species and a hermaphroditic species with very rare females in some populations. Segregation patterns in progeny of crosses between rare females of hermaphroditic Schiedea menziesii and hermaphroditic plants of gynodioecious Schiedea salicaria heterozygous at the male-sterility locus, and between female S. salicaria and hermaphroditic plants from the hybrid zone, were used to determine whether male-sterility was controlled at the same locus in the parental species and the hybrid zone. Segregations of females and hermaphrodites in approximately equal ratios from many of the crosses indicate that the same nuclear male-sterility allele occurs in the parent species and the hybrid zone. These rare male-sterility alleles in S. menziesii may result from gene flow from S. salicaria through the hybrid zone, presumably facilitated by wind pollination in S. salicaria. Alternatively, rare male-sterility alleles might result from a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii, or possibly de novo evolution of male sterility. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that some species of Schiedea have probably evolved separate sexes independently, but not in the lineage containing S. salicaria and S. menziesii. High levels of selfing and expression of strong inbreeding depression in S. menziesii, which together should favour females in populations, argue against a reversal from gynodioecy to hermaphroditism in S. menziesii. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2014 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  7. A common polymorphism in the promoter region of the TNFSF4 gene is associated with lower allele-specific expression and risk of myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Ria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TNFSF4/TNFRSF4 system, along with several other receptor-ligand pairs, is involved in the recruitment and activation of T-cells and is therefore tentatively implicated in atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndromes. We have previously shown that genetic variants in TNFSF4 are associated with myocardial infarction (MI in women. This prompted functional studies of TNFSF4 expression. METHODS AND RESULTS: Based on a screening of the TNFSF4 genomic region, a promoter polymorphism (rs45454293 and a haplotype were identified, conceivably involved in gene regulation. The rs45454293T-allele, in agreement with the linked rs3850641G-allele, proved to be associated with increased risk of MI in women. Haplotype-specific chromatin immunoprecipitation of activated polymerase II, as a measure of transcriptional activity in vivo, suggested that the haplotype including the rs45454293 and rs3850641 polymorphisms is functionally important, the rs45454293T- and rs3850641G-alleles being associated with lower transcriptional activity in cells heterozygous for both polymorphisms. The functional role of rs45454293 on transcriptional levels of TNFSF4 was clarified by luciferase reporter assays, where the rs45454293T-allele decreased gene expression when compared with the rs45454293C-allele, while the rs3850641 SNP did not have any effect on TNFSF4 promoter activity. Electromobility shift assay showed that the rs45454293 polymorphism, but not rs3850641, affects the binding of nuclear factors, thus suggesting that the lower transcriptional activity is attributed to binding of one or more transcriptional repressor(s to the T-allele. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that the TNFSF4 rs45454293T-allele is associated with lower TNFSF4 expression and increased risk of MI.

  8. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L.; Francioli, Laurent C.; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Ommen, G. J. B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral

  9. Association of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline B

    2017-01-01

    and ovarian cancer risks in 15,252 BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 mutation carriers ascertained from 54 studies participating in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2. RESULTS: We identified a region on 11q22.3 that is significantly associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA1 mutation carriers (most...... studies using estrogen receptor (ER)-negative or triple-negative (i.e., ER-, progesterone receptor-, and HER2-negative) cases could therefore be helpful to confirm the association of this locus with breast cancer risk.......1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, a list of 175 genes was developed based of their involvement in cancer-related pathways. METHODS: Using data from a genome-wide map of SNPs associated with allelic expression, we assessed the association of ~320 SNPs located in the vicinity of these genes with breast...

  10. Allele-specific Gene Silencing of Mutant mRNA Restores Cellular Function in Ullrich Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Noguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is an inherited muscle disorder characterized clinically by muscle weakness, distal joint hyperlaxity, and proximal joint contractures. Sporadic and recessive mutations in the three collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2, and COL6A3, are reported to be causative. In the sporadic forms, a heterozygous point mutation causing glycine substitution in the triple helical domain has been identified in higher rate. In this study, we examined the efficacy of siRNAs, which target point mutation site, on specific knockdown toward transcripts from mutant allele and evaluated consequent cellular phenotype of UCMD fibroblasts. We evaluated the effect of siRNAs targeted to silence-specific COL6A1 alleles in UCMD fibroblasts, where simultaneous expression of both wild-type and mutant collagen VI resulted in defective collagen localization. Addition of mutant-specific siRNAs allowed normal extracellular localization of collagen VI surrounding fibroblasts, suggesting selective inhibition of mutant collagen VI. Targeting the single-nucleotide COL6A1 c.850G>A (p.G284R mutation responsible a sporadic autosomal dominant form of UCMD can potently and selectively block expression of mutant collagen VI. These results suggest that allele-specific knockdown of the mutant mRNA can potentially be considered as a therapeutic procedure in UCMD due to COL6A1 point mutations.

  11. Allelic exchange of pheromones and their receptors reprograms sexual identity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    OpenAIRE

    Brynne C Stanton; Steven S Giles; Mark W Staudt; Emilia K Kruzel; Christina M Hull

    2010-01-01

    Cell type specification is a fundamental process that all cells must carry out to ensure appropriate behaviors in response to environmental stimuli. In fungi, cell identity is critical for defining "sexes" known as mating types and is controlled by components of mating type (MAT) loci. MAT-encoded genes function to define sexes via two distinct paradigms: 1) by controlling transcription of components common to both sexes, or 2) by expressing specially encoded factors (pheromones and their rec...

  12. Matching NLR Immune Receptors to Autoimmunity in camta3 Mutants Using Antimorphic NLR Alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Signe; Greeff, Christiaan; Petersen, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    result from inappropriate NLR activation because mutations in plant guardees could trigger corresponding NLR guards. To explore these hypotheses, we expressed 108 dominant-negative (DN) Arabidopsis NLRs in various lesion mimic mutants, including camta3, which exhibits autoimmunity. CAMTA3 was previously...

  13. Increased risk for CRC in diabetic patients with the nonrisk allele of SNPs at 8q24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Shinya; Mimori, Koshi; Yamamoto, Ken; Inoue, Hiroshi; Imoto, Seiya; Kawano, Shuichi; Yamaguchi, Rui; Sato, Tetsuya; Toh, Hiroyuki; Iinuma, Hisae; Maeda, Toyoki; Ishii, Hideshi; Suzuki, Sadao; Tokudome, Shinkan; Watanabe, Masahiko; Tanaka, Jun-ichi; Kudo, Shin-ei; Sugihara, Ken-ichi; Hase, Kazuo; Mochizuki, Hidetaka; Kusunoki, Masato; Yamada, Kazutaka; Shimada, Yasuhiro; Moriya, Yoshihiro; Barnard, Graham F; Miyano, Satoru; Mori, Masaki

    2012-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) oncogenesis was considered to be determined by interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Specific interacting factors that influence CRC morbidity have yet to be fully investigated. A multi-institutional collaborative study with 1511 CRC patients and 2098 control subjects was used to compare the odds ratios for the occurrence of polymorphisms at 11 known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). TaqMan PCR and questionnaires were used to evaluate the effects of environmental exposures. Variants of rs6983267 on 8q24 were the most significant markers of risk for CRC (odds ratio 1.16, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.27, P = 0.0015). Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM), a higher body mass index at age 20, and meat consumption were environmental risk factors, whereas a tuna-rich diet and vitamin intake were protective factors. The cohort of rs6983267 SNP major (T) allele at 8q24 and DM had a 1.66-fold higher risk ratio than the cohort of major allele patients without DM. We confirmed that interactions between the genetic background and environmental factors are associated with increased risk for CRC. There is a robust risk of the minor G allele at the 8q24 rs6983267 SNP; however, a major T allele SNP could more clearly reveal a correlation with CRC specifically when DM is present.

  14. The COMT Val158 allele is associated with impaired delayed-match-to-sample performance in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthews Natasha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study explored the association between three measures of working memory ability and genetic variation in a range of catecholamine genes in a sample of children with ADHD. Methods One hundred and eighteen children with ADHD performed three working memory measures taken from the CANTAB battery (Spatial Span, Delayed-match-to-sample, and Spatial Working Memory. Associations between performance on working memory measures and allelic variation in catecholamine genes (including those for the noradrenaline transporter [NET1], the dopamine D4 and D2 receptor genes [DRD4; DRD2], the gene encoding dopamine beta hydroxylase [DBH] and catechol-O-methyl transferase [COMT] were investigated using regression models that controlled for age, IQ, gender and medication status on the day of test. Results Significant associations were found between performance on the delayed-match-to-sample task and COMT genotype. More specifically, val/val homozygotes produced significantly more errors than did children who carried a least one met allele. There were no further associations between allelic variants and performance across the other working memory tasks. Conclusions The working memory measures employed in the present study differed in the degree to which accurate task performance depended upon either the dynamic updating and/or manipulation of items in working memory, as in the spatial span and spatial working memory tasks, or upon the stable maintenance of representations, as in the delay-match–to-sample task. The results are interpreted as evidence of a relationship between tonic dopamine levels associated with the met COMT allele and the maintenance of stable working memory representations required to perform the delayed-match-to-sample-task.

  15. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baker, C.L.; Petkova, P.; Walker, M.; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondřej; Trachtulec, Zdeněk; Petkov, P.M.; Paigen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 9 (2015), e1005512-e1005512 ISSN 1553-7390 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/1931; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20728S; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : recombination * PRDM9 * allelic competition Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.528, year: 2014

  16. [Phenotypic effects of puroindoline gene alleles of bread wheat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebotar, S V; Kurakina, K O; Khokhlov, O M; Chebotar, H O; Syvolap, Iu M

    2012-01-01

    85 winter bread wheat varieties and lines that have been developed mostly in Ukraine were analyzed with NIR for parameters of hardness and protein content. The hardness data were compared with the data of puroindoline gene alleles analysis done earlier and the published data. Significant variation of parameters of hardness was revealed when there was low polymorphism of puroindoline genes indicating the presence of additional genes that influence the hardness parameters.

  17. Allele-Specific DNA Methylation Detection by Pyrosequencing®

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Sommer; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays important roles in healthy as well as diseased cells, by influencing the transcription of genes. In spite the fact that human somatic cells are diploid, most of the currently available methods for the study of DNA methylation do not provide......-effective protocol for allele-specific DNA methylation detection based on Pyrosequencing(®) of methylation-specific PCR (MSP) products including a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) within the amplicon....

  18. Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder children with a 7-repeat allele of the dopamine recepter D4 gene have extreme behavior but normal performance on critical neuropsychological tests of attention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanson, J.; Oosterlaan, J.; Murias, M.; Schuck, S.; Flodman, P.; Spence, M.A.; Wasdell, M.; Ding, Y.; Chi, H-C.; Smith, M.; Mann, M.; Carlson, C.; Kennedy, J.L.; Sergeant, J.A.; Leung, P.; Zhang, Y-P.; Sadeh, A.; Chan, C.; Whalen, C.K.; Babb, K.; Moyzis, R.; Posner, M.I.

    2000-01-01

    An association of the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene located on chromosome 11p15.5 and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been demonstrated and replicated by multiple investigators. A specific allele [the 7-repeat of a 48-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) in exon 3] has

  19. A and MdMYB1 allele-specific markers controlling apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) skin color and suitability for marker-assisted selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X J; Wang, L X; Chen, X X; Liu, Y L; Meng, R; Wang, Y J; Zhao, Z Y

    2014-10-31

    Pre-selection for fruit skin color at the seedling stage would be highly advantageous, with marker-assisted selection offering a potential method for apple pre-selection. A and MdMYB1 alleles are allele-specific DNA markers that are potentially associated with apple skin color, and co-segregate with the Rf and Rni loci, respectively. Here, we assessed the potential application of these 2 alleles for marker-assisted breeding across 30 diverse cultivars and 2 apple seedling progenies. The red skin color phenotype was usually associated with the MdMYB1-1 allele and A(1) allele, respectively, while the 2 molecular markers provided approximately 91% predictability in the 'Fuji' x 'Cripps Pink' and 'Fuji' x 'Gala' progenies. The results obtained from the 30 cultivars and 2 progenies were consistent for the 2 molecular markers. Hence, the results supported that Rf and Rni could be located in a gene cluster, or even correspond to alleles of the same gene. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that red/yellow dimorphism is controlled by a monogenic system, with the presence of the red anthocyanin pigmentation being dominant. In addition, our results supported that the practical utilization of the 2 function markers to efficiently and accurately select red-skinned apple cultivars in apple scion breeding programs.

  20. Mutant power: using mutant allele collections for yeast functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kaitlyn L; Kumar, Anuj

    2016-03-01

    The budding yeast has long served as a model eukaryote for the functional genomic analysis of highly conserved signaling pathways, cellular processes and mechanisms underlying human disease. The collection of reagents available for genomics in yeast is extensive, encompassing a growing diversity of mutant collections beyond gene deletion sets in the standard wild-type S288C genetic background. We review here three main types of mutant allele collections: transposon mutagen collections, essential gene collections and overexpression libraries. Each collection provides unique and identifiable alleles that can be utilized in genome-wide, high-throughput studies. These genomic reagents are particularly informative in identifying synthetic phenotypes and functions associated with essential genes, including those modeled most effectively in complex genetic backgrounds. Several examples of genomic studies in filamentous/pseudohyphal backgrounds are provided here to illustrate this point. Additionally, the limitations of each approach are examined. Collectively, these mutant allele collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the related pathogenic yeast Candida albicans promise insights toward an advanced understanding of eukaryotic molecular and cellular biology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. The protease inhibitor PI*S allele and COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersh, C P; Ly, N P; Berkey, C S

    2005-01-01

    In many countries, the protease inhibitor (SERPINA1) PI*S allele is more common than PI*Z, the allele responsible for most cases of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) due to severe alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency. However, the risk of COPD due to the PI*S allele is not clear. The current...... authors located studies that addressed the risk of COPD or measured lung function in individuals with the PI SZ, PI MS and PI SS genotypes. A separate meta-analysis for each genotype was performed. Aggregating data from six studies, the odds ratio (OR) for COPD in PI SZ compound heterozygotes compared...... with PI MM (normal) individuals was significantly increased at 3.26 (95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.24-8.57). In 17 cross-sectional and case-control studies, the OR for COPD in PI MS heterozygotes was 1.19 (95%CI: 1.02-1.38). However, PI MS genotype was not associated with COPD risk after correcting...

  2. Major Histocompatibility complex-DMB allelic diversity in old and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    recorded all along the DM molecule domains and analyses of the critical ... Other molecules, like NK-cell receptors and Fc receptors, bear this type of ...... codon 242 (except in Mamu-DMB*01 in which Trp changes to a stop codon) in all the.

  3. Receptor assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, K; Ibayashi, H [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-05-01

    This paper summarized present status and problems of analysis of hormone receptor and a few considerations on clinical significance of receptor abnormalities. It was pointed that in future clinical field quantitative and qualitative analysis of receptor did not remain only in the etiological discussion, but that it was an epoch-making field of investigation which contained the possiblity of artificial change of sensitivity of living body on drugs and the development connected directly with treatment of various diseases.

  4. Camel Milk Modulates the Expression of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Regulated Genes, Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1, in Murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham M. Korashy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a traditional belief in the Middle East that camel milk may aid in prevention and treatment of numerous cases of cancer yet, the exact mechanism was not investigated. Therefore, we examined the ability of camel milk to modulate the expression of a well-known cancer-activating gene, Cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1, and cancer-protective genes, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (Nqo1 and glutathione S-transferase a1 (Gsta1, in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cell line. Our results showed that camel milk significantly inhibited the induction of Cyp1a1 gene expression by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, the most potent Cyp1a1 inducer and known carcinogenic chemical, at mRNA, protein, and activity levels in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, camel milk significantly decreased the xenobiotic responsive element (XRE-dependent luciferase activity, suggesting a transcriptional mechanism is involved. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of camel milk was associated with a proportional increase in heme oxygenase 1. On the other hand, camel milk significantly induced Nqo1 and Gsta1 mRNA expression level in a concentration-dependent fashion. The RNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin D, completely blocked the induction of Nqo1 mRNA by camel milk suggesting the requirement of de novo RNA synthesis through a transcriptional mechanism. In conclusion, camel milk modulates the expression of Cyp1a1, Nqo1, and Gsta1 at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels.

  5. Chemokine receptor CCR5 in interferon-treated multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Kristiansen, Thomas Birk; Wittenhagen, P

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the relationship between CC chemokine receptor CCR5 expression and disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with beta-interferon (IFN-beta). METHODS: The CCR5 Delta32 allele and a CCR5 promoter polymorphism associated with cell surface expression of CCR5 were...

  6. Association and Validation of Yield-Favored Alleles in Chinese Cultivars of Common Wheat (Triticumaestivum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Guo

    Full Text Available Common wheat is one of the most important crops in China, which is the largest producer in the world. A set of 230 cultivars was used to identify yield-related loci by association mapping. This set was tested for seven yield-related traits, viz. plant height (PH, spike length (SL, spikelet number per spike (SNPS, kernel number per spike (KNPS, thousand-kernel weight (TKW, kernel weight per spike (KWPS, and sterile spikelet number (SSN per plant in four environments. A total of 106 simple sequence repeat (SSR markers distributed on all 21 chromosomes were used to screen the set. Twenty-one and 19 of them were associated with KNPS and TKW, respectively. Association mapping detected 73 significant associations across 50 SSRs, and the phenotypic variation explained (R2 by the associations ranged from 1.54 to 23.93%. The associated loci were distributed on all chromosomes except 4A, 7A, and 7D. Significant and potentially new alleles were present on 8 chromosomes, namely 1A, 1D, 2A, 2D, 3D, 4B, 5B, and 6B. Further analysis showed that genetic effects of associated loci were greatly influenced by association panels, and the R2 of crucial loci were lower in modern cultivars than in the mini core collection, probably caused by strong selection in wheat breeding. In order to confirm the results of association analysis, yield-related favorable alleles Xgwm135-1A138, Xgwm337-1D186, Xgwm102-2D144, and Xgwm132-6B128 were evaluated in a double haploid (DH population derived from Hanxuan10 xLumai14.These favorable alleles that were validated in various populations might be valuable in breeding for high-yield.

  7. Identification of common bean alleles resistant to anthracnose using RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L.M. Castanheira

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available RAPD markers were identified close to common bean alleles responsible for resistance to the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and may be useful in selecting plants resistant to this pathogen. DNA from F2 plants of the crosses Carioca 300V x P45, Carioca 300V x Ouro and P24 x Ouro was amplified by RAPD. Line P45 has the Co.4 allele for resistance, and the Ouro cultivar has the Co.5 allele. The primer OPC08 amplified a DNA fragment of about 1059 bp linked to the Co.4 allele. The recombination frequency was 0.133 (SE = 0.039; 95% CI = 0.056-0.211. Using the primer OPF10 a DNA fragment of about 912 bp was amplified and found to be associated with the Co.5 allele. The recombination frequency was 0.115 (SE = 0.038; 95% CI = 0.041-0.189. A second marker (1122 pb amplified by the OPR03 primer was identified in the population P24 x Ouro. The recombination frequency for this marker was 0.363 (SE = 0.081; 95% CI = 0.205-0.522. Both these markers flanked the Co.5 allele. The markers identified in this study may be useful in identifying lines with the Co.4 and Co.5 alleles.Marcadores RAPD foram identificados próximos de alelos do feijão responsáveis pela resistência ao Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, visando auxiliar na seleção de plantas resistentes ao patógeno. Empregou-se o método dos bulks segregantes de DNA extraídos de plantas F2 dos seguintes cruzamentos: Carioca 300V x P45, Carioca 300V x Ouro e P24 x Ouro. A linhagem P45 é portadora do alelo Co.4 de resistência e o cultivar Ouro é portador do alelo Co.5, os quais foram marcados. Procedeu-se à reação RAPD dos bulks e foi identificado o iniciador OPC08 que amplificou um fragmento de DNA com cerca de 1059 pb, ligado ao alelo Co.4. A freqüência de recombinação foi de 0,133 (erro padrão 0,039 e o intervalo de confiança foi 0,056 e 0,211, com 95% de probabilidade. Em relação ao alelo Co.5 foi identificado um fragmento de DNA amplificado pelo iniciador OPF10 com cerca de 912 pb, na

  8. Allelic inhibition of displacement activity: a simplified one tube allele-specific PCR for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmozzi, E; Facchetti, F; Degasperi, E; Aghemo, A; Lampertico, P

    2013-02-01

    Recently, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have identified two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the inosine triphosphatase (ITPA) gene, that are associated strongly and independently with hemolytic anemia in patients exposed to pegylated-interferon (Peg-IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) combined therapy. Here has been developed a simplified allele discrimination polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay named allelic inhibition of displacement activity (AIDA) for evaluation of ITPA polymorphisms. AIDA system relies on three unlabeled primers only, two outer common primers and one inner primer with allele-specific 3' terminus mismatch. DNA samples from 192 patients with chronic HCV infection were used to validate the AIDA system and results were compared with the gold standard TaqMan(®) SNP genotyping assay. Concordant data were obtained for all samples, granting for high specificity of the method. In conclusion, AIDA is a practical one-tube method to reproducibly and to assess accurately rs7270101 and rs1127354 ITPA SNPs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. HLA Dr beta 1 alleles in Pakistani patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqi, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 alleles in rheumatoid arthritis in Pakistani patients. Study Design: Cross sectional / analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Immunology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Rawalpindi in collaboration with Rheumatology departments of Military Hospital, Rawalpindi and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi, from January 2009 to January 2010. Methodology: HLA DR beta 1 genotyping of one hundred Pakistani patients, diagnosed as having RA as per American College of Rheumatology revised criteria 1987, was done. HLA DR beta 1 genotyping was carried out at allele group level (DR beta 1*01-DR beta 1*16) by sequence specific primers in RA patients. Comparison of HLA DR beta 1 allele frequencies between patients and control groups was made using Pearson's chi-square test to find possible association of HLA DR?1 alleles with RA in Pakistani rheumatoid patients. Results: HLA DR beta 1*04 was expressed with significantly increased frequency in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (p <0.05). HLA DR?1*11 was expressed statistically significantly more in control group as compared to rheumatoid patients indicating a possible protective effect. There was no statistically significant difference observed in frequencies of HLA DR beta 1 allele *01, DR beta 1 allele *03, DR beta 1 allele *07, DR beta 1 allele *08, DR beta 1 allele *09, DR beta 1 allele *10, DR beta 1 allele *12, DR beta 1 allele *13, DR beta 1 allele *14, DR?1 allele *15 and DR beta 1 allele *16 between patients and control groups. Conclusion: The identification of susceptible HLA DR beta 1 alleles in Pakistani RA patients may help physicians to make early decisions regarding initiation of early intensive therapy with disease modifying anti rheumatic medicines and biological agents decreasing disability in RA patients. (author)

  10. Geographical gradient of the eIF4E alleles conferring resistance to potyviruses in pea (Pisum) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konečná, Eva; Šafářová, Dana; Navrátil, Milan; Hanáček, Pavel; Coyne, Clarice; Flavell, Andrew; Vishnyakova, Margarita; Ambrose, Mike; Redden, Robert; Smýkal, Petr

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E was shown to be involved in resistance against several potyviruses in plants, including pea. We combined our knowledge of pea germplasm diversity with that of the eIF4E gene to identify novel genetic diversity. Germplasm of 2803 pea accessions was screened for eIF4E intron 3 length polymorphism, resulting in the detection of four eIF4E(A-B-C-S) variants, whose distribution was geographically structured. The eIF4E(A) variant conferring resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype was found in 53 accessions (1.9%), of which 15 were landraces from India, Afghanistan, Nepal, and 7 were from Ethiopia. A newly discovered variant, eIF4E(B), was present in 328 accessions (11.7%) from Ethiopia (29%), Afghanistan (23%), India (20%), Israel (25%) and China (39%). The eIF4E(C) variant was detected in 91 accessions (3.2% of total) from India (20%), Afghanistan (33%), the Iberian Peninsula (22%) and the Balkans (9.3%). The eIF4E(S) variant for susceptibility predominated as the wild type. Sequencing of 73 samples, identified 34 alleles at the whole gene, 26 at cDNA and 19 protein variants, respectively. Fifteen alleles were virologically tested and 9 alleles (eIF4E(A-1-2-3-4-5-6-7), eIF4E(B-1), eIF4E(C-2)) conferred resistance to the P1 PSbMV pathotype. This work identified novel eIF4E alleles within geographically structured pea germplasm and indicated their independent evolution from the susceptible eIF4E(S1) allele. Despite high variation present in wild Pisum accessions, none of them possessed resistance alleles, supporting a hypothesis of distinct mode of evolution of resistance in wild as opposed to crop species. The Highlands of Central Asia, the northern regions of the Indian subcontinent, Eastern Africa and China were identified as important centers of pea diversity that correspond with the diversity of the pathogen. The series of alleles identified in this study provides the basis to study the co-evolution of potyviruses and the

  11. A high-throughput method for genotyping S-RNase alleles in apple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarne; Ørgaard, Marian; Toldam-Andersen, Torben Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present a new efficient screening tool for detection of S-alleles in apple. The protocol using general and multiplexed primers for PCR reaction and fragment detection on an automatized capillary DNA sequencer exposed a higher number of alleles than any previous studies. Analysis of alleles...

  12. Expression and loss of alleles in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts and stem cells carrying allelic fluorescent protein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stringer Saundra L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of heterozygosity (LOH contributes to many cancers, but the rate at which these events occur in normal cells of the body is not clear. LOH would be detectable in diverse cell types in the body if this event were to confer an obvious cellular phenotype. Mice that carry two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles of a locus would seem to be a useful tool for addressing this issue because LOH would change a cell's phenotype from dichromatic to monochromatic. In addition, LOH caused by mitotic crossing over might be discernable in tissues because this event produces a pair of neighboring monochromatic cells that are different colors. Results As a step in assessing the utility of this approach, we derived primary embryonic fibroblast populations and embryonic stem cell lines from mice that carried two different fluorescent protein genes as alleles at the chromosome 6 locus, ROSA26. Fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS showed that the vast majority of cells in each line expressed the two marker proteins at similar levels, and that populations exhibited expression noise similar to that seen in bacteria and yeast. Cells with a monochromatic phenotype were present at frequencies on the order of 10-4 and appeared to be produced at a rate of approximately 10-5 variant cells per mitosis. 45 of 45 stably monochromatic ES cell clones exhibited loss of the expected allele at the ROSA26 locus. More than half of these clones retained heterozygosity at a locus between ROSA26 and the centromere. Other clones exhibited LOH near the centromere, but were disomic for chromosome 6. Conclusion Allelic fluorescent markers allowed LOH at the ROSA26 locus to be detected by FACS. LOH at this locus was usually not accompanied by LOH near the centromere, suggesting that mitotic recombination was the major cause of ROSA26 LOH. Dichromatic mouse embryonic cells provide a novel system for studying genetic/karyotypic stability and factors

  13. CYP1A1 Genetic Polymorphisms in Ecuador, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Paz-y-Miño

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 108 individuals from the Ecuadorian population from rural and urban places were analyzed for two CYP1A1 gene polymorphisms. The frequency of the val allele at codon 462 was 0.50, while the frequency of the Msp I restriction site, m2 allele at the T6235C position was 0.70. These polymorphisms in Ecuador have higher frequencies if we compare with others around the world, with the exception of some South American population in Brazil and Chile.

  14. Improvements to a Markerless Allelic Exchange System for Bacillus anthracis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger D Plaut

    Full Text Available A system was previously developed for conducting I-SceI-mediated allelic exchange in Bacillus anthracis. In this system, recombinational loss of a chromosomally-integrated allelic exchange vector is stimulated by creation of a double-stranded break within the vector by the homing endonuclease I-SceI. Although this system is reasonably efficient and represents an improvement in the tools available for allelic exchange in B. anthracis, researchers are nonetheless required to "pick and patch" colonies in order to identify candidate "exchangeants." In the present study, a number of improvements have been made to this system: 1 an improved I-SceI-producing plasmid includes oriT so that both plasmids can now be introduced by conjugation, thus avoiding the need for preparing electro-competent cells of each integration intermediate; 2 antibiotic markers have been changed to allow the use of the system in select agent strains; and 3 both plasmids have been marked with fluorescent proteins, allowing the visualization of plasmid segregation on a plate and obviating the need for "picking and patching." These modifications have made the process easier, faster, and more efficient, allowing for parallel construction of larger numbers of mutant strains. Using this improved system, the genes encoding the tripartite anthrax toxin were deleted singly and in combination from plasmid pXO1 of Sterne strain 34F2. In the course of this study, we determined that DNA transfer to B. anthracis could be accomplished by conjugation directly from a methylation-competent E. coli strain.

  15. HLA-DR alleles among Pakistani patients of coeliac disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.; Ali, S.; Iqbal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether certain DR alleles might also contribute to the genetic susceptibility among Coeliac disease patients in Pakistan. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from October 2011 to January 2012, and analysed 25 children diagnosed to have coeliac disease as per the criteria set by the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition, which included histopathological alterations in duodenal biopsies, clinical response to gluten withdrawal, and presence of anti-endomyseal antibodies. Patients were compared with a group of 150 healthy subjects. Dioxyribonucleic acid was extracted from peripheral blood collected in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid.K3. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 typing was carried out on allele level (DRB1*01 - DRB1*16) using sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Phenotype frequency of various alleles among the patient group and the control group was calculated by direct counting, and significance of their association was determined by Fisher Exact Test. Results: A total of 11 (44%) female paediatric coeliac patients in age range 1-9 (mean 7.2+-4.8 years) and 14 (56%) male paediatric patients in the age range 6-14 (mean 8.6+-5.1 years) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1 loci. A statistically significant positive association of the disease with HLA-DRB1*03 (n=23; 92% versus n=31; 21% in controls, p <0.01) was observed. Conclusion: HLA-DRB1*03 is associated with increased risk of developing coeliac disease. (author)

  16. Exploring new alleles for frost tolerance in winter rye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, Wiltrud; Bauer, Eva; Fowler, D Brian; Gordillo, Andres; Korzun, Viktor; Ponomareva, Mira; Schmidt, Malthe; Schmiedchen, Brigitta; Wilde, Peer; Schön, Chris-Carolin

    2017-10-01

    Rye genetic resources provide a valuable source of new alleles for the improvement of frost tolerance in rye breeding programs. Frost tolerance is a must-have trait for winter cereal production in northern and continental cropping areas. Genetic resources should harbor promising alleles for the improvement of frost tolerance of winter rye elite lines. For frost tolerance breeding, the identification of quantitative trait loci (QTL) and the choice of optimum genome-based selection methods are essential. We identified genomic regions involved in frost tolerance of winter rye by QTL mapping in a biparental population derived from a highly frost tolerant selection from the Canadian cultivar Puma and the European elite line Lo157. Lines per se and their testcrosses were phenotyped in a controlled freeze test and in multi-location field trials in Russia and Canada. Three QTL on chromosomes 4R, 5R, and 7R were consistently detected across environments. The QTL on 5R is congruent with the genomic region harboring the Frost resistance locus 2 (Fr-2) in Triticeae. The Puma allele at the Fr-R2 locus was found to significantly increase frost tolerance. A comparison of predictive ability obtained from the QTL-based model with different whole-genome prediction models revealed that besides a few large, also small QTL effects contribute to the genomic variance of frost tolerance in rye. Genomic prediction models assigning a high weight to the Fr-R2 locus allow increasing the selection intensity for frost tolerance by genome-based pre-selection of promising candidates.

  17. The Rh allele frequencies in Gaza city in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skaik Younis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Rh blood group system is the second most clinically significant blood group system. It includes 49 antigens, but only five (D, C, E, c and e are the most routinely identified due to their unique relation to hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN and transfusion reactions. Frequency of the Rh alleles showed variation, with regard to race and ethnic. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to document the Rh alleles′ frequencies amongst males (M and females (F in Gaza city in Palestine. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and thirty-two blood samples (110 M and 122 F were tested against monoclonal IgM anti-C,anti-c, anti-E, anti-e and a blend of monoclonal/polyclonal IgM/IgG anti-D. The expected Rh phenotypes were calculated using gene counting method. Results: The most frequent Rh antigen in the total sample was e, while the least frequent was E.The order of the combined Rh allele frequencies in both M and F was CDe > cDe > cde > CdE > cDE > Cde > CDE. A significant difference was reported between M and F regarding the phenotypic frequencies (P < 0.05. However, no significance (P > 0.05 was reported with reference to the observed and expected Rh phenotypic frequencies in either M or F students. Conclusion: It was concluded that the Rh antigens, alleles and phenotypes in Gaza city have unique frequencies, which may be of importance to the Blood Transfusion Center in Gaza city and anthropology.

  18. Interaction between estrogen receptor and retinol-binding protein-4 polymorphisms as a tool for the selection of prolific pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Denise Vasconcellos Gonçalves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the association of the estrogen receptor (ER-PvuII and retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4-MspI gene polymorphisms and their interactions with prolificacy in a commercial synthetic pig line reared in Brazil. A total of 10,374 piglet records from 218 sows and 817 litters were used for litter size analysis. Only females with three or four farrowings were included in the analysis. The mean litter size ranged from 5.0 to 19.5 piglets. DNA was extracted from leukocytes by a standard method, and ER-PvuII and RBP4-MspI polymorphisms were characterized by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. The association between alleles or genotypes and reproductive performance was analyzed using a general linear model including the interaction between the ER-PvuII and RBP4-MspI genotypes. For the ER-PvuII gene, the allele frequencies of allele A and allele B were 0.56 and 0.44, respectively. For the RBP4-MspI gene, the frequencies of alleles A1 and A2 were 0.29 and 0.71, respectively. The total number of piglets born (TNB, born alive (NBA, or number of mummies and stillborn piglets (NMUM and NSB per litter did not differ between the various ER-PvuII and RBP4-MspI genotypes. However, when the ER-PvuII and RBP4-MspI genotypes were considered together in each sow, TNB and NBA were 1.4 (p = 0.0026 and 0.9 (p = 0.019 higher in AA/A1 and AB/A1 animals, respectively, than in AA/A2 and BB/A1 animals. Likewise, TNB and NBA were 0.9 (p = 0.0258 and 0.8 (p = 0.0168 higher in BB/A2 and AB/A2 sows, respectively, than in AA/A2 and BB/A1 animals, but no difference was observed compared to AA/A1 and AB/A1 animals. The results showed larger litter sizes (TNB and NBA for sows carrying the ER-PvuII allele A and the RBP4-MspI genotype A1, and for animals carrying the ER-PvuII allele B and the RBP4-MspI genotype A2. In conclusion, the interaction between genotypes ER-PvuII and RBP4-MspI is

  19. Allele-sharing models: LOD scores and accurate linkage tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, A; Cox, N J

    1997-11-01

    Starting with a test statistic for linkage analysis based on allele sharing, we propose an associated one-parameter model. Under general missing-data patterns, this model allows exact calculation of likelihood ratios and LOD scores and has been implemented by a simple modification of existing software. Most important, accurate linkage tests can be performed. Using an example, we show that some previously suggested approaches to handling less than perfectly informative data can be unacceptably conservative. Situations in which this model may not perform well are discussed, and an alternative model that requires additional computations is suggested.

  20. Allelic drop-out probabilities estimated by logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Asplund, Maria

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the model for estimating drop-out probabilities presented by Tvedebrink et al. [7] and the concerns, that have been raised. The criticism of the model has demonstrated that the model is not perfect. However, the model is very useful for advanced forensic genetic work, where allelic drop-out...... is occurring. With this discussion, we hope to improve the drop-out model, so that it can be used for practical forensic genetics and stimulate further discussions. We discuss how to estimate drop-out probabilities when using a varying number of PCR cycles and other experimental conditions....

  1. Polymorphisms of the human IL-1 receptor antagonist gene and forearm bone mineral density in postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jivka T Ivanova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Studies on the human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA gene polymorphism have provided conflicting data regarding the bone mass and quality. Aim and Design: The objective of this case-control study was to investigate the association between the forearm bone mineral density (BMD and the IL1RA gene polymorphisms. Materials and Methods: A total of 400 postmenopausal Bulgarian women participated in this study. BMD was measured at the forearm by X-ray absorptiometry on a DTX-100 device (Osteometer Meditech, USA. A PCR product was isolated. The alleles were scored according to their length: A1 - 410 bp - 4 repeats; A2 - 240 bp - 2 repeats; A3 - 500 bp - 5 repeats; A4 - 325 bp - 3 repeats; A5 - 595 bp - 6 repeats. All analyses were evaluated for statistical significance (χ2 -test and T-test. Results: Four alleles were observed - A1, A2, A3, and A4. The A1A1 genotype was more common in cases with low BMD than in controls with normal BMD (95% vs. 90%, χ2 P < 0.01. The A2A2 genotype was equally distributed among cases and controls (both 5%. The other two genotypes (A3A3 and A4A4 as well as A1A3 were present only in controls with normal BMD. The A2A2 genotype was associated with higher BMD and the A1A1 - with lower BMD at both forearm sites. The odds ratio for low BMD in the presence of the A1A1 genotype was 2.11. The etiological factor reflecting the association between the polymorphism and the disease was 0.50. In our study sample the IL1RA genetic polymorphisms were associated with the forearm BMD. Conclusion: This genetic polymorphism may become a useful genetic marker for the study of osteoporosis.

  2. Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Gene Polymorphism in Patients with Coronary Artery Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel Aziz, A.F.; El Said, A.M.; El Maghraby, T.K.; Hassan, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Cytokine gene variations are contributory factors in inflammatory pathology. Allele frequencies of Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) gene intron 2 VNTR were measured in healthy blood donors (healthy control subjects) and patients with angina, myocardial infarction (MI) and acute coronary syndrome(ACS). Patients were classified into three groups: thirty one MI patients, twenty two angina patients and thirteen ACS patients. A1/A2 genotype showed significant resistant factor for angina and myocardial infarction and angina (70.97% vs. 29.03%; p=0.0001, 70.97% vs. 31.82%; p0.0004, respectively). A1/A1 homo zygote was a risk factor in MI and angina (p=0.012; p= 0.0001), Moreover, A1/A3 and A2/A3 heterozygotes were found in MI only (p= 0.025; p= 0.0047, respectively). All genotypes didn't show any effect on ACS patients. In conclusion, the data reflected that A1/A1 homo zygote was considered as a significantly risk factor associated with patients with angina as well as MI patients. But, A1/A2 heterozygote was considered a resistance factor against both diseases.

  3. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  4. Effects of the APOE ε2 Allele on Mortality and Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Tan, Qihua; Mengel-From, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Some studies indicate that the APOE ε2 allele may have a protective effect on mortality and mental health among the elderly adults. We investigated the effect of the APOE ε2 allele on cognitive function and mortality in 1651 members of the virtually extinct Danish 1905 birth cohort. We found...... no protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality compared with the APOE ε3 allele. The point estimates indicated an increased protection against cognitive decline over time for persons with the APOE ε2 allele. Cognitive score did not significantly modify the mortality risk of the various APOE genotypes....... We did not find a protective effect of the APOE ε2 allele on mortality among the oldest old, but in agreement with our previous findings, we found a 22% increased mortality risk for APOE ε4 carriers. The APOE ε2 allele may be protective on cognitive decline among the oldest old....

  5. A matching-allele model explains host resistance to parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijckx, Pepijn; Fienberg, Harris; Duneau, David; Ebert, Dieter

    2013-06-17

    The maintenance of genetic variation and sex despite its costs has long puzzled biologists. A popular idea, the Red Queen Theory, is that under rapid antagonistic coevolution between hosts and their parasites, the formation of new rare host genotypes through sex can be advantageous as it creates host genotypes to which the prevailing parasite is not adapted. For host-parasite coevolution to lead to an ongoing advantage for rare genotypes, parasites should infect specific host genotypes and hosts should resist specific parasite genotypes. The most prominent genetics capturing such specificity are matching-allele models (MAMs), which have the key feature that resistance for two parasite genotypes can reverse by switching one allele at one host locus. Despite the lack of empirical support, MAMs have played a central role in the theoretical development of antagonistic coevolution, local adaptation, speciation, and sexual selection. Using genetic crosses, we show that resistance of the crustacean Daphnia magna against the parasitic bacterium Pasteuria ramosa follows a MAM. Simulation results show that the observed genetics can explain the maintenance of genetic variation and contribute to the maintenance of sex in the facultatively sexual host as predicted by the Red Queen Theory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  7. Characterization of a Weak Allele of Zebrafish cloche Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Huang, Zhibin; Chen, Xiaohui; He, Fei; Wang, Kun; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Linfeng; Xu, Xiangmin; Liao, Wangjun; Ruan, Hua; Luo, Shenqiu; Zhang, Wenqing

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoiesis is a complicated and dynamic process about which the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Danio rerio (zebrafish) is an excellent vertebrate system for studying hematopoiesis and developmental mechanisms. In the previous study, we isolated and identified a cloche 172 (clo 172) mutant, a novel allele compared to the original cloche (clo) mutant, through using complementation test and initial mapping. Here, according to whole mount in-situ hybridization, we report that the endothelial cells in clo 172 mutant embryos, although initially developed, failed to form the functional vascular system eventually. In addition, further characterization indicates that the clo 172 mutant exhibited weaker defects instead of completely lost in primitive erythroid cells and definitive hematopoietic cells compared with the clo s5 mutant. In contrast, primitive myeloid cells were totally lost in clo 172 mutant. Furthermore, these reappeared definitive myeloid cells were demonstrated to initiate from the remaining hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in clo 172 mutant, confirmed by the dramatic decrease of lyc in clo 172 runx1w84x double mutant. Collectively, the clo 172 mutant is a weak allele compared to the clo s5 mutant, therefore providing a model for studying the early development of hematopoietic and vascular system, as well as an opportunity to further understand the function of the cloche gene. PMID:22132109

  8. Characterization of ROP18 alleles in human toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Víctor; de-la-Torre, Alejandra; Gómez-Marín, Jorge Enrique

    2014-04-01

    The role of the virulent gene ROP18 polymorphisms is not known in human toxoplasmosis. A total of 320 clinical samples were analyzed. In samples positive for ROP18 gene, we determined by an allele specific PCR, if patients got the upstream insertion positive ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse avirulent strain) or the upstream insertion negative ROP18 sequence Toxoplasma strain (mouse virulent strain). We designed an ELISA assay for antibodies against ROP18 derived peptides from the three major clonal lineages of Toxoplasma. 20 clinical samples were of quality for ROP18 allele analysis. In patients with ocular toxoplasmosis, a higher inflammatory reaction on eye was associated to a PCR negative result for the upstream region of ROP18. 23.3%, 33% and 16.6% of serums from individuals with ocular toxoplasmosis were positive for type I, type II and type III ROP18 derived peptides, respectively but this assay was affected by cross reaction. The absence of Toxoplasma ROP18 promoter insertion sequence in ocular toxoplasmosis was correlated with severe ocular inflammatory response. Determination of antibodies against ROP18 protein was not useful for serotyping in human toxoplasmosis. © 2013.

  9. Seasonal Changes in Brain Serotonin Transporter Binding in Short Serotonin Transporter Linked Polymorphic Region-Allele Carriers but Not in Long-Allele Homozygotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Erritzoe, David; Holst, Klaus K

    2010-01-01

    of the short 5-HTTLPR allele but not in homozygote carriers of the long allele. Conclusions: Our findings are in line with S-carriers having an increased response in neural circuits involved in emotional processing to stressful environmental stimuli but here demonstrated as a endophenotype with dynamic changes...

  10. Low frequency of the scrapile resistance-associated allele and presence of lysine-171 allele of the prion protein gene in Italian Biellese ovine breed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acutis, P.L.; Sbaiz, L.; Verburg, F.J.; Riina, M.V.; Ru, G.; Moda, G.; Caramelli, M.; Bossers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Frequencies of polymorphisms at codons 136, 154 and 171 of the prion protein (PrP) gene were studied in 1207 pure-bred and cross-bred Italian Biellese rams, a small ovine breed of about 65 000 head in Italy. Aside from the five most common alleles (VRQ, ARQ, ARR, AHQ and ARH), the rare ARK allele

  11. Genetic Variations in the Human Cannabinoid Receptor Gene Are Associated with Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  12. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level. As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater

  13. Genetic variations in the human cannabinoid receptor gene are associated with happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Isowa, Tokiko; Yamakawa, Kaori; Fukuyama, Seisuke; Shinoda, Jun; Yamada, Jitsuhiro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Happiness has been viewed as a temporary emotional state (e.g., pleasure) and a relatively stable state of being happy (subjective happiness level). As previous studies demonstrated that individuals with high subjective happiness level rated their current affective states more positively when they experience positive events, these two aspects of happiness are interrelated. According to a recent neuroimaging study, the cytosine to thymine single-nucleotide polymorphism of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene is associated with sensitivity to positive emotional stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that our genetic traits, such as the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes, are closely related to the two aspects of happiness. In Experiment 1, 198 healthy volunteers were used to compare the subjective happiness level between cytosine allele carriers and thymine-thymine carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene. In Experiment 2, we used positron emission tomography with 20 healthy participants to compare the brain responses to positive emotional stimuli of cytosine allele carriers to that of thymine-thymine carriers. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, cytosine allele carriers have a higher subjective happiness level. Regression analysis indicated that the cytosine allele is significantly associated with subjective happiness level. The positive mood after watching a positive film was significantly higher for the cytosine allele carriers compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Positive emotion-related brain region such as the medial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated when the cytosine allele carriers watched the positive film compared to the thymine-thymine carriers. Thus, the human cannabinoid receptor 1 genotypes are closely related to two aspects of happiness. Compared to thymine-thymine carriers, the cytosine allele carriers of the human cannabinoid receptor 1 gene, who are sensitive to positive emotional stimuli, exhibited greater magnitude

  14. Effects of aripiprazole and the Taq1A polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor gene on the clinical response and plasma monoamine metabolites level during the acute phase of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Itaru; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Katsumi, Akihiko; Mori, Azuma; Kanno, Keiko; Yang, Qiaohui; Mashiko, Hirobumi; Numata, Yoshihiko; Niwa, Shin-Ichi

    2012-02-01

    The Taq1A polymorphism in the dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene could be related to the response to antipsychotics. We examined the effects of the Taq1A polymorphism on the plasma monoamine metabolites during the treatment of schizophrenia with aripiprazole, a DRD2 partial agonist. Thirty Japanese patients with schizophrenia were treated with aripiprazole for 6 weeks. We measured plasma levels of homovanillic acid (pHVA) and 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol (pMHPG) before and after treatment. The Taq1A polymorphism was genotyped with polymerase chain reaction. Aripiprazole improved the acute symptoms of schizophrenia and decreased pHVA in responders (P = 0.023) but not in nonresponders (P = 0.28). Although A1 allele carriers showed a tendency to respond to aripiprazole (61.5%) compared to A1 allele noncarriers (29.4%) (P = 0.078), there was not statistically significant difference in the response between the 2 genotype groups. There were significant effect for response (P = 0.013) and genotype × response interaction (P = 0.043) on the change of pHVA. The changes of pHVA differ between responders and nonresponders in A1 allele carriers but not in A1 allele noncarriers. There were no genotype or response effects or genotype × response interaction on the changes of the plasma levels of 3-methoxy-4hydroxyphenylglycol. Our preliminary results suggest that Taq1A polymorphism may be partly associated with changes in pHVA during acute schizophrenia.

  15. Allele variants of HLA II genes DRB1 and DQB1 regarding risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus in population of Bashkortostan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamilevna Avzaletdinova

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To estimate significance of HLA II DRB1 and DRB2 allele variants for development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM in Bashkortostanpopulation (ethnical Russians, Tatar, Bashkir. Materials and methods. We analyzed DNA of 323 patients with T1DM and 683 healthy controls. DNA was derived from venous bloodsamples by phenol-chloroform extraction. DRB1 and DQB1 gene typing was performed by PCR method. Amplification products wereidentified with electrophoresis on a 1% agarose gel. Statistica for Windows v6.0 and MS Excel 98 software were applied for statisticalprocessing of acquired data. Results. Common markers of high risk for T1DM were found to be DRB1*04, DRB1*17, genotype DRB1*04/*17. On the contrary,lower risk was associated with DRB1*15 allele. In ethnical Russians lower risk of T1DM is also determined by DRB1*11 allele andDRB1*01 in Tatars. Predisposition by DQB1-alleles in Russians and Bashkir realizes only within DRB1*04/*17 genotype. However,in Tatar subpopulation DQB1*0302 is an independent risk marker of T1DM development. Conclusion. Common low risk markers for all three ethnic groups are DQB1*0301, DQB1*0602-08 alleles. Their presence negates riskof disease in all studied subpopulations even within DRB1*04/*17-genotype.

  16. Effects of CCR5-Delta32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1 3'A alleles on HIV-1 disease progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ioannidis, J P; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies relating certain chemokine and chemokine receptor gene alleles with the outcome of HIV-1 infection have yielded inconsistent results. OBJECTIVE: To examine postulated associations of genetic alleles with HIV-1 disease progression. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of individual-patient data....... SETTING: 19 prospective cohort studies and case-control studies from the United States, Europe, and Australia. PATIENTS: Patients with HIV-1 infection who were of European or African descent. MEASUREMENTS: Time to AIDS, death, and death after AIDS and HIV-1 RNA level at study entry or soon after...... (relative hazard among seroconverters, 0.64 and 0.74; P HIV-1 RNA levels after seroconversion (difference, -0.18 log(10) copies/mL and -0.14 log(10) copies/mL; P

  17. Allelic variation at the vernalization and photoperiod sensitivity loci in Chinese winter wheat cultivars (Triticum aestivum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangfen eZhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A total of 205 wheat cultivars from the Yellow and Huai valley of China were used to identify allelic variations of vernalization and photoperiod response genes, as well as the copy number variations (CNVs of Ppd-B1 and Vrn-A1 genes. A novel Vrn-D1 allele with 174-bp insertion in the promoter region of the recessive allele vrn-D1 was discovered in three Chinese wheat cultivars and designated as Vrn-D1c. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that cultivars with the Vrn-D1c allele exhibited significantly higher expression of the Vrn-D1 gene than that in cultivars with the recessive allele vrn-D1, indicating that the 174-bp insertion of Vrn-D1c contributed to the increase in Vrn-D1 gene expression and caused early heading and flowering. The five new cis-elements (Box II-like, 3-AF1 binding site, TC-rich repeats, Box-W1 and CAT-box in the 174-bp insertion possibly promoted the basal activity level of Vrn-D1 gene. Two new polymorphism combinations of photoperiod genes were identified and designated as Ppd-D1_Hapl-IX and Ppd-D1_Hapl-X. Association of the CNV of Ppd-B1 gene with the heading and flowering days showed that the cultivars with Ppd-B1_Hapl-VI demonstrated the earliest heading and flowering times, and those with Ppd-B1_Hapl-IV presented the latest heading and flowering times in three cropping seasons. Distribution of the vernalization and photoperiod response genes indicated that all recessive alleles at the four vernalization response loci, Ppd-B1_Hapl-I at Ppd-B1 locus, and Ppd-D1_Hapl-I at the Ppd-D1 locus were predominant in Chinese winter wheat cultivars. This study can provide useful information for wheat breeding programs to screen wheat cultivars with relatively superior adaptability and maturity.

  18. Allelic imbalance modulates surface expression of the tolerance-inducing HLA-G molecule on primary trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djurisic, S; Teiblum, S; Tolstrup, C K; Christiansen, O B; Hviid, T V F

    2015-03-01

    The HLA-G molecule is expressed on trophoblast cells at the feto-maternal interface, where it interacts with local immune cells, and upholds tolerance against the semi-allogeneic fetus. Aberrant HLA-G expression in the placenta and reduced soluble HLA-G levels are observed in pregnancy complications, partly explained by HLA-G polymorphisms which are associated with differences in the alternative splicing pattern and of the stability of HLA-G mRNA. Of special importance is a 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism located in the 3'-untranslated region of the HLA-G gene. In the current study, we present novel evidence for allelic imbalance of the 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism, using a very accurate and sensitive Digital droplet PCR technique. Allelic imbalance in heterozygous samples was observed as differential expression levels of 14 bp insertion/deletion allele-specific mRNA transcripts, which was further associated with low levels of HLA-G surface expression on primary trophoblast cells. Full gene sequencing of HLA-G allowed us to study correlations between HLA-G extended haplotypes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms and HLA-G surface expression. We found that a 1:1 expression (allelic balance) of the 14 bp insertion/deletion mRNA alleles was associated with high surface expression of HLA-G and with a specific HLA-G extended haplotype. The 14 bp del/del genotype was associated with a significantly lower abundance of the G1 mRNA isoform, and a higher abundance of the G3 mRNA isoform. Overall, the present study provides original evidence for allelic imbalance of the 14 bp insertion/deletion polymorphism, which influences HLA-G surface expression on primary trophoblast cells, considered to be important in the pathogenesis of pre-eclampsia and other pregnancy complications. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Association of Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CASR rs 1801725 with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Rostami

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently prevents colorectal cancer through ion calcium receptor. Calcium-sensing receptor mutation reduces the expression of this receptor, and subsequently in reduces calcium transportation. Many studies have shown that Calcium-sensing receptor gene polymorphism may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of calcium-sensing receptor polymorphisms (rs 1801725 in Iran society and to examine the role of this polymorphism in the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC.Materials and Methods: The research was a case-control study. 105 patients with colorectal cancer and 105 controls were randomly studied using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. χ2 test and software 16- SPSS were used for statistical analysis.Results: In patient samples, the frequency of the genotypes TT, GT, GG in gene CASR rs 1801725 was respectively 64.8, 32.4, and 2.9 and the frequency of this polymorphism in control samples was respectively 51.2, 45.7, and 2.9. Frequency of allele G in patient samples was 0/48 and frequency of allele T was 0.25. In addition, Frequency of allele G in control samples was 0.74 and Frequency of allele T was calculated 0.19.Conclusion: The results show that calcium-sensing receptor variant (1801725 rs is not associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  20. Tri-allelic SNP markers enable analysis of mixed and degraded DNA samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westen, Antoinette A; Matai, Anuska S; Laros, Jeroen F J; Meiland, Hugo C; Jasper, Mandy; de Leeuw, Wiljo J F; de Knijff, Peter; Sijen, Titia

    2009-09-01

    For the analysis of degraded DNA in disaster victim identification (DVI) and criminal investigations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been recognized as promising markers mainly because they can be analyzed in short sized amplicons. Most SNPs are bi-allelic and are thereby ineffective to detect mixtures, which may lead to incorrect genotyping. We developed an algorithm to find non-binary (i.e. tri-allelic or tetra-allelic) SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database. We selected 31 potential tri-allelic SNPs with a minor allele frequency of at least 10%. The tri-allelic nature was confirmed for 15 SNPs residing on 14 different chromosomes. Multiplex SNaPshot assays were developed, and the allele frequencies of 16 SNPs were determined among 153 Dutch and 111 Netherlands Antilles reference samples. Using these multiplex SNP assays, the presence of a mixture of two DNA samples in a ratio up to 1:8 could be recognized reliably. Furthermore, we compared the genotyping efficiency of the tri-allelic SNP markers and short tandem repeat (STR) markers by analyzing artificially degraded DNA and DNA from 30 approximately 500-year-old bone and molar samples. In both types of degraded DNA samples, the larger sized STR amplicons failed to amplify whereas the tri-allelic SNP markers still provided valuable information. In conclusion, tri-allelic SNP markers are suited for the analysis of degraded DNA and enable the detection of a second DNA source in a sample.

  1. Erasure and reestablishment of random allelic expression imbalance after epigenetic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Aaron Richard; Uwanogho, Dafe Aghogho; Cocks, Graham; Perfect, Leo William; Dempster, Emma; Mill, Jonathan; Price, Jack

    2016-10-01

    Clonal level random allelic expression imbalance and random monoallelic expression provides cellular heterogeneity within tissues by modulating allelic dosage. Although such expression patterns have been observed in multiple cell types, little is known about when in development these stochastic allelic choices are made. We examine allelic expression patterns in human neural progenitor cells before and after epigenetic reprogramming to induced pluripotency, observing that loci previously characterized by random allelic expression imbalance (0.63% of expressed genes) are generally reset to a biallelic state in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We subsequently neuralized the iPSCs and profiled isolated clonal neural stem cells, observing that significant random allelic expression imbalance is reestablished at 0.65% of expressed genes, including novel loci not found to show allelic expression imbalance in the original parental neural progenitor cells. Allelic expression imbalance was associated with altered DNA methylation across promoter regulatory regions, with clones characterized by skewed allelic expression being hypermethylated compared to their biallelic sister clones. Our results suggest that random allelic expression imbalance is established during lineage commitment and is associated with increased DNA methylation at the gene promoter. © 2016 Jeffries et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Intrinsic MYH7 expression regulation contributes to tissue level allelic imbalance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, Judith; Syring, Mandy; Rose, Julia; Weber, Anna-Lena; Ernstberger, Pia; Mayer, Anne-Kathrin; Becker, Edgar; Keyser, Britta; Dos Remedios, Cristobal; Perrot, Andreas; van der Velden, Jolanda; Francino, Antonio; Navarro-Lopez, Francesco; Ho, Carolyn Yung; Brenner, Bernhard; Kraft, Theresia

    2017-08-01

    HCM, the most common inherited cardiac disease, is mainly caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes. More than a third of the patients are heterozygous for mutations in the MYH7 gene encoding for the β-myosin heavy chain. In HCM-patients, expression of the mutant and the wildtype allele can be unequal, thus leading to fractions of mutant and wildtype mRNA and protein which deviate from 1:1. This so-called allelic imbalance was detected in whole tissue samples but also in individual cells. There is evidence that the severity of HCM not only depends on the functional effect of the mutation itself, but also on the fraction of mutant protein in the myocardial tissue. Allelic imbalance has been shown to occur in a broad range of genes. Therefore, we aimed to examine whether the MYH7-alleles are intrinsically expressed imbalanced or whether the allelic imbalance is solely associated with the disease. We compared the expression of MYH7-alleles in non-HCM donors and in HCM-patients with different MYH7-missense mutations. In the HCM-patients, we identified imbalanced as well as equal expression of both alleles. Also at the protein level, allelic imbalance was determined. Most interestingly, we also discovered allelic imbalance and balance in non-HCM donors. Our findings therefore strongly indicate that apart from mutation-specific mechanisms, also non-HCM associated allelic-mRNA expression regulation may account for the allelic imbalance of the MYH7 gene in HCM-patients. Since the relative amount of mutant mRNA and protein or the extent of allelic imbalance has been associated with the severity of HCM, individual analysis of the MYH7-allelic expression may provide valuable information for the prognosis of each patient.

  3. The Microcephalin Ancestral Allele in a Neanderthal Individual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Martina; Rizzi, Ermanno; Milani, Lucio; Corti, Giorgio; Balsamo, Carlotta; Vai, Stefania; Catalano, Giulio; Pilli, Elena; Longo, Laura; Condemi, Silvana; Giunti, Paolo; Hänni, Catherine; De Bellis, Gianluca; Orlando, Ludovic; Barbujani, Guido; Caramelli, David

    2010-01-01

    Background The high frequency (around 0.70 worlwide) and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years) of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report the first PCR amplification and high- throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1) locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy). We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. Conclusions/Significance The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS) Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA. PMID:20498832

  4. Introgressive hybridization: brown bears as vectors for polar bear alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailer, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics and consequences of introgression can inform about numerous evolutionary processes. Biologists have therefore long been interested in hybridization. One challenge, however, lies in the identification of nonadmixed genotypes that can serve as a baseline for accurate quantification of admixture. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Cahill et al. (2015) analyse a genomic data set of 28 polar bears, eight brown bears and one American black bear. Polar bear alleles are found to be introgressed into brown bears not only near a previously identified admixture zone on the Alaskan Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof (ABC) Islands, but also far into the North American mainland. Elegantly contrasting admixture levels at autosomal and X chromosomal markers, Cahill and colleagues infer that male-biased dispersal has spread these introgressed alleles away from the Late Pleistocene contact zone. Compared to a previous study on the ABC Island population in which an Alaskan brown bear served as a putatively admixture-free reference, Cahill et al. (2015) utilize a newly sequenced Swedish brown bear as admixture baseline. This approach reveals that brown bears have been impacted by introgression from polar bears to a larger extent (up to 8.8% of their genome), than previously known, including the bear that had previously served as admixture baseline. No evidence for introgression of brown bear into polar bear is found, which the authors argue could be a consequence of selection. Besides adding new exciting pieces to the puzzle of polar/brown bear evolutionary history, the study by Cahill and colleagues highlights that wildlife genomics is moving from analysing single genomes towards a landscape genomics approach. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The microcephalin ancestral allele in a Neanderthal individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Lari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency (around 0.70 worldwide and the relatively young age (between 14,000 and 62,000 years of a derived group of haplotypes, haplogroup D, at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus led to the proposal that haplogroup D originated in a human lineage that separated from modern humans >1 million years ago, evolved under strong positive selection, and passed into the human gene pool by an episode of admixture circa 37,000 years ago. The geographic distribution of haplogroup D, with marked differences between Africa and Eurasia, suggested that the archaic human form admixing with anatomically modern humans might have been Neanderthal. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the first PCR amplification and high-throughput sequencing of nuclear DNA at the microcephalin (MCPH1 locus from Neanderthal individual from Mezzena Rockshelter (Monti Lessini, Italy. We show that a well-preserved Neanderthal fossil dated at approximately 50,000 years B.P., was homozygous for the ancestral, non-D, allele. The high yield of Neanderthal mtDNA sequences of the studied specimen, the pattern of nucleotide misincorporation among sequences consistent with post-mortem DNA damage and an accurate control of the MCPH1 alleles in all personnel that manipulated the sample, make it extremely unlikely that this result might reflect modern DNA contamination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The MCPH1 genotype of the Monti Lessini (MLS Neanderthal does not prove that there was no interbreeding between anatomically archaic and modern humans in Europe, but certainly shows that speculations on a possible Neanderthal origin of what is now the most common MCPH1 haplogroup are not supported by empirical evidence from ancient DNA.

  6. Unexpected allelic heterogeneity and spectrum of mutations in Fowler syndrome revealed by next-generation exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Emilie; Albrecht, Steffen; Ha, Kevin C H; Jacob, Karine; Bolduc, Nathalie; Polychronakos, Constantin; Dechelotte, Pierre; Majewski, Jacek; Jabado, Nada

    2010-08-01

    Protein coding genes constitute approximately 1% of the human genome but harbor 85% of the mutations with large effects on disease-related traits. Therefore, efficient strategies for selectively sequencing complete coding regions (i.e., "whole exome") have the potential to contribute our understanding of human diseases. We used a method for whole-exome sequencing coupling Agilent whole-exome capture to the Illumina DNA-sequencing platform, and investigated two unrelated fetuses from nonconsanguineous families with Fowler Syndrome (FS), a stereotyped phenotype lethal disease. We report novel germline mutations in feline leukemia virus subgroup C cellular-receptor-family member 2, FLVCR2, which has recently been shown to cause FS. Using this technology, we identified three types of genetic abnormalities: point-mutations, insertions-deletions, and intronic splice-site changes (first pathogenic report using this technology), in the fetuses who both were compound heterozygotes for the disease. Although revealing a high level of allelic heterogeneity and mutational spectrum in FS, this study further illustrates the successful application of whole-exome sequencing to uncover genetic defects in rare Mendelian disorders. Of importance, we show that we can identify genes underlying rare, monogenic and recessive diseases using a limited number of patients (n=2), in the absence of shared genetic heritage and in the presence of allelic heterogeneity.

  7. Dopamine D4 Receptor Gene Polymorphism in a Sample of Egyptian Children With Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElBaz Mohamed, Farida; Kamal, Tarek Mostafa; Zahra, Sally Soliman; Khfagy, Mona Abdel Hakiem; Youssef, Azza Mohamed

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to detect DRD4 receptor gene polymorphisms in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) children and to correlate their phenotype-genotype. Fifty children with ADHD were diagnosed by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, criteria and were subjected to Conners Parent Rating Scale. All cases and controls were subjected to history taking, physical examination, IQ assessment, and dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) exon 3 genotyping. The 7-repeat allele was present only in controls, whereas 2-repeat allele was present in the ADHD children (heterozygous 2-repeat allele in 16% and homozygous in 26% of cases). Eight percent of cases had homozygous 4-repeat allele vs 28% of controls, whereas 10% of cases had heterozygous 4-repeat allele vs 6% of controls, with its predominance in controls. The 2-repeat and 4-repeat alleles have been associated with more inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity phenotypes. In conclusion, children with ADHD had a significant presence of the 2-repeat allele and absence of the 7-repeat allele.

  8. Association between the dopamine D3 receptor gene locus (DRD3) and unipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikeos, D G; Papadimitriou, G N; Avramopoulos, D; Karadima, G; Daskalopoulou, E G; Souery, D; Mendlewicz, J; Vassilopoulos, D; Stefanis, C N

    1999-12-01

    Dopamine neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and, more recently, affective disorders. Among the dopamine receptors, D3 can be considered as particularly related to affective disorders due to its neuroanatomical localization in the limbic region of the brain and its relation to the serotoninergic activity of the CNS. The possible involvement of dopamine receptor D3 in unipolar (UP) major depression was investigated by a genetic association study of the D3 receptor gene locus (DRD3) on 36 UP patients and 38 ethnically matched controls. An allelic association of DRD3 (Bal I polymorphism) and UP illness was observed, with the Gly-9 allele (allele '2', 206/98 base-pairs long) being more frequent in patients than in controls (49% vs 29%, P < 0.02). The genotypes containing this allele (1-2 and 2-2) were found in 75% of patients vs 50% of controls (P < 0.03, odds ratio = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.12-8.05). The effect of the genotype remained significant (P < 0.02) after sex and family history were controlled by a multiple linear regression analysis. These results further support the hypothesis that dopaminergic mechanisms may be implicated in the pathogenesis of affective disorder. More specifically, the '2' allele of the dopamine receptor D3 gene seems to be associated with unipolar depression and can be considered as a 'phenotypic modifier' for major psychiatric disorders.

  9. Prevalence of melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) V103I gene variant and its association with obesity among the Kampar Health Clinic cohort, Perak, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, H N; Fan, S H; Say, Y H

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of the Melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) V1031 gene variant and its association with obesity among a cohort of 254 patients (101 males; 118 obese) attending the Kampar Health Clinic. Genotyping revealed the mutated I allele frequency of 0.02, no homozygous mutated (II), and similar distribution of V and I alleles across BMI groups, genders and ethnic groups. No significant difference was found for the means of anthropometric measurements between alleles. Prevalence of this gene variant among the Malaysian cohort was similar with previous populations (2-4% of mutated allele carrier), but was not associated with obesity.

  10. Genotype and allelic frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism in the southwest population of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Zanganeh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1 is a main enzyme which plays a major role in activating and detoxifying many xenobiotics, carcinogens and drugs. Available studies suggest that CYP2E1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are involved in the risk of developing certain cancers after exposure to carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to assess genotype and allele frequencies of polymorphic CYP2E1*5B in the Iranian population. Material and Methods: This study was performed on 200 healthy individuals (female: 100, male: 100 in medical laboratories of Ahvaz during 2011. The CYP2E1 *5B (rs3813867 G-1293C assessment was carried out using PCR-RFLP method. The data were analyzed with ĸ2 and hardy-Weinberg Equation statistically methods. Results: The frequency of *1A/*1A (c1/c1, *1A/*5B (c1/c2 and *5B/*5B (c2/c2 genotypes was computed 97, 3 and 0 percent, respectively. The frequency of *1A (c1 and *5B (c2 alleles was computed 98.5 and 1.5 percent, respectively. No statistically significant difference was between two genders (p>0.05. Conclusion: The genotype distribution and allele frequencies of CYP2E1*5B polymorphism were similar to Turkish and some of the European populations. However, there are significant interethnic differences when the Iranian population is compared with the Eastern Asian, American and some of the European populations. The allelic distribution of this polymorphism did not vary with gender.

  11. Enhancement of allele discrimination by introduction of nucleotide mismatches into siRNA in allele-specific gene silencing by RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Ohnishi

    Full Text Available Allele-specific gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi is therapeutically useful for specifically inhibiting the expression of disease-associated alleles without suppressing the expression of corresponding wild-type alleles. To realize such allele-specific RNAi (ASP-RNAi, the design and assessment of small interfering RNA (siRNA duplexes conferring ASP-RNAi is vital; however, it is also difficult. In a previous study, we developed an assay system to assess ASP-RNAi with mutant and wild-type reporter alleles encoding the Photinus and Renilla luciferase genes. In line with experiments using the system, we realized that it is necessary and important to enhance allele discrimination between mutant and corresponding wild-type alleles. Here, we describe the improvement of ASP-RNAi against mutant alleles carrying single nucleotide variations by introducing base substitutions into siRNA sequences, where original variations are present in the central position. Artificially mismatched siRNAs or short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs against mutant alleles of the human Prion Protein (PRNP gene, which appear to be associated with susceptibility to prion diseases, were examined using this assessment system. The data indicates that introduction of a one-base mismatch into the siRNAs and shRNAs was able to enhance discrimination between the mutant and wild-type alleles. Interestingly, the introduced mismatches that conferred marked improvement in ASP-RNAi, appeared to be largely present in the guide siRNA elements, corresponding to the 'seed region' of microRNAs. Due to the essential role of the 'seed region' of microRNAs in their association with target RNAs, it is conceivable that disruption of the base-pairing interactions in the corresponding seed region, as well as the central position (involved in cleavage of target RNAs, of guide siRNA elements could influence allele discrimination. In addition, we also suggest that nucleotide mismatches at the 3'-ends of sense

  12. Association Between a Germline OCA2 Polymorphism at Chromosome 15q13.1 and Estrogen Receptor-Negative Breast Cancer Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azzato, E.M.; Tyrer, J.; Fasching, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    -sided. In the hypothesis-generating dataset, SNP rs4778137 (C > G) of the OCA2 gene at 15q13.1 was statistically significantly associated with overall survival among patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors, with the rare G allele being associated with increased overall survival (HR of death per rare allele carried.......92, P = 5 x 10(-4)). The rare G allele of the OCA2 polymorphism, rs4778137, may be associated with improved overall survival among patients with estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer...

  13. Origin and differential selection of allelic variation at TAS2R16 associated with salicin bitter taste sensitivity in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael C; Ranciaro, Alessia; Zinshteyn, Daniel; Rawlings-Goss, Renata; Hirbo, Jibril; Thompson, Simon; Woldemeskel, Dawit; Froment, Alain; Rucker, Joseph B; Omar, Sabah A; Bodo, Jean-Marie; Nyambo, Thomas; Belay, Gurja; Drayna, Dennis; Breslin, Paul A S; Tishkoff, Sarah A

    2014-02-01

    Bitter taste perception influences human nutrition and health, and the genetic variation underlying this trait may play a role in disease susceptibility. To better understand the genetic architecture and patterns of phenotypic variability of bitter taste perception, we sequenced a 996 bp region, encompassing the coding exon of TAS2R16, a bitter taste receptor gene, in 595 individuals from 74 African populations and in 94 non-Africans from 11 populations. We also performed genotype-phenotype association analyses of threshold levels of sensitivity to salicin, a bitter anti-inflammatory compound, in 296 individuals from Central and East Africa. In addition, we characterized TAS2R16 mutants in vitro to investigate the effects of polymorphic loci identified at this locus on receptor function. Here, we report striking signatures of positive selection, including significant Fay and Wu's H statistics predominantly in East Africa, indicating strong local adaptation and greater genetic structure among African populations than expected under neutrality. Furthermore, we observed a "star-like" phylogeny for haplotypes with the derived allele at polymorphic site 516 associated with increased bitter taste perception that is consistent with a model of selection for "high-sensitivity" variation. In contrast, haplotypes carrying the "low-sensitivity" ancestral allele at site 516 showed evidence of strong purifying selection. We also demonstrated, for the first time, the functional effect of nonsynonymous variation at site 516 on salicin phenotypic variance in vivo in diverse Africans and showed that most other nonsynonymous substitutions have weak or no effect on cell surface expression in vitro, suggesting that one main polymorphism at TAS2R16 influences salicin recognition. Additionally, we detected geographic differences in levels of bitter taste perception in Africa not previously reported and infer an East African origin for high salicin sensitivity in human populations.

  14. Association of apolipoprotein E allele {epsilon}4 with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; David, F.; Berriche, S. [Regional Center of Neurogenetics, Reims (France)] [and others

    1994-09-15

    Apolipoprotein E, type {epsilon}4 allele (ApoE {epsilon}4), is associated with late-onset sporadic Alzheimer`s disease (AD) in French patients. The association is highly significant (0.45 AD versus 0.12 controls for {epsilon}4 allele frequencies). These data support the involvement of ApoE {epsilon}4 allele as a very important risk factor for the clinical expression of AD. 22 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Polymorphisms in CYP1A1 and CYP3A5 Genes Contribute to the Variability in Granisetron Clearance and Exposure in Pregnant Women with Nausea and Vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Martha L; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Huijun; Caritis, Steve N; Venkataramanan, Raman

    2016-12-01

    Nausea and vomiting affect up to 90% of pregnant women. Granisetron is a potent and highly selective serotonin receptor antagonist and is an effective antiemetic. Findings from a prior study in pregnant women demonstrated a large interindividual variability in granisetron exposure. Granisetron is primarily metabolized by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes CYP1A1 and CYP3A and is likely a substrate of the ABCB1 transporter. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP3A, CYP1A1, and ABCB1 can alter drug metabolism. This study evaluated the influence of polymorphisms in CYP3A4, CYP3A5, CYP1A1, and ABCB1 on the pharmacokinetic properties of granisetron in pregnant women. The study enrolled 16 pregnant women (gestational age of 12-19 wks). All patients had nausea and vomiting and were treated with granisetron 1 mg. Granisetron plasma concentrations were determined using liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry. The patients' genotype was determined using TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assays. The Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium was assessed by comparing observed and expected genotype frequencies, using the exact test. Intravenous granisetron clearance was used as the dependent variable for analysis of associations. Of 16 patients, 25% were homozygous for the allele variant CYP3A5*3 and had a significantly lower granisetron clearance and increased area under the plasma concentration-versus-time curve (AUC) compared with nonhomozygous patients. Approximately one-third of patients (n=5) were carriers for the allele variant CYP1A1*2A and had a significantly higher granisetron clearance and decreased AUC. We did not find significant differences in the AUC or clearance for any SNPs in CYP3A4 and ABCB1 genes. Polymorphisms in CYP3A5 and CYP1A1 account for some of the variability in systemic clearance and exposure of granisetron in pregnant women. © 2016 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. Haplotype Diversity at Sub1 Locus and Allelic Distribution Among Rice Varieties of Tide and Flood Prone Areas of South-East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S.M. Masuduzzaman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms and restriction digestion-based haplotype variations among 160 flood prone rice varieties were analyzed with enzymes Alu I and Cac8 I to generate polymorphisms at Sub1A and Sub1C loci (conferring submergence tolerance, respectively. Haplotype associated with phenotype was used to study the haplotype variations at Sub1A and Sub1C loci and to determine their functional influence on submergence tolerance and stem elongation. Three patterns at Sub1A locus, Sub1A0 (null allele, Sub1A1 (does not cut and Sub1A2 (one SNP, and four patterns at Sub1C locus, Sub1C1, Sub1C2, Sub1C3 and Sub1C4, were generated. Both tolerant Sub1A1 and intolerant Sub1A2 had the same length, but the difference was presence of a restriction site in the Sub1A2, but absent at the Sub1A1. Further, two types of polymorphism were detected at the Sub1C, one included major length polymorphisms (165, 170 and 175 bp and the other was a single restriction site at different position. Eight haplotypes (different combinations of the two loci, A1C1, A1C2, A1C4, A2C2, A2C4, A0C2, A0C3 and A0C4, were detected among 160 varieties. Haplotype A1C1 was comparatively more related to haplotypes A1C2 and A1C4, having the same Sub1A allele, and these haplotypes were found only in Bangladeshi, Sri Lankan and Indian varieties. Most tolerant varieties in A1C1 haplotype showed slow elongation, having tolerant specific Sub1A1 and Sub1C1 alleles. Further, the varieties Madabaru and Kottamali (A2C2 also showed moderate level of tolerance without Sub1A1 allele. These varieties were different with FR13A and also suspected to carry different novel tolerant genes at other loci. These materials could be used for hybridization with Sub1 varieties for pyramiding additional tolerant specific alleles into a single genotype for improving submergence tolerance in rice.

  17. Allele specific expression in worker reproduction genes in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harindra E. Amarasinghe

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Methylation has previously been associated with allele specific expression in ants. Recently, we found methylation is important in worker reproduction in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris. Here we searched for allele specific expression in twelve genes associated with worker reproduction in bees. We found allele specific expression in Ecdysone 20 monooxygenase and IMP-L2-like. Although we were unable to confirm a genetic or epigenetic cause for this allele specific expression, the expression patterns of the two genes match those predicted for imprinted genes.

  18. Allele frequency changes due to hitch-hiking in genomic selection programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huiming; Sørensen, Anders Christian; Meuwissen, Theo H E

    2014-01-01

    of inbreeding due to changes in allele frequencies and hitch-hiking. This study aimed at understanding the impact of using long-term genomic selection on changes in allele frequencies, genetic variation and the level of inbreeding. Methods Selection was performed in simulated scenarios with a population of 400......-BLUP, Genomic BLUP and Bayesian Lasso. Changes in allele frequencies at QTL, markers and linked neutral loci were investigated for the different selection criteria and different scenarios, along with the loss of favourable alleles and the rate of inbreeding measured by pedigree and runs of homozygosity. Results...

  19. Analysis of the CCR5 gene coding region diversity in five South American populations reveals two new non-synonymous alleles in Amerindians and high CCR5*D32 frequency in Euro-Brazilians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica B.W. Boldt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5 molecule is an important co-receptor for HIV. The effect of the CCR5*D32 allele in susceptibility to HIV infection and AIDS disease is well known. Other alleles than CCR5*D32 have not been analysed before, neither in Amerindians nor in the majority of the populations all over the world. We investigated the distribution of the CCR5 coding region alleles in South Brazil and noticed a high CCR5*D32 frequency in the Euro-Brazilian population of the Paraná State (9.3%, which is the highest thus far reported for Latin America. The D32 frequency is even higher among the Euro-Brazilian Mennonites (14.2%. This allele is uncommon in Afro-Brazilians (2.0%, rare in the Guarani Amerindians (0.4% and absent in the Kaingang Amerindians and the Oriental-Brazilians. R223Q is common in the Oriental-Brazilians (7.7% and R60S in the Afro-Brazilians (5.0%. A29S and L55Q present an impaired response to b-chemokines and occurred in Afro- and Euro-Brazilians with cumulative frequencies of 4.4% and 2.7%, respectively. Two new non-synonymous alleles were found in Amerindians: C323F (g.3729G > T in Guarani (1.4% and Y68C (g.2964A > G in Kaingang (10.3%. The functional characteristics of these alleles should be defined and considered in epidemiological investigations about HIV-1 infection and AIDS incidence in Amerindian populations.

  20. Novel ligands for the human adenosine A1 receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, Lisa Chung Wai

    2005-01-01

    This research describes the quest to create 'super-caffeines', substances that only produce the desired effects of caffeine, and unlike caffeine, substances that should only have to be taken in measured, minute, controlled amounts to achieve these effects. Unless particular steps are taken to avoid

  1. Pyramiding genes and alleles for improving energy cane biomass yield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ming, Ray [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Nagai, Chifumi [Hawaii Agriculture Research Center; Yu, Qingyi [Texas A & M AgriLife Research

    2018-03-23

    could potentially regulate biomass yield. Differentially expressed genes, PIF3 and EIL5, involved in gibberellin and ethylene pathway could play an important role in biomass accumulation. Differential gene expression analysis was also carried out on the LU population. High-biomass yield was mainly determined by assimilation of carbon in source tissues. The high-level expression of fermentative genes in the low-biomass group was likely induced by their low-energy status. The haploid (tetraploid) genome of S. spontanium AP85-441 was sequenced with chromosome level assembly and allele defined annotation. This reference genome along with the upcoming S. officinarum genome will allow us to identify genes and alleles contributed to biomass yield.

  2. Investigating the relationship between FMR1 allele length and cognitive ability in children: a subtle effect of the normal allele range on the normal ability range?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loat, C S; Craig, G; Plomin, R; Craig, I W

    2006-09-01

    The FMR1 gene contains a trinucleotide repeat tract which can expand from a normal size of around 30 repeats to over 200 repeats, causing mental retardation (Fragile X Syndrome). Evidence suggests that premutation males (55-200 repeats) are susceptible to a late-onset tremor/ataxia syndrome and females to premature ovarian failure, and that intermediate alleles ( approximately 41-55 repeats) and premutations may be in excess in samples with special educational needs. We explored the relationship between FMR1 allele length and cognitive ability in 621 low ability and control children assessed at 4 and 7 years, as well as 122 students with high IQ. The low and high ability and control samples showed no between-group differences in incidence of longer alleles. In males there was a significant negative correlation between allele length and non-verbal ability at 4 years (p = 0.048), academic achievement in maths (p = 0.003) and English (p = 0.011) at 7 years, and IQ in the high ability group (p = 0.018). There was a significant negative correlation between allele length and a standardised score for IQ and general cognitive ability at age 7 in the entire male sample (p = 0.002). This suggests that, within the normal spectrum of allele length, increased repeat numbers may have a limiting influence on cognitive performance.

  3. Type 2 diabetes risk alleles demonstrate extreme directional differentiation among human populations, compared to other diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chen

    Full Text Available Many disease-susceptible SNPs exhibit significant disparity in ancestral and derived allele frequencies across worldwide populations. While previous studies have examined population differentiation of alleles at specific SNPs, global ethnic patterns of ensembles of disease risk alleles across human diseases are unexamined. To examine these patterns, we manually curated ethnic disease association data from 5,065 papers on human genetic studies representing 1,495 diseases, recording the precise risk alleles and their measured population frequencies and estimated effect sizes. We systematically compared the population frequencies of cross-ethnic risk alleles for each disease across 1,397 individuals from 11 HapMap populations, 1,064 individuals from 53 HGDP populations, and 49 individuals with whole-genome sequences from 10 populations. Type 2 diabetes (T2D demonstrated extreme directional differentiation of risk allele frequencies across human populations, compared with null distributions of European-frequency matched control genomic alleles and risk alleles for other diseases. Most T2D risk alleles share a consistent pattern of decreasing frequencies along human migration into East Asia. Furthermore, we show that these patterns contribute to disparities in predicted genetic risk across 1,397 HapMap individuals, T2D genetic risk being consistently higher for individuals in the African populations and lower in the Asian populations, irrespective of the ethnicity considered in the initial discovery of risk alleles. We observed a similar pattern in the distribution of T2D Genetic Risk Scores, which are associated with an increased risk of developing diabetes in the Diabetes Prevention Program cohort, for the same individuals. This disparity may be attributable to the promotion of energy storage and usage appropriate to environments and inconsistent energy intake. Our results indicate that the differential frequencies of T2D risk alleles may

  4. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Deanna S; Ivacic, Lynn C; Stefanski, Elisha L; McCarty, Catherine A

    2010-06-17

    There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies.Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German.41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are important for the design and

  5. Personal receptor repertoires: olfaction as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olender Tsviya

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on nucleotide diversity along completely sequenced human genomes has increased tremendously over the last few years. This makes it possible to reassess the diversity status of distinct receptor proteins in different human individuals. To this end, we focused on the complete inventory of human olfactory receptor coding regions as a model for personal receptor repertoires. Results By performing data-mining from public and private sources we scored genetic variations in 413 intact OR loci, for which one or more individuals had an intact open reading frame. Using 1000 Genomes Project haplotypes, we identified a total of 4069 full-length polypeptide variants encoded by these OR loci, average of ~10 per locus, constituting a lower limit for the effective human OR repertoire. Each individual is found to harbor as many as 600 OR allelic variants, ~50% higher than the locus count. Because OR neuronal expression is allelically excluded, this has direct effect on smell perception diversity of the species. We further identified 244 OR segregating pseudogenes (SPGs, loci showing both intact and pseudogene forms in the population, twenty-six of which are annotatively “resurrected” from a pseudogene status in the reference genome. Using a custom SNP microarray we validated 150 SPGs in a cohort of 468 individuals, with every individual genome averaging 36 disrupted sequence variations, 15 in homozygote form. Finally, we generated a multi-source compendium of 63 OR loci harboring deletion Copy Number Variations (CNVs. Our combined data suggest that 271 of the 413 intact OR loci (66% are affected by nonfunctional SNPs/indels and/or CNVs. Conclusions These results portray a case of unusually high genetic diversity, and suggest that individual humans have a highly personalized inventory of functional olfactory receptors, a conclusion that might apply to other receptor multigene families.

  6. Polymorphisms in estrogen-metabolizing and estrogen receptor genes and the risk of developing breast cancer among a cohort of women with benign breast disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Berndt, Sonja I; McSorley, Meghan A; Newschaffer, Craig J; Thuita, Lucy W; Argani, Pedram; Hoffman, Sandra C; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2006-01-01

    A cohort study was conducted to examine the role of genetic polymorphisms in three estrogen metabolizing enzymes (COMT, CYP1A1, CYP1B1) and the two estrogen receptors (ESR1, ESR2) in the progression of benign breast disease (BBD) to breast cancer. Among participants in an ongoing cohort study, 1438 Caucasian women had a breast biopsy for BBD and were successfully genotyped for at least one of the polymorphisms examined in this study. Genotypes were determined using DNA extracted from blood specimens collected in 1989. Incident cases of breast cancer occurring subsequent to BBD diagnosis up to 2003 were identified through cancer registries. Among all participants, the ESR2 *5772G allele was associated with a significant decrease in the risk of breast cancer among women with BBD (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.38; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.15, 0.96). Compared to the reference wild-type genotypes, marginally significant associations with the development of breast cancer were observed between carriers of the variant ESR1 – 104062T allele (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.45, 1.09), the variant ESR2 *38A allele (OR 1.40; 95% CI 0.88, 2.25), and the variant CYP1B1 453Ser allele (OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.95, 2.32). The results indicate that specific polymorphisms in the CYP1B1, ESR1, and ESR2 genes may play a role in progression of BBD to breast cancer among Caucasian women. Although additional studies are needed to confirm or refute our findings, these results suggest that genetic markers may aid in the identification of women who are at risk for progression of BBD to cancer

  7. Leukemogenic Ptpn11 allele causes defective erythropoiesis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Usenko

    Full Text Available Src homology 2 (SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 (SHP2, encoded by PTPN11, regulates signaling networks and cell fate in many tissues. Expression of oncogenic PTPN11 in the hematopoietic compartment causes myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN in humans and mice. However, the stage-specific effect(s of mutant Ptpn11 on erythroid development have remained unknown. We found that expression of an activated, leukemogenic Ptpn11 allele, Ptpn11D61Y, specifically in the erythroid lineage causes dyserythropoiesis in mice. Ptpn11D61Y progenitors produce excess cKIT+ CD71+ Ter119- cells and aberrant numbers of cKITl° CD71+ erythroblasts. Mutant erythroblasts show elevated activation of ERK, AKT and STAT3 in response to EPO stimulation, and MEK inhibitor treatment blocks Ptpn11D61Y-evoked erythroid hyperproliferation in vitro. Thus, the expression of oncogenic Ptpn11 causes dyserythropoiesis in a cell-autonomous manner in vivo.

  8. Hypomorphic temperature-sensitive alleles of NSDHL cause CK syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarren, Keith W; Severson, Tesa M; du Souich, Christèle; Stockton, David W; Kratz, Lisa E; Cunningham, David; Hendson, Glenda; Morin, Ryan D; Wu, Diane; Paul, Jessica E; An, Jianghong; Nelson, Tanya N; Chou, Athena; DeBarber, Andrea E; Merkens, Louise S; Michaud, Jacques L; Waters, Paula J; Yin, Jingyi; McGillivray, Barbara; Demos, Michelle; Rouleau, Guy A; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Smith, Raffaella; Tarpey, Patrick S; Shears, Debbie; Schwartz, Charles E; Gecz, Jozef; Stratton, Michael R; Arbour, Laura; Hurlburt, Jane; Van Allen, Margot I; Herman, Gail E; Zhao, Yongjun; Moore, Richard; Kelley, Richard I; Jones, Steven J M; Steiner, Robert D; Raymond, F Lucy; Marra, Marco A; Boerkoel, Cornelius F

    2010-12-10

    CK syndrome (CKS) is an X-linked recessive intellectual disability syndrome characterized by dysmorphism, cortical brain malformations, and an asthenic build. Through an X chromosome single-nucleotide variant scan in the first reported family, we identified linkage to a 5 Mb region on Xq28. Sequencing of this region detected a segregating 3 bp deletion (c.696_698del [p.Lys232del]) in exon 7 of NAD(P) dependent steroid dehydrogenase-like (NSDHL), a gene that encodes an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. We also found that males with intellectual disability in another reported family with an NSDHL mutation (c.1098 dup [p.Arg367SerfsX33]) have CKS. These two mutations, which alter protein folding, show temperature-sensitive protein stability and complementation in Erg26-deficient yeast. As described for the allelic disorder CHILD syndrome, cells and cerebrospinal fluid from CKS patients have increased methyl sterol levels. We hypothesize that methyl sterol accumulation, not only cholesterol deficiency, causes CKS, given that cerebrospinal fluid cholesterol, plasma cholesterol, and plasma 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels are normal in males with CKS. In summary, CKS expands the spectrum of cholesterol-related disorders and insight into the role of cholesterol in human development. Copyright © 2010 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The IL23R A/Gln381 allele promotes IL-23 unresponsiveness in human memory T-helper 17 cells and impairs Th17 responses in psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meglio, Paola; Villanova, Federica; Napolitano, Luca; Tosi, Isabella; Terranova Barberio, Manuela; Mak, Rose K; Nutland, Sarah; Smith, Catherine H; Barker, Jonathan N W N; Todd, John A; Nestle, Frank O

    2013-10-01

    We and others have shown that the minor, nonconserved allele Gln381 of the Arg381Gln single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs11209026G>A) of the IL-23 receptor gene (IL23R) protects against psoriasis. Moreover, we have recently shown impaired IL-23-induced IL-17A production and STAT-3 phosphorylation in Th17 cells generated in vitro from healthy individuals heterozygous for the protective A allele (GA). However, the biological effect of this variant has not been determined in homozygous carriers of the protective A allele (AA), nor in psoriatic patients. Here we expand our functional investigation of the IL23R Arg381Gln gene variant to include AA homozygous individuals. By using isolated memory CD4+ T cells, we found attenuated IL-23-induced Th17 response in heterozygous individuals. Moreover, we found that AA homozygous individuals were strikingly unresponsive to IL-23, with minimal or no IL-17A and IL-17F production and failure of human memory Th17 cell survival/expansion. Finally, IL-23-induced Th17 response was also attenuated in age- and sex-matched GA versus GG psoriatic patients undergoing systemic treatment. Taken together, our data provide evidence for an allele-dosage effect for IL-23R Gln381 and indicate that common gene alleles associated with complex diseases might have biological effects of considerable magnitude in homozygous carriers.

  10. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  11. Distribution of coat-color-associated alleles in the domestic horse population and Przewalski's horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissmann, Monika; Musa, Lutfi; Zakizadeh, Sonia; Ludwig, Arne

    2016-11-01

    Considering the hidden mode of inheritance of some coat-color-associated alleles, we investigated the presence/absence of coat-color-associated alleles in 1093 domestic horses of 55 breeds and 20 specimens of Przewalski's horse. For coat-color genotyping, allele specific PCR, pyrosequencing and Li-Cor analyses were conducted on 12 coat-color-associated alleles of five genes. Our data provide deep insight into the distribution of coat-color-associated alleles within breeds. We found that the alleles for the basic colorations (bay, black, and chestnut) are widely distributed and occur in nearly all breeds. Alleles leading to dilutions or patterns are rare in domestic breeds and were not found in Przewalski's horse. Higher frequencies of these alleles are only found in breeds that are selected for their expressed phenotypes (e.g., Kinsky horse, Lewitzer, Tinker). Nevertheless, our study produced strong evidence that molecular testing of the coat color is necessary for well-defined phenotyping to avoid unexpected colorations of offspring that can result in legal action.

  12. An Updated Collection of Sequence Barcoded Temperature-Sensitive Alleles of Yeast Essential Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Megan; Milbury, Karissa L; Chiang, Jennifer H; Sinha, Sunita; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-07-14

    Systematic analyses of essential gene function using mutant collections in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been conducted using collections of heterozygous diploids, promoter shut-off alleles, through alleles with destabilized mRNA, destabilized protein, or bearing mutations that lead to a temperature-sensitive (ts) phenotype. We previously described a method for construction of barcoded ts alleles in a systematic fashion. Here we report the completion of this collection of alleles covering 600 essential yeast genes. This resource covers a larger gene repertoire than previous collections and provides a complementary set of strains suitable for single gene and genomic analyses. We use deep sequencing to characterize the amino acid changes leading to the ts phenotype in half of the alleles. We also use high-throughput approaches to describe the relative ts behavior of the alleles. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental usefulness of the collection in a high-content, functional genomic screen for ts alleles that increase spontaneous P-body formation. By increasing the number of alleles and improving the annotation, this ts collection will serve as a community resource for probing new aspects of biology for essential yeast genes. Copyright © 2015 Kofoed et al.

  13. Mannose-binding lectin variant alleles and the risk of arterial thrombosis in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhlenschlaeger, Tommy; Garred, Peter; Madsen, Hans O

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is an important complication in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Variant alleles of the mannose-binding lectin gene are associated with SLE as well as with severe atherosclerosis. We determined whether mannose-binding lectin variant alleles were associated...

  14. Correlation in chicken between the marker LEI0258 alleles and Major Histocompatibility Complex sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chazara, Olympe; Juul-Madsen, Helle Risdahl; Chang, Chi-Seng

    Background The LEI0258 marker is located within the B region of the chicken Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), and is surprisingly well associated with serology. Therefore, the correlation between the LEI0258 alleles and the MHC class I and the class II alleles at the level of sequences is w...

  15. Genotype calling in tetraploid species from bi-allelic marker data using mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, R.E.; Gort, G.; Vosman, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automated genotype calling in tetraploid species was until recently not possible, which hampered genetic analysis. Modern genotyping assays often produce two signals, one for each allele of a bi-allelic marker. While ample software is available to obtain genotypes (homozygous for either

  16. A new mutation for Huntington disease following maternal transmission of an intermediate allele

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Semaka, Alicia; Kay, Chris; Belfroid, René D. M.; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Losekoot, Monique; van Langen, Irene M.; van Maarle, Merel C.; Oosterloo, Mayke; Hayden, Michael R.; van Belzen, Martine J.

    2015-01-01

    New mutations for Huntington disease (HD) originate from CAG repeat expansion of intermediate alleles (27-35 CAG). Expansions of such alleles into the pathological range (≥ 36 CAG) have been exclusively observed in paternal transmission. We report the occurrence of a new mutation that defies the

  17. CYP3A4 allelic variants with amino acid substitutions in exons 7 and 12: evidence for an allelic variant with altered catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, F; Sapone, A; Elizondo, G; Stocker, P; Miller, V P; Zheng, W; Raunio, H; Crespi, C L; Gonzalez, F J

    2000-01-01

    To determine the existence of mutant and variant CgammaP3A4 alleles in three racial groups and to assess functions of the variant alleles by complementary deoxyribonucleic acid (cDNA) expression. A bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the complete CgammaP3A4 gene was isolated and the exons and surrounding introns were directly sequenced to develop primers to polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplify and sequence the gene from lymphocyte DNA. DNA samples from Chinese, black, and white subjects were screened. Mutating the affected amino acid in the wild-type cDNA and expressing the variant enzyme with use of the baculovirus system was used to functionally evaluate the variant allele having a missense mutation. To investigate the existence of mutant and variant CgammaP3A4 alleles in humans, all 13 exons and the 5'-flanking region of the human CgammaP3A4 gene in three racial groups were sequenced and four alleles were identified. An A-->G point mutation in the 5'-flanking region of the human CgammaP3A4 gene, designated CgammaP3A4*1B, was found in the three different racial groups. The frequency of this allele in a white population was 4.2%, whereas it was 66.7% in black subjects. The CgammaP3A4*1B allele was not found in Chinese subjects. A second variant allele, designated CgammaP3A4*2, having a Ser222Pro change, was found at a frequency of 2.7% in the white population and was absent in the black subjects and Chinese subjects analyzed. Baculovirus-directed cDNA expression revealed that the CYP3A4*2 P450 had a lower intrinsic clearance for the CYP3A4 substrate nifedipine compared with the wild-type enzyme but was not significantly different from the wild-type enzyme for testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation. Another rare allele, designated CgammaP3A4*3, was found in a single Chinese subject who had a Met445Thr change in the conserved heme-binding region of the P450. These are the first examples of potential function polymorphisms resulting from missense mutations in

  18. Bi-allelic Mutations in PKD1L1 Are Associated with Laterality Defects in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrini, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Akdemir, Zeynep C; Braxton, Alicia; Azamian, Mahshid S; Eldomery, Mohammad K; Miller, Kathryn; Kois, Chelsea; Sack, Virginia; Shur, Natasha; Rijhsinghani, Asha; Chandarana, Jignesh; Ding, Yan; Holtzman, Judy; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Hanchard, Neil A; Harel, Tamar; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Belmont, John W; Lupski, James R; Yang, Yaping

    2016-10-06

    Disruption of the establishment of left-right (L-R) asymmetry leads to situs anomalies ranging from situs inversus totalis (SIT) to situs ambiguus (heterotaxy). The genetic causes of laterality defects in humans are highly heterogeneous. Via whole-exome sequencing (WES), we identified homozygous mutations in PKD1L1 from three affected individuals in two unrelated families. PKD1L1 encodes a polycystin-1-like protein and its loss of function is known to cause laterality defects in mouse and medaka fish models. Family 1 had one fetus and one deceased child with heterotaxy and complex congenital heart malformations. WES identified a homozygous splicing mutation, c.6473+2_6473+3delTG, which disrupts the invariant splice donor site in intron 42, in both affected individuals. In the second family, a homozygous c.5072G>C (p.Cys1691Ser) missense mutation was detected in an individual with SIT and congenital heart disease. The p.Cys1691Ser substitution affects a highly conserved cysteine residue and is predicted by molecular modeling to disrupt a disulfide bridge essential for the proper folding of the G protein-coupled receptor proteolytic site (GPS) motif. Damaging effects associated with substitutions of this conserved cysteine residue in the GPS motif have also been reported in other genes, namely GPR56, BAI3, and PKD1 in human and lat-1 in C. elegans, further supporting the likely pathogenicity of p.Cys1691Ser in PKD1L1. The identification of bi-allelic PKD1L1 mutations recapitulates previous findings regarding phenotypic consequences of loss of function of the orthologous genes in mice and medaka fish and further expands our understanding of genetic contributions to laterality defects in humans. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A mutant crp allele that differentially activates the operons of the fuc regulon in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Lin, E C

    1988-05-01

    L-Fucose is used by Escherichia coli through an inducible pathway mediated by a fucP-encoded permease, a fucI-encoded isomerase, a fucK-encoded kinase, and a fucA-encoded aldolase. The adolase catalyzes the formation of dihydroxyacetone phosphate and L-lactaldehyde. Anaerobically, lactaldehyde is converted by a fucO-encoded oxidoreductase to L-1,2-propanediol, which is excreted. The fuc genes belong to a regulon comprising four linked operons: fucO, fucA, fucPIK, and fucR. The positive regulator encoded by fucR responds to fuculose 1-phosphate as the effector. Mutants serially selected for aerobic growth on propanediol became constitutive in fucO and fucA [fucO(Con) fucA(Con)], but noninducible in fucPIK [fucPIK(Non)]. An external suppressor mutation that restored growth on fucose caused constitutive expression of fucPIK. Results from this study indicate that this suppressor mutation occurred in crp, which encodes the cyclic AMP-binding (or receptor) protein. When the suppressor allele (crp-201) was transduced into wild-type strains, the recipient became fucose negative and fucose sensitive (with glycerol as the carbon and energy source) because of impaired expression of fucA. The fucPIK operon became hyperinducible. The growth rate on maltose was significantly reduced, but growth on L-rhamnose, D-galactose, L-arabinose, glycerol, or glycerol 3-phosphate was close to normal. Lysogenization of fuc+ crp-201 cells by a lambda bacteriophage bearing crp+ restored normal growth ability on fucose. In contrast, lysogenization of [fucO(Con)fucA(Con)fucPIK(Non)crp-201] cells by the same phage retarded their growth on fucose.

  20. Working mechanism of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease: cleavage of IgA1 antibody to Neisseria meningitidis PorA requires de novo synthesis of IgA1 Protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidarsson, Gestur; Overbeeke, Natasja; Stemerding, Annette M.; van den Dobbelsteen, Germie; van Ulsen, Peter; van der Ley, Peter; Kilian, Mogens; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis secretes a protease that specifically cleaves the hinge region of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), releasing the effector (Fc) domain of IgA1 from the antigen binding (Fab) determinants. Theoretically, the remaining Fab fragments can block pathogen receptors or toxins and still

  1. Working mechanism of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) protease: cleavage of IgA1 antibody to Neisseria meningitidis PorA requires de novo synthesis of IgA1 Protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidarsson, G; Overbeeke, N; Stemerding, AM

    2005-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis secretes a protease that specifically cleaves the hinge region of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1), releasing the effector (Fc) domain of IgA1 from the antigen binding (Fab) determinants. Theoretically, the remaining Fab fragments can block pathogen receptors or toxins and still...

  2. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) alleles in the Quechua, a high altitude South American native population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupert, J L; Devine, D V; Monsalve, M V; Hochachka, P W

    1999-01-01

    Recently it was reported that an allelic variant of the gene encoding angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) was significantly over-represented in a cohort of elite British mountaineers. It was proposed that this may be evidence for a specific genetic factor influencing the human capacity for physical performance. The implication that this allele could enhance performance at high altitude prompted us to determine its frequency in Quechua speaking natives living at altitudes greater than 3000m on the Andean Altiplano in South America. We found that the frequency of the putative performance allele in the Quechuas, although significantly higher than in Caucasians, was not different from lowland Native American populations. This observation suggests that, although the higher frequency of the 'performance allele' may have facilitated the migration of the ancestral Quechua to the highlands, the ACE insertion allele has not been subsequently selected for in this high altitude population.

  3. Allele-specific characterization of alanine: glyoxylate aminotransferase variants associated with primary hyperoxaluria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa D Lage

    Full Text Available Primary Hyperoxaluria Type 1 (PH1 is a rare autosomal recessive kidney stone disease caused by deficiency of the peroxisomal enzyme alanine: glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT, which is involved in glyoxylate detoxification. Over 75 different missense mutations in AGT have been found associated with PH1. While some of the mutations have been found to affect enzyme activity, stability, and/or localization, approximately half of these mutations are completely uncharacterized. In this study, we sought to systematically characterize AGT missense mutations associated with PH1. To facilitate analysis, we used two high-throughput yeast-based assays: one that assesses AGT specific activity, and one that assesses protein stability. Approximately 30% of PH1-associated missense mutations are found in conjunction with a minor allele polymorphic variant, which can interact to elicit complex effects on protein stability and trafficking. To better understand this allele interaction, we functionally characterized each of 34 mutants on both the major (wild-type and minor allele backgrounds, identifying mutations that synergize with the minor allele. We classify these mutants into four distinct categories depending on activity/stability results in the different alleles. Twelve mutants were found to display reduced activity in combination with the minor allele, compared with the major allele background. When mapped on the AGT dimer structure, these mutants reveal localized regions of the protein that appear particularly sensitive to interactions with the minor allele variant. While the majority of the deleterious effects on activity in the minor allele can be attributed to synergistic interaction affecting protein stability, we identify one mutation, E274D, that appears to specifically affect activity when in combination with the minor allele.

  4. Short, natural, and extended photoperiod response in BC2F4 lines of bread wheat with different photoperiod-1 (Ppd-1) alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, A R; Horsnell, R; Werner, C P; Turner, A S; Rose, G A; Bedard, C; Howell, P; Wilhelm, E P; Mackay, I J; Howells, R M; Greenland, A; Laurie, D A; Gosman, N

    2013-04-01

    Flowering is a critical period in the life cycle of flowering plant species, resulting in an irreversible commitment of significant resources. Wheat is photoperiod sensitive, flowering only when daylength surpasses a critical length; however, photoperiod insensitivity (PI) has been selected by plant breeders for >40 years to enhance yield in certain environments. Control of flowering time has been greatly facilitated by the development of molecular markers for the Photoperiod-1 (Ppd-1) homeoloci, on the group 2 chromosomes. In the current study, an allelic series of BC2F4 lines in the winter wheat cultivars 'Robigus' and 'Alchemy' was developed to elucidate the influence on flowering of eight gene variants from the B- and D-genomes of bread wheat and the A-genome of durum wheat. Allele effects were tested in short, natural, and extended photoperiods in the field and controlled environments. Across genetic background and treatment, the D-genome PI allele, Ppd-D1a, had a more potent effect on reducing flowering time than Ppd-B1a. However, there was significant donor allele effect for both Ppd-D1a and Ppd-B1a, suggesting the presence of linked modifier genes and/or additional sources of latent sensitivity. Development of Ppd-A1a BC2F4 lines derived from synthetic hexaploid wheat provided an opportunity to compare directly the flowering time effect of the A-genome allele from durum with the B- and D-genome variants from bread wheat for the first time. Analyses indicated that the reducing effect of Ppd-A1a is comparable with that of Ppd-D1a, confirming it as a useful alternative source of PI.

  5. Impact of estrogen receptor α gene and oxytocin receptor gene polymorphisms on female sexuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia K Armeni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, research attention has increasingly been paid to the neurobiological component of sexual behavior. The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation of estrogen receptor α (ERA gene polymorphism (rs2234693-PvuII (T→C substitution and oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism (rs53576 (G→A substitution with sexuality parameters of young, healthy women. One hundred thirty-three Greek heterosexual women, students in higher education institutions, 20–25 years of age, sexually active, with normal menstrual cycles (28–35 days, were recruited in the study. Exclusion criteria were chronic and/or major psychiatric diseases, use of oral contraceptive pills (OCs, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, thyroid diseases as well as drugs that are implicated in hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis. T allele (wildtype of rs2234693 (PvuII polymorphism of ERA gene was correlated with increased levels of arousal and lubrication, whereas A allele (polymorphic of rs53576 (OXTR polymorphism was correlated with increased arousal levels. The simultaneous presence of both T allele of rs2234693 (PvuII and A allele of rs53576 (OXTR polymorphisms (T + A group was correlated with increased arousal, orgasm levels as well as female sexual function index full score. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the interaction between ERA and OXTR with regard to sexual function in women. Female sexuality is a complex behavioral trait that encompasses both biological and psychological components. It seems that variability in female sexual response stems from genetic variability that characterizes endocrine, neurotransmitter and central nervous system influences.

  6. The Combinational Use of CRISPR/Cas9 and Targeted Toxin Technology Enables Efficient Isolation of Bi-Allelic Knockout Non-Human Mammalian Clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Watanabe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome editing systems such as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 have facilitated genomic modification in mammalian cells. However, most systems employ transient treatment with selective drugs such as puromycin to obtain the desired genome-edited cells, which often allows some untransfected cells to survive and decreases the efficiency of generating genome-edited cells. Here, we developed a novel targeted toxin-based drug-free selection system for the enrichment of genome-edited cells. Cells were transfected with three expression vectors, each of which carries a guide RNA (gRNA, humanized Cas9 (hCas9 gene, or Clostridium perfringens-derived endo-β-galactosidase C (EndoGalC gene. Once EndoGalC is expressed in a cell, it digests the cell-surface α-Gal epitope, which is specifically recognized by BS-I-B4 lectin (IB4. Three days after transfection, these cells were treated with cytotoxin saporin-conjugated IB4 (IB4SAP for 30 min at 37 °C prior to cultivation in a normal medium. Untransfected cells and those weakly expressing EndoGalC will die due to the internalization of saporin. Cells transiently expressing EndoGalC strongly survive, and some of these surviving clones are expected to be genome-edited bi-allelic knockout (KO clones due to their strong co-expression of gRNA and hCas9. When porcine α-1,3-galactosyltransferase gene, which can synthesize the α-Gal epitope, was attempted to be knocked out, 16.7% and 36.7% of the surviving clones were bi-allelic and mono-allelic knockout (KO cells, respectively, which was in contrast to the isolation of clones in the absence of IB4SAP treatment. Namely, 0% and 13.3% of the resulting clones were bi-allelic and mono-allelic KO cells, respectively. A similar tendency was seen when other target genes such as DiGeorge syndrome critical region gene 2 and transforming growth factor-β receptor type 1 gene were

  7. The Gln223Arg polymorphism of the leptin receptor in Pima Indians: influence on energy expenditure, physical activity and lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, N; Vozarova, B; Del Parigi, A

    2002-01-01

    Leptin regulates body weight by its receptor-mediated anorectic, thermogenic and antisteatotic effects. Recently, lower leptin binding to the soluble form of the leptin receptor (LEPR) was shown in carriers of the Arg223-encoding allele of the Gln223Arg polymorphism of the LEPR. To investigate wh...

  8. Immunogenicity of Recombinant Proteins Consisting of Plasmodium vivax Circumsporozoite Protein Allelic Variant-Derived Epitopes Fused with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Flagellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Monica Teixeira Andrade; Camacho, Ariane Guglielmi Ariza; Teixeira, Laís Helena; Bargieri, Daniel Youssef; Soares, Irene Silva; Tararam, Cibele Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP)-based recombinant fusion vaccine is the first malaria vaccine to reach phase III clinical trials. Resistance to infection correlated with the production of antibodies to the immunodominant central repeat region of the CSP. In contrast to P. falciparum, vaccine development against the CSP of Plasmodium vivax malaria is far behind. Based on this gap in our knowledge, we generated a recombinant chimeric protein containing the immunodominant central repeat regions of the P. vivax CSP fused to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium-derived flagellin (FliC) to activate the innate immune system. The recombinant proteins that were generated contained repeat regions derived from each of the 3 different allelic variants of the P. vivax CSP or a fusion of regions derived from each of the 3 allelic forms. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with the fusion proteins alone or in combination with the Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR-3) agonist poly(I·C), and the anti-CSP serum IgG response was measured. Immunization with a mixture of the 3 recombinant proteins, each containing immunodominant epitopes derived from a single allelic variant, rather than a single recombinant protein carrying a fusion of regions derived from each of 3 allelic forms elicited a stronger immune response. This response was independent of TLR-4 but required TLR-5/MyD88 activation. Antibody titers significantly increased when poly(I·C) was used as an adjuvant with a mixture of the 3 recombinant proteins. These recombinant fusion proteins are novel candidates for the development of an effective malaria vaccine against P. vivax. PMID:23863502

  9. Structural Mapping of Adenosine Receptor Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespers, Willem; Schiedel, Anke C; Heitman, Laura H

    2018-01-01

    The four adenosine receptors (ARs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with exceptional foundations for structure-based ligand design. The vast amount of mutagenesis data, accumulated in the literature since the 1990s, has been recently supplemente...

  10. Allele Age Under Non-Classical Assumptions is Clarified by an Exact Computational Markov Chain Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sanctis, Bianca; Krukov, Ivan; de Koning, A P Jason

    2017-09-19

    Determination of the age of an allele based on its population frequency is a well-studied problem in population genetics, for which a variety of approximations have been proposed. We present a new result that, surprisingly, allows the expectation and variance of allele age to be computed exactly (within machine precision) for any finite absorbing Markov chain model in a matter of seconds. This approach makes none of the classical assumptions (e.g., weak selection, reversibility, infinite sites), exploits modern sparse linear algebra techniques, integrates over all sample paths, and is rapidly computable for Wright-Fisher populations up to N e  = 100,000. With this approach, we study the joint effect of recurrent mutation, dominance, and selection, and demonstrate new examples of "selective strolls" where the classical symmetry of allele age with respect to selection is violated by weakly selected alleles that are older than neutral alleles at the same frequency. We also show evidence for a strong age imbalance, where rare deleterious alleles are expected to be substantially older than advantageous alleles observed at the same frequency when population-scaled mutation rates are large. These results highlight the under-appreciated utility of computational methods for the direct analysis of Markov chain models in population genetics.

  11. S-allele diversity in Sorbus aucuparia and Crataegus monogyna (Rosaceae: Maloideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspé, O; Kohn, J R

    2002-06-01

    RT-PCR was used to obtain the first estimates from natural populations of allelic diversity at the RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility locus in the Rosaceae. A total of 20 alleles were retrieved from 20 Sorbus aucuparia individuals, whereas 17 alleles were found in 13 Crataegus monogyna samples. Estimates of population-level allele numbers fall within the range observed in the Solanaceae, the only other family with RNase-based incompatibility for which estimates are available. The nucleotide diversity of S-allele sequences was found to be much lower in the two Rosaceae species as compared with the Solanaceae. This was not due to a lower sequence divergence among most closely related alleles. Rather, it is the depth of the entire genealogy that differs markedly in the two families, with Rosaceae S-alleles exhibiting more recent apparent coalescence. We also investigated patterns of selection at the molecular level by comparing nucleotide diversity at synonymous and nonsynonymous sites. Stabilizing selection was inferred for the 5' region of the molecule, while evidence of diversifying selection was present elsewhere.

  12. Preferential Allele Expression Analysis Identifies Shared Germline and Somatic Driver Genes in Advanced Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Najeeb M.; Martinez, Alejandra; Al-Farsi, Halema; Mery, Eliane; Puydenus, Laurence; Pujol, Pascal; Khalak, Hanif G.; McLurcan, Cameron; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Al-Azwani, Iman; Al-Dous, Eman; Mohamoud, Yasmin A.; Malek, Joel A.; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genes where a variant allele is preferentially expressed in tumors could lead to a better understanding of cancer biology and optimization of targeted therapy. However, tumor sample heterogeneity complicates standard approaches for detecting preferential allele expression. We therefore developed a novel approach combining genome and transcriptome sequencing data from the same sample that corrects for sample heterogeneity and identifies significant preferentially expressed alleles. We applied this analysis to epithelial ovarian cancer samples consisting of matched primary ovary and peritoneum and lymph node metastasis. We find that preferentially expressed variant alleles include germline and somatic variants, are shared at a relatively high frequency between patients, and are in gene networks known to be involved in cancer processes. Analysis at a patient level identifies patient-specific preferentially expressed alleles in genes that are targets for known drugs. Analysis at a site level identifies patterns of site specific preferential allele expression with similar pathways being impacted in the primary and metastasis sites. We conclude that genes with preferentially expressed variant alleles can act as cancer drivers and that targeting those genes could lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26735499

  13. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Elizabeth G; Sanderson, Brian J; McNeil, Casey L; Long, Anthony D; Macdonald, Stuart J

    2014-05-01

    Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  14. Genetic dissection of the Drosophila melanogaster female head transcriptome reveals widespread allelic heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G King

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern genetic mapping is plagued by the "missing heritability" problem, which refers to the discordance between the estimated heritabilities of quantitative traits and the variance accounted for by mapped causative variants. One major potential explanation for the missing heritability is allelic heterogeneity, in which there are multiple causative variants at each causative gene with only a fraction having been identified. The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS implicitly assume that a single SNP can explain all the variance for a causative locus. However, if allelic heterogeneity is prevalent, a substantial amount of genetic variance will remain unexplained. In this paper, we take a haplotype-based mapping approach and quantify the number of alleles segregating at each locus using a large set of 7922 eQTL contributing to regulatory variation in the Drosophila melanogaster female head. Not only does this study provide a comprehensive eQTL map for a major community genetic resource, the Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource, but it also provides a direct test of the allelic heterogeneity hypothesis. We find that 95% of cis-eQTLs and 78% of trans-eQTLs are due to multiple alleles, demonstrating that allelic heterogeneity is widespread in Drosophila eQTL. Allelic heterogeneity likely contributes significantly to the missing heritability problem common in GWAS studies.

  15. Type 2 Diabetes Risk Allele Loci in the Qatari Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L O'Beirne

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D is increasing in the Middle East. However, the genetic risk factors for T2D in the Middle Eastern populations are not known, as the majority of studies of genetic risk for T2D are in Europeans and Asians.All subjects were ≥3 generation Qataris. Cases with T2D (n = 1,124 and controls (n = 590 were randomly recruited and assigned to the 3 known Qatari genetic subpopulations [Bedouin (Q1, Persian/South Asian (Q2 and African (Q3]. Subjects underwent genotyping for 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 29 genes known to be associated with T2D in Europeans and/or Asian populations, and an additional 27 tag SNPs related to these susceptibility loci. Pre-study power analysis suggested that with the known incidence of T2D in adult Qataris (22%, the study population size would be sufficient to detect significant differences if the SNPs were risk factors among Qataris, assuming that the odds ratio (OR for T2D SNPs in Qatari's is greater than or equal to the SNP with highest known OR in other populations.Haplotype analysis demonstrated that Qatari haplotypes in the region of known T2D risk alleles in Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations were similar to European haplotypes. After Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment for multiple testing, only two SNPs (rs7903146 and rs4506565, both associated with transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2, achieved statistical significance in the whole study population. When T2D subjects and control subjects were assigned to the known 3 Qatari subpopulations, and analyzed individually and with the Q1 and Q2 genetic subpopulations combined, one of these SNPs (rs4506565 was also significant in the admixed group. No other SNPs associated with T2D in all Qataris or individual genetic subpopulations.With the caveats of the power analysis, the European/Asian T2D SNPs do not contribute significantly to the high prevalence of T2D in the Qatari population, suggesting that the genetic risks for T2D are

  16. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  17. [Analysis of allele dropout at TH01 locus in paternity testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Li; Shen, Xiao-li; Xue, Shi-jie; Hu, Jie

    2013-10-01

    To analyze allele dropout at TH01 locus in paternity testing in order to determine the accurate genotype. To use a two STR loci genotyping system to verify an abnormal genotype for the TH01 locus with PCR using specific primers, cloning and DNA sequencing. A rare allele at TH01 locus named 5.2, which was undetectable with PowerPlex 21 system, was detected with an Identifiler system. Genetic variations may result in rare alleles and loci loss. To avoid misjudgment, laboratories should have a variety of methods for detecting loci loss.

  18. Suspension Array for Multiplex Detection of Eight Fungicide-Resistance Related Alleles in Botrytis cinerea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xin; Xie, Fei; Lv, Baobei; Zhao, Pengxiang; Ma, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    A simple and high-throughput assay to detect fungicide resistance is required for large-scale monitoring of the emergence of resistant strains of Botrytis cinerea. Using suspension array technology performed on a Bio-Plex 200 System, we developed a single-tube allele-specific primer extension (ASPE) assay that can simultaneously detect eight alleles in one reaction. These eight alleles include E198 and 198A of the β-Tubulin gene (BenA), H272 and 272Y of the Succinate dehydrogenase iron–sulfur...

  19. Overdispersion in allelic counts and θ-correction in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Torben

    2010-01-01

    We present a statistical model for incorporating the extra variability in allelic counts due to subpopulation structures. In forensic genetics, this effect is modelled by the identical-by-descent parameter θ, which measures the relationship between pairs of alleles within a population relative...... with computation of the profile log-likelihood, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. In order to compare our method with existing methods, we reanalysed FBI data from Budowle and Moretti (1999) with allele counts in six US subpopulations. Furthermore, we investigate properties of our methodology from...

  20. Fine Mapping Seronegative and Seropositive Rheumatoid Arthritis to Shared and Distinct HLA Alleles by Adjusting for the Effects of Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Buhm; Diogo, Dorothee; Eyre, Steve; Kallberg, Henrik; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Bowes, John; Padyukov, Leonid; Okada, Yukinori; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Martin, Javier; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2014-01-01

    Despite progress in defining human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles for anti-citrullinated-protein-autoantibody-positive (ACPA(+)) rheumatoid arthritis (RA), identifying HLA alleles for ACPA-negative (ACPA(-)) RA has been challenging because of clinical heterogeneity within clinical cohorts. We

  1. Type 1 diabetes susceptibility alleles are associated with distinct alterations in the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullaney, Jane A; Stephens, Juliette E; Costello, Mary-Ellen; Fong, Cai; Geeling, Brooke E; Gavin, Patrick G; Wright, Casey M; Spector, Timothy D; Brown, Matthew A; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E

    2018-02-17

    Dysbiosis of the gut microbiota has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune conditions including type 1 diabetes (T1D). It is unknown whether changes in the gut microbiota observed in T1D are due to environmental drivers, genetic risk factors, or both. Here, we have performed an analysis of associations between the gut microbiota and T1D genetic risk using the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of T1D and the TwinsUK cohort. Through the analysis of five separate colonies of T1D susceptible NOD mice, we identified similarities in NOD microbiome that were independent of animal facility. Introduction of disease protective alleles at the Idd3 and Idd5 loci (IL2, Ctla4, Slc11a1, and Acadl) resulted in significant alterations in the NOD microbiome. Disease-protected strains exhibited a restoration of immune regulatory pathways within the gut which could also be reestablished using IL-2 therapy. Increased T1D disease risk from IL-2 pathway loci in the TwinsUK cohort of human subjects resulted in some similar microbiota changes to those observed in the NOD mouse. These findings demonstrate for the first time that type 1 diabetes-associated genetic variants that restore immune tolerance to islet antigens also result in functional changes in the gut immune system and resultant changes in the microbiota.

  2. Characterization of a family of gamma-ray-induced CHO mutants demonstrates that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the low-density lipoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sege, R.D.; Kozarsky, K.F.; Krieger, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ldlA locus is one of four Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell loci which are known to be required for the synthesis of functional low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors. Previous studies have suggested that the ldlA locus is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. To confirm this assignment, we have isolated a partial genomic clone of the Chinese hamster LDL receptor gene and used this and other nucleic acid and antibody probes to study a family of ldlA mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation. Our analysis suggests that there are two LDL receptor alleles in wild-type CHO cells. Each of the three mutants isolated after gamma-irradiation had detectable deletions affecting one of the two LDL receptor alleles. One of the mutants also had a disruption of the remaining allele, resulting in the synthesis of an abnormal receptor precursor which was not subject to Golgi-associated posttranslational glycoprotein processing. The correlation of changes in the expression, structure, and function of LDL receptors with deletions in the LDL receptor genes in these mutants directly demonstrated that the ldlA locus in CHO cells is diploid and encodes the LDL receptor. In addition, our analysis suggests that CHO cells in culture may contain a partial LDL receptor pseudogene

  3. Quantitative threefold allele-specific PCR (QuanTAS-PCR) for highly sensitive JAK2 V617F mutant allele detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapparoli, Giada V; Jorissen, Robert N; Hewitt, Chelsee A; McBean, Michelle; Westerman, David A; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The JAK2 V617F mutation is the most frequent somatic change in myeloproliferative neoplasms, making it an important tumour-specific marker for diagnostic purposes and for the detection of minimal residual disease. Sensitive quantitative assays are required for both applications, particularly for the monitoring of minimal residual disease, which requires not only high sensitivity but also very high specificity. We developed a highly sensitive probe-free quantitative mutant-allele detection method, Quantitative Threefold Allele-Specific PCR (QuanTAS-PCR), that is performed in a closed-tube system, thus eliminating the manipulation of PCR products. QuantTAS-PCR uses a threefold approach to ensure allele-specific amplification of the mutant sequence: (i) a mutant allele-specific primer, (ii) a 3′dideoxy blocker to suppress false-positive amplification from the wild-type template and (iii) a PCR specificity enhancer, also to suppress false-positive amplification from the wild-type template. Mutant alleles were quantified relative to exon 9 of JAK2. We showed that the addition of the 3′dideoxy blocker suppressed but did not eliminate false-positive amplification from the wild-type template. However, the addition of the PCR specificity enhancer near eliminated false-positive amplification from the wild-type allele. Further discrimination between true and false positives was enabled by using the quantification cycle (Cq) value of a single mutant template as a cut-off point, thus enabling robust distinction between true and false positives. As 10,000 JAK2 templates were used per replicate, the assay had a sensitivity of 1/10 -4 per replicate. Greater sensitivity could be reached by increasing the number of replicates analysed. Variation in replicates when low mutant-allele templates were present necessitated the use of a statistics-based approach to estimate the load of mutant JAK2 copies. QuanTAS-PCR showed comparable quantitative results when validated against a

  4. The 5-HT2C receptor gene Cys23Ser polymorphism influences the intravaginal ejaculation latency time in Dutch Caucasian men with lifelong premature ejaculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paddy KC Janssen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that the persistent short intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT of men with lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE is related to 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT2C receptor functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism and the duration of IELT in men with LPE. Therefore, a prospective study was conducted in 64 Dutch Caucasian men with LPE. Baseline IELT during coitus was assessed by stopwatch over a 1-month period. All men were genotyped for Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism. Allele frequencies and genotypes of Cys and Ser variants of 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism were determined. Association between Cys/Cys and Ser/Ser genotypes and the natural logarithm of the IELT in men with LPE were investigated. As a result, the geometric mean, median and natural mean IELT were 25.2, 27.0, 33.9 s, respectively. Of all men, 20.0%, 10.8%, 23.1% and 41.5% ejaculated within 10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-60 s after vaginal penetration. Of the 64 men, the Cys/Cys and Ser/Ser genotype frequency for the Cys23Ser polymorphism of the 5-HT2C receptor gene was 81% and 19%, respectively. The geometric mean IELT of the wildtypes (Cys/Cys is significantly lower (22.6 s; 95% CI 18.3-27.8 s than in male homozygous mutants (Ser/Ser (40.4 s; 95% CI 20.3-80.4 s (P = 0.03. It is concluded that Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism is associated with the IELT in men with LPE. Men with Cys/Cys genotype have shorter IELTs than men with Ser/Ser genotypes.

  5. The 5-HT2C receptor gene Cys23Ser polymorphism influences the intravaginal ejaculation latency time in Dutch Caucasian men with lifelong premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Paddy Kc; Schaik, Ron van; Olivier, Berend; Waldinger, Marcel D

    2014-01-01

    It has been postulated that the persistent short intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) of men with lifelong premature ejaculation (LPE) is related to 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)2C receptor functioning. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism and the duration of IELT in men with LPE. Therefore, a prospective study was conducted in 64 Dutch Caucasian men with LPE. Baseline IELT during coitus was assessed by stopwatch over a 1-month period. All men were genotyped for Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism. Allele frequencies and genotypes of Cys and Ser variants of 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism were determined. Association between Cys/Cys and Ser/Ser genotypes and the natural logarithm of the IELT in men with LPE were investigated. As a result, the geometric mean, median and natural mean IELT were 25.2, 27.0, 33.9 s, respectively. Of all men, 20.0%, 10.8%, 23.1% and 41.5% ejaculated within 10, 10-20, 20-30 and 30-60 s after vaginal penetration. Of the 64 men, the Cys/Cys and Ser/Ser genotype frequency for the Cys23Ser polymorphism of the 5-HT2C receptor gene was 81% and 19%, respectively. The geometric mean IELT of the wildtypes (Cys/Cys) is significantly lower (22.6 s; 95% CI 18.3-27.8 s) than in male homozygous mutants (Ser/Ser) (40.4 s; 95% CI 20.3-80.4 s) (P = 0.03). It is concluded that Cys23Ser 5-HT2C receptor gene polymorphism is associated with the IELT in men with LPE. Men with Cys/Cys genotype have shorter IELTs than men with Ser/Ser genotypes.

  6. HLA allele associations in idiopathic recurrent spontaneous abortion patients from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Shankarkumar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Rejection of semiallogenic foetus in recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA has been postulated to be a consequence of genetic and immunological phenomena. Aim: To evaluate the role of human leukocyte antigen (HLA alleles in RSA in Indian couples. Settings and Design : A case-control study. Materials and Methods : Eighty-one randomly selected couples with unexplained three or more RSAs and a control group of 97 couples with live birth belonging to the same ethnic background, referred to the Gynaecology Department, KEM Hospital were included in the case-control study. Serological HLA A and B typing was done followed by molecular subtypes, defined using PCR-SSOP technique for HLA A, B, and C in 40 couples and DRB1FNx01 and DQB1FNx01 in 28 couples which were then compared with appropriate case 46 and 88 controls. Results : Serologically A3 (15.43% vs . 4.43%; odds ratio (OR = 4.34; P = 0.0002 and B17 (25.3% vs . 11.34%; OR = 3.49; P = 0.0001 were increased. Haplotype A1-B17 was significantly increased. Molecular subtyping revealed that AFNx01030102 (11.25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 3.00; P = 0.07, BFNx015701 (11.25% vs . 1.08%; OR = 13.10; P = 0.003, CwFNx01120201 (25% vs . 4.34%; OR = 10.50; P = 2.05E-05, HLA DRB1FNx01030101 (17.85% vs . 3.40%; OR = 7.6; P = 0.0001, DRB1FNx01150101 (32.14% vs . 13.63%; OR = 4.8; P = 0.0003, and DQB1FNx01060101 (35.71% vs . 29.34%; OR = 2.3; P = 0.004 were significantly increased in patients. A differential association was noticed when compared with reported world RSA patients. Conclusion: The HLA alleles AFNx01030101, BFNx015701, CwFNx01120201, DRB1FNx01030101, and DRB1FNx01150101 as well as their associated ancestral haplotype may play a significant role in development of RSA in India.

  7. Association of the dopamine D2 receptor rs1800497 polymorphism and eating behavior in Chilean children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obregón, Ana M; Valladares, Macarena; Goldfield, Gary

    2017-03-01

    Studies have established a strong genetic component in eating behavior. The TaqI A1 polymorphism (rs1800497) has previously been associated with obesity and eating behavior. Additionally, this polymorphism has been associated with diminished dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) density, higher body mass, and food reinforcement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the DRD2 rs1800497 polymorphism and eating behavior in Chilean children. This was a cross-sectional study in which we selected 258 children (44% girls, 56% boys; ages 8-14 y) with a wide variation in body mass index. Anthropometric measurements were performed by standard procedures. Eating behavior was assessed using the Eating in Absence of Hunger Questionnaire (EAHQ), Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire, and the Food Reinforcement Value Questionnaire. Genotype of the rs1800497 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Association of the TaqI A1 variant (T allele) with eating behavior was assessed using nonparametric tests. Compared with normal-weight children, the obese group demonstrated higher scores on the External Eating and Fatigue/Boredom subscales of the EAHQ. Higher scores were assessed in Food Responsiveness, Emotional Overeating, Enjoyment to Food and Desire to Drink subscales (P Food subscale in boys. The TaqI A1 polymorphism may be a risk factor for eating behavior traits that may predispose children to greater energy intake and obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Population estimators or progeny tests: what is the best method to assess null allele frequencies at SSR loci?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oddou-Muratorio, S.; Vendramin, G.G.; Buiteveld, J.; Fady, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear SSRs are notorious for having relatively high frequencies of null alleles, i.e. alleles that fail to amplify and are thus recessive and undetected in heterozygotes. In this paper, we compare two kinds of approaches for estimating null allele frequencies at seven nuclear microsatellite

  9. Leukocyte Ig-Like Receptors – a model for MHC class I disease associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Louise Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I polymorphisms are associated with the outcome of some viral infections and autoimmune diseases. MHC-I proteins present antigenic peptides and are recognised by receptors on Natural Killer cells and Cytotoxic T lymphocytes, thus enabling the immune system to detect self-antigens and eliminate targets lacking self or expressing foreign antigens. Recognition of MHC-I, however, extends beyond receptors on cytotoxic leukocytes. Members of the Leukocyte Ig-like receptor (LILR family are expressed on monocytic cells and can recognise both classical and non-classical MHC-I alleles. Despite their relatively broad specificity when compared to the T Cell Receptor or Killer Ig-like Receptors, variations in the strength of LILR binding between different MHC-I alleles have recently been shown to correlate with control of HIV infection. We suggest that LILR recognition may mediate MHC-I disease association in a manner that does not depend on a binary discrimination of self/non-self by cytotoxic cells. Instead, the effects of LILR activity following engagement by MHC-I may represent a degrees of self model, whereby strength of binding to different alleles determines the degree of influence exerted by these receptors on immune cell functions. LILR are expressed by myelomonocytic cells and lymphocytes, extending their influence across antigen presenting cell subsets including dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells. They have been identified as important players in the response to infection, inflammatory diseases and cancer, with recent literature to indicate that MHC-I recognition by these receptors and consequent allelic effects could extend an influence beyond the immune system.

  10. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and sulfotransferase polymorphisms, sex hormone concentrations, and tumor receptor status in breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sparks, Rachel; Yuan, Xiaopu; Lin, Ming Gang; McVarish, Lynda; Aiello, Erin J; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Bigler, Jeannette; Tworoger, Shelley S; Yasui, Yutaka; Rajan, Kumar B; Porter, Peggy; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes are involved in removing sex hormones from circulation. Polymorphic variation in five UGT and SULT genes – UGT1A1 ((TA) 6 /(TA) 7 ), UGT2B4 (Asp 458 Glu), UGT2B7 (His 268 Tyr), UGT2B15 (Asp 85 Tyr), and SULT1A1 (Arg 213 His) – may be associated with circulating sex hormone concentrations, or the risk of an estrogen receptor-negative (ER - ) or progesterone receptor-negative (PR - ) tumor. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the odds ratios of an ER - or PR - tumor associated with polymorphisms in the genes listed above for 163 breast cancer patients from a population-based cohort study of women in western Washington. Adjusted geometric mean estradiol, estrone, and testosterone concentrations were calculated within each UGT and SULT genotype for a subpopulation of postmenopausal breast cancer patients not on hormone therapy 2–3 years after diagnosis (n = 89). The variant allele of UGT1A1 was associated with reduced risk of an ER - tumor (P for trend = 0.03), and variants of UGT2B15 and SULT1A1 were associated with non-statistically significant risk reductions. There was some indication that plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations varied by UGT2B15 and SULT1A1 genotypes; women with the UGT2B15 Asp/Tyr and Tyr/Tyr genotypes had higher concentrations of estradiol than women with the Asp/Asp genotype (P = 0.004). Compared with women with the SULT1A1 Arg/Arg and Arg/His genotypes, women with the His/His genotype had elevated concentrations of testosterone (P = 0.003). The risk of ER - breast cancer tumors may vary by UGT or SULT genotype. Further, plasma estradiol and testosterone concentrations in breast cancer patients may differ depending on some UGT and SULT genotypes

  11. Identification of Ppd-B1 alleles in common wheat cultivars by CAPS marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoń, S; Kowalczyk, K; Miazga, D

    2012-05-01

    Photoperiod response is a major determinant of the duration of growth stages in common wheat. In common wheat, many genes play a role in determining flowering time, but the Ppd genes located on the homoeologous group 2 play a major role. Of these Ppd-B1 is located on the short arm of 2B. In 107 common wheat cultivars grown in Poland and neighboring countries, the identification of Ppd-B1 alleles using in-del analysis by using a CAPS markers was investigated. 87 cultivars were shown to carry dominant Ppd-B1 alleles. This shows that Ppd-B1 alleles is have been widely used in common wheat breeding programme in these countries. Recessive ppd-B1 alleles were found only in 20 cultivars (12 Polish, 5 former Soviet Union, 2 German, 1 Swedish).

  12. The power and statistical behaviour of allele-sharing statistics when ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    3Human Genetics Division, School of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Abstract ... that the statistic S-#alleles gives good performance for recessive ... (H50) of the families are linked to the single marker. The.

  13. Allele-Specific Alternative mRNA processing (ASARP) | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A software pipeline for prediction of allele-specific alternative RNA processing events using single RNA-seq data. The current version focuses on prediction of alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation modulated by genetic variants.

  14. Fitness differences due to allelic variation at Esterase-4 locus in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KAVITA KRISHNAMOORTI

    2017-08-31

    Aug 31, 2017 ... Keywords. esterases; null allele; reproductive fitness; natural selection; Drosophila ananassae. .... cific substrate (1-naphthylacetate AR) and stain (fast blue. RR). On the ... transferred to fresh food vials and eggs were counted.

  15. Fitness differences due to allelic variation at Esterase-4 Locus in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-01-04

    Jan 4, 2017 ... specific substrate (1-Naphthylacetate AR) and stain (Fast blue RR). On the basis of ... After 24 hr. each pair was transferred to fresh food vials .... derived from the natural populations harbour allelic variation that affects lifespan.

  16. Comparative population analysis of metallothionein promoter alleles suggests stress-induced microevolution in the field.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, T.K.S.; Del Rio Lopez, R.; Mariën, A.G.H.; Timmermans, M.J.T.N.; Montagne-Wajer, K; van Straalen, N.M.; Roelofs, D.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a model system for microevolution of transcriptional regulation: metallothionein expression in springtails. A previous survey of the metallothionein promoter in Orchesella cincta (Collembola) revealed nine alleles with differential basal activities and responses to cadmium and

  17. Comparative population analysis of metallothionein promoter alleles suggests stress-induced microevolution in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Thierry K S; Lopéz, Ricardo del Rio; Mariën, Janine; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Montagne-Wajer, K; van Straalen, Nico M; Roelofs, Dick

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a model system for microevolution of transcriptional regulation: metallothionein expression in springtails. A previous survey of the metallothionein promoter in Orchesella cincta (Collembola) revealed nine alleles with differential basal activities and responses to cadmium and

  18. Allelic Dropout in the ENG Gene, Affecting the Results of Genetic Testing in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Pernille M; Kjeldsen, A.D.; Ousager, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal-dominant vascular disorder with three disease-causing genes identified to date: ENG, ACVRL1, and SMAD4. We report an HHT patient with allelic dropout that on routine sequence analysis for a known mutation in the family (c.817......-3T>G in ENG) initially seemed to be homozygous for the mutation. Aim: To explore the possibility of allelic dropout causing a false result in this patient. Methods: Mutation analysis of additional family members was performed and haplotype analysis carried out. New primers were designed to reveal...... the presence of a possible sequence variant, which could explain the presumed allelic dropout. Results: Allelic dropout caused by a six-nucleotide duplication close to the standard reverse primer was the assumed cause of a false homozygous diagnosis. Conclusion: Sequence variants outside of the primer regions...

  19. The number of self-incompatibility alleles in a finite, subdivided population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schierup, M H

    1998-01-01

    The actual and effective number of gametophytic self-incompatibility alleles maintained at mutation-drift-selection equilibrium in a finite population subdivided as in the island model is investigated by stochastic simulations. The existing theory founded by Wright predicts that for a given...... population size the number of alleles maintained increases monotonically with decreasing migration as is the case for neutral alleles. The simulation results here show that this is not true. At migration rates above Nm = 0.01-0.1, the actual and effective number of alleles is lower than for an undivided...... of individuals in the population but it underestimates the neutral effective size of the subdivided population. Udgivelsesdato: 1998-Jun...

  20. Haptoglobin genotyping of Vietnamese: global distribution of HP del, complete deletion allele of the HP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Lan, Vi Thi Mai; Minh, Tu Binh; Takahashi, Shin; Trang, Pham Thi Kim; Viet, Pham Hung; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Koda, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    The haptoglobin (HP) gene deletion allele (HP(del)) is responsible for anhaptoglobinemia and a genetic risk factor for anaphylaxis reaction after transfusion due to production of the anti-HP antibody. The distribution of this allele has been explored by several groups including ours. Here, we studied the frequency of HP(del) in addition to the distribution of common HP genotypes in 293 Vietnamese. The HP(del) was encountered with the frequency of 0.020. The present result suggested that this deletion allele is restricted to East and Southeast Asians. Thus, this allele seems to be a potential ancestry informative marker for these populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Using multi-locus allelic sequence data to estimate genetic divergence among four Lilium (Liliaceae) cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahin, A.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Tuyl, van J.M.; Arens, P.F.P.; Bakker, F.T.

    2014-01-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) may enable estimating relationships among genotypes using allelic variation of multiple nuclear genes simultaneously. We explored the potential and caveats of this strategy in four genetically distant Lilium cultivars to estimate their genetic divergence from

  2. Allele mining across DREB1A and DREB1B in diverse rice ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Low temperature stress is one of the major limiting factors affecting rice productivity in higher altitudes. DREB1A and ..... to isolate useful alleles from related genotypes. A total of ... work also suggests that DREB induction and cold response.

  3. The LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Joseph L; Brown, Michael S

    2009-04-01

    In this article, the history of the LDL receptor is recounted by its codiscoverers. Their early work on the LDL receptor explained a genetic cause of heart attacks and led to new ways of thinking about cholesterol metabolism. The LDL receptor discovery also introduced three general concepts to cell biology: receptor-mediated endocytosis, receptor recycling, and feedback regulation of receptors. The latter concept provides the mechanism by which statins selectively lower plasma LDL, reducing heart attacks and prolonging life.

  4. Effects of polymorphism rs3123554 in the cannabinoid receptor gene type 2 (CB2R) on metabolic and adiposity parameters after weight loss with two hypocaloric diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luis, D A; Mulero, I; Primo, D; Izaola, O; Aller, R

    2018-05-01

    The role of CB2R gene variants on weight loss after a dietary intervention remained unclear. Our aim was to analyze the effects of rs3123554 of CB2R receptor gene on metabolic and adiposity parameters after two different hypocaloric diets in obese subjects. A Caucasian population of 280 obese patients was enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated during 3 months to one of two diets (Diet I - moderate in carbohydrate. Vs Diet II - normal in carbohydrate). In both genotype groups (GG vs GA + AA), body weight, body mass index (BMI), fat mass, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure decreased after diet I and II. The decrease of these parameters was higher in non A allele carriers than A allele carriers. Pre- and post-dietary intervention, body weight, BMI, fat mass and waist circumference were higher in A allele carriers than non A allele carriers. In non A allele carriers, the decrease of glucose, insulin, HOMA-IR and Interleukin-6 levels was higher than A allele carriers after both diets. Carriers of the minor allele of rs3123554 variant of CB2R gene loose less body weight during two different hypocaloric diets. The improvement of metabolic parameters was better in no A allele carriers than A allele carriers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Diversity Outbred Mice at 21: Maintaining Allelic Variation in the Face of Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Chesler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multi-parent populations (MPPs capture and maintain the genetic diversity from multiple inbred founder strains to provide a resource for high-resolution genetic mapping through the accumulation of recombination events over many generations. Breeding designs that maintain a large effective population size with randomized assignment of breeders at each generation can minimize the impact of selection, inbreeding, and genetic drift on allele frequencies. Small deviations from expected allele frequencies will have little effect on the power and precision of genetic analysis, but a major distortion could result in reduced power and loss of important functional alleles. We detected strong transmission ratio distortion in the Diversity Outbred (DO mouse population on chromosome 2, caused by meiotic drive favoring transmission of the WSB/EiJ allele at the R2d2 locus. The distorted region harbors thousands of polymorphisms derived from the seven non-WSB founder strains and many of these would be lost if the sweep was allowed to continue. To ensure the utility of the DO population to study genetic variation on chromosome 2, we performed an artificial selection against WSB/EiJ alleles at the R2d2 locus. Here, we report that we have purged the WSB/EiJ allele from the drive locus while preserving WSB/EiJ alleles in the flanking regions. We observed minimal disruption to allele frequencies across the rest of the autosomal genome. However, there was a shift in haplotype frequencies of the mitochondrial genome and an increase in the rate of an unusual sex chromosome aneuploidy. The DO population has been restored to genome-wide utility for genetic analysis, but our experience underscores that vigilant monitoring of similar genetic resource populations is needed to ensure their long-term utility.

  6. Analysis of FBN1 allele expression by dermal fibroblasts from Marfan syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putman, E.A.; Cao, S.N.; Milewicz, D.M. [Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Screening for mutations in the FBN1 cDNA from Marfan patient cell strains has detected mutations in only 10-15% of patients. In an attempt to explain this poor detection rate, we examined FBN1 allele expression and fibrillin synthesis by 26 cell strains from Marfan patients. DNA from the patients and 10 controls was assessed for the presence of a polymorphic Rsa I restriction site in the 3{prime} untranslated region of the FBN1 gene. Twelve of 26 patient and 5 of 10 control DNAs were heterozygous. Fibroblast RNA from the heterozygous cell strains was reverse-transcribed and subsequently PCR amplified using a [{sup 32}P]-labelled primer, digested with Rsa I and analyzed. Although 3 samples showed no transcript from one allele by ethidium bromide staining, a Betagen scanner detected low levels (10-15%) of that allele. In addition, there was unequal expression of the two alleles in three other patients; for example, only 30% expression from one allele. The remaining patients and the controls had equal expression of each allele. Fibrillin protein synthesis by fibroblasts from these heterozygous patients was also examined. After a 30 minute pulse with [{sup 35}S]-cysteine, cell lysates were collected and proteins analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The amount of fibrillin produced relative to a reference protein was determined using a Betagen scanner. Fibrillin protein synthesis was reduced in 2 of the 3 patients with very low RNA production from one of the FBN1 alleles. All other Marfan and control cell strains showed normal amounts of fibrillin synthesized. The low expression levels from one allele may contribute to, but not fully account for, the low detection rate of FBN1 mutations. Interestingly, protein synthesis levels were not affected in 4 of 6 cell strains demonstrating low levels of RNA expression.

  7. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE

  8. No evidence for allelic association between bipolar disorder and monoamine oxidase A gene polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craddock, N.; Daniels, J.; Roberts, E. [Univ. of Wales, College of Medicine, Cardiff (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    We have tested the hypothesis that DNA markers in the MAOA gene show allelic association with bipolar affective disorder. Eighty-four unrelated Caucasian patients with DSM III-R bipolar disorder and 84 Caucasian controls were typed for three markers in MAOA: a dinucleotide repeat in intron 2, a VNTR in intron 1, and an Fnu4HI RFLP in exon 8. No evidence for allelic association was observed between any of the markers and bipolar disorder. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  9. QuASAR-MPRA: accurate allele-specific analysis for massively parallel reporter assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Cynthia A; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Brown, Christopher; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2018-03-01

    The majority of the human genome is composed of non-coding regions containing regulatory elements such as enhancers, which are crucial for controlling gene expression. Many variants associated with complex traits are in these regions, and may disrupt gene regulatory sequences. Consequently, it is important to not only identify true enhancers but also to test if a variant within an enhancer affects gene regulation. Recently, allele-specific analysis in high-throughput reporter assays, such as massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs), have been used to functionally validate non-coding variants. However, we are still missing high-quality and robust data analysis tools for these datasets. We have further developed our method for allele-specific analysis QuASAR (quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads) to analyze allele-specific signals in barcoded read counts data from MPRA. Using this approach, we can take into account the uncertainty on the original plasmid proportions, over-dispersion, and sequencing errors. The provided allelic skew estimate and its standard error also simplifies meta-analysis of replicate experiments. Additionally, we show that a beta-binomial distribution better models the variability present in the allelic imbalance of these synthetic reporters and results in a test that is statistically well calibrated under the null. Applying this approach to the MPRA data, we found 602 SNPs with significant (false discovery rate 10%) allele-specific regulatory function in LCLs. We also show that we can combine MPRA with QuASAR estimates to validate existing experimental and computational annotations of regulatory variants. Our study shows that with appropriate data analysis tools, we can improve the power to detect allelic effects in high-throughput reporter assays. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR/tree/master/mpra. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu. Supplementary data are available online at Bioinformatics. © The Author (2017). Published by

  10. SNP calling, genotype calling, and sample allele frequency estimation from new-generation sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus; Korneliussen, Thorfinn Sand; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2012-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimation and application of sample allele frequency spectra from New-Generation Sequencing (NGS) data. In this method, we first estimate the allele frequency spectrum using maximum likelihood. In contrast to previous methods, the likelihood function is cal...... be extended to various other cases including cases with deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. We evaluate the statistical properties of the methods using simulations and by application to a real data set....

  11. The link between some alleles on human leukocyte antigen system and autism in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Gehan A; Shehab, Abeer A; Al-Ayadhi, Laila Y

    2013-02-15

    The reason behind the initiation of autoimmunity to brain in some patients with autism is not well understood. There is an association between some autoimmune disorders and specific alleles of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. Thus, we examined the frequency of some HLA-DRB1 alleles in 100 autistic children and 100 healthy matched-children by differential hybridization with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes. The risk of association between acquisition or absence of these alleles and autism and also a history of autoimmune diseases in autistic relatives was studied. Autistic children had significantly higher frequency of HLA-DRB1*11 allele than controls (P<0.001). In contrast, autistic children had significantly lower frequency of HLA-DRB1*03 allele than controls (P<0.001). Acquisition of HLA-DRB1*011 and absence of HLA-DRB1*3 had significant risk for association with autism (odds ratio: 3.21 and 0.17, respectively; 95% CI: 1.65-6.31 and 0.06-0.45, respectively). HLA-DRB1*11 had a significant risk for association with a family history of autoimmunity in autistic children (odds ratio: 5.67; 95% CI: 2.07-16.3). In conclusions, the link of some HLA alleles to autism and to family history of autoimmunity indicates the possible contributing role of these alleles to autoimmunity in some autistic children. Despite a relatively small sample size, we are the first to report a probable protective association of HLA-DRB1*03 allele with autism. It warrants a replication study of a larger sample to validate the HLA-DRB1 genetic association with autism. This is important to determine whether therapeutic modulations of the immune function are legitimate avenues for novel therapy in selected cases of autism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dopamine Receptor Genes Modulate Associative Memory in Old Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papenberg, Goran; Becker, Nina; Ferencz, Beata; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Laukka, Erika J; Bäckman, Lars; Brehmer, Yvonne

    2017-02-01

    Previous research shows that associative memory declines more than item memory in aging. Although the underlying mechanisms of this selective impairment remain poorly understood, animal and human data suggest that dopaminergic modulation may be particularly relevant for associative binding. We investigated the influence of dopamine (DA) receptor genes on item and associative memory in a population-based sample of older adults (n = 525, aged 60 years), assessed with a face-scene item associative memory task. The effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms of DA D1 (DRD1; rs4532), D2 (DRD2/ANKK1/Taq1A; rs1800497), and D3 (DRD3/Ser9Gly; rs6280) receptor genes were examined and combined into a single genetic score. Individuals carrying more beneficial alleles, presumably associated with higher DA receptor efficacy (DRD1 C allele; DRD2 A2 allele; DRD3 T allele), performed better on associative memory than persons with less beneficial genotypes. There were no effects of these genes on item memory or other cognitive measures, such as working memory, executive functioning, fluency, and perceptual speed, indicating a selective association between DA genes and associative memory. By contrast, genetic risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) was associated with worse item and associative memory, indicating adverse effects of APOE ε4 and a genetic risk score for AD (PICALM, BIN1, CLU) on episodic memory in general. Taken together, our results suggest that DA may be particularly important for associative memory, whereas AD-related genetic variations may influence overall episodic memory in older adults without dementia.

  13. Self-incompatibility of Prunus tenella and evidence that reproductively isolated species of Prunus have different SFB alleles coupled with an identical S-RNase allele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbanovski, Nada; Tobutt, Kenneth R; Konstantinović, Miroslav; Maksimović, Vesna; Sargent, Daniel J; Stevanović, Vladimir; Bosković, Radovan I

    2007-05-01

    Many species of Prunus display an S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (SI), controlled by a single highly polymorphic multigene complex termed the S-locus. This comprises tightly linked stylar- and pollen-expressed genes that determine the specificity of the SI response. We investigated SI of Prunus tenella, a wild species found in small, isolated populations on the Balkan peninsula, initially by pollination experiments and identifying stylar-expressed RNase alleles. Nine P. tenella S-RNase alleles (S(1)-S(9)) were cloned; their sequence analysis showed a very high ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions (K(a)/K(s)) and revealed that S-RNase alleles of P. tenella, unlike those of Prunus dulcis, show positive selection in all regions except the conserved regions and that between C2 and RHV. Remarkably, S(8)-RNase, was found to be identical to S(1)-RNase from Prunus avium, a species that does not interbreed with P. tenella and, except for just one amino acid, to S(11) of P. dulcis. However, the corresponding introns and S-RNase-SFB intergenic regions showed considerable differences. Moreover, protein sequences of the pollen-expressed SFB alleles were not identical, harbouring 12 amino-acid replacements between those of P. tenella SFB(8) and P. avium SFB(1). Implications of this finding for hypotheses about the evolution of new S-specificities are discussed.

  14. Prevalence of Huntington's disease gene CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi S; Lee, Jong-Min; Alonso, Isabel; Gusella, James F; Smoller, Jordan W; Sklar, Pamela; MacDonald, Marcy E; Perlis, Roy H

    2015-06-01

    Huntington's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that are caused by huntingtin gene (HTT) CAG trinucleotide repeat alleles of 36 or more units. A greater than expected prevalence of incompletely penetrant HTT CAG repeat alleles observed among individuals diagnosed with major depressive disorder raises the possibility that another mood disorder, bipolar disorder, could likewise be associated with Huntington's disease. We assessed the distribution of HTT CAG repeat alleles in a cohort of individuals with bipolar disorder. HTT CAG allele sizes from 2,229 Caucasian individuals diagnosed with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were compared to allele sizes in 1,828 control individuals from multiple cohorts. We found that HTT CAG repeat alleles > 35 units were observed in only one of 4,458 chromosomes from individuals with bipolar disorder, compared to three of 3,656 chromosomes from control subjects. These findings do not support an association between bipolar disorder and Huntington's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mutation intolerant genes and targets of FMRP are enriched for nonsynonymous alleles in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonenko, Ganna; Richards, Alexander L; Walters, James T; Pocklington, Andrew; Chambert, Kimberly; Al Eissa, Mariam M; Sharp, Sally I; O'Brien, Niamh L; Curtis, David; Bass, Nicholas J; McQuillin, Andrew; Hultman, Christina; Moran, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Steven A; Sklar, Pamela; Neale, Benjamin M; Holmans, Peter A; Owen, Michael J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C

    2017-10-01

    Risk of schizophrenia is conferred by alleles occurring across the full spectrum of frequencies from common SNPs of weak effect through to ultra rare alleles, some of which may be moderately to highly penetrant. Previous studies have suggested that some of the risk of schizophrenia is attributable to uncommon alleles represented on Illumina exome arrays. Here, we present the largest study of exomic variation in schizophrenia to date, using samples from the United Kingdom and Sweden (10,011 schizophrenia cases and 13,791 controls). Single variants, genes, and gene sets were analyzed for association with schizophrenia. No single variant or gene reached genome-wide significance. Among candidate gene sets, we found significant enrichment for rare alleles (minor allele frequency [MAF] schizophrenia by excluding a role for uncommon exomic variants (0.01 ≤ MAF ≥ 0.001) that confer a relatively large effect (odds ratio [OR] > 4). We also show risk alleles within this frequency range exist, but confer smaller effects and should be identified by larger studies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Allelic variation of bile salt hydrolase genes in Lactobacillus salivarius does not determine bile resistance levels.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fang, Fang

    2009-09-01

    Commensal lactobacilli frequently produce bile salt hydrolase (Bsh) enzymes whose roles in intestinal survival are unclear. Twenty-six Lactobacillus salivarius strains from different sources all harbored a bsh1 allele on their respective megaplasmids. This allele was related to the plasmid-borne bsh1 gene of the probiotic strain UCC118. A second locus (bsh2) was found in the chromosomes of two strains that had higher bile resistance levels. Four Bsh1-encoding allele groups were identified, defined by truncations or deletions involving a conserved residue. In vitro analyses showed that this allelic variation was correlated with widely varying bile deconjugation phenotypes. Despite very low activity of the UCC118 Bsh1 enzyme, a mutant lacking this protein had significantly lower bile resistance, both in vitro and during intestinal transit in mice. However, the overall bile resistance phenotype of this and other strains was independent of the bsh1 allele type. Analysis of the L. salivarius transcriptome upon exposure to bile and cholate identified a multiplicity of stress response proteins and putative efflux proteins that appear to broadly compensate for, or mask, the effects of allelic variation of bsh genes. Bsh enzymes with different bile-degrading kinetics, though apparently not the primary determinants of bile resistance in L. salivarius, may have additional biological importance because of varying effects upon bile as a signaling molecule in the host.

  17. Human leukocyte antigen class II susceptibility conferring alleles among non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tipu, H.N.; Ahmed, T.A.; Bashir, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    To determine the frequency of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class II susceptibility conferring alleles among type 2 Diabetes mellitus patients, in comparison with healthy controls. Cross-sectional comparative study. Patients with non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus meeting World Health Organization criteria were studied. These were compared with age and gender matched healthy control subjects. For each subject (patients as well as controls), DNA was extracted from ethylene diamine tetra-acetate sample and HLA class II DRB1 typing was carried out at allele group level (DRB1*01-DRB1*16) by sequence specific primers. Human leukocyte antigen DRB1 type was determined by agarose gel electrophoresis and results were recorded. Frequencies were determined as number of an allele divided by total number of alleles per group; p-value was computed using Pearson's chi-square test. Among the 100 patients, there were 63 males and 37 females with 68 controls. A total of 13 different HLA DRB1 alleles were detected, with DRB1*15 being the commonest in both the groups. The allele DRB1*13 had statistically significant higher frequency in patient group as compared to controls (p 0.005). HLA DRB1*13 was found with a significantly increased frequency in non-insulin dependent Diabetes mellitus. (author)

  18. Null alleles and sequence variations at primer binding sites of STR loci within multiplex typing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yining; Yang, Qinrui; Shao, Chengchen; Liu, Baonian; Zhou, Yuxiang; Xu, Hongmei; Zhou, Yueqin; Tang, Qiqun; Xie, Jianhui

    2018-01-01

    Rare variants are widely observed in human genome and sequence variations at primer binding sites might impair the process of PCR amplification resulting in dropouts of alleles, named as null alleles. In this study, 5 cases from routine paternity testing using PowerPlex ® 21 System for STR genotyping were considered to harbor null alleles at TH01, FGA, D5S818, D8S1179, and D16S539, respectively. The dropout of alleles was confirmed by using alternative commercial kits AGCU Expressmarker 22 PCR amplification kit and AmpFℓSTR ® . Identifiler ® Plus Kit, and sequencing results revealed a single base variation at the primer binding site of each STR locus. Results from the collection of previous reports show that null alleles at D5S818 were frequently observed in population detected by two PowerPlex ® typing systems and null alleles at D19S433 were mostly observed in Japanese population detected by two AmpFℓSTR™ typing systems. Furthermore, the most popular mutation type appeared the transition from C to T with G to A, which might have a potential relationship with DNA methylation. Altogether, these results can provide helpful information in forensic practice to the elimination of genotyping discrepancy and the development of primer sets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Interlaboratory comparison of fig (Ficus carica L. microsatellite genotyping data and determination of reference alleles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž HLADNIK

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites have been identified as the marker of choice in plant genotyping projects. However, due to length discrepancies obtained between different laboratories for the same allele, interlaboratory comparison of fingerprinting results is often a difficult task. The objectives of this study were to compare genotyping results of two laboratories, to evaluate genetic parameters of microsatellite markers and to determine reference allele sizes for fig cultivars from the Istrian peninsula.Genotyping results of ninety fig (Ficus carica L. accessions were comparable between the laboratories despite differences observed when comparing electropherograms of different capillary electrophoresis systems. Differences in lengths of the same alleles were detected due to different PCR methods and laboratory equipment, but the distances between alleles of the same locus were preserved. However, locus FSYC01 exhibited one allele dropout which led to misidentification of 28 heterozygotes as homozygote individuals suggesting this locus as unreliable. Allele dropout was assigned to the tail PCR technology or to a touchdown PCR protocol.Genotypes of twenty-four reference cultivars from the Istrian peninsula were confirmed by both laboratories. These results will contribute to the usage of markers with greater reliability, discrimination power and consequently, to more reliable standardization with other fig genotyping projects.

  20. Functional polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptor gene are associated with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, L B; Harsløf, T; Stenkjær, L

    2013-01-01

    variant allele, which has been associated with increased receptor function in monocytes, was associated with increased total hip BMD in women. With the exception of His155Tyr for which we found conflicting results in men and women, our results are consistent with the phenotype of the knockout mouse......UNLABELLED: The P2X(7) receptor is an ATP-gated cation channel. We investigated the effect of both loss-of-function and gain-of-function polymorphisms in the P2X(7) receptor gene on BMD and risk of vertebral fractures and found that five polymorphisms and haplotypes containing three...... of these polymorphisms were associated with BMD and fracture risk. INTRODUCTION: The P2X(7) receptor is an ATP-gated cation channel. P2X(7) receptor knockout mice have reduced total bone mineral content, and because several functional polymorphisms have been identified in the human P2X(7) receptor gene, we wanted...

  1. The role of P2X receptors in bone biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, N R; Syberg, S; Ellegaard, M

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a highly dynamic organ, being constantly modeled and remodeled in order to adapt to the changing need throughout life. Bone turnover involves the coordinated actions of bone formation and bone degradation. Over the past decade great effort has been put into the examination of how P2X receptors regulate bone metabolism and especially for the P2X7 receptor an impressive amount of evidence has now documented its expression in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes as well as important functional roles in proliferation, differentiation, and function of the cells of bone. Key evidence has come from studies on murine knockout models and from pharmacologic studies on cells and animals. More recently, the role of P2X receptors in human bone diseases has been documented. Loss-of-functions polymorphisms in the P2X7 receptorare associated with bone loss and increased fracture risk. Very recently a report from a genetic study in multiple myeloma demonstrated that decreased P2X7 receptor function was associated with increased risk of developing multiple myeloma. In contrast, the risk of developing myeloma bone disease and subsequent vertebral fractures was increased in subjects carrying P2X7 receptor gain-of-function alleles as compared to subjects only carrying loss-of-function or normal functioning alleles. It is evident that P2X receptors are important in regulating bone turnover and maintaining bone mass, and thereby holding great potential as novel drug targets for treatment of bone diseases. However, further research is needed before we fully understand the roles and effects of P2X receptors in bone.

  2. Haplotypes of the TaGS5-A1 gene are associated with thousand-kernel weight in Chinese bread wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sha Sha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Availabl