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Sample records for receptive field size

  1. Receptive field organization across multiple electrosensory maps. I. Columnar organization and estimation of receptive field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maler, Leonard

    2009-10-10

    The electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus emits a high-frequency electric organ discharge (EOD) sensed by specialized electroreceptors (P-units). Amplitude modulations (AMs) of the EOD are caused by objects such as prey as well as by social interactions with conspecifics. The firing rate of P-units is modulated by the AMs due to both objects and communication signals. P-units trifurcate as they enter the medulla; they terminate topographically with three maps of the electrosensory lateral line lobe (ELL): the centromedial (CMS), centrolateral (CLS), and lateral (LS) segments. Within each map P-units terminate onto the basal dendrites of pyramidal cells. Anterograde filling of P-units and retrograde filling of the basal bushes of pyramidal cells were used to estimate their respective spreads and spacing in the three maps. These estimates were used to compute the receptive field structure of the pyramidal cells: receptive fields were small in CMS and very large in LS with intermediate values in CLS. There are several classes of pyramidal cells defined by morphological and functional criteria; these cells are organized into columns such that each column contains one member of each class and all cells within a column receive the same P-unit input.

  2. Effects of background illuminations on the receptive field size of horizontal cells in the turtle retina are mediated by dopamine.

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    Weiler, R; Akopian, A

    1992-06-08

    Intracellular recordings from luminosity-type horizontal cells of the turtle retina were used to analyze the effects of steady and flickering background illumination on the size of their receptive fields. Both types of background illumination reduce the size of the receptive field to about the same extent. The reduction seems largely due an increase in the coupling resistance between horizontal cells. The effects of both types of background illumination are sensitive to the dopamine antagonist fluphenazine. This suggests that steady and flickering illuminations stimulate the release of endogenous dopamine.

  3. Mismatch Receptive Fields in Mouse Visual Cortex.

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    Zmarz, Pawel; Keller, Georg B

    2016-11-23

    In primary visual cortex, a subset of neurons responds when a particular stimulus is encountered in a certain location in visual space. This activity can be modeled using a visual receptive field. In addition to visually driven activity, there are neurons in visual cortex that integrate visual and motor-related input to signal a mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow. Here we show that these mismatch neurons have receptive fields and signal a local mismatch between actual and predicted visual flow in restricted regions of visual space. These mismatch receptive fields are aligned to the retinotopic map of visual cortex and are similar in size to visual receptive fields. Thus, neurons with mismatch receptive fields signal local deviations of actual visual flow from visual flow predicted based on self-motion and could therefore underlie the detection of objects moving relative to the visual flow caused by self-motion. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  4. Receptive fields and visual representations

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    Watson, Andrew B.

    1989-01-01

    Efficient representation of images for human use requires an understanding of how the brain processes and represents visual information. Spatial imagery is represented in the brain in the receptive fields of visual neurons. Models of these neurons lead to models of image fidelity, and to digital implementations of these neural codes. This approach will be illustrated by two example codes. The advantages and difficulties of this approach will be discussed.

  5. Population Receptive Field Dynamics in Human Visual Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haak, Koen V.; Cornelissen, Frans W.; Morland, Antony B.

    2012-01-01

    Seminal work in the early nineties revealed that the visual receptive field of neurons in cat primary visual cortex can change in location and size when artificial scotomas are applied. Recent work now suggests that these single neuron receptive field dynamics also pertain to the neuronal population

  6. Invariance of visual operations at the level of receptive fields.

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    Lindeberg, Tony

    2013-01-01

    The brain is able to maintain a stable perception although the visual stimuli vary substantially on the retina due to geometric transformations and lighting variations in the environment. This paper presents a theory for achieving basic invariance properties already at the level of receptive fields. Specifically, the presented framework comprises (i) local scaling transformations caused by objects of different size and at different distances to the observer, (ii) locally linearized image deformations caused by variations in the viewing direction in relation to the object, (iii) locally linearized relative motions between the object and the observer and (iv) local multiplicative intensity transformations caused by illumination variations. The receptive field model can be derived by necessity from symmetry properties of the environment and leads to predictions about receptive field profiles in good agreement with receptive field profiles measured by cell recordings in mammalian vision. Indeed, the receptive field profiles in the retina, LGN and V1 are close to ideal to what is motivated by the idealized requirements. By complementing receptive field measurements with selection mechanisms over the parameters in the receptive field families, it is shown how true invariance of receptive field responses can be obtained under scaling transformations, affine transformations and Galilean transformations. Thereby, the framework provides a mathematically well-founded and biologically plausible model for how basic invariance properties can be achieved already at the level of receptive fields and support invariant recognition of objects and events under variations in viewpoint, retinal size, object motion and illumination. The theory can explain the different shapes of receptive field profiles found in biological vision, which are tuned to different sizes and orientations in the image domain as well as to different image velocities in space-time, from a requirement that the

  7. A computational theory of visual receptive fields.

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    Lindeberg, Tony

    2013-12-01

    A receptive field constitutes a region in the visual field where a visual cell or a visual operator responds to visual stimuli. This paper presents a theory for what types of receptive field profiles can be regarded as natural for an idealized vision system, given a set of structural requirements on the first stages of visual processing that reflect symmetry properties of the surrounding world. These symmetry properties include (i) covariance properties under scale changes, affine image deformations, and Galilean transformations of space-time as occur for real-world image data as well as specific requirements of (ii) temporal causality implying that the future cannot be accessed and (iii) a time-recursive updating mechanism of a limited temporal buffer of the past as is necessary for a genuine real-time system. Fundamental structural requirements are also imposed to ensure (iv) mutual consistency and a proper handling of internal representations at different spatial and temporal scales. It is shown how a set of families of idealized receptive field profiles can be derived by necessity regarding spatial, spatio-chromatic, and spatio-temporal receptive fields in terms of Gaussian kernels, Gaussian derivatives, or closely related operators. Such image filters have been successfully used as a basis for expressing a large number of visual operations in computer vision, regarding feature detection, feature classification, motion estimation, object recognition, spatio-temporal recognition, and shape estimation. Hence, the associated so-called scale-space theory constitutes a both theoretically well-founded and general framework for expressing visual operations. There are very close similarities between receptive field profiles predicted from this scale-space theory and receptive field profiles found by cell recordings in biological vision. Among the family of receptive field profiles derived by necessity from the assumptions, idealized models with very good qualitative

  8. Receptive vocabulary size of secondary spanish efl learners

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    Andrés Canga Alonso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper responds to the need of research on vocabulary knowledge in foreign language in secondary education in Spain. Thus, this research aims at investigating (i the receptive vocabulary knowledge of 49 girls and 43 boys, Spanish students learning English as a foreign language in a secondary school located in the north of Spain, and (ii its pedagogical implications for students’ understanding of written and spoken discourse in English (Adolphs & Schmitt 2004; Laufer 1992, 1997; Nation 2001. We used the 2,000 frequency band of the Vocabulary Level Test (VLT (Schmitt, Schmitt & Clapham, 2001, version 2 as the instrument to measure students’ receptive vocabulary knowledge. Our results reveal that the means of girls’ receptive vocabulary size is below 1,000 words, which agrees with the estimates proposed by López-Mezquita (2005 for Spanish students of the same age and educational level. On the contrary, the means for boys is slightly above 1,000 words, being the differences between boys’ and girls’ performance in the VLT statistically relevant. Our data also indicate that most of the students analysed in the present study could have problems to understand written and spoken discourse due to their low scores in the receptive vocabulary level test.

  9. Local diversity and fine-scale organization of receptive fields in mouse visual cortex.

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    Bonin, Vincent; Histed, Mark H; Yurgenson, Sergey; Reid, R Clay

    2011-12-14

    Many thousands of cortical neurons are activated by any single sensory stimulus, but the organization of these populations is poorly understood. For example, are neurons in mouse visual cortex--whose preferred orientations are arranged randomly--organized with respect to other response properties? Using high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we characterized the receptive fields of up to 100 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a 200 μm imaged plane. Inhibitory neurons had nonlinearly summating, complex-like receptive fields and were weakly tuned for orientation. Excitatory neurons had linear, simple receptive fields that can be studied with noise stimuli and system identification methods. We developed a wavelet stimulus that evoked rich population responses and yielded the detailed spatial receptive fields of most excitatory neurons in a plane. Receptive fields and visual responses were locally highly diverse, with nearby neurons having largely dissimilar receptive fields and response time courses. Receptive-field diversity was consistent with a nearly random sampling of orientation, spatial phase, and retinotopic position. Retinotopic positions varied locally on average by approximately half the receptive-field size. Nonetheless, the retinotopic progression across the cortex could be demonstrated at the scale of 100 μm, with a magnification of ≈ 10 μm/°. Receptive-field and response similarity were in register, decreasing by 50% over a distance of 200 μm. Together, the results indicate considerable randomness in local populations of mouse visual cortical neurons, with retinotopy as the principal source of organization at the scale of hundreds of micrometers.

  10. Active vision and receptive field development in evolutionary robots.

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    Floreano, Dario; Suzuki, Mototaka; Mattiussi, Dario

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the artificial evolution of adaptive neural controllers for an outdoor mobile robot equipped with a mobile camera. The robot can dynamically select the gazing direction by moving the body and/or the camera. The neural control system, which maps visual information to motor commands, is evolved online by means of a genetic algorithm, but the synaptic connections (receptive fields) from visual photoreceptors to internal neurons can also be modified by Hebbian plasticity while the robot moves in the environment. We show that robots evolved in physics-based simulations with Hebbian visual plasticity display more robust adaptive behavior when transferred to real outdoor environments as compared to robots evolved without visual plasticity. We also show that the formation of visual receptive fields is significantly and consistently affected by active vision as compared to the formation of receptive fields with grid sample images in the environment of the robot. Finally, we show that the interplay between active vision and receptive field formation amounts to the selection and exploitation of a small and constant subset of visual features available to the robot.

  11. Bilateral population receptive fields in congenital hemihydranencephaly

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    Fracasso, Alessio; Koenraads, Yvonne; Porro, Giorgio L.; Dumoulin, Serge O.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Congenital hemihydranencephaly (HH) is a very rare disorder characterised by prenatal near-complete unilateral loss of the cerebral cortex. We investigated a patient affected by congenital right HH whose visual field extended significantly into the both visual hemifields, suggesting a reorg

  12. Topographical estimation of visual population receptive fields by FMRI.

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    Lee, Sangkyun; Papanikolaou, Amalia; Keliris, Georgios A; Smirnakis, Stelios M

    2015-02-03

    Visual cortex is retinotopically organized so that neighboring populations of cells map to neighboring parts of the visual field. Functional magnetic resonance imaging allows us to estimate voxel-based population receptive fields (pRF), i.e., the part of the visual field that activates the cells within each voxel. Prior, direct, pRF estimation methods(1) suffer from certain limitations: 1) the pRF model is chosen a-priori and may not fully capture the actual pRF shape, and 2) pRF centers are prone to mislocalization near the border of the stimulus space. Here a new topographical pRF estimation method(2) is proposed that largely circumvents these limitations. A linear model is used to predict the Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal by convolving the linear response of the pRF to the visual stimulus with the canonical hemodynamic response function. PRF topography is represented as a weight vector whose components represent the strength of the aggregate response of voxel neurons to stimuli presented at different visual field locations. The resulting linear equations can be solved for the pRF weight vector using ridge regression(3), yielding the pRF topography. A pRF model that is matched to the estimated topography can then be chosen post-hoc, thereby improving the estimates of pRF parameters such as pRF-center location, pRF orientation, size, etc. Having the pRF topography available also allows the visual verification of pRF parameter estimates allowing the extraction of various pRF properties without having to make a-priori assumptions about the pRF structure. This approach promises to be particularly useful for investigating the pRF organization of patients with disorders of the visual system.

  13. Cortico-Cortical Receptive Field Estimates in Human Visual Cortex

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    Koen V Haak

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Human visual cortex comprises many visual areas that contain a map of the visual field (Wandell et al 2007, Neuron 56, 366–383. These visual field maps can be identified readily in individual subjects with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during experimental sessions that last less than an hour (Wandell and Winawer 2011, Vis Res 718–737. Hence, visual field mapping with fMRI has been, and still is, a heavily used technique to examine the organisation of both normal and abnormal human visual cortex (Haak et al 2011, ACNR, 11(3, 20–21. However, visual field mapping cannot reveal every aspect of human visual cortex organisation. For example, the information processed within a visual field map arrives from somewhere and is sent to somewhere, and visual field mapping does not derive these input/output relationships. Here, we describe a new, model-based analysis for estimating the dependence between signals in distinct cortical regions using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Just as a stimulus-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of the stimulus contrast, the neural-referred receptive field predicts the neural response as a function of responses elsewhere in the nervous system. When applied to two cortical regions, this function can be called the cortico-cortical receptive field (CCRF. We model the CCRF as a Gaussian-weighted region on the cortical surface and apply the model to data from both stimulus-driven and resting-state experimental conditions in visual cortex.

  14. Receptive fields of visual neurons: the early years.

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    Spillmann, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the history of the visual receptive field (RF) from Hartline to Hubel and Wiesel. Hartline (1938, 1940) found that an isolated optic nerve fiber in the frog could be excited by light falling on a small circular area of the retina. He called this area the RF, using a term first introduced by Sherrington (1906) in the tactile domain. In 1953 Kuffler discovered the antagonistic center-surround organization of cat RFs, and Barlow, Fitzhugh, and Kuffler (1957) extended this work to stimulus size and state of adaptation. Shortly thereafter, Lettvin and colleagues (1959) in an iconic paper asked "what the frog's eye tells the frog's brain". Meanwhile, Jung and colleagues (1952-1973) searched for the perceptual correlates of neuronal responses, and Jung and Spillmann (1970) proposed the term perceptive field (PF) as a psychophysical correlate of the RF. The Westheimer function (1967) enabled psychophysical measurements of the PF center and surround in human and monkey, which correlated closely with the underlying RF organization. The sixties and seventies were marked by rapid progress in RF research. Hubel and Wiesel (1959-1974), recording from neurons in the visual cortex of the cat and monkey, found elongated RFs selective for the shape, orientation, and position of the stimulus, as well as for movement direction and ocularity. These findings prompted the emergence in visual psychophysics of the concept of feature detectors selective for lines, bars, and edges, and contributed to a model of the RF in terms of difference of Gaussians (DOG) and Fourier channels. The distinction between simple, complex, and hypercomplex neurons followed. Although RF size increases towards the peripheral retina, its cortical representation remains constant due to the reciprocal relationship with the cortical magnification factor (M). This constitutes a uniform yardstick for M-scaled stimuli across the retina. Developmental studies have shown that RF properties are not fixed

  15. Optimum spatiotemporal receptive fields for vision in dim light.

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    Klaus, Andreas; Warrant, Eric J

    2009-04-22

    Many nocturnal insects depend on vision for daily life and have evolved different strategies to improve their visual capabilities in dim light. Neural summation of visual signals is one strategy to improve visual performance, and this is likely to be especially important for insects with apposition compound eyes. Here we develop a model to determine the optimum spatiotemporal sampling of natural scenes at gradually decreasing light levels. Image anisotropy has a strong influence on the receptive field properties predicted to be optimal at low light intensities. Spatial summation between visual channels is predicted to extend more strongly in the direction with higher correlations between the input signals. Increased spatiotemporal summation increases signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies but sacrifices signal-to-noise ratio at higher frequencies. These results, while obtained from a model of the insect visual system, are likely to apply to visual systems in general.

  16. Spatiotemporal structure of visual receptive fields in macaque superior colliculus.

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    Churan, Jan; Guitton, Daniel; Pack, Christopher C

    2012-11-01

    Saccades are useful for directing the high-acuity fovea to visual targets that are of behavioral relevance. The selection of visual targets for eye movements involves the superior colliculus (SC), where many neurons respond to visual stimuli. Many of these neurons are also activated before and during saccades of specific directions and amplitudes. Although the role of the SC in controlling eye movements has been thoroughly examined, far less is known about the nature of the visual responses in this area. We have, therefore, recorded from neurons in the intermediate layers of the macaque SC, while using a sparse-noise mapping procedure to obtain a detailed characterization of the spatiotemporal structure of visual receptive fields. We find that SC responses to flashed visual stimuli start roughly 50 ms after the onset of the stimulus and last for on average ~70 ms. About 50% of these neurons are strongly suppressed by visual stimuli flashed at certain locations flanking the excitatory center, and the spatiotemporal pattern of suppression exerts a predictable influence on the timing of saccades. This suppression may, therefore, contribute to the filtering of distractor stimuli during target selection. We also find that saccades affect the processing of visual stimuli by SC neurons in a manner that is quite similar to the saccadic suppression and postsaccadic enhancement that has been observed in the cortex and in perception. However, in contrast to what has been observed in the cortex, decreased visual sensitivity was generally associated with increased firing rates, while increased sensitivity was associated with decreased firing rates. Overall, these results suggest that the processing of visual stimuli by SC receptive fields can influence oculomotor behavior and that oculomotor signals originating in the SC can shape perisaccadic visual perception.

  17. Nonlinear population receptive field changes in human area V5/MT+ of healthy subjects with simulated visual field scotomas.

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    Papanikolaou, Amalia; Keliris, Georgios A; Lee, Sangkyun; Logothetis, Nikos K; Smirnakis, Stelios M

    2015-10-15

    There is extensive controversy over whether the adult visual cortex is able to reorganize following visual field loss (scotoma) as a result of retinal or cortical lesions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) methods provide a useful tool to study the aggregate receptive field properties and assess the capacity of the human visual cortex to reorganize following injury. However, these methods are prone to biases near the boundaries of the scotoma. Retinotopic changes resembling reorganization have been observed in the early visual cortex of normal subjects when the visual stimulus is masked to simulate retinal or cortical scotomas. It is not known how the receptive fields of higher visual areas, like hV5/MT+, are affected by partial stimulus deprivation. We measured population receptive field (pRF) responses in human area V5/MT+ of 5 healthy participants under full stimulation and compared them with responses obtained from the same area while masking the left superior quadrant of the visual field ("artificial scotoma" or AS). We found that pRF estimations in area hV5/MT+ are nonlinearly affected by the AS. Specifically, pRF centers shift towards the AS, while the pRF amplitude increases and the pRF size decreases near the AS border. The observed pRF changes do not reflect reorganization but reveal important properties of normal visual processing under different test-stimulus conditions.

  18. Comparing different stimulus configurations for population receptive field mapping in human fMRI

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    Ivan eAlvarez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population receptive field (pRF mapping is a widely used approach to measuring aggregate human visual receptive field properties by recording non-invasive signals using functional MRI. Despite growing interest, no study to date has systematically investigated the effects of different stimulus configurations on pRF estimates from human visual cortex. Here we compared the effects of three different stimulus configurations on a model-based approach to pRF estimation: size-invariant bars and eccentricity-scaled bars defined in Cartesian coordinates and traveling along the cardinal axes, and a novel simultaneous ‘wedge and ring’ stimulus defined in polar coordinates, systematically covering polar and eccentricity axes. We found that the presence or absence of eccentricity scaling had a significant effect on goodness of fit and pRF size estimates. Further, variability in pRF size estimates was directly influenced by stimulus configuration, particularly for higher visual areas including V5/MT+. Finally, we compared eccentricity estimation between phase-encoded and model-based pRF approaches. We observed a tendency for more peripheral eccentricity estimates using phase-encoded methods, independent of stimulus size. We conclude that both eccentricity scaling and polar rather than Cartesian stimulus configuration are important considerations for optimal experimental design in pRF mapping. While all stimulus configurations produce adequate estimates, simultaneous wedge and ring stimulation produced higher fit reliability, with a significant advantage in reduced acquisition time.

  19. Synaptic Contributions to Receptive Field Structure and Response Properties in the Rodent Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of the Thalamus.

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    Suresh, Vandana; Çiftçioğlu, Ulaş M; Wang, Xin; Lala, Brittany M; Ding, Kimberly R; Smith, William A; Sommer, Friedrich T; Hirsch, Judith A

    2016-10-26

    . In mouse retina, the most numerous cell type has the smallest receptive fields but lacks push-pull. The most common receptive field in rodent thalamus, however, is center-surround with push-pull. Thus, receptive field structure supersedes size per se for form vision. Further, for many orientation-selective cells, the second-order component of the receptive field aligned with stimulus preference, whereas suppression was untuned. Thus, inhibition may improve spatial resolution and sharpen other forms of selectivity in rodent lateral geniculate nucleus. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3610949-15$15.00/0.

  20. Synaptic Contributions to Receptive Field Structure and Response Properties in the Rodent Lateral Geniculate Nucleus of the Thalamus

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    Suresh, Vandana; Çiftçioğlu, Ulaş M.; Wang, Xin; Lala, Brittany M.; Ding, Kimberly R.; Smith, William A.; Sommer, Friedrich T.

    2016-01-01

    true for thalamic relay cells. In mouse retina, the most numerous cell type has the smallest receptive fields but lacks push-pull. The most common receptive field in rodent thalamus, however, is center-surround with push-pull. Thus, receptive field structure supersedes size per se for form vision. Further, for many orientation-selective cells, the second-order component of the receptive field aligned with stimulus preference, whereas suppression was untuned. Thus, inhibition may improve spatial resolution and sharpen other forms of selectivity in rodent lateral geniculate nucleus. PMID:27798177

  1. Categorically distinct types of receptive fields in early visual cortex.

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    Talebi, Vargha; Baker, Curtis L

    2016-05-01

    In the visual cortex, distinct types of neurons have been identified based on cellular morphology, response to injected current, or expression of specific markers, but neurophysiological studies have revealed visual receptive field (RF) properties that appear to be on a continuum, with only two generally recognized classes: simple and complex. Most previous studies have characterized visual responses of neurons using stereotyped stimuli such as bars, gratings, or white noise and simple system identification approaches (e.g., reverse correlation). Here we estimate visual RF models of cortical neurons using visually rich natural image stimuli and regularized regression system identification methods and characterize their spatial tuning, temporal dynamics, spatiotemporal behavior, and spiking properties. We quantitatively demonstrate the existence of three functionally distinct categories of simple cells, distinguished by their degree of orientation selectivity (isotropic or oriented) and the nature of their output nonlinearity (expansive or compressive). In addition, these three types have differing average values of several other properties. Cells with nonoriented RFs tend to have smaller RFs, shorter response durations, no direction selectivity, and high reliability. Orientation-selective neurons with an expansive output nonlinearity have Gabor-like RFs, lower spontaneous activity and responsivity, and spiking responses with higher sparseness. Oriented RFs with a compressive nonlinearity are spatially nondescript and tend to show longer response latency. Our findings indicate multiple physiologically defined types of RFs beyond the simple/complex dichotomy, suggesting that cortical neurons may have more specialized functional roles rather than lying on a multidimensional continuum.

  2. Spatiotemporal receptive fields: a dynamical model derived from cortical architectonics.

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    Krone, G; Mallot, H; Palm, G; Schüz, A

    1986-01-22

    We assume that the mammalian neocortex is built up out of some six layers which differ in their morphology and their external connections. Intrinsic connectivity is largely excitatory, leading to a considerable amount of positive feedback. The majority of cortical neurons can be divided into two main classes: the pyramidal cells, which are said to be excitatory, and local cells (most notably the non-spiny stellate cells), which are said to be inhibitory. The form of the dendritic and axonal arborizations of both groups is discussed in detail. This results in a simplified model of the cortex as a stack of six layers with mutual connections determined by the principles of fibre anatomy. This stack can be treated as a multi-input-multi-output system by means of the linear systems theory of homogeneous layers. The detailed equations for the simulation are derived in the Appendix. The results of the simulations show that the temporal and spatial behaviour of an excitation distribution cannot be treated separately. Further, they indicate specific processing in the different layers and some independence from details of wiring. Finally, the simulation results are applied to the theory of visual receptive fields. This yields some insight into the mechanisms possibly underlying hypercomplexity, putative nonlinearities, lateral inhibition, oscillating cell responses, and velocity-dependent tuning curves.

  3. Receptive field plasticity of neurons in rat auditory cortex

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    YANG Wenwei; GAO Lixia; SUN Xinde

    2004-01-01

    Using conventional electrophysiological technique, we investigated the plasticity of the frequency receptive fields (RF) of auditory cortex (AC) neurons in rats. In the AC, when the frequency difference between conditioning stimulus frequency (CSF) and the best frequency (BF) was in the range of 1-4 kHz, the frequency RF of AC neurons shifted. The smaller the differences between CSF and BF, the higher the probability of the RF shift and the greater the degree of the RF shift. To some extent, the plasticity of RF was dependent on the duration of the session of conditioning stimulus (CS). When the frequency difference between CSF and BF was bigger, the duration of the CS session needed to induce the plasticity was longer. The recovery time course of the frequency RF showed opposite changes after CS cessation.The RF shift could be induced by the frequency that was either higher or lower than the control BF, demonstrating no clear directional preference. The frequency RF of some neurons showed bidirectional shift, and the RF of other neurons showed single directional shift. The results suggest that the frequency RF plasticity of AC neurons could be considered as an ideal model for studying plasticity mechanism. The present study also provides important evidence for further study of learning and memory in auditory system.

  4. Effects of spike-triggered negative feedback on receptive-field properties.

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    Urdapilleta, Eugenio; Samengo, Inés

    2015-04-01

    Sensory neurons are often described in terms of a receptive field, that is, a linear kernel through which stimuli are filtered before they are further processed. If information transmission is assumed to proceed in a feedforward cascade, the receptive field may be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. The nervous system, however, contains many feedback loops, and sensory neurons filter more currents than the ones representing the transduced external stimulus. Some of the additional currents are generated by the output activity of the neuron itself, and therefore constitute feedback signals. By means of a time-frequency analysis of the input/output transformation, here we show how feedback modifies the receptive field. The model is applicable to various types of feedback processes, from spike-triggered intrinsic conductances to inhibitory synaptic inputs from nearby neurons. We distinguish between the intrinsic receptive field (filtering all input currents) and the effective receptive field (filtering only external stimuli). Whereas the intrinsic receptive field summarizes the biophysical properties of the neuron associated to subthreshold integration and spike generation, only the effective receptive field can be interpreted as the external stimulus' profile maximizing neuronal output. We demonstrate that spike-triggered feedback shifts low-pass filtering towards band-pass processing, transforming integrator neurons into resonators. For strong feedback, a sharp resonance in the spectral neuronal selectivity may appear. Our results provide a unified framework to interpret a collection of previous experimental studies where specific feedback mechanisms were shown to modify the filtering properties of neurons.

  5. Exploring the Relationship between Receptive and Productive Vocabulary Sizes and Their Increased Use by Azerbaijani English Majors

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    Hajiyeva, Konul

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the results of two studies on receptive and productive vocabulary knowledge of first-year English majors in an English-medium degree programme. The aim of the study is to answer these research questions: (1) to what extent do the receptive and productive vocabulary sizes of English majors increase after a year of…

  6. Visual cortex in aging and Alzheimer's disease: changes in visual field maps and population receptive fields.

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    Brewer, Alyssa A; Barton, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Although several studies have suggested that cortical alterations underlie such age-related visual deficits as decreased acuity, little is known about what changes actually occur in visual cortex during healthy aging. Two recent studies showed changes in primary visual cortex (V1) during normal aging; however, no studies have characterized the effects of aging on visual cortex beyond V1, important measurements both for understanding the aging process and for comparison to changes in age-related diseases. Similarly, there is almost no information about changes in visual cortex in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia. Because visual deficits are often reported as one of the first symptoms of AD, measurements of such changes in the visual cortex of AD patients might improve our understanding of how the visual system is affected by neurodegeneration as well as aid early detection, accurate diagnosis and timely treatment of AD. Here we use fMRI to first compare the visual field map (VFM) organization and population receptive fields (pRFs) between young adults and healthy aging subjects for occipital VFMs V1, V2, V3, and hV4. Healthy aging subjects do not show major VFM organizational deficits, but do have reduced surface area and increased pRF sizes in the foveal representations of V1, V2, and hV4 relative to healthy young control subjects. These measurements are consistent with behavioral deficits seen in healthy aging. We then demonstrate the feasibility and first characterization of these measurements in two patients with mild AD, which reveal potential changes in visual cortex as part of the pathophysiology of AD. Our data aid in our understanding of the changes in the visual processing pathways in normal aging and provide the foundation for future research into earlier and more definitive detection of AD.

  7. Visual Population Receptive Fields in People with Schizophrenia Have Reduced Inhibitory Surrounds.

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    Anderson, Elaine J; Tibber, Marc S; Schwarzkopf, D Sam; Shergill, Sukhwinder S; Fernandez-Egea, Emilio; Rees, Geraint; Dakin, Steven C

    2017-02-08

    People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal visual perception on a range of visual tasks, which have been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition. However, differences in the underlying architecture of visual cortex neurons, which might explain these visual anomalies, have yet to be reported in vivo Here, we probed the neural basis of these deficits using fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to infer properties of visually responsive neurons in people with SZ. We employed a difference-of-Gaussian model to capture the center-surround configuration of the pRF, providing critical information about the spatial scale of the pRFs inhibitory surround. Our analysis reveals that SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex, as well as a reduction in size and depth of the inhibitory surround in V1, V2, and V4. We consider how reduced inhibition might explain the diverse range of visual deficits reported in SZ.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT People with schizophrenia (SZ) experience abnormal perception on a range of visual tasks, which has been linked to abnormal synaptic transmission and an imbalance between cortical excitation/inhibition. However, associated differences in the functional architecture of visual cortex neurons have yet to be reported in vivo We used fMRI and population receptive field (pRF) mapping to demonstrate that the fine-grained functional architecture of visual cortex in people with SZ differs from unaffected controls. SZ is associated with reduced pRF size in early retinotopic visual cortex largely due to reduced inhibitory surrounds. An imbalance between cortical excitation and inhibition could drive such a change in the center-surround pRF configuration and ultimately explain the range of visual deficits experienced in SZ.

  8. Emergence of Complex-Like Cells in a Temporal Product Network with Local Receptive Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Gregor, Karo

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new neural architecture and an unsupervised algorithm for learning invariant representations from temporal sequence of images. The system uses two groups of complex cells whose outputs are combined multiplicatively: one that represents the content of the image, constrained to be constant over several consecutive frames, and one that represents the precise location of features, which is allowed to vary over time but constrained to be sparse. The architecture uses an encoder to extract features, and a decoder to reconstruct the input from the features. The method was applied to patches extracted from consecutive movie frames and produces orientation and frequency selective units analogous to the complex cells in V1. An extension of the method is proposed to train a network composed of units with local receptive field spread over a large image of arbitrary size. A layer of complex cells, subject to sparsity constraints, pool feature units over overlapping local neighborhoods, which causes the feat...

  9. Reflex receptive fields for human withdrawal reflexes elicited by non-painful and painful electrical stimulation of the foot sole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, O K; Sonnenborg, F A; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    2001-04-01

    Human withdrawal reflex receptive fields (RRFs) were assessed for 4 different electrical stimulus intensities, ranging from below the pain threshold (PTh) to up to two times the PTh intensity (0.8x, 1.2x, 1.6x, and 2.0xPTh). Thirteen subjects participated, and the reflexes were recorded in a sitting position. The stimuli were delivered in random order to 12 positions distributed over the foot sole. Tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), vastus lateralis (VL), and biceps femoris (BF) reflexes were recorded. Further, knee and ankle joint angle changes were recorded. The strongest reflexes were seen in the TA compared with the other 3 muscles. Dorsi-flexion dominated distal to the talocrural joint corresponding to the TA receptive field area. An expansion of the RRF for the TA and GM was seen when increasing the stimulus intensity from 0.8xPTh to 1.2xPTh and from 1.2xPTh to 1.6xPTh, indicating a gradually increasing reflex threshold towards the border, where TA contraction is inappropriate in a withdrawal reaction. For the BF and VL, the borders of the RRF areas were not detected. By integrating the reflex size within the RRF (i.e. the reflex volume), gradually increasing reflexes for increasing stimulus intensity were seen in all 4 muscles tested, most clearly in the TA and GM. The subjective pain intensity correlated to the reflex volume for the TA, GM, and BF. In conclusion, the highest reflex sensitivity was seen in the centre of the RRF, while the stimulus intensity needed for eliciting a reflex increased towards the receptive field border. Within the RRF, stronger reflexes were evoked for increasing stimulus intensity. The limit in the size of the receptive field size for the TA and GM supports a modular withdrawal reflex organisation.

  10. Adaptation of the simple or complex nature of V1 receptive fields to visual statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Julien; Monier, Cyril; Pananceau, Marc; Frégnac, Yves

    2011-07-17

    Receptive fields in primary visual cortex (V1) are categorized as simple or complex, depending on their spatial selectivity to stimulus contrast polarity. We studied the dependence of this classification on visual context by comparing, in the same cell, the synaptic responses to three classical receptive field mapping protocols: sparse noise, ternary dense noise and flashed Gabor noise. Intracellular recordings revealed that the relative weights of simple-like and complex-like receptive field components were scaled so as to make the same receptive field more simple-like with dense noise stimulation and more complex-like with sparse or Gabor noise stimulations. However, once these context-dependent receptive fields were convolved with the corresponding stimulus, the balance between simple-like and complex-like contributions to the synaptic responses appeared to be invariant across input statistics. This normalization of the linear/nonlinear input ratio suggests a previously unknown form of homeostatic control of V1 functional properties, optimizing the network nonlinearities to the statistical structure of the visual input.

  11. Systematic variation of population receptive field properties across cortical depth in human visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fracasso, A.; Petridou, Natalia; Dumoulin, Serge O

    2016-01-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) in visual cortex are organized in antagonistic, center-surround, configurations. RF properties change systematically across eccentricity and between visual field maps. However, it is unknown how center-surround configurations are organized in human visual cortex across lamina.

  12. Set-size procedures for controlling variations in speech-reception performance with a fluctuating masker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Joshua G W; Summers, Van; Iyer, Nandini; Brungart, Douglas S

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) tracking is often used to measure speech reception in noise. Because SNR varies with performance using this method, data interpretation can be confounded when measuring an SNR-dependent effect such as the fluctuating-masker benefit (FMB) (the intelligibility improvement afforded by brief dips in the masker level). One way to overcome this confound, and allow FMB comparisons across listener groups with different stationary-noise performance, is to adjust the response set size to equalize performance across groups at a fixed SNR. However, this technique is only valid under the assumption that changes in set size have the same effect on percentage-correct performance for different masker types. This assumption was tested by measuring nonsense-syllable identification for normal-hearing listeners as a function of SNR, set size and masker (stationary noise, 4- and 32-Hz modulated noise and an interfering talker). Set-size adjustment had the same impact on performance scores for all maskers, confirming the independence of FMB (at matched SNRs) and set size. These results, along with those of a second experiment evaluating an adaptive set-size algorithm to adjust performance levels, establish set size as an efficient and effective tool to adjust baseline performance when comparing effects of masker fluctuations between listener groups.

  13. A probabilistic approach to receptive field mapping in the frontal eye fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Patrick eMayo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the neuronal mechanisms of perisaccadic vision often lack the resolution needed to determine important changes in receptive field (RF structure. Such limited analytical power can lead to inaccurate descriptions of visuomotor processing. To address this issue, we developed a precise, probabilistic technique that uses a generalized linear model (GLM for mapping the visual receptive fields of frontal eye field (FEF neurons during stable fixation (Mayo et al., 2015. We previously found that full-field RF maps could be obtained using 1-8 dot stimuli presented at frame rates of 10-150 ms. FEF responses were generally robust to changes in the number of stimuli presented or the rate of presentation, which allowed us to visualize RFs over a range of spatial and temporal resolutions. Here, we compare the quality of RFs obtained over different stimulus and GLM parameters to facilitate future work on the detailed mapping of FEF RFs. We first evaluate the interactions between the number of stimuli presented per trial, the total number of trials, and the quality of RF mapping. Next, we vary the spatial resolution of our approach to illustrate the tradeoff between visualizing RF sub-structure and sampling at high resolutions. We then evaluate local smoothing as a possible correction for situations where under-sampling occurs. Finally, we provide a preliminary demonstration of the usefulness of a probabilistic approach for visualizing full-field perisaccadic RF shifts. Our results present a powerful, and perhaps necessary, framework for studying perisaccadic vision is applicable to FEF and possibly other visuomotor regions of the brain.

  14. Automatic mapping of visual cortex receptive fields: a fast and precise algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Mario; Azzi, João C B; Soares, Juliana G M; Gattass, Ricardo

    2014-01-15

    An important issue for neurophysiological studies of the visual system is the definition of the region of the visual field that can modify a neuron's activity (i.e., the neuron's receptive field - RF). Usually a trade-off exists between precision and the time required to map a RF. Manual methods (qualitative) are fast but impose a variable degree of imprecision, while quantitative methods are more precise but usually require more time. We describe a rapid quantitative method for mapping visual RFs that is derived from computerized tomography and named back-projection. This method finds the intersection of responsive regions of the visual field based on spike density functions that are generated over time in response to long bars moving in different directions. An algorithm corrects the response profiles for latencies and allows for the conversion of the time domain into a 2D-space domain. The final product is an RF map that shows the distribution of the neuronal activity in visual-spatial coordinates. In addition to mapping the RF, this method also provides functional properties, such as latency, orientation and direction preference indexes. This method exhibits the following beneficial properties: (a) speed; (b) ease of implementation; (c) precise RF localization; (d) sensitivity (this method can map RFs based on few responses); (e) reliability (this method provides consistent information about RF shapes and sizes, which will allow for comparative studies); (f) comprehensiveness (this method can scan for RFs over an extensive area of the visual field); (g) informativeness (it provides functional quantitative data about the RF); and (h) usefulness (this method can map RFs in regions without direct retinal inputs, such as the cortical representations of the optic disc and of retinal lesions, which should allow for studies of functional connectivity, reorganization and neural plasticity). Furthermore, our method allows for precise mapping of RFs in a 30° by 30

  15. Does L1 Make a Difference? Evidence from the Receptive Vocabulary Size of Spanish and German EFL Primary School Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustin Llach, Maria Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The present paper explores and compares the receptive vocabulary sizes of two groups of learners of different native languages. One of the most widely used vocabulary size tests is the Vocabulary Levels Test designed by Nation. Some reservations have been raised in relation to the adequacy of the Vocabulary Levels Test to estimate the vocabulary…

  16. Measurement of population receptive fields in human early visual cortex using back-projection tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greene, Clint A.; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Harvey, Ben M.; Ress, David

    2014-01-01

    Properties of human visual population receptive fields (pRFs) are currently estimated by performing measurements of visual stimulation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and then fitting the results using a predefined model shape for the pRF. Various models exist and different model

  17. Refinement but not maintenance of visual receptive fields is independent of visual experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Timothy S; Pallas, Sarah L

    2015-04-01

    Visual deprivation is reported to prevent or delay the development of mature receptive field (RF) properties in primary visual cortex (V1) in several species. In contrast, visual deprivation neither prevents nor delays refinement of RF size in the superior colliculus (SC) of Syrian hamsters, although vision is required for RF maintenance in the SC. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, visual cortical RF refinement occurs normally in dark-reared animals. As in the SC, a brief period of visual experience is required to maintain V1 RF refinement in adulthood. Whereas in the SC, 3 days of visual experience within a sensitive period (P37-40) was sufficient to protect RFs from deprivation-induced enlargement in adulthood, 7 days (P33-40) were required for RF size maintenance in V1. Thus, spontaneous activity is sufficient for RF refinement at these 2 levels of the visual pathway, and visual input is necessary only to prevent deprivation-induced RF enlargement in adulthood. These studies show that sensory experience during a late juvenile sensitive period protects the visual pathway against sensory deprivation in adulthood, and suggest that more importance may have been placed on the role of early visual experience in visual RF development than is warranted.

  18. Receptive field characteristics under electrotactile stimulation of the fingertip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jay P; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco; Sweeney, James D; Tillery, Stephen I Helms

    2008-08-01

    Skin on human fingertips has high concentrations of mechanoreceptors, which are used to provide fine resolution tactile representations of our environment. Here, we explore the ability to discriminate electrotactile stimulation at four sites on the fingertip. Electrical stimulation was delivered to arrays of electrodes centered on the index fingertip (volar aspect). Accuracy of discrimination was tested by examining electrode size, interelectrode spacing, and stimulation frequency as primary factors. Electrical stimulation was delivered at 2 mA with the pulse width modulated to be at (or above) perceptual threshold at 25 and 75 Hz and an average pulse width of 1.03 ms (+/- 0.70 ms standard deviation). Discrimination of the stimulated locations under this stimulation paradigm was significantly above chance level in all cases. Subjects' ability to discriminate stimulus location was not significantly influenced by electrode size or stimulation frequency when considered as separate factors. However, increased electrode spacing significantly increased subjects' ability to discriminate the location of the stimulated electrode. Further analysis revealed that errors were only significantly reduced along the medial-lateral direction with increasing interelectrode spacing. These results suggest that the electrotactile stimulus localization on the fingertip has some directional dependency, in addition to its dependency on interelectrode spacing. The neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed in relation to electrical stimulus transduction characteristics of tactile mechanoreceptors.

  19. Dynamics of visual receptive fields in the macaque frontal eye field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, J Patrick; DiTomasso, Amie R; Sommer, Marc A; Smith, Matthew A

    2015-12-01

    Neuronal receptive fields (RFs) provide the foundation for understanding systems-level sensory processing. In early visual areas, investigators have mapped RFs in detail using stochastic stimuli and sophisticated analytical approaches. Much less is known about RFs in prefrontal cortex. Visual stimuli used for mapping RFs in prefrontal cortex tend to cover a small range of spatial and temporal parameters, making it difficult to understand their role in visual processing. To address these shortcomings, we implemented a generalized linear model to measure the RFs of neurons in the macaque frontal eye field (FEF) in response to sparse, full-field stimuli. Our high-resolution, probabilistic approach tracked the evolution of RFs during passive fixation, and we validated our results against conventional measures. We found that FEF neurons exhibited a surprising level of sensitivity to stimuli presented as briefly as 10 ms or to multiple dots presented simultaneously, suggesting that FEF visual responses are more precise than previously appreciated. FEF RF spatial structures were largely maintained over time and between stimulus conditions. Our results demonstrate that the application of probabilistic RF mapping to FEF and similar association areas is an important tool for clarifying the neuronal mechanisms of cognition.

  20. A new method for estimating population receptive field topography in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sangkyun; Papanikolaou, Amalia; Logothetis, Nikos K; Smirnakis, Stelios M; Keliris, Georgios A

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a new method for measuring visual population receptive fields (pRF) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The pRF structure is modeled as a set of weights that can be estimated by solving a linear model that predicts the Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent (BOLD) signal using the stimulus protocol and the canonical hemodynamic response function. This method does not make a priori assumptions about the specific pRF shape and is therefore a useful tool for uncovering the underlying pRF structure at different spatial locations in an unbiased way. We show that our method is more accurate than a previously described method (Dumoulin and Wandell, 2008) which directly fits a 2-dimensional isotropic Gaussian pRF model to predict the fMRI time-series. We demonstrate that direct-fit models do not fully capture the actual pRF shape, and can be prone to pRF center mislocalization when the pRF is located near the border of the stimulus space. A quantitative comparison demonstrates that our method outperforms the direct-fit methods in the pRF center modeling by achieving higher explained variance of the BOLD signal. This was true for direct-fit isotropic Gaussian, anisotropic Gaussian, and difference of isotropic Gaussians model. Importantly, our model is also capable of exploring a variety of pRF properties such as surround suppression, receptive field center elongation, orientation, location and size. Additionally, the proposed method is particularly attractive for monitoring pRF properties in the visual areas of subjects with lesions of the visual pathways, where it is difficult to anticipate what shape the reorganized pRF might take. Finally, the method proposed here is more efficient in computation time than direct-fit methods, which need to search for a set of parameters in an extremely large searching space. Instead, this method uses the pRF topography to constrain the space that needs to be searched for the subsequent modeling.

  1. Self-organization model on receptive field of neuron with asymmetric time window of synaptic modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The spatial-temporal response properties of some simple neurons in visual pathway arise basically prior to birth. In the absence of visual experience, how do these neurons develop in visual system? Based on Wimbauer network with delay, a four-layer feed-forward network model is proposed, which is characterized by modifying the Hebb learning rule through introducing the asymmetric time window of synaptic modification found recently in neurobiology. The model can not only generate by self-organization more diversified spatial-temporal response characteristics of neuronal receptive field than earlier models but also provide some explanations for the possible mechanism underlying the development of receptive fields of contrast polarity sensitive neurons found in visual system of vertebrate. Thus the proposed model may be more widely applicable than Linsker model and Wimbauer model.

  2. Discriminative learning of receptive fields from responses to non-Gaussian stimulus ensembles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne F Meyer

    Full Text Available Analysis of sensory neurons' processing characteristics requires simultaneous measurement of presented stimuli and concurrent spike responses. The functional transformation from high-dimensional stimulus space to the binary space of spike and non-spike responses is commonly described with linear-nonlinear models, whose linear filter component describes the neuron's receptive field. From a machine learning perspective, this corresponds to the binary classification problem of discriminating spike-eliciting from non-spike-eliciting stimulus examples. The classification-based receptive field (CbRF estimation method proposed here adapts a linear large-margin classifier to optimally predict experimental stimulus-response data and subsequently interprets learned classifier weights as the neuron's receptive field filter. Computational learning theory provides a theoretical framework for learning from data and guarantees optimality in the sense that the risk of erroneously assigning a spike-eliciting stimulus example to the non-spike class (and vice versa is minimized. Efficacy of the CbRF method is validated with simulations and for auditory spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF estimation from experimental recordings in the auditory midbrain of Mongolian gerbils. Acoustic stimulation is performed with frequency-modulated tone complexes that mimic properties of natural stimuli, specifically non-Gaussian amplitude distribution and higher-order correlations. Results demonstrate that the proposed approach successfully identifies correct underlying STRFs, even in cases where second-order methods based on the spike-triggered average (STA do not. Applied to small data samples, the method is shown to converge on smaller amounts of experimental recordings and with lower estimation variance than the generalized linear model and recent information theoretic methods. Thus, CbRF estimation may prove useful for investigation of neuronal processes in response to

  3. Discriminative Learning of Receptive Fields from Responses to Non-Gaussian Stimulus Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Arne F.; Diepenbrock, Jan-Philipp; Happel, Max F. K.; Ohl, Frank W.; Anemüller, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of sensory neurons' processing characteristics requires simultaneous measurement of presented stimuli and concurrent spike responses. The functional transformation from high-dimensional stimulus space to the binary space of spike and non-spike responses is commonly described with linear-nonlinear models, whose linear filter component describes the neuron's receptive field. From a machine learning perspective, this corresponds to the binary classification problem of discriminating spike-eliciting from non-spike-eliciting stimulus examples. The classification-based receptive field (CbRF) estimation method proposed here adapts a linear large-margin classifier to optimally predict experimental stimulus-response data and subsequently interprets learned classifier weights as the neuron's receptive field filter. Computational learning theory provides a theoretical framework for learning from data and guarantees optimality in the sense that the risk of erroneously assigning a spike-eliciting stimulus example to the non-spike class (and vice versa) is minimized. Efficacy of the CbRF method is validated with simulations and for auditory spectro-temporal receptive field (STRF) estimation from experimental recordings in the auditory midbrain of Mongolian gerbils. Acoustic stimulation is performed with frequency-modulated tone complexes that mimic properties of natural stimuli, specifically non-Gaussian amplitude distribution and higher-order correlations. Results demonstrate that the proposed approach successfully identifies correct underlying STRFs, even in cases where second-order methods based on the spike-triggered average (STA) do not. Applied to small data samples, the method is shown to converge on smaller amounts of experimental recordings and with lower estimation variance than the generalized linear model and recent information theoretic methods. Thus, CbRF estimation may prove useful for investigation of neuronal processes in response to natural stimuli and

  4. Psychophysical Evidence for Spatiotemporal Tuning in Human Motion Sensing Receptive Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Mather

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available According to current models of motion detection, cortical motion sensors are tuned in both space and time to create spatiotemporally-oriented receptive fields. Motion direction is encoded by summing activity across sensors tuned to the same direction, and subtracting the outputs of sensors tuned to different directions. A psychophysical adaptation experiment tested for (i subtractive interactions between sensors tuned to different directions and (ii spatiotemporal tuning in motion sensing receptive fields. Participants viewed a counter-phase stimulus containing superimposed saw-tooth gratings moving in opposite directions. The contrast of one grating (pedestal was fixed, while the contrast of the other (test was varied to establish a motion null (no net apparent motion in the counter-phase. After adapting to a single grating drifting in the same direction as the test component, more test contrast was required to achieve a null relative to baseline. After adapting to a grating drifting in the opposite direction to the test component, less contrast was required to achieve a null. When both adapting and test gratings were counter-phase gratings, a small degree of test contrast threshold elevation was found which depended on the spatiotemporal phases of adapting and test components, consistent with spatiotemporally tuned motion sensor receptive fields.

  5. Division of labor in frontal eye field neurons during presaccadic remapping of visual receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sooyoon; Sommer, Marc A

    2012-10-01

    Our percept of visual stability across saccadic eye movements may be mediated by presaccadic remapping. Just before a saccade, neurons that remap become visually responsive at a future field (FF), which anticipates the saccade vector. Hence, the neurons use corollary discharge of saccades. Many of the neurons also decrease their response at the receptive field (RF). Presaccadic remapping occurs in several brain areas including the frontal eye field (FEF), which receives corollary discharge of saccades in its layer IV from a collicular-thalamic pathway. We studied, at two levels, the microcircuitry of remapping in the FEF. At the laminar level, we compared remapping between layers IV and V. At the cellular level, we compared remapping between different neuron types of layer IV. In the FEF in four monkeys (Macaca mulatta), we identified 27 layer IV neurons with orthodromic stimulation and 57 layer V neurons with antidromic stimulation from the superior colliculus. With the use of established criteria, we classified the layer IV neurons as putative excitatory (n = 11), putative inhibitory (n = 12), or ambiguous (n = 4). We found that just before a saccade, putative excitatory neurons increased their visual response at the RF, putative inhibitory neurons showed no change, and ambiguous neurons increased their visual response at the FF. None of the neurons showed presaccadic visual changes at both RF and FF. In contrast, neurons in layer V showed full remapping (at both the RF and FF). Our data suggest that elemental signals for remapping are distributed across neuron types in early cortical processing and combined in later stages of cortical microcircuitry.

  6. Topographical Estimation of Visual Population Receptive Fields by fMRI

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sangkyun; Papanikolaou, Amalia; Keliris, Georgios A.; Smirnakis, Stelios M.

    2015-01-01

    Visual cortex is retinotopically organized so that neighboring populations of cells map to neighboring parts of the visual field. Functional magnetic resonance imaging allows us to estimate voxel-based population receptive fields (pRF), i.e., the part of the visual field that activates the cells within each voxel. Prior, direct, pRF estimation methods1 suffer from certain limitations: 1) the pRF model is chosen a-priori and may not fully capture the actual pRF shape, and 2) pRF centers are pr...

  7. A two-layer sparse coding model learns simple and complex cell receptive fields and topography from natural images

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hyvärinen, Aapo; Hoyer, Patrik O

    2001-01-01

    The classical receptive fields of simple cells in the visual cortex have been shown to emerge from the statistical properties of natural images by forcing the cell responses to be maximally sparse, i.e...

  8. Visual cortex in aging and Alzheimer’s disease: Changes in visual field maps and population receptive fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa A. Brewer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Although several studies have suggested that cortical alterations underlie such age-related visual deficits as decreased acuity, little is known about what changes actually occur in visual cortex during healthy aging. Two recent studies showed changes in primary visual cortex (V1 during normal aging; however, no studies have characterized the effects of aging on visual cortex beyond V1, important measurements both for understanding the aging process and for comparison to changes in age-related diseases. Similarly, there is almost no information about changes in visual cortex in Alzheimer’s disease (AD, the most common form of dementia. Because visual deficits are often reported as one of the first symptoms of AD, measurements of such changes in the visual cortex of AD patients might improve our understanding of how the visual system is affected by neurodegeneration as well as aid early detection, accurate diagnosis and timely treatment of AD. Here we use fMRI to first compare the visual field map (VFM organization and population receptive fields (pRFs between young adults and healthy aging subjects for occipital VFMs V1, V2, V3, and hV4. Healthy aging subjects do not show major VFM organizational deficits, but do have reduced surface area and increased pRF sizes in the foveal representations of V1, V2, and hV4 relative to healthy young control subjects. These measurements are consistent with behavioral deficits seen in healthy aging. We then demonstrate the feasibility and first characterization of these measurements in two patients with mild AD, which reveal potential changes in visual cortex as part of the pathophysiology of AD. Our data aid in our understanding of the changes in the visual processing pathways in normal aging and provide the foundation for future research into earlier and more definitive detection of AD.

  9. Discriminative ability of reflex receptive fields to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Monika; Biurrun Manresa, José; Treichel, Fabienne;

    2016-01-01

    central pain processing may be a contributing mechanism. The measurement of Reflex Receptive Fields (RRF) is a novel method to assess altered central pain processing. The RRF area denotes the area of the foot sole from which spinal nociceptive reflexes can be elicited. It was shown to be enlarged...... included 214 patients with either acute or chronic low back pain and compared RRF between groups in both uni- and multivariable analyses adjusted for different socio-demographic and clinical characteristics possibly associated with the transition to chronic pain. We found a mean difference between patients...

  10. Receptive field properties of trigeminothalamic neurons in the rostral trigeminal sensory nuclei of cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    1994-01-01

    This study described topographic and receptive field representation in the region of the rostral trigeminal nuclei, and evaluated whether thalamic neurons from the principal sensory nucleus relay muscle afferent information to the thalamus. Extracellular single-unit activity was recorded from anesthetized cats. Units were tested for responses to natural stimuli (i.e., air bursts, brushing, light pressure, and pinch) applied to the face and oral cavity, electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, and ramp-and-hold movements of the jaw. The receptive fields and physiological properties for 110 units were studied; we were able to verify the recording site for 96 of these units. Most of the units had discrete receptive fields in the oral cavity, skin, hair, and masseter muscle. Only 2 units received convergent inputs. Stimulation of the ipsilateral and contralateral ventroposteromedial nucleus of the thalamus was performed to identify antidromically activated units. The results showed that the dorsal principal sensory nucleus received its input primarily from the oral cavity. Most of the units (85%) that were activated by antidromic stimulation from the ipsilateral thalamus were located in this nucleus. In contrast, 82% of the units that projected to the contralateral thalamus were located in the ventral principal sensory nucleus. A complete somatotopic representation of the ipsilateral face and oral cavity was observed in the ventral principal sensory nucleus. Although 24 units had muscle receptive fields, none were activated by stimulation of the ipsilateral thalamus, and only 1 responded to stimulation of the contralateral thalamus. Most of the units that were not antidromically driven were recorded outside of the cytoarchitectural boundaries of the principal sensory nucleus. Retrograde labeling of the rostral trigeminal nuclei indicated that most of the neurons in the dorsal principal sensory nucleus projected to the ipsilateral thalamus, whereas those in the

  11. Visual Receptive Field Properties of Neurons in the Mouse Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaying Tang

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN is increasingly regarded as a "smart-gating" operator for processing visual information. Therefore, characterizing the response properties of LGN neurons will enable us to better understand how neurons encode and transfer visual signals. Efforts have been devoted to study its anatomical and functional features, and recent advances have highlighted the existence in rodents of complex features such as direction/orientation selectivity. However, unlike well-researched higher-order mammals such as primates, the full array of response characteristics vis-à-vis its morphological features have remained relatively unexplored in the mouse LGN. To address the issue, we recorded from mouse LGN neurons using multisite-electrode-arrays (MEAs and analysed their discharge patterns in relation to their location under a series of visual stimulation paradigms. Several response properties paralleled results from earlier studies in the field and these include centre-surround organization, size of receptive field, spontaneous firing rate and linearity of spatial summation. However, our results also revealed "high-pass" and "low-pass" features in the temporal frequency tuning of some cells, and greater average contrast gain than reported by earlier studies. In addition, a small proportion of cells had direction/orientation selectivity. Both "high-pass" and "low-pass" cells, as well as direction and orientation selective cells, were found only in small numbers, supporting the notion that these properties emerge in the cortex. ON- and OFF-cells showed distinct contrast sensitivity and temporal frequency tuning properties, suggesting parallel projections from the retina. Incorporating a novel histological technique, we created a 3-D LGN volume model explicitly capturing the morphological features of mouse LGN and localising individual cells into anterior/middle/posterior LGN. Based on this categorization, we show that the ON/OFF, DS

  12. Simulating receptive fields of human visual cortex for 3D image quality prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng; Chen, Wanting; Lin, Wenchong; Jiang, Qiuping; Jiang, Gangyi

    2016-07-20

    Quality assessment of 3D images presents many challenges when attempting to gain better understanding of the human visual system. In this paper, we propose a new 3D image quality prediction approach by simulating receptive fields (RFs) of human visual cortex. To be more specific, we extract the RFs from a complete visual pathway, and calculate their similarity indices between the reference and distorted 3D images. The final quality score is obtained by determining their connections via support vector regression. Experimental results on three 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the most relevant existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistency alignment with subjective assessment, especially for asymmetrically distorted stereoscopic images.

  13. Spatiotemporal architecture of cortical receptive fields and its impact on multisensory interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian N.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Recent electrophysiology studies have suggested that neuronal responses to multisensory stimuli may possess a unique temporal signature. To evaluate this temporal dynamism, unisensory and multisensory spatiotemporal receptive fields (STRFs) of neurons in the cortex of the cat anterior ectosylvian sulcus were constructed. Analyses revealed that the multisensory STRFs of these neurons differed significantly from the component unisensory STRFs and their linear summation. Most notably, multisensory responses were found to have higher peak firing rates, shorter response latencies, and longer discharge durations. More importantly, multisensory STRFs were characterized by two distinct temporal phases of enhanced integration that reflected the shorter response latencies and longer discharge durations. These findings further our understanding of the temporal architecture of cortical multisensory processing, and thus provide important insights into the possible functional role(s) played by multisensory cortex in spatially directed perceptual processes. PMID:19308362

  14. Receptive field self-organization in a model of the fine structure in v1 cortical columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, Jörg

    2009-10-01

    We study a dynamical model of processing and learning in the visual cortex, which reflects the anatomy of V1 cortical columns and properties of their neuronal receptive fields. Based on recent results on the fine-scale structure of columns in V1, we model the activity dynamics in subpopulations of excitatory neurons and their interaction with systems of inhibitory neurons. We find that a dynamical model based on these aspects of columnar anatomy can give rise to specific types of computations that result in self-organization of afferents to the column. For a given type of input, self-organization reliably extracts the basic input components represented by neuronal receptive fields. Self-organization is very noise tolerant and can robustly be applied to different types of input. To quantitatively analyze the system's component extraction capabilities, we use two standard benchmarks: the bars test and natural images. In the bars test, the system shows the highest noise robustness reported so far. If natural image patches are used as input, self-organization results in Gabor-like receptive fields. In quantitative comparison with in vivo measurements, we find that the obtained receptive fields capture statistical properties of V1 simple cells that algorithms such as independent component analysis or sparse coding do not reproduce.

  15. Heterogeneity in the spatial receptive field architecture of multisensory neurons of the superior colliculus and its effects on multisensory integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Dipanwita; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Multisensory integration has been widely studied in neurons of the mammalian superior colliculus (SC). This has led to the description of various determinants of multisensory integration, including those based on stimulus- and neuron-specific factors. The most widely characterized of these illustrate the importance of the spatial and temporal relationships of the paired stimuli as well as their relative effectiveness in eliciting a response in determining the final integrated output. Although these stimulus-specific factors have generally been considered in isolation (i.e., manipulating stimulus location while holding all other factors constant), they have an intrinsic interdependency that has yet to be fully elucidated. For example, changes in stimulus location will likely also impact both the temporal profile of response and the effectiveness of the stimulus. The importance of better describing this interdependency is further reinforced by the fact that SC neurons have large receptive fields, and that responses at different locations within these receptive fields are far from equivalent. To address these issues, the current study was designed to examine the interdependency between the stimulus factors of space and effectiveness in dictating the multisensory responses of SC neurons. The results show that neuronal responsiveness changes dramatically with changes in stimulus location – highlighting a marked heterogeneity in the spatial receptive fields of SC neurons. More importantly, this receptive field heterogeneity played a major role in the integrative product exhibited by stimulus pairings, such that pairings at weakly responsive locations of the receptive fields resulted in the largest multisensory interactions. Together these results provide greater insight into the interrelationship of the factors underlying multisensory integration in SC neurons, and may have important mechanistic implications for multisensory integration and the role it plays in shaping

  16. Emulating the Visual Receptive Field Properties of MST Neurons with a Template Model of Heading Estimation

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    Perrone, John A.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously proposed a computational neural-network model by which the complex patterns of retinal image motion generated during locomotion (optic flow) can be processed by specialized detectors acting as templates for specific instances of self-motion. The detectors in this template model respond to global optic flow by sampling image motion over a large portion of the visual field through networks of local motion sensors with properties similar to neurons found in the middle temporal (MT) area of primate extrastriate visual cortex. The model detectors were designed to extract self-translation (heading), self-rotation, as well as the scene layout (relative distances) ahead of a moving observer, and are arranged in cortical-like heading maps to perform this function. Heading estimation from optic flow has been postulated by some to be implemented within the medial superior temporal (MST) area. Others have questioned whether MST neurons can fulfill this role because some of their receptive-field properties appear inconsistent with a role in heading estimation. To resolve this issue, we systematically compared MST single-unit responses with the outputs of model detectors under matched stimulus conditions. We found that the basic physiological properties of MST neurons can be explained by the template model. We conclude that MST neurons are well suited to support heading estimation and that the template model provides an explicit set of testable hypotheses which can guide future exploration of MST and adjacent areas within the primate superior temporal sulcus.

  17. The Role of Integrating Various Patterns of Activity Sequencing in Promoting the Receptive Vocabulary Size of EFL Learners

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    Ahlam Bouirane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The motivation underlying this research is the poor receptive vocabulary size (RVS among third year students of English as a foreign language (EFL. The purpose is to report the efficiency of integrating various patterns of activity sequencing in promoting RVS through quasi-experimentation. The research used a questionnaire to collect the participants’ perceptions of vocabulary and vocabulary learning, and to neutralize the bias of individual variables. Next, the research used the Vocabulary Levels Test (VLT to test the RVS at the beginning and end of the quasi-experiment. The questionnaire results revealed that the students have positive high perceptions of vocabulary and vocabulary learning activities. The VLT results showed significant differences in the RVS of the participants between the quasi-experiment phases.

  18. Eye-centered visual receptive fields in the ventral intraparietal area.

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    Chen, Xiaodong; DeAngelis, Gregory C; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-07-15

    The ventral intraparietal area (VIP) processes multisensory visual, vestibular, tactile, and auditory signals in diverse reference frames. We recently reported that visual heading signals in VIP are represented in an approximately eye-centered reference frame when measured using large-field optic flow stimuli. No VIP neuron was found to have head-centered visual heading tuning, and only a small proportion of cells had reference frames that were intermediate between eye- and head-centered. In contrast, previous studies using moving bar stimuli have reported that visual receptive fields (RFs) in VIP are head-centered for a substantial proportion of neurons. To examine whether these differences in previous findings might be due to the neuronal property examined (heading tuning vs. RF measurements) or the type of visual stimulus used (full-field optic flow vs. a single moving bar), we have quantitatively mapped visual RFs of VIP neurons using a large-field, multipatch, random-dot motion stimulus. By varying eye position relative to the head, we tested whether visual RFs in VIP are represented in head- or eye-centered reference frames. We found that the vast majority of VIP neurons have eye-centered RFs with only a single neuron classified as head-centered and a small minority classified as intermediate between eye- and head-centered. Our findings suggest that the spatial reference frames of visual responses in VIP may depend on the visual stimulation conditions used to measure RFs and might also be influenced by how attention is allocated during stimulus presentation.

  19. Measurement of population receptive fields in human early visual cortex using back-projection tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Clint A; Dumoulin, Serge O; Harvey, Ben M; Ress, David

    2014-01-22

    Properties of human visual population receptive fields (pRFs) are currently estimated by performing measurements of visual stimulation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and then fitting the results using a predefined model shape for the pRF. Various models exist and different models may be appropriate under different circumstances, but the validity of the models has never been verified, suggesting the need for a model-free approach. Here, we demonstrate that pRFs can be directly reconstructed using a back-projection-tomography approach that requires no a priori model. The back-projection method involves sweeping thin contrast-defined bars across the visual field whose orientation and direction is rotated through 0°-180° in discrete increments. The measured fMRI time series within a cortical location can be approximated as a projection of the pRF along the long axis of the bar. The signals produced by a set of bar sweeps encircling the visual field form a sinogram. pRFs were reconstructed from these sinograms with a novel scheme that corrects for the blur introduced by the hemodynamic response and the stimulus-bar width. pRF positions agree well with the conventional model-based approach. Notably, a subset of the reconstructed pRFs shows significant asymmetry for both their excitatory and suppressive regions. Reconstructing pRFs using the tomographic approach is a fast, reliable, and accurate way to noninvasively estimate human pRF parameters and visual-field maps without the need for any a priori shape assumption.

  20. Chronic morphine exposure induces degradation of receptive field properties of LGN cells in cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua HE; Guang-xing LI; Xiang-rui LI; Yi-feng ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of chronic morphine exposure on the receptive field properties of lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons in cats. Methods: Cats were injected with morphine (10 mg/kg) or saline twice daily, for 10 d. Subsequently,extracellular single-unit recording techniques were used to examine the sensitivity of LGN neurons to visual stimuli in chronic morphine-treated and saline-treated cats. Results: Compared with saline-treated cats (as controls), LGN neurons in morphine-treated cats had decreased signal-to-noise ratios (1.9 vs 3.1), and orientation and direction sensitivity (0.103 vs 0.135 and 0.074 vs 0.10, respectively),accompanied by significant increases in spontaneous (27.4 vs 17.5) and evoked activity (preferred: 42.2 vs 38.1; average: 28.1 vs 22.3). Conclusion: Chronic morphine exposure can lead to the functional degradation of LGN neurons in cats,which might result from the effects of chronic morphine exposure on inhibitory neurotransmission.

  1. Improved contour detection model with spatial summation properties based on nonclassical receptive field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuan; Xu, Guili; Cao, Yijun; Liang, Chenghua; Li, Ya

    2016-07-01

    The responses of cortical neurons to a stimulus in a classical receptive field (CRF) can be modulated by stimulating the non-CRF (nCRF) of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1). In the very early stages (at around 40 ms), a neuron in V1 exhibits strong responses to a small set of stimuli. Later, however (after 100 ms), the neurons in V1 become sensitive to the scene's global organization. As per these visual cortical mechanisms, a contour detection model based on the spatial summation properties is proposed. Unlike in previous studies, the responses of the nCRF to the higher visual cortex that results in the inhibition of the neuronal responses in the primary visual cortex by the feedback pathway are considered. In this model, the individual neurons in V1 receive global information from the higher visual cortex to participate in the inhibition process. Computationally, global Gabor energy features are involved, leading to the more coherent physiological characteristics of the nCRF. We conducted an experiment where we compared our model with those proposed by other researchers. Our model explains the role of the mutual inhibition of neurons in V1, together with an approach for object recognition in machine vision.

  2. Learning Receptive Fields and Quality Lookups for Blind Quality Assessment of Stereoscopic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Feng; Lin, Weisi; Wang, Shanshan; Jiang, Gangyi; Yu, Mei; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-03-01

    Blind quality assessment of 3D images encounters more new challenges than its 2D counterparts. In this paper, we propose a blind quality assessment for stereoscopic images by learning the characteristics of receptive fields (RFs) from perspective of dictionary learning, and constructing quality lookups to replace human opinion scores without performance loss. The important feature of the proposed method is that we do not need a large set of samples of distorted stereoscopic images and the corresponding human opinion scores to learn a regression model. To be more specific, in the training phase, we learn local RFs (LRFs) and global RFs (GRFs) from the reference and distorted stereoscopic images, respectively, and construct their corresponding local quality lookups (LQLs) and global quality lookups (GQLs). In the testing phase, blind quality pooling can be easily achieved by searching optimal GRF and LRF indexes from the learnt LQLs and GQLs, and the quality score is obtained by combining the LRF and GRF indexes together. Experimental results on three publicly 3D image quality assessment databases demonstrate that in comparison with the existing methods, the devised algorithm achieves high consistent alignment with subjective assessment.

  3. Assessing the modified receptive field (MRF) theory: Evidence from Sinhalese-English bilinguals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Ravini; Winskel, Heather

    2016-11-01

    The current study aimed to test the applicability of the modified receptive field (MRF) theory (Tydgat & Grainger, 2009) with English native speakers (Experiment 1) and Sinhalese native speakers (Experiment 2), who were skilled readers of both Sinhala and Roman scripts. A two-alternative forced choice (2AFC) procedure to measure identification accuracy for all positions in a string of five characters, which consisted of Roman script letters, Sinhala letters or symbols was conducted. For Roman script, the English and Sinhalese speakers displayed analogous results as in previous studies for Roman letters and symbols (i.e., an initial letter advantage and W-shaped function for Roman letters and a Λ-shaped function for symbols). In contrast for Sinhala script, the Sinhalese speakers displayed a strong linear function with accuracy for letter positions 1, 2 and 3 similarly advantaged. We propose that this characteristic pattern for Sinhala script has developed as a specialised adaptive mechanism to optimise the processing of letters when reading in this distinctive script.

  4. Receptive fields of locust brain neurons are matched to polarization patterns of the sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Miklós; Homberg, Uwe; Pfeiffer, Keram

    2014-09-22

    Many animals, including insects, are able to use celestial cues as a reference for spatial orientation and long-distance navigation [1]. In addition to direct sunlight, the chromatic gradient of the sky and its polarization pattern are suited to serve as orientation cues [2-5]. Atmospheric scattering of sunlight causes a regular pattern of E vectors in the sky, which are arranged along concentric circles around the sun [5, 6]. Although certain insects rely predominantly on sky polarization for spatial orientation [7], it has been argued that detection of celestial E vector orientation may not suffice to differentiate between solar and antisolar directions [8, 9]. We show here that polarization-sensitive (POL) neurons in the brain of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria can overcome this ambiguity. Extracellular recordings from POL units in the central complex and lateral accessory lobes revealed E vector tunings arranged in concentric circles within large receptive fields, matching the sky polarization pattern at certain solar positions. Modeling of neuronal responses under an idealized sky polarization pattern (Rayleigh sky) suggests that these "matched filter" properties allow locusts to unambiguously determine the solar azimuth by relying solely on the sky polarization pattern for compass navigation.

  5. Tone frequency maps and receptive fields in the developing chinchilla auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienkowski, Martin; Harrison, Robert V

    2005-01-01

    Single-unit responses to tone pip stimuli were isolated from numerous microelectrode penetrations of auditory cortex (under ketamine anesthesia) in the developing chinchilla (laniger), a precocious mammal. Results are reported at postnatal day 3 (P3), P15, and P30, and from adult animals. Hearing sensitivity and spike firing rates were mature in the youngest group. The topographic representation of sound frequency (tonotopic map) in primary and secondary auditory cortex was also well ordered and sharply tuned by P3. The spectral-temporal complexity of cortical receptive fields, on the other hand, increased progressively (past P30) to adulthood. The (purported) refinement of initially diffuse tonotopic projections to cortex thus seems to occur in utero in the chinchilla, where external (and maternal) sounds are considerably attenuated and might not contribute to the mechanism(s) involved. This compares well with recent studies of vision, suggesting that the refinement of the retinotopic map does not require external light, but rather waves of (correlated) spontaneous activity on the retina. In contrast, it is most probable that selectivity for more complex sound features, such as frequency stacks and glides, develops under the influence of the postnatal acoustic environment and that inadequate sound stimulation in early development (e.g., due to chronic middle ear disease) impairs the formation of the requisite intracortical (and/or subcortical) circuitry.

  6. The complex structure of receptive fields in the middle temporal area

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    Micah eRichert

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the middle temporal area (MT are often viewed as motion detectors that prefer a single direction of motion in a single region of space. This assumption plays an important role in our understanding of visual processing, and models of motion processing in particular. We used extracellular recordings in area MT of awake, behaving monkeys (M. mulatta to test this assumption with a novel reverse correlation approach. Nearly half of the MT neurons in our sample deviated significantly from the classical view. First, in many cells, direction preference changed with the location of the stimulus within the receptive field. Second, the spatial response profile often had multiple peaks with apparent gaps in between. This shows that visual motion analysis in MT has access to motion detectors that are more complex than commonly thought. This complexity could be a mere byproduct of imperfect development, but can also be understood as the natural consequence of the nonlinear, recurrent interactions among laterally connected MT neurons. An important direction for future research is to investigate whether these inhomogeneities are advantageous, how they can be incorporated into models of motion detection, and whether they can provide quantitative insight into the underlying effective connectivity.

  7. Spatial receptive field organization of multisensory neurons and its impact on multisensory interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Juliane; Royal, David W.; Fister, Matthew C.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2009-01-01

    Previous work has established that the spatial receptive fields (SRFs) of multisensory neurons in the cerebral cortex are strikingly heterogeneous, and that SRF architecture plays an important deterministic role in sensory responsiveness and multisensory integrative capacities. The initial part of this contribution serves to review these findings detailing the key features of SRF organization in cortical multisensory populations by highlighting work from the cat anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES). In addition, we have recently conducted parallel studies designed to examine SRF architecture in the classic model for multisensory studies, the cat superior colliculus (SC), and we present some of the preliminary observations from the SC here. An examination of individual SC neurons revealed marked similarities between their unisensory (i.e., visual and auditory) SRFs, as well as between these unisensory SRFs and the multisensory SRF. Despite these similarities within individual neurons, different SC neurons had SRFs that ranged from a single area of greatest activation (hot spot) to multiple and spatially discrete hot spots. Similar to cortical multisensory neurons, the interactive profile of SC neurons was correlated strongly to SRF architecture, closely following the principle of inverse effectiveness. Thus, large and often superadditive multisensory response enhancements were typically seen at SRF locations where visual and auditory stimuli were weakly effective. Conversely, subadditive interactions were seen at SRF locations where stimuli were highly effective. Despite the unique functions characteristic of cortical and subcortical multisensory circuits, our results suggest a strong mechanistic interrelationship between SRF microarchitecture and integrative capacity. PMID:19698773

  8. Adult plasticity of spatiotemporal receptive fields of multisensory superior colliculus neurons following early visual deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, David W.; Krueger, Juliane; Fister, Matthew C.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Previous work has established that the integrative capacity of multisensory neurons in the superior colliculus (SC) matures over a protracted period of postnatal life (Wallace and Stein, 1997), and that the development of normal patterns of multisensory integration depends critically on early sensory experience (Wallace et al., 2004). Although these studies demonstrated the importance of early sensory experience in the creation of mature multisensory circuits, it remains unknown whether the reestablishment of sensory experience in adulthood can reverse these effects and restore integrative capacity. Methods The current study tested this hypothesis in cats that were reared in absolute darkness until adulthood and then returned to a normal housing environment for an equivalent period of time. Single unit extracellular recordings targeted multisensory neurons in the deep layers of the SC, and analyses were focused on both conventional measures of multisensory integration and on more recently developed methods designed to characterize spatiotemporal receptive fields (STRF). Results Analysis of the STRF structure and integrative capacity of multisensory SC neurons revealed significant modifications in the temporal response dynamics of multisensory responses (e.g., discharge durations, peak firing rates, and mean firing rates), as well as significant changes in rates of spontaneous activation and degrees of multisensory integration. Conclusions These results emphasize the importance of early sensory experience in the establishment of normal multisensory processing architecture and highlight the limited plastic potential of adult multisensory circuits. PMID:20404413

  9. Population Receptive Field Properties from fMRI and Electrocorticography in Striate and Extrastriate Cortex of the Same Subject

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    Ben Mark Harvey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Population receptive field (pRF modelling reconstructs the properties of visually responsive neuronal populations, typically using fMRI in humans. However, fMRI is an indirect measure of neural activity. Electrocorticography (ECoG measures electrical activity directly in humans using subdural electrodes. Here, we model pRF properties using both fMRI and ECoG data from the same subject. Prior to clinical intervention, we recorded fMRI responses to visual field mapping stimuli to determine pRF properties and visual area layout. The same subject subsequently underwent surgery to implant subdural ECoG electrodes and was shown the same visual field mapping stimuli while recording ECoG signals. ECoG data were filtered into different spectral bands, which were analysed separately. ECoG electrodes were localised to V1, MT, LO2, and IPS visual areas. Gamma-band responses allowed pRF modelling in all electrodes, and beta-band responses could also be fit in V1. pRF sizes were similar between ECoG and fMRI models. V1 alpha-band amplitude was highest when the stimulus was in the inhibitory surround of the neural population, although this did not reduce the gamma signal below baseline. IPS, MT, and LO2 alpha amplitude was highest when a blank screen was displayed, which was also found in the IPS beta-band. ECoG recording produces comparable results to fMRI for pRF modelling, providing useful validation and extension of fMRI-based reconstruction of neural pRF properties. The fMRI signal cannot be explained by one ECoG spectral density band alone. Alpha band amplitudes reflect inhibitory signals in V1 and resting-state in extra-striate cortex. The same spectral band can reflect different functional processing depending on cortical location.

  10. A robust sub-pixel edge detection method of infrared image based on tremor-based retinal receptive field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kun; Yang, Hu; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2008-03-01

    Because of complex thermal objects in an infrared image, the prevalent image edge detection operators are often suitable for a certain scene and extract too wide edges sometimes. From a biological point of view, the image edge detection operators work reliably when assuming a convolution-based receptive field architecture. A DoG (Difference-of- Gaussians) model filter based on ON-center retinal ganglion cell receptive field architecture with artificial eye tremors introduced is proposed for the image contour detection. Aiming at the blurred edges of an infrared image, the subsequent orthogonal polynomial interpolation and sub-pixel level edge detection in rough edge pixel neighborhood is adopted to locate the foregoing rough edges in sub-pixel level. Numerical simulations show that this method can locate the target edge accurately and robustly.

  11. Within, but not between hands interactions in vibrotactile detection thresholds reflect somatosensory receptive field organization

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    Luigi eTamè

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Detection of a tactile stimulus on one finger is impaired when a concurrent stimulus (masker is presented on an additional finger of the same or the opposite hand. This phenomenon is known to be finger-specific at the within-hand level. However, whether this specificity is also maintained at the between-hand level is not known. In four experiments, we addressed this issue by combining a Bayesian adaptive staircase procedure (QUEST with a two-interval forced choice (2IFC design in order to establish threshold for detecting 200ms, 100Hz sinusoidal vibrations applied to the index or little fingertip of either hand (targets. We systematically varied the masker finger (index, middle, ring, or little finger of either hand, while controlling the spatial location of the target and masker stimuli. Detection thresholds varied consistently as a function of the masker finger when the latter was on the same hand (Experiments 1 and 2, but not when on different hands (Experiments 3 and 4. Within the hand, detection thresholds increased for masker fingers closest to the target finger (i.e., middle>ring when the target was index. Between the hands, detection thresholds were higher only when the masker was present on any finger as compared to when the target was presented in isolation. The within hand effect of masker finger is consistent with the segregation of different fingers at the early stages of somatosensory processing, from the periphery to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI. We propose that detection is finger-specific and reflects the organisation of somatosensory receptive fields in SI within, but not between the hands.

  12. Matching Pursuit Analysis of Auditory Receptive Fields' Spectro-Temporal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jörg-Hendrik; Kollmeier, Birger; Anemüller, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Gabor filters have long been proposed as models for spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs), with their specific spectral and temporal rate of modulation qualitatively replicating characteristics of STRF filters estimated from responses to auditory stimuli in physiological data. The present study builds on the Gabor-STRF model by proposing a methodology to quantitatively decompose STRFs into a set of optimally matched Gabor filters through matching pursuit, and by quantitatively evaluating spectral and temporal characteristics of STRFs in terms of the derived optimal Gabor-parameters. To summarize a neuron's spectro-temporal characteristics, we introduce a measure for the “diagonality,” i.e., the extent to which an STRF exhibits spectro-temporal transients which cannot be factorized into a product of a spectral and a temporal modulation. With this methodology, it is shown that approximately half of 52 analyzed zebra finch STRFs can each be well approximated by a single Gabor or a linear combination of two Gabor filters. Moreover, the dominant Gabor functions tend to be oriented either in the spectral or in the temporal direction, with truly “diagonal” Gabor functions rarely being necessary for reconstruction of an STRF's main characteristics. As a toy example for the applicability of STRF and Gabor-STRF filters to auditory detection tasks, we use STRF filters as features in an automatic event detection task and compare them to idealized Gabor filters and mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs). STRFs classify a set of six everyday sounds with an accuracy similar to reference Gabor features (94% recognition rate). Spectro-temporal STRF and Gabor features outperform reference spectral MFCCs in quiet and in low noise conditions (down to 0 dB signal to noise ratio). PMID:28232791

  13. Discriminative ability of reflex receptive fields to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Monika; Biurrun Manresa, José A; Treichel, Fabienne; Agten, Christoph A; Heini, Paul; Andersen, Ole K; Curatolo, Michele; Jüni, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Low back pain has a life time prevalence of 70% to 85%. Approximately 10% to 20% of all patients experience recurrent episodes or develop chronic low back pain. Sociodemographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics explain the transition from acute to chronic low back pain only to a limited extent. Altered central pain processing may be a contributing mechanism. The measurement of reflex receptive fields (RRF) is a novel method to assess altered central pain processing. The RRF area denotes the area of the foot sole from which spinal nociceptive reflexes can be elicited. It was shown to be enlarged in patients with acute and chronic low back pain compared with pain-free individuals. The aim of the study was to explore the discriminative ability of the RRF to distinguish patients with acute and chronic low back pain with the hypothesis that enlarged RRF are associated with chronic low back pain. We included 214 patients with either acute or chronic low back pain and compared RRF between groups in both univariable and multivariable analyses adjusted for different sociodemographic and clinical characteristics possibly associated with the transition to chronic pain. We found a mean difference between patients with acute and chronic low back pain of -0.01 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.06 to 0.04) in the crude, -0.02 (95% CI, -0.08 to 0.04) in the age and sex adjusted, and -0.02 (95% CI, -0.09 to 0.05) in the fully adjusted model. Our results suggest that the enlargement of RRF area may not be associated with the transition from acute to chronic low back pain.

  14. A generalized linear model for estimating spectrotemporal receptive fields from responses to natural sounds.

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    Ana Calabrese

    Full Text Available In the auditory system, the stimulus-response properties of single neurons are often described in terms of the spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF, a linear kernel relating the spectrogram of the sound stimulus to the instantaneous firing rate of the neuron. Several algorithms have been used to estimate STRFs from responses to natural stimuli; these algorithms differ in their functional models, cost functions, and regularization methods. Here, we characterize the stimulus-response function of auditory neurons using a generalized linear model (GLM. In this model, each cell's input is described by: 1 a stimulus filter (STRF; and 2 a post-spike filter, which captures dependencies on the neuron's spiking history. The output of the model is given by a series of spike trains rather than instantaneous firing rate, allowing the prediction of spike train responses to novel stimuli. We fit the model by maximum penalized likelihood to the spiking activity of zebra finch auditory midbrain neurons in response to conspecific vocalizations (songs and modulation limited (ml noise. We compare this model to normalized reverse correlation (NRC, the traditional method for STRF estimation, in terms of predictive power and the basic tuning properties of the estimated STRFs. We find that a GLM with a sparse prior predicts novel responses to both stimulus classes significantly better than NRC. Importantly, we find that STRFs from the two models derived from the same responses can differ substantially and that GLM STRFs are more consistent between stimulus classes than NRC STRFs. These results suggest that a GLM with a sparse prior provides a more accurate characterization of spectrotemporal tuning than does the NRC method when responses to complex sounds are studied in these neurons.

  15. Spatial Heterogeneity of Cortical Receptive Fields and Its Impact on Multisensory Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carriere, Brian N.; Royal, David W.; Wallace, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of multisensory processing at the level of the single neuron have illustrated the importance of the spatial and temporal relationship of the paired stimuli and their relative effectiveness in determining the product of the resultant interaction. Although these principles provide a good first-order description of the interactive process, they were derived by treating space, time, and effectiveness as independent factors. In the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES) of the cat, previous work hinted that the spatial receptive field (SRF) architecture of multisensory neurons might play an important role in multisensory processing due to differences in the vigor of responses to identical stimuli placed at different locations within the SRF. In this study the impact of SRF architecture on cortical multisensory processing was investigated using semichronic single-unit electrophysiological experiments targeting a multisensory domain of the cat AES. The visual and auditory SRFs of AES multisensory neurons exhibited striking response heterogeneity, with SRF architecture appearing to play a major role in the multisensory interactions. The deterministic role of SRF architecture was tightly coupled to the manner in which stimulus location modulated the responsiveness of the neuron. Thus multisensory stimulus combinations at weakly effective locations within the SRF resulted in large (often superadditive) response enhancements, whereas combinations at more effective spatial locations resulted in smaller (additive/subadditive) interactions. These results provide important insights into the spatial organization and processing capabilities of cortical multisensory neurons, features that may provide important clues as to the functional roles played by this area in spatially directed perceptual processes. PMID:18287544

  16. Binocular neurons in parastriate cortex: interocular 'matching' of receptive field properties, eye dominance and strength of silent suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip A Romo

    Full Text Available Spike-responses of single binocular neurons were recorded from a distinct part of primary visual cortex, the parastriate cortex (cytoarchitectonic area 18 of anaesthetized and immobilized domestic cats. Functional identification of neurons was based on the ratios of phase-variant (F1 component to the mean firing rate (F0 of their spike-responses to optimized (orientation, direction, spatial and temporal frequencies and size sine-wave-luminance-modulated drifting grating patches presented separately via each eye. In over 95% of neurons, the interocular differences in the phase-sensitivities (differences in F1/F0 spike-response ratios were small (≤ 0.3 and in over 80% of neurons, the interocular differences in preferred orientations were ≤ 10°. The interocular correlations of the direction selectivity indices and optimal spatial frequencies, like those of the phase sensitivies and optimal orientations, were also strong (coefficients of correlation r ≥ 0.7005. By contrast, the interocular correlations of the optimal temporal frequencies, the diameters of summation areas of the excitatory responses and suppression indices were weak (coefficients of correlation r ≤ 0.4585. In cells with high eye dominance indices (HEDI cells, the mean magnitudes of suppressions evoked by stimulation of silent, extra-classical receptive fields via the non-dominant eyes, were significantly greater than those when the stimuli were presented via the dominant eyes. We argue that the well documented 'eye-origin specific' segregation of the lateral geniculate inputs underpinning distinct eye dominance columns in primary visual cortices of mammals with frontally positioned eyes (distinct eye dominance columns, combined with significant interocular differences in the strength of silent suppressive fields, putatively contribute to binocular stereoscopic vision.

  17. Activity-dependent regulation of 'on' and 'off' responses in cat visual cortical receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debanne, D; Shulz, D E; Fregnac, Y

    1998-04-15

    1. A supervised learning procedure was applied to individual cat area 17 neurons to test the possible role of neuronal co-activity in controlling the plasticity of the spatial 'on-off' organization of visual cortical receptive fields (RFs). 2. Differential pairing between visual input evoked in a fixed position of the RF and preset levels of postsynaptic firing (imposed iontophoretically) were used alternately to boost the 'on' (or 'off') response to a 'high' level of firing (S+ pairing), and to reduce the opponent response (respectively 'off' or 'on') in the same position to a 'low' level (S- pairing). This associative procedure was repeated 50-100 times at a low temporal frequency (0.1-0.15 s-1). 3. Long-lasting modifications of the ratio of 'on-off' responses, measured in the paired position or integrated across the whole RF, were found in 44 % of the conditioned neurons (17/39), and in most cases this favoured the S+ paired characteristic. The amplitude change was on average half of that imposed during pairing. Comparable proportions of modified cells were obtained in 'simple' (13/27) and 'complex' (4/12) RFs, both in adult cats (4/11) and in kittens within the critical period (13/28). 4. The spatial selectivity of the pairing effects was studied by pseudorandomly stimulating both paired and spatially distinct unpaired positions within the RF. Most modifications were observed in the paired position (for 88 % of successful pairings). 5. In some cells (n = 13), a fixed delay pairing procedure was applied, in which the temporal phase of the onset of the current pulse was shifted by a few hundred milliseconds from the presentation or offset of the visual stimulus. Consecutive effects were observed in 4/13 cells, which retained the temporal pattern of activity imposed during pairing for 5-40 min. They were expressed in the paired region only. 6. The demonstration of long-lasting adaptive changes in the ratio of 'on' and 'off' responses, expressed in localized

  18. The reliance on inclusive living thing in inductive inference among 5-year-olds: the role of access to nature and the size of receptive vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarłowski Andrzej

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study employed a serial forced choice inductive inference paradigm to test whether rural and urban 5-year-olds varying in SES rely on the representation of living things in extending new knowledge. Sixty-five children learned that humans possess a novel internal property and, in a series of test trials, had to decide whether to attribute the property to an inanimate living thing or to an artifact. Additionally, the size of children’s receptive vocabulary was assessed. This study provides the first evidence that those 5-year-olds who have access to rich nature and who have acquired a high level of receptive vocabulary do rely on living kinds in induction in a forced choice task. The study further underscores the necessity to include children with diverse backgrounds in research on the development of biological knowledge. It also provides new evidence that general cognitive ability links to advances in children’s biological understanding.

  19. Receptive Field Vectors of Genetically-Identified Retinal Ganglion Cells Reveal Cell-Type-Dependent Visual Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Katz

    Full Text Available Sensory stimuli are encoded by diverse kinds of neurons but the identities of the recorded neurons that are studied are often unknown. We explored in detail the firing patterns of eight previously defined genetically-identified retinal ganglion cell (RGC types from a single transgenic mouse line. We first introduce a new technique of deriving receptive field vectors (RFVs which utilises a modified form of mutual information ("Quadratic Mutual Information". We analysed the firing patterns of RGCs during presentation of short duration (~10 second complex visual scenes (natural movies. We probed the high dimensional space formed by the visual input for a much smaller dimensional subspace of RFVs that give the most information about the response of each cell. The new technique is very efficient and fast and the derivation of novel types of RFVs formed by the natural scene visual input was possible even with limited numbers of spikes per cell. This approach enabled us to estimate the 'visual memory' of each cell type and the corresponding receptive field area by calculating Mutual Information as a function of the number of frames and radius. Finally, we made predictions of biologically relevant functions based on the RFVs of each cell type. RGC class analysis was complemented with results for the cells' response to simple visual input in the form of black and white spot stimulation, and their classification on several key physiological metrics. Thus RFVs lead to predictions of biological roles based on limited data and facilitate analysis of sensory-evoked spiking data from defined cell types.

  20. Mapping global cropland and field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Steffen; See, Linda; McCallum, Ian; You, Liangzhi; Bun, Andriy; Moltchanova, Elena; Duerauer, Martina; Albrecht, Fransizka; Schill, Christian; Perger, Christoph; Havlik, Petr; Mosnier, Aline; Thornton, Philip; Wood-Sichra, Ulrike; Herrero, Mario; Becker-Reshef, Inbal; Justice, Chris; Hansen, Matthew; Gong, Peng; Abdel Aziz, Sheta; Cipriani, Anna; Cumani, Renato; Cecchi, Giuliano; Conchedda, Giulia; Ferreira, Stefanus; Gomez, Adriana; Haffani, Myriam; Kayitakire, Francois; Malanding, Jaiteh; Mueller, Rick; Newby, Terence; Nonguierma, Andre; Olusegun, Adeaga; Ortner, Simone; Rajak, D Ram; Rocha, Jansle; Schepaschenko, Dmitry; Schepaschenko, Maria; Terekhov, Alexey; Tiangwa, Alex; Vancutsem, Christelle; Vintrou, Elodie; Wenbin, Wu; van der Velde, Marijn; Dunwoody, Antonia; Kraxner, Florian; Obersteiner, Michael

    2015-05-01

    A new 1 km global IIASA-IFPRI cropland percentage map for the baseline year 2005 has been developed which integrates a number of individual cropland maps at global to regional to national scales. The individual map products include existing global land cover maps such as GlobCover 2005 and MODIS v.5, regional maps such as AFRICOVER and national maps from mapping agencies and other organizations. The different products are ranked at the national level using crowdsourced data from Geo-Wiki to create a map that reflects the likelihood of cropland. Calibration with national and subnational crop statistics was then undertaken to distribute the cropland within each country and subnational unit. The new IIASA-IFPRI cropland product has been validated using very high-resolution satellite imagery via Geo-Wiki and has an overall accuracy of 82.4%. It has also been compared with the EarthStat cropland product and shows a lower root mean square error on an independent data set collected from Geo-Wiki. The first ever global field size map was produced at the same resolution as the IIASA-IFPRI cropland map based on interpolation of field size data collected via a Geo-Wiki crowdsourcing campaign. A validation exercise of the global field size map revealed satisfactory agreement with control data, particularly given the relatively modest size of the field size data set used to create the map. Both are critical inputs to global agricultural monitoring in the frame of GEOGLAM and will serve the global land modelling and integrated assessment community, in particular for improving land use models that require baseline cropland information. These products are freely available for downloading from the http://cropland.geo-wiki.org website.

  1. Spatial dynamics of receptive fields in cat primary visual cortex related to the temporal structure of thalamocortical feedforward activity. Experiments and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suder, Katrin; Funke, Klaus; Zhao, Yongqiang; Kerscher, Nicolas; Wennekers, Thomas; Wörgötter, Florentin

    2002-06-01

    We investigated how changes in the temporal firing rate of thalamocortical activity affect the spatiotemporal structure of receptive field (RF) subunits in cat primary visual cortex. Spike activity of 67 neurons (48 simple, 19 complex cells) was extracellulary recorded from area 17/18 of anesthetized and paralyzed cats. A total of 107 subfields (on/off) were mapped by applying a reverse correlation technique to the activity elicited by bright and dark rectangles flashed for 300 ms in a 20x10 grid. We found that the width of the (suprathreshold) discharge fields shrank on average by 22% during this 300-ms-long stimulus presentation time. Fifty-eight subfields (54%) shrank by more than 20% of peak width and only ten (less than 10%) showed a slight increase over time. The main size reduction took place 40-60 ms after response onset, which corresponded to the transition from transient peak firing to tonic visual activity in thalamocortical relay cells (TC). The experimentally obtained RFs were then fitted with the aid of a neural field model of the primary visual pathway. Assuming a Gaussian-shaped spatial sensitivity profile across the RF subfield width, the model allowed us to estimate the subthreshold RF (depolarization field, D-field) from the minimal discharge field (MDF). The model allowed us to test to what degree the temporal dynamics of thalamocortical activity contributes to the spatiotemporal changes of cortical RFs. To this end, we performed the fitting procedure either with a pure feedforward model or with a field model that also included intracortical feedback. Spatial and temporal parameters obtained from fits of the experimental RFs matched closely to those achieved by simulating a pure feedforward system with the field model but were not compatible with additional intracortical feedback. Thus, our results show that dot stimulation, which optimally excites thalamocortical cells, leads to a shrinkage with respect to the size of the RF subfield at the

  2. Central sensitization in spinal cord injured humans assessed by reflex receptive fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biurrun Manresa, José Alberto; Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Johannesen, Inger Lauge

    2014-01-01

    after an intramuscular injection of capsaicin in the foot sole in order to induce central sensitization. RESULTS: Both groups presented RRF expansion and lowered NWR thresholds immediately after capsaicin injection, reflected by the enlargement of RRF sensitivity areas and RRF probability areas....... Moreover, the topography of the RRF sensitivity and probability areas were significantly different in SCI volunteers compared to NI volunteers in terms of size and shape. CONCLUSIONS: SCI volunteers can develop central sensitization, despite adaptive/maladaptive changes in synaptic plasticity and lack...

  3. P3-9: Roles of Subthreshold LFP Induced by Receptive Field Surround for Response Modulation in Monkey V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayeon Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A focal stimulus outside the receptive field robustly induces LFP change, while the same stimulus evokes no spike activity. We determined how this subthreshold LFP change interacted with spike response to the RF stimulus. Specifically, we sequentially presented two identical Gabor stimuli with a variable stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA; the first one (S1 was presented outside RF inducing a subthreshold LFP change, and the second one (S2 was subsequently presented within RF generating a spiking response. This enabled us to manipulate the temporal relation between subthreshold LFP and evoked spike activity and to determine whether subthreshold LFP contributed to modulation of spike activity in a SOA-dependent manner. We found that the subthreshold LFP propagated a considerably long distance, estimated to be more than 10 mm of cortical distance. The cross-correlation between the time course of subthreshold LFP and the pattern of SOA-dependency of spike activity was significant. These results indicate that signal integration is farther beyond the RF than previously estimated based on spike-triggered average, and suggest that subthreshold LFP modulate spike activity in a SOA-dependent manner.

  4. Push-pull receptive field organization and synaptic depression: Mechanisms for reliably encoding naturalistic stimuli in V1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eKremkow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the primary visual cortex are known for responding vigorously but with high variability to classical stimuli such as drifting bars or gratings. By contrast, natural scenes are encoded more efficiently by sparse and temporal precise spiking responses. We used a conductance-based model of the visual system in higher mammals to investigate how two specific features of the thalamo-cortical pathway, namely push-pull receptive field organization and synaptic depression, can contribute to this contextual reshaping of V1 responses. By comparing cortical dynamics evoked respectively by natural vs. artificial stimuli in a comprehensive parametric space analysis, we demonstrate that the reliability and sparseness of the spiking responses during natural vision is not a mere consequence of the increased bandwidth in the sensory input spectrum. Rather, it results from the combined impacts of synaptic depression and push-pull inhibition, the later acting for natural scenes as a form of effective feed-forward inhibition as demonstrated in other sensory systems. Thus, the combination of feedforward-like inhibition with fast thalamo-cortical synaptic depression by simple cells receiving a direct structured input from thalamus composes a generic computational mechanism for generating a sparse and reliable encoding of natural sensory events.

  5. Sparse Spectro-Temporal Receptive Fields Based on Multi-Unit and High-Gamma Responses in Human Auditory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick L Jenison

    Full Text Available Spectro-Temporal Receptive Fields (STRFs were estimated from both multi-unit sorted clusters and high-gamma power responses in human auditory cortex. Intracranial electrophysiological recordings were used to measure responses to a random chord sequence of Gammatone stimuli. Traditional methods for estimating STRFs from single-unit recordings, such as spike-triggered-averages, tend to be noisy and are less robust to other response signals such as local field potentials. We present an extension to recently advanced methods for estimating STRFs from generalized linear models (GLM. A new variant of regression using regularization that penalizes non-zero coefficients is described, which results in a sparse solution. The frequency-time structure of the STRF tends toward grouping in different areas of frequency-time and we demonstrate that group sparsity-inducing penalties applied to GLM estimates of STRFs reduces the background noise while preserving the complex internal structure. The contribution of local spiking activity to the high-gamma power signal was factored out of the STRF using the GLM method, and this contribution was significant in 85 percent of the cases. Although the GLM methods have been used to estimate STRFs in animals, this study examines the detailed structure directly from auditory cortex in the awake human brain. We used this approach to identify an abrupt change in the best frequency of estimated STRFs along posteromedial-to-anterolateral recording locations along the long axis of Heschl's gyrus. This change correlates well with a proposed transition from core to non-core auditory fields previously identified using the temporal response properties of Heschl's gyrus recordings elicited by click-train stimuli.

  6. A study on reception electrodes for the vital-sign monitor using near-field intra-body communication enhanced by spread spectrum technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takumi; Shimatani, Yuichi; Kyoso, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    As a novel vital sign monitor, we have developed wireless ECG monitoring system with Near-field intra-body communication (NF-IBC) technique. However, it was hard to ensure communication reliability because transmission channel is noisy and unstable. In order to solve the problem, we utilize spread spectrum (SS), which is known as robust communication technique even through poor transmission channel. In previous study, we have already developed an ECG monitor using NF-IBC enhanced by SS. In this paper, we evaluated on structure of the reception electrode for reliable communication. Based on the evaluations with bit error rate, we suggested the reception electrode structure which can keep the communication reliability. As the results we considered that we can expand the reception electrode up to 2.25 m(2). Moreover, we proposed the structure of the reception electrodes that can keep the communication reliability. Finally we suggested how to use the SS NF-IBC vital-sign monitor in room that larger than 2.25 m(2), and we had shown the practicability of the systems.

  7. Emulating the visual receptive-field properties of MST neurons with a template model of heading estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, J. A.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    We have proposed previously a computational neural-network model by which the complex patterns of retinal image motion generated during locomotion (optic flow) can be processed by specialized detectors acting as templates for specific instances of self-motion. The detectors in this template model respond to global optic flow by sampling image motion over a large portion of the visual field through networks of local motion sensors with properties similar to those of neurons found in the middle temporal (MT) area of primate extrastriate visual cortex. These detectors, arranged within cortical-like maps, were designed to extract self-translation (heading) and self-rotation, as well as the scene layout (relative distances) ahead of a moving observer. We then postulated that heading from optic flow is directly encoded by individual neurons acting as heading detectors within the medial superior temporal (MST) area. Others have questioned whether individual MST neurons can perform this function because some of their receptive-field properties seem inconsistent with this role. To resolve this issue, we systematically compared MST responses with those of detectors from two different configurations of the model under matched stimulus conditions. We found that the characteristic physiological properties of MST neurons can be explained by the template model. We conclude that MST neurons are well suited to support self-motion estimation via a direct encoding of heading and that the template model provides an explicit set of testable hypotheses that can guide future exploration of MST and adjacent areas within the superior temporal sulcus.

  8. Rapid mapping of visual receptive fields by filtered back projection: application to multi-neuronal electrophysiology and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie; Ding, Huayu; Seibel, Sofie H; Esposti, Federico; Lagnado, Leon

    2014-11-15

    Neurons in the visual system vary widely in the spatiotemporal properties of their receptive fields (RFs), and understanding these variations is key to elucidating how visual information is processed. We present a new approach for mapping RFs based on the filtered back projection (FBP), an algorithm used for tomographic reconstructions. To estimate RFs, a series of bars were flashed across the retina at pseudo-random positions and at a minimum of five orientations. We apply this method to retinal neurons and show that it can accurately recover the spatial RF and impulse response of ganglion cells recorded on a multi-electrode array. We also demonstrate its utility for in vivo imaging by mapping the RFs of an array of bipolar cell synapses expressing a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator. We find that FBP offers several advantages over the commonly used spike-triggered average (STA): (i) ON and OFF components of a RF can be separated; (ii) the impulse response can be reconstructed at sample rates of 125 Hz, rather than the refresh rate of a monitor; (iii) FBP reveals the response properties of neurons that are not evident using STA, including those that display orientation selectivity, or fire at low mean spike rates; and (iv) the FBP method is fast, allowing the RFs of all the bipolar cell synaptic terminals in a field of view to be reconstructed in under 4 min. Use of the FBP will benefit investigations of the visual system that employ electrophysiology or optical reporters to measure activity across populations of neurons.

  9. Feedback to distal dendrites links fMRI signals to neural receptive fields in a spiking network model of the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Hanna; Sharifian, Fariba; Vigario, Ricardo; Vanni, Simo

    2015-07-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response has been strongly associated with neuronal activity in the brain. However, some neuronal tuning properties are consistently different from the BOLD response. We studied the spatial extent of neural and hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex, where the BOLD responses spread and interact over much longer distances than the small receptive fields of individual neurons would predict. Our model shows that a feedforward-feedback loop between V1 and a higher visual area can account for the observed spread of the BOLD response. In particular, anisotropic landing of inputs to compartmental neurons were necessary to account for the BOLD signal spread, while retaining realistic spiking responses. Our work shows that simple dendrites can separate tuning at the synapses and at the action potential output, thus bridging the BOLD signal to the neural receptive fields with high fidelity.

  10. Color opponent receptive fields self-organize in a biophysical model of visual cortex via spike-timing dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akihiro; Neymotin, Samuel A; Stringer, Simon M

    2014-01-01

    Although many computational models have been proposed to explain orientation maps in primary visual cortex (V1), it is not yet known how similar clusters of color-selective neurons in macaque V1/V2 are connected and develop. In this work, we address the problem of understanding the cortical processing of color information with a possible mechanism of the development of the patchy distribution of color selectivity via computational modeling. Each color input is decomposed into a red, green, and blue representation and transmitted to the visual cortex via a simulated optic nerve in a luminance channel and red-green and blue-yellow opponent color channels. Our model of the early visual system consists of multiple topographically-arranged layers of excitatory and inhibitory neurons, with sparse intra-layer connectivity and feed-forward connectivity between layers. Layers are arranged based on anatomy of early visual pathways, and include a retina, lateral geniculate nucleus, and layered neocortex. Each neuron in the V1 output layer makes synaptic connections to neighboring neurons and receives the three types of signals in the different channels from the corresponding photoreceptor position. Synaptic weights are randomized and learned using spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). After training with natural images, the neurons display heightened sensitivity to specific colors. Information-theoretic analysis reveals mutual information between particular stimuli and responses, and that the information reaches a maximum with fewer neurons in the higher layers, indicating that estimations of the input colors can be done using the output of fewer cells in the later stages of cortical processing. In addition, cells with similar color receptive fields form clusters. Analysis of spiking activity reveals increased firing synchrony between neurons when particular color inputs are presented or removed (ON-cell/OFF-cell).

  11. GlyRα2, not GlyRα3, modulates the receptive field surround of OFF retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Nobles, Regina D; McCall, Maureen A

    2015-01-01

    Receptive fields (RFs) of most retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) consist of an excitatory center and suppressive surround. The RF center arises from the summation of excitatory bipolar cell glutamatergic inputs, whereas the surround arises from lateral inhibitory inputs. In the retina, both gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) and glycine are inhibitory neurotransmitters. A clear role for GABAergic inhibition modulating the RGC RF surround has been demonstrated across species. Glycinergic inhibition is more commonly associated with RF center modulation, although there is some evidence that it may contribute to the RF surround. The synaptic glycinergic chloride channels are formed by three homomeric β and two homomeric α subunits that can be glycine receptor (GlyR) α1, α2, α3, or α4. GlyRα composition is responsible for currents with distinct decay kinetics. Their expression within the inner plexiform laminae and neuronal subtypes also differ. We studied the role of GlyR subunit selective modulation of RGC RF surrounds, using mice lacking GlyRα2 (Glra2 -/-), GlyRα3 (Glra3 -/-), or both (Glra2/3 -/-). We chose this molecular genetic approach instead of pharmacological manipulation because there are no subunit selective antagonists and strychnine blocks all GlyRs. Comparisons of annulus-evoked responses among wild type (WT) and GlyRα knockouts (Glra2 -/-, Glra3 -/- and Glra2/3 -/-) show that GlyRα2 inhibition enhances RF surround suppression and post-stimulus excitation in only WT OFF RGCs. Similarities in the responses in Glra2 -/- and Glra2/3 -/- RGCs verify these conclusions. Based on previous and current data, we propose that GlyRα2-mediated input uses a crossover inhibitory circuit. Further, we suggest that GlyRα2 modulates the OFF RGC RF center and surround independently. In summary, our results define a selective GlyR subunit-specific control of RF surround suppression in OFF RGCs.

  12. Tactile orientation perception: an ideal observer analysis of human psychophysical performance in relation to macaque area 3b receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Ryan M; Staibano, Phillip; Goldreich, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    The ability to resolve the orientation of edges is crucial to daily tactile and sensorimotor function, yet the means by which edge perception occurs is not well understood. Primate cortical area 3b neurons have diverse receptive field (RF) spatial structures that may participate in edge orientation perception. We evaluated five candidate RF models for macaque area 3b neurons, previously recorded while an oriented bar contacted the monkey's fingertip. We used a Bayesian classifier to assign each neuron a best-fit RF structure. We generated predictions for human performance by implementing an ideal observer that optimally decoded stimulus-evoked spike counts in the model neurons. The ideal observer predicted a saturating reduction in bar orientation discrimination threshold with increasing bar length. We tested 24 humans on an automated, precision-controlled bar orientation discrimination task and observed performance consistent with that predicted. We next queried the ideal observer to discover the RF structure and number of cortical neurons that best matched each participant's performance. Human perception was matched with a median of 24 model neurons firing throughout a 1-s period. The 10 lowest-performing participants were fit with RFs lacking inhibitory sidebands, whereas 12 of the 14 higher-performing participants were fit with RFs containing inhibitory sidebands. Participants whose discrimination improved as bar length increased to 10 mm were fit with longer RFs; those who performed well on the 2-mm bar, with narrower RFs. These results suggest plausible RF features and computational strategies underlying tactile spatial perception and may have implications for perceptual learning.

  13. A neural network model on self-organizing emergence of simple-cell receptive field with orientation selectivity in visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Qian(

    2001-01-01

    [1]Hubel, D. H.. Wiesel. T. N., Receptive fields of single neuron in the cat striate cortex, Journal of Physiology, 1959, 148:574-591.[2]Hubel. D. H.. Wiesel, T. N., Functional architecture macaque monkey visual cortexm, Proc. Roy. Soc. B, 1977, 198: 1-59.[3]Shou. T. D., Brain Mechanisms of Visual Information Processing (in Chinese), Shanghai: Shanghai Science-Technology and Education Press, 1997, 188-197.[4]Ferster, D., Chung, S., Wheat, H., Orientation selectivity of thalamic input to simple cells of cat visual cortex, Nature,1996, 380: 249-252.[5]Vidyasagar. T. R., Pei, X., Volgushev, M., Multiple mechanisms underlying the orientation selectivity of visual cortical neurons. TINS, 1996, 19: 272-277.[6]Artun, O. B., Shouval, H. Z., Cooper, L. N., The effect of dynamic synapses on spatiotemporal receptive fields in visual cortex, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 1998, 95:11999-12003.[7]Rolls, E. T.. Tovee, M. J., Sparseness of the neuronal representation of stimuli in the primate temporal visual cortex, J.Neurophysiology, 1995,73: 713-726.[8]Olshausen. B. A.. Field, D. J., Sparse coding with an overcomplete basis set: A strategy employed by V 1 ? Vision Research,1997.37: 3311-3325.[9]Bell. A. J., Sejnoswski, T. J., The "Independent components" of natural scenes are edge filters, Vision Research, 1997, 37:3327-3338.[10]Dan, Y., Atick, J. J., Reid, R. C., Efficient coding of natural scenes in the lateral geniculate nucleus: experimental test of a computational theory, Journal of Neuroscience, 1996, 16:3351-3362.[11]Field. D. J., Relations between the statistics of natural images and the response properties of cortical cells, Journal of the Optical Society of America A, 1987, 4: 2379-2394.[12]DeAngelis, G. C., Ohzawa, I., Freeman, R. D., Receptive filed dynamics in the central visual pathway, TINS, 1995,18:451-458.[13]Wang, Y. J., Qi, X. L., Chen, Y. Z., Simulations of receptive fields dynamics, TINS, 1996, 19: 385-386.

  14. Local sensitivity to stimulus orientation and spatial frequency within the receptive fields of neurons in visual area 2 of macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, X; Zhang, B; Smith, E L; Nishimoto, S; Ohzawa, I; Chino, Y M

    2012-02-01

    We used dynamic dense noise stimuli and local spectral reverse correlation methods to reveal the local sensitivities of neurons in visual area 2 (V2) of macaque monkeys to orientation and spatial frequency within their receptive fields. This minimized the potentially confounding assumptions that are inherent in stimulus selections. The majority of neurons exhibited a relatively high degree of homogeneity for the preferred orientations and spatial frequencies in the spatial matrix of facilitatory subfields. However, about 20% of all neurons showed maximum orientation differences between neighboring subfields that were greater than 25 deg. The neurons preferring horizontal or vertical orientations showed less inhomogeneity in space than the neurons preferring oblique orientations. Over 50% of all units also exhibited suppressive profiles, and those were more heterogeneous than facilitatory profiles. The preferred orientation and spatial frequency of suppressive profiles differed substantially from those of facilitatory profiles, and the neurons with suppressive subfields had greater orientation selectivity than those without suppressive subfields. The peak suppression occurred with longer delays than the peak facilitation. These results suggest that the receptive field profiles of the majority of V2 neurons reflect the orderly convergence of V1 inputs over space, but that a subset of V2 neurons exhibit more complex response profiles having both suppressive and facilitatory subfields. These V2 neurons with heterogeneous subfield profiles could play an important role in the initial processing of complex stimulus features.

  15. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Durán

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a cooperative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009, we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields but fail to reproduce their homogeneity along the wind direction.

  16. Size distribution and structure of Barchan dune fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duran, O.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lind, P. G.;

    2011-01-01

    Barchans are isolated mobile dunes often organized in large dune fields. Dune fields seem to present a characteristic dune size and spacing, which suggests a co-operative behavior based on dune interaction. In Duran et al. (2009), we propose that the redistribution of sand by collisions between...... dunes is a key element for the stability and size selection of barchan dune fields. This approach was based on a mean-field model ignoring the spatial distribution of dune fields. Here, we present a simplified dune field model that includes the spatial evolution of individual dunes as well...... as their interaction through sand exchange and binary collisions. As a result, the dune field evolves towards a steady state that depends on the boundary conditions. Comparing our results with measurements of Moroccan dune fields, we find that the simulated fields have the same dune size distribution as in real fields...

  17. Hebbian learning in a model with dynamic rate-coded neurons: an alternative to the generative model approach for learning receptive fields from natural scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamker, Fred H; Wiltschut, Jan

    2007-09-01

    Most computational models of coding are based on a generative model according to which the feedback signal aims to reconstruct the visual scene as close as possible. We here explore an alternative model of feedback. It is derived from studies of attention and thus, probably more flexible with respect to attentive processing in higher brain areas. According to this model, feedback implements a gain increase of the feedforward signal. We use a dynamic model with presynaptic inhibition and Hebbian learning to simultaneously learn feedforward and feedback weights. The weights converge to localized, oriented, and bandpass filters similar as the ones found in V1. Due to presynaptic inhibition the model predicts the organization of receptive fields within the feedforward pathway, whereas feedback primarily serves to tune early visual processing according to the needs of the task.

  18. A neural network model on self-organizing emergence of simple-cell receptive field with orientation selectivity in visual cortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨谦; 齐翔林; 汪云九

    2001-01-01

    In order to probe into the self-organizing emergence of simple cell orientation selectivity,we tried to construct a neural network model that consists of LGN neurons and simple cells in visual cortex and obeys the Hebbian learning rule. We investigated the neural coding and representation of simple cells to a natural image by means of this model. The results show that the structures of their receptive fields are determined by the preferred orientation selectivity of simple cells.However, they are also decided by the emergence of self-organization in the unsupervision learning process. This kind of orientation selectivity results from dynamic self-organization based on the interactions between LGN and cortex.

  19. Receptivity and judgment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Nedelsky

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Both judgment and receptivity are important to optimal politics, and both are important to each other. In making this argument, I use an Arendtian conception of judgment and take mindfulness as an example of receptivity. I argue that receptivity offers a needed dimension to addressing the puzzles of what makes Arendtian judgment possible, and that judgment provides a necessary complement to receptivity for action in the world. Exploring this complementary relation between judgment and receptivity also reveals a surprising similarity between what each offers to the practice of politics, in particular to freedom and the possibility of transformation. At the same time, I argue, these important contributions to politics are best understood and realized if judgment and receptivity are thought of as distinct forms of relating to the world.

  20. Receptive processer og IT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Lone

    2002-01-01

    Sproglæringsteoretisk værktøj til udvikling af IT-støttede materialer og programmer inden for sproglig reception......Sproglæringsteoretisk værktøj til udvikling af IT-støttede materialer og programmer inden for sproglig reception...

  1. Vision Integration Model of Receptive Field and Its Application%感受野视觉特征整合模型及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章健; 赵冰; 李永强; 常奇峰; 逯鹏

    2013-01-01

    采用基本ICA模拟视觉感知机制对自然图像分解得到的图像基函数在空间排列上是混乱的,这与视觉生理机制相互矛盾.模拟视皮层感受野间的信息整合机制,建立了新的计算模型.针对基于内容的图像故障区域检测问题,提出了相应的高效率少样本检测算法.首先,以列车正常和故障图像序列作为训练数据,利用拓扑ICA方法学习图像基函数,由此得到的独立分量系数作为神经元响应,然后模拟同步振荡机制选择响应强烈的神经元,输出其对应的内容,最后通过自动对比实现图像故障区域的快速定位.实验结果表明,与传统方法相比较,引入视觉信息整合机制的新模型及其算法能够提高故障检测率.%The visual information in the brain is passed layer by layer. Almost all the visual signals from the retina go through the receptive field of the primary visual cortex (V1 area) and pass on to a more advanced visual cortex after processing. The receptive field of V1 is mainly responsible for extracting the image shape, direction, color and other information, with the spatial domain of locality, time and frequency domain direction and choice, as well as sparse response characteristics. From the view of natural image statistics, Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is one of the main methods to model early computational vision. However, the space arrangement of basic functions (independent components of natural image) decomposed by basic ICA is chaotic and their amplitudes are uncertainty. This decomposition result is contradicted with physiological mechanisms of vision. So, a new computational model is proposed to simulate two important mechanisms of vision which are visual cortex receptive field topology construct and synchronous oscillation among neuron group. To solve the problem of train image fault detection, a new algorithm was proposed based on above compute model. The experiment results show that, the new

  2. Covariation between Spike and LFP Modulations Revealed with Focal and Asynchronous Stimulation of Receptive Field Surround in Monkey Primary Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kayeon; Kim, Taekjun; Yoon, Taehwan; Lee, Choongkil

    2015-01-01

    A focal visual stimulus outside the classical receptive field (RF) of a V1 neuron does not evoke a spike response by itself, and yet evokes robust changes in the local field potential (LFP). This subthreshold LFP provides a unique opportunity to investigate how changes induced by surround stimulation leads to modulation of spike activity. In the current study, two identical Gabor stimuli were sequentially presented with a variable stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) ranging from 0 to 100 ms: the first (S1) outside the RF and the second (S2) over the RF of primary visual cortex neurons, while trained monkeys performed a fixation task. This focal and asynchronous stimulation of the RF surround enabled us to analyze the modulation of S2-evoked spike activity and covariation between spike and LFP modulation across SOA. In this condition, the modulation of S2-evoked spike response was dominantly facilitative and was correlated with the change in LFP amplitude, which was pronounced for the cells recorded in the upper cortical layers. The time course of covariation between the SOA-dependent spike modulation and LFP amplitude suggested that the subthreshold LFP evoked by the S1 can predict the magnitude of upcoming spike modulation.

  3. Covariation between Spike and LFP Modulations Revealed with Focal and Asynchronous Stimulation of Receptive Field Surround in Monkey Primary Visual Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayeon Kim

    Full Text Available A focal visual stimulus outside the classical receptive field (RF of a V1 neuron does not evoke a spike response by itself, and yet evokes robust changes in the local field potential (LFP. This subthreshold LFP provides a unique opportunity to investigate how changes induced by surround stimulation leads to modulation of spike activity. In the current study, two identical Gabor stimuli were sequentially presented with a variable stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA ranging from 0 to 100 ms: the first (S1 outside the RF and the second (S2 over the RF of primary visual cortex neurons, while trained monkeys performed a fixation task. This focal and asynchronous stimulation of the RF surround enabled us to analyze the modulation of S2-evoked spike activity and covariation between spike and LFP modulation across SOA. In this condition, the modulation of S2-evoked spike response was dominantly facilitative and was correlated with the change in LFP amplitude, which was pronounced for the cells recorded in the upper cortical layers. The time course of covariation between the SOA-dependent spike modulation and LFP amplitude suggested that the subthreshold LFP evoked by the S1 can predict the magnitude of upcoming spike modulation.

  4. About the Bakhtinian Thought: A Reception of Receptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Coelho Marchezan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several receptions of the Bakhtinian work: those which situate it in a cultural and historical perspective, making it possible to understand the context inherent to it, the interchanges with which it was instituted and its development paths; those which separately take one or other of its ideas, and those which search to infer a less or more systemized framework from it in order to consider a specific object. When we concentrate on those last ones and on the field of studies about language, we examine the receptions of the Bakhtinian thought as a pragmatics, a sociolinguistics, a semiotics, a social theory, a theory of the discourse. The perspective of this branch of instruction is the one on which we lastly focus in order to reflect upon some of its fundamental basis.

  5. Evaluation of the field size in dental diagnostic radiology system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, P.S.; Potiens, M.P.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    In this work the field size of a dental X rays machine was evaluated considering the recommendation of the Brazilian Health Ministry Regulation 453 which established basic lines of radiological protection in medical and dental diagnostic radiology. The diameter of the field should not be superior to 6 cm in the localized end point, limiting the radiated area and protecting the head-neck region. The measurements were carried out in a dental X rays machine, Dabi Atlante, model Spectro 70X Seletronic. For the field size or useful beam determination, the intra-oral films were positioned on a plain surface to be exposed in four stages and two focus-film distances (FFD), 20 cm and 27.5 cm: 1) with spacer cone; 2) without spacer cone; 3) with spacer cone and film-holding device; 4) without spacer cone and film-holding device. The results show that the diameter of the field size is satisfactory only for FFD = 20 cm. When the film-holding device is used, which is recommended by the Regulation 453, item 5.8 d(ii), the diameter of the field size exceeds the maximum recommended value of 6 cm. (authors)

  6. Relationship between the size of the dominant follicle, vaginal electrical resistance, serum concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone and sexual receptivity during the follicular phase of the dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, I M; Waheed, M M; Adam, Mohammed I; Al-Eknah, M M

    2015-03-01

    Thirteen dromedaries were used to study the relationship between the size of the dominant follicle, vaginal electrical resistance (VER), sexual receptivity, and serum concentrations of oestradiol-17β (E2) and progesterone (P4) throughout the follicular phase. On a daily basis, the animals experienced teasing with a vasectomised camel, trans-rectal ultrasound examination of the ovaries, and measurement of VER and blood collection for serum E2 and P4. Results revealed no significant differences between the mean VER in the animals that had a follicle of 5-10mm (group I, n=11), 11-15mm (group II, n=12) and 16-20mm (group III, n=13). The VER did not correlate with the follicular size. The E2 concentrations in the animals in groups II (60.14pg/ml) and III (66.52pg/ml) were significantly (Pdromedary camels.

  7. The visual development of hand-centered receptive fields in a neural network model of the primate visual system trained with experimentally recorded human gaze changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, Juan M; Navajas, Joaquín; Mender, Bedeho M W; Quian Quiroga, Rodrigo; Minini, Loredana; Stringer, Simon M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons have been found in the primate brain that respond to objects in specific locations in hand-centered coordinates. A key theoretical challenge is to explain how such hand-centered neuronal responses may develop through visual experience. In this paper we show how hand-centered visual receptive fields can develop using an artificial neural network model, VisNet, of the primate visual system when driven by gaze changes recorded from human test subjects as they completed a jigsaw. A camera mounted on the head captured images of the hand and jigsaw, while eye movements were recorded using an eye-tracking device. This combination of data allowed us to reconstruct the retinal images seen as humans undertook the jigsaw task. These retinal images were then fed into the neural network model during self-organization of its synaptic connectivity using a biologically plausible trace learning rule. A trace learning mechanism encourages neurons in the model to learn to respond to input images that tend to occur in close temporal proximity. In the data recorded from human subjects, we found that the participant's gaze often shifted through a sequence of locations around a fixed spatial configuration of the hand and one of the jigsaw pieces. In this case, trace learning should bind these retinal images together onto the same subset of output neurons. The simulation results consequently confirmed that some cells learned to respond selectively to the hand and a jigsaw piece in a fixed spatial configuration across different retinal views.

  8. On Field Size and Success Probability in Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geil, Hans Olav; Matsumoto, Ryutaroh; Thomsen, Casper

    2008-01-01

    Using tools from algebraic geometry and Gröbner basis theory we solve two problems in network coding. First we present a method to determine the smallest field size for which linear network coding is feasible. Second we derive improved estimates on the success probability of random linear network...

  9. Size separation of DNA molecules by pulsed electric field dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedelcu, S [National Institute for R and D in Microtechnologies, Str. Erou Iancu Nicolae 32B, PO Box 38-160, 023573 Bucharest (Romania); Watson, J H P [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Highfield, SO17 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2004-08-07

    In this paper we propose an electrode design and a switching pattern of the applied DC electrode potentials for a microfluidic device to be used in size separation of DNA molecules. Estimates on the separation resolution, which are based on numerical solutions of a Newton-type equation on time-averaged quantities, are presented for an input batch sample of DNA fragments with sizes up to 220 base pairs (bp). The active area of the device (which can be microfabricated by standard photolitographic techniques) is a channel 6 {mu}m wide, 8 {mu}m deep and 150 {mu}m in length, flanked by 23 plane parallel integrated electrodes, individually addressed with low DC voltages, up to {+-} 25 V. In the active area a time-dependent non-uniform electric field, or a travelling dielectrophoretic wave (TDW) is being produced. In order to enhance the separation resolution, the polarization DC potentials are switched with a relatively high frequency ({approx} 10{sup -7} s), which is chosen accordingly with the buffer conductivity and dielectric constants of the fluid and particles. Since the external field is of DC type, we put forward an explanatory model of the dielectric response of the DNA to the time-dependent applied field. We then numerically investigate the size-dependent response of the DNA in a low conductivity buffer ({approx}0.01 {omega}{sup -1} m{sup -1}) under the influence of the electric field, which is calculated by means of the method of moments. The results of the computer modelling indicate the existence of a threshold value for the size of the successfully transported molecules, which can be adjusted by varying the velocity of the dielectrophoretic wave produced by the system. The estimated error in selecting a chosen group of molecules with sizes above a specified value is about 5 bp, while the processing times are of the order of hundred of seconds.

  10. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Adinolfi, V.

    2013-07-03

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  11. Field emission from quantum size GaN structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D.; Litvin, Yu. M.; Hubbard, S.; Tiginyanu, I. M.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Litovchenko, V. G.; Evtukh, A.

    2003-12-01

    Whisker structures and quantum dots fabricated by photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of undoped and doped metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN (2×10 17 or 3×10 18 cm -3) are investigated in relation with their field-emission characteristics. Different surface morphologies, corresponding to different etching time and photocurrent, results in different field-emission characteristics with low turn-on voltage down to 4 V/μm and the appearance of quantum-size effect in the I- V curves.

  12. Field emission from quantum size GaN structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D.; Litvin, Yu.M.; Hubbard, S.; Tiginyanu, I.M.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H.L.; Litovchenko, V.G.; Evtukh, A

    2003-12-30

    Whisker structures and quantum dots fabricated by photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of undoped and doped metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD)-grown GaN (2x10{sup 17} or 3x10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) are investigated in relation with their field-emission characteristics. Different surface morphologies, corresponding to different etching time and photocurrent, results in different field-emission characteristics with low turn-on voltage down to 4 V/{mu}m and the appearance of quantum-size effect in the I-V curves.

  13. Electric field engineering using quantum-size-effect-tuned heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, V.; Ning, Z.; Xu, J.; Masala, S.; Zhitomirsky, D.; Thon, S. M.; Sargent, E. H.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum junction solar cell architecture was recently reported that employs colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) on each side of the p-n junction. This architecture extends the range of design opportunities for CQD photovoltaics, since the bandgap can be tuned across the light-absorbing semiconductor layer via control over CQD size, employing solution-processed, room-temperature fabricated materials. We exploit this feature by designing and demonstrating a field-enhanced heterojunction architecture. We optimize the electric field profile within the solar cell through bandgap engineering, thereby improving carrier collection and achieving an increased open circuit voltage, resulting in a 12% improvement in power conversion efficiency.

  14. Comparison of LFP-based and spike-based spectro-temporal receptive fields and cross-correlation in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jos J Eggermont

    Full Text Available Multi-electrode array recordings of spike and local field potential (LFP activity were made from primary auditory cortex of 12 normal hearing, ketamine-anesthetized cats. We evaluated 259 spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs and 492 frequency-tuning curves (FTCs based on LFPs and spikes simultaneously recorded on the same electrode. We compared their characteristic frequency (CF gradients and their cross-correlation distances. The CF gradient for spike-based FTCs was about twice that for 2-40 Hz-filtered LFP-based FTCs, indicating greatly reduced frequency selectivity for LFPs. We also present comparisons for LFPs band-pass filtered between 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 16-40 Hz, with spike-based STRFs, on the basis of their marginal frequency distributions. We find on average a significantly larger correlation between the spike based marginal frequency distributions and those based on the 16-40 Hz filtered LFP, compared to those based on the 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 2-40 Hz filtered LFP. This suggests greater frequency specificity for the 16-40 Hz LFPs compared to those of lower frequency content. For spontaneous LFP and spike activity we evaluated 1373 pair correlations for pairs with >200 spikes in 900 s per electrode. Peak correlation-coefficient space constants were similar for the 2-40 Hz filtered LFP (5.5 mm and the 16-40 Hz LFP (7.4 mm, whereas for spike-pair correlations it was about half that, at 3.2 mm. Comparing spike-pairs with 2-40 Hz (and 16-40 Hz LFP-pair correlations showed that about 16% (9% of the variance in the spike-pair correlations could be explained from LFP-pair correlations recorded on the same electrodes within the same electrode array. This larger correlation distance combined with the reduced CF gradient and much broader frequency selectivity suggests that LFPs are not a substitute for spike activity in primary auditory cortex.

  15. Comparison of LFP-based and spike-based spectro-temporal receptive fields and cross-correlation in cat primary auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, Jos J; Munguia, Raymundo; Pienkowski, Martin; Shaw, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Multi-electrode array recordings of spike and local field potential (LFP) activity were made from primary auditory cortex of 12 normal hearing, ketamine-anesthetized cats. We evaluated 259 spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs) and 492 frequency-tuning curves (FTCs) based on LFPs and spikes simultaneously recorded on the same electrode. We compared their characteristic frequency (CF) gradients and their cross-correlation distances. The CF gradient for spike-based FTCs was about twice that for 2-40 Hz-filtered LFP-based FTCs, indicating greatly reduced frequency selectivity for LFPs. We also present comparisons for LFPs band-pass filtered between 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 16-40 Hz, with spike-based STRFs, on the basis of their marginal frequency distributions. We find on average a significantly larger correlation between the spike based marginal frequency distributions and those based on the 16-40 Hz filtered LFP, compared to those based on the 4-8 Hz, 8-16 Hz and 2-40 Hz filtered LFP. This suggests greater frequency specificity for the 16-40 Hz LFPs compared to those of lower frequency content. For spontaneous LFP and spike activity we evaluated 1373 pair correlations for pairs with >200 spikes in 900 s per electrode. Peak correlation-coefficient space constants were similar for the 2-40 Hz filtered LFP (5.5 mm) and the 16-40 Hz LFP (7.4 mm), whereas for spike-pair correlations it was about half that, at 3.2 mm. Comparing spike-pairs with 2-40 Hz (and 16-40 Hz) LFP-pair correlations showed that about 16% (9%) of the variance in the spike-pair correlations could be explained from LFP-pair correlations recorded on the same electrodes within the same electrode array. This larger correlation distance combined with the reduced CF gradient and much broader frequency selectivity suggests that LFPs are not a substitute for spike activity in primary auditory cortex.

  16. Stochastic Neural Field Theory and the System-Size Expansion

    KAUST Repository

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze a master equation formulation of stochastic neurodynamics for a network of synaptically coupled homogeneous neuronal populations each consisting of N identical neurons. The state of the network is specified by the fraction of active or spiking neurons in each population, and transition rates are chosen so that in the thermodynamic or deterministic limit (N → ∞) we recover standard activity-based or voltage-based rate models. We derive the lowest order corrections to these rate equations for large but finite N using two different approximation schemes, one based on the Van Kampen system-size expansion and the other based on path integral methods. Both methods yield the same series expansion of the moment equations, which at O(1/N) can be truncated to form a closed system of equations for the first-and second-order moments. Taking a continuum limit of the moment equations while keeping the system size N fixed generates a system of integrodifferential equations for the mean and covariance of the corresponding stochastic neural field model. We also show how the path integral approach can be used to study large deviation or rare event statistics underlying escape from the basin of attraction of a stable fixed point of the mean-field dynamics; such an analysis is not possible using the system-size expansion since the latter cannot accurately determine exponentially small transitions. © by SIAM.

  17. Simulation of 2D Fields of Raindrop Size Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, A.; Schleiss, M.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2008-12-01

    The raindrop size distribution (DSD hereafter) is of primary importance for quantitative applications of weather radar measurements. The radar reflectivity~Z (directly measured by radar) is related to the power backscattered by the ensemble of hydrometeors within the radar sampling volume. However, the rain rate~R (the flux of water to the surface) is the variable of interest for many applications (hydrology, weather forecasting, air traffic for example). Usually, radar reflectivity is converted into rain rate using a power law such as Z=aRb. The coefficients a and b of the Z-R relationship depend on the DSD. The variability of the DSD in space and time has to be taken into account to improve radar rain rate estimates. Therefore, the ability to generate a large number of 2D fields of DSD which are statistically homogeneous provides a very useful simulation framework that nicely complements experimental approaches based on DSD data, in order to investigate radar beam propagation through rain as well as radar retrieval techniques. The proposed approach is based on geostatistics for structural analysis and stochastic simulation. First, the DSD is assumed to follow a gamma distribution. Hence a 2D field of DSDs can be adequately described as a 2D field of a multivariate random function consisting of the three DSD parameters. Such fields are simulated by combining a Gaussian anamorphosis and a multivariate Gaussian random field simulation algorithm. Using the (cross-)variogram models fitted on data guaranties that the spatial structure of the simulated fields is consistent with the observed one. To assess its validity, the proposed method is applied to data collected during intense Mediterranean rainfall. As only time series are available, Taylor's hypothesis is assumed to convert time series in 1D range profile. Moreover, DSD fields are assumed to be isotropic so that the 1D structure can be used to simulate 2D fields. A large number of 2D fields of DSD parameters are

  18. From grid cells to place cells with realistic field sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Torsten; Azizi, Amir Hossein; Cheng, Sen

    2017-01-01

    While grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) of rodents have multiple, regularly arranged firing fields, place cells in the cornu ammonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus mostly have single spatial firing fields. Since there are extensive projections from MEC to the CA regions, many models have suggested that a feedforward network can transform grid cell firing into robust place cell firing. However, these models generate place fields that are consistently too small compared to those recorded in experiments. Here, we argue that it is implausible that grid cell activity alone can be transformed into place cells with robust place fields of realistic size in a feedforward network. We propose two solutions to this problem. Firstly, weakly spatially modulated cells, which are abundant throughout EC, provide input to downstream place cells along with grid cells. This simple model reproduces many place cell characteristics as well as results from lesion studies. Secondly, the recurrent connections between place cells in the CA3 network generate robust and realistic place fields. Both mechanisms could work in parallel in the hippocampal formation and this redundancy might account for the robustness of place cell responses to a range of disruptions of the hippocampal circuitry.

  19. Quantum-size resonance tunneling in the field emission phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchenko, V.; Evtukh, A.; Kryuchenko, Yu.; Goncharuk, N.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Mutamba, K.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2004-07-01

    Theoretical analyses have been performed of the quantum-size (QS) resonance tunneling in the field-emission (FE) phenomenon for different models of the emitting structures. Such experimentally observed peculiarities have been considered as the enhancement of the FE current, the deviation from the Fowler-Nordheim law, the appearance of sharp current peaks, and a negative resistance. Different types of FE cathodes with QS structures (quantized layers, wires, or dots) have been studied experimentally. Resonance current peaks have been observed, from which the values of the energy-level splitting can be estimated.

  20. The field size matters: low dose external beam radiotherapy for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis : Importance of field size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltenborn, Alexander; Bulling, Elke; Nitsche, Mirko; Carl, Ulrich Martin; Hermann, Robert Michael

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of low-dose radiotherapy (RT) for thumb carpometacarpal osteoarthritis (rhizarthrosis). The responses of 84 patients (n = 101 joints) were analyzed 3 months after therapy (n = 65) and at 12 months (n = 27). Patients were treated with 6 fractions of 1 Gy, two times a week, with a linear accelerator. At the end of therapy, about 70 % of patients reported a response (partial remission or complete remission), 3 months later about 60 %, and 1 year after treatment 70 %. In univariate regression analysis, higher patient age and field size greater than 6 × 4 cm were associated with response to treatment, while initial increase of pain under treatment was predictive for treatment failure. Duration of RT series (more than 18 days), gender, time of symptoms before RT, stress pain or rest pain, or prior ortheses use, injections, or surgery of the joint were not associated with treatment efficacy. In multivariate regression analysis, only field size and initial pain increase were highly correlated with treatment outcome. In conclusion, RT represents a useful treatment option for patients suffering from carpometacarpal osteoarthritis. In contrast to other benign indications, a larger field size (>6 × 4 cm) seems to be more effective than smaller fields and should be evaluated in further prospective studies.

  1. Bioinspired Haircell Receptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-23

    DAPAR program manager Dr. Hylton. The new objective copes better with navy’s immediate interests, (ii) Station keeping was later aborted after some...alien to our human experience such as, for example, sensitivities in the infrared and ultrasound , electro-magnetic reception, and strain detection

  2. Diversity Networking Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Join us at the APS Diversity Reception to relax, network with colleagues, and learn about programs and initiatives for women, underrepresented minorities, and LGBT physicists. You'll have a great time meeting friends in a supportive environment and making connections.

  3. Measuring receptive vocabulary size : reliability and validity of the yes/no vocabulary test for French-speaking learners of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyckmans, June

    2004-01-01

    The relatively recent upsurge of the role of vocabulary in foreign language acquisition has gone hand in hand with a growing interest in vocabulary testing. Learners need a certain amount of vocabulary knowledge in order to be able to operate independently in the target language. The size of a one's

  4. Measuring receptive vocabulary size : reliability and validity of the yes/no vocabulary test for French-speaking learners of Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyckmans, June

    2004-01-01

    The relatively recent upsurge of the role of vocabulary in foreign language acquisition has gone hand in hand with a growing interest in vocabulary testing. Learners need a certain amount of vocabulary knowledge in order to be able to operate independently in the target language. The size of a one's

  5. Receptivity, possibility, and democratic politics

    OpenAIRE

    Kompridis, Nikolas

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I present a model of receptivity that is composed of ontological and normative dimensions, which I argue answer to the critical-diagnostic and to the possibility-disclosing needs of democratic politics. I distinguish between ‘pre-reflective receptivity,’ understood ontologically as a condition of intelligibility, and ‘reflective receptivity,’ understood normatively as a condition of disclosing new possibilities.Keywords: receptivity; change; possibility; critique; reflective dis...

  6. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T J M; Fonseca, Sofia; Araujo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four

  7. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T J M; Fonseca, Sofia; Araujo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-

  8. 基于蛙眼R3细胞感受野模型的运动滤波方法%Motion Filtering by Modelling R3 Cell0s Receptive Field in Frog Eyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李智勇; 何霜; 刘俊敏; 李仁发

    2015-01-01

    视觉感受野(Visual receptive field)模型作为生物视觉感知计算的基础单元,在整个生物视觉信息加工过程中发挥着重要作用。借鉴具有运动视觉特长的生物感受野特性研究高效的运动视觉计算技术,是一种潜在可行的方法。本文基于蛙眼R3细胞感受野,在高斯差分模型(Difference of Gaussians, DOG)的基础上引入时间和空间各向异性的运动视觉表达方式,提出一种基于蛙眼R3细胞的不对称各向异性感受野(Asymmetric anisotropy receptive field, AARF)模型,表达蛙类视觉系统对运动目标敏感的视觉时空特征。基于该运动视觉模型,进一步提出了一种面向序列图像运动目标分析的蛙眼时空运动滤波算子(Frog-based spatio-temporal motion filter, FSTMF),以实现运动目标准确检测与分析。实验结果表明,该方法具有使序列图像背景模糊、动态目标突显的滤波效果,既符合蛙眼视觉背景模糊而前景清晰的特性,也为下一步运动目标的准确检测实现了高效的预处理。%As a basic unit of biological visual perception computing, the visual receptive field plays a significant role in the whole process of biological visual information processing. It is a potentially feasible method for further study of efficient computing technology based on motion visual characteristic from biological receptive field. Inspired by frog eye0s R3 cell receptive field, this study introduces a spatio-temporal anisotropy motion visual presentation to the difference of Gaussians (DOG) model. Thus, an asymmetric anisotropy receptive field (AARF) model is presented. This model can express frog visual system0s spatio-temporal characteristic which is sensitive to moving visual targets. Based on the motion visual model, a frog-based spatio-temporal motion filter (FSTMF) is further proposed, which aims at accurate moving object detection and analysis in sequential images and videos. The experimental results

  9. The Active Music Reception

    OpenAIRE

    Šulanová, Silvie

    2009-01-01

    Listening to music in the process of education is beneficial for a pupil only in case it is realized by means of active creativeness. To meet this requirement specific activities concerning music listening are applied in the framework of receptive music teaching. The dissertation proposes a so called dynamic model to function as an ideal solution to didactic transformation of music. The model enables to set up such classroom conditions in which pupils find it easier to observe elementary item...

  10. Electromagnetic fields, size, and copy of a single photon

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Shan-Liang

    2016-01-01

    We propose the expressions of electromagnetic fields of a single photon which properly describe the known characteristics of a photon, derive the relations between the photon size and wavelength on basis of the expressions, reveal the differences between a photon and its copy, and give the specific expressions of annihilation and creation operators of a photon. The results show that a photon has length of half the wavelength, and its radius is proportional to square root of the wavelength; a photon and its copy have the phase difference of {\\pi} and constitute a phase-entangled state; the N-photon phase-entangled state, which is formed by the sequential stimulated emission and corresponds to the wave train in optics, is not a coherent state, but it is the eigenstate of the number operator of photons.

  11. Reception Shop Special Stand

    CERN Multimedia

    Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

    2004-01-01

    Friday 15.10.2004 CERN 50th Anniversary articles will be sold in the Main Building, ground floor on Friday 15th October from 10h00 to 16h00. T-shirt, (S, M, L, XL) 20.- K-way (M, L, XL) 20.- Silk tie (2 models) 30.- Einstein tie 45.- Umbrella 20.- Caran d'Ache pen 5.- 50th Anniversary Pen 5.- Kit of Cartoon Album & Crayons 10.- All the articles are also available at the Reception Shop in Building 33 from Monday to Saturday between 08.30 and 17.00 hrs. Education and Technology Transfer Unit/ETT-EC

  12. Whether radial receptive field organization of the fourth extrastriate crescent (area V4A) gives special advantage for analysis of the optic flow. Comparison with the first crescent (area V2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levichkina, E V; Loshkarev, A A; Rodionova, E I; Popova, E P; Pigarev, I N

    2007-09-01

    Recently, elongated comet-shaped receptive fields were discovered in the fourth extrastriate crescent (area V4A) of cats and monkeys. It was shown that the long axes of these receptive fields were oriented radially toward the centre of the retina. Such unusual "radial" organization of this extrastriate area led to the assumption that these neurons may contribute to the analysis of optic flow. To investigate this assumption we recorded activity of neurons in the V4A of cats during real motion in depth toward or away from a stationary visual scene. Responses of neurons in area V4A were compared with activity of neurons in area V2 under similar conditions of stimulation. Area V2 is known to be sensitive to motion but does not have radial organization. It was found that a substantial number of visual neurons in both areas did not fire at all when cats were exposed to motion in depth. Nevertheless, neurons with selective activation to direction of motion in depth were identified, but comparable numbers were found in both areas studied. We conclude that radial organization of the fourth extrastriate crescent does not provide any special advantage for the analysis of optic flow information.

  13. 织物纹理的简单视神经细胞感受野的选择特性%Selection characteristics of receptive field of simple optic nerve cells for fabric textures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建立; 沈菁; 王蕾; 高卫东

    2014-01-01

    研究了织物纹理的简单视神经细胞感受野的选择特性。分别选择具有明显方向性和周期性以及周期性和方向性不显著的两类代表织物纹理为研究对象,采用基于独立分量分析的视觉模型估计出简单视觉细胞的感受野。通过对感受野兴奋区域重心、方向角和面积的分析,以有效表示感受野在位置、方向和空间频率的选择特性。基于织物纹理与自然纹理两类纹理的简单细胞感受野选择性比较实验显示,相比于自然纹理,织物纹理的简单细胞感受野单元中的兴奋区域在方向、位置和空间频率上具有更加显著的选择特性。实验结果表明,提出的简单视觉细胞感受野选择特性研究方法在一定程度上揭示了初级视皮层对织物纹理图像处理的神经机制,从视觉感知层面反映了织物纹理的视觉特性。%The research on the selection characteristics of receptive field of simple optic nerve cells for fabric textures is presented. The fabric textures having obvious direction and period properties or not are both chosen as research objects to evaluate the receptive field of simple optic nerve cells by using the vision model based on the independent component analysis. The selection characteristics, such as location, direction and spatial frequency can be represented through the analysis of the center of gravity, orientation angle and area of the excited areas in the receptive field. The comparative experiment between natural and fabric texture shows that the excited areas in the receptive field of simple cell of fabric texture has more observable selection characteristics in direction, location and spatial frequency. Experimental results indi-cate that the method proposed here for the analysis of the receptive field in the simple optic nerve cells can not only reveal the neural mechanism for the fabric textures processing in the primary visual cortex, but also reflect the

  14. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, P. H., E-mail: p.charles@qut.edu.au; Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001 (Australia); Cranmer-Sargison, G. [Department of Medical Physics, Saskatchewan Cancer Agency, 20 Campus Dr., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7L 3P6, Canada and Academic Unit of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Leeds, 8.001 Worsley Building, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kairn, T. [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Queensland University of Technology, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia and Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Knight, R. T. [Premion, The Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower, Brisbane, QLD 4066 (Australia); Kenny, J. [The Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, 619 Lower Plenty Road, Yallambie, VIC 3085, Australia and Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Toowoomba Hospital, Toowoomba, QLD 4350 (Australia)

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  15. Representation of the visual field in the primary visual area of the marmoset monkey: magnification factors, point-image size, and proportionality to retinal ganglion cell density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Tristan A; Yu, Hsin-Hao; Rosa, Marcello G P

    2013-04-01

    The primary visual area (V1) forms a systematic map of the visual field, in which adjacent cell clusters represent adjacent points of visual space. A precise quantification of this map is key to understanding the anatomical relationships between neurons located in different stations of the visual pathway, as well as the neural bases of visual performance in different regions of the visual field. We used computational methods to quantify the visual topography of V1 in the marmoset (Callithrix jacchus), a small diurnal monkey. The receptive fields of neurons throughout V1 were mapped in two anesthetized animals using electrophysiological recordings. Following histological reconstruction, precise 3D reconstructions of the V1 surface and recording sites were generated. We found that the areal magnification factor (M(A) ) decreases with eccentricity following a function that has the same slope as that observed in larger diurnal primates, including macaque, squirrel, and capuchin monkeys, and humans. However, there was no systematic relationship between M(A) and polar angle. Despite individual variation in the shape of V1, the relationship between M(A) and eccentricity was preserved across cases. Comparison between V1 and the retinal ganglion cell density demonstrated preferential magnification of central space in the cortex. The size of the cortical compartment activated by a punctiform stimulus decreased from the foveal representation towards the peripheral representation. Nonetheless, the relationship between the receptive field sizes of V1 cells and the density of ganglion cells suggested that each V1 cell receives information from a similar number of retinal neurons, throughout the visual field.

  16. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T. J. M.; Fonseca, Sofia; Araújo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-level volleyball players received jump-float serves from four servers in two reception zones—zone 1 and 5. The ball and the receiver's head were tracked with two video cameras, allowing 3D world-coordinates reconstruction. Logistic-regression models were used to predict the type of pass used (overhand or underhand) and serve-reception efficacy (error, out, or effective) from variables related with the serve kinematics and related with the receiver's on-court positioning and movement. Receivers' initial position was different when in zone 1 and 5. This influenced the serve-related variables as well as the type of pass used. Strong predictors of using an underhand rather than overhand pass were higher ball contact of the server, reception in zone 1, receiver's initial position more to the back of the court and backward receiver movement. Receiver's larger longitudinal displacements and an initial position more to the back of the court had a strong relationship with the decreasing of the serve-reception efficacy. Receivers' positioning and movement were the factors with the largest impact on the type of pass used and the efficacy of the reception. Reception zone affected the variance in the ball's kinematics (with the exception of the ball's lateral displacement), as well as in the receivers' positioning (distances from the net and from the target). Also the reception zone was associated with the type of pass used by the receiver but not with reception efficacy. Given volleyball's rotation rule, the receiver needs to master receiving in the different reception zones; he/she needs to adapt to the diverse constraints of each zone to maintain performance efficacy. Thus

  17. Predicting Volleyball Serve-reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver’s actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four high-level players received jump-float serves from four servers in two reception zones – zone 1 and 5. The ball and the receiver’s head were tracked with two video cameras, allowing 3D world-coordinates reconstruction. Logistic-regression models were used to predict the type of pass used (overhand or underhand and serve-reception efficacy (error, out, or effective from variables related with the serve kinematics and related with the receiver’s on-court positioning and movement. Receivers’ initial position was different when in zone 1 and 5. This influenced the serve-related variables as well as the type of pass used. Strong predictors of using an underhand rather than overhand pass were higher ball contact of the server, reception in zone 1, receiver’s initial position more to the back of the court and backward receiver movement. Receiver’s larger longitudinal displacements and an initial position more to the back of the court had a strong relationship with the decreasing of the serve-reception efficacy. Receivers’ positioning and movement were the factors with the largest impact on the type of pass used and the efficacy of the reception. Reception zone affected the variance in the ball’s kinematics (with the exception of the ball’s lateral displacement, as well as in the receivers’ positioning (distances from the net and from the target. Also the reception zone was associated with the type of pass used by the receiver but not with reception efficacy. Given volleyball’s rotation rule, the receiver needs to master receiving in the different reception zones; he/she needs to adapt to the diverse constraints of each zone to maintain

  18. Student Learning Networks on Residential Field Courses: Does Size Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, A. Mark; Cullen, W. Rod; Shuker, David M.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes learner and tutor reports of a learning network that formed during the completion of investigative projects on a residential field course. Staff and students recorded project-related interactions, who they were with and how long they lasted over four phases during the field course. An enquiry based learning format challenged…

  19. Technique for image fusion based on non-subsampled contourlet transform domain receptive field model%基于NSCT域感受野模型的图像融合方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔韦韦; 雷英杰; 雷阳; 李卫忠

    2011-01-01

    To the multi-sensor image fusion problem,a technique for image fusion based on non-subsampled contourlet transform(NSCT) domain receptive field model is presented.Firstly,by using NSCT,multi-scale and multi-direction sparse decomposition of source images are performed.Then,an improved receptive field model is utilized to achieve the fusion of the low frequency sub-images.In addition,the course of the high frequency sub-images fusion can be completed by using the model of adaptive unit-fast-linking pulse coupled neural network.Finally,the final fused image can be gained by adopting inverse NSCT to all sub-images.The simulation experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed technique.%针对多传感器图像融合问题,提出了一种基于非下采样轮廓波变换域感受野模型的图像融合方法.首先,采用非下采样轮廓波变换对源图像进行多尺度、多方向稀疏分解;然后,对低频子图像采用改进型感受野模型进行融合,高频子图像则采用自适应Unit-Fast-Linking脉冲耦合神经网络模型进行融合;最后,将各子图像进行非下采样轮廓波逆变换,得到最终融合图像.仿真实验表明了所提出方法的有效性.

  20. Conterminous United States Crop Field Size Quantification from Multi-temporal Landsat Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L.; Roy, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    Field sizes are indicative of the degree of agricultural capital investment, mechanization and labor intensity. Information on the size of fields is needed to plan and understand these factors, and may help the allocation of agricultural resources. The Landsat satellites provide the longest global land observation record and their data have potential for monitoring field sizes. A recently published automated methodology to extract agricultural crop fields was refined and applied to 30 m weekly Landsat 5 and 7 time series of year 2010 in the range of all the conterminous United States (CONUS). For the first time, spatially explicit CONUS field size maps and derived information are presented. A total of 4.18 million fields were extracted with mean and median field sizes of 0.193 km2 and 0.278 km2, respectively. There were discernable patterns between field size and the majority crop type as defined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) cropland data layer (CDL) classification. In general, larger field sizes occurred where a greater proportion of the land was dedicated to agriculture, predominantly in the U.S. Wheat and Corn belts, and in regions of irrigated agriculture. The CONUS field size histogram was skewed, and 50% of the extracted fields had sizes greater than or smaller than 0.361 km2, and there were four distinct peaks that corresponded closely to sizes equivalent to fields with 0.25 × 0.25 mile, 0.25 × 0.5 mile, 0.5 × 0.5 mile, and 0.5 × 1 mile side dimensions. The results of validation by comparison with independent field boundaries at 48 subsets selected across the 16 states with the greatest harvested cropland area are summarized. The presentation concludes with a discussion of the implications of this NASA funded research and challenges for field size extraction from global coverage long term satellite data.

  1. C-Slot Coaxial fed Microstrip Patch antenna for DTV reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Jagan Mohan Rao. S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel design of small sized, low profile coaxial fed microstrip patch antenna is proposed for terrestrial DTV signal reception applications in the UHF band frequency range of 540-890MHz. Designed model was C-slot Microstrip antenna. Different parameters like return loss which is 21.44dB at 640MHz, VSWR as 1.1851, gain along θ, Ø directions, radiation pattern in 2D & 3D where the 2-D gain is 7.57dB, axial ratio, E & H field distributions, current distributions are simulated using HFSS 13.0. The measured parameters satisfy required limits hence making the proposed antenna suitable for DTV reception applications in the UHF band.

  2. Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity field measurements at Olympic Dam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, S.B.; Wilkis, M.; O`Brein, R.; Ganakas, G.

    1993-12-01

    On July 1, 1991 the Australian Radiation Laboratory (ARL) commenced a two year project entitled - Particle sizing of airborne radioactivity, funded by a Mining and Quarrying Occupational Health and Safety Committee - grant (submission No. 9138). This study was set out to measure airborne radioactivity size distributions in an underground uranium mine, in order to provide better estimates of the health risks associated with inhalation of airborne radiation in the work place. These measurements included both active and passive measurement of radon gas, continuous and spot sample of radon daughter levels, as well as wire screen diffusion battery measurements of the radon daughter size distributions. The results of measurements at over 50 sites within the mine are reported, together with the calculated dose conversion factors derived from the older dosimetric models and from the new ICRP lung model using the computer code RADEP. The results showed that the ventilation is relatively uniform within the mine and the radon daughter concentrations are kept to less than 20% of the equilibrium concentration. The radon and radon daughter concentrations showed marked variability with both time and position within the mine. It is concluded that the present radiation protection methods and dose conversion factors used in Australia provide a good estimate of the radiation risk for the inhalation of radon progeny. 29 refs., 8 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. New Year’s reception

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    At a reception on 28 January, the CERN management presented their best wishes for 2009 to politicians and representatives of the administrations in the local area, and diplomats representing CERN’s Member States, Observer States and other countries.

  4. 生物Reichardt运动检测器和感受域模板的FPGA设计与实现%FPGA Design and Implementation of Insect-inspired Reichardt Motion Detector and Receptive Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kolja Kuehnlenz; 吴海燕; Martin Buss; Alexander Borst; 张天光

    2009-01-01

    In order to realize high-speed motion detection and camera ego-motion estimation in image processing, an insect-inspired Reichardt motion detector ( Elementary Motion Detector ( EMD)) and receptive fields based on insect's vision system are applied. The principal characteristics and drawbacks of the Reichardt model are analyzed. According to one of its main drawbacks, a modified model is selected which performs better in motion detection than the original method. Moreover, six templates of receptive field based on fly's vision system are designed for simple ego-motion estimation, such as self-translation and self-rotation of the camera. Finally, the related algorithms are implemented on a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) platform. The results of several typical experiments demonstrate, that the EMDs can detect local optical flow quickly and the receptive field templates enable simple motion estimation under specific backgrounds. The developed FPGA system is sufficient to deal with a video frame rate of 350 fps at 256 × 256 pixels resolution, the resulting time delay of the Reichardt model implementation is only 0. 25 μs. This hardware can be applied to real-time computer vision systems, such as for obstacle detection, motion estimation, UAV/MAV's stability control and so on.%为了在图像处理中快速地实现运动检测和相机自身运动方式估算,引入了基于生物视觉机制的Reichardt运动检测器模型(EMD)和感受域模板.分析了Reichardt运动检测器模型的基本特性及其缺陷.为了克服模型上的主要缺陷,在应用中选择了一种优化模型,应用该模型可以得到较好的运动检测结果.同时,提出了基于苍蝇视觉系统的6个感受域模板,用以实现简单自身运动方式的估算,如相机自身的平移、旋转等.最后,在FPGA(FieldProgrammable Gate Array)平台上实现了相关的算法.实验结果表明,优化后的运动检测器可以快速地判断局部运动方向,感受域模

  5. Enhanced AIS receiver design for satellite reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clazzer, Federico; Lázaro, Francisco; Plass, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The possibility to detect Automatic Identification System (AIS) messages from low earth orbit (LEO) satellites paves the road for a plurality of new and unexplored services. Besides worldwide tracking of vessels, maritime traffic monitoring, analysis of vessel routes employing big data, and oceans monitoring are just few of the fields, where satellite-aided AIS is beneficial. Designed for ship-to-ship communication and collision avoidance, AIS satellite reception performs poorly in regions with a high density of vessels. This calls for the development of advanced satellite AIS receivers able to improve the decoding capabilities. In this context, our contribution focuses on the introduction of a new enhanced AIS receiver design and its performance evaluation. The enhanced receiver makes use of a coherent receiver for the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) region, while for medium to high SNRs, a differential Viterbi receiver is used. Additional novelty of our work is in the exploitation of previously decoded packets from one vessel that is still under the LEO reception range, to improve the vessel detection probability. The assessment of the performance against a common receiver is done making the use of a simple and tight model of the medium access (MAC) layer and the multi-packet reception (MPR) matrix for physical layer (PHY) representation. Performance results show the benefits of such enhanced receiver, especially when it is bundled with successive interference cancellation (SIC).

  6. The dune size distribution and scaling relations of barchan dune fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durán, O.; Schwämmle, V.; Lind, P.G.; Herrmann, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Barchan dunes emerge as a collective phenomena involving the generation of thousands of them in so called barchan dune fields. By measuring the size and position of dunes in Moroccan barchan dune fields, we find that these dunes tend to distribute uniformly in space and follow an unique size distrib

  7. Optical field enhancement of nanometer-sized gaps at near-infrared frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Sung; Kang, Taehee; Singh, Dilip K; Bahk, Young-Mi; Lee, Hyunhwa; Choi, Soo Bong; Kim, Dai-Sik

    2015-02-23

    We report near-field and far-field measurements of transmission through nanometer-sized gaps at near-infrared frequencies with varying the gap size from 1 nm to 10 nm. In the far-field measurements, we excluded direct transmission on the metal film surface via interferometric method. Kirchhoff integral formalism was used to relate the far-field intensity to the electric field at the nanogaps. In near-field measurements, field enhancement factors of the nanogaps were quantified by measuring transmission of the nanogaps using near-field scanning optical microscopy. All the measurements produce similar field enhancements of about ten, which we put in the context of comparing with the giant field enhancements in the terahertz regime.

  8. Influence of honey bee, Apis mellifera, hives and field size on foraging activity of native bee species in pumpkin fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Derek R; Hsu, Cynthia L; Nault, Brian A

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify bee species active in pumpkin fields in New York and to estimate their potential as pollinators by examining their foraging activity. In addition, we examined whether foraging activity was affected by either the addition of hives of the honey bee, Apis mellifera L., or by field size. Thirty-five pumpkin (Cucurbita spp.) fields ranging from 0.6 to 26.3 ha, 12 supplemented with A. mellifera hives and 23 not supplemented, were sampled during peak flowering over three successive weeks in 2008 and 2009. Flowers from 300 plants per field were visually sampled for bees on each sampling date. A. mellifera, Bombus impatiens Cresson, and Peponapis pruinosa (Say) accounted for 99% of all bee visits to flowers. A. mellifera and B. impatiens visited significantly more pistillate flowers than would be expected by chance, whereas P. pruinosa showed no preference for visiting pistillate flowers. There were significantly more A. mellifera visits per flower in fields supplemented with A. mellifera hives than in fields not supplemented, but there were significantly fewer P. pruinosa visits in supplemented fields. The number of B. impatiens visits was not affected by supplementation, but was affected by number of flowers per field. A. mellifera and P. pruinosa visits were not affected by field size, but B. impatiens visited fewer flowers as field size increased in fields that were not supplemented with A. mellifera hives. Declining A. mellifera populations may increase the relative importance of B. impatiens in pollinating pumpkins in New York.

  9. Influence of Magnetic Field Amplitude on Quantity and Sizes of Disintegration Fragments of Magnetic Particles Cluster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The disintegration of a mass of magnetic particles is investigated at pulsing switching on a magnetic field. The influence of field value on quantity, sizes and allocation of fragments of disintegration is explored. The presence of two critical fields, defining the process of disintegration, is revealed. The results can be used at manufacture of packings to magnetic filters.

  10. Reception research 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David

    to set the question of meaning as a central issue in media studies, an issue that appears to be missing from current understandings of social media in which audiences are often reduced to a single reality or simply ignored as an empirical reality. Knowing about the meanings produced and circulated...... on social media can help us better understand the participatory media culture that has established itself over the past decade. To properly address the question of meaning, however, reception research needs to be adapted to the current media landscape. Taking my point of departure in the multi...... (motivation, comprehension, discrimination, position, implementation) for their relevance and explanatory power in today’s media landscape, suggesting new interpretations and new formulations. A revision of reception research does not only concern the notion of reception itself, but also that of the text...

  11. A Companion to Classical Receptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Villiers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This recent addition to the excellent Blackwell Companions series looks at the various forms of classical reception currently being researched as well as those deemed to have future importance. The diversity and volume of the themes and approaches contained in this book are truly impressive. As Hardwick and Stray state in their introduction, this collection “has been constructed on the basis that the activators of reception are many and varied and that we all gain from encountering examples from outside our own immediate areas of knowledge” (p. 4. Throughout the book they stay true to this motto and traditional approaches to classical reception are not given prominence over more recent (sometimes contentious approaches such as film studies, cultural politics and photography. The same goes for the various cultures involved and there is even a chapter on Greek drama in South Africa.

  12. A contemporary decennial global Landsat sample of changing agricultural field sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Emma; Roy, David

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture has caused significant human induced Land Cover Land Use (LCLU) change, with dramatic cropland expansion in the last century and significant increases in productivity over the past few decades. Satellite data have been used for agricultural applications including cropland distribution mapping, crop condition monitoring, crop production assessment and yield prediction. Satellite based agricultural applications are less reliable when the sensor spatial resolution is small relative to the field size. However, to date, studies of agricultural field size distributions and their change have been limited, even though this information is needed to inform the design of agricultural satellite monitoring systems. Moreover, the size of agricultural fields is a fundamental description of rural landscapes and provides an insight into the drivers of rural LCLU change. In many parts of the world field sizes may have increased. Increasing field sizes cause a subsequent decrease in the number of fields and therefore decreased landscape spatial complexity with impacts on biodiversity, habitat, soil erosion, plant-pollinator interactions, and impacts on the diffusion of herbicides, pesticides, disease pathogens, and pests. The Landsat series of satellites provide the longest record of global land observations, with 30m observations available since 1982. Landsat data are used to examine contemporary field size changes in a period (1980 to 2010) when significant global agricultural changes have occurred. A multi-scale sampling approach is used to locate global hotspots of field size change by examination of a recent global agricultural yield map and literature review. Nine hotspots are selected where significant field size change is apparent and where change has been driven by technological advancements (Argentina and U.S.), abrupt societal changes (Albania and Zimbabwe), government land use and agricultural policy changes (China, Malaysia, Brazil), and/or constrained by

  13. Size matter! A choice architectural field experiment in reducing food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Guldborg Hansen, Pelle; Maaløe Jespersen, Andreas; Skov, Laurits Rohden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs. Methods A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two different sizes. One buffet featured standard sized plates that served as control (standard size as provided by the caterer, 27cm). A second buffet featured smaller sized plates (24cm) that served as the in...

  14. Transducer project and optimization of the ultra low magnetic field NMR tomograph reception system system; Projeto de transdutores e otimizacao do sistema de recepcao do tomografo de RMN de campo magnetico ultra baixo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidoto, Edson Luiz Gea

    1995-12-31

    The aim of the present work was to optimize the signal to noise ratio in our NMR imaging system (TORM 005) by improving transducer`s reception quality through better designed coils, balanced tuning circuit for this coils and power decoupling circuits and by reducing interference from the electromagnetic environment. For this purpose, we had to modify the internal electromagnetic shielding and incorporate line filters in the more critical signals paths. Also, new types of coils were developed, improving the signal to noise ratio, and allowing us to make clinical exams with superior quality for several anatomies. Balanced circuits for tuning and matching of the coil were studied and built, allowing a reduction of the coil losses because patient`s load. This produced a more reliable coil tuning after positioning each new patient. Circuits to avoid the receiver input overload and decoupling circuits for the isolation of receiver coils from excitation coil were designed and incorporated to the TORM 005. All these alterations of our imaging system (TORM 005) contributed to a significant improvement in the signal to noise ratio, reliability and reproducibility of the system. This permitted to operate the system routinely for clinical applications, research and development in the area of ultra low magnetic field tomography. (author) 46 refs., 66 figs., 11 tabs.

  15. Effect of field of view and monocular viewing on angular size judgements in an outdoor scene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, E. A.; Palmer, E. A.; Ellis, S. R.

    1980-01-01

    Observers typically overestimate the angular size of distant objects. Significantly, overestimations are greater in outdoor settings than in aircraft visual-scene simulators. The effect of field of view and monocular and binocular viewing conditions on angular size estimation in an outdoor field was examined. Subjects adjusted the size of a variable triangle to match the angular size of a standard triangle set at three greater distances. Goggles were used to vary the field of view from 11.5 deg to 90 deg for both monocular and binocular viewing. In addition, an unrestricted monocular and binocular viewing condition was used. It is concluded that neither restricted fields of view similar to those present in visual simulators nor the restriction of monocular viewing causes a significant loss in depth perception in outdoor settings. Thus, neither factor should significantly affect the depth realism of visual simulators.

  16. The Receptive Side of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    When observing teachers in action, one is likely to witness explaining, modeling, managing, guiding, and encouraging. These expressive behaviors constitute a directive force moving outward from teacher to students. Though less visible to an outside observer, teaching also requires receptive skills, the ability to take in information by being fully…

  17. Communication from Goods Reception services

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Members of the personnel are invited to take note that only parcels corresponding to official orders or contracts will be handled at CERN. Individuals are not authorised to have private merchandise delivered to them at CERN and private deliveries will not be accepted by the Goods Reception services. Thank you for your understanding.

  18. Size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles in intense radiation fields using wire screens and imaging plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Yuichi; Tanaka, Toru; Takamiya, Koichi; Ishi, Yoshihiro; UesugI, Tomonori; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nitta, Shinnosuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osada, Naoyuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

    2016-09-15

    Very fine radiation-induced aerosol particles are produced in intense radiation fields, such as high-intensity accelerator rooms and containment vessels such as those in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP). Size measurement of the aerosol particles is very important for understanding the behavior of radioactive aerosols released in the FDNPP accident and radiation safety in high-energy accelerators. A combined technique using wire screens and imaging plates was developed for size measurement of fine radioactive aerosol particles smaller than 100 nm in diameter. This technique was applied to the radiation field of a proton accelerator room, in which radioactive atoms produced in air during machine operation are incorporated into radiation-induced aerosol particles. The size of 11C-bearing aerosol particles was analyzed using the wire screen technique in distinction from other positron emitters in combination with a radioactive decay analysis. The size distribution for 11C-bearing aerosol particles was found to be ca. 70 μm in geometric mean diameter. The size was similar to that for 7Be-bearing particles obtained by a Ge detector measurement, and was slightly larger than the number-based size distribution measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer. The particle size measuring method using wire screens and imaging plates was successfully applied to the fine aerosol particles produced in an intense radiation field of a proton accelerator. This technique is applicable to size measurement of radioactive aerosol particles produced in the intense radiation fields of radiation facilities.

  19. Sexual conflict over floral receptivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankinen, Asa; Hellriegel, Barbara; Bernasconi, Giorgina

    2006-12-01

    In flowering plants, the onset and duration of female receptivity vary among species. In several species the receptive structures wilt upon pollination. Here we explore the hypothesis that postpollination wilting may be influenced by pollen and serve as a general means to secure paternity of the pollen donor at the expense of female fitness. Taking a game-theoretical approach, we examine the potential for the evolution of a pollen-borne wilting substance, and for the coevolution of a defense strategy by the recipient plant. The model without defense predicts an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) for the production of wilting substance. The ESS value is highest when pollinator visiting rates are intermediate and when the probability that pollen from several donors arrives at the same time is low. This finding has general implications in that it shows that male traits to secure paternity also can evolve in species, such as plants, where mating is not strictly sequential. We further model coevolution of the wilting substance with the timing of stigma receptivity. We assume that pollen-receiving plants can reduce the costs induced by toxic pollen by delaying the onset of stigmatic receptivity. The model predicts a joint ESS, but no female counter-adaptation when the wilting substance is highly toxic. This indicates that toxicity affects the probability that a male manipulative trait stays beneficial (i.e., not countered by female defense) over evolutionary time. We discuss parallels to male induced changes in female receptivity known to occur in animals and the role of harm for the evolution of male manipulative adaptations.

  20. Field induced rotational viscosity of ferrofluid: effect of capillary size and magnetic field direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andhariya, Nidhi; Chudasama, Bhupendra; Patel, Rajesh; Upadhyay, R V; Mehta, R V

    2008-07-01

    In the present investigation we report the effect of capillary diameter and the direction of applied magnetic field on the rotational viscosity of water and kerosene based ferrofluids. We found that changes in the field induced rotational viscosity are larger in the case of water based magnetic fluid than that of kerosene based fluid. The field induced rotational viscosity is found to be inversely proportional to the capillary diameter and it falls exponentially as a function of the angle between the direction of field and vorticity of flow. Magnetophoretic mobility and hydrodynamic volume fraction of nanomagnetic particles are determined for above cases.

  1. The influence of size and shape of microorganism on pulsed electric field inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hag, Ayman H; Jayaram, Shesha H; Gonzalez, Oscar Rodriguez; Griffiths, M W

    2011-09-01

    In this paper the effect of microorganism size and shape on the killing efficiency of pulsed electric field (PEF) is investigated both experimentally and using a transient finite element program. The effect of cell size, membrane thickness, cell shape (spherical, elliptical, and cylindrical) on the calculated transmembrane voltage is studied. It has been found that both the cell size and cell membrane thickness have significant effect on the induced field across the cell membrane. The findings of the simulation results have been evaluated by comparing the trends with some experimental results. Five different types of microorganisms that have different shapes and dimensions have been inoculated with water at a conductivity level of 100 μS/cm and have been treated with the application of a pulsed electric field of 70 kV/cm. Significant difference in bacteria reduction was noticed between the treated cells which could be attributed to the cell size and shape.

  2. Reliability of different mark-recapture methods for population size estimation tested against reference population sizes constructed from field data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret Grimm

    evaluate the performance of mark-recapture population size estimators under field conditions, which is essential for selecting an appropriate method and obtaining reliable results in ecology and conservation biology, and thus for sound management.

  3. The immigrants’ reception system in Italy. Reflections emerging from an experience of reception upon landing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Chiara Cannella

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available After the description of the main migration routes toward Italian territory, the article provides an overview of the laws and administrative policy instruments that characterize the system of reception and detention of migrants in Italy. This type of information can help psychosocial workers supporting migrants to better cope with various psychosocial issues, such as the landing in a foreign country. Following a report on the first reception intervention carried out in Palermo, Sicily, by Psicologi per i Popoli – Sicilia, some reflections about the strengths and weaknesses identified as well as the potential for a greater involvement of psychosocial teams in immigrants reception and detention processes are presented. In fact, psychological science may improve the quality and effectiveness of the emergency services provided to migrants and be useful both in the training of workers and in crisis and emergency risk communication, with particular reference to risk perception about infectious diseases. However, the “added value” of psychological intervention might remain concealed and its usefulness may appear unimpressive. For this reason the papers suggests some principles through which psychology can contribute to processes of inclusiveness within a multicultural society and promote the acknowledgement of its own role in the field of humanitarian intervention.

  4. Monte Carlo-based adaptive EPID dose kernel accounting for different field size responses of imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, John J; Li, Weidong; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present an efficient method to generate imager-specific Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose kernels for amorphous silicon-based electronic portal image device dose prediction and determine the effective backscattering thicknesses for such imagers. EPID field size-dependent responses were measured for five matched Varian accelerators from three institutions with 6 MV beams at the source to detector distance (SDD) of 105 cm. For two imagers, measurements were made with and without the imager mounted on the robotic supporting arm. Monoenergetic energy deposition kernels with 0-2.5 cm of water backscattering thicknesses were simultaneously computed by MC to a high precision. For each imager, the backscattering thickness required to match measured field size responses was determined. The monoenergetic kernel method was validated by comparing measured and predicted field size responses at 150 cm SDD, 10 x 10 cm2 multileaf collimator (MLC) sliding window fields created with 5, 10, 20, and 50 mm gaps, and a head-and-neck (H&N) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient field. Field size responses for the five different imagers deviated by up to 1.3%. When imagers were removed from the robotic arms, response deviations were reduced to 0.2%. All imager field size responses were captured by using between 1.0 and 1.6 cm backscatter. The predicted field size responses by the imager-specific kernels matched measurements for all involved imagers with the maximal deviation of 0.34%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured field size responses at 150 cm SDD is 0.39%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured MLC sliding window fields is 0.39%. For the patient field, gamma analysis yielded that 99.0% of the pixels have gamma < 1 by the 2%, 2 mm criteria with a 3% dose threshold. Tunable imager-specific kernels can be generated rapidly and accurately in a single MC simulation. The resultant kernels are imager position

  5. Morphology, dendritic field size, somal size, density, and coverage of M and P retinal ganglion cells of dichromatic Cebus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Perry, V H

    1996-01-01

    Male Cebus monkeys are all dichromats, but about two thirds of the females are trichromats. M and P retinal ganglion cells were studied in the male Cebus monkey to investigate the relationship of their morphology to retinal eccentricity. Retinal ganglion cells were retrogradely labeled after optic nerve deposits of biocytin to reveal their entire dendritic tree. Cebus M and P ganglion cell morphology revealed by biocytin retrograde filling is similar to that described for macaque and human M and P ganglion cells obtained by in vitro intracellular injection of HRP and neurobiotin. We measured 264 and 441 M and P ganglion cells, respectively. M ganglion cells have larger dendritic field and cell body size than P ganglion cells at any comparable temporal or nasal eccentricity. Dendritic trees of both M and P ganglion cells are smaller in the nasal than in the temporal region at eccentricities greater than 5 mm and 2 mm for M and P ganglion cells, respectively. The depth of terminal dendrites allows identification of both inner and outer subclasses of M and P ganglion cells. The difference in dendritic tree size between inner and outer cells is small or absent. Comparison between Cebus and Macaca shows that M and P ganglion cells have similar sizes in the central retinal region. The results support the view that M and P pathways are similarly organized in diurnal dichromat and trichromat primates.

  6. Transient increase of intact visual field size by high-frequency narrow-band stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Mark A; Seifert, Doerthe; Poggel, Dorothe A; Strasburger, Hans

    2015-03-01

    Three patients with visual field defects were stimulated with a square matrix pattern, either static, or flickering at frequencies that had been found to either promote or not promote blindsight performance. Comparison between pre- and post-stimulation perimetric maps revealed an increase in the size of the intact visual field but only for flicker frequencies previously found to promote blindsight. These changes were temporary but dramatic - in two instances the intact field was increased by an area of ∼30 deg(2) of visual angle. These results indicate that not only does specific high-frequency stimulus flicker promote blindsight, but that intact visual field size may be increased by stimulation at the same frequencies. Our findings inform speculation on both the brain mechanisms and the potency of temporal modulation for altering the functional visual field.

  7. SU-E-T-432: Field Size Influence On the Electron and Photon Spectra Within Small MV Field Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmakhlouf, H; Andreo, P [Department of Medical Physics, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm and Department of Physics, Medical Radiation Physics, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the influence of photon field size on the electron and photon fluence spectra in the active volume of small field detectors. Methods: The PENELOPE MC system based usercode PenEasy was used to calculate the material influence on the spectra by scoring the differential fluence in inserts of silicon, carbon, phosphorus and aluminium having 3 mm diameter and height. The spectra were then calculated inside the active volume of eleven detectors (ion chambers and solid-state detectors) whose geometry was simulated with great detail. The inserts/detectors were placed at 10 cm depth in a 30 cm x 30 cm x 30 cm water phantom and irradiated with 2.5 MeV photons and Varian Clinac 6 MV beams of small, medium and large size. Results: For all configurations, photon spectra in the scoring volume were similar to that in a small water volume except for additional characteristic x-ray peaks resulting from the material itself and from the materials surrounding the detectors (i.e. high-Z shielding the silicon). Electron fluence calculated in the inserts were up to 60% larger than in water; the difference increased with material density and decreasing field size. MC-calculated doses were compared to analytically determined collision kerma and restricted cema (cut-off=15keV). For the inserts, with large and medium fields K-col agreed with MC-dose, but K-col overestimated the dose for small fields due to lack of lateral CPE. For the detectors, up to 15% differences between K-col and the MC-dose were found. For all configurations the C-delta and MC-dose agreed within ±2%. Conclusion: The most relevant findings were that shielding affects substantially the photon spectra and material conditions the electron spectra, their field size dependence varying with the geometry configuration. These affect the values of factors entering into relative dosimetry.

  8. Speech recognition employing biologically plausible receptive fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Bothe, Hans-Heinrich

    2011-01-01

    The main idea of the project is to build a widely speaker-independent, biologically motivated automatic speech recognition (ASR) system. The two main differences between our approach and current state-of-the-art ASRs are that i) the features used here are based on the responses of neuronlike spec...

  9. Idealized computational models for auditory receptive fields

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lindeberg, Tony; Friberg, Anders

    2015-01-01

    .... For defining a time-frequency transformation of a purely temporal sound signal, it is shown that the framework allows for a new way of deriving the Gabor and Gammatone filters as well as a novel...

  10. Comparing the Evolution of the Galaxy Disk Sizes with CDM Models The Hubble Deep Field

    CERN Document Server

    Giallongo, E; Poli, F; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    2000-01-01

    The intrinsic sizes of the field galaxies with I-19) galaxies is skewed with respect to the CDM predictions and an excess of small-size disks (R_d<2 kpc) is already present at z~ 0.5. The excess persists up to z~3 and involves brighter galaxies . Such an excess may be reduced if luminosity-dependent effects, like starburst activity in interacting galaxies, are included in the physical mechanisms governing the star formation history in CDM models.

  11. Finite Size Corrected Relativistic Mean-Field Model and QCD Critical End Point

    CERN Document Server

    Uddin, Saeed; Ahmad, Jan Shabir

    2012-01-01

    The effect of finite size of hadrons on the QCD phase diagram is analyzed using relativistic mean field model for the hadronic phase and the Bag model for the QGP phase. The corrections to the EOS for hadronic phase are incorporated in a thermodynamic consistent manner for Van der Waals like interaction. It is found that the effect of finite size of baryons is to shift CEP to higher chemical potential values.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotubes of controlled diameter and bundle size and their field emission properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Balzano, Leandro; Resasco, Daniel E

    2005-08-04

    Field emission studies were conducted on as-produced CoMoCAT single-walled carbon nanotube/silica composites with controlled nanotube diameter and bundle size. It has been observed that the as-produced nanotube material does not need to be separated from the high-surface area catalyst to be an effective electron emitter. By adjusting the catalytic synthesis conditions, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) of different diameters and bundle sizes were synthesized. A detailed characterization involving Raman spectroscopy, optical absorption (vis-NIR), SEM, and TEM was conducted to identify the nanotube species present in the different samples. The synthesis reaction temperature was found to affect the nanotube diameter and bundle size in opposite ways; that is, as the synthesis temperature increased the nanotube average diameter became larger, but the bundle size became smaller. A gradual and consistent reduction in the emission onset field was observed as the synthesis temperature increased. It is suggested that the bundle size, more than the nanotube diameter or chirality, determines the field emission characteristics of these composites. This is a clear demonstration that field emission characteristics of SWNT can be controlled by the nanotube synthesis conditions.

  13. Laser cutting of rectangular geometry into aluminum alloy: Effect of cut sizes on thermal stress field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Sohail; Kardas, Omer Ozgur; Keles, Omer; Yilbas, Bekir Sami

    2014-10-01

    Laser cutting of a rectangular geometry into aluminum alloy 2024 is carried out. Temperature and stress fields are predicted in the cutting section using the ABAQUS finite element code in line with the experimental conditions. Effect of the size of the rectangular geometry on the thermal stress fields is examined in the cutting section. Temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. To identify the morphological changes in the cutting section, an experiment is carried out and the resulting cutting sections are examined under optical and scanning electron microscopes. It is found that temperature and stress fields are affected by the size of the rectangular cut geometry. Temperature and von Mises stress attains higher values for small size rectangular geometry as compared to its counterpart corresponding to the large size geometry. Laser cut sections are free from large size asperities including sideways burning and out-off flatness at the cut edges. Locally scattered some small dross attachments are observed at the kerf exit.

  14. Light concentration in the near-field of dielectric spheroidal particles with mesoscopic sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Manuel J.; Tobías, Ignacio; Martí, Antonio; Luque, Antonio

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical study of the light focusing properties of dielectric spheroids with sizes comparable to the illuminating wavelength. An analytical separation-of-variables method is used to determine the electric field distribution inside and in the near-field outside the particles. An optimization algorithm was implemented in the method to determine the particles' physical parameters that maximize the forward scattered light in the near-field region. It is found that such scatterers can exhibit pronounced electric intensity enhancement (above 100 times the incident intensity) in their close vicinity, or along wide focal regions extending to 10 times the wavelength. The results reveal the potential of wavelength-sized spheroids to manipulate light beyond the limitations of macroscopic geometrical optics. This can be of interest for several applications, such as light management in photovoltaics.

  15. Sedimentation field flow fractionation and optical absorption spectroscopy for a quantitative size characterization of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto; Amendola, Vincenzo

    2016-11-04

    Many advanced industrial and biomedical applications that use silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), require that particles are not only nano-sized, but also well dispersed, not aggregated and not agglomerated. This study presents two methods able to give rapidly sizes of monodispersed AgNPs suspensions in the dimensional range of 20-100nm. The first method, based on the application of Mie's theory, determines the particle sizes from the values of the surface plasmon resonance wavelength (SPRMAX), read from the optical absorption spectra, recorded between 190nm and 800nm. The computed sizes were compared with those determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) and resulted in agreement with the nominal values in a range between 13% (for 20nm NPs) and 1% (for 100nm NPs), The second method is based on the masterly combination of the Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF - now sold as Centrifugal FFF-CFFF) and the Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (OAS) techniques to accomplish sizes and quantitative particle size distributions for monodispersed, non-aggregated AgNPs suspensions. The SdFFF separation abilities, well exploited to size NPs, greatly benefits from the application of Mie's theory to the UV-vis signal elaboration, producing quantitative mass-based particle size distributions, from which trusted number-sized particle size distributions can be derived. The silver mass distributions were verified and supported by detecting off-line the Ag concentration with the graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental

  17. The Evolution of the Galaxy Sizes in the NTT Deep Field a Comparison with CDM Models

    CERN Document Server

    Poli, F; Menci, N; D'Odorico, S; Fontana, A

    1999-01-01

    The sizes of the field galaxies with I<25 have been measured in the NTT Deep Field. Intrinsic sizes have been obtained after deconvolution of the PSF with a multigaussian method. The reliability of the method has been tested using both simulated data and HST observations of the same field. The distribution of the half light radii is peaked at r_{hl} 0.3 arcsec, in good agreement with that derived from HST images at the same magnitude. An approximate morphological classification has been obtained using the asymmetry and concentration parameters. The intrinsic sizes of the galaxies are shown as a function of their redshifts and absolute magnitudes using photometric redshifts derived from the multicolor catalog. While the brighter galaxies with morphological parameters typical of the normal spirals show a flat distribution in the range r_{d}=1-6 kpc, the fainter population at 0.4sizes. To explore the significance of this behaviour, an analytical rendition of the standard CDM mo...

  18. Direct correlation of internal gradients and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Blümich, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    Internal magnetic field gradients Gint, which arise from the magnetic susceptibility difference Δχ between solid matrix and fluid in porous media relate to the pore geometry. However, this relationship is complex and not well understood. Here we correlate internal-gradient distributions to pore-size distributions directly to examine internal gradients in detail at low field NMR. The pore-size distributions were obtained by the method of Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF), and the internal-gradient distributions were measured with the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) method. The internal-gradient-pore-size distributions correlation maps were obtained for water in packs of glass beads with different diameter and in a sandstone sample. The relationship between internal gradients and pore structure is analyzed in detail by considering the restricted diffusion of fluids in porous samples. For each case diffusion regimes are assigned by plotting normalized CPMG data and comparing the diffusion lengths, the dephasing lengths and pore diameters. In the free-diffusion limit, the correlation maps reveal the true relationship between pore structure and internal gradients so that Δχ can be approximated from the correlation maps. This limit is met most easily at low field. It provides information about porous media, which is expected to benefit the oil industry, in particular NMR well logging.

  19. Optic disc size and progression of visual field damage in patients with normal-tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayamizu F

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fukuko Hayamizu, Yoshio Yamazaki, Takako Nakagami, Kenji MizukiDepartment of Ophthalmology, Division of Visual Science, Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: Our goal was to evaluate the influence of optic disc size on the progression of visual field damage in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG.Subjects and methods: Eighty-two eyes of 82 NTG patients who had been receiving topical antiglaucoma medications and followed-up for more than 4 years were enrolled in this study. The patients were allocated to two groups, according to the mean size of their optic discs. The data were analyzed using regression analysis, based on the Cox proportional hazard model.Results: The probability of visual field stability was significantly lower in eyes with large discs than in those with small discs (log rank test, P = 0.007. Progression of visual field damage was significantly associated with the optic disc area (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.812, P = 0.018, occurrence of disc hemorrhage (HR: 2.116, P = 0.028, and intraocular pressure reduction ratio (HR: 0.957, P = 0.014.Conclusion: The optic disc area correlates with progression of visual field damage in patients with NTG.Keywords: Cox proportional hazards model, disc hemorrhage, disc size, intraocular pressure, Kaplan–Meier life-table analysis

  20. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  1. Peculiarities of the electron field emission from quantum-size structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litovchenko, V. G.; Evtukh, A. A.; Litvin, Yu. M.; Goncharuk, N. M.; Hartnagel, H.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D.

    2003-06-01

    The electron field emission from semiconductor based layered structures has been investigated. Among studied structures were silicon tips coated with ultra-thin DLC layer, multilayer structures Si-SiO 2-Si ∗-SiO 2 with delta-doped Si ∗ layer, nanocomposite layers SiO xN y(Si) with Si nanocrystals embedded in SiO xN y matrix, GaN layers and Si-SiGe heterostructures. All of them have such peculiarities of electron field emission as peaks on emission current-voltage characteristics and corresponding Fowler-Nordheim plots. A physical model is proposed for explanation of experimental results. All emitters have layer, cluster wire or dot with quantum-size restriction in it. As a result, the quantum well with splitted electron levels exists or appears at electric field. Additional mechanism of electron emission-resonance tunneling is realized at definite electric fields.

  2. Peculiarities of the electron field emission from quantum-size structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litovchenko, V.G.; Evtukh, A.A.; Litvin, Yu.M.; Goncharuk, N.M.; Hartnagel, H.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Pavlidis, D

    2003-06-15

    The electron field emission from semiconductor based layered structures has been investigated. Among studied structures were silicon tips coated with ultra-thin DLC layer, multilayer structures Si-SiO{sub 2}-Si*-SiO{sub 2} with delta-doped Si* layer, nanocomposite layers SiO{sub x}N{sub y}(Si) with Si nanocrystals embedded in SiO{sub x}N{sub y} matrix, GaN layers and Si-SiGe heterostructures. All of them have such peculiarities of electron field emission as peaks on emission current-voltage characteristics and corresponding Fowler-Nordheim plots. A physical model is proposed for explanation of experimental results. All emitters have layer, cluster wire or dot with quantum-size restriction in it. As a result, the quantum well with splitted electron levels exists or appears at electric field. Additional mechanism of electron emission-resonance tunneling is realized at definite electric fields.

  3. Magnetic field effects on nonlocal wave dispersion characteristics of size-dependent nanobeams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Barati, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, wave propagation analysis of functionally graded size-dependent nanobeams embedded in elastic foundation exposed to a longitudinal magnetic field is conducted based on nonlocal elasticity theory. Material properties of nanobeam change gradually according to the sigmoid function. Applying an analytical solution, the acoustical and optical dispersion relations are explored for various wave number, nonlocality parameter, material composition, elastic foundation constants and magnetic field intensity. It is found that frequency and phase velocity of waves propagating in S-FGM nanobeam are significantly affected by these parameters. Also the presence of cutoff and escape frequencies in wave propagation analysis of embedded S-FGM nanobeams is investigated.

  4. Note from the Goods Reception services

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    Members of the personnel are invited to take note that only parcels corresponding to official orders or contracts will be handled at CERN. Individuals are not authorised to have private merchandise delivered to them at CERN and private deliveries will not be accepted by the Goods Reception services. Goods Reception Services

  5. Morning Receptions in a Danish ECE Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornerup, Ida; Gravgaard, Mette Lykke

    2017-01-01

    This paper focus on a special pedagogical context; morning receptions as a learning environment. The studies of mornings are part of a 3 year long research project in which different types of learning environments were investigated. Few studies have researched morning receptions in this perspecti...

  6. Use of the truncated shifted Pareto distribution in assessing size distribution of oil and gas fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The truncated shifted Pareto (TSP) distribution, a variant of the two-parameter Pareto distribution, in which one parameter is added to shift the distribution right and left and the right-hand side is truncated, is used to model size distributions of oil and gas fields for resource assessment. Assumptions about limits to the left-hand and right-hand side reduce the number of parameters to two. The TSP distribution has advantages over the more customary lognormal distribution because it has a simple analytic expression, allowing exact computation of several statistics of interest, has a "J-shape," and has more flexibility in the thickness of the right-hand tail. Oil field sizes from the Minnelusa play in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana, are used as a case study. Probability plotting procedures allow easy visualization of the fit and help the assessment. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. THE AUDIT OF RECEPTION PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorina MOCUŢA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The object of study case is to analyze the quality of the logistics department, focusing on the audit process. Purpose of this paper is to present the advantages resulting from the systematic audit processes and methods of analysis and improvement of nonconformities found. The case study is realised at SC Miele Tehnica SRL Brasov, twelfth production line, and the fourth from outside Germany. The specific objectives are: clarifying the concept of audit quality, emphasizing requirements ISO 19011:2003 "Guidelines for auditing quality management systems and / or environment" on audits; cchieving quality audit and performance analysis; improved process performance reception materials; compliance with legislation and auditing standards applicable in EU and Romania.

  8. Restructuring of plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates with arbitrary particle size distribution in pulsed laser fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershov, A. E.; Gavrilyuk, A. P.; Karpov, S. V.; Polyutov, S. P.

    2016-11-01

    We have studied processes of interaction of pulsed laser radiation with resonant groups of plasmonic nanoparticles (resonant domains) in large colloidal nanoparticle aggregates having different interparticle gaps and particle size distributions. These processes are responsible for the origin of nonlinear optical effects and photochromic reactions in multiparticle aggregates. To describe photo-induced transformations in resonant domains and alterations in their absorption spectra remaining after the pulse action, we introduce the factor of spectral photomodification. Based on calculation of changes in thermodynamic, mechanical, and optical characteristics of the domains, the histograms of the spectrum photomodification factor have been obtained for various interparticle gaps, an average particle size, and the degree of polydispersity. Variations in spectra have been analyzed depending on the intensity of laser radiation and various combinations of size characteristics of domains. The obtained results can be used to predict manifestation of photochromic effects in composite materials containing different plasmonic nanoparticle aggregates in pulsed laser fields.

  9. The size effect of the quantum coherence in the transverse-field XY chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lu; Yang, Cui-hong; Wang, Jun-feng [Department of Physics, Nanjing University of Information Science & Technology, Nanjing 210044 (China); Lei, Shu-guo, E-mail: sglei@njtech.edu.cn [College of Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, 211816 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Based on the Wigner–Yanase skew information, the size effect of the quantum coherence in the ground state of the finite transverse-field spin-1/2 XY chain is explored. It is found that the first-order derivatives of the single-spin coherence and the two-spin local coherence both have scaling behaviors in the vicinity of the critical point. A simplified version of coherence is also studied and the same characteristics with its counterpart are found.

  10. Direct correlation of diffusion and pore size distributions with low field NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Xiao, Lizhi; Liao, Guangzhi; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2016-08-01

    The time-dependent diffusion coefficient (D) is a powerful tool to probe microstructure in porous media, and can be obtained by the NMR method. In a real porous sample, molecular diffusion is very complex. Here we present a new method which directly measures the relationship between effective diffusion coefficients and pore size distributions without knowing surface relaxivity. This method is used to extract structural information and explore the relationship between D and a in porous media having broad pore size distributions. The diffusion information is encoded by the Pulsed Field Gradient (PFG) method and the pore size distributions are acquired by the Decay due to Diffusion in the Internal Field (DDIF) method. Two model samples were measured to verify this method. Restricted diffusion was analyzed, and shows that most fluid molecules experience pore wall. The D(a) curves obtained from correlation maps were fitted to the Padé approximant equation and a good agreement was found between the fitting lines and the measured data. Then a sandstone sample with unknown structure was measured. The state of confined fluids was analyzed and structural information, such as pore size distributions, were extracted. The D - T1 correlation maps were also obtained using the same method, which yielded surface relaxivities for different samples. All the experiments were conducted on 2 MHz NMR equipment to obtain accurate diffusion information, where internal gradients can be neglected. This method is expected to have useful applications in the oil industry, particularly for NMR logging in the future.

  11. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torkhov, N. A., E-mail: trkf@mail.ru [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Scientific-Research Institute of Semiconductor Devices, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Novikov, V. A., E-mail: novikovvadim@mail.ru; Ivonin, I. V. [Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-03-07

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L < 100 μm), AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  12. Nature of size effects in compact models of field effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkhov, N. A.; Babak, L. I.; Kokolov, A. A.; Salnikov, A. S.; Dobush, I. M.; Novikov, V. A.; Ivonin, I. V.

    2016-03-01

    Investigations have shown that in the local approximation (for sizes L GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures satisfy to all properties of chaotic systems and can be described in the language of fractal geometry of fractional dimensions. For such objects, values of their electrophysical characteristics depend on the linear sizes of the examined regions, which explain the presence of the so-called size effects—dependences of the electrophysical and instrumental characteristics on the linear sizes of the active elements of semiconductor devices. In the present work, a relationship has been established for the linear model parameters of the equivalent circuit elements of internal transistors with fractal geometry of the heteroepitaxial structure manifested through a dependence of its relative electrophysical characteristics on the linear sizes of the examined surface areas. For the HEMTs, this implies dependences of their relative static (A/mm, mA/V/mm, Ω/mm, etc.) and microwave characteristics (W/mm) on the width d of the sink-source channel and on the number of sections n that leads to a nonlinear dependence of the retrieved parameter values of equivalent circuit elements of linear internal transistor models on n and d. Thus, it has been demonstrated that the size effects in semiconductors determined by the fractal geometry must be taken into account when investigating the properties of semiconductor objects on the levels less than the local approximation limit and designing and manufacturing field effect transistors. In general, the suggested approach allows a complex of problems to be solved on designing, optimizing, and retrieving the parameters of equivalent circuits of linear and nonlinear models of not only field effect transistors but also any arbitrary semiconductor devices with nonlinear instrumental characteristics.

  13. Defeaturing CAD models using a geometry-based size field and facet-based reduction operators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quadros, William Roshan; Owen, Steven James

    2010-04-01

    We propose a method to automatically defeature a CAD model by detecting irrelevant features using a geometry-based size field and a method to remove the irrelevant features via facet-based operations on a discrete representation. A discrete B-Rep model is first created by obtaining a faceted representation of the CAD entities. The candidate facet entities are then marked for reduction by using a geometry-based size field. This is accomplished by estimating local mesh sizes based on geometric criteria. If the field value at a facet entity goes below a user specified threshold value then it is identified as an irrelevant feature and is marked for reduction. The reduction of marked facet entities is primarily performed using an edge collapse operator. Care is taken to retain a valid geometry and topology of the discrete model throughout the procedure. The original model is not altered as the defeaturing is performed on a separate discrete model. Associativity between the entities of the discrete model and that of original CAD model is maintained in order to decode the attributes and boundary conditions applied on the original CAD entities onto the mesh via the entities of the discrete model. Example models are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  14. SU-E-T-299: Small Fields Profiles Correction Through Detectors Spatial Response Functions and Field Size Dependence Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipuzzi, M; Garrigo, E; Venencia, C [Instituto de Radioterapia - Fundacion Marie Curie, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain); Germanier, A [CEPROCOR, Cordoba, Cordoba (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To calculate the spatial response function of various radiation detectors, to evaluate the dependence on the field size and to analyze the small fields profiles corrections by deconvolution techniques. Methods: Crossline profiles were measured on a Novalis Tx 6MV beam with a HDMLC. The configuration setup was SSD=100cm and depth=5cm. Five fields were studied (200×200mm2,100×100mm2, 20×20mm2, 10×10mm2and 5×5mm2) and measured were made with passive detectors (EBT3 radiochromic films and TLD700 thermoluminescent detectors), ionization chambers (PTW30013, PTW31003, CC04 and PTW31016) and diodes (PTW60012 and IBA SFD). The results of passive detectors were adopted as the actual beam profile. To calculate the detectors kernels, modeled by Gaussian functions, an iterative process based on a least squares criterion was used. The deconvolutions of the measured profiles were calculated with the Richardson-Lucy method. Results: The profiles of the passive detectors corresponded with a difference in the penumbra less than 0.1mm. Both diodes resolve the profiles with an overestimation of the penumbra smaller than 0.2mm. For the other detectors, response functions were calculated and resulted in Gaussian functions with a standard deviation approximate to the radius of the detector in study (with a variation less than 3%). The corrected profiles resolve the penumbra with less than 1% error. Major discrepancies were observed for cases in extreme conditions (PTW31003 and 5×5mm2 field size). Conclusion: This work concludes that the response function of a radiation detector is independent on the field size, even for small radiation beams. The profiles correction, using deconvolution techniques and response functions of standard deviation equal to the radius of the detector, gives penumbra values with less than 1% difference to the real profile. The implementation of this technique allows estimating the real profile, freeing from the effects of the detector used for the

  15. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarboro, Sarah B.; Stovall, Marilyn; White, Allen; Smith, Susan A.; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.

    2010-12-01

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by >=2.5 cm.

  16. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarboro, Sarah B; White, Allen; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M [University of Texas Health Science Center Houston, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, TX (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A, E-mail: Rhowell@mdanderson.or [The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-12-07

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by {>=}2.5 cm.

  17. Reception theory and the Christian reader: A preliminary perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Comhrink

    1983-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a significant shift in emphasis from text- centred criticism in literature to reader-centred criticism. This new field of criticism, called Reception Theory or Reader Response Criticism, denies the immutable nature of the "text” and regards as its object of study the work of literature that is created through the co-constituent creative and interpre­tive acts o f both writer and reader.

  18. Reception theory and the Christian reader: A preliminary perspective

    OpenAIRE

    A. L. Comhrink

    1983-01-01

    In recent years there has been a significant shift in emphasis from text- centred criticism in literature to reader-centred criticism. This new field of criticism, called Reception Theory or Reader Response Criticism, denies the immutable nature of the "text” and regards as its object of study the work of literature that is created through the co-constituent creative and interpre­tive acts o f both writer and reader.

  19. Simultaneous measurement of droplet size and velocity field by an interferometric imaging technique in spray combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujisawa, N.; Hosokawa, A.; Tomimatsu, S. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    2003-08-01

    The present paper describes an experimental technique of droplet sizing and velocity measurement for application to a luminous flame in spray combustion. The size measurement of unburnt fuel droplets in combustion is carried out by using an interferometric imaging method, while the corresponding velocity field is measured by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) in combination with the rotary shutter to avoid the high intensity noise of the luminous flame in spray combustion. The measurements are successfully applied to the spray flow from a gun-type burner with and without combustion. The experimental results in spray combustion indicate that the smaller size of fuel droplets are almost burnt in the centre of the flame and the unburnt droplets of larger size remain in the outer region of the burner flow. It was found that the mean droplet velocity measured by the present PTV technique in combustion is almost independent of the droplet size and agrees closely with the gas velocity. However, the velocity magnitude with combustion is increased in comparison with the case without combustion, which suggests the influence of gas expansion at high temperatures. (author)

  20. Design and fabrication of novel anode flow-field for commercial size solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canavar, Murat; Timurkutluk, Bora

    2017-04-01

    In this study, nickel based woven meshes are tested as not only anode current collecting meshes but also anode flow fields instead of the conventional gas channels fabricated by machining. For this purpose, short stacks with different anode flow fields are designed and built by using different number of meshes with various wire diameters and widths of opening. A short stack with classical machined flow channels is also constructed. Performance and impedance measurements of the short stacks with commercial size cells of 81 cm2 active area are performed and compared. The results reveal that it is possible to create solid oxide fuel cell anode flow fields with woven meshes and obtain acceptable power with a proper selection of the mesh number, type and orientation.

  1. Thermal extraction: enhancing thermal emission of finite size macroscopic blackbody to far-field vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Torbjorn Skauli Gang; Wang, Hailiang; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of far-field thermal radiation had directly led to the discovery of quantum mechanics a century ago, and is of great current practical importance for applications in energy conversions, radiative cooling, and thermal control. It is commonly assumed that for any macroscopic thermal emitter, its maximal emitted power within any given frequency range cannot exceed that of a blackbody with the same surface area. In contrast to such conventional wisdom, here we propose, and experimentally demonstrate, that the emitted power from a finite size macroscopic blackbody to far field vacuum can be significantly enhanced, within the constraint of the second law of thermodynamics. To achieve such an enhancement, the thermal body needs to have internal electromagnetic density of states (DOS) greater than that of vacuum, and one needs to provide a thermal extraction mechanism to enable the contributions of all internal modes to far field radiation.

  2. Defect Formation in Superconducting Rings: External Fields and Finite-Size Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, D. J.; Monaco, R.; Rivers, R. J.

    2013-06-01

    Consistent with the predictions of Kibble and Zurek, scaling behaviour has been seen in the production of fluxoids during temperature quenches of superconducting rings. However, deviations from the canonical behaviour arise because of finite-size effects and stray external fields. Technical developments, including laser heating and the use of long Josephson tunnel junctions, have improved the quality of data that can be obtained. With new experiments in mind we perform large-scale 3D simulations of quenches of small, thin rings of various geometries with fully dynamical electromagnetic fields, at nonzero externally applied magnetic flux. We find that the outcomes are, in practise, indistinguishable from those of much simpler Gaussian analytical approximations in which the rings are treated as one-dimensional systems and the magnetic field fluctuation-free.

  3. Normal Threshold Size of Stimuli in Children Using a Game-Based Visual Field Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanfang; Ali, Zaria; Subramani, Siddharth; Biswas, Susmito; Fenerty, Cecilia; Henson, David B; Aslam, Tariq

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate and explore the ability of novel game-based perimetry to establish normal visual field thresholds in children. One hundred and eighteen children (aged 8.0 ± 2.8 years old) with no history of visual field loss or significant medical history were recruited. Each child had one eye tested using a game-based visual field test 'Caspar's Castle' at four retinal locations 12.7° (N = 118) from fixation. Thresholds were established repeatedly using up/down staircase algorithms with stimuli of varying diameter (luminance 20 cd/m(2), duration 200 ms, background luminance 10 cd/m(2)). Relationships between threshold and age were determined along with measures of intra- and intersubject variability. The Game-based visual field test was able to establish threshold estimates in the full range of children tested. Threshold size reduced with increasing age in children. Intrasubject variability and intersubject variability were inversely related to age in children. Normal visual field thresholds were established for specific locations in children using a novel game-based visual field test. These could be used as a foundation for developing a game-based perimetry screening test for children.

  4. Remediation of copper contaminated soil by using different particle sizes of apatite: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jinfeng; Hu, Tiantian; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The particle size of apatite is one of the critical factors that influence the adsorption of heavy metals on apatite in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils using apatite. However, little research has been done evaluating the impact of different particle sizes of apatite on immobilization remediation of heavy metal polluted soils in field. In this study, the adsorption isothermal experiments of copper on three kinds of apatite was tested, and the field experiment by using different particle sizes apatite [nano-hydroxyapatite (NAP), micro-hydroxyapatite (MAP), ordinary particle apatite (OAP)] at a same dosage of 25.8 t/ha (1.16 %, W/W) was also conducted. Ryegrass was chosen as the test plant. The ryegrass biomass, the copper contents in ryegrass and the copper fractionations in soil were determined after field experiments. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the adsorption amounts of copper on OAP was the lowest among different particles. The adsorption amounts of copper on MAP was higher than NAP at high copper equilibrium concentration (>1 mmol L(-1)), an opposite trend was obtained at low copper concentration (soil pH, decrease the available copper concentration in soil, provide more nutrient phosphate and promote the growth of ryegrass. The ryegrass biomass and the copper accumulation in ryegrass were the highest in MAP among all treatments. The effective order of apatite in phytoremediation of copper contaminated field soil was MAP > NAP > OAP, which was attributed to the high adsorption capacity of copper and the strong releasing of phosphate by MAP.

  5. Comparison of magnetic field uniformities for discretized and finite-sized standard $\\cos\\theta$, solenoidal, and spherical coils

    CERN Document Server

    Nouri, N

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge for experiments requiring a highly uniform magnetic field concerns the identification and design of a discretized and finite-sized magnetic field coil of minimal size. In this work we compare calculations of the magnetic field uniformities and field gradients for three different standard (i.e., non-optimized) types of coils: $\\cos\\theta$, solenoidal, and spherical coils. For an experiment with a particular requirement on either the field uniformity or the field gradient, we show that the volume required by a spherical coil form which satisfies these requirements can be significantly less than the volumes required by $\\cos\\theta$ and solenoidal coil forms.

  6. Determination of field size limitations in stereotactic and intensity modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J M; Ihnen, E; Eilf, K; Kimmig, B

    2003-12-01

    For dose measurement in small photon fields, different detectors are currently in use: TLD, semiconductor, diamond-detector, film, etc. But for absolute dosimetry, ionization chambers show the most advantages. To meet the basic dosimetrical requirements for lateral electron equilibrium the field size F must not remain under specified values: i.e. 5.2 x 5.2 cm2 for 15 MeV X-bremsstrahlung. As well as increasing the focus-chamber-distance, changing the physical density of the build-up material in the close vicinity of the chamber will be helpful to determine the output factor OF for smaller fields. By means of a correction factor, k(mat), this is taken into account. For a 6 MeV X and a 15 MeV X-bremsstrahlung of linear accelerators the lower limit of the field size F is determined: F > or = 0.8 cm. This value is mainly dependent on the diameter of the focal-spot (phi = 3 mm) of the treatment unit including design characteristics of the treatment head. Beside the dosimetrical aspects, some geometrical parameters have to be considered, when accuracy of dose application should remain on the same level as in medium and large field treatment (4 cm < or = F < or = F(max)). To keep dose-volume errors as low as +/- 10 % (diameter of PTV: 20 mm), the mean total error delta of CT-scanning (delta(p)), planning (delta(pl)), patient positioning (delta(x)), and treatment unit instabilities (delta(m)) should not exceed +/- 0.8 mm.

  7. Size sorting of citrate reduced gold nanoparticles by sedimentation field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Argazzi, Roberto

    2009-12-25

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been synthesized through the citrate reduction method; the citrate/gold(III) ratio was changed from 1:1 up to 10:1 and the size of the resulting nanoparticles was measured by sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF). Experimental data showed that the GNPs size decreases in the ratio range 1:1-3:1 and then increases from 5:1 to 10:1 passing through a plateau region in between, and is almost independent of the precursor solution concentrations. In the zone of minimum diameters the synthetic process does not produce monodispersed GNPs but often multiple distributions, very close in size, are observed as evidenced by the particle size distributions (PSDs) derived from the SdFFF fractograms. UV-vis spectrophotometry, being the most common technique employed in the optical characterization of nanoparticles suspensions, was used throughout this work. A confirmation of the nucleation-aggregation-fragmentation mechanism was inferred from the cross-correlation between UV-vis and SdFFF results.

  8. Measuring shape and size of micrometric particles from the analysis of the forward scattered field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villa, S.; Paroli, B.; Pullia, A.; Potenza, M. A. C., E-mail: marco.potenza@unimi.it [Department of Physics and CIMAINA, University of Milan, via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Sanvito, T. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); EOS s.r.l., viale Ortles 22/4, 20139 Milan (Italy); Delmonte, B. [DISAT Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy)

    2016-06-14

    Characterizing nano- and micro-particles in fluids still proves to be a significant challenge for both science and industry. Here, we show how to determine shape and size distributions of polydisperse water suspensions of micron-sized particles by the analysis of the field scattered in the forward direction by single particles illuminated by a laser beam. We exploit the novel Single Particle Extinction and Scattering method in connection with shear conditions which give preferred orientations to the particles passing through the scattering volume. Water suspensions of calibrated non-spherical particles, polydisperse standard monophasic mineral samples of quartz and kaolinite, and a mixture of quartz and illite are studied in detail. Application and limitation of the method are discussed.

  9. Mapping field-scale spatial patterns of size and activity of the denitrifier community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, Laurent; Cuhel, Jiri; Saby, Nicolas P A; Chèneby, Dominique; Chronáková, Alicia; Bru, David; Arrouays, Dominique; Martin-Laurent, Fabrice; Simek, Miloslav

    2009-06-01

    There is ample evidence that microbial processes can exhibit large variations in activity on a field scale. However, very little is known about the spatial distribution of the microbial communities mediating these processes. Here we used geostatistical modelling to explore spatial patterns of size and activity of the denitrifying community, a functional guild involved in N-cycling, in a grassland field subjected to different cattle grazing regimes. We observed a non-random distribution pattern of the size of the denitrifier community estimated by quantification of the denitrification genes copy numbers with a macro-scale spatial dependence (6-16 m) and mapped the distribution of this functional guild in the field. The spatial patterns of soil properties, which were strongly affected by presence of cattle, imposed significant control on potential denitrification activity, potential N(2)O production and relative abundance of some denitrification genes but not on the size of the denitrifier community. Absolute abundance of most denitrification genes was not correlated with the distribution patterns of potential denitrification activity or potential N(2)O production. However, the relative abundance of bacteria possessing the nosZ gene encoding the N(2)O reductase in the total bacterial community was a strong predictor of the N(2)O/(N(2) + N(2)O) ratio, which provides evidence for a relationship between bacterial community composition based on the relative abundance of denitrifiers in the total bacterial community and ecosystem processes. More generally, the presented geostatistical approach allows integrated mapping of microbial communities, and hence can facilitate our understanding of relationships between the ecology of microbial communities and microbial processes along environmental gradients.

  10. SIZE AND FIELD OF ACTIVITY INFLUENCE ON WEB SITES FUNCTIONALITY FOR ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarca Ioan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The internet became an important part of the company’s informational system. In order to take advantage on the Internet’s interactive nature, a lot of companies have created their own websites. Companies use the website for numerous applications: to promote themselves, online shopping, and communication with targeted clients. This study reveals the fact that the company’s size and field of activity have influence on website’s functionality and interactivity. Small companies use the website to successfully compete corporations which do not have yet necessary stimulants to fully exploit the internet capacities.

  11. Finite size effects on the electromagnetic field enhancement from low-dimensional silver nanoshell dimer arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Youlin [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhao, Ke [ORNL; Jia, Yu [Zhengzhou University, China; Hu, Xing [Zhengzhou University, China; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional 1D and two-dimensional 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy SERS. It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic EM field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. 2008 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.3009293

  12. Finite Size Effects on the Electromagnetic Field Enhancement from Low-dimensional Silver Nanoshell Dimer Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youlin; Zhao, Ke; Jia, Yu; Hu, Xing; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-03-01

    Finite size effects on the optical properties of one-dimensional (1D) and 2D nanoshell dimer arrays are investigated using generalized Mie theory and coupled dipole approximation within the context of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). It is shown that the huge enhancement in the electromagnetic (EM) field at the center of a given dimer oscillates with the length of the 1D array. For an array of fixed length, the EM enhancement also oscillates along the array, but with a different period. Both types of oscillations can be attributed to the interference of the dynamic dipole fields from different dimers in the array. When generalized to 2D arrays, EM enhancement higher than that of the 1D arrays can be gained with a constant magnitude, a salient feature advantageous to experimental realization of single-molecule SERS. [K. Zhao et al, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 081102 (2005); Y. L. Song et al, accepted by J. Chem. Phys.

  13. Effect of the hypomagnetic field on the size of the eye pupil

    CERN Document Server

    Binhi, Vladimir N

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the hypomagnetic field obtained by the 100-fold deprivation of the geomagnetic field affected human cognitive processes as estimated in several computer tests. The exposure to the hypomagnetic field caused a statistically significant increase both in the task processing time and in the number of errors. The magnitude of this magnetic effect, averaged over 40 healthy subjects and more than 10^5 separate trials, was about 1.7%. In the present work, the results of a simultaneous study are described, in which the right eye of each subject was video recorded, while the subject performed the tasks. It has appeared that the pupil size grows in the hypomagnetic field. This effect has been calculated based on the treatment of a large data set of about 6.10^6 video frames. Averaged all over the frames, the magnetic effect on the pupil area was about 1.6%, with high statistical confidence. This is the first laboratory study in which the number of separate trials has been large enough to obta...

  14. K-pop Reception and Participatory Fan Culture in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Yeon Sung

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available K-pop’s popularity and its participatory fan culture have expanded beyond Asia and become significant in Europe in the past few years. After South Korean pop singer Psy’s “Gangnam Style” music video topped the Austrian chart in October 2012, the number and size of K-pop events in Austria sharply increased, with fans organizing various participatory events, including K-pop auditions, dance festivals, club meetings, quiz competitions, dance workshops, and smaller fan-culture gatherings. In the private sector, longtime fans have transitioned from participants to providers, and in the public sector, from observers to sponsors. Through in-depth interviews with event organizers, sponsors, and fans, this article offers an ethnographic study of the reception of K-pop in Europe that takes into consideration local interactions between fans and Korean sponsors, perspectives on the genre, patterns of social integration, and histories. As a case study, this research stresses the local situatedness of K-pop fan culture by arguing that local private and public sponsors and fans make the reception of K-pop different in each locality. By exploring local scenes of K-pop reception and fan culture, the article demonstrates the rapidly growing consumption of K-pop among Europeans and stresses multidirectional understandings of globalization.

  15. Unified approach to thermodynamic Bethe ansatz and finite size corrections for lattice models and field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Destri, C

    1994-01-01

    We present a unified approach to the Thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz (TBA) for magnetic chains and field theories that includes the finite size (and zero temperature) calculations for lattice BA models. In all cases, the free energy follows by quadratures from the solution of a {\\bf single} non-linear integral equation (NLIE). [A system of NLIE appears for nested BA]. We derive the NLIE for: a) the six-vertex model with twisted boundary conditions; b) the XXZ chain in an external magnetic field h_z and c) the sine-Gordon-massive Thirring model (sG-mT) in a periodic box of size \\b \\equiv 1/T using the light-cone approach. This NLIE is solved by iteration in one regime (high T in the XXZ chain and low T in the sG-mT model). In the opposite (conformal) regime, the leading behaviors are obtained in closed form. Higher corrections can be derived from the Riemann-Hilbert form of the NLIE that we present.

  16. Evaluating shock absorption behavior of small-sized systems under programmable electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Piyush; Kumar, Praveen

    2014-11-01

    A simple ball-drop impact tester is developed for studying the dynamic response of hierarchical, complex, small-sized systems and materials. The developed algorithm and set-up have provisions for applying programmable potential difference along the height of a test specimen during an impact loading; this enables us to conduct experiments on various materials and smart structures whose mechanical behavior is sensitive to electric field. The software-hardware system allows not only acquisition of dynamic force-time data at very fast sampling rate (up to 2 × 10(6) samples/s), but also application of a pre-set potential difference (up to ±10 V) across a test specimen for a duration determined by feedback from the force-time data. We illustrate the functioning of the set-up by studying the effect of electric field on the energy absorption capability of carbon nanotube foams of 5 × 5 × 1.2 mm(3) size under impact conditions.

  17. The role of packaging size on contamination rates during simulated presentation to a sterile field.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Trier

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the impact of package size on the contact between medical devices and non-sterile surfaces (i.e. the hands of the practitioner and the outside of the package during aseptic presentation to a simulated sterile field. Rationale for this objective stems from the decades-long problem of hospital-acquired infections. This work approaches the problem from a unique perspective, namely packaging size.Randomized complete block design with subsampling.Research study conducted at professional conferences for surgical technologists and nursing professionals.Ninety-seven healthcare providers, primarily surgical technologists and nurses.Participants were gloved and asked to present the contents of six pouches of three different sizes to a simulated sterile field. The exterior of pouches and gloves of participants were coated with a simulated contaminant prior to each opening trial. After presentation to the simulated sterile field, the presence of the contaminant on package contents was recorded as indicative of contact with non-sterile surfaces and analyzed in a binary fashion using a generalized linear mixed model.Recruited subjects were 26-64 years of age (81 females, 16 males, with 2.5-44 years of professional experience. Results indicated a significant main effect of pouch size on contact rate of package contents (P = 0.0108, whereby larger pouches induced greater rates of contact than smaller pouches (estimates±SEM: 14.7±2.9% vs. 6.0±1.7%, respectively.This study utilized novel methodologies which simulate contamination in aseptic presentation. Results of this work indicate that increased contamination rates are associated with larger pouches when compared to smaller pouches. The results add to a growing body of research which investigate packaging's role in serving as a pathway for product contamination during aseptic presentation. Future work should investigate other packaging design factors (e

  18. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Ravani, Laura; Passarella, Martina

    2013-07-25

    Four types of SiO2, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w(-1)) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO2 sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO2 particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO2 content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w(-1)). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO2-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Size-resolved culturable airborne bacteria sampled in rice field, sanitary landfill, and waste incineration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yongju; Park, Jiyeon; Lim, Sung-Il; Hur, Hor-Gil; Kim, Daesung; Park, Kihong

    2010-08-01

    Size-resolved bacterial concentrations in atmospheric aerosols sampled by using a six stage viable impactor at rice field, sanitary landfill, and waste incinerator sites were determined. Culture-based and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) methods were used to identify the airborne bacteria. The culturable bacteria concentration in total suspended particles (TSP) was found to be the highest (848 Colony Forming Unit (CFU)/m(3)) at the sanitary landfill sampling site, while the rice field sampling site has the lowest (125 CFU/m(3)). The closed landfill would be the main source of the observed bacteria concentration at the sanitary landfill. The rice field sampling site was fully covered by rice grain with wetted conditions before harvest and had no significant contribution to the airborne bacteria concentration. This might occur because the dry conditions favor suspension of soil particles and this area had limited personnel and vehicle flow. The respirable fraction calculated by particles less than 3.3 mum was highest (26%) at the sanitary landfill sampling site followed by waste incinerator (19%) and rice field (10%), which showed a lower level of respiratory fraction compared to previous literature values. We identified 58 species in 23 genera of culturable bacteria, and the Microbacterium, Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus were the most abundant genera at the sanitary landfill, waste incinerator, and rice field sites, respectively. An antibiotic resistant test for the above bacteria (Micrococcus sp., Microbacterium sp., and Staphylococcus sp.) showed that the Staphylococcus sp. had the strongest resistance to both antibiotics (25.0% resistance for 32 microg ml(-1) of Chloramphenicol and 62.5% resistance for 4 microg ml(-1) of Gentamicin).

  20. An interplanetary magnetic field enhancement observed by five spacecraft: Deducing the magnetic structure, size and mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Delzanno, G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    Interplanetary Field Enhancements (IFEs) were discovered almost 30 years ago in the PVO magnetic-field records and attributed to the interaction between solar wind and dust particles from comets or asteroids, but the physics of this interaction remained obscure. Our current understanding is that IFEs result from collisions of small interplanetary bodies that produce electrically charged nanometer-scale dust particles possibly enhanced by tribo-electric charging in the collision. These charged dust particles in turn interact with the magnetized solar wind. Momentum is transferred from the solar wind to the dust cloud via the collective effect of the formation of a magnetic barrier. This momentum transfer accelerates the particles to near the solar wind speed and moves the dust outward through the solar gravitational potential well. Multi-spacecraft observations can help us to determine the speed of the IFE and the orientation of the current sheet. They enable us to reconstruct the pressure profile of an IFE in three dimensions and estimate the mass contained in the IFE. We have done these reconstructions with an IFE observed on March 3, 2011 with Wind, ACE, ARTEMIS P1 and P2 and Geotail. We find that the magnetic field near the center of the IFE is highly twisted indicating a complicated magnetic topology as expected in a plasma-charged dust interaction. The magnetic field and plasma properties during this event distinguish it from a typical flux rope. Based on the statistical results obtained at 1 AU and the assumption that all the IFEs are self-similar, we find that this IFE has a radial scale length several times longer than the cross flow radius and contains a mass of about 108 kg. The rates of collisions expected for objects of this size are consistent with the observed rates of these disturbances.

  1. From reception of classics to outreach: classical reception and American response to war. A case study. Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Lauriola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available After providing a theoretical framework pertaining to the field of Reception of Classic in the first part of this essay (LAURIOLA, 2014 and after discussing some related issues from a pedagogical viewpoint, I introduced, as case study, works and initiatives by a psychiatrist (SHAY, 1991, 1994, 2002, an American director (DOERRIES, 2008, and two scholars (MEINECK, 2010a, b, 2012; TRITLE, 1998, 2000, 2010 who have been proposing a use of Classical Literature as a therapeutic and awareness-raising tool in response to the problems that modern wars have been causing. Veterans and their family, as well as the whole civic community, are the addressees of their work. What follows is a detailed analysis of those works with the intention both to determine whether they can be classified as work of reception – which, so far, has never been proposed – and to discuss the plausibility of this kind of reception, which also turns into social outreach, and how it can be proposed without risking to completely dismiss changes that have occurred in the vision of war, although we may agree that the sufferings of war did not change too much1. Like in the first part, the discussion will be also carried on within a pedagogical discourse. A personal note based on a personal experience will conclude the analysis.

  2. 100-nm-size ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor with 108-cycle endurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hai, Le; Takahashi, Mitsue; Zhang, Wei; Sakai, Shigeki

    2015-08-01

    The fabrication process of 100-nm-size ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors (FeFETs) with high endurance was reported. The FeFETs had Pt/Sr0.8Ca0.2Bi2Ta2O9 (SCBT)/HfO2/Si stacks where the Pt gate length was 100 nm. The FeFETs were successfully fabricated by integrating many technologies such as fine patterning of etching masks by electron-beam lithography, precise anisotropic etching of the gate stacks, well-controlled ion implantation for gate-self-aligned sources and drains, and the sidewall-cover process that we had developed. Good performances of the FeFETs were characterized by the endurance of 108 program-and-erase cycles with negligible threshold-voltage shift and good drain-current retention for 3.98 × 105 s.

  3. Size dependency and potential field influence on deriving mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.G.S. Dilrukshi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding on the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT is essential in extending the advanced applications of CNT based systems. However, conducting experiments to estimate mechanical properties at this scale is extremely challenging. Therefore, development of mechanistic models to estimate the mechanical properties of CNTs along with the integration of existing continuum mechanics concepts is critically important. This paper presents a comprehensive molecular dynamics simulation study on the size dependency and potential function influence of mechanical properties of CNT. Commonly used reactive bond order (REBO and adaptive intermolecular reactive bond order (AIREBO potential functions were considered in this regard. Young’s modulus and shear modulus of CNTs are derived by integrating classical continuum mechanics concepts with molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that the potential function has a significant influence on the estimated mechanical properties of CNTs, and the influence of potential field is much higher when studying the torsional behaviour of CNTs than the tensile behaviour.

  4. Realization of periodic and quasiperiodic microstructures with sub-diffraction-limit feature sizes by far-field holographic lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Guo Ping

    2006-09-01

    The authors experimentally demonstrate a far-field holography for the realization of Ag nanoparticles-embedded periodic and quasiperiodic microstructures with feature sizes beyond the diffraction limit. Periodic cylindrical nanoshell arrays with about 240nm hole diameter and 12-fold symmetry quasiperiodic structures with 220nm feature sizes are achieved, respectively, by using a 632.8nm laser beam. Our results imply that conventional far-field optical technology is capable of fabricating nanostructures in modern micromanufacture.

  5. A field study investigating effects of landmarks on territory size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyampola, Piyumika S; Eason, Perri K

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have examined how landmarks affect territories' fundamental characteristics. In this field study, we investigated effects of landmarks on territory size, shape and location in a cichlid fish (Amatitlania siquia). We provided cans as breeding sites and used plastic plants as landmarks. During 10 min trials, we recorded locations where residents chased intruders and used those locations to outline and measure the territory. In two experiments, we observed pairs without landmarks and with either a point landmark (one plant) or linear landmark (four plants) placed near the nest can. We alternated which trial occurred first and performed the second trial 24 h after the first. Territories were approximately round without landmarks or with a point landmark but were significantly more elongated when we added a linear landmark. Without landmarks, nests were centrally located; however, with any landmark, pairs set territory boundaries closer to the landmark and thus the nest. Territory size was significantly reduced in the presence of any landmark. This reduction suggests that a smaller territory with well-defined boundaries has greater benefits than a larger territory with less well-defined borders.

  6. Observed oil and gas field size distributions: A consequence of the discovery process and prices of oil and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, L.J.; Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    If observed oil and gas field size distributions are obtained by random samplings, the fitted distributions should approximate that of the parent population of oil and gas fields. However, empirical evidence strongly suggests that larger fields tend to be discovered earlier in the discovery process than they would be by random sampling. Economic factors also can limit the number of small fields that are developed and reported. This paper examines observed size distributions in state and federal waters of offshore Texas. Results of the analysis demonstrate how the shape of the observable size distributions change with significant hydrocarbon price changes. Comparison of state and federal observed size distributions in the offshore area shows how production cost differences also affect the shape of the observed size distribution. Methods for modifying the discovery rate estimation procedures when economic factors significantly affect the discovery sequence are presented. A primary conclusion of the analysis is that, because hydrocarbon price changes can significantly affect the observed discovery size distribution, one should not be confident about inferring the form and specific parameters of the parent field size distribution from the observed distributions. ?? 1988 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  7. Ballistic-type field penetration into metals illustrated by high- and low-frequency size-effect measurements in silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gantmakher, V. F.; Lebech, Jens; Bak, Christen Kjeldahl

    1979-01-01

    Radio-frequency size-effect experiments were performed on silver plane-parallel plates at high, 45 GHz, and low, 3 MHz, frequencies. By investigation of size-effect structures we show the influence of frequency on the field distribution inside the metal. When the frequency increases, the splash s...

  8. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation, and size-distribution analysis of whole yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora

    2004-08-01

    This work continues the project on field-flow fractionation characterisation of whole wine-making yeast cells reported in previous papers. When yeast cells are fractionated by gravitational field-flow fractionation and cell sizing of the collected fractions is achieved by the electrosensing zone technique (Coulter counter), it is shown that yeast cell retention depends on differences between physical indexes of yeast cells other than size. Scanning electron microscopy on collected fractions actually shows co-elution of yeast cells of different size and shape. Otherwise, the observed agreement between the particle size distribution analysis obtained by means of the Coulter counter and by flow field-flow fractionation, which employs a second mobile phase flow as applied field instead of Earth's gravity, indicates that yeast cell density can play a major role in the gravitational field-flow fractionation retention mechanism of yeast cells, in which flow field-flow fractionation retention is independent of particle density. Flow field-flow fractionation is then coupled off-line to gravitational field-flow fractionation for more accurate characterisation of the doubly-fractionated cells. Coupling gravitational and flow field-flow fractionation eventually furnishes more information on the multipolydispersity indexes of yeast cells, in particular on their shape and density polydispersity.

  9. Prototyping a large field size IORT applicator for a mobile linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Rogier W. J.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Dries, Wim J. F.

    2008-04-01

    The treatment of large tumors such as sarcomas with intra-operative radiotherapy using a Mobetron® is often complicated because of the limited field size of the primary collimator and the available applicators (max Ø100 mm). To circumvent this limitation a prototype rectangular applicator of 80 × 150 mm2 was designed and built featuring an additional scattering foil located at the top of the applicator. Because of its proven accuracy in modeling linear accelerator components the design was based on the EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation code BEAMnrc. First, the Mobetron® treatment head was simulated both without an applicator and with a standard 100 mm applicator. Next, this model was used to design an applicator foil consisting of a rectangular Al base plate covering the whole beam and a pyramid of four stacked cylindrical slabs of different diameters centered on top of it. This foil was mounted on top of a plain rectangular Al tube. A prototype was built and tested with diode dosimetry in a water tank. Here, the prototype showed clinically acceptable 80 × 150 mm2 dose distributions for 4 MeV, 6 MeV and 9 MeV, obviating the use of complicated multiple irradiations with abutting field techniques. In addition, the measurements agreed well with the MC simulations, typically within 2%/1 mm.

  10. The generalized 20/80 law using probabilistic fractals applied to petroleum field size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Fractal properties of the Pareto probability distribution are used to generalize "the 20/80 law." The 20/80 law is a heuristic law that has evolved over the years into the following rule of thumb for many populations: 20 percent of the population accounts for 80 percent of the total value. The general p100/q100 law in probabilistic form is defined with q as a function of p, where p is the population proportion and q is the proportion of total value. Using the Pareto distribution, the p100/q100 law in fractal form is derived with the parameter q being a fractal, where q unexpectedly possesses the scale invariance property. The 20/80 law is a special case of the p100/q100 law in fractal form. The p100/q100 law in fractal form is applied to petroleum fieldsize data to obtain p and q such that p100% of the oil fields greater than any specified scale or size in a geologic play account for q100% of the total oil of the fields. The theoretical percentages of total resources of oil using the fractal q are extremely close to the empirical percentages from the data using the statistic q. Also, the empirical scale invariance property of the statistic q for the petroleum fieldsize data is in excellent agreement with the theoretical scale invariance property of the fractal q. ?? 1995 Oxford University Press.

  11. Size characterization by Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation of silica particles used as food additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contado, Catia, E-mail: Catia.Contado@unife.it [University of Ferrara, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, via L. Borsari, 46, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Ravani, Laura [University of Ferrara, Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnologies, via L. Borsari, 46, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Passarella, Martina [University of Ferrara, Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, via L. Borsari, 46, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Four types of SiO{sub 2} particles were characterized by SdFFF, PCS and EM techniques. •Clusters of 10 nm nanoparticles were found in some SiO{sub 2} samples. •A method was set up to extract SiO{sub 2} particles from food matrices. •The effects of the carrier solution composition on SdFFF separations were evaluated. •Particle size distributions were obtained from SiO{sub 2} particles extracted from foodstuffs. -- Abstract: Four types of SiO{sub 2}, available on the market as additives in food and personal care products, were size characterized using Sedimentation Field Flow Fractionation (SdFFF), SEM, TEM and Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (PCS). The synergic use of the different analytical techniques made it possible, for some samples, to confirm the presence of primary nanoparticles (10 nm) organized in clusters or aggregates of different dimension and, for others, to discover that the available information is incomplete, particularly that regarding the presence of small particles. A protocol to extract the silica particles from a simple food matrix was set up, enriching (0.25%, w w{sup −1}) a nearly silica-free instant barley coffee powder with a known SiO{sub 2} sample. The SdFFF technique, in conjunction with SEM observations, made it possible to identify the added SiO{sub 2} particles and verify the new particle size distribution. The SiO{sub 2} content of different powdered foodstuffs was determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS); the concentrations ranged between 0.006 and 0.35% (w w{sup −1}). The protocol to isolate the silica particles was so applied to the most SiO{sub 2}-rich commercial products and the derived suspensions were separated by SdFFF; SEM and TEM observations supported the size analyses while GFAAS determinations on collected fractions permitted element identification.

  12. SU-E-T-98: Dependence of Radiotherapy Couch Transmission Factors On Field Size and Couch-Isocenter Distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhabib, S; Duan, J; Wu, X; Cardan, R; Shen, S; Huang, M; Popple, R; Brezovich, I [UniversityAlabama Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch is non-negligible in today's radiotherapy treatment. To accurately include couch in dose calculation, we investigated the dependence of couch transmission factors on field size and couch-isocenter distance. Methods: Couch transmission factors for Varian Exact Couch were determined by taking the ratios of ionization of a posterior-anterior beam with and without the couch in the beam path. Measurements were performed at the isocenter using a PTW cylindrical ionization chamber (Model 31030) with an Aluminum buildup cap of 1.1 cm thick for the 6 MV photon beam. Ionization readings for beam sizes ranging from 2 × 2 cm2 to 40 × 40 cm2 were taken. Transmission factors for couch-isocenter distances ranging from 3 cm to 20 cm were also investigated. Results: The couch transmission factors increased with the field size approximately in an exponential manner. For the field sizes that we tested, the transmission factor ranged from 0.976 to 0.992 for couch-isocenter distance of 3 cm. The transmission factor was also monotonically dependent on couch-isocenter separation distance, but in a lighter magnitude. For the tested couch heights, the transmission factor ranged from 0.974 – 0.972 for 2 × 2 cm2 field size and 0.992 – 0.986 for 40 × 40 cm2 field size. The dependence on couch-isocenter distance is stronger for larger field size. Conclusions: The transmission factor of a radiotherapy treatment couch increases with field size of the radiation beam and its distance from the isocenter. Such characterization of the couch transmission factor helps improve the accuracy of couch modeling for radiotherapy treatment planning.

  13. Re-Examining Format Distortion and Orthographic Neighbourhood Size Effects in the Left, Central and Right Visual Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Quintino R.; Patrick, Cory J.; Andresen, Elizabeth N.; Capizzi, Kyle; Biagioli, Raschel; Osmon, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown orthographic neighbourhood size effects (ONS) in the left visual field (LVF) but not in the right visual field (RVF). An earlier study examined the combined effects of ONS and font distortion in the LVF and RVF, but did not find an interaction. The current lexical decision experiment re-examined the interaction between ONS and…

  14. Modeling of magnetic fields on a cylindrical surface and associated parameter estimation for development of a size sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Song; Rajamani, Rajesh

    2016-11-01

    This paper develops analytical sensing principles for estimation of circumferential size of a cylindrical surface using magnetic sensors. An electromagnet and magnetic sensors are used on a wearable band for measurement of leg size. In order to enable robust size estimation during rough real-world use of the wearable band, three estimation algorithms are developed based on models of the magnetic field variation over a cylindrical surface. The magnetic field models developed include those for a dipole and for a uniformly magnetized cylinder. The estimation algorithms used include a linear regression equation, an extended Kalman filter and an unscented Kalman filter. Experimental laboratory tests show that the size sensor in general performs accurately, yielding sub-millimeter estimation errors. The unscented Kalman filter yields the best performance that is robust to bias and misalignment errors. The size sensor developed herein can be used for monitoring swelling due to fluid accumulation in the lower leg and a number of other biomedical applications.

  15. Early experiences can alter the size of cortical fields in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelke, A.M.H.; Yuan, S.-M.; Perkeybile, A.M.; Krubitzer, L.A.; Bales, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    The neocortex of the prairie vole is composed of three well-defined sensory areas and one motor area: primary somatosensory, visual, auditory areas and the primary motor area respectively. The boundaries of these cortical areas are identifiable very early in development, and have been thought to resist alteration by all but the most extreme physical or genetic manipulations. Here we assessed the extent to which the boundaries of sensory/motor cortical areas can be altered by exposing young prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) to a chronic stimulus, high or low levels of parental contact, or an acute stimulus, a single dose of saline, oxytocin (OT), or oxytocin antagonist on the day of birth. When animals reached adulthood, their brains were removed, the cortex was flattened, cut parallel to the pial surface, and stained for myelin to identify the architectonic boundaries of sensory and motor areas. We measured the overall proportion of cortex that was myelinated, as well as the proportion of cortex devoted to the sensory and motor areas. Both the chronic and acute manipulations were linked to significant alterations in areal boundaries of cortical fields, but the areas affected differed with different conditions. Thus, differences in parental care and early exposure to OT can both change cortical organization, but their effects are not identical. Furthermore, the effects of both manipulations were sexually dimorphic, with a greater number of statistically significant differences in females than in males. These results indicate that early environmental experience, both through exposure to exogenous neuropeptides and parental contact, can alter the size of cortical fields.

  16. Ableism and the Reception of Improvised Soundsinging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonelli, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Soundsinging is one name for the practice of making music using an idiosyncratic palette of vocal and non-vocal oral techniques. This paper is concerned with the reception of soundsinging and, more specifically, with listeners whose reactions to soundsinging involve attempts to contain the practice.

  17. The reception of relativity in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Besouw; J. van Dongen

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the early academic and public reception of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in the Netherlands, particularly after Arthur Eddington's eclipse experiments of 1919. Initially, not much attention was given to relativity, as it did not seem an improvement over Hendrik A. Loren

  18. The politics, science, and art of receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Beausoleil

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With so much attention on the issue of voice in democratic theory, the inverse question of how people come to listen remains a marginal one. Recent scholarship in affect and neuroscience reveals that cognitive and verbal strategies, while privileged in democratic politics, are often insufficient to cultivate the receptivity that constitutes the most basic premise of democratic encounters. This article draws on this scholarship and a recent case of forum theatre to examine the conditions of receptivity and responsiveness, and identify specific strategies that foster such conditions. It argues that the forms of encounter most effective in cultivating receptivity are those that move us via affective intensity within pointedly mediated contexts. It is this constellation of strategies—this strange marriage of immersion and mediation—that enabled this performance to surface latent memory, affect and bias, unsettle entrenched patterns of thought and behaviour, and provide the conditions for revisability. This case makes clear that to lie beyond the domain of cognitive and verbal processes is not to lie beyond potential intervention, and offers insight to how such receptivity might be achieved in political processes more broadly.

  19. The reception of Cambodian refugees in France

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, G.D.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cambodian refugees’ arrival in France has helped initiate an atypical political mobilization in the process of their reception. The French political power balance, the sociocultural “mood” (zeitgeist) and the “mediatization” of the Indochinese region have impacted on their resettlement and given the

  20. Simulated Critical Differences for Speech Reception Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Ellen Raben; Juhl, Peter Møller

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Critical differences state by how much 2 test results have to differ in order to be significantly different. Critical differences for discrimination scores have been available for several decades, but they do not exist for speech reception thresholds (SRTs). This study presents and discusses how critical differences for SRTs can be…

  1. BVA and AWF hold parliamentary reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-02

    After another successful Animal Welfare Foundation (AWF) Discussion Forum, BVA honorary member Neil Parish MP hosted an evening reception in the House of Commons' terrace pavilion on behalf of BVA and AWF. Felicity Quick, BVA media officer, reports on the event.

  2. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déogratias Nizonkiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates, (i English as Foreign Language (EFL learners’ receptive collocational knowledge growth in relation to their linguistic proficiency level; (ii how much receptive collocational knowledge is acquired as proficiency develops; and (iii the extent to which receptive knowledge of collocations of EFL learners varies across word frequency bands. A proficiency measure and a collocation test were administered to English majors at the University of Burundi. Results of the study suggest that receptive collocational competence develops alongside EFL learners’ linguistic proficiency; which lends empirical support to Gyllstad (2007, 2009 and Author (2011 among others, who reported similar findings. Furthermore, EFL learners’ collocations growth seems to be quantifiable wherein both linguistic proficiency level and word frequency occupy a crucial role. While more gains in terms of collocations that EFL learners could potentially add as a result of change in proficiency are found at lower levels of proficiency; collocations of words from more frequent word bands seem to be mastered first, and more gains are found at more frequent word bands. These results confirm earlier findings on the non-linearity nature of vocabulary growth (cf. Meara 1996 and the fundamental role played by frequency in word knowledge for vocabulary in general (Nation 1983, 1990, Nation and Beglar 2007, which are extended here to collocations knowledge.

  3. Interrelating Reception and Expression in Speechreading Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Uden, Antoine M. J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper identifies characteristics of poor speechreaders, defines developmental dyspraxia in profoundly hearing-impaired children, and outlines the speechreading process. An active training method is described in which expressive and receptive skills are integrated, by having hearing-impaired people speechread their own speech via videotape…

  4. Language, gay pornography, and audience reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, William L

    2011-01-01

    Erotic imagery is an important component of gay pornographic cinema, particularly, where work of audience reception is concerned. However, to assume the audience engagement with the films is limited solely to the erotic realm is to underestimate the workings of ideological power in the context and aftermath of reception. For example, the director of the film under discussion here (Men of Israel; Lucas, 2009b) intended to present an erotic celebration of the nation-state. Yet, most viewers ignore the particulars of context in their comments about audience reception, placing the "Israeli" narrative within a broader framework, using transnational rather than film-specific criteria to guide their "reading" of the Israeli-centered narrative. This article uses as its entry point the language that viewers employ when describing their reactions to Men of Israel on a gay video club's Web site; this article shows how the work of audience reception may draw attention to a film's erotic details while invoking social and political messages that completely reframe the film's erotic narrative.

  5. Design of an Oscillator for Satellite Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leong, F.H.E.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents research on an LC-oscillator for Ku-band (10.7-12.7GHz) satellite reception. The zero-IF receiver architecture, proposed in the joint project involving the University of Twente and NXP Research, requires a 11.7GHz quadrature oscillator that achieves a phase noise of -85dBc/Hz@10

  6. Geological constraints of giant and medium-sized gas fields in Kuqa Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    There is a gas-rich and well-charged petroleum system in the Kuqa Depression where Triassic and Jurassic source rocks play important roles. Distributed in an area of more than 10000 km2 and with a thickness of up to 1000 m, they are composed of dark mudstones, carbonaceous mudstones and coal seams containing 6%, 40% and 90% of TOC, respectively, and are mainly the humic organic matter. As high-quality regional cap rocks, the Neogene and Eogene gypsum rocks and gypseous mudstones matched well with the underlying Neogene and Cretaceous-Eogene sandstones. They have formed the most favorable reservoir-seal assemblages in the Kuqa Depression. Also the Jurassic sandstones and mudstones formed another favorable reservoir-seal assemblage. The traps are shaped late in the fold-thrust belt, mainly fixed in the Tertiary-Quaternary, where ten structure styles have been distinguished. These traps spread as a zone in N-S, are scattered like a segmental line in W-E and show tier-styled vertically. The best traps are gypsum-salt covered fault-bend anticlines related to the passive roof duplex. This petroleum system is characterized by late accumulation. In the early Himalayan Movement, mainly gas condensate and oil accumulated and were distributed in the outer circular region of the kitchen; whereas in the middle and late Himalayan the gas accumulations mainly formed and were distributed in the inner circular region near the kitchen. The overpressure of gas pools is common and is formed by seal capacity of thick gypsum layers, extensive tectonic compression and large uplift. The well-preserved anticline traps underlying the high-quality regional cap rocks of the Tertiary gypsum rocks and gypseous mudstones are the main targets for the discovery of giant and medium-sized gas fields. Above conclusions are important for the petroleum geology theory and the exploration of the fold-thrust belt in foreland basins in central and western China.

  7. Influence of phantom size on output, peak scatter factor, and percentage depth dose in large-field photon irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.; Evans, M.D.C.; Pla, M.

    1985-09-01

    Machine outputs, peak scatter factors, and central axis percentage depth dose distributions were measured for various phantom sizes in large radiation fields produced at extended distances by cobalt, 6-MV, and 10-MV photon beams. The results can be applied to practical total body irradiation procedures which usually involve treatment volumes smaller than the actual field sizes in order to provide a uniform total body exposure to radiation. Our study addresses the question of the appropriate phantom dimension to be used in the calibration of photon beams employed in total body irradiations. The measurements show that the machine outputs are only slightly dependent on phantom size; the percentage depth dose distributions, however, are strongly dependent on the phantom size, suggesting that machine data for total body irradiations should be measured in phantoms whose dimensions approximate the patient during the total body irradiation. Peak scatter factors measured in large-field/small-phantom configurations link up well with the published small-field/large-phantom data. The finite patient thickness lowers the dose to points close to the beam exit surface by a few percent, when compared to dose measured at the same depths in infinitely thick phantoms. The surface doses in large radiation fields are essentially independent of phantom cross sections and range from 40% for the 10-MV beam, to 65% for the 6-MV beam and 80% for the cobalt beam.

  8. Mobile television news: a study on the reception of the news on the mobile audience by adults / seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Finger Costa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available By inserting digital television in Brazil, the programming of open television becomes available in mobile and portable devices without any additional fares. The reception of contents anytime and anywhere is bound to provoke change in the relation between journalists and viewers. For this work, a survey was made in the field of reception to identify, in a qualitative way, the expectations and needs of senior/adult public when watching news in cell phones.

  9. Retrieval of Droplet size Density Distribution from Multiple field of view Cross polarized Lidar Signals: Theory and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    is derived to facilitate use of secondary polarization. The model is supported by exper- imental MFOV lidar measurements carried out in a controlled ...Retrieval of droplet-size density distribution from multiple-field-of- view cross-polarized lidar signals: theory and experimental validation...Gilles Roy, Luc Bissonnette, Christian Bastille, and Gilles Vallee Multiple-field-of- view (MFOV) secondary-polarization lidar signals are used to

  10. Internal and External Factors Affecting The Size of Paddy Field Sold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Rostiana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted  to identify internal condition of the farmers who sold their paddy field and analyze the effects of age, education level, number of family members, field productivity, location, and production cost to the total area of paddy field sold. This study used quantitative descriptive method. This research found that age, education level, number of family members, and location of the land had positive relation to the total area of paddy field sold. On the other hand, production cost and field productivity had negative relation to the total area of paddy field sold. Partially, field production and number of family members had no significant effect to the total area of paddy field sold.

  11. Rethinking clinical language mapping approaches: discordant receptive and expressive hemispheric language dominance in epilepsy surgery candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Nicole M; Eliashiv, Dawn S; Isenberg, Anna L; Fillmore, Paul T; Kurelowech, Lacey; Quint, Patti J; Chung, Jeffrey M; Otis, Shirley M

    2011-06-01

    Neuroimaging studies have shed light on cortical language organization, with findings implicating the left and right temporal lobes in speech processing converging to a left-dominant pattern. Findings highlight the fact that the state of theoretical language knowledge is ahead of current clinical language mapping methods, motivating a rethinking of these approaches. The authors used magnetoencephalography and multiple tasks in seven candidates for resective epilepsy surgery to investigate language organization. The authors scanned 12 control subjects to investigate the time course of bilateral receptive speech processes. Laterality indices were calculated for left and right hemisphere late fields ∼150 to 400 milliseconds. The authors report that (1) in healthy adults, speech processes activated superior temporal regions bilaterally converging to a left-dominant pattern, (2) in four of six patients, this was reversed, with bilateral processing converging to a right-dominant pattern, and (3) in three of four of these patients, receptive and expressive language processes were laterally discordant. Results provide evidence that receptive and expressive language may have divergent hemispheric dominance. Right-sided receptive language dominance in epilepsy patients emphasizes the need to assess both receptive and expressive language. Findings indicate that it is critical to use multiple tasks tapping separable aspects of language function to provide sensitive and specific estimates of language localization in surgical patients.

  12. The optimum circular field size for dental radiography with intraoral films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straaten, F.J. van; Aken, J. van

    1982-01-01

    Intraoral radiographs are often made with circular fields to irradiate the film, and in many instances these fields are much larger than the film. The feasibility of reducing a circular radiation field without increasing the probability of excessive cone cutting was evaluated clinically, and an opti

  13. Divisional and hierarchical innervations of G.gecko's toes to motion and reception

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Ce; CAI Lei; XIE HeRui; WANG ZhouYi; DAI ZhenDong; SUN JiuRong

    2009-01-01

    As a member of robot families,climbing robots have become one of the research hot-spots in the robotic field recently and Gekko gecko (G gecko) has been broadly seen as an ideal model for climbing robot development.But for gecko-mimic robots,one of the key problems is how to design the robot's foot.In this paper,(1) high-speed camera recording and electrophysiological method are used to observe motion patterns of G gecko's foot when it climbs on different oriented surfaces;(2) nerve innerrations of gecko's toes to motion and reception are studied.It is found that the five toes of the G gecko can be divided into two motion and reception divisions,and also its motion and reception are modulated and controlled hierarchically.The results provide important information and exclusive ideas for the foot design and control algorithm of gecko-mimic robots.

  14. Background field removal technique using regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying kernel sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Hirohito; Kasai, Harumasa; Arai, Nobuyuki; Kunitomo, Hiroshi; Hirose, Yasujiro; Shibamoto, Yuta

    2016-09-01

    An effective background field removal technique is desired for more accurate quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) prior to dipole inversion. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of regularization enabled sophisticated harmonic artifact reduction for phase data with varying spherical kernel sizes (REV-SHARP) method using a three-dimensional head phantom and human brain data. The proposed REV-SHARP method used the spherical mean value operation and Tikhonov regularization in the deconvolution process, with varying 2-14mm kernel sizes. The kernel sizes were gradually reduced, similar to the SHARP with varying spherical kernel (VSHARP) method. We determined the relative errors and relationships between the true local field and estimated local field in REV-SHARP, VSHARP, projection onto dipole fields (PDF), and regularization enabled SHARP (RESHARP). Human experiment was also conducted using REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. The relative errors in the numerical phantom study were 0.386, 0.448, 0.838, and 0.452 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP. REV-SHARP result exhibited the highest correlation between the true local field and estimated local field. The linear regression slopes were 1.005, 1.124, 0.988, and 0.536 for REV-SHARP, VSHARP, PDF, and RESHARP in regions of interest on the three-dimensional head phantom. In human experiments, no obvious errors due to artifacts were present in REV-SHARP. The proposed REV-SHARP is a new method combined with variable spherical kernel size and Tikhonov regularization. This technique might make it possible to be more accurate backgroud field removal and help to achive better accuracy of QSM.

  15. BIOREACTOR ECONOMICS, SIZE AND TIME OF OPERATION (BEST) COMPUTER SIMULATOR FOR DESIGNING SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA FIELD BIOREACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    BEST (bioreactor economics, size and time of operation) is an Excel™ spreadsheet-based model that is used in conjunction with the public domain geochemical modeling software, PHREEQCI. The BEST model is used in the design process of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) field bioreacto...

  16. Near-Field Characterization of a Printed Circuit Board in the Presence of a Finite-sized Metallic Ground Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franek, Ondrej; Sørensen, Morten; Ebert, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Model of a generic printed circuit board (PCB) in a presence of a finite-sized metallic ground plane is introduced as a commonly occurring scenario of electronic module whose electromagnetic fields are disturbed by a nearby object. Finite-difference time-domain simulations are performed...

  17. Laser cutting of triangular geometry into 2024 aluminum alloy: Influence of triangle size on thermal stress field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Akhtar, Syed Sohail [King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Keles, Omer; Boran, Kurtulus [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkmenistan)

    2015-08-15

    Laser cutting of a triangular geometry into aluminum 2024 alloy is carried out. Thermal stress field in the cutting section is predicted using the finite element code ABAQUS. Surface temperature predictions are validated through the thermocouple data. Morphological changes in the cut section are examined incorporating optical and electron scanning microscopes. The effects of the size of the triangular geometry on thermal stress field are also examined. It is found that surface temperature predictions agree well with thermocouple data. von Mises stress remains high in the region close to the corners of the triangular geometry, which is more pronounced for the small size triangle. This behavior is associated with the occurrence of the high cooling rates in this region. Laser cut edges are free from large scale sideways burning and large size burr attachments. However, some locally scattered dross attachments are observed at the kerf exit.

  18. Influence of secondary preparative parameters and aging effects on PLGA particle size distribution: a sedimentation field flow fractionation investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Vighi, Eleonora; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles in the 200-400-nm size range were formulated through nanoprecipitation and solvent evaporation methods. Different concentrations of the polymer and stabilizer (Pluronic® F 68) were tested in order to identify the best conditions for making poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles of suitable size, stable in time, and to be used as carriers for brain-targeting drugs. The particles with the best characteristics for delivery system design were those formulated by nanoprecipitation with an organic/water phase ratio of 2:30, a polymer concentration of 25 mg/mL, and a surfactant concentration of 0.83 mg/mL; their surface charge was reasonably negative (approximately -27 mV) and the average size of the almost monodisperse population was roughly 250 nm. Particle characterization was obtained through ζ-potential measurements, scanning electron microscope observations, and particle size distribution determinations; the latter achieved by both photon-correlation spectroscopy and sedimentation field flow fractionation. Sedimentation field flow fractionation, which is considered more reliable than photon-correlation spectroscopy in describing the possible particle size distribution modifications, was used to investigate the effects of 3 months of storage at 4 °C had on the lyophilized particles. Figure Particle size ditribution from the SdFFF and the PCS techniques.

  19. The Critical Reception of Lewis Nordan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Thomas Ærvold

    2010-01-01

    The essay covers the critical reception of Mississippi-writer Lewis Nordan from his debut in 1983 to the boost in scholarly attention in the new millennium. The essay covers newspaper reviews but pays particular attention to the many academic essays that have placed Nordan as a writer in the sout...... in the southern literary tradition and have highlighted themes such as magical realism, the grotesque, race relations, music, and gender....

  20. A Methodology for Conus APOE Reception Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    Heizer , Ramon N. Chief, Supply Systems Branch, Dir- ectorate of Distribution, DCS/Logistics Operations , HQ AFLC, Wright-Patterson AFB OH. Personal inter...would be tasked to serve as aerial ports of embarkation for large quantities of per- sonnel and equipment. The managers must develop reception plans to...into a ’rough cut’ estimate of the workload based on an unconstrained flow through the -.i system. Based on this workload, the managers can develop a

  1. Czech children's literature reception in Slovenia

    OpenAIRE

    Starc, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This master’s degree thesis introduces the historical background of the Czech nation and the cultural contacts between Slovenes and Czechs. It outlines the development of the Czech young adult literature. In the thesis is qualitatively and quantitatively researched the reception of the Czech young adult literature. With a qualitative research it has been discovered how many young adult books have been translated from Czech into Slovene language, how many in different periods and which lit...

  2. Dual-Antenna Microwave Reception Without Switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartop, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    Receiver remains connected to both antennas, transmitter switched to connect it to one or other. Combination of hybrid junction, circulators, and filter provides simultaneous reception paths from both antennas without significantly altering radiation patterns of antennas. Communication system considered for use in spacecraft and in which mechanical switch permitted on downlink but not on uplink. Applicable to terrestrial microwave communication stations subject to dual-antenna requirements.

  3. Eugen Bleuler 150: Bleuler's reception of Freud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Thomas G

    2007-12-01

    On the 150th anniversary of Eugen Bleuler's birth, this article examines his reception of Sigmund Freud and his use of Freudian theory to understand the symptoms of schizophrenia. In addition, in contrast to earlier interpretations of Bleuler's relationship with Freud in terms of an eventual personal and theoretical incompatibility, the article demonstrates that, although Bleuler did distance himself from the psychoanalytic movement, he remained consistent in his views on Freud's theories.

  4. Rapid estimation of Aedes aegypti population size using simulation modeling, with a novel approach to calibration and field validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Craig R; Johnson, Petrina H; Long, Sharron A; Rapley, Luke P; Ritchie, Scott A

    2008-11-01

    New approaches for control of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti (L.) are being developed, including the potential introduction of life-shortening symbiont bacteria into field populations and the release of transgenic strains with reduced vector competency. With these new approaches comes the need for rapid estimations of existing field population size. Here, we describe the use of simulation modeling with container-inhabiting mosquito simulation (CIMSiM) for estimation of Ae. aegypti pupal crop size in north Queensland, Australia. CIMSiM was calibrated for local conditions by deploying "sentinel key containers" (tire, 2-liter plastic bucket, 0.6-liter pot plant base, and tarpaulin indentation) in which water flux and pupal productivity were studied for 72 d. Iterative adjustment of CIMSiM parameters was used to fit model outputs to match that of sentinel key containers. This calibrated model was then used in a blind field validation, in which breeding container and local meteorological data were used to populate CIMSiM, and model outputs were compared with a field pupal survey. Actual pupae per ha during two 10-d periods in 2007 fell within 95% confidence intervals of simulated pupal crop estimates made by 10 replicate simulations in CIMSiM, thus providing a successful field validation. Although the stochasticity of the field environment can never be wholly simulated, CIMSiM can provide field-validated estimates of pupal crop in a timely manner by using simple container surveys.

  5. Rehabilitering og 'motion på recept'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Niels Sandholm; Larsen, Kristian

    2008-01-01

    I denne artikel vil vi søge at analysere fænomenerne 'rehabilitering' og 'motion på recept' med særlig fokus på relationerne til det, som vi efterfølgende betegner som medicinsk felt. Vi vil via en sociologisk optik beskrive og forklare opkomsten af rehabilitering som del af en række andre...... stridigheder og bevægelser i medicinsk felt. Vi vil i den forbindelse samtidig vise, at rehabilitering, og også det nye fænomen 'motion på recept', hverken kan forstås som en selvstændig substans eller som et isoleret fænomen. Rehabilitering og 'motion på recept' konstrueres som fænomener, der udgør et slags...... sociologisk analyse af nogle relativt upåagtede områder indenfor sundhedsområdet, og hensigten er at vise, at denne type praksisområder med fordel kan beskrives og forklares sociologisk.  I Danmark ser vi aktuelt en genkomst eller opblomstring af fænomenet 'rehabilitering'. Rehabilitering beskrives i...

  6. Size selectivity in field-flow fractionation: lift mode of retention with near-wall lift force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michel; Beckett, Ronald

    2012-06-28

    A simple theoretical model for the size selectivity, S(d), in the lift mode of retention in field-flow fractionation (FFF) is developed on the basis of the near-wall lift force expression. S(d) is made up of two contributions: the flow contribution, S(d,f), arising from the variation of the flow velocity at center of particle due to a change in particle position with particle size, and a slip contribution, S(d,s), arising from the concomitant change in the extent of retardation due to the presence of a nearby channel wall. The slip contribution is minor, but not negligible, and amounts to 10-20% of the overall size selectivity. It contributes to reduce S(d) in sedimentation FFF but to enhance it in flow FFF. S(d) would steadily increase with particle size if the flow profile was linear (Couette flow). Because of the curvature of the flow profile encountered in the classical Poiseuille flow, S(d) exhibits a maximum at some specific particle size. The model predicts a significant difference in S(d) between sedimentation FFF and flow FFF, arising from the different functional dependences of the field force with particle size between these two methods. The predictions are in good agreement with the various S(d) values reported in the literature in both sedimentation and flow FFF. On the basis of the model, guidelines are given for adjusting the operating parameters (carrier flow rate and field strength) to optimize the size selectivity. Finally, it is found that S(d) generally decreases with decreasing channel thickness.

  7. Study of particle size distribution and formation mechanism of radioactive aerosols generated in high-energy neutron fields

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, A; Noguchi, H; Tanaka, S; Iida, T; Furuichi, S; Kanda, Y; Oki, Y

    2003-01-01

    The size distributions of sup 3 sup 8 Cl, sup 3 sup 9 Cl, sup 8 sup 2 Br and sup 8 sup 4 Br aerosols generated by irradiations of argon and krypton gases containing di-octyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols with 45 MeV and 65 MeV quasi-monoenergetic neutrons were measured in order to study the formation mechanism of radioactive particles in high energy radiation fields. The effects of the size distribution of the radioactive aerosols on the size of the added DOP aerosols, the energy of the neutrons and the kinds of nuclides were studied. The observed size distributions of the radioactive particles were explained by attachment of the radioactive atoms generated by the neutron-induced reactions to the DOP aerosols. (author)

  8. Interaction of two differently sized oscillating bubbles in a free field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2011-12-01

    Most real life bubble dynamics applications involve multiple bubbles, for example, in cavitation erosion prevention, ultrasonic baths, underwater warfare, and medical applications involving microbubble contrast agents. Most scientific dealings with bubble-bubble interaction focus on two similarly sized bubbles. In this study, the interaction between two oscillating differently sized bubbles (generated in tap water) is studied using high speed photography. Four types of bubble behavior were observed, namely, jetting toward each other, jetting away from each other, bubble coalescence, and a behavior termed the "catapult" effect. In-phase bubbles jet toward each other, while out-of-phase bubbles jet away from each other. There exists a critical phase difference that separates the two regimes. The behavior of the bubbles is fully characterized by their dimensionless separation distance, their phase difference, and their size ratio. It is also found that for bubbles with large size difference, the smaller bubble behaves similarly to a single bubble oscillating near a free surface.

  9. Effect of the hypomagnetic field on the size of the eye pupil

    OpenAIRE

    Binhi, Vladimir N.; Sarimov, Ruslan M.

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we reported that the hypomagnetic field obtained by the 100-fold deprivation of the geomagnetic field affected human cognitive processes as estimated in several computer tests. The exposure to the hypomagnetic field caused a statistically significant increase both in the task processing time and in the number of errors. The magnitude of this magnetic effect, averaged over 40 healthy subjects and more than 10^5 separate trials, was about 1.7%. In the present work, the results of a ...

  10. Effects of 'target' plant species body size on neighbourhood species richness and composition in old-field vegetation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon S Schamp

    Full Text Available Competition is generally regarded as an important force in organizing the structure of vegetation, and evidence from several experimental studies of species mixtures suggests that larger mature plant size elicits a competitive advantage. However, these findings are at odds with the fact that large and small plant species generally coexist, and relatively smaller species are more common in virtually all plant communities. Here, we use replicates of ten relatively large old-field plant species to explore the competitive impact of target individual size on their surrounding neighbourhoods compared to nearby neighbourhoods of the same size that are not centred by a large target individual. While target individuals of the largest of our test species, Centaurea jacea L., had a strong impact on neighbouring species, in general, target species size was a weak predictor of the number of other resident species growing within its immediate neighbourhood, as well as the number of resident species that were reproductive. Thus, the presence of a large competitor did not restrict the ability of neighbouring species to reproduce. Lastly, target species size did not have any impact on the species size structure of neighbouring species; i.e. they did not restrict smaller, supposedly poorer competitors, from growing and reproducing close by. Taken together, these results provide no support for a size-advantage in competition restricting local species richness or the ability of small species to coexist and successfully reproduce in the immediate neighbourhood of a large species.

  11. Farm size and growth in field crop and dairy farms in France, Hungary and Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bakucs

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the relationship between size and farm growth. The existing theories of the association between size and farm growth give mixed results by countries and over time. This paper pursues a twofold objective: on one hand, to test the validity of Gibrat’s Law for French, Hungarian and Slovenian specialized dairy and crop farms during the pre- and post-accession period to the European Union membership. Dairy and crops farms are prevailing in the farming structure of these countries. Using Farm Accountancy Data Network datasets makes it necessary to avoid biases due to heterogeneous structures across the farming systems. Thus we use quantile regressions to control for farm size related heterogeneity in the samples. On the other hand, the main novelty of this paper is the comparative analysis of the relationship between farm size and farm growth between transition Hungarian and Slovenian and non-transition French farming sectors, characterized by rather different farm structures. The results reject the validity of Gibrat’s Law for crop farms in Hungary and to a lesser extent in France, and for French and Slovenian dairy farms. We provide evidence that smaller farms grew faster than larger ones over the studied period 2001-2007 for France, 2001-2008 for Hungary, and 2004-2008 for Slovenia. Conversely, the results for Slovenia suggest that the rate of growth of crop farms in terms of its land is independent from its size.

  12. Finite-size scaling in Ising-like systems with quenched random fields: evidence of hyperscaling violation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, R L C; Fischer, T; Binder, K

    2010-11-01

    In systems belonging to the universality class of the random field Ising model, the standard hyperscaling relation between critical exponents does not hold, but is replaced with a modified hyperscaling relation. As a result, standard formulations of finite-size scaling near critical points break down. In this work, the consequences of modified hyperscaling are analyzed in detail. The most striking outcome is that the free-energy cost ΔF of interface formation at the critical point is no longer a universal constant, but instead increases as a power law with system size, ΔF∝L(θ), with θ as the violation of hyperscaling critical exponent and L as the linear extension of the system. This modified behavior facilitates a number of numerical approaches that can be used to locate critical points in random field systems from finite-size simulation data. We test and confirm the approaches on two random field systems in three dimensions, namely, the random field Ising model and the demixing transition in the Widom-Rowlinson fluid with quenched obstacles.

  13. Electric near-field enhancing properties of a finite-size metal conical nano-tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharenko, A V; Chang, Hung-Chih; Wang, Juen-Kai

    2007-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique simulations are performed to study the near-field resonance properties of a silver conical nano-tip with a rounded end. Varying the tip geometry, we have computed the electric field distribution, as well as the electric field enhancement factor in the immediate vicinity of the tip apex. The aim of this study is to find optimal geometric parameters of the conical tip, such as its angle and length, in order to maximize the electric field enhancement factor. The increase of the tip length is shown to result in a redshift of the tip resonance wavelength. In addition, some subsidiary (non-dipole) peaks appear for relatively long tips. The peak enhancement values for the small-angle tips increase with the tip length while those for the large-angle ones decrease with it. At the same time, the dependencies of the field enhancement on the cone angle exhibit non-monotonic behavior. In other words, an optimal angle exists allowing one to maximize the electric near field. Finally, the effect of the supporting dielectric medium on the electric field near the tip apex is discussed. In the approximation used, the effect is shown to leave the main conclusions unchanged.

  14. The cluster size transformation model of molten alloy under pulse electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZhenBin; WANG JianZhong; QI JinGang; WANG Bing; HE LiJia; CANG DaQiang

    2008-01-01

    Based on the electric dipole theory,the coupled field distribution of pulse electric field (PEF) with electric dipole field around the cluster in superheated molten alloy is simulated under the effect of PEF. For the difference of electro-migration,the atom of solute and solution will accumulate around the cluster,and then the smaller cluster may reorganize and grow up under the action of the coupled field.We also apply the electrostatic induction theory to analyze the bearing behavior of the half side of the cluster. The bigger the cluster is,the stronger the electrostatic force is,therefore,the bigger cluster's stability is weak apparently. The study indicates that the cluster in the superheated molten has the homogeneous tendency under the effect of PEF.

  15. The cluster size transformation model of molten alloy under pulse electric field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the electric dipole theory, the coupled field distribution of pulse electric field (PEF) with electric dipole field around the cluster in superheated molten alloy is simulated under the effect of PEF. For the difference of electro-migration, the atom of solute and solution will accumulate around the cluster, and then the smaller cluster may reorganize and grow up under the action of the coupled field. We also apply the electrostatic induction theory to analyze the bearing behavior of the half side of the cluster. The bigger the cluster is, the stronger the electrostatic force is, therefore, the bigger cluster’s stability is weak apparently. The study indi- cates that the cluster in the superheated molten has the homogeneous tendency under the effect of PEF.

  16. Kicking to bigger uprights: Field goal kicking performance influences perceived size.

    OpenAIRE

    Witt, Jessica; Dorsch, Travis E.

    2009-01-01

    Perception relates not only to the optical information from the environment but also to the perceiver’s performance on a given task. We present evidence that the perceived height and width of an American-football field goal post relates to the perceiver’s kicking performance. Participants who made more successful kicks perceived the field goal posts to be farther apart and perceived the crossbar to be closer to the ground compared with participants who made fewer kicks. Interestingly, the cur...

  17. Dependence of demagnetizing fields in Fe-based composite materials on magnetic particle size and the resin content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollár, Peter, E-mail: peter.kollar@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Košice (Slovakia); Birčáková, Zuzana; Vojtek, Vladimír; Füzer, Ján [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 04154 Košice (Slovakia); Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-15

    Demagnetizing fields are in general produced by the volume and surface magnetic poles. The structure of soft magnetic composite materials, where the ferromagnetic particles are insulated from each other, causes the formation of demagnetizing fields produced by the particle surfaces. These fields depend on the amount of insulation and on the shapes, clustering and distribution of ferromagnetic particles. In this work the demagnetizing fields in iron–phenolphormaldehyde resin composite samples were investigated experimentally using the method for determining the demagnetization factor from the anhysteretic magnetization curve measurement. The initial magnetization curves were calculated for an ideal composite with 100% filler content using the values of the demagnetization factor. The results on the “ideal” permeability show differences between the samples with different resin content for each granulometric class, which tells about the internal stresses introduced into ferromagnetic material during the compaction process. - Highlights: • Demagnetization factor decreases as magnetic content and particle size increases. • Different “ideal” initial curves for each resin content due to stresses in particles. • “Ideal” permeability rises and H{sub C} decreases as resin content and particle size rises. • Demagnetizing fields in SMC studied by means of anhysteretic curve for the first time.

  18. Finite size corrections to scaling of the formation probabilities and the Casimir effect in the conformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabpour, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate formation probabilities of the ground state of the finite size quantum critical chains using conformal field theory (CFT) techniques. In particular, we calculate the formation probability of one interval in the finite open chain and also formation probability of two disjoint intervals in a finite periodic system. The presented formulas can be also interpreted as the Casimir energy of needles in particular geometries. We numerically check the validity of the exact CFT results in the case of the transverse field Ising chain.

  19. Flow field-flow fractionation: a versatile approach for size characterization of alpha-tocopherol-induced enlargement of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermsri, Wimut; Jarujamrus, Purim; Shiowatana, Juwadee; Siripinyanond, Atitaya

    2010-04-01

    Flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) was used for size characterization of gold nanoparticles. The measured particle sizes obtained from FlFFF for the commercial 10 nm gold nanoparticle standard and the gold nanoparticles synthesized in the laboratory were in good agreement with those measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Further, the capability of alpha-tocopherol to induce enlargement of gold nanoparticles by catalysis of the reduction of AuCl(4)(-) by citrate was observed by monitoring the changes in particle size of gold nanoparticles using FlFFF. The effects of alpha-tocopherol and incubation time on enlargement of the gold nanoparticles were examined. Higher concentrations of alpha-tocopherol resulted in larger nanoparticles. At fixed alpha-tocopherol concentration, larger nanoparticles were formed at longer incubation times.

  20. Finite-size and correlation-induced effects in Mean-field Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Touboul, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    The brain's activity is characterized by the interaction of a very large number of neurons that are strongly affected by noise. However, signals often arise at macroscopic scales integrating the effect of many neurons into a reliable pattern of activity. In order to study such large neuronal assemblies, one is often led to derive mean-field limits summarizing the effect of the interaction of a large number of neurons into an effective signal. Classical mean-field approaches consider the evolution of a deterministic variable, the mean activity, thus neglecting the stochastic nature of neural behavior. In this article, we build upon a recent approach that includes correlations and higher order moments in mean-field equations, and study how these stochastic effects influence the solutions of the mean-field equations, both in the limit of an infinite number of neurons and for large yet finite networks. We show that, though the solutions of the deterministic mean-field equation constitute uncorrelated solutions of...

  1. Plant-mediated effects on extracellular enzyme activities in distinct soil aggregate size classes in field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Splettstößer, Thomas; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Pausch, Johanna

    2017-04-01

    Soil aggregation and microbial activities within the aggregates are important factors regulating soil carbon (C) turnover. A reliable and sensitive proxy for microbial activity is activity of extracellular enzymes (EEA). In the present study, effects of soil aggregates on EEA were investigated under three maize plant densities (Low, Normal, and High). Bulk soil was fractionated into three aggregate size classes (>2000 µm large macroaggregates; 2000-250 µm small macroaggregates; moisture sieving. Microbial biomass and EEA (β-1,4-glucosidase (BG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), L-leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) and acid phosphatase (acP)) catalyzing soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition were measured in rooted soil of maize and soil from bare fallow. Microbial biomass C (Cmic) decreased with decreasing aggregate size classes. Potential and specific EEA (per unit of Cmic) increased from macro- to microaggregates. In comparison with bare fallow soil, specific EEA of microaggregates in rooted soil was higher by up to 73%, 31%, 26%, and 92% for BG, NAG, acP and LAP, respectively. Moreover, high plant density decreased macroaggregates by 9% compared to bare fallow. Enhanced EEA in three aggregate size classes demonstrated activation of microorganisms by roots. Strong EEA in microaggregates can be explained by microaggregates' localization within the soil. Originally adhering to surfaces of macroaggregates, microaggregates were preferentially exposed to C substrates and nutrients, thereby promoting microbial activity.

  2. SUSY sine-Gordon theory as a perturbed conformal field theory and finite size effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Z; Palla, L; Takács, G; Wagner, F

    2004-01-01

    We consider SUSY sine-Gordon theory in the framework of perturbed conformal field theory. Using an argument from Zamolodchikov, we obtain the vacuum structure and the kink adjacency diagram of the theory, which is cross-checked against the exact S matrix prediction, first-order perturbed conformal field theory (PCFT), the NLIE method and truncated conformal space approach. We provide evidence for consistency between the usual Lagrangian description and PCFT on the one hand, and between PCFT, NLIE and a massgap formula conjectured by Baseilhac and Fateev, on the other. In addition, we extend the NLIE description to all the vacua of the theory.

  3. Front Office and Reception; An Approach to Front Office and Reception Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This manual is concerned with the tasks and training needs of front office personnel in hotels. After discussion of selection and qualifications of such personnel, the perfect receptionist is described in terms of personality, appearance, and deportment. Then follows a detailed listing of tasks--basic tasks, such as reception, bookkeeping, cash,…

  4. Intervention for mixed receptive-expressive language impairment: a review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyle, James; McCartney, Elspeth; O'Hare, Anne; Law, James

    2010-01-01

    ... difficulties as well as adverse outcomes for language development and academic progress. This paper considers underlying explanations that may account for receptive-expressive language impairment...

  5. Linking snow depth to avalanche release area size: measurements from the Vallée de la Sionne field site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitinger, Jochen; Sovilla, Betty

    2016-08-01

    One of the major challenges in avalanche hazard assessment is the correct estimation of avalanche release area size, which is of crucial importance to evaluate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or infrastructure. Terrain analysis plays an important role in assessing the potential size of avalanche releases areas and is commonly based on digital terrain models (DTMs) of a snow-free summer terrain. However, a snow-covered winter terrain can significantly differ from its underlying, snow-free terrain. This may lead to different, and/or potentially larger release areas. To investigate this hypothesis, the relation between avalanche release area size, snow depth and surface roughness was investigated using avalanche observations of artificially triggered slab avalanches over a period of 15 years in a high-alpine field site. High-resolution, continuous snow depth measurements at times of avalanche release showed a decrease of mean surface roughness with increasing release area size, both for the bed surface and the snow surface before avalanche release. Further, surface roughness patterns in snow-covered winter terrain appeared to be well suited to demarcate release areas, suggesting an increase of potential release area size with greater snow depth. In this context, snow depth around terrain features that serve as potential delineation borders, such as ridges or trenches, appeared to be particularly relevant for release area size. Furthermore, snow depth measured at a nearby weather station was, to a considerable extent, related to potential release area size, as it was often representative of snow depth around those critical features where snow can accumulate over a long period before becoming susceptible to avalanche release. Snow depth - due to its link to surface roughness - could therefore serve as a highly useful variable with regard to potential release area definition for varying snow cover scenarios, as, for example, the avalanche

  6. Werner Sombart and his reception in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Pisanelli

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article intends to focus on the difficulty encountered by Werner Sombart’s works in gaining a hearing in various Italian intellectual circuits. As is well known, Sombart belonged to the German Historical School of economics, sharing with other scholars of that school the same problems in getting his work known in Italy. Our aim is to explain the reason for this hostile reception. First of all, we will analyze the factors which generally hindered the spread of the German Historical School in Italy, recognizing in economists like Francesco Ferrara, Idealists like Benedetto Croce and Marxists like Antonio Labriola some of its strongest opponents. We will dwell on the cases of Gustav Schmoller and Max Weber, in order to give two representative examples of the slow and complicated Italian reception of methodological approaches and analytical perspectives which characterized the scientific experience of the German Historical School. Secondly, we will try to show why Sombart was even less appreciated than other German social scientists, giving the reasons that attracted severe criticism from economists, economic historians and sociologists towards his interdisciplinary approach in the analysis of modern capitalism. Finally, we will show the reasons of the contemporary rediscovery of Sombart and of his works.

  7. Towards a better understanding of dielectric barrier discharges in ferroelectrets: Paschen breakdown fields in micrometer sized voids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Scott; Mellinger, Axel

    2014-04-01

    Charged cellular polypropylene foams (i.e., ferro- or piezoelectrets) demonstrate high piezoelectric activity upon being electrically charged. When an external electric field is applied, dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) occur, resulting in a separation of charges which are subsequently deposited on dielectric surfaces of internal micrometer sized voids. This deposited space charge is responsible for the piezoelectric activity of the material. Previous studies have indicated charging fields larger than predicted by Townsend's model of Paschen breakdown applied to a multilayered electromechanical model; a discrepancy which prompted the present study. The actual breakdown fields for micrometer sized voids were determined by constructing single cell voids using polypropylene spacers with heights ranging from 8 to 75 μm, "sandwiched" between two polypropylene dielectric barriers and glass slides with semi-transparent electrodes. Subsequently, a bipolar triangular charging waveform with a peak voltage of 6 kV was applied to the samples. The breakdown fields were determined by monitoring the emission of light due to the onset of DBDs using an electron multiplying CCD camera. The breakdown fields at absolute pressures from 101 to 251 kPa were found to be in good agreement with the standard Paschen curves. Additionally, the magnitude of the light emission was found to scale linearly with the amount of gas, i.e., the height of the voids. Emissions were homogeneous over the observed regions of the voids for voids with heights of 25 μm or less and increasingly inhomogeneous for void heights greater than 40 μm at high electric fields.

  8. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D

    2014-04-01

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  9. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richters, Dorothee [Institute of Mathematics and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Kühne, Thomas D., E-mail: kuehne@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  10. Characterization of large size YBa2Cu3O7-δ films using magnetic field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, B.; Azoulay, M.; Castro, H.; Deutscher, G.

    2005-11-01

    High critical current density (jc) is one of the most important properties of high Tc superconducting thin films. Determining it is difficult especially in large films (2-3 inch). We propose a non-destructive and easy technique for measuring jc. From measurements of the magnetic moment in the middle of a superconducting film as a function of the external magnetic field, we calculate the macroscopic critical current density.

  11. Face inversion and acquired prosopagnosia reduce the size of the perceptual field of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Goedele; Lefèvre, Philippe; Rossion, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Using a gaze-contingent morphing approach, we asked human observers to choose one of two faces that best matched the identity of a target face: one face corresponded to the reference face's fixated part only (e.g., one eye), the other corresponded to the unfixated area of the reference face. The face corresponding to the fixated part was selected significantly more frequently in the inverted than in the upright orientation. This observation provides evidence that face inversion reduces an observer's perceptual field of view, even when both upright and inverted faces are displayed at full view and there is no performance difference between these conditions. It rules out an account of the drop of performance for inverted faces--one of the most robust effects in experimental psychology--in terms of a mere difference in local processing efficiency. A brain-damaged patient with pure prosopagnosia, viewing only upright faces, systematically selected the face corresponding to the fixated part, as if her perceptual field was reduced relative to normal observers. Altogether, these observations indicate that the absence of visual knowledge reduces the perceptual field of view, supporting an indirect view of visual perception.

  12. Lattice model for amyloid peptides: OPEP force field parametrization and applications to the nucleus size of Alzheimer's peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh Thuy; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    Coarse-grained protein lattice models approximate atomistic details and keep the essential interactions. They are, therefore, suitable for capturing generic features of protein folding and amyloid formation at low computational cost. As our aim is to study the critical nucleus sizes of two experimentally well-characterized peptide fragments Aβ16-22 and Aβ37-42 of the full length Aβ1-42 Alzheimer's peptide, it is important that simulations with the lattice model reproduce all-atom simulations. In this study, we present a comprehensive force field parameterization based on the OPEP (Optimized Potential for Efficient protein structure Prediction) force field for an on-lattice protein model, which incorporates explicitly the formation of hydrogen bonds and directions of side-chains. Our bottom-up approach starts with the determination of the best lattice force parameters for the Aβ16-22 dimer by fitting its equilibrium parallel and anti-parallel β-sheet populations to all-atom simulation results. Surprisingly, the calibrated force field is transferable to the trimer of Aβ16-22 and the dimer and trimer of Aβ37-42. Encouraged by this finding, we characterized the free energy landscapes of the two decamers. The dominant structure of the Aβ16-22 decamer matches the microcrystal structure. Pushing the simulations for aggregates between 4-mer and 12-mer suggests a nucleus size for fibril formation of 10 chains. In contrast, the Aβ37-42 decamer is largely disordered with mixed by parallel and antiparallel chains, suggesting that the nucleus size is >10 peptides. Our refined force field coupled to this on-lattice model should provide useful insights into the critical nucleation number associated with neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Magnetic field effects on buckling behavior of smart size-dependent graded nanoscale beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this article, buckling behavior of nonlocal magneto-electro-elastic functionally graded (MEE-FG) beams is investigated based on a higher-order beam model. Material properties of smart nanobeam are supposed to change continuously throughout the thickness based on the power-law model. Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory is adopted to capture the small size effects. Nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG nanobeam are obtained employing Hamilton's principle and they are solved using the Navier solution. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, nonlocal parameter and material composition on buckling behavior of MEE-FG nanobeams. Therefore, the present study makes the first attempt in analyzing the buckling responses of higher-order shear deformable (HOSD) MEE-FG nanobeams.

  14. The effect of cultivation on the size, shape, and persistence of disease patches in fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, J E; Gilligan, C A

    2001-06-19

    Epidemics of soil-borne plant disease are characterized by patchiness because of restricted dispersal of inoculum. The density of inoculum within disease patches depends on a sequence comprising local amplification during the parasitic phase followed by dispersal of inoculum by cultivation during the intercrop period. The mechanisms that control size, shape, and persistence have received very little rigorous attention in epidemiological theory. Here we derive a model for dispersal of inoculum in soil by cultivation that takes account into the discrete stochastic nature of the system in time and space. Two parameters, probability of movement and mean dispersal distance, characterize lateral dispersal of inoculum by cultivation. The dispersal parameters are used in combination with the characteristic area and dimensions of host plants to identify criteria that control the shape and size of disease patches. We derive a critical value for the probability of movement for the formation of cross-shaped patches and show that this is independent of the amount of inoculum. We examine the interaction between local amplification of inoculum by parasitic activity and subsequent dilution by dispersal and identify criteria whereby asymptomatic patches may persist as inoculum falls below a threshold necessary for symptoms to appear in the subsequent crop. The model is motivated by the spread of rhizomania, an economically important soil-borne disease of sugar beet. However, the results have broad applicability to a very wide range of diseases that survive as discrete units of inoculum. The application of the model to patch dynamics of weed seeds and local introductions of genetically modified seeds is also discussed.

  15. Condition and size of damselflies: a field study of food limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert L

    1989-10-01

    Based on evidence from field manipulations, several authors have recently suggested that interference competition among larval odonates reduces individual growth rates and biomass by reducing foraging rates. This study was designed to test the effects of food shortage on "condition" (relative mass per unit head width) of larval Ischnura verticalis (Odonata: Coenagrionidae) under laboratory conditions and to use these results to estimate the degree of food shortage of larvae under naturally occurring field conditions. In the laboratory, there were marked differences in condition of larvae fed diets ranging from ad libitum feeding with worms to ad libitum feeding with Daphnia 1 day out of every 8. Condition of larvae collected from May through October from 17 different sites in southern Ontario indicated that, for most of the year, larvae had conditions similar to those fed ad libitum with Daphnia in the laboratory. There was no evidence that larval condition was related to population density. Condition of larvae in most sites during July was similar to that of larvae fed poor diets in the laboratory. It is unlikely that the low conditions were due to competition as there were no correlations with density across sites and population densities during July were at their lowest. Adult head widths showed a seasonal decline from mid June to the end of the flight season. There was no evidence that head widths were related to population density although there was some evidence that head widths of males were positively related to larval condition. My results do not support the hypothesis that competition is important in affecting foraging rates and subsequent development of larvae. Contrasts between my results and other studies may stem from difficulties with the interpretation of field experiments, that densities in my study may have been low due to fish predation, and/or that I. verticalis larvae are slow moving relative to other larvae and thus less likely to interact.

  16. Multi-reception strategy with improved SNR for multichannel MR imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wu

    Full Text Available A multi-reception strategy with extended GRAPPA is proposed in this work to improve MR imaging performance at ultra-high field MR systems with limited receiver channels. In this method, coil elements are separated to two or more groups under appropriate grouping criteria. Those groups are enabled in sequence for imaging first, and then parallel acquisition is performed to compensate for the redundant scan time caused by the multiple receptions. To efficiently reconstruct the data acquired from elements of each group, a specific extended GRAPPA was developed. This approach was evaluated by using a 16-element head array on a 7 Tesla whole-body MRI scanner with 8 receive channels. The in-vivo experiments demonstrate that with the same scan time, the 16-element array with twice receptions and acceleration rate of 2 can achieve significant SNR gain in the periphery area of the brain and keep nearly the same SNR in the center area over an eight-element array, which indicates the proposed multi-reception strategy and extended GRAPPA are feasible to improve image quality for MRI systems with limited receive channels. This study also suggests that it is advantageous for a MR system with N receiver channels to utilize a coil array with more than N elements if an appropriate acquisition strategy is applied.

  17. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra

  18. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level

  19. Locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices of different size and shell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.

    2000-10-01

    The behavior of locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices, the Toroidal Pinch Experiment (TPE-RX) [Y. Yagi et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, 2552 (1999)] and Extrap T2 [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996, Montreal (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1996), Vol. 2, p. 193] is analyzed and compared. The main characteristics of the locked mode are qualitatively similar. The toroidal distribution of the mode locking shows that field errors play a role in both devices. The probability of phase locking is found to increase with increasing magnetic fluctuation levels in both machines. Furthermore, the probability of phase locking increases with plasma current in TPE-RX despite the fact that the magnetic fluctuation levels decrease. A comparison with computations using a theoretical model estimating the critical mode amplitude for locking [R. Fitzpatrick et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3878 (1999)] shows a good correlation with experimental results in TPE-RX. In Extrap T2, the magnetic fluctuations scale weakly with both plasma current and electron densities. This is also reflected in the weak scaling of the magnetic fluctuation levels with the Lundquist number (˜S-0.06). In TPE-RX, the corresponding scaling is ˜S-0.18.

  20. Controlled Aloin Release from Crosslinked Polyacrylamide Hydrogels: Effects of Mesh Size, Electric Field Strength and a Conductive Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuvat Sirivat

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of hydrogel mesh size, a conductive polymer, and electric field strength on controlled drug delivery phenomena using drug-loaded polyacrylamide hydrogels prepared at various crosslinking ratios both with and without a conductive polymer system. Poly(p-phenylene vinylene, PPV, as the model conductive polymer, was used to study its ability to control aloin released from aloin-doped poly(p-phenylene vinylene/polyacrylamide hydrogel (aloin-doped PPV/PAAM. In the passive release, the diffusion of aloin from five aloin-doped PPV/PAAM hydrogel systems each was delayed ranging from during the first three hours to during the first 14 h due to the ionic interaction between the anionic drug and PPV. After the delayed periods, aloin could diffuse continuously into the buffer solution through the PAAM matrix. The amount of aloin released from the aloin-doped PPV/PAAM rose with increasing electric field strength as a result of the three mechanisms: the expansion of PPV chains inside the hydrogel, iontophoresis, and the electroporation of the matrix pore size, combined. Furthermore, the conductive polymer and the electric field could be used in combination to regulate the amount of release drug to a desired level, to control the release rate, and to switch the drug delivery on/off.

  1. JNK1 Controls Dendritic Field Size in L2/3 and L5 of the Motor Cortex, Constrains Soma Size and Influences Fine Motor Coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia eKomulainen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic anomalies on the JNK pathway confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders, schizophrenia and intellectual disability. The mechanism whereby a gain or loss of function in JNK signaling predisposes to these prevalent dendrite disorders, with associated motor dysfunction, remains unclear. Here we find that JNK1 regulates the dendritic field of L2/3 and L5 pyramidal neurons of the mouse motor cortex (M1, the main excitatory pathway controlling voluntary movement. In Jnk1-/- mice, basal dendrite branching of L5 pyramidal neurons is increased in M1, as is cell soma size, whereas in L2/3, dendritic arborization is decreased. We show that JNK1 phosphorylates rat HMW-MAP2 on T1619, T1622 and T1625 (Uniprot P15146 corresponding to mouse T1617, T1620, T1623, to create a binding motif, that is critical for MAP2 interaction with and stabilization of microtubules, and dendrite growth control. Targeted expression in M1 of GFP-HMW-MAP2 that is pseudo-phosphorylated on T1619, T1622 and T1625 increases dendrite complexity in L2/3 indicating that JNK1 phosphorylation of HMW-MAP2 regulates the dendritic field. Consistent with the morphological changes observed in L2/3 and L5, Jnk1-/- mice exhibit deficits in limb placement and motor coordination, while stride length is reduced in older animals. In summary, JNK1 phosphorylates HMW-MAP2 to increase its stabilization of microtubules while at the same time controlling dendritic fields in the main excitatory pathway of M1. Moreover, JNK1 contributes to normal functioning of fine motor coordination. We report for the first time, a quantitative sholl analysis of dendrite architecture, and of motor behavior in Jnk1-/- mice. Our results illustrate the molecular and behavioral consequences of interrupted JNK1 signaling and provide new ground for mechanistic understanding of those prevalent neuropyschiatric disorders where genetic disruption of the JNK pathway is central.

  2. Complementary use of flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques for size characterizing biodegradable poly(lactic acid) nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Dalpiaz, Alessandro; Leo, Eliana; Zborowski, Maciej; Williams, P. Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Poly(lactic acid) nanoparticles were synthesized using a modified evaporation method, testing two different surfactants (sodium cholate and Pluronic F68) for the process. During their formulation the prodrug 5′-octanoyl-CPA (Oct-CPA) of the antiischemic N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) was encapsulated. Three different purification methods were compared with respect to the influence of surfactant on the size characteristics of the final nanoparticle product. Flow and sedimentation field-flow fractionation techniques (FlFFF and SdFFF, respectively) were used to size characterize the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. Two different combinations of carrier solution (mobile phase) were employed in the FlFFF analyses, while a solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) was used as mobile phase for the SdFFF runs. The separation performances of the two techniques were compared and the particle size distributions, derived from the fractograms, were interpreted with the support of observations by scanning electron microscopy. Some critical aspects, such as the carrier choice and the channel thickness determination for the FlFFF, have been investigated. This is the first comprehensive comparison of the two FFF techniques for characterizing non standard particulate materials. The two FFF techniques proved to be complementary and gave good, congruent and very useful information on the size distributions of the five poly(lactic acid) particle samples. PMID:17482199

  3. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on final frequency of RF-field in evaporative cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. R.; Ram, S. P.; Tiwari, S. K.; Rawat, H. S.

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of in-situ characterization of 87Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after a radio-frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The in-situ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report here, for the first time, the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency selected in the frequency scan of the RF-field for evaporative cooling. These results on frequency-dependent sizes of the clouds are consistent with the theoretical understanding of the BEC phenomenon in the trap.

  4. Dependence of $\\it{in-situ}$ Bose condensate size on final frequency of RF-field in evaporative cooling

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R MISHRA; S P RAM; S K TIWARI; H S RAWAT

    2017-04-01

    We report the results of $\\it{in-situ}$ characterization of $^{87}$Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after a radio-frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The $\\it{in-situ}$ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose–Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report here, for the first time, the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency selected in the frequency scan of the RF-field for evaporative cooling. These results on frequency-dependent sizes of the clouds are consistent with the theoretical understanding of the BEC phenomenon in the trap.

  5. Size- and density-dependent elution of normal and pathological red blood cells by gravitational field-flow fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardot, P J; Elgéa, C; Guernet, M; Godet, D; Andreux, J P

    1994-04-01

    Elution of normal and pathological human red blood cells (RBCs) was performed by gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF). The reproducibility of the retention factor was lower than 10% and elution at high and low flow-rates confirmed the existence of "lifting forces". No direct correlation between size and retention was observed for normal RBCs in the absence of density information. Elution of pathological human RBCs, known to be modified in shape, density and rigidity, was performed. The elution parameters confirmed that the retention mechanism of RBCs is at least density dependent but that other factors can be involved, such as shape or deformity. Moreover, peak profile description parameters (standard deviation and asymmetry) can be qualitatively related to some biophysical parameters. Numerous elution characteristics can be linked to cell properties described in the literature and although GFFF appeared to have limited capabilities in terms of size analysis it appeared to be a versatile tool for studying cell biophysical characteristics.

  6. S -wave pairing: A study of low-field dc magnetization in micrometer-sized HTSC powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, G.; Bhagat, S.M. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    An extensive study of the low-field ({mu}{sub 0}{ital H} {le} 8 mT) dc initial susceptibility {chi}{sub in} has been performed using micrometer-sized HTSC powders of varying sizes and methods of preparation. It is found, as before, that {chi}{sub in}({ital T}) is essentially constant for {ital T} {approx lt} 0.4{ital T}{sub {ital c}}. This supports {ital s}-wave pairing and implies no zeros of the gap on the fermi surface. Additionally, {chi}{sub in}({ital T}) finds reasonable description in a London model for superconducting spheres and a two-fluid model {lambda}({ital T}).

  7. Statistical Correlations Between Near-Infrared Luminosities and Ring Sizes in Field Ringed Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wentao

    2008-01-01

    Statistically complete samples of inner-pseudo-, inner-, and outer-ringed galaxies can be extracted from the Catalog of Southern Ringed Galaxies. Redshifts and near-infrared (NIR) photometric data are available for the samples, allowing the derivation of the statistical correlations between the total NIR luminosities (L NIR) and the projected ring major axes in the physical scale (D) for these galaxies. For any of the three types of rings, the correlations are approximately L NIR vprop D 1.2 among the early-type ringed galaxies (the most commonly observed ringed galaxies). The correlations among late-type ringed galaxies appear significantly different. The results contradict the previous suggestion by Kormendy (1979, ApJ, 227, 714), who gave LB vprop D 2 (LB : B-band galaxy luminosity). The relations can be used in future to test theoretical simulations of dynamical structures of ringed galaxies as well as those of ring formation under the framework of cosmological models. Currently the results indicate at most small differences in the relative contributions of disk components to total galaxy masses and in the initial disk velocity dispersions between commonly observed ringed galaxies of similar type. The correlations also suggest a new approach to effectively use ring sizes as tertiary cosmological distance indicators, to help enhance the reliability of the measurement of the Hubble Constant.

  8. A voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D cluster-size test based on random field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanjie; Nickerson, Lisa D; Zhao, Xuna; Nichols, Thomas E; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Cluster-size tests (CSTs) based on random field theory (RFT) are commonly adopted to identify significant differences in brain images. However, the use of RFT in CSTs rests on the assumption of uniform smoothness (stationarity). When images are non-stationary, CSTs based on RFT will likely lead to increased false positives in smooth regions and reduced power in rough regions. An adjustment to the cluster size according to the local smoothness at each voxel has been proposed for the standard test based on RFT to address non-stationarity, however, this technique requires images with a large degree of spatial smoothing, large degrees of freedom and high intensity thresholding. Recently, we proposed a voxelation-corrected 3D CST based on Gaussian random field theory that does not place constraints on the degree of spatial smoothness. However, this approach is only applicable to stationary images, requiring further modification to enable use for non-stationary images. In this study, we present modifications of this method to develop a voxelation-corrected non-stationary 3D CST based on RFT. Both simulated and real data were used to compare the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST to the standard cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT and the voxelation-corrected stationary CST. We found that voxelation-corrected stationary CST is liberal for non-stationary images and the voxelation-corrected non-stationary CST performs better than cluster-size adjusted non-stationary CST based on RFT under low smoothness, low intensity threshold and low degrees of freedom. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Cross-National Policy Borrowing: Understanding Reception and Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner-Khamsi, Gita

    2014-01-01

    The article examines two key concepts in research on policy borrowing and lending that are often used to explain why and how educational reforms travel across national boundaries: reception and translation. The studies on reception analyse the political, economic, and cultural reasons that account for the attractiveness of a reform from elsewhere.…

  10. The Comparative Reception of Darwinism: A Brief History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    The subfield of Darwin studies devoted to comparative reception coalesced around 1971 with the planning of a conference on the subject, at the University of Texas at Austin held in April 1972. The original focus was western Europe, Russia and the United States. Subsequently a spate of studies on the Italian reception added to the Eurocentric…

  11. Developmental Stages in Receptive Grammar Acquisition: A Processability Theory Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyl, Aafke; Housen, Alex

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a new look at the topic of developmental stages in the second language (L2) acquisition of morphosyntax by analysing receptive learner data, a language mode that has hitherto received very little attention within this strand of research (for a recent and rare study, see Spinner, 2013). Looking at both the receptive and productive…

  12. The reception of relativity in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Danian

    2007-09-01

    Having introduced the theory of relativity from Japan, the Chinese quickly and enthusiastically embraced it during the May Fourth Movement, virtually without controversy. This unique passion for and openness to relativity, which helped advance the study of theoretical physics in China in the 1930s, was gradually replaced by imported Soviet criticism after 1949. During the Cultural Revolution, radical Chinese ideologues sponsored organized campaigns against Einstein and relativity, inflicting serious damage on Chinese science and scientific education. China's economic reforms in the late 1970s empowered scientists and presented them with the opportunity to rehabilitate Einstein and call for social democracy. Einstein has since become the symbol in China of the unity of science and democracy, the two eminent objectives of the May Fourth Movement that remain to be achieved in full. Using the reception of relativity as a case study, the essay also discusses issues involving the historical study of modern Chinese science.

  13. Uterine receptivity and the plasma membrane transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christopher R MURPHY

    2004-01-01

    This review begins with a brief commentary on the diversity of placentation mechanisms, and then goes on to examine the extensive alterations which occur in the plasma membrane of uterine epithelial cells during early pregnancy across species. Ultrastructural, biochemical and more general morphological data reveal that strikingly common phenomena occur in this plasma membrane during early pregnancy despite the diversity of placental types-from epitheliochorial to hemochorial, which ultimately form in different species. To encapsulate the concept that common morphological and molecular alterations occur across species, that they are found basolaterally as well as apically, and that moreover they are an ongoing process during much of early pregnancy, not just an event at the time attachment,brane during early pregnancy are key to uterine receptivity.

  14. [Educational pamphlets on health: a reception study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Évelyn Aparecida; Tarcia, Rita Maria Lino; Magalhães, Lidiane Pereira; Soares, Mariângela Abate de Lara; Suriano, Maria Lucia Fernandez; Domenico, Edvane Birelo Lopes De

    2015-06-01

    Identifying the socioeconomic and cultural profile of users/readers of educational pamphlets, characterizing the context of the reading material and people involved; describing the user/reader evaluation on language and style used, as well as content range or limitations, and its characterization as an educational material in assisting users for meeting homecare demands. A reception, cross-sectional, qualitative study. 27 respondents who had received five educational pamphlets were interviewed on Oncology signs and symptoms during primary care consultations. Study participants were adults, with average schooling of more than 10 years and low income. Pamphlets were assessed as appropriate for consistent language, quantity and quality of content, and especially in relation to the capacity of helping in the homecare decision making process. The importance of receiving pamphlets at the initial stage of the disease was verified. Users acceptance was positive and the study revealed aspects that should be reinforced in the creation of educational pamphlets.

  15. The neuropolitical habitus of resonant receptive democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romand Coles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I argue that the recent work on mirror neurons illuminates the character of our capacities for a politics of resonant receptivity in ways that both help us to comprehend the damages of our contemporary order and suggest indispensable alternative ethical–strategic registers and possible directions for organising a powerful movement towards radical democracy. In doing so, neuroscience simultaneously contributes to our understanding of the possibility and importance of a more durable (less fugitive radically democratic habitus. While the trope, ‘radically democratic habitus’, may seem oxymoronic in light of Bourdieu's extensive rendering of ‘habitus’, I suggest that research on mirror neurons discloses ways in which iterated practices and dispositional structures are crucial for democratic freedom.

  16. The reception of relativity in the Netherlands

    CERN Document Server

    van Besouw, Jip

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the early academic and public reception of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in the Netherlands, particularly after Arthur Eddington's eclipse experiments of 1919. Initially, not much attention was given to relativity, as it did not seem an improvement over Hendrik A. Lorentz' work. This changed after the arrival in Leiden of Paul Ehrenfest. Soon relativity was much studied and lead to controversy among a number of conservative intellectuals, as elsewhere in Europe. The tone of Dutch critics was much more mild, however. This can be understood when one considers Dutch neutrality during World War I. Einstein's political positions were generally positively perceived in Holland, which Dutch academics put to use in their efforts at international reconciliation abroad, and the presentation of theoretical physics at home.

  17. Dependence of in-situ Bose condensate size on frequency of RF-field used for evaporative cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, S R; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of in-situ characterization of $ ^{87}$Rb atom cloud in a quadrupole Ioffe configuration (QUIC) magnetic trap after radio frequency (RF) evaporative cooling of the trapped atom cloud. The in-situ absorption images of the atom cloud have shown clear bimodal optical density (OD) profiles which indicate the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) phase transition in the trapped gas. Also, we report the measured variation in the sizes of the condensate and thermal clouds with the final frequency in the frequency scan of the RF-field applied for evaporative cooling. The results are consistent with the theoretical understanding and predictions reported earlier.

  18. Rapid Synthesis of Submicrometer-sized Red Phosphor CaS∶Cu+,Eu2+ in a Microwave Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The red phosphor materials CaS∶Cu+,Eu2+ were firstly synthesized in a microwave field, and characterized by XRD、SEM、fluorescent spectroscopy. The experimental results of XRD and SEM show that the phosphors of CaS∶Cu+,Eu2+ possess a spherical crystallite structure, in the submicrometer(250~500 nm) size range. Compared to the conventional high temperature solid state reaction this new synthetic technique exhibits interesting features, such as rapid reactions without other protective atmosphere,phosphors with high purity, smaller particles,and higher efficient luminescence.

  19. Silica Measurement with High Flow Rate Respirable Size Selective Samplers: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Harper, Martin; Kashon, Michael; Lee, Larry A; Healy, Catherine B; Coggins, Marie A; Susi, Pam; O'Brien, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    High and low flow rate respirable size selective samplers including the CIP10-R (10 l min(-1)), FSP10 (11.2 l min(-1)), GK2.69 (4.4 l min(-1)), 10-mm nylon (1.7 l min(-1)), and Higgins-Dewell type (2.2 l min(-1)) were compared via side-by-side sampling in workplaces for respirable crystalline silica measurement. Sampling was conducted at eight different occupational sites in the USA and five different stonemasonry sites in Ireland. A total of 536 (268 pairs) personal samples and 55 area samples were collected. Gravimetric analysis was used to determine respirable dust mass and X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine quartz mass. Ratios of respirable dust mass concentration, quartz mass concentration, respirable dust mass, and quartz mass from high and low flow rate samplers were compared. In general, samplers did not show significant differences greater than 30% in respirable dust mass concentration and quartz mass concentration when outliers (ratio 3.0) were removed from the analysis. The frequency of samples above the limit of detection and limit of quantification of quartz was significantly higher for the CIP10-R and FSP10 samplers compared to low flow rate samplers, while the GK2.69 cyclone did not show significant difference from low flow rate samplers. High flow rate samplers collected significantly more respirable dust and quartz than low flow rate samplers as expected indicating that utilizing high flow rate samplers might improve precision in quartz measurement. Although the samplers did not show significant differences in respirable dust and quartz concentrations, other practical attributes might make them more or less suitable for personal sampling.

  20. [Mechanism of intermolecular energy transfer and reception of ultralow action by chemical and biological systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall', L N; Gall', N R

    2009-01-01

    A novel concept of intermolecular energy transfer and reception of the ultralow action in living systems is proposed. The concept is based on the methods of nonlinear mathematical physics used in description of energy movement along molecular chains and on quantum mechanical ideas concerning signal formation in anisotropic media. A concept of a molecular cell as an indivisible structural unit and a constituent of a biological (chemical) system has been put forward and substantiated, which manifests collective features of the unity of molecules, physical fields, and energetically strained bound water media in processes of energy transfer and reception. Both intermolecular energy transfer and amplification of the ultralow action has been shown to be the components of a unified energy process in a living system, and the physical basis of both processes is the unity of molecules and water-field media in a molecular cell.

  1. Size-, electric-field-, and frequency-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Hu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui; Bi, Zetong; Xu, Runfeng

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the electronic properties and second hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters (H-SiNCs) by using the density functional theory method. The effects of cluster size, external electric field and incident frequency on the second hyperpolarizability were also examined, respectively. We found that small H-SiNCs exhibit large second hyperpolarizability. With the increase of the number of silicon atoms in H-SiNCs, the frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases, attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. Interestingly, we also found the electric-field-induced gigantic enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability for H-SiNCs due to the change of electron density distributions. In addition, our results demonstrate a significant dependence on the frequency of incident light.

  2. Size-, electric-field-, and frequency-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Hu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui; Bi, Zetong; Xu, Runfeng

    2016-06-16

    We investigated the electronic properties and second hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters (H-SiNCs) by using the density functional theory method. The effects of cluster size, external electric field and incident frequency on the second hyperpolarizability were also examined, respectively. We found that small H-SiNCs exhibit large second hyperpolarizability. With the increase of the number of silicon atoms in H-SiNCs, the frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases, attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. Interestingly, we also found the electric-field-induced gigantic enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability for H-SiNCs due to the change of electron density distributions. In addition, our results demonstrate a significant dependence on the frequency of incident light.

  3. Size-, electric-field-, and frequency-dependent third-order nonlinear optical properties of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Xu, Hu; Shen, Xiaopeng; Han, Kui; Bi, Zetong; Xu, Runfeng

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the electronic properties and second hyperpolarizabilities of hydrogenated silicon nanoclusters (H-SiNCs) by using the density functional theory method. The effects of cluster size, external electric field and incident frequency on the second hyperpolarizability were also examined, respectively. We found that small H-SiNCs exhibit large second hyperpolarizability. With the increase of the number of silicon atoms in H-SiNCs, the frontier molecular orbital energy gap decreases, attributed to the enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability. Interestingly, we also found the electric-field-induced gigantic enhancement of the second hyperpolarizability for H-SiNCs due to the change of electron density distributions. In addition, our results demonstrate a significant dependence on the frequency of incident light. PMID:27305957

  4. Tsunami Size Distributions at Far-Field Locations from Aggregated Earthquake Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, E. L.; Parsons, T.

    2015-12-01

    The distribution of tsunami amplitudes at far-field tide gauge stations is explained by aggregating the probability of tsunamis derived from individual subduction zones and scaled by their seismic moment. The observed tsunami amplitude distributions of both continental (e.g., San Francisco) and island (e.g., Hilo) stations distant from subduction zones are examined. Although the observed probability distributions nominally follow a Pareto (power-law) distribution, there are significant deviations. Some stations exhibit varying degrees of tapering of the distribution at high amplitudes and, in the case of the Hilo station, there is a prominent break in slope on log-log probability plots. There are also differences in the slopes of the observed distributions among stations that can be significant. To explain these differences we first estimate seismic moment distributions of observed earthquakes for major subduction zones. Second, regression models are developed that relate the tsunami amplitude at a station to seismic moment at a subduction zone, correcting for epicentral distance. The seismic moment distribution is then transformed to a site-specific tsunami amplitude distribution using the regression model. Finally, a mixture distribution is developed, aggregating the transformed tsunami distributions from all relevant subduction zones. This mixture distribution is compared to the observed distribution to assess the performance of the method described above. This method allows us to estimate the largest tsunami that can be expected in a given time period at a station.

  5. Unaccompanied adolescents seeking asylum - Poorer mental health under a restrictive reception : poorer mental health under a restrictive reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; de Boer, J.B.; Bean, T.; Korfker, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the effects of a stringent reception policy on the mental health of unaccompanied adolescent asylum seekers by comparing the mental health of adolescents in a restricted campus reception setting and in a setting offering more autonomy (numbers [response rates]: 69 [93%] and 53 [69%],

  6. Unaccompanied adolescents seeking asylum - Poorer mental health under a restrictive reception : poorer mental health under a restrictive reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijneveld, S.A.; de Boer, J.B.; Bean, T.; Korfker, D.G.

    2005-01-01

    We assessed the effects of a stringent reception policy on the mental health of unaccompanied adolescent asylum seekers by comparing the mental health of adolescents in a restricted campus reception setting and in a setting offering more autonomy (numbers [response rates]: 69 [93%] and 53 [69%], res

  7. The influence of field size on stopping-power ratios in- and out-of-field: quantitative data for the BrainLAB m3 micro-multileaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael; Kairn, Tanya; Kron, Tomas; Dunn, Leon; Johnston, Peter N; Franich, Rick D

    2012-11-08

    The objective of this work is to quantify the systematic errors introduced by the common assumption of invariant secondary electron spectra with changing field sizes, as relevant to stereotactic radiotherapy and other treatment modes incorporating small beam segments delivered with a linac-based stereotactic unit. The EGSnrc/BEAMnrc Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to construct a dosimetrically-matched model of a Varian 600C linear accelerator with mounted BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Stopping-power ratios were calculated for field sizes ranging from 6 × 6 mm2 up to the maximum (98 × 98 mm2), and differences between these and the reference field were computed. Quantitative stopping power data for the BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator has been compiled. Field size dependent differences to reference conditions increase with decreasing field size and increasing depth, but remain a fraction of a percent for all field sizes studied. However, for dosimetry outside the primary field, errors induced by the assumption of invariant electron spectra can be greater than 1%, increasing with field size. It is also shown that simplification of the Spencer-Attix formulation by ignoring secondary electrons below the cutoff kinetic energy applied to the integration results in underestimation of stopping-power ratios of about 0.3% (and is independent of field size and depth). This work is the first to quantify stopping powers from a BrainLAB micro-multileaf collimator. Many earlier studies model simplified beams, ignoring collimator scatter, which is shown to significantly influence the spectrum. Importantly, we have confirmed that the assumption of unchanging electron spectra with varying field sizes is justifiable when performing (typical) in-field dosimetry of stereotactic fields. Clinicians and physicists undertaking precise out-of-field measurements for the purposes of risk estimation, ought to be aware that the more pronounced spectral variation results

  8. The sizes of $z\\sim6-8$ lensed galaxies from the Hubble Frontier Fields Abell 2744 data

    CERN Document Server

    Kawamata, Ryota; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Oguri, Masamune; Ouchi, Masami

    2014-01-01

    We investigate sizes of $z\\sim6-8$ dropout galaxies using the complete data of the Abell 2744 cluster and parallel fields in the Hubble Frontier Fields program. By directly fitting light profiles of observed galaxies with lensing-distorted S\\'ersic profiles on the image plane with the \\texttt{glafic} software, we accurately measure intrinsic sizes of 31 $z\\sim6-7$ and eight $z\\sim8$ galaxies, including those as faint as $M_{\\mathrm{UV}}\\simeq-17$. We find that half-light radii $r_\\mathrm{e}$ positively correlates with UV luminosity at each redshift, although the correlation is not very tight. Largest ($r_\\mathrm{e}>0.8$ kpc) galaxies are mostly red in UV color while smallest ($r_\\mathrm{e} < 0.05$ kpc) ones tend to be blue. We also find that galaxies with multiple cores tend to be brighter. Combined with previous results at $2.5\\lesssim z\\lesssim12$, our result confirms that the average $r_{\\mathrm{e}}$ of bright ($(0.3-1)L^\\star_{z=3}$) galaxies scales as $r_{\\mathrm{e}}\\propto(1+z)^{-m}$ with $m=1.31\\pm0...

  9. Spatial Distribution and Minimum Sample Size for Overwintering Larvae of the Rice Stem Borer Chilo suppressalis (Walker) in Paddy Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, A

    2014-10-01

    The rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), feeds almost exclusively in paddy fields in most regions of the world. The study of its spatial distribution is fundamental for designing correct control strategies, improving sampling procedures, and adopting precise agricultural techniques. Field experiments were conducted during 2011 and 2012 to estimate the spatial distribution pattern of the overwintering larvae. Data were analyzed using five distribution indices and two regression models (Taylor and Iwao). All of the indices and Taylor's model indicated random spatial distribution pattern of the rice stem borer overwintering larvae. Iwao's patchiness regression was inappropriate for our data as shown by the non-homogeneity of variance, whereas Taylor's power law fitted the data well. The coefficients of Taylor's power law for a combined 2 years of data were a = -0.1118, b = 0.9202 ± 0.02, and r (2) = 96.81. Taylor's power law parameters were used to compute minimum sample size needed to estimate populations at three fixed precision levels, 5, 10, and 25% at 0.05 probabilities. Results based on this equation parameters suggesting that minimum sample sizes needed for a precision level of 0.25 were 74 and 20 rice stubble for rice stem borer larvae when the average larvae is near 0.10 and 0.20 larvae per rice stubble, respectively.

  10. The finite-size scaling study of four-dimensional Ising model in the presence of external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdan, Ziya; Kürkçü, Cihan; Öztürk, Mustafa K.

    2014-12-01

    The four-dimensional ferromagnetic Ising model in external magnetic field is simulated on the Creutz cellular automaton algorithm using finite-size lattices with linear dimension 4 ≤ L ≤ 8. The critical temperature value of infinite lattice, Tc χ ( ∞ ) = 6 , 680 (1) obtained for h = 0 agrees well with the values T c ( ∞ ) ≈ 6.68 obtained previously using different methods. Moreover, h = 0.00025 in our work also agrees with all the results obtained from h = 0 in the literature. However, there are no works for h ≠ 0 in the literature. The value of the field critical exponent (δ = 3.0136(3)) is in good agreement with δ = 3 which is obtained from scaling law of Widom. In spite of the finite-size scaling relations of | M L ( t ) | and χ L ( t ) for 0 ≤ h ≤ 0.001 are verified; however, in the cases of 0.0025 ≤ h ≤ 0.1 they are not verified.

  11. Highly Localized Acoustic Streaming and Size-Selective Submicrometer Particle Concentration Using High Frequency Microscale Focused Acoustic Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, David J; Ma, Zhichao; Ai, Ye

    2016-05-17

    Concentration and separation of particles and biological specimens are fundamental functions of micro/nanofluidic systems. Acoustic streaming is an effective and biocompatible way to create rapid microscale fluid motion and induce particle capture, though the >100 MHz frequencies required to directly generate acoustic body forces on the microscale have traditionally been difficult to generate and localize in a way that is amenable to efficient generation of streaming. Moreover, acoustic, hydrodynamic, and electrical forces as typically applied have difficulty manipulating specimens in the submicrometer regime. In this work, we introduce highly focused traveling surface acoustic waves (SAW) at high frequencies between 193 and 636 MHz for efficient and highly localized production of acoustic streaming vortices on microfluidic length scales. Concentration occurs via a novel mechanism, whereby the combined acoustic radiation and streaming field results in size-selective aggregation in fluid streamlines in the vicinity of a high-amplitude acoustic beam, as opposed to previous acoustic radiation induced particle concentration where objects typically migrate toward minimum pressure locations. Though the acoustic streaming is induced by a traveling wave, we are able to manipulate particles an order of magnitude smaller than possible using the traveling wave force alone. We experimentally and theoretically examine the range of particle sizes that can be captured in fluid streamlines using this technique, with rapid particle concentration demonstrated down to 300 nm diameters. We also demonstrate that locations of trapping and concentration are size-dependent, which is attributed to the combined effects of the acoustic streaming and acoustic forces.

  12. Lexical knowledge of Serbian L1 English L2 learners: Reception vs. production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović-Jeremić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of lexical knowledge in a second/foreign language is often investigated by means of vocabulary size tests which assess two aspects of the learners' competence: reception and production. Estimates of these two dimensions, as well as the (potential gap between them, have important pedagogical implications in that they indicate the degree to which the learners can comprehend or use the language autonomously. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to explore the vocabulary size of three generations of B2-level L2 learners (CEFR, first-year students majoring in English at the Faculty of Philology and Arts in Kragujevac, Serbia, by means of Vocabulary Levels Tests (Laufer & Nation, 1999; Nation, 1990. The results of the statistical analyses show that the receptive vocabulary of Serbian L2 learners is much more developed than their productive vocabulary, and that the gap between lexical production and reception changes depending on the frequency of the lexemes and the proficiency level of L2 learners. The findings imply that, at the primary and secondary level of education, more attention should be paid to the development of productive lexical knowledge which is crucial not only for success in English degree courses but communication in English in general.

  13. SINs and SOMs: Neural microcircuits for size tuning in the zebrafish and mouse visual pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Barker

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In many animals, a fast and reliable circuit for discriminating between predator-sized objects and edible (prey-sized objects is necessary for survival. How are receptive fields in visual brain areas organized to extract information about size? Recent studies from the zebrafish optic tectum and the mouse visual cortex suggest de novo shaping of receptive fields by subtypes of inhibitory neurons. Del Bene et al. (2010 describe a population of GABAergic neurons in the zebrafish optic tectum (Superficial Interneurons, SINs that are necessary for size filtering during prey capture. Adesnik et al. (2012 describe a somatostatin-expressing interneuron population (SOMs that confers surround suppression on layer II/III pyramidal cells in mouse V1. Strikingly both the SINs and the SOMs, display size-dependent response properties. Increasing visual stimulus size increases excitatory input to these neurons. Dampening SIN or SOM activity alters tuning of neighboring circuits such that they lose preference for small objects. Both results provide exciting evidence for mechanisms of size filtering in visual circuits. Here we review the roles of the SINs and the SOMs and speculate on the similarity of such spatial filters across species.

  14. Effect of wedge filter and field size on photoneutron dose equivalent for an 18 MV photon beam of a medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesbahi, Asghar [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: asgharmesbahi@yahoo.com; Keshtkar, Ahmad [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Ehsan [Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadzadeh, Mohammad [Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Photoneutrons produced during radiation therapy with high energy photons is the main source of unwanted out-of-field received doses of patients. To analyze the neutron dose equivalent (NDE) for wedged beams and its variation with field size, Monte Carlo (MC) modeling of an 18 MV photon beam was performed using MCNPX MC code. The results revealed that the NDE is on average 6.5 times higher for wedged beams. For open beams, the NDE decreased with increasing field size especially for field sizes >20x20 cm{sup 2}. While, for wedged beams, the NDE increased with field size. It was suggested that the increase of NDE for wedged beams should be taken into account in radiation-induced secondary cancer risk estimations and radiation protection calculations.

  15. Direct broadcast satellite-radio: Portable and mobile reception trade-offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golshan, Nasser

    1991-09-01

    There has been considerable international effort in the areas of system studies, system development, and regulatory work for a Direct Broadcast Satellite Radio (DBS-R). An important milestone will be the 1992 World Radio Administrative Conference (WARC 1992) consideration of frequency allocation in the 500 - 3000 MHz range for such a service. There is an interagency agreement between Voice of America and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for a coordinated program in DBS-R. This program includes seven tasks: systems tradeoff studies, propagation measurements, satellite experiment and demonstration, receiver development, market studies, regulatory studies, and WARC preparations. The findings of ongoing work under the first task, systems tradeoff studies, are discussed. Topics covered include digital bit rate and audio quality, propagation considerations and link margin estimates for portable reception, link margin estimates for mobile reception, coverage, and satellite size and cost estimates for a regional DBS-R coverage example.

  16. Influence of transplant size on the above- and below-ground performance of four contrasting field-grown lettuce cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Julie Kerbiriou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims: Modern lettuce cultivars underperform under conditions of variable temporal and spatial resource availability, common in organic or low-input production systems. Information is scarce on the impact of below-ground traits on such resource acquisition and performance of field-grown lettuce; exploring genetic variation in such traits might contribute to strategies to select for cultivars robust enough to perform well in the field, even under stress.Methods: To investigate the impact of below-ground (root development and resource capture on above-ground (shoot weight, leaf area traits, different combinations of shoot and root growth were created using transplants of different sizes in three field experiments. Genetic variation in morphological and physiological below- and above-ground responses to different types of transplant shocks was assessed using four cultivars. Results: Transplanting over-developed seedling did not affect final yield of any of the four cultivars. Small transplant size persistently impacted growth and delayed maturity. The cultivars with overall larger root weights and rooting depth, ‘Matilda’ and ‘Pronto’, displayed a slightly higher growth rate in the linear phase leading to better yields than ‘Mariska’ which had a smaller root system and a slower linear growth despite a higher maximal exponential growth rate. ‘Nadine’, which had the highest physiological nitrogen-use efficiency (NUE, g dry matter produced per g N accumulated in the head among the tested cultivars, gave most stable yields over seasons and locations. Conclusions: Robustness was conferred by a large root system exploring deep soil layers. More roots generally correlated with improved nitrate capture in a soil layer and cultivars with a larger root system may therefore perform better in harsh environmental conditions; increased NUE can also confer robustness at low cost for the plant, and secure stable yields under a wide

  17. Development of a field-portable small-size impedance analyzer for structural health monitoring using the electromechanical impedance technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Xu, Buli

    2004-07-01

    Electromechanical (E/M) impedance method is emerging as an effective and powerful technique for structural health monitoring. The E/M impedance method utilizes as its main apparatus an impedance analyzer that reads the in-situ E/M impedance of piezoelectric wafer active sensors (PWAS) attached to the monitored structure. Laboratory-type impedance analyzers (e.g. HP4194) are bulky, heavy, and expensive. They cannot be easily carried into the field for on-site structural health monitoring. To address this issue, means of to reduce the size of the impedance analyzer making the impedance analyzer more compact and field-portable are explored. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to the development of a field-portable small-size impedance analyzer for structural health monitoring using the electromechanical impedance technique. Our approach consists of several developmental stages. First, we perform a simulation of the E/M Impedance technique and develop the software tools for analyzing the signal in a fast and efficient way while maintaining the desired accuracy. The objective of this signal processing part is to obtain the complex impedance, ZR+iZI)=|Z| angle arg Z, at a number of frequencies in a predetermined range. Several signal processing methods were explored such as: (a) integration method; (b) correlation method; (c) Discrete Fourier transform (DFT) method. Second, we discuss the hardware issues associated with the implementation of this approach. The hardware system architecture consists of several blocks: (a) reference signal generation; (b) voltage and current measurements; and (c) digital signal acquisition and processing. Practical results obtained during proof-of-concept experiments are presented and comparatively examined.

  18. Seed Size, the Only Factor Positively Affecting Direct Seeding Success in an Abandoned Field in Quebec, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick St-Denis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Direct tree seeding is potentially an economical technique for restoring forests on abandoned fields. However, the success of tree establishment depends on many factors related to species and seed characteristics, environmental conditions, competition and predation. We compared seedling emergence, survival and growth of six tree species of different seed sizes in a forest restoration project of abandoned fields. Species were seeded in plots with and without herbaceous vegetation and with and without protection from bird and mammal predation. Yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis did not emerge in all treatments, paper birch (Betula papyrifera and tamarack (Larix laricina had a seedling emergence rate lower than 1%, and sugar maple (Acer saccharum had a low overall emergence rate of 6%. Seedling emergence reached 57% for northern red oak (Quercus rubra and 34% for red pine (Pinus resinosa, but survival of oak after one year was much higher (92% than pine seedlings (16%. Overall, protection from birds and mammals and elimination of the herbaceous vegetation cover had no detectable effects on seedling emergence, survival and height. Nonetheless, red oak seedlings growing in the presence of vegetation had a smaller diameter and shoot biomass and a larger specific leaf area. We conclude that only large seeded species, such as oak, should be used for forest restoration of abandoned fields by direct seeding in our region.

  19. Evaluation of collapsed cone convolution superposition (CCCS algorithms in prowess treatment planning system for calculating symmetric and asymmetric field size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Dawod

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This work investigated the accuracy of prowess treatment planning system (TPS in dose calculation in a homogenous phantom for symmetric and asymmetric field sizes using collapse cone convolution / superposition algorithm (CCCS. Methods: The measurements were carried out at source-to-surface distance (SSD set to 100 cm for 6 and 10 MV photon beams. Data for a full set of measurements for symmetric fields and asymmetric fields, including inplane and crossplane profiles at various depths and percentage depth doses (PDDs were obtained during measurements on the linear accelerator.Results: The results showed that the asymmetric collimation dose lead to significant errors (up to approximately 7% in dose calculations if changes in primary beam intensity and beam quality. It is obvious that the most difference in the isodose curves was found in buildup and the penumbra regions. Conclusion: The results showed that the dose calculation using Prowess TPS based on CCCS algorithm is generally in excellent agreement with measurements.

  20. Receptivity to Tobacco Advertising and Susceptibility to Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, John P; Sargent, James D; White, Martha M; Borek, Nicolette; Portnoy, David B; Green, Victoria R; Kaufman, Annette R; Stanton, Cassandra A; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Strong, David R; Pearson, Jennifer L; Coleman, Blair N; Leas, Eric; Noble, Madison L; Trinidad, Dennis R; Moran, Meghan B; Carusi, Charles; Hyland, Andrew; Messer, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Non-cigarette tobacco marketing is less regulated and may promote cigarette smoking among adolescents. We quantified receptivity to advertising for multiple tobacco products and hypothesized associations with susceptibility to cigarette smoking. Wave 1 of the nationally representative PATH (Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health) study interviewed 10 751 adolescents who had never used tobacco. A stratified random selection of 5 advertisements for each of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, smokeless products, and cigars were shown from 959 recent tobacco advertisements. Aided recall was classified as low receptivity, and image-liking or favorite ad as higher receptivity. The main dependent variable was susceptibility to cigarette smoking. Among US youth, 41% of 12 to 13 year olds and half of older adolescents were receptive to at least 1 tobacco advertisement. Across each age group, receptivity to advertising was highest for e-cigarettes (28%-33%) followed by cigarettes (22%-25%), smokeless tobacco (15%-21%), and cigars (8%-13%). E-cigarette ads shown on television had the highest recall. Among cigarette-susceptible adolescents, receptivity to e-cigarette advertising (39.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 37.9%-41.6%) was higher than for cigarette advertising (31.7%; 95% CI: 29.9%-33.6%). Receptivity to advertising for each tobacco product was associated with increased susceptibility to cigarette smoking, with no significant difference across products (similar odds for both cigarette and e-cigarette advertising; adjusted odds ratio = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.09-1.37). A large proportion of US adolescent never tobacco users are receptive to tobacco advertising, with television advertising for e-cigarettes having the highest recall. Receptivity to advertising for each non-cigarette tobacco product was associated with susceptibility to smoke cigarettes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. A mixed framework for new media art reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Filimowicz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this essay I propose a theoretical assemblage integrating several discursive perspectives towards audience reception in the context of new media art creation, with a focus on sonic works. After reviewing the historical origins of reception theory in reader response and its later appropriation by communication and cultural studies, I argue that a mixed discursive perspective offers a potential refinement of contemporary reception theory as applicable to new media production, in which technological abstractions and complexities may be rich for purposes of production, but fall short in appreciation and communicative value for an audience

  2. "IN ALL ITS HIDEOUS AND APPALLING NAKEDNESS AND TRUTH": THE RECEPTION OF SOME ANATOMICAL COLLECTIONS IN GEORGIAN AND VICTORIAN ENGLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talairach-Vielmas, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the reception of some anatomical collections in Georgian and Victorian England. Both private medical museums and public anatomical museums reflected the central role played by anatomy in medical knowledge and education in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. However, because they were associated with death and sexuality, anatomical museums were both products of enlightenment science and potentially immoral loci likely to corrupt young and innocent women. But, as this article shows, the reasons behind the hostile receptions of some collections varied throughout the centuries, revealing in so doing the gradual professionalization of the medical field and growing monopoly of medical professionals over medical knowledge.

  3. Low oral receptivity for dengue type 2 viruses of Aedes albopictus from Southeast Asia compared with that of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazeille, Marie; Rosen, Leon; Mousson, Laurence; Failloux, Anna-Bella

    2003-02-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever has been a major health problem in Asia since the 1950s. During this period, the former principal vector of dengue viruses in Asia, Aedes albopictus, was replaced by Aedes aegypti in most major cities of the area. Ae. aegypti is now considered the main vector of dengue viruses in Asia. Surprisingly, however, this mosquito has been described as having a relatively low oral receptivity for dengue viruses compared with Ae. albopictus. In the present study, we compared the relative oral receptivities of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus collected in southeast Asia from both sympatric and allopatric breeding sites. In all instances, the oral receptivity of Ae. aegypti to the dengue type 2 virus used was significantly higher than that of Ae. albopictus. We also compared the relative oral receptivity of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus for two other low-passage strains of dengue 2. In all instances, Ae. aegypti was significantly more receptive than Ae. albopictus. It should be noted, however, that the difference was found only for Ae. albopictus recently collected from the field (Ta Promh strain, Cambodia, 2001) and not for an Ae. albopictus strain that had been colonized for many years (Oahu strain, Hawaii, 1971). We also observed a significant increase in the infection rate of Ae. albopictus of the Ta Promh strain with increasing generations in the laboratory. These observations demonstrate the importance of considering the colonization history of mosquitoes when assessing their susceptibility to infection with dengue viruses and, perhaps, other arboviruses.

  4. Everyday Citizenship: Identity Claims and Their Reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Hopkins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Citizenship involves being able to speak and be heard as a member of the community. This can be a formal right (e.g., a right to vote. It can also be something experienced in everyday life. However, the criteria for being judged a fellow member of the community are multiple and accorded different weights by different people. Thus, although one may self-define alongside one’s fellows, the degree to which these others reciprocate depends on the weight they give to various membership criteria. This suggests we approach everyday community membership in terms of an identity claims-making process in which first, an individual claims membership through invoking certain criteria of belonging, and second, others evaluate that claim. Pursuing this logic we report three experiments investigating the reception of such identity-claims. Study 1 showed that in Scotland a claim to membership of the national ingroup was accepted more if couched in terms of place of birth and ancestry rather than just in terms of one’s subjective identification. Studies 2 and 3 showed that this differential acceptance mattered for the claimant’s ability to be heard as a community member. We discuss the implications of these studies for the conceptualization of community membership and the realization of everyday citizenship rights.

  5. Educational pamphlets on health: a reception study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Évelyn Aparecida Nascimento

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES Identifying the socioeconomic and cultural profile of users/readers of educational pamphlets, characterizing the context of the reading material and people involved; describing the user/reader evaluation on language and style used, as well as content range or limitations, and its characterization as an educational material in assisting users for meeting homecare demands. METHOD A reception, cross-sectional, qualitative study. 27 respondents who had received five educational pamphlets were interviewed on Oncology signs and symptoms during primary care consultations. RESULTS Study participants were adults, with average schooling of more than 10 years and low income. Pamphlets were assessed as appropriate for consistent language, quantity and quality of content, and especially in relation to the capacity of helping in the homecare decision making process. The importance of receiving pamphlets at the initial stage of the disease was verified. CONCLUSION Users acceptance was positive and the study revealed aspects that should be reinforced in the creation of educational pamphlets.

  6. Middle Byzantine Historiography: Tradition, Innovation, and Reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staffan Wahlgren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of Greek historical writing of the Middle Byzantine period (approx. 800 until 1000 A.D., with a particular focus on the major chronicles, such as Theophanesthe Confessor (early 9th c., George the Monk (probably late 9th c., and Symeon the Logothete (second half of the 10th c.. On the one hand, it is discussed how the chroniclers engage with tradition and either accept it or reject it. Acceptance of tradition is illustrated by many cases where chroniclers keep very close to the narrative modes of their predecessors and in particular where they copy them extensively. Rejection of, or at least deviation from tradition is illustrated by many cases where new narrative techniques and modes of expression are apparent. Particular attention is paid to some aspects of narrative technique which seem to be innovative. In short, there seems to be an increased tendency towards greater logical (and hence, narrative coherence in the chronicles and an increased tendency towards concentration on a small number of settings, issues and persons (in particular, there is an increased concentration on the Capital of Constantinople and the Emperor’s person. Further, reception is discussed, and especially how Middle Byzantine historical texts were read and used in later writings, including the Slavic literatures. The need for further research in order to understand the transmission processes, especially in the form of the philological study of manuscripts, is stressed.

  7. Experimental measurement of radiological penumbra associated with intermediate energy x-rays (1 MV) and small radiosurgery field sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brian M; Beachey, David J; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2007-10-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is used to treat intracranial lesions with a high degree of accuracy. At the present time, x-ray energies at or above Co-60 gamma rays are used. Previous Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated that intermediate energy x-ray photons or IEPs (defined to be photons in the energy range of 0.2-1.2 MeV), combined with small field sizes, produce a reduced radiological penumbra leading to a sharper dose gradient, improved dose homogeneity and sparing of critical anatomy adjacent to the target volume. This hypothesis is based on the fact that, for small x-ray fields, a dose outside the treatment volume is dictated mainly by the range of electrons set into motion by x-ray photons. The purpose of this work is: (1) to produce intermediate energy x rays using a detuned medical linear accelerator, (2) to characterize the energy of this beam, (3) to measure the radiological penumbra for IEPs and small fields to compare with that produced by 6 MV x rays or Co-60, and (4) to compare these experimental measurements with Monte Carlo computer simulations. The maximum photon energy of our IEP x-ray spectrum was measured to be 1.2 MeV. Gafchromic EBT films (ISP Technologies, Wayne, NJ) were irradiated and read using a novel digital microscopy imaging system with high spatial resolution. Under identical irradiation conditions the measured radiological penumbra widths (80%-20% distance), for field sizes ranging from 0.3 x 0.3 to 4.0 x 4.0 cm2, varied from 0.3-0.77 mm (1.2 MV) and from 1.1-2.1 mm (6 MV). Even more dramatic were the differences found when comparing the 90%-10% or the 95%-5% widths, which are in fact more significant in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulations agreed well with the experimental findings. The reduction in radiological penumbra could be substantial for specific clinical situations such as in the treatment of an ocular melanoma abutting the macula or for the treatment of functional disorders such as trigeminal neuralgia (a nonlethal

  8. Influence of aggregate sizes and microstructures on bioremediation assessment of field-contaminated soils in pilot-scale biopiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W.; Akbari, A.; Frigon, D.; Ghoshal, S.

    2011-12-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soils and groundwater is an environmental concern. Bioremediation has been frequently considered a cost-effective, less disruptive remedial technology. Formation of soil aggregate fractions in unsaturated soils is generally believed to hinder aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation due to the slow intra-pore diffusion of nutrients and oxygen within the aggregate matrix and to the reduced bioavailability of hydrocarbons. On the other hand, soil aggregates may harbour favourable niches for indigenous bacteria, providing protective microsites against various in situ environmental stresses. The size of the soil aggregates is likely to be a critical factor for these processes and could be interpreted as a relevant marker for biodegradation assessment. There have been only limited attempts in the past to assess petroleum hydrocarbon biodegradation in unsaturated soils as a function of aggregate size. This study is aimed at investigating the roles of aggregate sizes and aggregate microstructures on biodegradation activity. Field-aged, contaminated, clayey soils were shipped from Norman Wells, Canada. Attempts were made to stimulate indigenous microbial activity by soil aeration and nutrient amendments in a pilot-scale biopile tank (1m L×0.65m W×0.3 m H). A control biopile was maintained without the nutrient amendment but was aerated. The initial concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons in the field-contaminated soils increased with increasing aggregate sizes, which were classified in three fractions: micro- (250-2000 μm) and macro-aggregates (>2000 μm). Compared to the TPH analyses at whole-soil level, the petroleum hydrocarbon analyses based on the aggregate-size levels demonstrated more clearly the extent of biodegradation of non-volatile, heavier hydrocarbons (C16-C34) in the soil. The removal of the C16-C34 hydrocarbons was 44% in macro-aggregates, but only 13% in meso-aggregates. The increased protein concentrations in macro

  9. Phase-field simulations of the impact of bimodal pore size distributions on solid-state densification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Bruce E.; Millett, Paul C.

    2017-08-01

    The densification behavior of a porous body subjected to elevated temperature is relevant to many nuclear fuel performance metrics. The diffusional processes that govern such densification occur on microscopic length scales, and depend on the type of material and the nature of the porosity. In this study, we explore how bimodal pore size distributions impact diffusion-based densification relative to monomodal pore sizes for a given overall value of porosity. We utilize a Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model implemented with the MOOSE framework to simulate densification evolution with a range of overall porosities and a variety of porosity distributions between small and large pores. The results demonstrate that bimodal porosity can resist densification to a much greater extent than monomodal porosity. These findings have implications for the microstructural design of metallic nuclear fuels, in which an initial, bimodal porosity may resist early-stage densification and therefore provide collection sites for fission gases, thus reducing in-pile fission gas swelling.

  10. THE SIZE EVOLUTION OF PASSIVE GALAXIES: OBSERVATIONS FROM THE WIDE-FIELD CAMERA 3 EARLY RELEASE SCIENCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, R. E. Jr. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); McCarthy, P. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institute of Washington, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cohen, S. H.; Rutkowski, M. J.; Mechtley, M. R.; Windhorst, R. A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Yan, H. [Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Hathi, N. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Koekemoer, A. M.; Bond, H. E.; Bushouse, H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); O' Connell, R. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Balick, B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Calzetti, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Crockett, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Disney, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Dopita, M. A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Frogel, J. A. [Galaxies Unlimited, Lutherville, MD 21093 (United States); Hall, D. N. B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Holtzman, J. A., E-mail: rryan@physics.ucdavis.edu [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); and others

    2012-04-10

    We present the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at z {approx} 2 identified in Wide-Field Camera 3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample was constructed using an analog to the passive BzK galaxy selection criterion, which isolates galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation at z {approx}> 1.5. We identify 30 galaxies in {approx}40 arcmin{sup 2} to H < 25 mag. By fitting the 10-band Hubble Space Telescope photometry from 0.22 {mu}m {approx}< {lambda}{sub obs} {approx}< 1.6 {mu}m with stellar population synthesis models, we simultaneously determine photometric redshift, stellar mass, and a bevy of other population parameters. Based on the six galaxies with published spectroscopic redshifts, we estimate a typical redshift uncertainty of {approx}0.033(1 + z). We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical point-spread function. By supplementing our data with published samples, we propose a mass-dependent size evolution model for passively evolving galaxies, where the most massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) undergo the strongest evolution from z {approx} 2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1 + z){sup -{alpha}}, we find a tentative scaling of {alpha} Almost-Equal-To (- 0.6 {+-} 0.7) + (0.9 {+-} 0.4)log (M{sub *}/10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }), where the relatively large uncertainties reflect the poor sampling in stellar mass due to the low numbers of high-redshift systems. We discuss the implications of this result for the redshift evolution of the M{sub *}-R{sub e} relation for red galaxies.

  11. Surface-Borne Time-of-Reception Measurements (STORM) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Invocon proposes the Surface-borne Time-Of-Reception Measurements (STORM) system as a method to locate the position of lightning strikes on aerospace vehicles....

  12. Review: Current writing: Text and reception in Southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Combrink

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available Current writing: Text and reception in Southern Africa. (Published by the University of Natal under the joint editorship of Margaret Lenta, Michael Chapman, Margaret Daymond and Johan U. Jacobs. Volume 1, 1989 - editor: Margaret Lenta

  13. Dc SQUIDs with sub-micron-sized Nb/HfTi/Nb Josephson junctions for operation in high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, Joachim; Konovalenko, Konstantin; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter [Physikalisches Institut - Experimentalphysik II, Center for Collective Quantum Phenomena and their Applications, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, D-72076 (Germany); Kieler, Oliver; Kohlmann, Johannes; Zorin, Alexander [Fachbereich 2.4 ' ' Quantenelektronik' ' , Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the suitability of dc superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) for operation in high magnetic fields (up to B{approx}100 mT) at temperature T=4.2 K. The micro SQUIDs with superconductor (S)-normal metal (N)-superconductor (S) sub-micrometer Josephson junctions were realized using Nb electrodes and HfTi for the normal interlayer. Our fabrication technology combines e-beam lithography and chemical-mechanical polishing which enables junction sizes down to 200 nm x 200 nm, integrated into small superconductor rings with inner dimensions down to 0.5 {mu} m x 0.5 {mu} m. The characteristic voltage of the SNS junctions is typically 30-40 {mu}V with a McCumber parameter {beta}{sub C}<0.1, and a screening parameter of the SQUIDs {beta}{sub L}{approx}0.2. The SQUIDs where characterized by measurements of electric transport and noise (using a Nb dc SQUID amplifier) in a magnetically shielded environment as well as in high magnetic fields. The SQUIDs show very low flux noise which is a major prerequisite for their application as detectors for magnetic properties of nanoparticles.

  14. Receptive Vocabulary and Cognition of Elderly People in Institutional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahimagic, Amela; Zunic, Lejla Junuzovic; Ibrahimagic, Omer C; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Rasidovic, Mirsada

    2017-06-01

    Basic cognitive functions such as: alertness, working memory, long term memory and perception, as well as higher levels of cognitive functions like: speech and language, decision-making and executive functions are affected by aging processes. Relations between the receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning, and the manifestation of differences between populations of elderly people based on the primary disease is in the focus of this study. To examine receptive vocabulary and cognition of elderly people with: verified stroke, dementia, verified stroke and dementia, and without the manifested brain disease. The sample consisted of 120 participants older than 65 years, living in an institution. A total of 26 variables was analyzed and classified into three groups: case history/anamnestic, receptive vocabulary assessment, and cognitive assessments. The interview with social workers, nurses and caregivers, as well as medical files were used to determine the anamnestic data. A Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA) was used for the assessment of cognition. In order to estimate the receptive vocabulary, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was used. Mean raw score of receptive vocabulary is 161.58 (+-21:58 points). The best results for cognitive assessment subjects achieved on subscales of orientation, naming, serial subtraction, and delayed recall. Discriminative analysis showed the significant difference in the development of receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning in relation to the primary disease of elderly people. The biggest difference was between subjects without manifested brain disease (centroid = 1.900) and subjects with dementia (centroid = -1754). There is a significant difference between elderly with stroke; dementia; stroke and dementia, and elderly people without manifested disease of the brain in the domain of receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning. Variables of serial subtraction, standardized test results of receptive vocabulary

  15. The Use of Meaningful Reception Learning in Lesson on Classification

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This paper begins with a learning theory of instruction. It describes how Meaningful Reception Learning can be used to teach in classification of items. Meaningful Reception Learning is a learning theory of instruction proposed by Ausubel who believed that learners can learn best when the new material being taught can be anchored into existing cognitive information in the learners. He also proposed the use of advance organizers as representations of the facts of the lesson. ...

  16. Receptivity to alcohol marketing predicts initiation of alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lisa; Feighery, Ellen C; Schleicher, Nina C; Fortmann, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined the influence of alcohol advertising and promotions on the initiation of alcohol use. A measure of receptivity to alcohol marketing was developed from research about tobacco marketing. Recall and recognition of alcohol brand names were also examined. Data were obtained from in-class surveys of sixth, seventh, and eighth graders at baseline and 12-month follow-up. Participants who were classified as never drinkers at baseline (n = 1,080) comprised the analysis sample. Logistic regression models examined the association of advertising receptivity at baseline with any alcohol use and current drinking at follow-up, adjusting for multiple risk factors, including peer alcohol use, school performance, risk taking, and demographics. At baseline, 29% of never drinkers either owned or wanted to use an alcohol branded promotional item (high receptivity), 12% students named the brand of their favorite alcohol ad (moderate receptivity), and 59% were not receptive to alcohol marketing. Approximately 29% of adolescents reported any alcohol use at follow-up; 13% reported drinking at least 1 or 2 days in the past month. Never drinkers who reported high receptivity to alcohol marketing at baseline were 77% more likely to initiate drinking by follow-up than those were not receptive. Smaller increases in the odds of alcohol use at follow-up were associated with better recall and recognition of alcohol brand names at baseline. Alcohol advertising and promotions are associated with the uptake of drinking. Prevention programs may reduce adolescents' receptivity to alcohol marketing by limiting their exposure to alcohol ads and promotions and by increasing their skepticism about the sponsors' marketing tactics.

  17. Digital neuromorphic processing for a simplified algorithm of ultrasonic reception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Lin; Clarke, Chris

    2001-05-01

    Previously, most mammalian auditory systems research has concentrated on human sensory perception whose frequencies are lower than 20 kHz. The implementations almost always used analog VLSI design. Due to the complexity of the model, it is difficult to implement these algorithms using current digital technology. This paper introduces a simplified model of biosonic reception system in bats and its implementation in the ``Chiroptera Inspired Robotic CEphaloid'' (CIRCE) project. This model consists of bandpass filters, a half-wave rectifier, low-pass filters, automatic gain control, and spike generation with thresholds. Due to the real-time requirements of the system, the system employs Butterworth filters and advanced field programmable gate array (FPGA) architectures to provide a viable solution. The ultrasonic signal processing is implemented on a Xilinx FPGA Virtex II device in real time. In the system, 12-bit input echo signals from receivers are sampled at 1 M samples per second for a signal frequency range from 20 to 200 kHz. The system performs a 704-channel per ear auditory pipeline operating in real time. The output of the system is a coded time series of threshold crossing points. Comparing hardware implementation with fixed-point software, the system shows significant performance gains with no loss of accuracy.

  18. Field assessment of the impacts of landscape structure on different-sized airborne particles in residential areas of Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuxin; Li, Xiaopeng; Han, Jing; Cao, Yu; Dong, Li

    2017-10-01

    In high-density metropolis, residential areas are important human living environments. Aimed at investigating the impacts of landscape structure on the levels of different-sized airborne particle in residential areas, we conducted field monitoring of the levels of TSP, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 using mobile traverses in 18 residential areas during the daytime in winter (Dec. 2015-Feb. 2016) and summer (Jun.-Aug. 2016) in Beijing, China. The net concentration differences (d) of the four-sized particles (dTSP, dPM10, dPM2.5 and dPM1) between residential environments and nearby corresponding urban backgrounds, which can be regarded as the reduction of particle concentration in residential environments, were calculated. The effects and relative contributions of different landscape structure parameters on these net concentration differences were further investigated. Results showed that the distribution of particle concentrations has great spatial variation in urban environments. Within the residential environment, there were overall lower concentrations of the four-sized particles compared with the nearby urban background. The net concentration differences of the four-sized particles were all significantly different among the 18 studied residential areas. The average dTSP, dPM10, dPM2.5 and dPM1 reached 18.92, 12.28, 2.01 and 0.53 μg/m3 in summer, and 9.91, 7.81, 1.39 and 0.38 μg/m3 in winter, respectively. The impacts and relative contribution of different landscape structure parameters on the reductions of TSP, PM10, PM2.5 and PM1 in residential environments differed and showed seasonal variation. Percentage of vegetation cover (PerVC) and building cover (PerBC) had the greatest impact. A 10% increase in PerVC would increase about 5.03, 8.15, 2.16 and 0.20 μg/m3 of dTSP, dPM10, dPM2.5 and dPM1 in summer, and a 10% increase in PerBC would decreased about 41.37, 16.54, 2.47 and 0.95 μg/m3 of them in winter. Increased vegetation coverage and decreased building

  19. Compressibility effects on the non-linear receptivity of boundary layers to dielectric barrier discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denison, Marie F. C.

    The reduction of drag and aerodynamic heating caused by boundary layer transition is of central interest for the development of hypersonic vehicles. Receptivity to flow perturbation in the form of Tollmien-Schlichting (TS) wave growth often determines the first stage of the transition process, which can be delayed by depositing specific excitations into the boundary layer. Weakly ionized Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) actuators are being investigated as possible sources of such excitations, but little is known today about their interaction with high-speed flows. In this framework, the first part of the thesis is dedicated to a receptivity study of laminar compressible boundary layers over a flat plate by linear stability analysis following an adjoint operator formulation, under DBD representative excitations assumed independent of flow conditions. The second part of the work concentrates on the development of a coupled plasma-Navier and Stokes solver targeted at the study of supersonic flow and compressibility effects on DBD forcing and non-parallel receptivity. The linear receptivity study of quasi-parallel compressible flows reveals several interesting features such as a significant shift of the region of maximum receptivity deeper into the flow at high Mach number and strong wave amplitude reduction compared to incompressible flows. The response to DBD relevant excitation distributions and to variations of the base flow conditions and system length scales follows these trends. Observed absolute amplitude changes and relative sensitivity modifications between source types are related to the evolution of the offset between forcing peak profile and relevant adjoint mode maximum. The analysis highlights the crucial importance of designing and placing the actuator in a way that matches its force field to the position of maximum boundary layer receptivity for the specific flow conditions of interest. In order to address the broad time and length scale spectrum

  20. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  1. STIGMA RECEPTIVITY AND POLLEN VIABILITY OF Melaleuca alternifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Baskorowati

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Stigma  receptivity based on seed set and pollen  tubes growth  following controlled pollination of flowers  of different  ages was examined  in Melaleuca alternifolia. The stigma secretion during 10 days after anthesis and pollen viability under three different temperatures and five storage times were also observed. These series of research were undertaken because successful controlled pollination of M. alternifolia depends on the application of viable pollen to the receptive compatible  stigma. The objective of this research was therefore to determine the stigma receptivity and pollen viability of M. alternifolia. Results showed that the stigma receptivity began to develop  on day  one and finished  on day  seven after anthesis,  peak receptivity occurred from day three to day six. The stigma receptivity also coincides with the appearance of secretion in the stigma, occurring  from day three to day seven after anthesis. Therefore,  the time for pollination of M. alternifolia appeared to extend for  approximately 7 days after anthesis. Data for M. alternifolia showed that regardless of storage temperature, pollen  was still  viable  after 26 weeks  of storage;  results also demonstrated  that the lowest temperature  (-18oC was the best regime for long term storage.

  2. [Visual interneurons, sensitive to the size of objects and the direction of their movement in dragonflies of the genus Sympetrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrushov, P A; Frantsevich, L I

    1976-01-01

    Experiments have been made on 4 dragonfly species -- Sympetrum vulgatum, S. flaveolum, S sanguineum, S. danae. A pair of neurons was found in the thoracic ganglia and connectives, which has symmetrical contralateral receptive fields. These neurons are selectively sensitive to swift upward motion of a target of 3--10 degrees in size. This type of response was originally described by Zenkin and Pigarev [1, 2]. The receptive field, 120X25 degrees in size, is oriented horizontally from the medial rim of the eye. The center of sensitivity has the following polar coordinates: 15 degrees laterally from the medial plane and 20 degrees above the equatorial one. The relation of detecting properties of the observed neurones to key stimuli which trigger hunting behaviour is discussed. It is suggested that filtration of single and small optic stimuli by specialized detector neurons results not from the processes in the own receptive field of the neuron, but from the interaction with other neurons which are sensitive to motion of large objects and complex patterns.

  3. Support for non-locking parallel reception of packets belonging to a single memory reception FIFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong [Yorktown Heights, NY; Heidelberger, Philip [Yorktown Heights, NY; Salapura, Valentina [Yorktown Heights, NY; Senger, Robert M [Yorktown Heights, NY; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard [Boeblingen, DE; Sugawara, Yutaka [Yorktown Heights, NY

    2011-01-27

    A method and apparatus for distributed parallel messaging in a parallel computing system. A plurality of DMA engine units are configured in a multiprocessor system to operate in parallel, one DMA engine unit for transferring a current packet received at a network reception queue to a memory location in a memory FIFO (rmFIFO) region of a memory. A control unit implements logic to determine whether any prior received packet destined for that rmFIFO is still in a process of being stored in the associated memory by another DMA engine unit of the plurality, and prevent the one DMA engine unit from indicating completion of storing the current received packet in the reception memory FIFO (rmFIFO) until all prior received packets destined for that rmFIFO are completely stored by the other DMA engine units. Thus, there is provided non-locking support so that multiple packets destined for a single rmFIFO are transferred and stored in parallel to predetermined locations in a memory.

  4. The ecological validity of laboratory cycling: Does body size explain the difference between laboratory- and field-based cycling performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, S A; Nevill, A M; Palmer, G S; Jeukendrup, A E; Doherty, M; Atkinson, G

    2007-01-01

    Previous researchers have identified significant differences between laboratory and road cycling performances. To establish the ecological validity of laboratory time-trial cycling performances, the causes of such differences should be understood. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to quantify differences between laboratory- and road-based time-trial cycling and to establish to what extent body size [mass (m) and height (h)] may help to explain such differences. Twenty-three male competitive, but non-elite, cyclists completed two 25 mile time-trials, one in the laboratory using an air-braked ergometer (Kingcycle) and the other outdoors on a local road course over relatively flat terrain. Although laboratory speed was a reasonably strong predictor of road speed (R2 = 69.3%), a significant 4% difference (P cycling speed was identified (laboratory vs. road speed: 40.4 +/- 3.02 vs. 38.7 +/- 3.55 km x h(-1); mean +/- s). When linear regression was used to predict these differences (Diff) in cycling speeds, the following equation was obtained: Diff (km x h(-1)) = 24.9 - 0.0969 x m - 10.7 x h, R2 = 52.1% and the standard deviation of residuals about the fitted regression line = 1.428 (km . h-1). The difference between road and laboratory cycling speeds (km x h(-1)) was found to be minimal for small individuals (mass = 65 kg and height = 1.738 m) but larger riders would appear to benefit from the fixed resistance in the laboratory compared with the progressively increasing drag due to increased body size that would be experienced in the field. This difference was found to be proportional to the cyclists' body surface area that we speculate might be associated with the cyclists' frontal surface area.

  5. AN ALMA SURVEY OF SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES IN THE EXTENDED CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH: NEAR-INFRARED MORPHOLOGIES AND STELLAR SIZES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Simpson, J. M.; Ma, Cheng-Jiun; Alexander, D. M.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Edge, A. C. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Biggs, A. D.; Ivison, R. J. [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Chapman, S. C. [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 3J5 (Canada); Coppin, K. E. K. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Dannerbauer, H. [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Wien, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria); Greve, T. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Karim, A. [Argelander-Institute for Astronomy, Bonn University, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Schinnerer, E.; Walter, F. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wardlow, J. L. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2015-02-01

    We analyze Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/H {sub 160}-band observations of a sample of 48 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array detected submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South field, to study their stellar morphologies and sizes. We detect 79% ± 17% of the SMGs in the H {sub 160}-band imaging with a median sensitivity of 27.8 mag, and most (80%) of the nondetections are SMGs with 870 μm fluxes of S {sub 870} < 3 mJy. With a surface brightness limit of μ {sub H} ∼ 26 mag arcsec{sup –2}, we find that 82% ± 9% of the H {sub 160}-band-detected SMGs at z = 1-3 appear to have disturbed morphologies, meaning they are visually classified as either irregulars or interacting systems, or both. By determining a Sérsic fit to the H {sub 160} surface brightness profiles, we derive a median Sérsic index of n = 1.2 ± 0.3 and a median half-light radius of r{sub e} = 4.4{sub −0.5}{sup +1.1} kpc for our SMGs at z = 1-3. We also find significant displacements between the positions of the H {sub 160} component and 870 μm emission in these systems, suggesting that the dusty starburst regions and less-obscured stellar distribution are not colocated. We find significant differences in the sizes and the Sérsic index between our z = 2-3 SMGs and z ∼ 2 quiescent galaxies, suggesting that a major transformation of the stellar light profile is needed in the quenching processes if SMGs are progenitors of the red-and-dead z ∼ 2 galaxies. Given the short-lived nature of SMGs, we postulate that the majority of the z = 2-3 SMGs with S {sub 870} ≳ 2 mJy are early/mid-stage major mergers.

  6. Size-dependent particle activation properties in fog during the ParisFog 2012/13 field campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hammer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fog causes a variety of hazards in road traffic, maritime navigation, as well as in air traffic and railway traffic. There is a great demand, e.g. from airports, for more reliable fog forecasts to prevent fog related accidents. Improved fog forecasts require a better understanding of the numerous complex mechanisms during the fog life cycle. During winter 2012/13 a field campaign called ParisFog aiming at fog research took place at SIRTA (Instrumented Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research. SIRTA is located about 20 km southwest of the Paris city centre, France in a semi-urban environment. In situ activation properties of the prevailing fog were investigated by measuring: (1 total and interstitial (non-activated dry particle number size distributions behind two different inlet systems; (2 interstitial hydrated aerosol and fog droplet size distributions at ambient conditions; (3 cloud condensation nuclei (CCN number concentration at different supersaturations (SS with a CCN counter. The aerosol particles were characterized regarding their hygroscopic properties, fog droplet activation behavior and contribution to light scattering for 17 developed fog events. Low particle hygroscopicity with an overall median of hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of 0.14 was found, likely caused by substantial influence from local traffic and wood burning emissions. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution at ambient RH revealed that the critical wet diameter, above which the hydrated aerosols activate to fog droplets, is rather large with a median value of 2.4 μm and is highly variable (ranging from 1 to 5 μm between the different fog events. Thus, the number of activated fog droplets was very small and the non-activated hydrated particles were found to contribute siginificantly to the observed light scattering and thus to the reduction in visibility. Combining all experimental data, the effective peak supersaturation, SSpeak, a measure of the peak

  7. Size-dependent particle activation properties in fog during the ParisFog 2012/13 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, E.; Gysel, M.; Roberts, G. C.; Elias, T.; Hofer, J.; Hoyle, C. R.; Bukowiecki, N.; Dupont, J.-C.; Burnet, F.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2014-04-01

    Fog causes a variety of hazards in road traffic, maritime navigation, as well as in air traffic and railway traffic. There is a great demand, e.g. from airports, for more reliable fog forecasts to prevent fog related accidents. Improved fog forecasts require a better understanding of the numerous complex mechanisms during the fog life cycle. During winter 2012/13 a field campaign called ParisFog aiming at fog research took place at SIRTA (Instrumented Site for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Research). SIRTA is located about 20 km southwest of the Paris city centre, France in a semi-urban environment. In situ activation properties of the prevailing fog were investigated by measuring: (1) total and interstitial (non-activated) dry particle number size distributions behind two different inlet systems; (2) interstitial hydrated aerosol and fog droplet size distributions at ambient conditions; (3) cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration at different supersaturations (SS) with a CCN counter. The aerosol particles were characterized regarding their hygroscopic properties, fog droplet activation behavior and contribution to light scattering for 17 developed fog events. Low particle hygroscopicity with an overall median of hygroscopicity parameter, κ, of 0.14 was found, likely caused by substantial influence from local traffic and wood burning emissions. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution at ambient RH revealed that the critical wet diameter, above which the hydrated aerosols activate to fog droplets, is rather large with a median value of 2.4 μm and is highly variable (ranging from 1 to 5 μm) between the different fog events. Thus, the number of activated fog droplets was very small and the non-activated hydrated particles were found to contribute siginificantly to the observed light scattering and thus to the reduction in visibility. Combining all experimental data, the effective peak supersaturation, SSpeak, a measure of the peak supersaturation

  8. MONTE GENEROSO ROCKFALL FIELD TEST (SWITZERLAND): Real size experiment to constraint 2D and 3D rockfall simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humair, F.; Matasci, B.; Carrea, D.; Pedrazzini, A.; Loye, A.; Pedrozzi, G.; Nicolet, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2012-04-01

    In numerical rockfall simulation, the runout of rockfall is highly dependent of the restitution coefficients which are one of the key parameters to estimate the energy and simulate the rebounds of the blocks during their travel. Restitution coefficients values derived from literature may however not be adapted to every rockfall area as they do not integrate some of the influencing parameters as, among others, block shape rock size, soil cover… The aim is to illustrate how real size rockfall experiment can improve the reliability of computational trajectory simulations of rockfall propagation by calibrating these latter with experiment extracted results. Experimental rockfall tests were performed in the slopes of Monte Generoso area (lat 720850/ long 84830) which is located in the canton of Ticino in south Switzerland above a highway. The field site is a forested area with a thin soil cover on a bedrock characterized by massive carbonates. The elevation ranges between 894m and 322m above see level with a slope of 35 to 40° in the upper part, 60 to 89° in the medium part and 28 to 38° in the lower part. 22 blocks with different size and shape were manually released down, imparting little or no initial velocity. The failing blocks were coloured to make the impacts easier to recognize. The paths of the failing blocks are recorded using two high speed cameras and the impacts of the blocks were sampled using dGNSS. The rockfall trajectories were analysed based on the movies. As the movies have to be referenced in x and y direction, the distance between two known point in the terrain as well as the position of the cameras were measured prior to the blocks throws. Measurements of bounce height, angular and translational velocity (as well as energy) and restitution coefficients (normal kn and tangential kt) were attempt to be deduced from the movies. First, a-priori simulations are compared with the real size experiment throw. Then a-fortiori simulations taking into

  9. SU-E-T-454: Impact of Air Gap On PDDs of 6 MV Photon Beam for Various Field Sizes in Inhomogeneous Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewale, S [Cancer Centers of Southwest Oklahoma, Lawton, OK (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Singh, H [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Islam, M [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Rana, S [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate how the shape of air gap and its size will impact the percent depth doses (PDDs) of a 6MV photon beam for various field sizes. Methods: Two in-house phantoms were manufactured containing rectangular (phantom A) and circular (phantom B) air gaps. Both phantoms A and B were composed of same top layer (solid-water; 30×30cm{sup 2},5cm thickness) and bottom layer (solid-water; 30×30cm {sup 2},8cm thickness), but middle layer was varied to observe air gap effects and scatter contribution to the measurement point. In phantom A, a rectangular shaped air gap (30×30cm{sup 2},7cm thickness) was created by placing Styrofoam blocks between top and bottom layers of the phantom. In phantom B, middle layer was replaced by “inhomogenous block”, composed of acrylic plate (30×30cm{sup 2}, 4cm thickness) followed by PVC(30×30cm{sup 2},3cm thickness). Additionally, circular air gap was created by drilling a hole (diameter=2.8cm, length=7cm) at the center of “inhomogenous block”. In both phantoms, measurement readings were obtained at 13cm depth (i.e., 1cm after air gap) and depth of maximum dose(6MV energy; 100 MUs; field sizes ranged from 3×3cm{sup 2} to 10×10cm{sup 2}). The PDDs at 13cm depth were compared in both phantoms. Results: The measurements in both phantoms A and B showed an almost linear increase in PDDs with increasing field size, especially for smaller field sizes (from 3×3 to 7×7cm{sup 2}). For each field size, the PDD in phantom A was smaller compared to the one in phantom B. The difference in PDDs between two phantoms decreased with an increase in field size as the PDD difference decreased from 9.0% to 6.4%. Conclusion: The shape and size of air gap affect the PDD measurements in secondary build-up region as 6 MV primary beam traverses through the center of air gap. The scatter contribution due to increase in field size was more noticeable for field sizes ≤7×7cm{sup 2}.

  10. In-vivo dosimetry for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2 in shaped beam radiosurgery with microMOSFET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sors, A; Cassol, E; Latorzeff, I; Duthil, P; Sabatier, J; Lotterie, J A; Redon, A; Berry, I; Franceries, X

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate microMOSFET as in-vivo dosimeter in 6 MV shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2. A homemade build-up cap was developed and its use with microMOSFET was evaluated down to 6 × 6 mm2. The study with the homemade build-up cap was performed considering its influence on field size over-cover occurring at surface, achievement of the overall process of electronic equilibrium, dose deposition along beam axis and dose attenuation. An optimized calibration method has been validated using MOSFET in shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes from 98 × 98 down to 18 × 18 mm2. The method was detailed in a previous study and validated in irregular field shapes series measurements performed on a head phantom. The optimized calibration method was applied to microMOSFET equipped with homemade build-up cap down to 6 × 6 mm2. Using the same irregular field shapes, dose measurements were performed on head phantom. MicroMOSFET results were compared to previous MOSFET ones. Additional irregular field shapes down to 8.8 × 8.8 mm2 were studied with microMOSFET. Isocenter dose attenuation due to the homemade build-up cap over the microMOSFET was near 2% irrespective of field size. Our results suggested that microMOSFET equipped with homemade build-up cap is suitable for in-vivo dosimetry in shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2 and therefore that the required build-up cap dimensions to perform entrance in-vivo dosimetry in small-fields have to ensure only partial charge particle equilibrium.

  11. Integral field spectroscopy of nearby QSOs: I. ENLR size-luminosity relation, ongoing star formation & resolved gas-phase metallicities

    CERN Document Server

    Husemann, B; Sánchez, S F; Wisotzki, L; Nugroho, D; Kupko, D; Schramm, M

    2014-01-01

    [abridged] We present optical integral field spectroscopy for a flux-limited sample of 19 QSOs at z<0.2 and spatially resolve their ionized gas properties at a physical resolution of 2-5kpc. The extended narrow line regions (ENLRs), photoionized by the radiation of AGN, have sizes of up to several kpc and correlate more strongly with the QSO continuum luminosity than with the integrated [OIII] luminosity. We find a relation of the form log(r)~(0.46+-0.04)log(L_5100), reinforcing the picture of an approximately constant ionization parameter for the ionized clouds across the ENLR. Besides the ENLR, we also find gas ionized by young massive stars in more than 50 per cent of the galaxies on kpc scales. In more than half of the sample, the specific star formation rates based on the extinction-corrected Ha luminosity are consistent with those of inactive disc-dominated galaxies, even for some bulge-dominated QSO hosts. Enhanced SFRs of up to 70Msun/yr are rare and always associated with signatures of major merge...

  12. Effects of seed size and aging on field performance of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. under different irrigation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A sub-sample of lentil (Lens culinaris ‘Kimia’ seeds was kept as bulk (S1 and another sample was separated to large (S2 and small (S3 seeds. A sub-sample of each size was kept as control or high vigor seed lot (A1 and the two other sub-samples were artificially aged for 2 and 4 days (A2 and A3, respectively. Field performance of these seeds was evaluated during 2011 and 2012. Yield components and grain yield of lentil decreased with decreasing water availability. The highest yield components (except 1000 grain weight and grain yield per unit area were obtained by plants from large seeds. The superiority of plants from large seeds in grain yield was more evident under limited irrigations than under well watering. Seed aging resulted in poor stand establishment and consequently low grain yield per unit area. Plants from aged large seeds showed the lowest reduction in grain yield per unit area, compared with those from aged small and bulk seeds. It seems that cultivation of large seeds somehow can reduce the deleterious effects of drought stress and seed aging on grain yield per unit area of lentil.

  13. Measuring receptive collocational competence across proficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    These limitations range from testing collocational knowledge and another aspect of vocabulary knowledge in the same test battery (e.g. Mochizuki 2002 and Nizonkiza. 2011) to .... with overall proficiency, depth, and vocabulary size tests.

  14. Effect of Field Size and Length of Plantar Spur on Treatment Outcome in Radiation Therapy of Plantar Fasciitis: The Bigger the Better?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Robert Michael, E-mail: hermann@strahlentherapie-westerstede.com [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Meyer, Andreas [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Gemeinschaftspraxis für Strahlentherapie Hildesheim/Goslar (Germany); Becker, Alexandra [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Schneider, Michael [Orthopaedic Centre for Musculoskeletal Research, University of Würzburg (Germany); Reible, Michael; Carl, Ulrich Martin [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Christiansen, Hans [Abteilung Strahlentherapie und Spezielle Onkologie, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover (Germany); Nitsche, Mirko [Zentrum für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen/Westerstede (Germany); Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Karl-Lennert-Krebscentrum, Universität Kiel (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy is well established in the treatment of painful plantar fasciitis or heel spur. A retrospective analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of field definition on treatment outcome and to determine the impact of factors potentially involved. Methods and Materials: A review of treatment data of 250 patients (285 heels) with a mean follow-up time of 11 months showed that complete symptom remission occurred in 38%, partial remission in 32%, and no change in 19% (11% were lost to follow-up). Variables such as radiologic evidence of plantar spurs, their length, radiation dose, field size, age, sex, and onset of pain before administration of radiation therapy were investigated in univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Treatment response depended upon age >53 years, length of heel spur ≤6.5 mm (or no radiologic evidence of a heel spur), and onset of pain <12 months before radiation therapy. Patients with these clinical prerequisites stood a 93% chance of clinical response. Without these prerequisites, only 49% showed any impact. No influence of field size on treatment outcome became evident. Conclusion: Patients with short plantar heel spurs benefit from radiation therapy equally well as patients without any radiologic evidence. Moreover, smaller field sizes have the same positive effect as commonly used large field definitions covering the entire calcaneal bone. This leads to a recommendation of a considerable reduction of field size in future clinical practice.

  15. Larger sizes of massive quiescent early-type galaxies in clusters than in the field at 0.8 < z < 1.5

    CERN Document Server

    Delaye, L; Mei, S; Lidman, C; Licitra, R; Newman, A; Raichoor, A; Shankar, F; Barrientos, F; Bernardi, M; Cerulo, P; Couch, W; Demarco, R; Muñoz, R; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Tanaka, M

    2013-01-01

    [abridged] The mass-size relation of early-type galaxies (ETGs) has been largely studied in the last years to probe the mass assembly of the most massive objects in the Universe. In this paper, we focus on the mass-size relation of quiescent massive ETGs (Mstar/Msol > 3*10^10) living in massive clusters (M200 ~ 10^14 Mstar) at 0.8< z <1.5, as compared to those living in the field at the same epoch. Our sample contains ~ 400 ETGs in clusters and the same number in the field. Therefore, our sample is approximately an order of magnitude larger than previous studies in the same redshift range for galaxy clusters. We find that ETGs living in clusters are between ~30-50% larger than galaxies with the same stellar mass residing in the field. We parametrize the size using the mass-normalized size, gamma=Re/Mstar^0.57. The gamma distributions in both environments peak at the same position but the distributions in clusters are more skewed towards larger sizes. Since this size difference is not observed in the loc...

  16. Active Change in Psychodynamic Therapy: Moments of High Receptiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gauna, Mariano De Iceta Ibáñez; Roibal, M Angela Soler; Ruiz, José Antonio Méndez; Fernández, Joaquin Ingelmo; Bleichmar, Hugo B

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the concept of "moments of high receptiveness" (MoHR or "Momentos de Alta Receptividad"), which is derived from the concept of "experiential coupling" ("Acoplamiento de Experiencias") proposed by Bleichmar (2001). Experiential coupling recently received empirical support by the work of Schiller and colleagues (2010). We will also show the conceptual placing of moments of high receptiveness with respect to the developments of Stern and colleagues (Stern and et al., 1998; Stern, 2004). In order to achieve both objectives, we focus on various clinical vignettes stressing the differences in repercussions of the technique. We describe use of stimuli for active evocation, explain how to identify moments of high receptiveness, and review ways to take advantage of these moments. Lastly, to minimize the risk of iatrogenic symptoms, we examine the role of therapists and some features of the therapeutic process when using this technique.

  17. View the label before you view the movie: A field experiment into the impact of Portion size and Guideline Daily Amounts labelling on soft drinks in cinemas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Boer Michiel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large soft drink sizes increase consumption, and thereby contribute to obesity. Portion size labelling may help consumers to select more appropriate food portions. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of portion size and caloric Guidelines for Daily Amounts (GDA labelling on consumers' portion size choices and consumption of regular soft drinks. Methods A field experiment that took place on two subsequent evenings in a Dutch cinema. Participants (n = 101 were asked to select one of five different portion sizes of a soft drink. Consumers were provided with either portion size and caloric GDA labelling (experimental condition or with millilitre information (control condition. Results Labelling neither stimulated participants to choose small portion sizes (OR = .75, p = .61, CI: .25 - 2.25, nor did labelling dissuade participants to choose large portion sizes (OR = .51, p = .36, CI: .12 - 2.15. Conclusions Portion size and caloric GDA labelling were found to have no effect on soft drink intake. Further research among a larger group of participants combined with pricing strategies is required. The results of this study are relevant for the current public health debate on food labelling.

  18. View the label before you view the movie: A field experiment into the impact of Portion size and Guideline Daily Amounts labelling on soft drinks in cinemas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Large soft drink sizes increase consumption, and thereby contribute to obesity. Portion size labelling may help consumers to select more appropriate food portions. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of portion size and caloric Guidelines for Daily Amounts (GDA) labelling on consumers' portion size choices and consumption of regular soft drinks. Methods A field experiment that took place on two subsequent evenings in a Dutch cinema. Participants (n = 101) were asked to select one of five different portion sizes of a soft drink. Consumers were provided with either portion size and caloric GDA labelling (experimental condition) or with millilitre information (control condition). Results Labelling neither stimulated participants to choose small portion sizes (OR = .75, p = .61, CI: .25 - 2.25), nor did labelling dissuade participants to choose large portion sizes (OR = .51, p = .36, CI: .12 - 2.15). Conclusions Portion size and caloric GDA labelling were found to have no effect on soft drink intake. Further research among a larger group of participants combined with pricing strategies is required. The results of this study are relevant for the current public health debate on food labelling. PMID:21645373

  19. ANTHROPOLOGICAL DESCARTES’ RATIONALISM AND IT'S HUSSERL’S RECEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatolii M. Malivskyi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article is aimed to figure out the features of Husserl's reception of anthropological Descartes rationalism. Its implementation requires a consistent solution of the following tasks: 1 schematically express a modern vision of the basic intentions of philosophizing as an anthropological rationalism; 2 highlight the main points of the Husserl's reception of Descartes’ rationalism as the deanthropologizing and analyze radicalization of its basic design as the reanthropologizing. Conclusions. When clarifying the question of the method of reception and completion of the philosophical Descartes’ project in the doctrine of Edmund Husserl, the author finds that the originality of his reception of anthropological Descartes’ rationalism appears as the paradoxical union of denying the existence of anthropology in the base project and the rediscovery of its key role in the radicalization of Descartes. Thinking of its way, he comes to the rediscovery some of the key ideas of the French philosopher, rooted in his anthropological rationalism. Among them is the basic intention of the ambivalence, the rejection of Descartes’ ideas of panrationalism, recognition irreducibility of philosophical method to the mathematical, constitutive of human presence in the new rationalism. Prospects for further research in understanding the author sees a meaningful relationship and continuity of the two great thinkers - namely, the personal nature of philosophizing and the ethical focus of their searching. Originality. Appeal to the reception of Husserl's Cartesian project confirms the thesis of an essential importance for the basic anthropological project of Descartes. The presented version of Husserl reception base project Descartes is a reproduction of the surface age stereotypes, which link the quest of the philosopher with the natural sciences and neglected anthropological measurements. The proposed version of the radicalization of Descartes’ project

  20. Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Kinugasa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex by dynamic light scattering (DLS was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF using multi-angle light scattering (MALS with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS.

  1. Diverse Contexts of Reception and Feelings of Belonging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Stepick

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical focus of this paper is the context of reception experienced by migrants in their new homeland. In particular we examine relations between established residents and newcomers or immigrants from Cuba, Haiti, and other Caribbean and Latin American nations in South Florida. Based upon long term fieldwork among late adolescents and young adults, we develop a framework and give ethnographic examples of established resident-newcomer relations that influence the contexts of reception for immigrants in South Florida. These contexts range from positive to negative, vary between national and local settings, and change over time. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0903156

  2. Diversity reception and equalization techniques for laser communication in space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Liang; Weibiao Chen

    2007-01-01

    The principle of band-limited space optical communication system using the techniques of space diversity methods and time domain Rake receiver is analyzed. The joint channel equalizer method combining diversity reception and equalization technique is presented in space laser communication. By computer simulation, the bit error rates of noncoherent pace optical on-off keying signal using different space diversity methods, Rake reception with different inter-symbol interferences, joint diversity equalizations with different signal noise rates and different channel numbers are analysed. The results identify that joint diversity equalization method can enhance space optical communication erformance evidently.

  3. The effects of ion mass variation and domain size on octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field generation in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf von der Pahlen, J.; Tsiklauri, D. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Graf von der Pahlen and Tsiklauri [Phys. Plasmas 21, 060705 (2014)] established that the generation of octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure in a stressed X-point collapse is due to ion currents. The field has a central region, comprising of the well-known quadrupolar field (quadrupolar components), as well as four additional poles of reversed polarity closer to the corners of the domain (octupolar components). In this extended work, the dependence of the octupolar structure on domain size and ion mass variation is investigated. Simulations show that the strength and spatial structure of the generated octupolar magnetic field is independent of ion to electron mass ratio; thus showing that ion currents play a significant role in out-of-plane magnetic structure generation in physically realistic scenarios. Simulations of different system sizes show that the width of the octupolar structure remains the same and has a spacial extent of the order of the ion inertial length. The width of the structure thus appears to be independent on boundary condition effects. The length of the octupolar structure, however, increases for greater domain sizes, prescribed by the external system size. This was found to be a consequence of the structure of the in-plane magnetic field in the outflow region halting the particle flow and thus terminating the in-plane currents that generate the out-of-plane field. The generation of octupolar magnetic field structure is also established in a tearing-mode reconnection scenario. The differences in the generation of the octupolar field and resulting qualitative differences between X-point collapse and tearing-mode are discussed.

  4. Monte Carlo modeling of small photon fields: quantifying the impact of focal spot size on source occlusion and output factors, and exploring miniphantom design for small-field measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alison J D; Nahum, Alan E; Fenwick, John D

    2009-07-01

    The accuracy with which Monte Carlo models of photon beams generated by linear accelerators (linacs) can describe small-field dose distributions depends on the modeled width of the electron beam profile incident on the linac target. It is known that the electron focal spot width affects penumbra and cross-field profiles; here, the authors explore the extent to which source occlusion reduces linac output for smaller fields and larger spot sizes. A BEAMnrc Monte Carlo linac model has been used to investigate the variation in penumbra widths and small-field output factors with electron spot size. A formalism is developed separating head scatter factors into source occlusion and flattening filter factors. Differences between head scatter factors defined in terms of in-air energy fluence, collision kerma, and terma are explored using Monte Carlo calculations. Estimates of changes in kerma-based source occlusion and flattening filter factors with field size and focal spot width are obtained by calculating doses deposited in a narrow 2 mm wide virtual "milliphantom" geometry. The impact of focal spot size on phantom scatter is also explored. Modeled electron spot sizes of 0.4-0.7 mm FWHM generate acceptable matches to measured penumbra widths. However the 0.5 cm field output factor is quite sensitive to electron spot width, the measured output only being matched by calculations for a 0.7 mm spot width. Because the spectra of the unscattered primary (psi(pi)) and head-scattered (psi(sigma)) photon energy fluences differ, miniphantom-based collision kerma measurements do not scale precisely with total in-air energy fluence psi = (psi(pi) + psi(sigma) but with (psi(pi)+ 1.2psi(sigma)). For most field sizes, on-axis collision kerma is independent of the focal spot size; but for a 0.5 cm field size and 1.0 mm spot width, it is reduced by around 7% mostly due to source occlusion. The phantom scatter factor of the 0.5 cm field also shows some spot size dependence, decreasing by

  5. Towards the Development and Validation of a Global Field Size and Irrigation Map using Crowdsourcing, Mobile Apps and Google Earth Engine in support of GEOGLAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, S.; Nordling, J.; See, L. M.; McCallum, I.; Perger, C.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Mucher, S.; Bydekerke, L.; Havlik, P.; Kraxner, F.; Obersteiner, M.

    2014-12-01

    The International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) has developed a global cropland extent map, which supports the monitoring and assessment activities of GEOGLAM (Group on Earth Observations Global Agricultural Monitoring Initiative). Through the European-funded SIGMA (Stimulating Innovation for Global Monitoring of Agriculture and its Impact on the Environment in support of GEOGLAM) project, IIASA is continuing to support GEOGLAM by providing cropland projections in the future and modelling environmental impacts on agriculture under various scenarios. In addition, IIASA is focusing on two specific elements within SIGMA: the development of a global field size and irrigation map; and mobile app development for in-situ data collection and validation of remotely-sensed products. Cropland field size is a very useful indicator for agricultural monitoring yet the information we have at a global scale is currently very limited. IIASA has already created a global map of field size at a 1 km resolution using crowdsourced data from Geo-Wiki as a first approximation. Using automatic classification of Landsat imagery and algorithms contained within Google Earth Engine, initial experimentation has shown that circular fields and landscape structures can easily be extracted. Not only will this contribute to improving the global map of field size, it can also be used to create a global map that contains a large proportion of the world's irrigated areas, which will be another useful contribution to GEOGLAM. The field size map will also be used to stratify and develop a global crop map in SIGMA. Mobile app development in support of in-situ data collection is another area where IIASA is currently working. An Android app has been built using the Open Data Toolkit (ODK) and extended further with spatial mapping capabilities called GeoODK. The app allows users to collect data on different crop types and delineate fields on the ground, which can be used to validate the

  6. Physicochemical characterization of titanium dioxide pigments using various techniques for size determination and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsper, J.P.F.G.; Peters, R.J.B.; Bemmel, M.E.M. van; Rivera, Z.E.H.; Wagner, S.; Kammer, F. von der; Tromp, P.C.; Hofmann, T.; Weigel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Seven commercial titanium dioxide pigments and two other well-defined TiO2 materials (TiMs) were physicochemically characterised using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF4) for separation, various techniques to determine size distribution and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (IC

  7. Use of Homogeneously-Sized Carbon Steel Ball Bearings to Study Microbially-Influenced Corrosion in Oil Field Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit eVoordouw

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC contributes to the general corrosion rate (CR, which is typically measured with carbon steel coupons. Here we explore the use of carbon steel ball bearings, referred to as beads (55.0 ± 0.3 mg; Ø = 0.238 cm, for determining CRs. CRs for samples from an oil field in Oceania incubated with beads were determined by the weight loss method, using acid treatment to remove corrosion products. The release of ferrous and ferric iron was also measured and CRs based on weight loss and iron determination were in good agreement. Average CRs were 0.022 mm/yr for 8 produced waters with high numbers (105/ml of acid-producing bacteria (APB, but no sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB. Average CRs were 0.009 mm/yr for 5 central processing facility (CPF waters, which had no APB or SRB due to weekly biocide treatment and 0.036 mm/yr for 2 CPF tank bottom sludges, which had high numbers of APB (106/ml and SRB (108/ml. Hence, corrosion monitoring with carbon steel beads indicated that biocide treatment of CPF waters decreased the CR, except where biocide did not penetrate. The CR for incubations with 20 ml of a produced water decreased from 0.061 to 0.007 mm/yr when increasing the number of beads from 1 to 40. CRs determined with beads were higher than those with coupons, possibly also due to a higher weight of iron per unit volume used in incubations with coupons. Use of 1 ml syringe columns, containing carbon steel beads and injected with 10 ml/day of SRB-containing medium for 256 days gave a CR of 0.11 mm/yr under flow conditions. The standard deviation of the distribution of residual bead weights, a measure for the unevenness of the corrosion, increased with increasing CR. The most heavily corroded beads showed significant pitting. Hence the use of uniformly sized carbon steel beads offers new opportunities for screening and monitoring of corrosion including determination of the distribution of corrosion rates, which allows

  8. To Investigate the Absorption, Dynamic Contact Angle and Printability Effects of Synthetic Zeolite Pigments in an Inkjet Receptive Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalindre, Swaraj Sunil

    Ink absorption performance in inkjet receptive coatings containing synthetic zeolite pigments was studied. Coating pigment pore and particle size distribution are the key parameters that influence in modifying media surface properties, thus affecting the rate of ink penetration and drying time (Scholkopf, et al. 2004). The primary objective of this study was: (1) to investigate the synthetic zeolite pigment effects on inkjet ink absorption, dynamic contact angle and printability, and (2) to evaluate these novel synthetic zeolite pigments in replacing the fumed silica pigments in conventional inkjet receptive coatings. In this research study, single pigment coating formulations (in equal P:B ratio) were prepared using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments (5A, Organophilic and 13X) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) binder. The laboratory-coated samples were characterized for absorption, air permeance, roughness, drying time, wettability and print fidelity. Based on the rheological data, it was found that the synthetic zeolite formulated coatings depicted a Newtonian flow behavior at low shear; while the industry accepted fumed silica based coatings displayed a characteristically high pseudoplastic flow behavior. Our coated samples generated using microporous synthetic zeolite pigments produced low absorption, reduced wettability and accelerated ink drying characteristics. These characteristics were caused due to the synthetic zeolite pigments, which resulted in relatively closed surface structure coated samples. The research suggested that no single selected synthetic zeolite coating performed better than the conventional fumed silica based coatings. Experimental data also showed that there was no apparent relationship between synthetic zeolite pigment pore sizes and inkjet ink absorption. For future research, above coated samples should be evaluated for pore size distribution using Mercury Porosimeter, which quantifies surface porosity of coated samples. This presented

  9. A Psychometric Evaluation of the Cultural Receptivity in Fostering Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coakley, Tanya M.; Orme, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The psychometric properties of a new measure of foster parents' openness toward participating in activities that promote children's cultural development are evaluated. The measure is titled the Cultural Receptivity in Fostering Scale (CRFS). Method: Data from 304 foster mothers who completed the CRFS and a battery of measures on…

  10. Receptive Vocabulary Differences in Monolingual and Bilingual Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialystok, Ellen; Luk, Gigi

    2012-01-01

    English receptive vocabulary scores from 797 monolingual and 808 bilingual participants between the ages of 17 and 89 years old were aggregated from 20 studies to compare standard scores across language groups. The distribution of scores was unimodal for both groups but the mean score was significantly different, with monolinguals obtaining higher…

  11. Real gas effects on receptivity to kinetic fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Anatoli; Edwards, Luke

    2016-11-01

    Receptivity of high-speed boundary layers is considered within the framework of fluctuating hydrodynamics where stochastic forcing is introduced through fluctuating shear stress and heat flux stemming from kinetic fluctuations (thermal noise). The forcing generates unstable modes whose amplification downstream and may lead to transition. An example of high-enthalpy (16 . 53 MJ / kg) boundary layer at relatively low wall temperatures (Tw = 1000 K - 3000 K), free stream temperature (Te = 834 K), and low pressure (0 . 0433 atm) is considered. Dissociation at the chosen flow parameters is still insignificant. The stability and receptivity analyses are carried out using a solver for calorically perfect gas with effective Prandtl number and specific heats ratio. The receptivity phenomenon is unchanged by the inclusion of real gas effects in the mean flow profiles. This is attributed to the fact that the mechanism for receptivity to kinetic fluctuations is localized near the upper edge of the boundary layer. Amplitudes of the generated wave packets are larger downstream in the case including real gas effects. It was found that spectra in both cases include supersonic second Mack unstable modes despite the temperature ratio Tw /Te > 1 . Supported by AFOSR.

  12. Power transmission and reception. An overview and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, R. H.

    1980-07-01

    Systems definition and assessment of the microwave power transmission and reception (PTAR) system for the solar power satellite are surveyed. Five different options are discussed and the separate antenna concept using the linear beam klystron to convert from dc to RF energy is described in detail.

  13. Adolescent Weight Status and Receptivity to Food TV Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Sutherland, Lisa A.; Longacre, Meghan R.; Beach, Michael L.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Jennifer J.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship between adolescent weight status and food advertisement receptivity. Design: Survey-based evaluation with data collected at baseline (initial and at 2 months), and at follow-up (11 months). Setting: New Hampshire and Vermont. Participants: Students (n = 2,281) aged 10-13 in 2002-2005. Main Outcome…

  14. On the Reception of Foucauldian Ideas in Pedagogical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowicka, Helena

    2011-01-01

    The article is devoted to the presentation of the reception of Foucauldian ideas in Polish pedagogical research over the past twenty years. This movement of thought is described as an oscillation between heterotopia and utopia, autonomy and heteronomy, emancipation and repression. As results of this analysis indicate, Polish pedagogues are most…

  15. Adolescent Weight Status and Receptivity to Food TV Advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi-Mejia, Anna M.; Sutherland, Lisa A.; Longacre, Meghan R.; Beach, Michael L.; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Gibson, Jennifer J.; Dalton, Madeline A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the relationship between adolescent weight status and food advertisement receptivity. Design: Survey-based evaluation with data collected at baseline (initial and at 2 months), and at follow-up (11 months). Setting: New Hampshire and Vermont. Participants: Students (n = 2,281) aged 10-13 in 2002-2005. Main Outcome…

  16. Joint Book Reading and Receptive Vocabulary: A Parallel Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to understand the reciprocal, bidirectional longitudinal relation between joint book reading and English receptive vocabulary. To address the research goals, a nationally representative sample of Head Start children, the Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (2003 cohort), was used for analysis. The…

  17. Reception Marking 30 Years of China-Gabon Diplomatic Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The CPAFFC held a recep-tion on April 20 to cel-ebrate the 30th anniversary of the establishment of diplo-matic relations between China and Gabon. Uyunqimg, vice chairperson of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress, Chen

  18. The formation of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakulin Serhij

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is devoted to the substantiation of the algorithm of corona reception of judo veteran competitive activity formation, each of its steps. Purposeful formation of judoka technical actions individual arsenal using the proposed algorithm (7 stages is implemented on the basis of the identification, a subsequent in-depth development and improvement of the best techniques.

  19. The Judaeo-Karaite Reception of the Hebrew Bible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabih, Joshua

    DESCRIPTION: The Karaites emerged as a school of thought within Middle Eastern Judaism in the 8th century. The Karaites were a “reading community” whose intellectual activity and daily lives were based around the divine scriptures. Over time Karaism became one of the two main competing schools of...... between the Rabbinate and the Karaite reception and interpretation of the Hebrew Bible....

  20. Ovarian fluid of receptive females enhances sperm velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Clelia; Andreatta, Gabriele; Pilastro, Andrea

    2012-05-01

    The females of several internal fertilizers are able to store sperm for a long time, reducing the risk of sperm limitation. However, it also means that males can attempt to mate outside females' receptive period, potentially increasing the level of sperm competition and exacerbating sexual conflict over mating. The guppy ( Poecilia reticulata), an internally fertilizing fish, is a model system of such competition and conflict. Female guppies accept courtship and mate consensually only during receptive periods of the ovarian cycle but receive approximately one (mostly forced) mating attempt per minute both during and outside their sexually receptive phase. In addition, females can store viable sperm for months. We expected that guppy females would disfavour sperm received during their unreceptive period, possibly by modulating the quality and/or quantity of the components present in the ovarian fluid (OF) over the breeding cycle. Ovarian fluid has been shown to affect sperm velocity, a determinant of sperm competition success in this and other fishes. We found that in vitro sperm velocity is slower in OF collected from unreceptive females than in OF from receptive females. Visual stimulation with a potential partner prior to collection did not significantly affect in vitro sperm velocity. These results suggest that sperm received by unreceptive females may be disfavoured as sperm velocity likely affects the migration process and the number of sperm that reach storage sites.

  1. Concern About Hunger May Increase Receptivity to GMOs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B Elijah; Conn, Caitlin C; Wiles, Jason R

    2016-07-01

    Due to a phenomenon known as the 'backfire effect', intuition-based opinions can be inadvertently strengthened by evidence-based counterarguments. Students' views on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be subject to this effect. We explored the impact of an empathetically accessible topic, world hunger, on receptivity to GMO technology as an alternative to direct evidence-based approaches.

  2. Recepción, audiencias y consumo cultural en Venezuela (período: 2000-2011 / Reception, audiences, and cultural consumption in Venezuela (period 2000-2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo HERNÁNDEZ DÍAZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analizamos el estado del arte de los estudios de recepción, audiencias y consumo cultural en Venezuela durante el período 2000-2011. Examinamos enfoques teóricos sobre el campo de la recepción mediática y cultural, desde las propuestas conceptuales de Aguirre, Barrios y Hernández Díaz. Se pudo constatar, en esta revisión documental, que los estudios de recepción en Venezuela abordan cuatro campos de estudio: 1 Educación para la recepción. 2 Influencia de la televisión. 3 Ciber-recepción. 4 Consumo cultural. We offer an analysis on the status of the studies of reception, audiences, and cultural consumption in Venezuela during the years 2000-2011. We examine the theoretical perspectives on the field of mass media and cultural reception following the conceptual proposals of Aguirre, Barrios, and Hernández Díaz. Through this documented review we have validated that the reception studies in Venezuela reach four fields: 1 Education for reception; 2 Influence of television; 3 Cyber-reception; 3 Cultural consumption.

  3. Effect of Size of the Computational Domain on Spherical Nonlinear Force-Free Modeling of Coronal Magnetic Field Using SDO/HMI Data

    CERN Document Server

    Tadesse, Tilaye; MacNeice, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal magnetic field produces solar activity, including extremely energetic solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Knowledge of the structure and evolution of the magnetic field of the solar corona is important for investigating and understanding the origins of space weather. Although the coronal field remains difficult to measure directly, there is considerable interest in accurate modeling of magnetic fields in and around sunspot regions on the Sun using photospheric vector magnetograms as boundary data. In this work, we investigate effects of the size of the domain chosen for coronal magnetic field modeling on resulting model solution. We apply spherical Optimization procedure to vector magnetogram data of Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with four Active Region observed on 09 March 2012 at 20:55UT. The results imply that quantities like magnetic flux density, electric current density and free magnetic energy density of ARs of interest are...

  4. Linking snow depth to avalanche release area size: measurements from the Vallée de la Sionne field site

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    One of the major challenges in avalanche hazard assessment is the correct estimation of avalanche release area size, which is of crucial importance to evaluate the potential danger that avalanches pose to roads, railways or infrastructure. Terrain analysis plays an important role in assessing the potential size of avalanche releases areas and is commonly based on digital terrain models (DTMs) of a snow-free summer terrain. However, a snow-covered winter terrain can significa...

  5. Can We Tell the Inner Core Size and the Heat Flow Pattern inside a Planet from the Observed Magnetic Field?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wicht, J.; Christensen, U. R.

    2012-09-01

    Several distinct features of Saturn's magnetic field have been revealed in a recent study based on in-situ magnetic field measurements made by the Cassini spacecraft [1]. The field at the dynamo surface is found to be strongly concentrated near the spin-poles with little hemispherical asymmetry. This field geometry corresponds to a zig-zag shape magnetic spectrum with pronounced odd degree terms and all odd degree magnetic moments possess the same sign ( , and all be positive in this case). This is in contrast to the field properties at the outer core surface of the Earth, where the field near the spinpoles is at a relative minimum compared to field at mid-latitude (see Fig. 1). An anticyclonic polar vortex with upwelling flow inside the tangent cylinder (the tangent cylinder is an imaginary cylinder parallel to the spin axis and tangent to the inner core surface at the equator) has been inferred at the Earth's core surface from geomagnetic secular variation analyses [2]. The associated advective transport of magnetic field is like responsible for the typical minimum or inverse geomagnetic field at high latitudes and the pronounced flux patches at midlatitudes. This feature is also frequently found in convectively driven geodynamo models [3].

  6. Revising traditional theory on the link between plant body size and fitness under competition: evidence from old-field vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Amanda J; Aarssen, Lonnie W

    2014-04-01

    The selection consequences of competition in plants have been traditionally interpreted based on a "size-advantage" hypothesis - that is, under intense crowding/competition from neighbors, natural selection generally favors capacity for a relatively large plant body size. However, this conflicts with abundant data, showing that resident species body size distributions are usually strongly right-skewed at virtually all scales within vegetation. Using surveys within sample plots and a neighbor-removal experiment, we tested: (1) whether resident species that have a larger maximum potential body size (MAX) generally have more successful local individual recruitment, and thus greater local abundance/density (as predicted by the traditional size-advantage hypothesis); and (2) whether there is a general between-species trade-off relationship between MAX and capacity to produce offspring when body size is severely suppressed by crowding/competition - that is, whether resident species with a larger MAX generally also need to reach a larger minimum reproductive threshold size (MIN) before they can reproduce at all. The results showed that MIN had a positive relationship with MAX across resident species, and local density - as well as local density of just reproductive individuals - was generally greater for species with smaller MIN (and hence smaller MAX). In addition, the cleared neighborhoods of larger target species (which had relatively large MIN) generally had - in the following growing season - a lower ratio of conspecific recruitment within these neighborhoods relative to recruitment of other (i.e., smaller) species (which had generally smaller MIN). These data are consistent with an alternative hypothesis based on a 'reproductive-economy-advantage' - that is, superior fitness under competition in plants generally requires not larger potential body size, but rather superior capacity to recruit offspring that are in turn capable of producing grand-offspring - and hence

  7. Deaf Students' Receptive and Expressive American Sign Language Skills: Comparisons and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and…

  8. Deaf Students' Receptive and Expressive American Sign Language Skills: Comparisons and Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal-Alvarez, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills of 85 students, 6 through 22 years of age at a residential school for the deaf using the American Sign Language Receptive Skills Test and the Ozcaliskan Motion Stimuli. Results are presented by ages and indicate that students' receptive skills increased with age and…

  9. Evolution of the Sizes of Galaxies over 7Field Campaign

    CERN Document Server

    Ono, Yoshiaki; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Schenker, Matthew A; Ellis, Richard S; McLure, Ross J; Dunlop, James S; Robertson, Brant E; Koekemoer, Anton M; Bowler, Rebecca A A; Rogers, Alexander B; Schneider, Evan; Charlot, Stephane; Stark, Daniel P; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Furlanetto, Steven R; Cirasuolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the redshift- and luminosity-dependent sizes of dropout galaxy candidates in the redshift range z~7-12 using deep images from the UDF12 campaign, data which offers two distinct advantages over that used in earlier work. Firstly, we utilize the increased S/N ratio offered by the UDF12 imaging to provide improved size measurements for known galaxies at z=6.5-8 in the HUDF. Specifically, we stack the new deep F140W image with the existing F125W data in order to provide improved measurements of the half-light radii of z-dropouts. Similarly we stack this image with the new deep UDF12 F160W image to obtain new size measurements for a sample of Y-dropouts. Secondly, because the UDF12 data have allowed the construction of the first robust galaxy sample in the HUDF at z>8, we have been able to extend the measurement of average galaxy size out to significantly higher redshifts. Restricting our size measurements to sources which are now detected at >15sigma, we confirm earlier indications that the average hal...

  10. The Size Evolution of Passive Galaxies: Observations from the Wide Field Camera 3 Early Release Science Program

    CERN Document Server

    Ryan, R E; Cohen, S H; Yan, H; Hathi, N P; Koekemoer, A M; Rutkowski, M J; Mechtley, M R; Windhorst, R A; O'Connell, R W; Balick, B; Bond, H E; Bushouse, H; Calzetti, D; Crockett, R M; Disney, M; Dopita, M A; Frogel, J A; Hall, D N B; Holtzman, J A; Kaviraj, S; Kimble, R A; MacKenty, J; Mutchler, M; Paresce, F; Saha, A; Silk, J I; Trauger, J; Walker, A R; Whitmore, B C; Young, E

    2010-01-01

    We present results on the size evolution of passively evolving galaxies at 11.5. We identify 30 galaxies in ~40 square arcmin to H<25 mag. We supplement spectroscopic redshifts from the literature with photometric redshifts determined from the 15-band photometry from 0.22-8 micron. We determine effective radii from Sersic profile fits to the H-band image using an empirical PSF. We find that size evolution is a strong function of stellar mass, with the most massive (M* ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies undergoing the most rapid evolution from z~2 to the present. Parameterizing the size evolution as (1+z)^{-alpha}, we find a tentative scaling between alpha and stellar mass of alpha ~ -1.8+1.4 log(M*/10^9 Msol). We briefly discuss the implications of this result for our understanding of the dynamical evolution of the red galaxies.

  11. A field test of the relationship between habitat area and population size for five perennial plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Bruun

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The population sizes of five perennial vascular plant species confined to old unimproved dry grasslands were assessed, viz. Anthericum ramosum, Filipendula vulgaris, Silene nutans, Thymus pulegioides, and Thymus serpyllum. All populations within the region were included. Only for Filipendula vulgaris and Thymus serpyllum, significant relationships between habitat area and population size were found. Thus, apparently perennial vascular plants have a limited ability to respond to large habitat areas by forming large populations. This puts a question mark on the use of incidence-function models for the study of plant metapopulations, because these models are based on an assumed positive relationship between habitat area and population size.

  12. Dependence of demagnetizing fields in Fe-based composite materials on magnetic particle size and the resin content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollár, Peter; Birčáková, Zuzana; Vojtek, Vladimír; Füzer, Ján; Bureš, Radovan; Fáberová, Mária

    2015-08-01

    Demagnetizing fields are in general produced by the volume and surface magnetic poles. The structure of soft magnetic composite materials, where the ferromagnetic particles are insulated from each other, causes the formation of demagnetizing fields produced by the particle surfaces. These fields depend on the amount of insulation and on the shapes, clustering and distribution of ferromagnetic particles. In this work the demagnetizing fields in iron-phenolphormaldehyde resin composite samples were investigated experimentally using the method for determining the demagnetization factor from the anhysteretic magnetization curve measurement. The initial magnetization curves were calculated for an ideal composite with 100% filler content using the values of the demagnetization factor. The results on the "ideal" permeability show differences between the samples with different resin content for each granulometric class, which tells about the internal stresses introduced into ferromagnetic material during the compaction process.

  13. Characterization of winemaking yeast by cell number-size distribution analysis through flow field-flow fractionation with multi-wavelength turbidimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2004-10-29

    Yeasts are widely used in several areas of food industry, e.g. baking, beer brewing, and wine production. Interest in new analytical methods for quality control and characterization of yeast cells is thus increasing. The biophysical properties of yeast cells, among which cell size, are related to yeast cell capabilities to produce primary and secondary metabolites during the fermentation process. Biophysical properties of winemaking yeast strains can be screened by field-flow fractionation (FFF). In this work we present the use of flow FFF (FlFFF) with turbidimetric multi-wavelength detection for the number-size distribution analysis of different commercial winemaking yeast varieties. The use of a diode-array detector allows to apply to dispersed samples like yeast cells the recently developed method for number-size (or mass-size) analysis in flow-assisted separation techniques. Results for six commercial winemaking yeast strains are compared with data obtained by a standard method for cell sizing (Coulter counter). The method here proposed gives, at short analysis time, accurate information on the number of cells of a given size, and information on the total number of cells.

  14. Size matter!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Pelle Guldborg; Jespersen, Andreas Maaløe; Skov, Laurits Rhoden

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We examined how a reduction in plate size would affect the amount of food waste from leftovers in a field experiment at a standing lunch for 220 CEOs. Methods A standing lunch for 220 CEOs in the Danish Opera House was arranged to feature two identical buffets with plates of two differ...

  15. Field-isolated genotypes of Mycobacterium bovis vary in virulence and influence case pathology but do not affect outbreak size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Wright

    Full Text Available Strains of many infectious agents differ in fundamental epidemiological parameters including transmissibility, virulence and pathology. We investigated whether genotypes of Mycobacterium bovis (the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, bTB differ significantly in transmissibility and virulence, combining data from a nine-year survey of the genetic structure of the M. bovis population in Northern Ireland with detailed records of the cattle population during the same period. We used the size of herd breakdowns as a proxy measure of transmissibility and the proportion of skin test positive animals (reactors that were visibly lesioned as a measure of virulence. Average breakdown size increased with herd size and varied depending on the manner of detection (routine herd testing or tracing of infectious contacts but we found no significant variation among M. bovis genotypes in breakdown size once these factors had been accounted for. However breakdowns due to some genotypes had a greater proportion of lesioned reactors than others, indicating that there may be variation in virulence among genotypes. These findings indicate that the current bTB control programme may be detecting infected herds sufficiently quickly so that differences in virulence are not manifested in terms of outbreak sizes. We also investigated whether pathology of infected cattle varied according to M. bovis genotype, analysing the distribution of lesions recorded at post mortem inspection. We concentrated on the proportion of cases lesioned in the lower respiratory tract, which can indicate the relative importance of the respiratory and alimentary routes of infection. The distribution of lesions varied among genotypes and with cattle age and there were also subtle differences among breeds. Age and breed differences may be related to differences in susceptibility and husbandry, but reasons for variation in lesion distribution among genotypes require further investigation.

  16. Forced vibrations of a current-carrying nanowire in a longitudinal magnetic field accounting for both surface energy and size effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2014-09-01

    Forced vibrations of current-carrying nanowires in the presence of a longitudinal magnetic field are of interest. By considering the surface energy and size effects, the coupled equations of motion describing transverse motions of the nanostructure are derived. By employing Galerkin and Newmark-β approaches, the deflections of the nanowire subjected to transverse dynamic loads are evaluated. The effects of the magnetic field, electric current, pre-tension force, frequency of the applied load, surface and size effects on the maximum transverse displacements are discussed. The obtained results display that for the frequency of the applied load lower than the nanowire's fundamental frequency, by increasing the magnetic field or electric current, the maximum transverse displacements would increase. However, for exciting frequencies greater than that of the nanowire, maximum transverse displacements would increase or decrease with the magnetic field strength or electric current. Additionally, the pre-tension force results in decreasing of the maximum transverse displacements. Such a reduction is more apparent for higher values of the magnetic field strength and electric current. The present study would be useful in the design of the micro- and nano-electro-mechanical systems expected to be one of the most wanted technologies in the near future.

  17. Effect of Quantizing Magnetic Field on Cyclotron Energy and Cyclotron Effective Mass in Size Quantized Films with Non-Parabolic Energy Band

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.(I). GUL(I)YEV; R. F. EM(I)NBEYL(I); A. KORKUT

    2007-01-01

    The Fermi energy, cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass of degenerate electron gas in a size-quantized semiconductor thin film with non-parabolic energy bands are studied. The influences of quantizing magnetic field on these quantities in two-band approximation of the Kane model are investigated. It is shown that the Fermi energy oscillates in a magnetic field. The period and positions of these oscillations are found as a function of film thickness and concentration of electrons. Cyclotron energy and cyclotron effective mass are investigated as a function of film thickness in detail. The results obtained here are compared with experimental data on GaAs quantum wells.

  18. Simultaneous 3D measurement of the translation and rotation of finite size particles and the flow field in a fully developed turbulent water flow

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Simon; Bérut, Antoine; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel experimental technique that measures simultaneously in three dimensions the trajectories, the translation, and the rotation of finite size inertial particles together with the turbulent flow. The flow field is analyzed by tracking the temporal evolution of small fluorescent tracer particles. The inertial particles consist of a super-absorbent polymer that makes them index and density matched with water and thus invisible. The particles are marked by inserting at various locations tracer particles into the polymer. Translation and rotation, as well as the flow field around the particle are recovered dynamically from the analysis of the marker and tracer particle trajectories. We apply this technique to study the dynamics of inertial particles much larger in size (Rp/{\\eta} \\approx 100) than the Kolmogorov length scale {\\eta} in a von K\\'arm\\'an swirling water flow (R{\\lambda} \\approx 400). We show, using the mixed (particle/fluid) Eulerian second order velocity structure function, that the in...

  19. Analyzing panel acoustic contributions toward the sound field inside the passenger compartment of a full-size automobile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sean F; Moondra, Manmohan; Beniwal, Ravi

    2015-04-01

    The Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS)-based nearfield acoustical holography (NAH) is utilized to analyze panel acoustic contributions toward the acoustic field inside the interior region of an automobile. Specifically, the acoustic power flows from individual panels are reconstructed, and relative contributions to sound pressure level and spectrum at any point of interest are calculated. Results demonstrate that by correlating the acoustic power flows from individual panels to the field acoustic pressure, one can correctly locate the panel allowing the most acoustic energy transmission into the vehicle interior. The panel on which the surface acoustic pressure amplitude is the highest should not be used as indicative of the panel responsible for the sound field in the vehicle passenger compartment. Another significant advantage of this HELS-based NAH is that measurements of the input data only need to be taken once by using a conformal array of microphones in the near field, and ranking of panel acoustic contributions to any field point can be readily performed. The transfer functions between individual panels of any vibrating structure to the acoustic pressure anywhere in space are calculated not measured, thus significantly reducing the time and effort involved in panel acoustic contributions analyses.

  20. EFFECT OF MIFEPRISTONE (RU486) ON MARKERS OF ENDOMETRIAL RECEPTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武捷; 王龙生; 程捷; 王介东

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of single and low dose of RU486 on endometrial receptivity of healthy women. Methods A total of 5 healthy women were followed for one control and one treatment cycle. In the treatment cycle, a dose of 10 mg RU486 was administered on day luteinizing hormone (LH)-2. In both the control and treatment cycle, an endometrial biopsy was obtained on LH+7. These biopsies were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis to find the difference in expression of integrins and progesterone receptor (PR) between the control and treatment cycle. Results The treatment with RU486 increased the expression of α1 and α4 subunits of integrin in glandular epithelial cells, but did not influence β3 subunit. Moreover, the normal down-regulation of PR in epitherial cell nuclei was inhibited by 10 mg RU486. Conclusion Single dose of 10 mg RU486 impairs the establishment of endometrial receptivity on time.

  1. Receptive vocabulary knowledge and motivation in CLIL and EFL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Fernández Fontecha

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL is a widely researched approach to foreign language learning and teaching. One of the pillars of CLIL is the concept of motivation. Some studies have focused on exploring motivation within CLIL, however there has not been much discussion about the connection between motivation, or other affective factors, and each component of foreign language learning. Hence, given two groups of learners with the same hours of EFL instruction, the main objective of this research is to determine whether there exists any kind of interaction between the number of words learners know receptively and their motivation towards English as a Foreign Language (EFL. Most students in both groups were highly motivated. No relationship was identified between the receptive vocabulary knowledge and the general motivation for the secondary graders but a positive significant relationship was found for the primary CLIL graders. Several reasons will be adduced.

  2. Adjusting of Wind Input Source Term in WAVEWATCH III Model for the Middle-Sized Water Body on the Basis of the Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Kuznetsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Adjusting of wind input source term in numerical model WAVEWATCH III for the middle-sized water body is reported. For this purpose, the field experiment on Gorky Reservoir is carried out. Surface waves are measured along with the parameters of the airflow. The measurement of wind speed in close proximity to the water surface is performed. On the basis of the experimental results, the parameterization of the drag coefficient depending on the 10 m wind speed is proposed. This parameterization is used in WAVEWATCH III for the adjusting of the wind input source term within WAM 3 and Tolman and Chalikov parameterizations. The simulation of the surface wind waves within tuned to the conditions of the middle-sized water body WAVEWATCH III is performed using three built-in parameterizations (WAM 3, Tolman and Chalikov, and WAM 4 and adjusted wind input source term parameterizations. Verification of the applicability of the model to the middle-sized reservoir is performed by comparing the simulated data with the results of the field experiment. It is shown that the use of the proposed parameterization CD(U10 improves the agreement in the significant wave height HS from the field experiment and from the numerical simulation.

  3. Receptive vocabulary differences in monolingual and bilingual children

    OpenAIRE

    Bialystok, Ellen; PEETS, KATHLEEN F.; Yang, Sujin; Luk, Gigi

    2010-01-01

    Studies often report that bilingual participants possess a smaller vocabulary in the language of testing than monolinguals, especially in research with children. However, each study is based on a small sample so it is difficult to determine whether the vocabulary difference is due to sampling error. We report the results of an analysis of 1,738 children between 3 and 10 years old and demonstrate a consistent difference in receptive vocabulary between the two groups. Two preliminary analyses s...

  4. Genetic influences on receptive joint attention in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, William D; Keebaugh, Alaine C; Reamer, Lisa A;

    2014-01-01

    Despite their genetic similarity to humans, our understanding of the role of genes on cognitive traits in chimpanzees remains virtually unexplored. Here, we examined the relationship between genetic variation in the arginine vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A) and social cognition in chimpanze....... The collective findings show that AVPR1A polymorphisms are associated with individual differences in performance on a receptive joint attention task in chimpanzees....

  5. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Ken eRosslau; Daniel eSteinwede; Christine eSchröder; Sibylle eHerholz; Claudia eLappe; Christian eDobel; Eckart eAltenmüller

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in...

  6. Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15. Nanoparticle Size Distribution (NPSD) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang, C [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Artaxo, P [University of Sao Paulo (Brazil); Martin, S [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Wang, J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol nucleation and initial growth were investigated during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon) 2014/15 campaign. Aerosol sampling occurred during the wet and dry seasons of 2014, and took place at the T3 measurement site, downwind of the city of Manaus, Brazil. Characterization of the aerosol size distribution from 10 to 500 nm was accomplished through the deployment of a conventional Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) and a fine condensation particle counter (> 10 nm). In order to directly measure aerosol nucleation and initial growth, a Nano SMPS (1.5-20 nm) was also deployed, consisting of a condensation particle counter-based electrical mobility spectrometer that was modified for the detection of sub-3 nm aerosol. Measurements of the aerosol size distribution from 1.5 nm to 10 nm were obtained during the first observational period, and from 3 nm to 15 nm during the second observational period. Routine, stable measurement in this size range was complicated due to persistent water condensation in the Nano SMPS and diffusional transport losses

  7. Choice of sample size for high transport critical current density in a granular superconductor: percolation versus self-field effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulet, R.; Diaz, O.; Altshuler, E. [Superconductivity Laboratory, IMRE-Physics Faculty, University of Havana, La Habana (Cuba)

    1997-10-01

    The percolative character of the current paths and the self-field effects were considered to estimate optimal sample dimensions for the transport current of a granular superconductor by means of a Monte Carlo algorithm and critical-state model calculations. We showed that, under certain conditions, self-field effects are negligible and the J{sub c} dependence on sample dimensions is determined by the percolative character of the current. Optimal dimensions are demonstrated to be a function of the fraction of superconducting phase in the sample. (author)

  8. Application of receptive music therapy in internal medicine and cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Marconato

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of receptive music therapy in clinical practice. METHODS: Receptive music therapy was individually applied via musical auditions, including five stages: musical stimulation, sensation, situation, reflection, and behavioral alteration. Following anamnesis and obtainment of consent, patients answered a first questionnaire on health risk evaluation (Q1, and after participating in 16 weekly music therapy sessions, answered a second one (Q2. RESULTS: Two men and 8 women, aged above 18 years, referred to us due to symptoms of stress, emotional suffering, and the need to change lifestyles (health risk behavior were studied between August 1998 and December 1999. Comparison between answers to Q1 and Q2, showed a trend (P=0.059 for reduction of ingestion of cholesterol-rich foods and for increased prospects in life with a tendency towards improvement, and also of increased intake of fiber-rich food (55.6%, increased levels of personal satisfaction (44.5%, and decreased levels of stress (66.7%. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated decreased stress levels and increased personal satisfaction, higher consumption of fiber-rich food, lower cholesterol intake, and a better perspective on life, suggesting that receptive music therapy may be applied in clinical practice as an auxiliary therapeutic intervention for the treatment of behavioral health risks.

  9. The relevance of receptive vocabulary in reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalom, Ana Flávia de Oliveira; Soares, Aparecido José Couto; Cárnio, Maria Silvia

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the performance of students from the 5th year of primary school, with and without indicatives of reading and writing disorders, in receptive vocabulary and reading comprehension of sentences and texts, and to verify possible correlations between both. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the institution (no. 098/13). Fifty-two students in the 5th year from primary school, with and without indicatives of reading and writing disorders, and from two public schools participated in this study. After signing the informed consent and having a speech therapy assessment for the application of inclusion criteria, the students were submitted to a specific test for standardized evaluation of receptive vocabulary and reading comprehension. The data were studied using statistical analysis through the Kruskal-Wallis test, analysis of variance techniques, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient with level of significance to be 0.05. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (was constructed in which reading comprehension was considered as gold standard. The students without indicatives of reading and writing disorders presented a better performance in all tests. No significant correlation was found between the tests that evaluated reading comprehension in either group. A correlation was found between reading comprehension of texts and receptive vocabulary in the group without indicatives. In the absence of indicatives of reading and writing disorders, the presence of a good range of vocabulary highly contributes to a proficient reading comprehension of texts.

  10. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken eRosslau

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions or expression (music production abilities, and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a right-sided stroke, patients with a left-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  11. Clinical investigations of receptive and expressive musical functions after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosslau, Ken; Steinwede, Daniel; Schröder, C; Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Dobel, Christian; Altenmüller, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    There is a long tradition of investigating various disorders of musical abilities after stroke. These impairments, associated with acquired amusia, can be highly selective, affecting only music perception (i.e., receptive abilities/functions) or expression (music production abilities), and some patients report that these may dramatically influence their emotional state. The aim of this study was to systematically test both the melodic and rhythmic domains of music perception and expression in left- and right-sided stroke patients compared to healthy subjects. Music perception was assessed using rhythmic and melodic discrimination tasks, while tests of expressive function involved the vocal or instrumental reproduction of rhythms and melodies. Our approach revealed deficits in receptive and expressive functions in stroke patients, mediated by musical expertise. Those patients who had experienced a short period of musical training in childhood and adolescence performed better in the receptive and expressive subtests compared to those without any previous musical training. While discrimination of specific musical patterns was unimpaired after a left-sided stroke, patients with a right-sided stroke had worse results for fine melodic and rhythmic analysis. In terms of expressive testing, the most consistent results were obtained from a test that required patients to reproduce sung melodies. This implies that the means of investigating production abilities can impact the identification of deficits.

  12. Depression. Does it affect the comprehension of receptive skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtchi, Mojgan; Zokaee, Zahra; Ghaffarinejad, Ali R; Sadeghi, Mohammad M

    2012-07-01

    To compare the comprehension of depressed and non-depressed male and female Iranian learners of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in receptive skills, and to investigate whether inefficiency in learning English could be due to depression. We selected 126 boys and 96 girls aged between 15 and 18 by simple random sampling from 2 high schools in Kerman, Iran to examine whether there was any significant relationship between depression and comprehension of receptive skills in males and females. We undertook this descriptive, correlational study between January and May 2011 in Kerman, Iran. After administration of the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), we found that 93 students were non-depressed, 65 had minimal depression, 48 mild depression, and 16 suffered from severe depression. The correlation between participants` scores on listening and reading test with depression level indicated a significant relationship between depression and comprehension of both listening, and reading. Males had higher scores in both reading and listening. In listening, there was no significant difference among the levels of depression and males and females. Regarding the reading skill, there was no significant difference among levels of depression; however, the reading comprehension of males and females differed significantly. Learners who show a deficiency in receptive skills should be examined for the possibility of suffering from some degree of depression.

  13. Central brain neurons expressing doublesex regulate female receptivity in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Pan, Yufeng; Robinett, Carmen C; Meissner, Geoffrey W; Baker, Bruce S

    2014-07-02

    Drosophila melanogaster females respond to male courtship by either rejecting the male or allowing copulation. The neural mechanisms underlying these female behaviors likely involve the integration of sensory information in the brain. Because doublesex (dsx) controls other aspects of female differentiation, we asked whether dsx-expressing neurons mediate virgin female receptivity to courting males. Using intersectional techniques to manipulate the activities of defined subsets of dsx-expressing neurons, we found that activation of neurons in either the pCd or pC1 clusters promotes receptivity, while silencing these neurons makes females unreceptive. Furthermore, pCd and pC1 neurons physiologically respond to the male-specific pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA), while pC1 neurons also respond to male courtship song. The pCd and pC1 neurons expressing dsx in females do not express transcripts from the fruitless (fru) P1 promoter. Thus, virgin female receptivity is controlled at least in part by neurons that are distinct from those governing male courtship.

  14. A study of the tactual reception of sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C M; Delhorne, L A; Durlach, N I; Fischer, S D

    1995-04-01

    One of the natural methods of tactual communication in common use among individuals who are both deaf and blind is the tactual reception of sign language. In this method, the receiver (who is deaf-blind) places a hand (or hands) on the dominant (or both) hand(s) of the signer in order to receive, through the tactual sense, the various formational properties associated with signs. In the study reported here, 10 experienced deaf-blind users of either American Sign Language (ASL) or Pidgin Sign English (PSE) participated in experiments to determine their ability to receive signed materials including isolated signs and sentences. A set of 122 isolated signs was received with an average accuracy of 87% correct. The most frequent type of error made in identifying isolated signs was related to misperception of individual phonological components of signs. For presentation of signed sentences (translations of the English CID sentences into ASL or PSE), the performance of individual subjects ranged from 60-85% correct reception of key signs. Performance on sentences was relatively independent of rate of presentation in signs/sec, which covered a range of roughly 1 to 3 signs/sec. Sentence errors were accounted for primarily by deletions and phonological and semantic/syntactic substitutions. Experimental results are discussed in terms of differences in performance for isolated signs and sentences, differences in error patterns for the ASL and PSE groups, and communication rates relative to visual reception of sign language and other natural methods of tactual communication.

  15. Gender Differences in Receptivity to Sexual Offers: A New Research Prototype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Tappé

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the most cited series of experiments in social and evolutionary psychology are those conducted by Clark and Hatfield (1989, 2003. In these studies, college students served as confederates in a simple field experiment. They approached fellow college students of another gender and asked one of three questions: (a “Would you go out with me tonight?” (b “Would you come over to my apartment tonight?” or (c “Would you go to bed with me tonight?” Men and women differed markedly in their receptivity to casual sexual offers. When asked: “Would you go out with me tonight?” both were equally receptive. Yet, when confederates asked, “Would you come over to my apartment” or “Would you go to bed with me?” gender differences were striking. In the following series of experiments we attempted to develop a pencil and paper method to mirror the procedure of the classic study. We think we succeeded. Although cultural and social considerations may have influenced participants’ tendency to accept or reject sexual offers, as predicted by evolutionary perspectives, in all three experiments men were more likely than women to accept sexual offers. The studies also explored some of the reasons men and women gave for refusing a date, apartment visit, or a sexual encounter. We close by itemizing some questions that, given this new set of research materials, may be worth asking.

  16. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  17. Topographic mapping of a hierarchy of temporal receptive windows using a narrated story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Yulia; Honey, Christopher J; Silbert, Lauren J; Hasson, Uri

    2011-02-23

    Real-life activities, such as watching a movie or engaging in conversation, unfold over many minutes. In the course of such activities, the brain has to integrate information over multiple time scales. We recently proposed that the brain uses similar strategies for integrating information across space and over time. Drawing a parallel with spatial receptive fields, we defined the temporal receptive window (TRW) of a cortical microcircuit as the length of time before a response during which sensory information may affect that response. Our previous findings in the visual system are consistent with the hypothesis that TRWs become larger when moving from low-level sensory to high-level perceptual and cognitive areas. In this study, we mapped TRWs in auditory and language areas by measuring fMRI activity in subjects listening to a real-life story scrambled at the time scales of words, sentences, and paragraphs. Our results revealed a hierarchical topography of TRWs. In early auditory cortices (A1+), brain responses were driven mainly by the momentary incoming input and were similarly reliable across all scrambling conditions. In areas with an intermediate TRW, coherent information at the sentence time scale or longer was necessary to evoke reliable responses. At the apex of the TRW hierarchy, we found parietal and frontal areas that responded reliably only when intact paragraphs were heard in a meaningful sequence. These results suggest that the time scale of processing is a functional property that may provide a general organizing principle for the human cerebral cortex.

  18. Reception conditions of low frequency (LF) transmitter signals onboard DEMETER micro-satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Biagi, Pier F.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick H. M.; Besser, Bruno; Wolbang, Daniel; Prattes, Gustav; Eichelberger, Hans; Stangl, Günter; Parrot, Michel; Schwingenschuh, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    We analyze the flux density variation associated to low frequency (LF) broadcasting transmitters observed by the ICE electric field experiment onboard DEMETER micro-satellite. We select five stations localised around the Mediterranean and the black seas: Tipaza (252 kHz, 02°28'E, 36°33'N, Algeria), Roumoules (216 kHz, 06°08'E, 43°47'N, Monte Carlo), Polatli (180 kHz, 32°25'E, 39°45'N, Turkey), Nador (171 kHz, 02°55'W, 35°02'N, Morocco) and Brasov (153 kHz, 25°36'E,45°40', Romania). The detection of the LF transmitter signals by DEMETER micro-satellite is found to depend on the radiated power, the emitted frequency, and the orbit paths with regard to the location of the stations. This leads us to characterise the reception condition of the LF signals and to define time intervals where the detection probability is high. We firstly discuss the dependence of the reception conditions on the ionospheric disturbances due to the geomagnetic and solar activities, and we secondly attempt to estimate the global electric environment above the Mediterranean and the black seas.

  19. Molecular tracking of Salmonella spp. in chicken meat chain: from slaughterhouse reception to end cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Mariane Rezende; Cavicchioli, Valéria Quintana; Camargo, Anderson Carlos; Lanna, Frederico Germano Piscitelli Alvarenga; Pinto, Paulo Sérgio de Arruda; Bersot, Luciano Dos Santos; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2016-02-01

    Due to the importance of Salmonella spp. in poultry products, this study aimed to track its main contamination routes since slaughtering reception to processing of chicken end cuts. Samples from different steps of slaughtering and processing (n = 277) were collected from two chicken slaughterhouses (Sl1 and Sl2) located in Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and subjected to Salmonella spp. detection. The obtained isolates were subjected to serological identification and tested by PCR for specific Salmonella spp. genes (ompC and sifB). Also, Salmonella spp. isolates were subjected to XbaI macrorestriction and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Sixty-eight samples were positive for Salmonella spp. and 172 isolates were obtained. Sl1 and Sl2 presented similar frequencies of Salmonella spp. positive samples during reception, slaughtering and processing (p > 0.05), except for higher frequencies in Sl1 for chicken carcasses after de-feathering and evisceration (p Salmonella spp. strains in Sl1. The results highlighted the relevance of the initial steps of chicken slaughtering for Salmonella spp. contamination, and the pre-chilling of carcasses as an important controlling tool. In addition, the presence of Salmonella spp. in chicken end cuts samples represents a public health concern.

  20. Influence of transplant size on the above- and below-ground performance of four contrasting field-grown lettuce cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbiriou, P.J.; Stomph, T.J.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Modern lettuce cultivars underperform under conditions of variable temporal and spatial resource availability, common in organic or low-input production systems. Information is scarce on the impact of below-ground traits on such resource acquisition and performance of field-grow

  1. Perceptual scaling of visual and inertial cues: Effects of field of view, image size, depth cues, and degree of freedom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia Grácio, B.J.; Bos, J.E.; Paassen, M.M. van; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    In the field of motion-based simulation, it was found that a visual amplitude equal to the inertial amplitude does not always provide the best perceived match between visual and inertial motion. This result is thought to be caused by the "quality" of the motion cues delivered by the simulator motion

  2. Influence of transplant size on the above- and below-ground performance of four contrasting field-grown lettuce cultivars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerbiriou, P.J.; Stomph, T.J.; Lammerts Van Bueren, E.; Struik, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims: Modern lettuce cultivars underperform under conditions of variable temporal and spatial resource availability, common in organic or low-input production systems. Information is scarce on the impact of below-ground traits on such resource acquisition and performance of field-grow

  3. Extremely Small Sizes for Faint z~2-8 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields: A Key Input For Establishing their Volume Density and UV Emissivity

    CERN Document Server

    Bouwens, R J; Oesch, P A; Atek, H; Lam, D; Stefanon, M

    2016-01-01

    We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. Yet, we cannot really assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first such size constraints with 2 new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly-magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy's size. Only the most compact galaxies will remain detectable in regions of high shear (vs. a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we carefully quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 faint h...

  4. Synthesis of silica nanoparticles for the manufacture of porous carbon membrane and particle size analysis by sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Ho; Eum, Chul; Hun; Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Woon Jung [Dept. of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Silica nanoparticles were synthesized by emulsion polymerization by mixing ethanol, ammonium hydroxide, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate. An apparatus was designed and assembled for a large-scale synthesis of silica nanospheres, which was aimed for uniform mixing of the reactants. Then sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was used to determine the size distribution of the silica nanoparticles. SdFFF provided mass-based separation where the retention time increased with the particle size, thus the size distribution of silica nanoparticles obtained from SdFFF appeared more accurate than that from dynamic light scattering, particularly for those having broad and multimodal size distributions. A disk-shaped porous carbon membrane (PCM) was manufactured for application as an adsorbent by pressurizing the silica particles, followed by calcination. Results showed that PCM manufactured in this study has relatively high surface area and temperature stability. The PCM surface was modified by attaching a carboxyl group (PCM-COOH) and then by incorporating silver (PCM-COOH-Ag). The amount of COOH group on PCM was measured electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry, and the surface area, pore size, pore volume of PCM-COOH-Ag by Brunauer–Emmet–Teller measurement. The surface area was 40.65 and reduced to 13.02 after loading a COOH group then increased up to 30.37 after incorporating Ag.

  5. The effects of ion mass variation and domain size on octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field generation in collisionless magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    von der Pahlen, Jan Graf

    2015-01-01

    J. Graf von der Pahlen and D. Tsiklauri, Phys. Plas. 21, 060705 (2014), established that the generation of octupolar out-of-plane magnetic field structure in a stressed $X$-point collapse is due to ion currents. The field has a central region, comprising of the well-known qaudrupolar field (quadrupolar components), as well as four additional poles of reversed polarity closer to the corners of the domain (octupolar components). In this extended work, the dependence of the octupolar structure on domain size and ion mass variation is investigated. Simulations show that the strength and spatial structure of the generated octupolar magnetic field is independent of ion to electron mass ratio. Thus showing that ion currents play a significant role in out-of-plane magnetic structure generation in physically realistic scenarios. Simulations of different system sizes show that the width of the octupolar structure remains the same and has a spacial extent of the order of the ion inertial length. The width of the structu...

  6. Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trattner, Sigal; Cheng, Bin; Pieniazek, Radoslaw L.; Hoffmann, Udo; Douglas, Pamela S.; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomen–pelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same

  7. Extremely Small Sizes for Faint z ˜ 2-8 Galaxies in the Hubble Frontier Fields: A Key Input for Establishing Their Volume Density and UV Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, R. J.; Illingworth, G. D.; Oesch, P. A.; Atek, H.; Lam, D.; Stefanon, M.

    2017-07-01

    We provide the first observational constraints on the sizes of the faintest galaxies lensed by the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) clusters. Ionizing radiation from faint galaxies likely drives cosmic reionization, and the HFF initiative provides a key opportunity to find such galaxies. However, we cannot assess their ionizing emissivity without a robust measurement of their sizes, since this is key to quantifying both their prevalence and the faint-end slope to the UV luminosity function. Here we provide the first size constraints with two new techniques. The first utilizes the fact that the detectability of highly magnified galaxies as a function of shear is very dependent on a galaxy’s size. Only the most compact galaxies remain detectable in high-shear regions (versus a larger detectable size range for low shear), a phenomenon we quantify using simulations. Remarkably, however, no correlation is found between the surface density of faint galaxies and the predicted shear, using 87 high-magnification (μ =10-100) z˜ 2-8 galaxies seen behind the first four HFF clusters. This can only be the case if faint (˜ -15 mag) galaxies have significantly smaller sizes than more luminous galaxies, i.e., ≲ 30 mas or 160-240 pc. As a second size probe, we rotate and stack 26 faint high-magnification sources along the major shear axis. Less elongation is found even for objects with an intrinsic half-light radius of 10 mas. Together, these results indicate that extremely faint z˜ 2-8 galaxies have near point-source profiles (half-light radii <30 mas and perhaps 5-10 mas). These results suggest smaller completeness corrections and hence shallower faint-end slopes for the z˜ 2-8 LFs than derived in some recent studies (by {{Δ }}α ≳ 0.1-0.3).

  8. Long-term resource variation and group size: A large-sample field test of the Resource Dispersion Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morecroft Michael D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Resource Dispersion Hypothesis (RDH proposes a mechanism for the passive formation of social groups where resources are dispersed, even in the absence of any benefits of group living per se. Despite supportive modelling, it lacks empirical testing. The RDH predicts that, rather than Territory Size (TS increasing monotonically with Group Size (GS to account for increasing metabolic needs, TS is constrained by the dispersion of resource patches, whereas GS is independently limited by their richness. We conducted multiple-year tests of these predictions using data from the long-term study of badgers Meles meles in Wytham Woods, England. The study has long failed to identify direct benefits from group living and, consequently, alternative explanations for their large group sizes have been sought. Results TS was not consistently related to resource dispersion, nor was GS consistently related to resource richness. Results differed according to data groupings and whether territories were mapped using minimum convex polygons or traditional methods. Habitats differed significantly in resource availability, but there was also evidence that food resources may be spatially aggregated within habitat types as well as between them. Conclusions This is, we believe, the largest ever test of the RDH and builds on the long-term project that initiated part of the thinking behind the hypothesis. Support for predictions were mixed and depended on year and the method used to map territory borders. We suggest that within-habitat patchiness, as well as model assumptions, should be further investigated for improved tests of the RDH in the future.

  9. Modelling of coupled heat and electric field distribution during ohmic heating of solid foods with varying sizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feyissa, Aberham Hailu; Bøknæs, Niels; Nielsen, P.L.

    Heat treatment is an important process in the manufacturing of a wide range of solid foods. When food products of different sizes (e.g. cooking of shrimps) are processed with the conventional thermal processes, the products are heated unevenly where the small bodies are overcooked and the large...... developed. The mathematical model has been formulated from mechanistic understanding of the process. The resulting coupled model equations were solved using the Finite Element Method (COMSOL Multiphysics® version 4.3b). Experiments were carried out using a newly developed laboratory-scale ohmic heater where...

  10. Finite size dependence of scaling functions of the three dimensional O(4) model in an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Engels, J

    2014-01-01

    We calculate universal finite size scaling functions for the order parameter and the longitudinal susceptibility of the three-dimensional O(4) model. The phase transition of this model is supposed to be in the same universality class as the chiral transition of two-flavor QCD. The scaling functions serve as a testing device for QCD simulations on small lattices, where, for example, pseudocritical temperatures are difficult to determine. In addition, we have improved the infinite volume limit parametrization of the scaling functions by using newly generated high statistics data for the 3d O(4) model in the high temperature region on an L=120 lattice.

  11. The Size of Winter-Flooded Paddy Fields No Longer Limits the Foraging Habitat Use of the Endangered Crested Ibis (Nipponia nippon) in Winter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Can-Shi; Song, Xiao; Ding, Chang-Qing; Ye, Yuan-Xing; Qing, Bao-Ping; Wang, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Paddy fields have traditionally been viewed as the key foraging habitats for the endangered crested ibis (Nipponia nippon). With the population of this species now increasing, its distribution has expanded to both lowland areas and outside the nature reserve. However, little is known about the current foraging habitat preferences of these birds, especially during winter. In this research, a total of 54 used sites and 50 unused sites were investigated during winter from December 2011 to January 2012. The results of logistic regression analysis indicate that soil softness, human disturbance, and distance to the nearest road were important factors. For the site plots of winter-flooded paddy fields, the birds prefer the paddy fields with higher coverage of vegetation, except softer foraging sites and lower human-related disturbance. In lowland areas, the size of winter-flooded paddy fields was not a limiting factor, due to the availability of other wetlands capable of providing abundant food. The micro-habitat characteristics were important indicators of foraging habitat quality rather than the size of winter-flooded paddy fields, and the food accessibility may play an important role in the process of foraging habitat use. We suggest the improvement of the foraging micro-habitat and environmental characteristics would be effective in ensuring the availability of food in the dispersed lowland areas. The local people still needed to be encouraged and compensated by their single-cropping cultivation, ploughed the paddy fields after harvesting and irrigated them with shallow water flooded in the original core areas of the nature reserve.

  12. Roughness receptivity studies in a 3-D boundary layer - Flight tests and computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Andrew L.; Saric, William S.; Reed, Helen L.

    The receptivity of 3-D boundary layers to micron-sized, spanwise-periodic Discrete Roughness Elements (DREs) was studied. The DREs were applied to the leading edge of a 30-degree swept-wing at the wavelength of the most unstable disturbance. In this case, calibrated, multi-element hotfilm sensors were used to measure disturbance wall shear stress. The roughness height was varied from 0 to 50 microns. Thus, the disturbance-shear-stress amplitude variations were determined as a function of modulated DRE heights. The computational work was conducted parallel to the flight experiments. The complete viscous flowfield over the O-2 aircraft with the SWIFT model mounted on the port wing store pylon was successfully modeled and validated with the flight data. This highly accurate basic-state solution was incorporated into linear stability calculations and the wave growth associated with the crossflow instability was calculated.

  13. Energy landscape of the finite-size mean-field 2-spin spherical model and topology trivialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Dhagash; Hauenstein, Jonathan D.; Niemerg, Matthew; Simm, Nicholas J.; Stariolo, Daniel A.

    2015-02-01

    Motivated by the recently observed phenomenon of topology trivialization of potential energy landscapes (PELs) for several statistical mechanics models, we perform a numerical study of the finite-size 2-spin spherical model using both numerical polynomial homotopy continuation and a reformulation via non-Hermitian matrices. The continuation approach computes all of the complex stationary points of this model while the matrix approach computes the real stationary points. Using these methods, we compute the average number of stationary points while changing the topology of the PEL as well as the variance. Histograms of these stationary points are presented along with an analysis regarding the complex stationary points. This work connects topology trivialization to two different branches of mathematics: algebraic geometry and catastrophe theory, which is fertile ground for further interdisciplinary research.

  14. An attempt to analyse colour reception by electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naka, K I; Rushton, W A

    1966-08-01

    1. The problem of colour reception is that we do not know the action spectra of the visual pigments involved, the nature of the signals generated nor the interaction between these signals. We only know the incident light and the electric results of interaction.2. In Part 1 we show that S-potentials from red/green (R/G) units saturated with deep red light show this property: added green light pulls down the ceiling of depolarization, but more added red had no power to raise it again. Thus lights that depress the deep red ceiling equally stimulate the green pigment equally. From this the action spectrum of the green pigment can be obtained.3. If we assume that only two visual pigments are involved in the R/G unit, and that lights which do not pull down the deep red ceiling are below the threshold for green cones, then in this range only the red pigment is excited and we may obtain its action spectrum. Its maximum is at 680 nm where no visual pigment so far has been found.4. In Part 2 we consider the following mathematical problem: ;Is it possible that two pigments of given action spectra could combine their outputs in such a way that the resultant would be identical with the output of a third pigment of given action spectrum, for every intensity of every monochromatic light?' The solution shows that this is always mathematically possible, and the necessary interaction function is deduced.5. It is shown further that if the log action spectra are the ;visual parabolas' that resemble Dartnall's nomogram, then the interaction function is simply a linear transform such as Hartline & Ratliff (1957) have found with lateral inhibition in Limulus and Donner & Rushton (1959) with silent substitution in the frog.6. An interaction that matches a single pigment to perfection for all monochromatic lights will not match it for certain mixtures. By this criterion the 680 nm excitability is a pigment and not the resultant of two other pigments, i.e. pigments more excitable in other

  15. Influence of shock wave pressure amplitude and pulse repetition frequency on the lifespan, size and number of transient cavities in the field of an electromagnetic lithotripter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Peter; Jöchle, Knut; Debus, Jürgen

    1998-10-01

    Monitoring the generation of cavitation is of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic use of ultrasound in medicine, since cavitation is considered to play a major role in nonthermal ultrasound interactions with tissue. Important parameters are the number of cavitation events and the energy released during the bubble collapse. This energy is correlated to the maximum bubble radius which is related to the cavitation lifespan. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the influence of the acoustic pressure amplitude and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF) in the field of a lithotripter (Lithostar, Siemens) on the number, size and lifespan of transient cavitation bubbles in water. We used scattered laser light recorded by a photodiode and stroboscopic photographs to monitor the cavitation activity. We found that PRF (range 0.5-5 Hz) had no influence on the cavitation bubble lifespan and size, whereas lifespan and size increased with the acoustic pressure amplitude. In contrast, the number of cavitation events strongly increased with PRF, whereas the pressure amplitude had no significant influence on the number of cavitation events. Thus, by varying the pressure amplitude and PRF, it might be possible to deliver a defined relative number of cavitations at a defined relative energy level in a defined volume. This seems to be relevant to further studies that address the biological effects of transient cavitation occurring in the fields of lithotripters.

  16. Spectra of photons and neutrons generated in a heterogeneous head of a 15 MV LINAC at differents field sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benites-Rengifo, J. L.; Vega-Carrillo, H. R.; Velazquez-Fernandez, J. B. [Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico); Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Apdo. Postal 336, 98000 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Posgrado en CBAP, Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Carretera Tepic-Compostela km 9. C.P. 63780. Xalisco, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    Spectra of photons and neutrons were calculated, using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-5 using the e/p/n mode. A heterogeneous model was used to define the linac head where the collimators were modeled to produce five different treatment fields at the isocenter. Photon and neutron spectra were estimated in several points along two directions from the isocenter. The total photon fluence beyond 60 cm behaves according to 1/r{sup 2} rule, while total neutron fluence, beyond 80 cm, can be described by diffusion theory using an infinite plane as a neutron source.

  17. Preliminary study of the individual variability of the sexual receptivity of rabbit does

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Theau.Clément

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this preliminary experiment was to investigate the individual variability of the sexual receptivity of a rabbit doe in the presence of a buck (lordosis position, 0-1  variable. Twenty primiparous does maintained without reproduction were tested over 4 mo (3 tests per week at a 2- or 3-day interval after their first kindling. Out of 48 tests, the receptivity rate was 52.5±50.0% on average and varied from 20.0 to 73.3% depending on the test day. The does were lactating at the beginning of the test period and a strong receptivity decrease was revealed at the peak of lactation. Receptivity did not vary according to the tester buck or to the test operator. The individual receptivity of does varied from 8.6 to 81.3%; three of them had a receptivity rate lower than 30% and four of them a receptivity rate greater than 70%. No relationship was revealed between average receptivity and body weight or body weight variations around first litter weaning. The repeatability of sexual receptivity of non-lactating does was 23.2%. Lowly receptive does had a shorter average oestrus time (<2 tests and a longer dioestrus time (≥6 tests, whereas highly receptive does had a longer oestrus time (>4 tests and a shorter dioestrus time (≤3 tests. The correlation between average receptivity and average oestrus time was 0.80. These results indicate a fairly high individual variability of the expression of rabbit sexual receptivity and of its duration, and justify the exploration of an eventual genetic origin in a subsequent experiment.

  18. Field dependent transition to the non-linear regime in magnetic hyperthermia experiments: Comparison between maghemite, copper, zinc, nickel and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Verde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Further advances in magnetic hyperthermia might be limited by biological constraints, such as using sufficiently low frequencies and low field amplitudes to inhibit harmful eddy currents inside the patient's body. These incite the need to optimize the heating efficiency of the nanoparticles, referred to as the specific absorption rate (SAR. Among the several properties currently under research, one of particular importance is the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime that takes place as the field amplitude is increased, an aspect where the magnetic anisotropy is expected to play a fundamental role. In this paper we investigate the heating properties of cobalt ferrite and maghemite nanoparticles under the influence of a 500 kHz sinusoidal magnetic field with varying amplitude, up to 134 Oe. The particles were characterized by TEM, XRD, FMR and VSM, from which most relevant morphological, structural and magnetic properties were inferred. Both materials have similar size distributions and saturation magnetization, but strikingly different magnetic anisotropies. From magnetic hyperthermia experiments we found that, while at low fields maghemite is the best nanomaterial for hyperthermia applications, above a critical field, close to the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime, cobalt ferrite becomes more efficient. The results were also analyzed with respect to the energy conversion efficiency and compared with dynamic hysteresis simulations. Additional analysis with nickel, zinc and copper-ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes confirmed the importance of the magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor. Further, the analysis of the characterization parameters suggested core-shell nanostructures, probably due to a surface passivation process during the nanoparticle synthesis. Finally, we discussed the effect of particle-particle interactions and its consequences, in particular regarding discrepancies between estimated

  19. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver M.

    2015-11-12

    Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR) requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness). The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  20. Method of Relating Grain Size Distribution to Hydraulic Conductivity in Dune Sands to Assist in Assessing Managed Aquifer Recharge Projects: Wadi Khulays Dune Field, Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver M. Lopez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Planning for use of a dune field aquifer for managed aquifer recharge (MAR requires that hydraulic properties need to be estimated over a large geographic area. Saturated hydraulic conductivity of dune sands is commonly estimated from grain size distribution data by employing some type of empirical equation. Over 50 samples from the Wadi Khulays dune field in Western Saudi Arabia were collected and the grain size distribution, porosity, and hydraulic conductivity were measured. An evaluation of 20 existing empirical equations showed a generally high degree of error in the predicted compared to the measured hydraulic conductivity values of these samples. Statistical analyses comparing estimated versus measured hydraulic conductivity demonstrated that there is a significant relationship between hydraulic conductivity and mud percentage (and skewness. The modified Beyer equation, which showed a generally low prediction error, was modified by adding a second term fitting parameter related to the mud concentration based on 25 of the 50 samples analyzed. An inverse optimization process was conducted to quantify the fitting parameter and a new empirical equation was developed. This equation was tested against the remaining 25 samples analyzed and produced an estimated saturated hydraulic conductivity with the lowest error of any empirical equation. This methodology can be used for large dune field hydraulic conductivity estimation and reduce planning costs for MAR systems.

  1. Size-dependent structure and magnetic properties of co-evaporated Fe-SiO2 nanoparticle composite film under high magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Ma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Composite film of Fe nanoparticles embedded in a SiO2 matrix has been prepared by the co-evaporation of Fe and SiO2. Both source temperature and in-situ high magnetic field (HMF have been used to adjust the Fe particle size and the growth of Fe-SiO2 film. The size of Fe particle decreased with increasing the source temperature without HMF. When HMF was presented during the growth of the film, the size of Fe particle was enlarged and reduced for source temperatures of 1300 °C and 1400 °C, respectively. Meanwhile, the preferred orientation of the film grown at 1400 °C became uniform with the application of HMF. In addition, it is also found that the film was formed in two layers. One layer is formed by the Fe particle, while the other is free of Fe particles due to the existence of more SiO2. The structural variation has a significant effect on the magnetic properties. The coercivity (90 Oe of the 1300 °C film is much higher than that (6 Oe of the 1400 °C film with a small particle size and uniform orientation. The saturation magnetization can be increased by increasing the Fe particle volume fraction. This study develops a new method to tune the soft magnetic properties by the co-evaporation of Fe and SiO2.

  2. Size characterization of barley starch granules by gravitational field-flow fractionation: a rapid, low-cost method to assess the brewing capability of different strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Zattoni, Andrea; Casolari, Sonia; Krumlova, Andrea; Budinska, Marcela; Chmelík, Josef

    2002-04-01

    Cereal starch occurs as two types of micrometer-sized granules, large and small. Large starch granules are more susceptible to enzymatic hydrolysis. When cereal starch is used for fermentation processes, as in brewing of barley malt, the barley strains with the highest content of large starch granules should be preferred. Gravitational field-flow fractionation (GFFF) is a separation method able to fractionate starch samples at low cost and short analysis time. In this work, the search for the best GFFF conditions for the analytical separation of barley starch within an inter-laboratory approach is presented. For different barley strains cultivated under monitored conditions the size distributions of starch granules is here quickly monitored and characterized by GFFF. As a consequence, dimensional characterization of barley starch can allow for the selection of the most suitable strains with the lowest content of non-degradable starch.

  3. Cluster size convergence of the density matrix embedding theory and its dynamical cluster formulation: A study with an auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Kretchmer, Joshua S.; Shi, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the cluster size convergence of the energy and observables using two forms of density matrix embedding theory (DMET): the original cluster form (CDMET) and a new formulation motivated by the dynamical cluster approximation (DCA-DMET). Both methods are applied to the half-filled one- and two-dimensional Hubbard models using a sign-problem free auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo impurity solver, which allows for the treatment of large impurity clusters of up to 100 sites. While CDMET is more accurate at smaller impurity cluster sizes, DCA-DMET exhibits faster asymptotic convergence towards the thermodynamic limit. We use our two formulations to produce new accurate estimates for the energy and local moment of the two-dimensional Hubbard model for U /t =2 ,4 ,6 . These results compare favorably with the best data available in the literature, and help resolve earlier uncertainties in the moment for U /t =2 .

  4. Field Investigation on the Prevalence of Trypanosomiasis in Camels in Relation to Sex, Age, Breed and Herd Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Bhutto, J. A. Gadahi, G. Shah1, P. Dewani2 and A.G. Arijo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples were collected from 240 camels (183 male and 57 female of four breeds from six districts of Sindh. An overall infection was determined as 11.25%. Species of Trypanosoma was identified as Trypanosoma evansi. District wise infection was found to be 2.5, 7.5, 12.5, 15.00, 22.5 and 7.5% in Hyderabad, Mirpur Khas, Umerkot, Badin, Thatta and Larkana, respectively. A higher infection was found in females (15.79% as compared to males (9.84%. Highest (14.96% infection was noted in age group >7 years, followed by 8.57 and 4.65% in 3 to 7 years and less than to 3 years old camels, respectively. Four breeds of camels were surveyed and the highest infection rate was found in Sakrai breed (21.82%, followed by 16.67, 6.15 and 5.95% in Kharai, Sindhi and Dhati breeds respectively. When herd size was considered, infection rate was 1.67, 6.67, 15.00 and 21.67% in herds possessing 1 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 20 and more than 20 animals, respectively.

  5. Real-time reception of multi-gigabit coherent optical OFDM signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qi; Chen, Simin; Ma, Yiran; Shieh, William

    2009-05-11

    Coherent Optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) has been demonstrated for delivering superior performance in spectral efficiency, receiver sensitivity, and polarization-dispersion resilience. Fueled by the rapid advancement in semiconductor technology, high-speed field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) and analogue-to-digital-converters/digital-to-analogue converters (ADC/DACs) have been increasingly adopted for digital signal processing in optical communications. In this paper, we report the first FPGA-based real-time implementation of coherent optical OFDM (CO-OFDM) receiver with a transmission rate up to 3.1 Gb/s. Several basic aspects of CO-OFDM signal processing are described in detail, and the BER sensitivity performance are evaluated in real-time. To the best of our knowledge, we have achieved the record real-time reception date rate for a single-input single-output (SISO) coherent OFDM signal, in either RF domain or optical domain.

  6. Membrane–initiated estradiol signaling regulating sexual receptivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Micevych

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Estradiol has profound actions on the structure and function of the nervous system. In addition to nuclear actions that directly modulate gene expression, the idea that estradiol can rapidly activate cell signaling by binding to membrane estrogen receptors (mERs has emerged. Even the regulation of sexual receptivity, an action previously thought to be completely regulated by nuclear ERs, has been shown to have a membrane-initiated estradiol signaling (MIES component. This highlighted the question of the nature of mERs. Several candidates have been proposed, ERα, ERβ, ER-X, GPR30 (G protein coupled estrogen receptor; GPER, and a receptor activated by a diphenylacrylamide compound, STX. Although each of these receptors has been shown to be active in specific assays, we present evidence for and against their participation in sexual receptivity by acting in the lordosis-regulating circuit. The initial MIES that activates the circuit is in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH. Using both activation of μ-opioid receptors (MOR in the medial preoptic nucleus and lordosis behavior, we document that both ERα and the STX receptor participate in the required MIES. ERα and the STX receptor activation of cell signaling are dependent on the transactivation of type 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1a that augment progesterone synthesis in astrocytes and protein kinase C (PKC in ARH neurons. While estradiol-induced sexual receptivity does not depend on neuroprogesterone, proceptive behaviors do. Moreover, the ERα and the STX receptor activation of medial preoptic MORs and augmentation of lordosis were sensitive to mGluR1a blockade. These observations suggest a common mechanism through which mERs are coupled to intracellular signaling cascades, not just in regulating reproduction, but in actions throughout the neuraxis including the cortex, hippocampus, striatum and DRGs.

  7. Realization of size controllable graphene micro/nanogap with a micro/nanowire mask method for organic field-effect transistors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Zhiyu; Wan, Qing; Liu, Huixuan;

    2011-01-01

    A size controllable graphene micro/nanogap fabrication method using micro/nanowire as mask is presented. The gap dimension can be adjusted by the diameter of the mask wire. As a typical application, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) film organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) were fabricated...... with the graphene micro/nanogap bottom electrodes. The ultrathin thickness of the graphene, combined with its good compatibility with organic semiconductors, and high electrical conductivity produced high-performance CuPc film device with mobility at 0.053 cm(2)/Vs and on/off ratio at 10(5), showing promising...

  8. Radiation Emergency Preparedness Tools: Virtual Community Reception Center

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-28

    This podcast is an overview of resources from the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Practical Tools for Radiation Emergency Preparedness. A specialist working with CDC's Radiation Studies Branch describes a web-based training tool known as a Virtual Community Reception Center (vCRC).  Created: 2/28/2011 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Radiation Studies Branch and Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB)/Joint Information Center (JIC); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 2/28/2011.

  9. Receptive vocabulary differences in monolingual and bilingual children*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialystok, Ellen; Luk, Gigi; Peets, Kathleen F.; Yang, Sujin

    2015-01-01

    Studies often report that bilingual participants possess a smaller vocabulary in the language of testing than monolinguals, especially in research with children. However, each study is based on a small sample so it is difficult to determine whether the vocabulary difference is due to sampling error. We report the results of an analysis of 1,738 children between 3 and 10 years old and demonstrate a consistent difference in receptive vocabulary between the two groups. Two preliminary analyses suggest that this difference does not change with different language pairs and is largely confined to words relevant to a home context rather than a school context. PMID:25750580

  10. Noise-Assisted Signal Reception in Threshold Neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In certain cases, noises can improve signal transmission or signal processing. This phenomenon is the so-called stochastic resonance. In this paper, we firstly present two theorems to prove that the noisy threshold neuron shows stochastic resonance in terms of the probability of correct reception. Secondly, we analytically discuss stochastic resonance effects and give the probability-optimal noise levels for four representative noises. Finally, we discuss the stochastic gradient ascent learning law, which can be used to find the probability-optimal noise levels. We also present our simulation results for the four representative noises. These results indicate that stochastic resonance is favorable both in biological neurons and in signal processing.

  11. First direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    The first direct exposure to lunar material for Crew Reception personnel probably happened late Friday, July 25, 1969. Terry Slezak (displaying moon dust on his left hand fingers), Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) photographic technician, was removing film magazines from the first of two containers when the incident occurred. As he removed the plastic seal from Magazine S, one of the 70mm magazines taken during Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA), it was apparent that the exterior of the cassette displayed traces of a black powdery substance. Apollo 11 Commander Neil Armstrong reported during the mission that he had retrieved a 70mm cassette which had dropped to the lunar surface.

  12. Inexpensive, pocket-sized LED-based fluorometer for undergraduate teaching laboratories and in-the-field chemical detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiber, Gage; Basu, Partha; Corcovilos, Theodore A.

    2015-05-01

    Fluorometry is a standard experimental technique for the detection of chemical compounds in solution. Excitation light is absorbed by a sample and then longer-wavelength light is emitted. Typical laboratory fluorometers are large and expensive, making them poorly suited for field work and teaching laboratories. We present a simple battery-powered fluorometer built with off-the-shelf components and a 3D-printed body. The light sources are user-replaceable light emitting diodes (LEDs). Two independent light sources of different wavelengths allow ratiometric measurements of the sample. The detectors are photodiodes with interchangeable dielectric Fabry-Perot stack spectral filters. The light gathering optics are designed using non-imaging optics principles to maximize the amount of detected fluorescence light. We present the design of the device and demonstrate the sensitivity using a molecular detector of Pb2+ ions in solution. The absorption and emission wavelengths of the detector molecule change from 415 nm and 465 nm, resp., in the absence of Pb2+ to 389 nm and 423 nm, resp., in the presence of Pb2+. The estimated sensitivity of the fluorometer with this molecular detector is a few p.p.b.

  13. Teaching receptive naming of Chinese characters to children with autism by incorporating echolalia.

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, J. P.; Wu, K I

    1997-01-01

    The facilitative effect of incorporating echolalia on teaching receptive naming of Chinese characters to children with autism was assessed. In Experiment 1, echoing the requested character name prior to the receptive naming task facilitated matching a character to its name. In addition, task performance was consistently maintained only when echolalia preceded the receptive manual response. Positive results from generalization tests suggested that learned responses occurred across various nove...

  14. Arabinogalactan-protein secretion is associated with the acquisition of stigmatic receptivity in the apple flower

    OpenAIRE

    Losada Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Herrero Romero, María

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Stigmatic receptivity plays a clear role in pollination dynamics; however, little is known about the factors that confer to a stigma the competence to be receptive for the germination of pollen grains. In this work, a developmental approach is used to evaluate the acquisition of stigmatic receptivity and its relationship with a possible change in arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs). Methods Flowers of the domestic apple, Malus × domestica, were assessed for their capacity ...

  15. Effect of Bactericides on Population Sizes and Spread of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis on Tomatoes in the Greenhouse and on Disease Development and Crop Yield in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausbeck, M K; Bell, J; Medina-Mora, C; Podolsky, R; Fulbright, D W

    2000-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemical applications, with the exception of mancozeb, reduced population sizes and spread of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis among tomato seedlings in the greenhouse and impacted subsequent plant development and yield in the field. While applications of copper hydroxide, copper hydroxide/mancozeb, copper hydroxide/mancozeb (premixed 12 h before spraying), streptomycin, and streptomycin/copper hydroxide to seedlings in the greenhouse did not differ significantly from the inoculated control, the trend was for these treatments to increase the survival of inoculated transplants in the field in comparison to the inoculated control. In the field, inoculated controls produced yields that were 63% (1995) and 51% (1996) of those produced by uninoculated controls. In both years, with the exception of mancozeb in 1995, all treatments resulted in yields similar to those obtained with the uninoculated control. Plant survival and yield in the field were severely affected when transplants had a pathogen population of >/= x 10(8) CFU/g of tissue. All treatments, with the exception of mancozeb, limited C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis populations to <5.0 x 10(5). None of the treatments significantly reduced the incidence of fruit spotting compared with that of the inoculated control.

  16. Field study and numerical modeling of wind and surface waves at the middle-sized water body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baydakov, Georgy; Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Sergeev, Daniil; Papko, Vladislav; Kandaurov, Alexander; Vdovin, Maxim; Troitskaya, Yuliya

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of field experiments on studying the wind and waves over inland waters, which were carried out at the Gorky Reservoir in 2011-2014. The sensors were positioned at the oceanographic Froude buoy including five two-component ultrasonic sensors WindSonic by Gill Instruments at different levels (0.1, 0.85, 1.3, 2.27, 5.26 meters above the mean water surface level), one water and three air temperature sensors, and three-channel wire wave gauge. From the measured profiles of wind speed, we calculated basic parameters of the atmospheric boundary layer: the friction velocity u*, the wind speed at the standard height of 10 m U10 and the drag coefficient CD. Parameters were obtained in the range of wind speeds of 1-10 m/s. For wind speeds stronger than 3 m/s CD values were lower than those obtained before (see eg. [1,2]) and those predicted by the bulk parameterization. In the range of wind speeds of 3-5 m/s CD values are even lower than the corresponding smooth flow. However, for weak winds (less than 2.5 m/s) CD values considerably higher than expected ones. The main peculiarity of our measurements is very low location of the lowest sensor: 0.1 m against 0.89 m in [1] and 0.5 m in [2]. Moreover, the lowest sensor was not fixed on the mast, but was located on the float and followed the water surface. Analysis shows that the obtained parameters of profile are almost independent on the number of approximated wind speed levels if they include the lowest sensor. But excluding the lowest sensor gave larger values of CD similar to [1] and [2]. These results demonstrate importance of wind speed measuring close to the water surface. The new parameterization of surface drag coefficient was proposed on the basis of the obtained data. The new surface drag parameterization was used in WAVEWATCH III model applied for modeling waves at the reservoir. 1-D spectra of the field experiment were compared with those obtained in the numerical experiments with

  17. Linear models for airborne-laser-scanning-based operational forest inventory with small field sample size and highly correlated LiDAR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junttila, Virpi; Kauranne, Tuomo; Finley, Andrew O.; Bradford, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Modern operational forest inventory often uses remotely sensed data that cover the whole inventory area to produce spatially explicit estimates of forest properties through statistical models. The data obtained by airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR) correlate well with many forest inventory variables, such as the tree height, the timber volume, and the biomass. To construct an accurate model over thousands of hectares, LiDAR data must be supplemented with several hundred field sample measurements of forest inventory variables. This can be costly and time consuming. Different LiDAR-data-based and spatial-data-based sampling designs can reduce the number of field sample plots needed. However, problems arising from the features of the LiDAR data, such as a large number of predictors compared with the sample size (overfitting) or a strong correlation among predictors (multicollinearity), may decrease the accuracy and precision of the estimates and predictions. To overcome these problems, a Bayesian linear model with the singular value decomposition of predictors, combined with regularization, is proposed. The model performance in predicting different forest inventory variables is verified in ten inventory areas from two continents, where the number of field sample plots is reduced using different sampling designs. The results show that, with an appropriate field plot selection strategy and the proposed linear model, the total relative error of the predicted forest inventory variables is only 5%–15% larger using 50 field sample plots than the error of a linear model estimated with several hundred field sample plots when we sum up the error due to both the model noise variance and the model’s lack of fit.

  18. Expressive and receptive language skills in preschool children from a socially disadvantaged area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ashling; Gibbon, Fiona E; O'shea, Aoife

    2016-02-01

    Evidence suggests that children present with receptive language skills that are equivalent to or more advanced than expressive language skills. This profile holds true for typical and delayed language development. This study aimed to determine if such a profile existed for preschool children from an area of social deprivation and to investigate if particular language skills influence any differences found between expressive and receptive skills. Data from 187 CELF P2 UK assessments conducted on preschool children from two socially disadvantaged areas in a city in southern Ireland. A significant difference was found between Receptive Language Index (RLI) and Expressive Language Index (ELI) scores with Receptive scores found to be lower than Expressive scores. The majority (78.6%) of participants had a lower Receptive Language than Expressive score (RLI ELI), with very few (3.2%) having the same Receptive and Expressive scores (RLI = ELI). Scores for the Concepts and Following Directions (receptive) sub-test were significantly lower than for the other receptive sub tests, while scores for the Expressive Vocabulary sub-test were significantly higher than for the other expressive sub tests. The finding of more advanced expressive than receptive language skills in socially deprived preschool children is previously unreported and clinically relevant for speech-language pathologists in identifying the needs of this population.

  19. The determination of aldehyde oxidase activity patterns in the wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster : Absence of field size influence during the third larval instar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrady, Edward; Sprey, Th E

    1986-07-01

    The pattern of aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity was determined in wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster larvae homozygous for the mutants apt (73n), Beaded, and vestigial (vg) in order to determine if reduction in field size in the pouch could be related to alterations of the wild-type AO pattern, as suggested by the Kauffman (1978) hypothesis. The pattern in wild-type discs was resolved into six areas for comparison with mutant discs. vg discs developed at 25° C showed restriction of the pattern into a small area on the anterior side of the disc, and comparison of vg and wild-type prepupal wings allowed positive identification of the AO pattern elements which remained. AO patterns in vg wing discs grown at 27°, 29°, and 31° C were progressively more complete and similar to wild-type, reflecting the reduction in cell death in discs grown at higher temperatures. These results show that cell loss during the third instar in vg development at 25° C is responsible for the alteration of the AO pattern, rather than field size reduction, and that determination of the pattern must take place much earlier than the time of its first appearance during the third larval instar, and before cell death in vg discs begins. Thus mutants acting at earlier stages will be necessary for further tests of the Kauffman hypothesis.

  20. Estimating population size for Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L.) with spatial capture-recapture models based on genotypes from one field sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollet, Pierre; Kery, Marc; Gardner, Beth; Pasinelli, Gilberto; Royle, Andy

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey of an endangered and cryptic forest grouse, the capercaillie Tetrao urogallus, based on droppings collected on two sampling occasions in eight forest fragments in central Switzerland in early spring 2009. We used genetic analyses to sex and individually identify birds. We estimated sex-dependent detection probabilities and population size using a modern spatial capture-recapture (SCR) model for the data from pooled surveys. A total of 127 capercaillie genotypes were identified (77 males, 46 females, and 4 of unknown sex). The SCR model yielded atotal population size estimate (posterior mean) of 137.3 capercaillies (posterior sd 4.2, 95% CRI 130–147). The observed sex ratio was skewed towards males (0.63). The posterior mean of the sex ratio under the SCR model was 0.58 (posterior sd 0.02, 95% CRI 0.54–0.61), suggesting a male-biased sex ratio in our study area. A subsampling simulation study indicated that a reduced sampling effort representing 75% of the actual detections would still yield practically acceptable estimates of total size and sex ratio in our population. Hence, field work and financial effort could be reduced without compromising accuracy when the SCR model is used to estimate key population parameters of cryptic species.

  1. TiO2 in commercial sunscreen lotion: flow field-flow fractionation and ICP-AES together for size analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contado, Catia; Pagnoni, Antonella

    2008-10-01

    A new method for determining the size of titanium dioxide particles is proposed and assayed in a commercial sunscreen product. Today many sun protection cosmetics incorporate physical UV filters as active ingredients, and there are no official methods for determining these compounds in sunscreen cosmetics. Here flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) has been tested, first to sort two different types of TiO2 nano- and microstandard materials (AeroxideTiO2 Degussa P-25 and TiO2 rutile 0.1-0.2-microm size) and then to fractionate TiO2 particles, extracted from a commercial sunscreen lotion. All the TiO2 FlFFF separations were detected by UV but during elution fractions were collected and their Ti content measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES); the Ti concentration profiles obtained by ICP-AES were well correlated with the UV signals. The TiO2 particle mass-size distribution were calculated from the UV profiles. This methodology is relatively simple and rapid, and the sample treatment is as a whole easy and low cost.

  2. Size separations of starch of different botanical origin studied by asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation and multiangle light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlund, Karl-Gustav; Leeman, Mats; Santacruz, Stalin

    2011-02-01

    Asymmetrical-flow field-flow fractionation combined with multiangle light scattering and refractive index detection has been revealed to be a powerful tool for starch characterization. It is based on size separation according to the hydrodynamic diameter of the starch components. Starch from a wide range of different botanical sources were studied, including normal starch and high-amylose and high-amylopectin starch. The starch was dissolved by heat treatment at elevated pressure in a laboratory autoclave. This gave clear solutions with no granular residues. Amylose retrogradation was prevented by using freshly dissolved samples. Programmed cross flow starting at 1.0 mL min(-1) and decreasing exponentially with a half-life of 4 min was utilised. The starches showed two size populations representing mainly amylose and mainly amylopectin with an overlapping region where amylose and amylopectin were possibly co-eluted. Most of the first population had molar masses below 10(6) g mol(-1), and most of the second size population had molar masses above 10(7) g mol(-1). Large differences were found in the relative amounts of the two populations, the molar mass, and hydrodynamic diameters, depending on the plant source and its varieties.

  3. Estimating Population Size for Capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus L. with Spatial Capture-Recapture Models Based on Genotypes from One Field Sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Mollet

    Full Text Available We conducted a survey of an endangered and cryptic forest grouse, the capercaillie Tetrao urogallus, based on droppings collected on two sampling occasions in eight forest fragments in central Switzerland in early spring 2009. We used genetic analyses to sex and individually identify birds. We estimated sex-dependent detection probabilities and population size using a modern spatial capture-recapture (SCR model for the data from pooled surveys. A total of 127 capercaillie genotypes were identified (77 males, 46 females, and 4 of unknown sex. The SCR model yielded a total population size estimate (posterior mean of 137.3 capercaillies (posterior sd 4.2, 95% CRI 130-147. The observed sex ratio was skewed towards males (0.63. The posterior mean of the sex ratio under the SCR model was 0.58 (posterior sd 0.02, 95% CRI 0.54-0.61, suggesting a male-biased sex ratio in our study area. A subsampling simulation study indicated that a reduced sampling effort representing 75% of the actual detections would still yield practically acceptable estimates of total size and sex ratio in our population. Hence, field work and financial effort could be reduced without compromising accuracy when the SCR model is used to estimate key population parameters of cryptic species.

  4. Study of Endometrial Receptivity during Implantation in Implantation Dysfunction Mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-juan LIU; Guang-ying HUANG; Ming-wei YANG; Fu-er LU

    2008-01-01

    Objective To establish the mice model of implantation dysfunction and to study the endometrial receptivity during implantation in implantation dysfunction mouse. Methods Sexually mature female virgin, Kunming mice were randomly assigned to the control group and the model group postcoitally. The model mice at 9 : 00 AM on d 4 of pregnancy(d 4) were injected subcutaneously with mifepristone. All animals were sacrificed at 9:00 PM on d 4 and their uterine horns were examined for the presence of implanted embryos. Histopathology of uterine endometrium was observed by light-microscope. The endometrial expressions of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) assessed by immunnohistochemical SP method. The endometrial expressions of ER mRNA and PR mRNA were assessed by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results Compared with control group, implantation rates and average embryo number significently decreased in model group, the development of endometrium was inhibited. In model group, absorbency and area rate of ER and PR in the gland and stroma were lower than those in control group (P<0.05). Expressions of ER mRNA and PR mRNA in model uterus were significantly lower than those in the control.Conclusion The endometrial receptivity and implantation decreased in mifepristoneinduced implantation dysfunction mouse.

  5. Predicting Endometrium Receptivity with Parameters of Spiral Artery Blood Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Xuehao; LI Quanshui; ZHANG Qingping; ZHU Guijin

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order To evaluate whether the parameters of spiral artery blood flow, as measured by transvaginal color Doppler, may be used to assess endometrium receptivity prior to embryo transfer (ET), a retrospective study of 94 infertile women who had undergone ART treatments with different outcomes (pregnant or nonpregnant) was done. Subendometrial blood flow was evaluated. The resistance index (RI), systolic/diastolic ratio (S/D) and pulsatility index (PI) were significantly lower in those who achieved pregnancy as compared with those who did not: 0.62±0.04 vs 0.68±0.04 (P<0.001), 2.66±0.33 vs 3.19±0.39 (P<0.01) and 1.15±0.17 vs 1.34±0.22 (P<0.05), respectively. Furthermore, when RI>0.72, PI>1.6, and S/D>3.6, no pregnancy occurred. These data suggest that the parameters of spiral artery blood flow could be used as a new assay in predicting endometrial receptivity before ET.

  6. Follistatin is critical for mouse uterine receptivity and decidualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Paul T; Monsivais, Diana; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Matzuk, Martin M

    2017-06-13

    Embryo implantation remains a significant challenge for assisted reproductive technology, with implantation failure occurring in ∼50% of in vitro fertilization attempts. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine receptivity will enable the development of new interventions and biomarkers. TGFβ family signaling in the uterus is critical for establishing and maintaining pregnancy. Follistatin (FST) regulates TGFβ family signaling by selectively binding TGFβ family ligands and sequestering them. In humans, FST is up-regulated in the decidua during early pregnancy, and women with recurrent miscarriage have lower endometrial expression of FST during the luteal phase. Because global knockout of Fst is perinatal lethal in mice, we generated a conditional knockout (cKO) of Fst in the uterus using progesterone receptor-cre to study the roles of uterine Fst during pregnancy. Uterine Fst-cKO mice demonstrate severe fertility defects and deliver only 2% of the number of pups delivered by control females. In Fst-cKO mice, the uterine luminal epithelium does not respond properly to estrogen and progesterone signals and remains unreceptive to embryo attachment by continuing to proliferate and failing to differentiate. The uterine stroma of Fst-cKO mice also responds poorly to artificial decidualization, with lower levels of proliferation and differentiation. In the absence of uterine FST, activin B expression and signaling are up-regulated, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals are impaired. Our findings support a model in which repression of activin signaling by FST enables uterine receptivity by preserving critical BMP signaling.

  7. Go contributes to olfactory reception in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Gregg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seven-transmembrane receptors typically mediate olfactory signal transduction by coupling to G-proteins. Although insect odorant receptors have seven transmembrane domains like G-protein coupled receptors, they have an inverted membrane topology and function as ligand-gated cation channels. Consequently, the involvement of cyclic nucleotides and G proteins in insect odor reception is controversial. Since the heterotrimeric Goα subunit is expressed in Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons, we reasoned that Go acts together with insect odorant receptor cation channels to mediate odor-induced physiological responses. Results To test whether Go dependent signaling is involved in mediating olfactory responses in Drosophila, we analyzed electroantennogram and single-sensillum recording from flies that conditionally express pertussis toxin, a specific inhibitor of Go in Drosophila. Pertussis toxin expression in olfactory receptor neurons reversibly reduced the amplitude and hastened the termination of electroantennogram responses induced by ethyl acetate. The frequency of odor-induced spike firing from individual sensory neurons was also reduced by pertussis toxin. These results demonstrate that Go signaling is involved in increasing sensitivity of olfactory physiology in Drosophila. The effect of pertussis toxin was independent of odorant identity and intensity, indicating a generalized involvement of Go in olfactory reception. Conclusion These results demonstrate that Go is required for maximal physiological responses to multiple odorants in Drosophila, and suggest that OR channel function and G-protein signaling are required for optimal physiological responses to odors.

  8. Effect of size of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles on electrochemical performance of screen printed electrode using sedimentation field-flow fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Haiyang; Kim, Beom-Ju; Choi, Seong-Ho; Jung, Euo Chang; Lee, Seungho

    2014-10-01

    Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and Fe3O4-deposited multi-walled carbon nanotubes (Fe3O4@MWCNTs) were synthesized by ultrasonic co-precipitation method. The surface and structural properties of Fe3O4 MNPs and Fe3O4@MWCNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission transmission electron microscopy (FE-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Sedimentation field-flow fractionation (SdFFF) was, for the first time, employed to study the influence of synthesis parameters on size distribution of Fe3O4 MNPs. A reasonable resolution for SdFFF analysis of Fe3O4 MNPs was obtained by a combination of 1,600 RPM, flow rate of 0.3 mL min-1, and Triton X-100. The results suggest that lower pH and higher reaction temperature tend to yield smaller Fe3O4 MNPs size. The size distribution of Fe3O4 MNPs obtained from SdFFF was compared with those obtained from TEM and DLS. Also the effect of the particle size of Fe3O4 MNPs on electrochemical property of Fe3O4@MWCNTs-treated screen printed electrode (SPE) was studied. Cyclic voltammetry revealed that SPE treated with MWCNTs yields a significantly enhanced signal than that with no treatment. The SPE signal was even further enhanced with addition of Fe3O4 MNPs. For SPE analysis of dopamine, a liner range of 0.005-0.1 mM with a correlation coefficient of 0.986 was observed. Results revealed that (1) SdFFF is a useful tool for size-based separation and characterization of MNPs; (2) Proposed methods for synthesis of Fe3O4 nanoparticles and Fe3O4@MWCNTs are mild and fast (about 30 min); (3) SPE treated with Fe3O4@MWCNTs shows potential applicability for biosensing.

  9. Study of the Effects of the Electric Field on Charging Measurements on Individual Micron-size Dust Grains by Secondary Electron Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tankosic, D.; Abbas, M. M.

    2013-01-01

    The dust charging by electron impact is an important dust charging process in Astrophysical, Planetary, and the Lunar environments. Low energy electrons are reflected or stick to the grains charging the dust grains negatively. At sufficiently high energies electrons penetrate the grain leading to excitation and emission of electrons referred to as secondary electron emission (SEE). Available theoretical models for the calculation of SEE yield applicable for neutral, planar or bulk surfaces are generally based on Sternglass Equation. However, viable models for charging of individual dust grains do not exist at the present time. Therefore, the SEE yields have to be obtained by some experimental methods at the present time. We have conducted experimental studies on charging of individual micron size dust grains in simulated space environments using an electrodynamic balance (EDB) facility at NASA-MSFC. The results of our extensive laboratory study of charging of individual micron-size dust grains by low energy electron impact indicate that the SEE by electron impact is a very complex process expected to be substantially different from the bulk materials. It was found that the incident electrons may lead to positive or negative charging of dust grains depending upon the grain size, surface potential, electron energy, electron flux, grain composition, and configuration. In this paper we give a more elaborate discussion about the possible effects of the AC field in the EDB on dust charging measurements by comparing the secondary electron emission time-period (tau (sub em) (s/e)) with the time-period (tau (sub ac) (ms)) of the AC field cycle in the EDB that we have briefly addressed in our previous publication.

  10. Analysis of the variation of the attenuation curve in function of the radiation field size for k Vp X-ray beams using the MCNP-5C code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Marco A.R., E-mail: marco@cetea.com.b, E-mail: marfernandes@fmb.unesp.b [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FMB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina; Ribeiro, Victor A.B. [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (IBB/UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias; Viana, Rodrigo S.S.; Coelho, Talita S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The paper illustrates the use of the Monte Carlo method, MCNP-5C code, to analyze the attenuation curve behavior of the 50 kVp radiation beam from superficial radiotherapy equipment as Dermopan2 model. The simulations seek to verify the MCNP-5C code performance to study the variation of the attenuation curve - percentage depth dose (PDD) curve - in function of the radiation field dimension used at radiotherapy of skin tumors with 50 kVp X-ray beams. The PDD curve was calculated for six different radiation field sizes with circular geometry of 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter. The radiation source was modeled considering a tungsten target with inclination 30 deg, focal point of 6.5 mm in diameter and energy beam of 50 kVp; the X-ray spectrum was calculated with the MCNP-5C code adopting total filtration (beryllium window of 1 mm and aluminum additional filter of 1 mm). The PDD showed decreasing behavior with the attenuation depth similar what is presented on the literature. There was not significant variation at the PDD values for the radiation field between 1.0 and 4.0 cm in diameter. The differences increased for fields of 5.0 and 6.0 cm and at attenuation depth higher than 1.0 cm. When it is compared the PDD values for fields of 3.0 and 6.0 cm in diameter, it verifies the greater difference (12.6 %) at depth of 5.7 cm, proving the scattered radiation effect. The MCNP-5C code showed as an appropriate procedure to analyze the attenuation curves of the superficial radiotherapy beams. (author)

  11. Physicochemical characterization of titanium dioxide pigments using various techniques for size determination and asymmetric flow field flow fractionation hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsper, Johannes P F G; Peters, Ruud J B; van Bemmel, Margaretha E M; Rivera, Zahira E Herrera; Wagner, Stephan; von der Kammer, Frank; Tromp, Peter C; Hofmann, Thilo; Weigel, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Seven commercial titanium dioxide pigments and two other well-defined TiO2 materials (TiMs) were physicochemically characterised using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (aF4) for separation, various techniques to determine size distribution and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for chemical characterization. The aF4-ICPMS conditions were optimised and validated for linearity, limit of detection, recovery, repeatability and reproducibility, all indicating good performance. Multi-element detection with aF4-ICPMS showed that some commercial pigments contained zirconium co-eluting with titanium in aF4. The other two TiMs, NM103 and NM104, contained aluminium as integral part of the titanium peak eluting in aF4. The materials were characterised using various size determination techniques: retention time in aF4, aF4 hyphenated with multi-angle laser light spectrometry (MALS), single particle ICPMS (spICPMS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and particle tracking analysis (PTA). PTA appeared inappropriate. For the other techniques, size distribution patterns were quite similar, i.e. high polydispersity with diameters from 20 to >700 nm, a modal peak between 200 and 500 nm and a shoulder at 600 nm. Number-based size distribution techniques as spICPMS and SEM showed smaller modal diameters than aF4-UV, from which mass-based diameters are calculated. With aF4-MALS calculated, light-scattering-based "diameters of gyration" (Øg) are similar to hydrodynamic diameters (Øh) from aF4-UV analyses and diameters observed with SEM, but much larger than with spICPMS. A Øg/Øh ratio of about 1 indicates that the TiMs are oblate spheres or fractal aggregates. SEM observations confirm the latter structure. The rationale for differences in modal peak diameter is discussed.

  12. SU-E-T-282: Remove Field-Size Limitation Using the Combination of Collimator Rotation and Jaw Tracking with MLC Aperture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiu, A; Chiu, R; Cumming, D; Chung, E; Ragab, O; Cui, G [UniversitySouthern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: this study is to investigate the use of variable-collimators and/or collimator-rotation to overcome the field-size limitation on TrueBeamSTX. Methods: The maximum static field-size is 22- × 40-cm for TrueBeamSTX and 40- × 40-cm for Trilogy. Maximum displacement between adjacent leaf ends at a single carriage position is 15-cm for TBSTX and 14-cm for Trilogy. Our current practice for IMRT treatment at Trilogy is as follows, if MLC leaves travel more than 13.5 cm in the MLC traveling direction, the treatment fields will be split at isocenter to two groups of IMRT fields to cover the large tumors. However, TrueBeamSTX is not limited in this way because the jaws can track each segments of the MLC aperture. Radiation treatment plans for ten patients (different tumor sites) treated at Trilogy with one dimension of the field is greater than 22 cm and the other dimension is less than or equal to 22 cm. All the plans will be converted with jaws tracking each segment's MLC aperture. If necessary, the collimator rotation will also be applied for the planning. Comparison of the converted plans with the original clinical plans will be evaluated and based on the following criterion: (1) tumor coverage; (2) dose sparing to the critical structures; and (3) treatment time. Results: The tumor coverage is compatible between two plans. The dose of critical structures was evaluated in the cumulative DVH for spinal cord, parotids, and brainstem at V20 and V5. In all patients, the maximum reduction in V20 was never more than 5% and was typically less than 1%. In V5, the maximum reduction was 10% and 3% respectively. The significant difference can be found in using the variable collimator to shorten the treatment time. Conclusion: We conclude that we will use the variable-collimator for all IMRT cases on TrueBeamSTX and as a potential backup machine for Trilogy.

  13. On Movie Title Translation from the Perspective of Reception Aesthetics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琼

    2014-01-01

    Movie is a popular art which occupies an important position in people’s leisure time. Movie title, as the most direct and accessible tool for audience to know about the movie, is very significant to attract audience into the cinema. Therefore, the translation of movie title cannot be ignored. However, due to the cultural differences in Chinese and English culture, the problem of movie title translation is obvious which needs to be paid attention to the translation and people working in movie industry. Traditional translation theory puts more emphasis on the important and authoritative status of original text and author. But this notion cannot satisfy the needs of movie title translation to the largest extent. Movie is not only a cultural and linguistic product, it also is a special commercial product. The ultimate objective of movie is to allure the audience into the cinema to watch and ap-preciate it in addition to provide the cultural information. Reception aesthetics, as a theory of literary criticism, gives priority to readers’role in literary understanding and interpretation. According to reception aesthetics, the horizon of expectation should be taken into consideration when the translation work begins to be done. Horizon of expectation is composed of the readers’or au-diences’ previous cultural norms, assumptions, and criteria in the source language and culture at a given time. Movie title, as a special text, is also understood and influenced by the audience’s horizon of expectation. Chinese audience, before they decide to watch a movie, are naturally harbor their horizon of expectation about the movie. They will form their judgment and assumptions about the genre, plot, story, background about the movie from the movie title. These kind of horizon of expectation will conse-quently influence their ultimate decision to watch the movie or not. Hence, in doing the movie title translation, the translator is supposed to keep the audience’s horizon of

  14. Aggregation dynamics and magnetic properties of magnetic micrometer-sized particles dispersed in a fluid under the action of rotating magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llera, María [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Codnia, Jorge [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro de Investigaciones en Láseres y Aplicaciones, CITEDEF-CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jorge, Guillermo A., E-mail: gjorge@ungs.edu.ar [Instituto de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-06-15

    We present a dynamic study of soft magnetic, commercial Fe and Ni micrometer-sized particles dispersed in oleic acid and subjected to a variable (rotating) magnetic field in the horizontal plane. A very complex structure is formed after the particles decant towards the bottom liquid–solid interface and the magnetic field is applied for several minutes. The dynamics of structure formation was studied by means of the registration and analysis of microscopic video images, through a Matlab image analysis script. Several parameters, such as the number of clusters, the perimeter-based fractal dimension and circularity, were calculated as a function of time. The time evolution of the number of clusters was found to follow a power-law behavior, with an exponent consistent with that found in other studies for magnetic systems, whereas the typical formation time depends on the particle diameter and field configuration. Complementarily, the magnetic properties of the formed structure were studied, reproducing the experiment with liquid paraffin as the containing fluid, and then letting it solidify. The sample obtained was studied by vibrating sample magnetometry. The magnetization curves show that the material obtained is a planar magnetically anisotropic material, which could eventually be used as an anisotropic magnetic sensor or actuator. - Highlights: • Dynamic study of Fe and Ni particles in oleic acid under rotating fields. • A very complex system of interconnected clusters was observed. • Larger particles had a smaller aggregation time. • A power law behavior of the number of clusters vs. time. • A Fe-paraffin sample with planar anisotropy characterized.

  15. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for sizing SeNPs for packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo-Siguero, María; Vera, Paula; Echegoyen, Yolanda; Nerin, Cristina; Cámara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the application of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (AF4-UV-ICP-MS) to characterize selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) in an aqueous acrylic adhesive to be used in a multilayer food packaging material. SeNPs were synthesized using a solution-phase approach based on the reduction of selenite with ascorbic acid in presence of different stabilizers compatible with food industry such as polysaccharides (chitosan (poly(D-glucosamine) and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC)) and non-ionic surfactants (Triton X-100 (t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl 5decyne-4,7-diol ethoxylate, and isotridecanol ethoxylate). Several parameters such as pH, ascorbic acid and stabilizers concentration, and compatibility of the stabilizer with the adhesive were evaluated. SeNPs suspensions with spherical morphology were obtained except when isotridecanol ethoxylate was employed which provides SeNPs with a nanorod morphology. AF4-DAD-ICP-MS was further applied for sizing the different SeNPs preparations. DAD was used as detector for selecting the best AF4 separation conditions before coupling to ICP-MS to ensure unequivocal identification of NPs. AF4 calibration with polystyrene latex (PSL) beads of known sizes allowed size determination of the different SeNPs. The following estimated hydrodynamic sizes (expressed as the mean ± standard deviation, n = 6 replicates) were found: chitosan-SeNPs- (26 ± 3 nm), TritonX100-SeNPs (22 ± 10 nm) HEC- SeNPs (91 ± 8 nm) and 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl 5decyne-4,7-diol ethoxylate- SeNPs (59 ± 4 nm). The proposed methodology was successfully applied to the characterization in terms of size of aqueous acrylic adhesives containing SeNPs Results from AF4-ICP-MS and TEM shown that only those SeNPs obtained with non-ionic surfactants and HEC were compatible with the adhesive. The results reported here evidence the usefulness of AF4-ICP

  16. Ego receptivity and hypnotizability--two pilot studies: a brief communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, L S; Holroyd, J

    1992-04-01

    Ego receptivity has been described as important for the psychotherapy process and as a characteristic of hypnosis (Deikman, 1974: Dosamantes-Alperson, 1979; Fromm, 1979). Receptivity also has been associated with a measure of absorption (Tellegen, 1981). In the first pilot study with 6 dance/movement therapy students, higher observer ratings of receptivity were associated with greater hypnotizability (r = .79, df = 4, p less than .05, 2-tailed test). In the second pilot study, the correlation was replicated (r = .51, df = 12, p = .06, 2-tailed test) with 14 dance/movement therapy students. In the second pilot study, receptivity did not correlate with absorption. Receptivity and absorption, however, accounted for 54% of hypnotizability population variance in a step-wise multiple regression. Receptivity accounted for a unique part of the variance after the effects of absorption were removed. It was concluded that receptivity should be explored as a potential predictor of hypnotizability, and that a reliable scaled measure of receptivity should be developed.

  17. Effective Strategies for Turning Receptive Vocabulary into Productive Vocabulary in EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Avan Kamal Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Vocabulary acquisition has been a main concern of EFL English teachers and learners. There have been tons of research to examine the student's level of receptive vocabulary and productive vocabulary, but no research has conducted on how turning receptive vocabulary into productive vocabulary. This study has reported the impact of the teaching…

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a "genome-wide association" approach. Method: The…

  19. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language abil