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Sample records for receiving radioiodine ablation

  1. Anxiety and depression related to the hospitalization experience of patients receiving radioiodine ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koc, Z.; Karaboc, A.; Balci, T.; Kepenek, F.; Atmaca, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: the hospital rooms for radioiodine ablation of differentiated thyroid carcinoma are designed according to radiation safety lows where patients have to remain isolated. The aim of the present study is to investigate depression and anxiety levels of the patients associated with hospitalization experience for radioiodine ablation. Methods: 30 patients (8 M, 22 F; mean: 45±13 years old) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma were included into study. After withdrawal of thyroid hormone replacement at least for 3 weeks, the patients were subject of the ablation treatment. After routine psychiatric examination Hamilton Anxiety and Depression scales were administered to the patients before and after complement of hospitalization for 1-3 days. Results: according to the statistical analysis there was not any significant difference between Hamilton depression and anxiety scores and state and trait anxiety scores of the patients before and after treatment (P>0.05). However, 18 patients had depression, with major depression of six, and 21 had high anxiety levels, according to Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Scales. Conclusion: Although the patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma do not experience anxiety or depression related to the hospitalization itself for radioiodine ablation they might frequently have depression or anxiety just before the treatment. (authors)

  2. Radioiodine Remnant Ablation: A Critical Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Chandra Sekhar; Padhy, Ajit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) is considered a safe and effective method for eliminating residual thyroid tissue, as well as microscopic disease if at all present in thyroid bed following thyroidectomy. The rationale of RRA is that in the absence of thyroid tissue, serum thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement can be used as an excellent tumor marker. Other considerations are like the presence of significant remnant thyroid tissue makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. Rarely, microscopic disease in the thyroid bed if not ablated, in the future, could be a source of anaplastic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic tumor emboli in distant sites could be the cause of distant metastasis too. The ablation of remnant tissue would in all probability eliminate these theoretical risks. It may be noted that all these are unproven contentious issues except postablation serum Tg estimation that could be a good tumor marker for detecting early biochemical recurrence in long-term follow-up strategy. Radioactive iodine is administered as a form of “adjuvant therapy” for remnant ablation. There have been several reports with regard to the administered dose for remnant ablation. The first report of a prospective randomized clinical trial was published from India by a prospective randomized study conducted at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the year 1996. The study reported that increasing the empirical 131 I initial dose to more than 50 mCi results in plateauing of the dose-response curve and thus, conventional high-dose remnant ablation needs critical evaluation. Recently, two important studies were published: One from French group and the other from UK on a similar line. Interestingly, all three studies conducted in three different geographical regions of the world showed exactly similar conclusion. The new era of low-dose remnant ablation has taken a firm scientific footing across the continents

  3. A dose-effect correlation for radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

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    Flux, Glenn D; Chittenden, Sarah J; Buckley, Susan; Hindorf, Cecilia [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Physics, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Haq, Masud; Newbold, Kate; Harmer, Clive L [Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Thyroid Unit, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the range of absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow from fixed administrations of radioiodine and to ascertain whether the success of ablation is more dependent on these absorbed doses than on the administered activity. Twenty-three patients received 3,000 MBq radioiodine following near-total thyroidectomy. The maximum absorbed dose to remnants was calculated from subsequent single photon emission tomography scans. Absorbed doses delivered to blood and red marrow were calculated from blood samples and from whole-body retention measurements. The protein bound iodine (PBI) was also calculated. Maximum absorbed doses to thyroid remnants ranged from 7 to 570 Gy. Eighteen of the 23 patients had a successful ablation. A significant difference was seen between the absorbed doses delivered to thyroid remnants, blood, and red marrow for those patients that had a successful ablation compared to those with a failed ablation (p = 0.030, p = 0.043 and p = 0.048, respectively). The difference between the PBI values acquired at day 1 and day 6 were also indicative of response (p = 0.074). A successful ablation is strongly dependent on the absorbed dose to the thyroid remnant. Dosimetry-based personalized treatment can prevent both sub-optimal administrations, which entails further radioiodine therapy, and excessive administration of radioactivity, which increases the potential for radiation toxicity. (orig.)

  4. Does multifocal papillary micro-carcinoma require radioiodine ablation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punda, A.; Markovic, V.; Eterovic, D.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Background: the thyroid carcinomas smaller than 1 cm (micro-carcinomas) comprise a significant fraction of papillary carcinomas. Excluding clinical micro-carcinomas, which present as metastatic disease, the micro-carcinomas diagnosed by ultrasound/FNAC or incidentally have very good prognosis. However, whether or not these papillary micro-carcinomas require post-surgical radioiodine ablation remains a matter of debate. Hypothesis: multi-focality is present in majority of clinical papillary micro-carcinomas and this characteristic can be used to identify the subset of non-clinical micro-carcinomas with greater malignant potential. Methods: the data on types of differentiated thyroid carcinomas diagnosed in the period 2008-2011 in the University Hospital Split were collected. Results: there were 359 patients with thyroid carcinoma, 329 (92%) of which had papillary carcinoma. About 61% (202/329) of papillary carcinomas were micro-carcinomas; most of them were diagnosed by ultrasound/FNAC (134/202= 66%), the rest were incidentalomas (48/202=24%) and clinical micro carcinomas (20/202=10%). Sixty percent (12/20) of patients with clinical micro-carcinoma and 23 patients with non-clinical micro-carcinoma (23/182=13%) had multifocal disease. Conclusion: multifocal disease is a frequent characteristic of clinical papillary thyroid micro-carcinomas, suggesting that multi-focality presents an early stage of non-clinical micro-carcinomas with more aggressive behaviour. Thus multifocal, but not uni-focal papillary micro-carcinomas may require radioiodine ablation. (authors)

  5. Heath-related quality of life in thyroid cancer patients following radioiodine ablation

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    Henry Jean-françois

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited information about the medium to long-term health-related quality of life (QOL in thyroid cancer patients after initial therapy and the existing studies suffer from limitations. The aim of the study was to assess the determinants of medium-term QOL after the initial therapy. Methods Following a total thyroidectomy, 88 thyroid cancer patients received either rhTSH or hypothyroid-assisted radioiodine ablation (RRA using 3.7 GBq (100 mCi of radioiodine. QOL evaluation of the patients using the validated Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness & Therapy (FACIT was performed at the time of inclusion (t0 and later at the 9-month post-RRA (t1. Results 83 patients were eligible for the final evaluation. Medium-term FACIT scores were not statistically different between t0 and t1 patients. All but one domain of the QOL score was similar between t0 and t1. Using a multivariate analysis, only age and immediate postoperative QOL scores were found to be determinants of the overall medium term 9-month QOL scores. Analysis showed that 'high QOL levels' (baseline and 9-month and 'no depression', 'low anxiety levels', were associated with ' Conclusions The use of radioiodine ablation does not seem to affect the medium term QOL scores of patients. Medium-term QOL is mainly determined by pre-ablation QOL. The assessment of baseline QOL might be interesting to evaluate in order to adapt the treatment protocols, the preventive strategies, and medical information to patients for potentially improving their outcomes.

  6. Immunogenic hyperthyroidism following radioiodine ablation of focal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boddenberg, B.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1993-01-01

    Immunogenic hyperthyroidism rarely develops after radioiodine elimination of focal autonomous thyroid tissue. We observed this phenomenon in 8 patients between 1989 and 1992. The occurrence of immunogenic hyperthyroidism shortly after elimination of autonomous nodules has not been studied nor is it properly understood. Most studies known today describe the development of autonomous nodules in the course of immunogenic hyperthyroidism or ignore the chronologic order of occurrence. The possibility that immunogenic hyperthyroidism may occur after radioiodine therapy of autonomous nodules, makes a consequent follow-up within the first year following radioiodine therapy mandatory. (orig.) [de

  7. Length and cost of hospital stay of radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients: comparison between preparation with thyroid hormone withdrawal and thyrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borget, I.; Chevalier, J.; Remy, H.; Ricard, M.; Schlumberger, M.; Allyn, M.; Pouvourville, G. de

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of thyroid cancer consists of thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation following thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation. Similar ablation rates were obtained with either thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) or rhTSH. But with rhTSH, the elimination of radioiodine is more rapid, thus reducing its whole-body retention and potentially resulting in a shorter hospital stay. The aim of this study was to assess the financial impact of a reduced length of hospital stay with the use of rhTSH. This was a case-control study of thyroid cancer patients treated postoperatively with 3,700 MBq (100 mCi) radioiodine; 35 patients who received rhTSH were matched with 64 patients submitted to THW according to covariates influencing radioiodine retention. The length of hospitalization (LOH) was estimated for each method according to the threshold of radioiodine retention below which the patient can be discharged from the hospital. The economic analysis was conducted from a hospital perspective. Simulations were performed. For a threshold of 400 MBq, the LOH was 2.4 days and 3.5 days with rhTSH and THW, respectively, and the cost for an ablation stay was, respectively, 2,146 and 1,807 EUR. In the French context, 57% of the acquisition cost of rhTSH was compensated by the reduction of the length of hospitalization. By increasing the iodine excretion, rhTSH allows a shorter hospitalization length, which partially compensates its acquisition cost. (orig.)

  8. Radioiodine remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer after combined endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation.

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    Vrachimis, A; Schober, O; Riemann, B

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) after (near-)total thyroidectomy (TE) is a key element in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). The use of exogenous TSH stimulation (rhTSH) prior to RRA has shown promising results as compared to conventional thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). As yet, the efficacy of RRA after brief THW and single rhTSH administration has not been assessed. The study sample comprised 147 patients with DTC referred to our center between May 2008 and September 2010. All patients received TE with subsequent RRA. None of these 147 patients had evidence of distant metastasis. 93 patients had endogenous TSH stimulation 4-5 weeks after surgery (group I) and twenty-six received two rhTSH injections (group II). 28 patients were treated with a single rhTSH injection after a brief THW (group III). RRA-Efficacy was assessed three months after therapy by diagnostic whole-body scan and measurement of the tumour marker thyroglobulin (Tg) under TSH stimulation. Three categories of success were defined for remnant ablation. Based on the definition of successful remnant ablation no visible uptake and a Tg ≤ 2.0 ng/ml (category 1) was seen in 62/93 patients in group I, in 17/26 patients in group II (p = n.s.) and in 12/28 patients in group III (p 2.0 ng/ml (category 3) was found in 3/93 patients in group I and 1/26 patients in group II but in no patient in group III. The third strategy of remnant ablation using a single injection of rhTSH after a brief THW period resulted in a significant higher rate of patients with residual uptake in the thyroid bed and a Tg level below 2 ng/ml three months after remnant ablation in comparison to THW. However, the overall efficacy of the third protocol was not significantly different as compared to two rhTSH injections. Under the aspect of the supply shortage of rhTSH the combined endogenous and exogenous TSH stimulation may be an attractive alternative for remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer.

  9. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

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    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ye Young [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Inje University Sanggye Paik Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ji Young [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients.

  10. Correlation of consecutive serum thyroglobulin levels during hormone withdrawal and failure of initial radioiodine ablation in thyroid cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; O, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yeong Joo; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Seo, Ye Young; Ryu, Ji Young

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of thyroglobulin (Tg) kinetics during preparation of radioiodine ablation for prediction of initial radioiodine ablation failure in thyroid cancer patients. Thyroid cancer patients after total thyroidectomy who underwent radioiodine ablation with 3–4 weeks of hormone withdrawal between May 2011 and January 2012 were included. Consecutive serum Tg levels 5–10 days before ablation (Tg1) and on the day of ablation (Tg2) were obtained. The difference between Tg1 and Tg2 (ΔTg), daily change rate of Tg (ΔTg/day) and Tg doubling time (Tg-DT) were calculated. Success of initial ablation was determined by the results of the follow-up ultrasonography, diagnostic radioiodine scan and stimulated Tg level after 6 to 20 months. A total of 143 patients were included. Failed ablation was reported in 52 patients. Tg2 higher than 5.6 ng/ml and Tg-DT shorter than 4.2 days were significantly related to a high risk of ablation failure. ΔTg and ΔTg/day did not show significant correlation with ablation failure. Thyroglobulin kinetics on consecutive blood sampling during hormone withdrawal may be helpful in predicting patients with higher risk of treatment failure of initial radioiodine ablation therapy in thyroid cancer patients

  11. Treatment with radioiodine of Graves' disease. Calculated activity; fixed activity or ablation. Were are we going?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrossi, O.

    2006-01-01

    The new tendencies of radioiodine ( 131 I) treatment of Graves'disease are presented . One group have the objective of administrate an activity of radioiodine to bring back the patient to euthyroidism , using individual activities to each patient. Others propose a fixed dose, with high activity to cure the disease and anticipating the hypothyroidism of the patient. The third group propose directly the ablation of the thyroids with a calculated activity to deliver 300 Gy .This calculi demand the investigation of the maximum uptake of radioiodine, the biological half life, and the thyroid weight with adequate method (US, TC, MR) Finally, the dose to not thyroid tissues are discussed and the risk of these procedures are presented. (author)

  12. Adjuvant thyroid remnant ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma confined to the thyroid. A comparison of ablation success with different activities of radioiodine (I-131)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prpic, M.; Dabelic, N.; Stanicic, J.; Jukic, T.; Kusic, Z.; Milosevic, M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess efficiency of various I-131 activities on thyroid remnant ablation in thyroid cancer patients. The significance of patients' characteristics, pathologic features and levels of Tg were analyzed. This study included 259 consecutive differentiated thyroid cancer patients, with disease confined to the thyroid, treated with I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Patients were divided into the three groups: 80 patients receiving low [1110-1850 MBq (30-50 mCi)], 121 intermediate [2775 MBq (75 mCi)] and 58 high [3700 MBq (100 mCi)] postoperative I-131 activities. Six to eight months after the application of radioiodine, measurements of TSH, Tg, anti-Tg antibodies (in hypothyroid state) together with ultrasound exam and whole-body scintigraphy were performed. The ablation was significantly more effective (after the first application) in patients receiving 100 mCi of I-131-89.7% than in patients receiving lower activities (P=0.016). There was no significant difference in ablation rate between the 30-50 mCi (77.5%) and 75 mCi (70.2%) groups. In the group receiving 30-50 mCi, patients with solitary tumors had significantly higher ablation rate (P=0.038). In patients receiving 75 mCi ablation rates were higher among older patients (P=0.005), with infiltration of the single lobe (P=0.005), and with solitary tumor (P=0.012). The rates of successful ablation after the second application of I-131 (after 12-16 months) amounted to 96, 97 and 96% in the 30-50, 75 and 100 mCi groups, respectively. The activity of I-131 and age were independent factors for thyroid ablation failure after the first application of I-131 (model of binary logistic regression). The results of remnant ablation were satisfactory with all activities applied. Although after the first application of I-131 the activity of 100 mCi is significantly more effective in thyroid ablation than the administration of 30-50 mCi and 75 mCi, the ablation rates between all the three groups are

  13. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the achieved dose above 200 Gy?

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    Kobe, C.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Weber, I.; Marx, K.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to determine the results of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) when the achieved dose in the thyroid was above 200 Gy and to characterize predictive factors for treatment outcome. Patients, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were a confirmed diagnosis Groves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of antithyroid drugs two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose was 250 Gy and the therapeutically achieved dose was calculated from serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months after RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The relation between success rate and the achieved dose, thyroid volume, age and sex of patients, TSH- and TRAb-values and presence of ophthalmopathy was analysed. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients who received more than 200 Gy, even for thyroid volumes >40 ml. The success of ablative RIT was not influenced by age or sex of patients, or by TSH- or TRAb values or concomitant ophthalmopathy. The mean achieved dose in the thyroid was 298 Gy with a standard deviation of 74.6 Gy. Conclusion: to achieve a dose of over 200 Gy with the above standard deviation, we recommend calculating on intended dose of 250 Gy and using a dosimetric approach with early and late uptake values in the radioiodine test, to allow early therapeutic intervention should the posttherapeutic thyroid dose fall unexpectedly below 200 Gy. (orig.)

  14. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  15. Differentiated thyroid cancer. New concept of radioiodine ablation; Differenziertes Schilddruesenkarzinom. Fortschritte bei der Radioiodablation

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    Dietlein, M.; Kobe, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Universitaetsklinikum Koeln (Germany), Zentrum fuer Integrierte Onkologie Koeln-Bonn; Luster, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2010-12-15

    Ablative radioiodine therapy is the treatment of choice in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, the only exception being the unifocal, very small papillary thyroid cancer. The TSH-stimulation can be achieved by a waiting period for 2-3 weeks after thyroidectomy without medication or by the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). Both options lead to high success rates. 'Single dose cure' using activities between 1.85 and 3.7 GBq {sup 131}I is standard. Since 2010 rhTSH is approved by the EMA for the indications pT1-4, N0-1, cM0. Survey studies did not find any inferiority of ablation with rhTSH or iatrogenic hypothyroidism in the high-risk patient group. Renal clearance is not reduced after rhTSH administration, thus the {sup 131}I blood dose and the whole body doses are lower in patients under rhTSH. Comparing identical {sup 131}I activities after endogeneous or exogeneous stimulation, rhTSH will minimize the acute adverse effects of {sup 131}I. A short-term withdrawal of levothyroxine some days before rhTSH-injection lowers the iodine plasma level, which may be advantageous for the ablation success if lower 131I activities are used. A rhTSH-based diagnostic {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy 3-6 months after ablation is standard for therapy control. At this time, the rhTSH-stimulated thyroglobulin-level is essential for a personalized risk stratification. Tg-measurements by a second generation assay should be used for follow-up care. Metaanalyses have shown that radioiodine ablation lowers the mortality rate, the risk of locoregional recurrences and the risk of late metastasizing. Therefore, ablation has shown a clear benefit. (orig.)

  16. Radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaduban, M.

    1978-01-01

    The physical, chemical radiochemical and radiometric properties of radioiodine significant for the radiochemical analysis are summarized. The occurrence of iodine, especially in the biosphere organic part, the calculation of the amount of iodine radioisotopes formed under different conditions, the spectrometric and integral methods of measuring the radioactivity of the most important iodine radioisotopes, the methods of separating iodine and its respective chemical forms are described. (M.K.)

  17. Initial radioiodine remnant ablation success rates compared by diagnostic scan methods: I123 versus I131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, W.; Choi, E.; Yoo, I.; Kim, S.; Han, E.; Lee, S.; Lee, W.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objective: to see if diagnostic whole body scan (DxWBS) performed with I-131 prior diminishes the success rate of initial radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) compared to I-123 DxWBS in differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Material and methods: consecutive thyroid cancer patients who received total thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and then high dose RRA (either 100 mCi or 150 mCi) within 6 months were included. DxWBSs were performed with I-123 or with I-131. Prior to the DxWBSs, all patients followed strict low iodine diet for 2 weeks and withdrew hormone to stimulate TSH above 30 mIU/l. Patients with extra-thyroidal extension of tumor, lymph node metastasis, or distant metastasis were excluded. The initial RRA was defined as successful if the next DxWBS done 6 months to 1 year later was negative and stimulated thyroglobulin level was below 2 ng/ml. Results: of 71 patients who had I-123 DxWBSs, 31 patients went on to receive RRA with 100 mCi and 40 patients received 150 mCi. Of 73 patients who had I-131 DxWBSs, 66 received 100 mCi and 7 patients received 150 mCi. The overall success rate was 79% for patients who had I-123 DxWBS prior to RRA (68% for 100 mCi and 86% for 150 mCi), and 68% for patient who had I-131 DxWBSs (68% for 100 mCi and 71% for 150 mCi). Conclusion: for patients who received 100 mCi, the RRA success rate was the same for I-123 DxWBS and I-131 DxWBS. For patients treated with 150 mCi, the success rate may be lower in patients who receive RRA following DxWBS with I-131 compared to DxWBS with I-123. (authors)

  18. The efficacy of radioiodine remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FU, Hongliang; MA, Chao; LI, Jianing; FENG, Fang; WU, Shuqi; YE, Zhiyi; WANG, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy. The medical histories of post surgical DTC patients who accepted RRA between 2010 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Among them, 113 patients who had undergone a total or near-total thyroidectomy comprised the complete thyroidectomy group (CT group) and the remaining 40 patients who had undergone a lobectomy or sub-total thyroidectomy comprised the incomplete thyroidectomy group (ICT group). The difference in the patients’ age, gender, histology, serum TSH level and 24hr radioactive iodine uptake (RIU) between the two groups was analyzed by χ2 Test or ANOVA. The efficacy of RRA in ICT group was evaluated by comparing its rate of complete ablation after the first RRA and its cumulative rate of complete ablation after the second RRA to the rate of complete ablation after the first RRA in CT group respectively by χ2 Test. Of all the clinical characteristics, only serum TSH level and 24hr RIU have significant difference between two groups (P<0.01 for both). The rate of complete ablation after the first RRA was 67.26% in CT group. The rate of complete ablation after the first RRA and the cumulative rate of complete ablation after the second RRA was 27.50% and 67.50% respectively in ICT group. The ablative rate of the first RRA between the two groups was compared by χ2 Test and the difference was significant (P<0.01). The ablative rate of the first RRA in CT group was compared with the cumulative rate of the second RRA in ICT group and the difference was not significant (P=0.978). Although the efficacy of RRA in DTC patients with an incomplete thyroidectomy is not as good as that of patients with a complete thyroidectomy after the first RRA, a higher ablative rate can still be achieved after the second or third RRA.

  19. [Postoperative radioiodine ablation in patients with low risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Juan J; Grande, Enrique; Iglesias, Pedro

    2015-01-06

    Most patients with newly diagnosed differentiated thyroid carcinoma have tumors with low risk of mortality and recurrence. Standard therapy has been total or near total thyroidectomy followed by postoperative radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA). Although RRA provides benefits, current clinical guidelines do not recommend it universally, since an increase in disease-free survival or a decrease in mortality in low risk patients has not been demonstrated so far. Advancements in our understanding of the biological behavior of thyroid cancer have been translated into the clinic in a personalized approach to the patients based on their individual risk of recurrence and mortality. Current evidence suggests that RRA is not indicated in most low-risk patients, especially those with papillary carcinomas smaller than 1cm, without extrathyroidal extension, unfavorable histology, lymph node involvement or distant metastases. Follow-up of these patients with serial measurements of serum thyroglobulin and neck ultrasound is adequate. Careful evaluation of all risk factors of clinical relevance will allow a more realistic assessment of each individual patient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Graves' disease and radioiodine therapy. Is success of ablation dependent on the choice of thyreostatic medication?

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    Kobe, C.; Weber, I.; Eschner, W.; Sudbrock, F.; Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. of Cologne (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Aim: this study was performed to analyse the impact of the choice of antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the outcome of ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with Graves' disease. Patients, material, methods: a total of 571 consecutive patients were observed for 12 months after RIT between July 2001 and June 2004. Inclusion criteria were the confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease, compensation of hyperthyroidism and withdrawal of ATD two days before preliminary radioiodine-testing and RIT. The intended dose of 250 Gy was calculated from the results of the radioiodine test and the therapeutically achieved dose was measured by serial uptake measurements. The end-point measure was thyroid function 12 months offer RIT; success was defined as elimination of hyperthyroidism. The pretreatment ATD was retrospectively correlated with the results achieved. Results: relief from hyperthyroidism was achieved in 96% of patients. 472 patients were treated with carbimazole or methimazole (CMI) and 61 with propylthiouracil (PTU). 38 patients had no thyrostatic drugs (ND) prior to RIT. The success rate was equal in all groups (CMI 451/472; PTU 61/61; ND 37/38; p = 0.22). Conclusion: thyrostatic treatment with PTU achieves excellent results in ablative RIT, using an accurate dosimetric approach with an achieved post-therapeutic dose of more than 200 Gy. (orig.)

  1. A prospective clinical trial to assess the efficacy of radioiodine ablation as an alternative to completion thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer undergoing sub-total thyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, C.S.; Kumar, Ajay; Pant, G.S.; Chandra, Prem; Dwivedi, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective clinical trial to evaluate whether radioiodine ablation can be an effective alternative to completion thyroidectomy in patients undergoing sub-total thyroidectomy and if yes, the optimum activity of 131 I and frequency of ablation. A total of 85 patients (F-63; M-22) with mean age of 37.9±12.3 years were recruited in this study. The pre-ablation mean 24 hour radioiodine neck uptake, effective half-life, residual thyroid tissue weight and TSH values were 13.9±8.5%, 4.5±0.9 days, 9.6±3.6 g and 11.7±6.4 μIU/ml, respectively. Thyroid tissue was completely ablated in 50 patients (58.8%, 95% CI:50-68%) after mean 1st administered activity of 32.3±10.7 mCi of 131 I and the cumulative ablation rate was 91.8% after two doses of 131 I. During mean follow-up duration of 49 months no local/distant recurrence has been observed so far in this cohort. It appears that radioiodine ablation may be an attractive alternative to completion thyroidectomy and an activity as low as 35 mCi may achieve reasonable ablation

  2. Effect of a Low Iodine Diet vs. Restricted Iodine Diet on Postsurgical Preparation for Radioiodine Ablation Therapy in Thyroid Carcinoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chi Young; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Yoon, Mi-Jin; Chang, Hang Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Chung, Woong Youn

    2015-07-01

    The radioiodine ablation therapy is required for patients who underwent a total thyroidectomy. Through a comparative review of a low iodine diet (LID) and a restricted iodine diet (RID), the study aims to suggest guidelines that are suitable for the conditions of Korea. The study was conducted with 101 patients. With 24-hour urine samples from the patients after a 2-week restricted diet and after a 4-week restricted diet, the amount of iodine in the urine was estimated. The consumed radioiodine amounts for 2 hours and 24 hours were calculated. This study was conducted with 47 LID patients and 54 RID patients. The amounts of iodine in urine, the 2-week case and 4-week case for each group showed no significant differences. The amounts of iodine in urine between the two groups were both included in the range of the criteria for radioiodine ablation therapy. Also, 2 hours and 24 hours radioiodine consumption measured after 4-week restrictive diet did not show statistical differences between two groups. A 2-week RID can be considered as a type of radioiodine ablation therapy after patients undergo a total thyroidectomy.

  3. Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids - early effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarewicz Jacek

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radioiodine (131I therapy is widely accepted as an essential part of therapeutic regimens in many cases of differentiated thyroid cancer. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to macromolecules is a well known phenomenon. Frequently examined process to evaluate oxidative damage to macromolecules is lipid peroxidation (LPO, resulting from oxidative damage to membrane lipids. The aim of the study was to examine serum LPO level in hypothyroid (after total thyroidectomy cancer patients subjected to ablative activities of 131I. Materials and methods The study was carried out in 21 patients (18 females and 3 males, average age 52.4 ± 16.5 years after total thyroidectomy for papillary (17 patients or follicular (4 patients thyroid carcinoma. Hypothyroidism was confirmed by increased TSH blood concentration (BRAHMS, Germany, measured before 131I therapy. Activity of 2.8 - 6.9 GBq of 131I was administered to the patients orally as sodium iodide (OBRI, Poland. Concentrations of malondialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals (MDA + 4-HDA, as an index of LPO (LPO-586 kit, Calbiochem, USA, were measured in blood serum just before 131I administration (day "0" and on the days 1-4 after 131I therapy. Sera from 23 euthyroid patients served as controls. Correlations between LPO and TSH or 131I activity were calculated. Results Expectedly, serum LPO level, when measured before 131I therapy, was several times higher (p 131I therapy. LPO did not correlate with TSH concentration. In turn, negative correlation was found between 131I activity and LPO level on the day "2" after radioiodine treatment. Conclusions Radioiodine remnant ablation of differentiated thyroid cancer does not further increase oxidative damage to membrane lipids, at least early, after therapy.

  4. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N. (Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation.

  5. Local reactions to radioiodine in the treatment of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burmeister, L.A.; du Cret, R.P.; Mariash, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the rate of local complications resulting from radioiodine ablation of thyroid cancer in patients with a residual intact thyroid lobe to that in patients who had more extensive surgical treatment prior to radioiodine administration. We retrospectively studied 59 patients who had received 131I between 1979 and 1989. The patients were divided into two groups, depending on the extent of their previous surgical thyroid excision. Group 1 comprised 10 patients with a lobectomy or hemithyroidectomy before the ablative radioiodine dose, and Group 2 comprised 49 patients with more extensive thyroid excision (near-total or subtotal thyroidectomy) before the radioiodine treatment. Sixty percent of the 10 patients in Group 1 experienced some degree of neck pain or tenderness following radioiodine ablation of their residual thyroid. In one case, the local reaction was very severe and accompanied by the development of transient hyperthyroidism. There was only a 6% local complication rate in the patients who had undergone more extensive thyroid excision before ablative therapy (p less than 0.001), and none had a severe reaction. Patients with only unilateral surgical excision before radioiodine therapy have a higher rate of local complications than do patients treated with more extensive surgery prior to radioiodine ablation. If radioiodine is to be employed in such patients, they should be informed of this possible complication. Since evidence supports a dose effect in the pathogenesis of the complications, we recommend using a dose of less than 30 mCi for the initial ablation in these patients even though it may be necessary to repeat this dose to complete thyroid ablation

  6. Internal contamination in nurses attending patients, that received therapeutic amounts of radioiodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Termorshuizen, W.; Gerritsen, A.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The most frequent and often very successful used unsealed source in Nuclear Medicine and Radiotherapy is the radioiodine-131 for the treatment of thyroid carcinoma and hyperthyroidism. Always there is a great concern about the health physics of radioiodine and possible internal contamination involved in high level 131-I thyroid therapy cases, in particular to the thyroid as target and limiting organ. This report deals with 131-I air concentrations and internal contamination in nurses attending these patients under two different conditions. During the past three years a change took place from the old building, where we had an unventilated two-bed nursing room, to a new building were we have rooms with forced ventilation and air-conditioning (refreshment five times per hour). From both external exposure caused by radioiodine treated patients and internal contamination due to ingestion and inhalation of 131-I, we calculated the dose-equivalent to the thyroid and the effective dose-equivalent to our health care personnel

  7. Radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andres-Barrenechea, E.C.

    2001-01-01

    A ten year study (1988-98) was done at the Veterans Memorial Medical Center on radioiodine (RAI) therapy for hyperthyroidism. A total of 162 patients received 131-I after careful selection hence was included in this study. A predominantly female population was seen (81%) compared to only (19%) males. The most frequent age group were in the third and fourth decades of life. Those included had clinical manifestations of thyrotoxicosis aside from the abnormal thyroid function tests and elevated RAI uptake. Almost all were given antithyroid drugs and beta-blockers prior to RAI ablation. Doses ranged from 7 to 12 mCi depending on gland size and degree of toxicity. Success rate of treatment was 92% which meant that the symptoms were abated and there was shrinkage of the thyroid gland after a single dose of iodine. The most common short term complications were sialitis and local neck tenderness while hypothyroidism was the commonest long term complication. (author)

  8. Radioiodine Thyroid Remnant Ablation after Recombinant Human Thyrotropin or Thyroid Hormone Withdrawal in Patients with High-Risk Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabián Pitoia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To supplement limited relevant literature, we retrospectively compared ablation and disease outcomes in high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC patients undergoing radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation aided by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH versus thyroid hormone withdrawal/withholding (THW. Our cohort was 45 consecutive antithyroglobulin antibody- (TgAb- negative, T3-T4/N0-N1-Nx/M0 adults ablated with high activities at three referral centers. Ablation success comprised negative (<1 μg/L stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg and TgAb, with absent or <0.1% scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake. “No evidence of disease” (NED comprised negative unstimulated/stimulated Tg and no suspicious neck ultrasonography or pathological imaging or biopsy. “Persistent disease” was failure to achieve NED, “recurrence,” loss of NED status. rhTSH patients (n=18 were oftener ≥45 years old and higher stage (P=0.01, but otherwise not different than THW patients (n=27 at baseline. rhTSH patients were significantly oftener successfully ablated compared to THW patients (83% versus 67%, P<0.02. After respective 3.3 yr and 4.5 yr mean follow-ups (P=0.02, NED was achieved oftener (72% versus 59% and persistent disease was less frequent in rhTSH patients (22% versus 33% (both comparisons P=0.03. rhTSH stimulation is associated with at least as good outcomes as is THW in ablation of high-risk DTC patients.

  9. Radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation after recombinant human thyrotropin or thyroid hormone withdrawal in patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitoia, Fabián; Marlowe, Robert J; Abelleira, Erika; Faure, Eduardo N; Bueno, Fernanda; Schwarzstein, Diego; Lutfi, Rubén Julio; Niepomniszcze, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    To supplement limited relevant literature, we retrospectively compared ablation and disease outcomes in high-risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) patients undergoing radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation aided by recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) versus thyroid hormone withdrawal/withholding (THW). Our cohort was 45 consecutive antithyroglobulin antibody- (TgAb-) negative, T3-T4/N0-N1-Nx/M0 adults ablated with high activities at three referral centers. Ablation success comprised negative (<1 μg/L) stimulated serum thyroglobulin (Tg) and TgAb, with absent or <0.1% scintigraphic thyroid bed uptake. "No evidence of disease" (NED) comprised negative unstimulated/stimulated Tg and no suspicious neck ultrasonography or pathological imaging or biopsy. "Persistent disease" was failure to achieve NED, "recurrence," loss of NED status. rhTSH patients (n = 18) were oftener ≥45 years old and higher stage (P = 0.01), but otherwise not different than THW patients (n = 27) at baseline. rhTSH patients were significantly oftener successfully ablated compared to THW patients (83% versus 67%, P < 0.02). After respective 3.3 yr and 4.5 yr mean follow-ups (P = 0.02), NED was achieved oftener (72% versus 59%) and persistent disease was less frequent in rhTSH patients (22% versus 33%) (both comparisons P = 0.03). rhTSH stimulation is associated with at least as good outcomes as is THW in ablation of high-risk DTC patients.

  10. Role of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in diagnostic iodine-131 scintigraphy before initial radioiodine ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Kanhaiyalal; Bhattacharya, Anish; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai

    2005-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate the incremental value of single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) over planar radioiodine imaging before radioiodine ablation in the staging, management and stratification of risk of recurrence (ROR) in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) patients. Totally, 83 patients (21 male, 62 female) aged 17–75 (mean 39.9) years with DTC were included consecutively in this prospective study. They underwent postthyroidectomy planar and SPECT/CT scans after oral administration of 37–114 MBq iodine-131 (I-131). The scans were interpreted as positive, negative or suspicious for tracer uptake in the thyroid bed, cervical lymph nodes and sites outside the neck. In each case, the findings on planar images were recorded first, without knowledge of SPECT/CT findings. Operative and pathological findings were used for postsurgical tumor–node–metastasis staging. The tumor staging was reassessed after each of these two scans. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography localized radioiodine uptake in the thyroid bed in 9/83 (10.8%) patients, neck nodes in 24/83 (28.9%) patients and distant metastases in 8/83 (9.6%) patients in addition to the planar study. Staging was changed in 8/83 (9.6%), ROR in 11/83 (13.2%) and management in 26/83 (31.3%) patients by the pretherapy SPECT/CT in comparison to planar imaging. SPECT/CT had incremental value in 32/83 patients (38.5%) over the planar scan. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography is feasible during a diagnostic I-131 scan with a low amount of radiotracer. It improved the interpretation of pretherapy I-131 scintigraphy and changed the staging and subsequent patient management

  11. Cost-effectiveness of using recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone before radioiodine ablation for thyroid cancer treatment in Spanish hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, J A; Muros, M A

    In thyroid cancer treatment, the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) must be elevated before radioiodine ablation, either by exogenous (with recombinant human thyrotropin [rhTSH]) or endogenous stimulation by thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW). The use of rhTSH avoids hypothyroidism and favours the subsequent elimination of radioiodine, but involves the cost of the product. For this reason, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed, taking into account all costs involved and the benefits associated with the use of this therapy. Using a Markov modelling with two analysis arms (rhTSH and THW), stratified into high (100mCi/3700 MBq) and low (30mCi/1110 MBq) radioiodine doses, and using 17 weekly cycles, the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) related to the use of rhTSH was determined. The clinical inputs included in the model were based on published studies and in a treatment survey conducted in Spain. Radioablation preparation with rhTSH is superior to THW, showing additional benefits (0.048 AVAC), as well as cost savings (-€614.16), with an incremental cost-effectiveness rate (ICER) of -€12,795/QALY. The univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses showed the result to be robust. The use of rhTSH previous to radioablation in Spain has cost savings, as well as a series of health benefits for the patient, making it highly cost-effective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  12. Quality of life changes and clinical outcomes in thyroid cancer patients undergoing radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) with recombinant human TSH (rhTSH): a randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taïeb, D; Sebag, F; Cherenko, M; Baumstarck-Barrau, K; Fortanier, C; Farman-Ara, B; De Micco, C; Vaillant, J; Thomas, S; Conte-Devolx, B; Loundou, A; Auquier, P; Henry, J F; Mundler, O

    2009-07-01

    Recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) has become the modality of choice for radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) in low-risk thyroid cancer patients. The aims of the present prospective randomized study were to evaluate the impact of TSH stimulation procedure (hypothyroidism vs. rhTSH) on quality of life (QoL) of thyroid cancer patients undergoing RRA and to evaluate efficacy of both procedures. L-T4 was initiated in both groups after thyroidectomy. After randomization, L-T4 was discontinued in hypothyroid (hypo) group and continued in rhTSH group. A measure of 3.7 GBq of radioiodine was given to both groups. The functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-fatigue (FACIT-F) was administered from the early postoperative period to 9 months. Socio-demographic parameters, anxiety and depression scales were also evaluated (CES-D, BDI and Spielberger state-trait questionnaires). At 9 months, patients underwent an rhTSH stimulation test, diagnostic (131)I whole body scan (dxWBS) and neck ultrasonography. A total of 74 patients were enrolled for the study. There was a significant decrease in QoL from baseline (t0) to t1 (RRA period) in the hypothyroid group with significant differences in FACIT-F TOI (P hypothyrodism. However, there is a wide heterogeneity in the clinical impact of hypothyroidism.

  13. Comparison of urine iodine/creatinine ratio between patients following stringent and less stringent low iodine diet for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Jee Ho; Kim, Byung Il; Ha, Ji Su; Chang, Sei Joong; Shin, Hye Young; Choi, Joon Hyuk; Kim, Do Min; Kim, Chong Soon

    2006-01-01

    A low iodine diet (LID) for 1 ∼ 2 weeks is recommended for patients who undergoing radioiodine remnant ablation. However, the LID educations for patients are different among centers because there is no concrete recommendation for protocol of LID. In this investigation, we compared two representative types of LID protocols performed in several centers in Korea using urine iodine to creatinine tatio (urine I/Cr). From 2006, April to June, patients referred to our center for radioiodine remnant ablation of thyroid cancer from several local hospitals which had different LID protocols were included. We divided into two groups, stringent LID for 1 week and less stringent LID for 2 weeks, then measured their urine I/Cr ratio with spot urine when patients were admitted to the hospital. Total 27 patients were included in this investigation (M:F = 1:26; 13 in one-week stringent LID; 14 in two-week less stringent LID). Average of urine I/Cr ratio was 127.87 ± 78.52 μ g/g in stringent LID for 1 week, and 289.75 ± 188.24 μ g/g in less stringent LID for 2 weeks. It was significantly lower in stringent LID for 1 week group (ρ = 0.008). The number of patients whose urine I/Cr ratios were below 100 μ g/g was 6 of 13 in stringent LID for 1 week group, and 3 of 14 in less stringent LID for 2 weeks group. Stringent LID for 1 week resulted in better urinary I/Cr ratio in our investigation compared with the other protocol. However it still resulted in plenty of inadequate range of I/Cr ratio, so more stringent protocol such as stringent LID for 2 weeks is expected more desirable

  14. Ablative therapy with radioiodine in the postoperative management of differentiated thyroid carcinoma, a retrospective observational study of the justified indication of the therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto Herrera, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    The validity of the indication of treatment with I131 as part of the management of differentiated thyroid cancer, was analyzed in patients older than 16 years attended in Hospital San Juan de Dios and Hospital Mexico, who received this therapy, during the years 2006-2009. The medical records of the selected patients were reviewed and registered in the SPSS statistical program. The following variables were obtained: name, file number, age, gender, type of cancer, maximum diameter of the tumor, presence of one of 2 or more tumor foci in the surgical piece, hospital of origin, value of T, N and M according to the TNM staging, MACIS scale score and staging according to the MACIS score. The most common differentiated carcinoma in the studied population was papillary carcinoma. A little less than half of the patients, had the criteria to receive radioiodine therapy according to that established by the ATA, same result when said population was subjected to European criteria Criteria to receive radioiodine dictated by the American school as the European one were fulfilled in the majority of patients with stage 2. Compliance with indication or non-indication of treatment was maintained without significant difference between papillary and follicular carcinomas [es

  15. Combined use of radioiodine therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating postsurgical thyroid remnant of differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Long

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Combined use of RAI therapy and radiofrequency ablation in treating excessive postsurgical thyroid remnant of DTC can be an effective approach and avoids re-operation. Long-term efficacy monitoring would further determine its feasibility.

  16. Efficacy of 131I SPECT/CT in the initial nodal staging in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma at the first ablative radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisiel, N.; Garcia-Burillo, A.; Barios, M.; Dellepiane, F.; Castell-Conesa, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Background: after the first radioiodine ablative dose, planar Whole-Body Scanning (WBS) offers the possibility for detecting thyroid remnant, loco-regional node involvement and distant metastases. Nevertheless, available anatomic information is scarce and the high activity of thyroid remnants can interfere with the detection of cervical lymphatic nodes. Objective: to determine the additional value of the SPECT-CT over planar WBS, performed seven days after ablative treatment with 131 I, in patients who were operated on for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer (DTC). Methods: from January 2009 to December 2012, 132 patients with DTC were admitted for radio-ablation with 131 I after thyroidectomy. All of them underwent WBS seven days after ablation, and 91 had an additional SPECT-CT, 71 women and 20 men, with ages ranged from 15 to 89 years (mean, age 54 years). All patients had histological confirmed DTC (73 papillary, 17 follicular -2 cases with double tumour, papillary and follicular-, and 1 insular type). In addition to the thyroidectomy, lymph node dissection was performed in 54 patients (59%): 20 patients were classified as N0 and 29 as N1. The remaining 42 patients were classified as Nx. Planar and tomographic images were independently evaluated by two experienced nuclear medicine physicians. Results: 195 cervical focal uptake were observed in the 91 planar WBSs. No additional foci were observed in SPECT-CT. Findings: Planar WBS........... SPECT-CT........... Number of Foci Thyroid remnant...... Thyroid remnant..........51........... LNM...........0 Indeterminate.......... Thyroid remnant..........84............. LNM............5 LNM............ Thyroid remnant.........12............ Indeterminate.............0............ LNM..........43. Total Number of Foci............. 195. Compared to the nodal staging prior to ablation based on the histopathological diagnosis, we had an upstaging from N0 to N1 in 4 of 20 patients and from Nx to

  17. HiLo: Multicentre randomized phase III clinical trial of high vs low dose radioiodine, with or without recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH), for remnant ablation for differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallick, U. [Freeman Hospital, Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Harmer, C.; Clarke, S.; Moss, L.; Nicol, A.; Clarke, P.; Smellie, J.; McCready, R.; Farnell, K.; Franklyn, J.; John, R.; Nutting, C.; Yap, B.; Lemon, C.; Wadlsey, J.; Gerrard, G.; Roques, T.; Macias, E.; Whitaker, S.; Abdul-Hamid, A.; Alvarez, P.; Kadalayil, L.; Hackshaw, A.

    2012-07-01

    Recommended treatment for most patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is surgery followed by radioiodine ablation. Current practice in many centres is to use a high administered activity of 3.7 GBq (100 mCi). However, a lower activity (1.1 GBq or 30 mCi) has advantages including a shorter stay in hospital isolation and lower risk of side effects, including the risk of a second cancer. Also, Thyrogen (rhTSH) allows patients to continue thyroid hormone replacement during ablation, avoiding symptoms of hypothyroidism and also reduces total body radiation dose. We conducted a large randomized factorial multi centre trial to simultaneously address whether ablation success rates are similar using (i) either 1.1 GBq or 3.7 GBq, and (ii) either Thyrogen or thyroid hormone withdrawal. It is the first ever national prospective trial in thyroid cancer in the UK. Final results will be available in 2011

  18. Treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput with radioiodine thyroid remnant ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer: comparison of thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Casas, Juan Antonio; Mena Bares, Luisa M; Gálvez, María Angeles; Marlowe, Robert J; Latre Romero, José M; Martínez-Paredes, María

    2011-09-01

    We sought to empirically compare treatment room length-of-stay and patient throughput for recombinant human thyroid-stimulating hormone (rhTSH)-aided thyroid remnant ablation with thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW)-aided ablation in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). We retrospectively reviewed charts of all eligible (near) totally thyroidectomized patients with DTC undergoing ablation and 1-year ablation success evaluation at our tertiary referral centre from January 2003 to February 2009 (N=274). M1 disease caused exclusion unless discovered by a postablation scan or present when rhTSH was the only tolerable stimulation method. We extracted data on the length-of-stay, defined as the time between treatment room admission and discharge, and patient throughput, defined as patients ablated per treatment room per week. The treatment room discharge criterion was a whole-body dose rate of less than 60 μSv/h at 50 cm. The treatment groups (rhTSH, n=187; THW, n=87) had mostly statistically similar characteristics, but differed in primary tumour status distribution. In addition, at ablation, the rhTSH patients had a greater prevalence of prior diagnostic scintigraphy, higher mean serum TSH, and shorter interval since surgery, and received a 5.6% larger mean ablation activity. On average, rhTSH patients had a significantly lower peak whole-body dose rate (57.1 vs. 83.4 μSv/h at 50 cm; P<0.0001) and a significantly shorter treatment room stay than did the THW patients (1.41 vs. 2.02 days; P<0.001). rhTSH use allowed significantly more patients to be ablated per room per week (2.7 vs. 1.2; P<0.001). Relative to THW, rhTSH use to aid ablation reduced mean treatment room length-of-stay by almost one-third and more than doubled the average weekly patient throughput, both of which were significant differences.

  19. Effectiveness of L-thyroxine treatment on TSH suppression during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma after total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krhin, Blaz; Besic, Nikola

    2012-01-01

    There are scarce data about the optimal increase of L-thyroxine dose during pregnancy in patients with a history of thyroid carcinoma. The first aim of the study was to find out if routine therapeutic measures enable adequate TSH suppression in pregnancy. The other aim was to find out the optimal dose of L-thyroxine for TSH suppression in pregnant women. In this retrospective observational study, we analysed 36 pregnancies of 32 women with a history of thyroid carcinoma. Before pregnancy, all of them underwent total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnant, and they were on suppressive doses of L-thyroxine. Thyroid function tests were obtained before, during and after pregnancy. Mean L-thyroxine dose before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 149, 147, 155, 165 and 158 micrograms daily, respectively. TSH concentration remained suppressed in 9 pregnancies, it was within normal range in 22 and elevated in 5 pregnancies. The mean dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH before pregnancy, in the first, second and, third trimester and after delivery was 154, 154, 164, 160 and 161 micrograms daily, respectively. When the dose had to be changed, the mean increase of the dose was 31.5 micrograms daily. The range of changes in TSH concentration during pregnancy in the patients who have been on suppressive L-thyroxine therapy before conception is quite wide. TSH was adequately suppressed in only 25% of pregnancies. The dose of L-thyroxine in patients with suppressed TSH in the first, second and third trimester was 154, 164 and 160 micrograms daily, respectively

  20. Combination of ultrasound-guided percutaneous microwave ablation and radioiodine therapy in benign thyroid disease. A 3-month follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkusuz, H.; Happel, C.; Koch, D.A.; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2016-01-15

    Pilot studies of combined therapies treating benign nodular goiters reported promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of combined microwave ablation (MWA) and radioiodine therapy (RIT) with a special focus on thyroid function at the 3-month follow-up. 15 patients (median age: 55 years) with a large goiter and benign thyroid nodules or Graves' disease were treated with the combined therapy. Serum levels of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), thyroglobuline (Tg) and, additionally, antibody levels against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyrotropin receptors (TRAb) and thyroid peroxidase (TPOAb) were measured at enrollment, post MWA and at the 3-month follow-up (3MFU). Furthermore, the goiter volume, I-131 dose and hospitalization time were analyzed to evaluate effectiveness. MWA was operated under local anesthesia with a system working in a wavelength field of 902 to 928 MHz. TSH, T4, T3 and Tg did not change at 3MFU, except for in two patients in whom the initial TSH levels improved to normal thyroid functioning levels at follow-up. One of the patients developed a high TRAb-level that receded back into the normal range. At 3MFU, the combined therapy showed a mean thyroid volume reduction of 26.4 ml ± 7.9 ml (30.5 % ± 4.6 % (p < 0.05)). By utilizing the combined therapy, administered activity could be reduced by 26.6 % ± 4.8 % (p < 0.05) and hospitalization time by 30.9 % ± 19.9 % (p < 0.05). The data confirmed the effectiveness of the combination of MWA with RIT. The combined therapy is an innovative and conservative approach and could become a safe alternative to surgery for the treatment of very large benign nodular goiters. Due to the short follow-up and the limited number of patients, further studies will be necessary.

  1. Radioiodinated bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, S.E.; Liu, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Radioiodinated bleomycin is a useful imaging agent for body tissues. Its production by iodination of bleomycin with radioactive iodide ions in the presence of an oxidizing agent is described. 7 claims, no drawings

  2. Radioiodine dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J R [Biomedical Research Branch, Health Sciences Div., Chalk River, Ontario (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Lab.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given.

  3. Radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of individual doses for radiation protection and for risk assessment purposes from a radioiodine intake requires a knowledge of the distribution and retention of the radioiodine (primarily in the thyroid), and a knowledge of the average energy deposited in each organ of interest per radioactive decay (S-factors). This paper reviews a model for distribution and retention used previously for adults, and extends the model to include all ages. The extended model also includes the effects of stable iodine intakes on radioiodine uptakes explicitly. Included in the paper is a tabulation of existing adult S-factors for selected radioiodines and the extension of S-factors for the thyroid to all age groups. Finally, doses per unit intake are calculated and tabulated. A discussion and some calculations of the effects of stable iodine intake on committed doses are given. (author)

  4. Thyroid remnant ablation using 1,110 MBq of I-131 after total thyroidectomy. Regulatory considerations on release of patients after unsealed radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Ito, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to measure the radiation exposure level of caregivers following outpatient NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq therapy for remnant thyroid ablation after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, and to evaluate the influence of activities of daily living on radiation exposure level, with the goal of proposing an optimum method of I-131 therapy. The study included 37 patients with differentiated thyroid cancer, who had undergone total thyroidectomy and received outpatient based remnant thyroid ablation using NaI (I-131) 1,110 MBq, who were satisfying the following requirements: patients who have no evidence of distant metastases, whose living environments were appropriate for outpatient I-131 (1,110 MBq) therapy, and patients who gave written informed consent. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the body surface of the patient at the moment of release was measured using survey meters of the GM type or ionization chamber type. The dose level for the caregiver was measured with a personal dosimeter in all cases. The dose rate at a distance of 1 m from the patient's body surface 1 h after I-131 administration was in the range of 29-115 μSv/h (mean 63.8 μSv/h). The 7-day cumulative effective dose of caregivers was 0.11±0.08 mSv, on an average, in 34 dosimeters. In 31 of 34 dosimeters, cumulative effective dose of caregivers was below 0.2 mSv. Dose levels exceeding 0.2 mSv were recorded in 3 cases (0.21, 0.35 and 0.43 mSv in one case each). These results suggest that the exposure level of family members (caregiver and others) was minimal and is lower than the radiation levels affecting human environments. Outpatient-based remnant thyroid ablation with I-131 (1,110 MBq) performed after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer is safe if applied in accordance with the appropriate supervision and guidance by experts with certain qualifications. (author)

  5. Radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, J.F. Jr.; Deliso, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ( 131 I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  6. Radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Jr, J F; Deliso, H B

    1993-12-31

    For over 40 years now, radioiodine ({sup 131}I) has remained one of the most useful radionuclide for diagnosis and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The wide application of radioiodine in the study of the thyroid gland and in the management of its disorders has been most rewarding. The medical literature is replete with reports of its efficacy, failures, and complications, but most of these studies have been conducted among Caucasian persons and in relatively affluent societies. Very few reports are available from the less developed and economically depressed areas of the world where thyroid disorders abound or and are even endemic. This chapter is an attempt to highlight the use of radioactive iodine therapy in the developing countries, particularly those in the Asian region

  7. An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jofre, M J; Sierralta, M P [Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department, Santiago (Chile); Del Campo, G; Ide, A; Wiener, R [Department of Endocrinology of the Military Hospital, Santiago (Chile)

    2002-09-01

    An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Since the beginning of Nuclear Medicine, the thyroid gland has been an important subject for study. In the fifties, the complimentary use of 131 radioiodine after differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) surgery was postulated. The aim of the study was to analyze our experience of the management of patients with DTC. Material and methods: An 18-year retrospective analysis was made including 109 patients with previous diagnosis of DTC, 90 % females, mean age 47 +/- 17 y.o. (range: 19-85 y.o). Tumoral histology was 67 % papillary, 28 % follicular and 5% non-determined in the medical record. First doses of 131 radioiodine were between 50 and 200 mCi. In all, 156 radioiodine doses were given and 6 patients received 4 doses or more, with total doses between 300 and 570 mCi. Results: The distribution of first and total radioiodine doses is presented in the table below. Of the group of patients who received a first radioiodine dose of less than 100 mCi post surgery, 79% were treated before 1990. Those who received 150mCi or more had cervical ganglionar compromise, trachea invasion or subtotal thyroidectomy. In 50% of the patients who received 4 or more doses, the first two doses were 50 mCi. It is important to mention that there was one patient who received 8 radioiodine doses in 4 years , seven of them were 50 mCi ( total dose 438 mCi). This patient presented trachea and larynx invasion in the early stages, with a persistent focus in the left supraclavicular region. She later developed pulmonary fibrosis, for which she was treated with complimentary radiotherapy (30 Gy), before dying. Distribution of radioiodine doses is presented. Conclusion: It is important to emphasize the validity of a first 131 radioiodine dose after surgery of DTC patients of 100 mCi or more, to obtain the ablation of the remaining thyroid tissue. This

  8. An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jofre, M.J.; Sierralta, M.P.; Del Campo, G.; Ide, A.; Wiener, R.

    2002-01-01

    An eighteen year experience of differentiated thyroid carcinoma treatment with 131 radioiodine at the Military Hospital Nuclear Medicine Department. Since the beginning of Nuclear Medicine, the thyroid gland has been an important subject for study. In the fifties, the complimentary use of 131 radioiodine after differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) surgery was postulated. The aim of the study was to analyze our experience of the management of patients with DTC. Material and methods: An 18-year retrospective analysis was made including 109 patients with previous diagnosis of DTC, 90 % females, mean age 47 +/- 17 y.o. (range: 19-85 y.o). Tumoral histology was 67 % papillary, 28 % follicular and 5% non-determined in the medical record. First doses of 131 radioiodine were between 50 and 200 mCi. In all, 156 radioiodine doses were given and 6 patients received 4 doses or more, with total doses between 300 and 570 mCi. Results: The distribution of first and total radioiodine doses is presented in the table below. Of the group of patients who received a first radioiodine dose of less than 100 mCi post surgery, 79% were treated before 1990. Those who received 150mCi or more had cervical ganglionar compromise, trachea invasion or subtotal thyroidectomy. In 50% of the patients who received 4 or more doses, the first two doses were 50 mCi. It is important to mention that there was one patient who received 8 radioiodine doses in 4 years , seven of them were 50 mCi ( total dose 438 mCi). This patient presented trachea and larynx invasion in the early stages, with a persistent focus in the left supraclavicular region. She later developed pulmonary fibrosis, for which she was treated with complimentary radiotherapy (30 Gy), before dying. Distribution of radioiodine doses is presented. Conclusion: It is important to emphasize the validity of a first 131 radioiodine dose after surgery of DTC patients of 100 mCi or more, to obtain the ablation of the remaining thyroid tissue. This

  9. Teenage hyperthyroidism and radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, F.A.; Nisa, L.; Hoque, M.; Jehan, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To assess the efficacy of radioiodine therapy in teenage patients with hyperthyroidism. Method: The medical records of 28 patients (age range 16 -18 years) were purposely selected from a pool of 3637 hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine during the period January 1982 to December 2006. Data for analysis included the age, sex, clinical symptoms, type of hyperthyroidism, antithyroid medications received, doses of radioiodine therapy given and the outcome of the therapy after one and five years. Results: The mean age of the patients treated for hyperthyroidism was 17.60 ± 0.73 years and 82 % were females. The most common type of hyperthyroidism was Graves' disease (75%). All patients were pre-treated with antithyroid drugs for variable duration periods (6 months to 2 years). The mean administered dose of radioiodine was 10.69 ± 2.77 mCi. The dose of I-131 was calculated on the basis of gland size and morphology (assessment by palpation and scintigraphy) and percentage of radioactive iodine uptake. Effective control of hyperthyroidism after radioiodine treatment occurred in 60.72% patients with a single dose, 35.71% required a second dose and 3.57% required more than two doses. Frequency of early hypothyroidism within one year was 38.09 % in Graves' disease and 33.33% in toxic multinodular goiter. Most patients (66.66%) in the toxic nodule group remained euthyroid up to one year after I-131 therapy. Overall incidence rates of hypothyroidism after 1 year and 5 years of radioiodine therapy were 32.14% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion: Hyperthyroidism in the teen group of patients was effectively controlled with radioiodine. There were no early side effects. The only long-term effect was hypothyroidism. Appearance of early/late hypothyroidism showed a direct relationship with the type of hyperthyroidism and the dose of radioiodine administered. In general, patients with Graves' disease showed a greater tendency in the evolution of early

  10. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  11. Radioiodine therapy in management of thyroid carcinoma - A review of 138 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, A.S.; Hossain, S.; Hafiz, N.; Taslima, D.A.; Rashid, H.

    2001-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas are being treated by using a widely accepted protocol of surgery and radioiodine therapy followed by supplementation of thyroid hormones in the Nuclear Medicine Centre (NMC), Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH) since 1990. In the present study 138 patients(Male-54, Female-84) with differentiated thyroid cancers received radioiodine therapy for ablation of residual thyroid tissue with a dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq (75-100 mCi), for lymph node metastases 5.55-6.5 GBq(150-175mCi), for lung metastases 5.55 GBq(150 mCi) and for bony metastases 7.4 GBq (200 mCi). Among 138 patients papillary carcinoma was observed in 94 cases (68%; Male-42, Female-52), follicular type was found in 30 cases (22%; Male-8, Female-22) and mixed type in 14 patients (10%, Male-4, Female-10). Single dose of 2.77-3.7 GBq(75-100 mCi) of radioiodine was received by all 138 patients. Among the unablated patients 62 received double doses totalling 9.25 GBq (250 mCi), 44 received three doses 12.95 GBq (350 mCi) and one patient received 8 doses 33.3 GBq (900 mCi). Out of 138 patients single dose ablated 76 cases and 62 remain unablated. Multiple doses ablated 28 patients and 34 still remain unablated and is under follow up. The success and failure in management of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer over 8 years period have been discussed here revealing a satisfactory outcome. (author)

  12. Results of 52 cases with struma maligna treated with radio-iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebe, S.F.; Huth, K.D.

    1982-01-01

    Results of 52 cases with struma maligna treated with radio-iodine. Between 1966 and 1977, 52 thyroid carcinoma patients received radio-iodine therapy. Their age ranged from 18 to 82 years. Out of 52 patients, 46 underwent surgery with 26 thyrodectomized subtotally and 20 totally so. No surgery was performed in 6 cases since this was refused in 2 cases and inoperable for clinical reasons in 4 cases. Radio-iodine treatment was performed 6 to 10 weeks after operation or 2 to 4 weeks after diagnosis. In 9 cases, additional irradiation therapy was performed on metastases (predominantly in skeleton) at total doses ranging between 2500-7500 R focal dose for palliative reasons. In terms of summary, the authors draw the conclusion that surgical ablation of thyroid tissue as total as possible combined with subsequent radio-iodine treatments till complete destruction of the iodine-storing tissue imposes as the optimum treatment of follicular and papillary thyroid carcinoma. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Graves' disease in a 3 year-old patient with agranulocytosis due to anti-thyroid drugs: Radioiodine ablation therapy as an effective alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Muñoz, E; Ramírez-Ocaña, D; Martín-García, A M; Ruiz-García, F J; Puentes-Zarzuela, C

    The case is presented of a 3 year-old girl with mitochondrial disease (subacute necrotizing encephalomyelopathy of Leigh syndrome), v-stage chronic kidney disease of a diffuse mesangial sclerosis, as well as developmental disorders, and diagnosed with hyperthyroidism Graves-Basedow disease. Six weeks after starting the treatment with neo-carbimazole, the patient reported a serious case of agranulocytosis. This led to stopping the anti-thyroid drugs, and was treated successfully with 131 I ablation therapy. The relevance of the article is that Graves' disease is uncommon in the paediatric age range (especially in children younger than 6 years old), and developing complications due to a possible late diagnosis. Agranulocytosis as a potentially serious adverse effect following the use of anti-thyroid drugs, and the few reported cases of ablation therapy with 131 I at this age, makes this case unique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of radioiodine therapy failures in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Reinartz, P.; Nowak, B.; Ostwald, E.; Schaefer, W.; Block, S.; Setani, K.; Buell, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim of this study was a characterization of radioiodine therapy (RIT) failures in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole. Method: 226 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease received 686.8 ± 376.4 MBq of iodine-131 orally for thyroid ablation. Target dose was 250 Gy. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Therapy failures were compared with successes regarding possible influencing variables initial thyroid volume, thyroid function, immune activity (TRAb), I-131 uptake, effective half-life, absorbed energy dose, age and gender. Results: 212 of 226 patients (93.8%) were treated successfully, 14 (6.2%) showed a hyperthyroidism relapse within 6 months which required a second radioiodine therapy. A success rate of 92.5% (62/67) could also be achieved with 67 patients who were hyperthyroid at the time of RIT. Compared to the therapy successes, the 14 failures achieved significantly lower absorbed doses (223.8 ± 76.6 Gy vs. 285.2 ± 82.1 Gy, p 0.2). Of the 14 failures, n = 8 reached an absorbed dose 250 Gy. Stepwise logistic regression revealed only absorbed energy dose as a variable significantly influencing therapy success (p 0.2) or gender (p = 0.13). Two-tailed Fisher's exact test showed no significant influence of gender on success rates (failures/successes: male 1/36, female 13/176, p = 0.48). Conclusions: Except for the absorbed energy dose, no other significant variable influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole could be found. It should be noted, though, that 5 therapy failures (2.2%) reached an absorbed energy dose of >250 Gy. (orig.) [de

  15. Quality of Life and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment of Radioiodine Ablation Strategies in Patients With Thyroid Cancer: Results From the Randomized Phase III ESTIMABL Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borget, Isabelle; Bonastre, Julia; Catargi, Bogdan; Déandréis, Désirée; Zerdoud, Slimane; Rusu, Daniela; Bardet, Stéphane; Leenhardt, Laurence; Bastie, Delphine; Schvartz, Claire; Vera, Pierre; Morel, Olivier; Benisvy, Daniele; Bournaud, Claire; Bonichon, Francoise; Kelly, Antony; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Leboulleux, Sophie; Journeau, Florence; Benhamou, Ellen; Schlumberger, Martin

    2015-09-10

    In the ESTIMABL phase III trial, the thyroid ablation rate was equivalent for the two thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) stimulation methods (thyroid hormone withdrawal [THW] and recombinant human TSH [rhTSH]) and the two iodine-131 ((131)I) activities (1.1 or 3.7 GBq). The objectives of this article were to present health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) results and a cost-effectiveness evaluation performed alongside this trial. HRQoL and utility were longitudinally assessed, from random assignment to the follow-up visit at 8 ± 2 months for the 752 patients with thyroid cancer, using the Short Form-36 and the EuroQoL-5D questionnaires, respectively. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from the societal perspective in the French context. Resource use (hospitalization for (131)I administration, rhTSH, sick leaves, and transportation) was collected prospectively. We used the net monetary benefit approach and computed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for both TSH stimulation methods and (131)I activities. Sensitivity analyses of the costs of rhTSH were performed. At (131)I administration, THW caused a clinically significant deterioration of HRQoL, whereas HRQoL remained stable with rhTSH. This deterioration was transient with no difference 3 months later. rhTSH was more effective than THW in terms of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs; +0.013 QALY/patient) but more expensive (+€474/patient). The probability that rhTSH would be cost effective at a €50,000/QALY threshold was 47% in France. The use of 1.1 GBq of (131)I instead of 3.7 GBq reduced per-patient costs by €955 (US$1,018) but with slightly decreased efficacy (-0.007 QALY/patient). rhTSH avoids the transient THW-induced deterioration of HRQoL but is unlikely to be cost effective at its current price. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  16. Predictive value of pyramidal lobe, percentage thyroid uptake and age for ablation outcome after 15 mCi fixed dose of radioiodine-131 in Graves’ disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaman, Maseeh uz; Fatima, Nosheen; Zaman, Unaiza; Sajjad, Zafar; Zaman, Areeba; Tahseen, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose was to find out the efficacy of fixed 15 mCi radioactive iodine-131 (RAI) dose and predictive values of various factors for inducing hypothyroidism in Graves’ disease (GD). Retrospective study conducted from January 2012 till August 2014. Patients with GD who had a technetium-99m thyroid scan, thyroid antibodies, received fixed 15 mCi RAI and did follow endocrine clinics for at least 6 months were selected. RAI was considered successful if within 6 months of RAI therapy patients developed hypothyroidism. Of the 370 patients with GD who had RAI during study period, 210 (57%) qualified study criteria. Mean age of patients was 48 ± 15 years with female: male ratio of 69:31, positive thyroid antibodies in 61%, means thyroid uptake of 15.09 ± 11.23%, and presence of pyramidal lobe in 40% of total population. Hypothyroidism was achieved in 161 (77%) patients while 49 (23%) patients failed to achieve it (remained either hyperthyroid or euthyroid on antithyroid medication). Patients who became hypothyroid were significantly younger with higher proportion of presence of thyroid antibodies and pyramidal lobe and lower percentage thyroid uptake than those who failed. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that age (odds ratio; OR = 2.074), pyramidal lobe (OR = 3.317), thyroid antibodies (OR = 8.198), and percentage thyroid uptake (OR = 3.043) were found to be significant prognostic risk factors for post-RAI hypothyroidism. Gender was found to have nonsignificant association with the development of hypothyroidism. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed age <42 years and thyroid uptake <15% as threshold values for the development of post-RAI hypothyroidism. We conclude that fixed (15 mCi) RAI dose is highly effective in rendering hypothyroidism in patients with GD. Age (≤42 years), thyroid uptake (≤15%) and presence of pyramidal lobe are strong predictors of hypothyroidism and must be considered for selecting optimal RAI dose

  17. Contributions of short-lived radioiodines to thyroid doses received by evacuees from the Chernobyl area estimated using early in vivo activity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balonov, M.; Kaidanovsky, G.; Zvonova, I.; Kovtun, A.; Bouville, A.; Luckyanov, L.; Voilleque, P.

    2003-01-01

    A series of in-vivo gamma spectrometric measurements of 65 people, evacuated from Pripyat 1.5 days after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 explosion was performed in St. Petersburg, Russia, as early as 30 April 1986. The historical spectra and interviews were recently processed and the results used for thyroid dose estimation. Activities of 131 I in thyroid and 132 Te in lungs were determined easily; for estimation of 132 I and 133 I activities in thyroid, sophisticated methods of spectra processing were developed. According to thyroid measurement data, the mean ratio of 133 I/ 131 I activities (at the time of the accident) inhaled by residents of Pripyat was 2.0. The mean ratio of thyroid dose from 133 I inhalation to that caused by 131 I amounts to 0.3, which confirms accuracy of dose estimates based on the evolution of the Chernobyl accident. The mean ratio of 132 I activity in thyroid to that of 132 Te in lungs was assessed from the human measurement data to be 0.2, which is in reasonable agreement with the metabolic properties of these radionuclides. The mean ratio of thyroid dose from 132 I originating from 132 Te deposited in lungs to the dose caused by 131 I was 0.13 ± 0.02 for Pripyat residents who did not take KI pills and 0.9 ± 0.1 for persons who took KI pills. Thus, the contribution of short-lived radioiodines to total thyroid dose of Pripyat residents, which was on average 30% for persons who did not apply stable iodine prophylaxis, and about 50% for persons who took KI pills on 26-27 April, should be accounted for in the assessment of thyroid health effects. (author)

  18. Chemical forms of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo

    1979-01-01

    Release of radioiodine built-up during reactor operations presents a potential problem from the standpoint of environmental safety. Among the chemical forms of radioiodine, depending upon the circumstances, organic iodides cast a most serious problem because of its difficulties in the trapping and because of its stability compared to other chemical forms. Furthermore, pellet-cladding interaction (PCl) fuel failures in LWR fuel rods are believed to be stress corrosion cracks caused by embrittling fission product species, radioiodine. To deal with these problems, knowledge is required on the chemical behaviors of radioiodine in and out of fuels, as well as the release behaviors from fuels. Here a brief review is given of these respects, in aiming at clearing-up the questions still remaining unknown. The data seem to indicate that radioiodine exists as a combined form in fuels. upon heating slightly irradiated fuels, the iodine atoms are released in a chemical form associated with uranium atoms. Experiments, however, as needed with specimen of higher burnup, where the interactions of radioiodine with metallic fission products could be favored. The dominant release mechanism of radioiodine under normal operating temperatures will be diffusion to grain boundaries leading to open surfaces. Radiation-induced internal traps, however, after the rate of diffusion significantly. The carbon sources of organic iodides formed under various conditions and its formation mechanisms have also been considered. (author)

  19. Radioiodine treatment for malignant thyroid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Gertrud [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology

    2006-12-15

    Radioiodine treatment for thyroid disease has been given for half a decade in Sweden. The most common indication for treatment is hyperthyroidism, when iodine uptake is high. The situation in which radioiodine treatment is used in thyroid cancer is less favourable and measures therefore have to be taken to optimize the treatment. Treatment should be performed early in the course of the disease to achieve the highest possible differentiation. Before treatment the iodine and goitrogen intake should be kept low. Stimulation of the thyrocytes by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) should be high. It is conventionally achieved by thyroid hormone withdrawal rendering the patient hypothyroid, or by the recently available recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) which can be recommended for ablation of the thyroid remnant after thyroidectomy and for treatment of metastases in fragile patients unable to undergo hypothyroidism. Finally, stunning - the negative effect of a prior test dose from radioactive iodine - should be avoided.

  20. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  1. Radioiodine in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.

    1981-01-01

    Behaviour was studied of radioiodine in different soil subtypes sampled in the vicinity of the A-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice. Radioiodine sorption is mainly affected by the amount of humus and by the clay fraction of soil. The highest sorption was recorded for meadow chernozem and the lowest for rendzina soils. At the same pH, soils with a higher level of organic matter adsorb more radioiodine. Upon applying radioiodate in soil samples, reduction to iodide takes place. Under the action of anions, radioiodine sorption decreases, the effect decreasing as follows: H 2 PO 4 - >SO 2- >Cl - >NO 3 - . The highest desorption was caused by 0.1 N NaOH solution. (author)

  2. Optimizing radioiodine for ablation of residual thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    The thyroid cancer (TC) has been studied in great detail in the form of the clinical experience during the past several decades. This has led to the retrospective analysis of various prognostic factors that have separated DTC into various risk groups. On one hand, the prognosis in the low-risk group is excellent with survival rate of 98 %, whereas the other end of the spectrum consists of high-risk group patients with poor survival, approximating only 50% at 10 years. Clearly, the understanding of the prognostic factors and risk groups is critically important in distinguishing a patient at low-risk from that at a high-risk which can make an impact in decision making regarding the extent of thyroidectomy and adjuvant treatment such as radioactive iodine ( 131 I) therapy

  3. Extrathyroidal Radioiodine Accumulation in a Fibroadenoma of the Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoung Hyoun; Kim, Hun Soo; Park, Soon-Ah

    2017-02-01

    A 45-year-old woman with a differentiated thyroid carcinoma received adjuvant radioiodine therapy following total thyroidectomy and left modified radical neck dissection. A posttherapy planar radioiodine scan showed multifocal uptake in the thyroid bed and left chest. SPECT/CT revealed a fibroadenoma in the left breast. Six months later, an I scan showed no iodine avidity in the breast fibroadenoma, whereas ultrasonography showed no significant change in the size of the fibroadenoma. Altered radioiodine uptake of a breast fibroadenoma can be observed on follow-up scans after cytotoxic radioiodide treatment in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma.

  4. Clinical research of juvenile hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Ling; Zhang Chunying; Chen Yue

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects and side effects in the radioiodine management of juvenile hyperthyroidism. Methods: 80 patients with poor effects using anti-thyroid drug were assigned to receive 131 I therapy. The follows of therapy outcome were assessed 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment. One follows up per 1-3 years. Results: Among 80 patients followed by 6 months, clinical response was excellent in 65 patients (81%), good in 15 (19%). There were 12 patients with hypothyroidism followed 4 years, and with no other side effects. Conclusion: The good therapeutic effect was obtained in radioiodine treatment for juvenile hyperthyroidism. Radioiodine was effective to juvenile hyperthyroidism

  5. Synthesis of radioiodinated labeled peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matloobi, M.; Rafii, H.; Beigi, D.; Khalaj, A.; Kamali-Dehghan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Optimization of radioiodination of peptides is covered by both a direct method in which a constituent tyrosine residue is labeled and indirect method by using an iodinated derivative (SIB) of N succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE) as the intermediate. Radioiodination of IgG and FMLF were performed by direct method using Chloramine-T as an oxidant but since Formyl-Methyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine, FMLF, does not lend itself for direct radioiodination we performed labeling of FMLF by indirect method via radioiodined SIB at different pH. (author)

  6. Radioiodine (I-131) application in the management of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.

    2005-01-01

    metastases were detected in 16% (n=21). Of 52 patients with residual thyroid tissues, fourteen patients (30%) received residual ablation dose of 30 mCi of radioiodine. All 21 patients who exhibit abnormal WBS were referred to the cancer unit for high dose therapy. This study showed DTC is more common in young females than in males and Papillary carcinoma is the commonest histological type in Sri Lanka. Though the preferred surgical management is TT or NTT (92%) this study showed inadequacy of excision. In Sri Lanka we have very few experienced thyroid surgeons. Inadequate surgical excision could be due to inexperience and lack of facilities for surgical management in peripheral hospitals. Inadequate surgical excision will directly interfere with the long-term follow up of DTC. Presence of remnant thyroid tissues makes detection and treatment of nodal or distant metastases difficult. High TSH levels necessary to enhance tumor I 131 uptake and assessment of Tg levels, the most sensitive test for detection of recurrences cannot be achieved with a large thyroid remnants. This results indicative of low sensitivity of the WBS and serum Tg measurements in our set up. We have detected 16% of patients with distant metastases but the actual number may be higher than this figure. Monitoring with Tg is grossly inadequate. Serum Tg test is expensive in our set up prevent us using this facility. Approximately 2/3 of this study group were not received residual ablation partly due to unawareness, not enough radioiodine in the government hospitals and poor follow up in our set up. Management of DTC is still debatable. There is no agreement on extent of surgery, optimal time for WBS, residual ablation and long-term fallow up. Today highly effective method of treatment for DTC is the combination of thyroid surgery (TT/NTT) followed by RAI residual ablation and thyroxine suppression therapy. 30 mCi of radioiodine is the highest permissible activity for out patient treatment according to the

  7. (Radioiodinated free fatty acids)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, Jr., F. F.

    1987-12-11

    The traveler participated in the Second International Workshop on Radioiodinated Free Fatty Acids in Amsterdam, The Netherlands where he presented an invited paper describing the pioneering work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving the design, development and testing of new radioiodinated methyl-branched fatty acids for evaluation of heart disease. He also chaired a technical session on the testing of new agents in various in vitro and in vivo systems. He also visited the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Nuclear Medicine in Bonn, West Germany, to review, discuss, plan and coordinate collaborative investigations with that institution. In addition, he visited the Cyclotron Research Center in Liege, Belgium, to discuss continuing collaborative studies with the Osmium-191/Iridium-191m radionuclide generator system, and to complete manuscripts and plan future studies.

  8. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Balawi, Ibrahim A.; Meir, Hadir M.; Yousef, Mohammad K.; Nayel, Hala A.; Al-Mobarak, Mohammad F.

    2001-01-01

    The current work was conducted to study the disease status and treatment results of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioactive iodine therapy. Retrospective review of 78 patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma referred for radioiodine therapy in the Nuclear Medicine Unit, King Abdulaziz Hospital and Oncology Center, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics, age correlation to different risk factors, treatment protocol and results were performed. Seventy seven percent were female and the female to male ratio was 3.5:1. The age of patients ranged between 13-63 years with a median age of 36 years. Cervical lymph node involvement was detected in 22 patients (25%). Papillary carcinoma was encountered in 78 patients (90%) and follicular carcinoma in 9 patients (10%). Analysis of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed no statistically significant difference between patients in the different age groups except for extrathyroid extension and lymph node involvement. Patients older than 45 years had a statistically significant lower incidence of nodal involvement and higher incidence of extra thyroid extension (P<0.02). In the current study we used a high dose method (Radioiodine-131 dose 75-100mCi) for thyroid remnant ablation after thyroidectomy (total or near total) in 67 patients. An Iodine 131 dose of 150 mCi was used in 12 patients with radioiodine-avid cervical lymph nodes and in 3 patients with gross residual tumor. In 4 patients with distant metastases an Iodine 131 dose of 200 mCi was used. For the whole study group the 5 year overall survival and disease-free survival was 96% and 88%. The current study, as with many other retrospective studies, concluded that despite the fact that differentiated thyroid carcinoma is among the most curable cancers, some patients are still at high risk for recurrent disease and associated mortality. (author)

  9. High versus low radioiodine activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer - A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valachis, Antonis; Nearchou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to estimate the effectiveness and toxicity of low activity radioiodine ablation versus high activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by including all randomized trials of low activity versus high activity radioiodine ablation after thyroidectomy. Standard meta-analytic procedures were used to analyze the study outcomes. Results: Ten trials were considered eligible and were further analyzed. The pooled risk ratio (RR) of having a successful ablation for an activity of 1100 MBq versus 3700 MBq (seven trials, 1772 patients) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.85 - 1.04, p-value 0.21). The RR for successful ablation when only thyroid hormone withdrawal was used (five trials, 1116 patients) was 0.87 (95% CI 0.72 - 1.06, p-value 0.17) and it was comparable to RR when only recombinant-human TSH (rec-hTSH) (two trials, 812 patients) was used (1.00, 95% CI 0.93 - 1.07, p-value 0.92). Salivary dysfunction, nausea, and neck pain were significantly more frequent among patients with higher dose for ablation. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provides some evidence from randomized trials that a lower activity of radioiodine ablation is as effective as higher dose after surgery in patients with DTC with lower toxicity

  10. High versus low radioiodine activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer - A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valachis, Antonis [Dept. of Oncology, Maelarsjukhuset., Eskilstuna (Sweden); Univ. of Uppsala,, (Sweden)], e-mail: Valachis@hotmail.com, Antonis.Valachis@akademiska.uu.se; Nearchou, Andreas [Dept, of Oncology, Maelarsjukhuset., Eskilstuna (Sweden); Univ. of Uppsala., Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    Background: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to estimate the effectiveness and toxicity of low activity radioiodine ablation versus high activity in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Design: A systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by including all randomized trials of low activity versus high activity radioiodine ablation after thyroidectomy. Standard meta-analytic procedures were used to analyze the study outcomes. Results: Ten trials were considered eligible and were further analyzed. The pooled risk ratio (RR) of having a successful ablation for an activity of 1100 MBq versus 3700 MBq (seven trials, 1772 patients) was 0.94 (95% CI 0.85 - 1.04, p-value 0.21). The RR for successful ablation when only thyroid hormone withdrawal was used (five trials, 1116 patients) was 0.87 (95% CI 0.72 - 1.06, p-value 0.17) and it was comparable to RR when only recombinant-human TSH (rec-hTSH) (two trials, 812 patients) was used (1.00, 95% CI 0.93 - 1.07, p-value 0.92). Salivary dysfunction, nausea, and neck pain were significantly more frequent among patients with higher dose for ablation. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis provides some evidence from randomized trials that a lower activity of radioiodine ablation is as effective as higher dose after surgery in patients with DTC with lower toxicity.

  11. Our experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, Otakar

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper the author presents his experience with radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomies. The objectives of this study were to establish the efficacy and determine the adverse effects of radioiodine therapy of patients with thyroid functional autonomies. The main pathologic attribute of thyroid functional autonomies is the loss of regulation in the axis of hypothalamus-hypophysis-thyroid. The main cause of functional autonomy of the thyroid is iodine deficiency. Over a period of 30 years (1974-2004) 799 patients (age from 33 to 86 years; average age 58.7 years; the female: male ration was 7.4:1) with unifocal functional autonomy (UFA), multifocal functional autonomy (MFA) and disseminated functional autonomy (DFA) received at least one treatment of radioiodine. For diagnostics and the evaluation of radioiodine therapeutic effect of functional autonomies a thyroid scintigraphy is the basic and necessary procedure. In some patients a common scintigraphy with special imaging modulation, in some patients a scintigraphy after suppression or stimulation by means of thyroid hormones or TSH were done. We have also performed a thyroid ultrasonography, an assessment of a serum level of a total and free thyroxine, total triiodothyronine, TSH, radioiodine accumulation test, estimation of radioiodine effective half-life, in some patients TRH-TSH test. The follow-up examinations were done in all patients after 4-6 months, another examination after one year in 545 patients and after two years in 254 patients. One therapeutic dose received 733 patients (91.74%) and it was sufficient for an elimination of functional autonomies. Some patients were retreated if there was the evidence of small or no treatment effect and no elimination of functional autonomies. Two radioiodine treatments received 62 patients (7.76%) and three treatments 4 patients (0.5%). We advocate individual pre-therapeutic dosimetry to determine the activity necessary to achieve a

  12. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distenfeld, C.H.; Klemish, J.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector

  13. The clinical value of immunosuppression in Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yue; Qiu Ling; Zhang Chunying; Long Shuiqing; Gan Xilun

    2001-01-01

    Objective: The chief clinical characteristics of Graves disease are hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy. To assess the values of using immunosuppression in Graves ophthalmopathy. Method: 415 patients with Graves hyperthyroidism were studied. They were randomly assigned to receive radioiodine, methimazole from 1.5 to 2 years, radioiodine followed by a 3-month course of prednisone. The changes in thyroid function and progression of ophthalmopathy were evaluated. Results: Among the 138 patients treated with radioiodine, 19 patients had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 117 had no changes in their eyes; 2 patients had improvement in their eye disease. Among the 138 patients treated with methimazole, 3 patients had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 133 had no changes in their eyes; 2 patients had improvement in their eye disease. Among the 139 patients treated with radioiodine and prednisone, no patient had new or worsening ophthalmopathy; 107 had no changes in their eyes; 32 patients had improvement in their eye disease. The frequency of improvement of ophthalmopathy was significantly higher in the radioiodine-prednisone group than in either the radioiodine group or the methimazole group (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Conclusions: The administration of prednisone after radioiodine therapy was associated with improvement of ophthalmopathy. Worsening of ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy is often transient and can be prevented by the administration of prednisone

  14. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.

    2005-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  15. Radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a clinical symptom complex caused by elevated thyroid hormone levels. Of the disorders in which it appears, the most common is Graves' disease; toxic nodular goiter (Plummer's disease) is considerably less frequent. Recent studies suggest that Graves' disease is autoimmune in origin and is probably caused by a genetic defect in immunoserveillance in which thyroid-stimulating antibodies interact with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor sites on thyroid follicular cell membranes to increase synthesis and secretion of thyroid hormones. Toxic nodular goiter is characterized by the secretion of increased amounts of thyroid hormone by localized autonomous areas of increased function within the thyroid gland. Other forms of hyperthyroidism are discussed. Radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism is described

  16. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and the effects of prior carbimazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Arun; Hamide, Abdoul; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2014-09-01

    The use of radioiodine as the first line of treatment in Graves' disease is restricted in India because of its limited availability and an unrealistic risk perception associated with it. Additionally, the effectiveness of radioiodine ablation in Graves' disease is influenced by many factors. Prior medical antithyroid therapy is one such important factor. To analyze the efficacy of low dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi) in treatment of naive patients of Graves' disease in comparison to that in which it was already primed with an antithyroid drug, carbimazole. A non-randomized, interventional study conducted in the Department of Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care institute in South India. The study had two groups; Group A (36 treatment naive, uncomplicated Graves' disease patients) and B (34 Graves' disease patients on carbimazole prior to radioiodine therapy). Both groups had baseline clinical, biochemical evaluation and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months for evaluating the clinical status for possible documentation of cure. The cure rate was 61.1% in drug naive group and 58.8% in pretreated group at 6 months following radioiodine (P = 0.845). Higher baseline 999m technicium (99m Tc) uptake, male gender, BMI and higher baseline free thyroxine (fT4) level predicted treatment failure following radioiodine therapy. Administration of carbimazole prior to low dose radioiodine therapy does not alter the efficacy of radioiodine. Low fixed dose (5 mCi) of radioactive iodine may be a safe and effective primary therapeutic option in Graves' disease patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs.

  17. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  18. Experience and outcome of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, S.H.; Paul, A.K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is being increasingly used in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. The primary reasons for choosing radioiodine therapy are its effectiveness, ease of administration, relatively low cost and paucity of side effects. Here we presented our experiences and outcome of radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism in a divisional referral centre.We retrospectively analyzed 203 patients receiving radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism in Centre for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Khulna during the period from July 1994 to June 2004. All the patients had clinical signs and symptoms of hyperthyroidism as well as elevated triiodothyronine (T 3 ), thyroxine (T 4 ) and suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). T 3 , T 4 and TSH were done in all cases. Radionuclide scan and ultrasound of thyroid gland, radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU), thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb) and fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) was done in selected cases. We assessed all patients prior to radioiodine therapy. Elderly patients and all those with cardiac complications and severe hyperthyroidism were pretreated with a short course of antithyroid drug in full dosages until they were clinically and biochemically euthyroid. Ninety five patients were on antithyroid medication (Neomercazole) prior to radioiodine therapy. Antithyroid medication were stopped 3 days before radioiodine therapy and restarted 3 days later and continued for 1 to 2 months depending on patient's symptoms. The rest of the patients received either no treatment or beta-blocker prior to radioiodine therapy. Menstrual history was taken in female patients and pregnancy was excluded by ultrasonography in doubtful cases before administering radioiodine. The likely consequences of the treatment were fully explained to the patients and attendants, the usual precautions for radiation protection of the public and the necessity of the follow-up were discussed and verbal consent was taken before administering radioiodine

  19. Focal Bronchiectasis Causing Abnormal Pulmonary Radioiodine Uptake in a Patient with Well-Differentiated Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ash Gargya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. False-positive pulmonary radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma has been reported in patients with certain respiratory conditions. Patient Findings. We describe a case of well-differentiated papillary thyroid carcinoma treated by total thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation therapy. Postablation radioiodine whole body scan and subsequent diagnostic radioiodine whole body scans have shown persistent uptake in the left hemithorax despite an undetectable stimulated serum thyroglobulin in the absence of interfering thyroglobulin antibodies. Contrast-enhanced chest computed tomography has confirmed that the abnormal pulmonary radioiodine uptake correlates with focal bronchiectasis. Summary. Bronchiectasis can cause abnormal chest radioactive iodine uptake in the followup of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Conclusions. Recognition of potential false-positive chest radioactive iodine uptake, simulating pulmonary metastases, is needed to avoid unnecessary exposure to further radiation from repeated therapeutic doses of radioactive iodine.

  20. Radioiodine therapy in Graves` disease; Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ., Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    Analogous to subtotal struma resection, stable long-term results are attained with radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis only with an ablative therapy concept. Hypothyreosis is thus no longer an undesired or unavoidable side effect of radioiodine therapy, but constitutes part of the treatment principle. In addition to the negligible theoretical low late risk of radiation effect, an increase in immunostimulation is induced in the majority of patients by means of increased antigen presentation. In a minority of patients, this has detrimental effects on the treatment results and leads to a requirement for relatively high focal doses (200-300 Gy) to achieve a generally satisfactory therapeutic result. In individual cases, endocrine orbitopathy may be exacerbated or elicited. It is therefore recommended that radioiodine therapy of immunohyperthyreosis should be undertaken with cortisone protection as a matter of principle. (orig.) [Deutsch] In Analogie zur subtotalen Strumaresektion werden auch mit der Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose nur mit einem ablativen Therapiekonzept stabile Langzeitergebnisse erzielt. Die Hypothyreose ist somit nicht laenger unerwuenschte oder unvermeidliche Nebenwirkung der Radioiodtherapie, sondern Bestandteil des Behandlungsprinzips. Neben dem vernachlaessigbar geringen theoretischen Spaetrisiko durch Strahleneinwirkung wird bei einem Grossteil der Patienten durch eine vermehrte Antigenpraesentation eine Zunahme der Immunstimulation induziert, die bei einem kleineren Teil der Patienten das Behandlungsergebnis beeintraechtigt und dazu fuehrt, dass relativ hohe Herddosen (200-300 Gy) fuer ein insgesamt zufriedenstellendes Behandlungsergebnis erforderlich werden. In Einzelfaellen kann hierdurch auch eine endokrine Orbitopathie verschlechtert oder neu ausgeloest werden. Es wird daher empfohlen, die Radioiodtherapie der Immunhyperthyreose grundsaetzlich unter Kortisonschutz vorzunehmen. (orig.)

  1. Radioiodination of humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, K.; Kupsch, H. [Inst. of Interdisciplinary Isotope Research, Leipzig (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The known IODO-GEN trademark -method was adapted for radiolabeling of humic and fulvic acids with {sup 131}I. The water insoluble oxidizing agent 1,3,4,6tetrachloro-3{alpha},6{alpha}-diphenylglycoluril (IODO-GEN trademark) forms an iodous ion species (I{sup +}), which undergoes an electrophilic I/H-substitution on aromatic moieties of the humic and fulvic acids. This method offers mild conditions with a lesser extent of oxidative alterations of the target molecule, accompanied by an easy handling due to the virtual water-insolubility of the oxidizing agent. The method was optimized and different techniques were tested for the purification of the radioiodinated humic material. The yield of the labeling procedure varies between 45 and 75% depending on the provenance of the humic material and the applied purification method. A specific activity up to 40 MBq/mg was achieved. Furthermore, the known inherent photo-susceptibility of the iodinated humic substance and the influence of reducing agents were verified. An additional release of {sup 131}I up to 20% and up to 35%, respectively were observed. (orig.)

  2. Radioiodine removal in nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Technical means are reviewed available for the retention of radioiodine in nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing plants, its immobilization, storage, and disposal. The removal of iodine species from gaseous effluents of nuclear power plants using impregnated activated charcoal is dealt with. Various scrubbing techniques for trapping iodine from the head-end and dissolver off-gases are discussed as well as solid adsorbents for iodine which may be used to clean up other gaseous streams. Current practices and activities for radioiodine treatment and management in Belgian, Dutch, Swedish, USSR and UK nuclear installations are presented

  3. Endocrine ophthalmopathy and radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, F. Anders

    2006-01-01

    Endocrine ophthalmopathy is to some degree present in most patients with Graves' disease. In few cases, a severe form of the condition develops and in the majority of these cases, the course of the eye problems has been influenced by the treatment for thyrotoxicosis. In this regard, radioiodine therapy has been increasingly recognized as carrying a special risk. Here, the current understanding of endocrine ophthalmopathy and the risks associated with the development of severe eye disease are discussed. The results of a retrospective investigation of patients with severe eye disease in our hospital, and the experience with corticosteroid administration following radioiodine in order to reduce the risk of ophthalmopathy, are also presented

  4. Preliminary study of attitude and knowledge of thyroid cancer patients to radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongpraparn, Thonnapong; Pusuwan, Pawana; Tocharoenchai, Chiraporn; Siriphitukyotin, Oratai; Wongsawat, Wanwimon; Chaudakshetrin, Pachee; Putrasreni, Nucharee

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study is to survey the attitude and knowledge of radiation and radioiodine treatment in thyroid cancer patients. Fifty-two thyroid cancer patients who were prepared for radioactive iodine treatment at Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital were requested to fill the questionaires before and after receiving the information about radioiodine treatment. The questionaires consisted of 12 questions of which the first five were about the attitude to radiation and radioiodine treatment. The rest was about an information on radioiodine treatment. For data analysis, firstly the percentage of correct answer of each question was calculated and compared between pre- and post-test. Secondly all patients were categorized into 2 groups according to their education: upto high school, and undergraduate or higher. The attitude and the understanding about radioiodine treatment were analyzed in each group. The results show that post-test gives higher percentages of correct answers for all questions with an average of 29% improvement. For upto high school group, the attitude improves from 69.4% to 97.2% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 88.9% to 100%. Similarly, for the undergraduate or higher group,the attitude improves from 93.3% to 100% and the understanding about radioiodine treatment improves from 73.3% to 100%. It may be concluded that our education intervention is informative and the well-educated patients have better attitude to radiation

  5. Radioiodine therapy and thyrostatic drugs and iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moka, D.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Cologne, Joseph Stelzmannstrasse 9, 50924 Koeln (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Radioiodine therapy is now the most common definite treatment for persistent hyperthyroidism. The outcome of radioiodine therapy depends mainly on the absorbed energy dose in the diseased thyroid tissue. The administered activity and the resulting target dose in the thyroid depend on both the biokinetics of radioiodine and the actual therapeutic effect of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thyrostatic drugs have a major influence on the kinetics of radioiodine in the thyroid and may additionally have a radioprotective effect. Pre-treatment with thyrostatic medication lowers the effective half-life and uptake of radioiodine. This can reduce the target dose in the thyroid and have a negative influence on the outcome of the therapy. Discontinuation of medication shortly before radioiodine administration can increase the absorbed energy dose in the thyroid without increasing the whole-body exposure to radiation as much as would a higher or second radioiodine administration. Furthermore, administration of non-radioactive iodine-127 2-3 days after radioiodine administration can also increase the effective half-life of radioiodine in the thyroid. Thus, improving the biokinetics of radioiodine will allow lower activities to be administered with lower effective doses to the rest of the body, while achieving an equally effective target dose in the thyroid. (orig.)

  6. Cytogenetic biodosimetry and dose-rate effect after radioiodine therapy for thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvostunov, Igor K. [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Saenko, Vladimir A.; Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki University, Department of Radiation Molecular Epidemiology, Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki (Japan); Krylov, Valeri; Rodichev, Andrei [Russian Ministry of Health Care, A.F. Tsyb Medical Radiological Research Center, Branch of the National Medical Research Radiological Centre, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2017-08-15

    This study set out to investigate chromosomal damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes of thyroid cancer patients receiving {sup 131}I for thyroid remnant ablation or treatment of metastatic disease. The observed chromosomal damage was further converted to the estimates of whole-body dose to project the adverse side effects. Chromosomal aberration analysis was performed in 24 patients treated for the first time or after multiple courses. Blood samples were collected before treatment and 3 or 4 days after administration of 2-4 GBq of {sup 131}I. Both conventional cytogenetic and chromosome 2, 4 and 12 painting assays were used. To account for dose-rate effect, a dose-protraction factor was applied to calculate the whole-body dose. The mean dose was 0.62 Gy (95% CI: 0.44-0.77 Gy) in the subgroup of patients treated one time and 0.67 Gy (95% CI: 0.03-1.00 Gy) in re-treated patients. These dose estimates are about 1.7-fold higher than those disregarding the effect of exposure duration. In re-treated patients, the neglected dose-rate effect can result in underestimation of the cumulative whole-body dose by the factor ranging from 2.6 to 6.8. Elevated frequency of chromosomal aberrations observed in re-treated patients before radioiodine therapy allows estimation of a cumulative dose received from all previous treatments. (orig.)

  7. The absorbed dose to the blood is a better predictor of ablation success than the administered {sup 131}I activity in thyroid cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Lassmann, Michael; Reiners, Christoph; Haenscheid, Heribert [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Maeder, Uwe [University of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Cancer Center Mainfranken, Wuerzburg (Germany); Luster, Markus [University of Ulm, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ulm (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    The residence time of {sup 131}I in the blood is likely to be a measure of the amount of {sup 131}I that is available for uptake by thyroid remnant tissue and thus the radiation absorbed dose to the target tissue in {sup 131}I ablation of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). This hypothesis was tested in an investigation on the dependence of the success rate of radioiodine remnant ablation on the radiation absorbed dose to the blood (BD) as a surrogate for the amount of {sup 131}I available for iodine-avid tissue uptake. This retrospective study included 449 DTC patients who received post-operative {sup 131}I ablation in our centre in the period from 1993 to 2007 and who returned to us for diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy. The BD was calculated based on external dose rate measurements using gamma probes positioned in the ceiling. Success of ablation was defined as a negative diagnostic {sup 131}I whole-body scan and undetectable thyroglobulin levels at 6 months follow-up. Ablation was successful in 56.6% of the patients. The rate of successful ablation correlated significantly with BD but not with the administered activity. Patients with blood doses exceeding 350 mGy (n = 144) had a significantly higher probability for successful ablation (63.9%) than the others (n = 305, ablation rate 53.1%, p = 0.03). In contrast, no significant dependence of the ablation rate on the administered activity was observed. The BD is a more powerful predictor of ablation success than the administered activity. (orig.)

  8. Radioiodine in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauby, A.; Saas, A.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure was developed in order to follow the pathways of radioiodine, 129 I especially, through the various compartments of nuclear plant environment: atmosphere, soil, plants, precipitations, ... A partial evaluation of the results is made. Data are supplied on iodine transfer into soil, iodine distribution one year later, release of iodine at the level of soil and plants. The intake of various forms of iodine in a soil and the evaluation of availability to plants by chemical tests showed that radioactive iodine ( 125 I) reached equilibrium with stable iodine after 120 - 140 days of incubation. During this time, there was a large amount of iodine exchangeable against a KI solution N/10. Equilibrium was reached progressively by iodine transfer on soil organic molecules. According to the origin of contamination, the transfer was more or less fast and differences were especially noticed in volatile iodine release and on chemical mobility. During intake, potential hazard of soil, groundwater, plant and atmospheric contaminations was greater. Iodine-129 is presently one of the chief contributors to air pollution around nuclear installations because of its radioactive half-life (1.72 x 10 7 yr) rather than on account of the amounts released. Just as with iodine-131, it is released into the atmosphere under many chemical forms. However, 129 I reaches man through several food chains and not only through the air-grass-cow-milk food chain. The values of its deposition rate on soil and plants are fairly dispersed because of its changing reactivity due to its chemical instability. On account of this chemical complexity, the transfer of iodine along the air-soil-plant system was studied using 125 I. (author)

  9. Amifostine is a potent radioprotector of salivary glands in radioiodine therapy. Structural and ultrastructural findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutta, H.; Kampen, U.; Sagowski, C.; Brenner, W.; Bohuslavizki, K.H.; Paulsen, F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: salivary gland impairment following high-dose radioiodine treatment is well recognized. Since differentiated thyroid cancer has a good prognosis, reduction of long-term side effects is important. This study investigates the radioprotective effects of amifostine in salivary glands of rabbits receiving high-dose radioiodine therapy so as to obtain deeper insight in changes on the cellular and ultrastructural level. Material and methods: a total of 20 rabbits were investigated. High-dose radioiodine therapy applying 1 GBq 131 I was performed in 16 animals. Eight of these 16 animals received 200 mg/m 2 body surface amifostine prior to high-dose radioiodine therapy. Four additional rabbits served as controls, two receiving amifostine, the other two no treatment at all. Subsequently, salivary glands (submandibular and parotid glands, respectively) of all animals were examined by light and transmission electron microscopy. Results: parenchymal damage of both parotid and submandibular glands, specially acinar structures comprising cell organelles and nuclei, of animals pretreated with amifostine was much less pronounced than in animals without amifostine pretreatment. Conclusion: the results indicate that parenchymal damage in salivary glands induced by high-dose radioiodine therapy can significantly be reduced by amifostine. Therefore, amifostine therapy may increase quality of life in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  10. Lithium as an adjunct to radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease for prolonging the intrathyroidal effective half-life of radioiodine. Useful or not?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Kuenstner, H.; Nabavi, E.; Eberlein, U.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentrum fuer Radiologie

    2006-07-01

    Aim: Evaluation of intrathyroidal kinetics of radioiodine with and without lithium as adjunct with respect to the increase in radiation dose delivered to the thyroid. Patients, methods: 267 patients in three groups were included in the study. Group I with 227 patients served as control group, Group II with 21 patients and Group III with 19 patients were distinguished by an intrathyroidal half-life of radioiodine below 3.5 days in the diagnostic test. Patients in Group III received 885 mg lithium carbonate a day for 2 weeks as adjunct to radioiodine therapy. Both diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine kinetics were followed up by at least 10 uptake measurements within a minimum of 48 h. Kinetics of radioiodine were defined mathematically as balance of the thyroidal iodine intake and excretion by a two-compartment model. Results: Under therapy the maximum uptake of radioiodine was reduced by nearly 10% in all groups, in Group I, the effective half-life as well as the product of maximum uptake x effective half-life as an equivalent of radiation dose independent of thyroid volume was lowered in the same magnitude. In Group II, the energy-dose equivalent remained constant under therapy. With adjunct lithium in Group III, the effective half-life was prolonged significantly by factor 1.61{+-}0.49 and the volume-independent energy-dose equivalent by factor 1.39{+-}0.37. No severe side effects of lithium were observed. Conclusion: Using lithium as adjunct to radio-iodine therapy increases the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid by 39% on average and nearly 30% of radioiodine activity can be saved in these patients. Lithium is recommended in patients with very short effective half-life in the diagnostic test in order to reduce the activity required and whole-body radiation dose. (orig.)

  11. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of 131 I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  12. Radioiodine treatment of recurrent hyperthyroidism in patients previously treated for Graves' disease by subtotal thyroidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Laurberg, P

    1992-01-01

    showed a higher sensitivity to radioiodine, with more cases of early hypothyroidism, than non-operated patients. However, after 50 months of follow-up the outcome was identical. The results indicate that frequent assessment is necessary after radioiodine treatment of previously operated patients, since......Radioiodine therapy is often employed for treatment of patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, after previous thyroid surgery. Little is known about the outcome of this treatment compared to patients with no previous surgery. A total of 20 patients who had received surgical...... treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism 1-46 years previously and with relapse of the hyperthyroidism, and 25 patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and no previous thyroid surgery were treated with radioiodine, following the same protocol. Early after treatment the previously operated patients...

  13. Use of radiofrequency ablation in benign thyroid nodules: a literature review and updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai-Pun; Lang, Brian Hung-Hin

    2013-01-01

    Successful thermal ablation using radiofrequency has been reported in various tumors including liver or kidney tumors. Nonsurgical minimally invasive ablative therapy such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) has been reported to be a safe and efficient treatment option in managing symptomatic cold thyroid nodules or hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Pressure and cosmetic symptoms have been shown to be significantly improved both in the short and long terms after RFA. For hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules, RFA is indicated for whom surgery or radioiodine are not indicated or ineffective or for those who refuse surgery or radio-iodine. Improvement of thyroid function with decreased need for antithyroid medications has been reported. Complication rate is relatively low. By reviewing the current literature, we reported its efficacy and complications and compared the efficacy of RFA relative to other ablative options such as ethanol ablation and laser ablation.

  14. Use of Radiofrequency Ablation in Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Literature Review and Updates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Pun Wong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful thermal ablation using radiofrequency has been reported in various tumors including liver or kidney tumors. Nonsurgical minimally invasive ablative therapy such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA has been reported to be a safe and efficient treatment option in managing symptomatic cold thyroid nodules or hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Pressure and cosmetic symptoms have been shown to be significantly improved both in the short and long terms after RFA. For hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules, RFA is indicated for whom surgery or radioiodine are not indicated or ineffective or for those who refuse surgery or radio-iodine. Improvement of thyroid function with decreased need for antithyroid medications has been reported. Complication rate is relatively low. By reviewing the current literature, we reported its efficacy and complications and compared the efficacy of RFA relative to other ablative options such as ethanol ablation and laser ablation.

  15. A mathematical model of optimized radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Suhail AR; Loutfi, Issa; Al-Shoumer, Kamal AS

    2001-01-01

    The current status of radioiodine-131 (RaI) dosimetry for Graves' hyperthyroidism is not clear. Recurrent hyperthyroidism and iatrogenic hypothyroidism are two problems which interact such that trying to solve one leads to exacerbation of the other. Optimized RaI therapy has therefore begun to be defined just in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) as physicians have given up on reducing hypothyroidism. Optimized therapy is evaluated both in terms of the greatest separation of cure rate from hypothyroidism rate (non-ablative therapy) or in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) by mathematical modeling of outcome after radioiodine and critically discussing the three common methods of RaI dosing for Graves' disease. Cure follows a logarithmic relationship to activity administered or absorbed dose, while hypothyroidism follows a linear relationship. The effect of including or omitting factors in the calculation of the administered I–131 activity such as the measured thyroid uptake and effective half-life of RaI or giving extra compensation for gland size is discussed. Very little benefit can be gained by employing complicated methods of RaI dose selection for non-ablative therapy since the standard activity model shows the best potential for cure and prolonged euthyroidism. For ablative therapy, a standard MBq/g dosing provides the best outcome in terms of cure and early hypothyroidism

  16. New prospects in radioiodine production technologies and radioiodination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J [Magyar Tudomanyos Akademia, Budapest. Izotopintezete

    1984-01-01

    A new economical dry distillation procedure was developed to produce /sup 131/I or /sup 125/I from irradiated TeO/sub 2/ melt and xenon gas, respectively. The method can be applied to the thermodesorptive radioiodination of different types of water soluble or insoluble organic compounds: oleic acid, prostaglandin, insulin, ACTH, antipyrine. The labelling procedure is based on the thermolysis of the stable Pt(I) surface compound.

  17. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases: Graves' disease - current aspects; Radioiodtherapie gutartiger Schilddruesenerkrankungen: Morbus Basedow - aktuelle Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, M.J. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Radioiodine therapy is a reliable and cost-effective alternative to medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Current recommendations favour a risk-adapted therapeutic procedure. Medical treatment is preferred in patients with a low risk of relapse which are characterised by the combination of female gender, age of onset above 40 years, thyroid volume below 40 ml and TSH-receptor antibodies below 10 U/l. Because of the poor remission rate with medical treatment in patients at less than 40 years of age, male gender, thyroid volume above 40 ml and TSH receptor antibodies above 10 U/l, it is suggested that definitive treatment with radioiodine or surgery should be considered soon after disease presentation. Analysis of cost-effectiveness clearly favour ablative radioiodine treatment. Ablative treatment is even more favourable in terms of early resumption of a normal life style of the hyperthyroid patient. Recent publications suggest further an adaptation of the tissue-absorbed dose to the pre-treatment thyroid volume using Marinelli's formula to achieve thyroid ablation with a single radioiodine treatment. (orig.)

  18. Guidelines on radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Impact on clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biermann, M.; Pixberg, M.K.; Schober, O.; Doerr, U.; Dietlein, M.; Schlemmer, H.; Grimm, J.; Zajic, T.; Nestle, U.; Ladner, S.; Sepehr-Rezai, S.; Rosenbaum, S.; Puskas, C.; Fostitsch, P.; Heinecke, A.; Schuck, A.; Willich, N.; Schmid, K.W.; Dralle, H.

    2005-01-01

    Aim: For the examination of the impact on clinical practice of the guidelines for differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), treatment data from the ongoing multicenter study differentiated thyroid carcinoma (MSDS) were analyzed. Patients, methods: patients were randomized to adjuvant external beam radiotherapy (RTx) or no RTx in addition to standard therapy in TNM stages pT4 pNO/1/x MO/x (UICC, 5 th ed. 1997). All patients were to receive the same treatment regimen consisting of thyroidectomy, ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT), and a diagnostic 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (WBS) 3-4 months after RIT. Results: Of 339 eligible patients enrolled between January 2000 and March 2004, 273 could be analyzed. Guideline recommendations by the German Society for Nuclear Medicine from 1999 and 1992 were complied with within 28% and 82% with regard to the interval between surgery and RIT (4 vs. 4-6 weeks), in 33% and 84% with regard to 131 I activity for RIT (1-3 vs. 1-4 GBq; ±10%), and in 16% and 60% with regard to 131 I activity for WBS (100-300 vs. 100-400 MBq; ±10%). Conclusions: the 1999 guideline revision appears to have had little impact on clinical practice. Further follow-up will reveal if guideline compliance had an effect on outcomes. (orig.)

  19. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Xie, Jiawei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Suyun

    2016-02-18

    ). The development and worsening of Graves' ophthalmopathy was observed in 76 of 202 radioiodine-treated participants (38%) and in 40 of 215 methimazole-treated participants (19%): risk ratio (RR) 1.94 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40 to 2.70); 417 participants; 2 trials; low quality evidence. A total of 35% to 56% of radioiodine-treated participants and 42% of participants treated with methimazole were smokers, which is associated with the risk of worsening or development of Graves' ophthalmopathy. Euthyroidism was not achieved by any participant being treated with radioiodine compared with 64/68 (94%) of participants after methimazole treatment (112 participants; 1 trial). In this trial thyroxine therapy was not introduced early in both treatment arms to avoid hypothyroidism. Recurrence of hyperthyroidism (relapse) in favour of radioiodine treatment showed a RR of 0.20 (95% CI 0.01 to 2.66); P value = 0.22; 417 participants; 2 trials; very low quality evidence. Heterogeneity was high (I² = 91%) and the RRs were 0.61 or 0.06 with non-overlapping CIs. Adverse events other than development of worsening of Graves' ophthalmopathy for radioiodine therapy were hypothyroidism (39 of 41 participants (95%) compared with 0% of participants receiving methimazole, however thyroxine treatment to avoid hypothyroidism was not introduced early in the radioiodine group - 104 participants; 1 trial; very low quality evidence) and drug-related adverse events for methimazole treatment (23 of 215 participants (11%) reported adverse effects likely related to methimazole therapy - 215 participants; 2 trials; very low quality evidence). The outcome measures all-cause mortality and bone mineral density were not reported in the included trials. One trial (174 participants) reported socioeconomic effects: costs based on the official hospital reimbursement system in Sweden for patients without relapse and methimazole treatment were USD 1126/1164 (young/older methimazole group) and for

  20. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter [Clinic and Policlinic for Nuclear Medicine, University of Wuerzburg, Josef-Schneider-Strasse 2, 97080 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. {sup 131}I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  1. Radioiodine therapy of thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Over half a century, treatment of thyroid autonomy with an oral dose of iodine-131 has proven to be effective. The optimum management strategy for the patient is, however, still a matter of debate. The article provides an overview of the pathogenesis of functional autonomy and its clinical relevance. According to the guidelines on both sides of the Atlantic, radioiodine treatment is considered the most comfortable and economical approach to the treatment of the toxic nodular goitre. Some differences in the preparation procedures in the guidelines of the American and the German Society of Nuclear Medicine are discussed with respect to therapy results and the subtypes of thyroid autonomy. The results of studies are summarised concerning changes in thyroid function and thyroid volume after a course of radioiodine treatment. Therapy-related risks, such as immunogenic hypothyroidism or thyroid cancer, are discussed. 131 I treatment of functional autonomy and hyperthyroidism is considered an effective and safe procedure. (orig.)

  2. Exhalation of I-131 after radioiodine therapy: time dependence and chemical form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomaecker, K.; Fischer, T.; Eschner, W.; Gaidouk, M.I.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: The change of both amount and chemical forms of radioiodine exhaled in the air of rooms with patients on the therapy ward should be investigated depending on radioactivity applied, time after application, and kind of thyroid disease. Methods: The air of ward-rooms of 62 patients with thyroid carcinoma, Graves' Disease, and autonomy which received different therapy doses, was investigated with an portable constant air flow sampler. Different chemical iodine species (organic, elemental, aerosol bound) were collected during 8 hr in various filters until 3 days after application of the radioiodine capsule, according to their chemical form. The radioactivity in the filters was measured with a well counter on defined time points after application. Results: The radioactivity exhaled was between 0,008 and 0,03% related to activity of radioiodine applied. The percentage of radioiodine exhaled related to the activity applied, differed significantly depending on disease and changed as follows: Grave's disease > autonomy > carcinoma. The exhalation of radioiodine became stronger with increasing applied activities and showed an exponential decrease with time. The most part of radioiodine was present in organic bound form. This organic portion decreased with time in favour of the other iodine species. Conclusion: The degree of accumulation of radioiodine orally applied within thyroid seems to be in direct proportion to the extend of its exhalation. Further measurements directly in the breathing air of RIT-patients are necessary, in order to clarify the relationship between degree of thyroid uptake and quantity as well as chemical form of radioiodine exhaled. (orig.) [de

  3. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemsen, U.F.; Knesewitsch, P.; Kreisig, T.; Pickardt, C.R.; Kirsch, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  4. Functional results of radioiodine therapy with a 300-GY absorbed dose in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willemsen, U.F. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Knesewitsch, P. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Kreisig, T. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)); Pickardt, C.R. (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Muenchen Univ. (Germany)); Kirsch, C.M. (Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Dept. of Radiology, Muenchen (Germany))

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of high-dose radioiodine therapy given to 43 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease between 1986 and 1992. We chose an intrathyroidal absorbed dose of 300 Gy and determined the applied activity individually, which ranged from 240 to 3120 MBq with a median of 752 MBq. Hperthyroidism was eliminated in 86% of cases after 3 months and in 100% after 12 months. No patient required a second radioiodine treatment. The incidnece of hyperthyroidism was 63% after 3 months and 93% after 18 months. Neither the pretherapeutic thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin level nor the degree of co-existing endocrine ophthalmopathy was correlated with the time at which hypothyroidism developed. Patients with previous radioiodine therapy developed hypothyroidism earlier than patients with previous thyroid surgery. The results show that ablative radioiodine therapy with a 300-Gy absorbed dose is a very effective treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, but it should be restricted to patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism combined with severe co-existing disorders or episodes of unfavourable reactions to antithyroid drugs. (orig.)

  5. Radioiodine Therapy for Graves’ Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhdomi, B.K.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of grave diseases include Antithyroid medications, Iodine-131 therapy and Surgery. First patient treated with radioiodine (Iodine-130) in 1941, while Iodine-131 therapy was introduced in 1946. Factors affecting treatment include Iodine uptake; Size of goitre; Length of time I-131 is retained in the gland; Homogeneity of distribution within the gland; Radiosensitivity of thyroid cells and Drug interactions. Some side effects include Transient sore throat or mild dysphagia; Exacerbation of ophthalmopathy; Radiation thyroiditis and no increase in incidence of thyroid cancer and Leukemia or other malignancies. There no harmful effect upon Health of progeny; Fertility and Reproductive history

  6. Optimization of Inpatient Management of Radioiodine Treatment in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min Jae; Kim, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Jang, Jung Chan; Kim, Chang Ho

    2008-01-01

    We established a model to calculate radioactive waste from sewage disposal tank of hospitals to optimize the number of patients receiving inpatient radioiodine therapy within the safety guideline in our country. According to this model and calculation of radioactivity concentration using the number of patients per week, the treatment dose of radioiodine, the capacity and the number of sewage tanks and the daily amount of water waste per patient, estimated concentration of radioactivity in sewage waste upon disposal from disposal tanks after long term retention were within the safety guideline (30 Bq/L) in all the hospitals examined. In addition to the fact that we could increase the number of patients in two thirds of hospitals, we found that the daily amount of waste water was the most important variable to allow the increase of the number of patients within the safety margin of disposed radioactivity. We propose that saving the water amount be led to increase the number of patients and they allow two patients in an already furnished hospital inpatient room to meet the increasing need of inpatient radioiodine treatment for thyroid cancer

  7. New Molecular Targeted Therapy and Redifferentiation Therapy for Radioiodine-Refractory Advanced Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma: Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Pun Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of papillary thyroid carcinoma could be successfully managed by complete surgical resection alone or resection followed by radioiodine ablation, a small proportion of patients may develop radioiodine-refractory progressive disease which is not amenable to surgery, local ablative treatment or other treatment modalities. The use of FDG-PET/CT scan for persistent/recurrent disease has improved the accuracy of restaging as well as cancer prognostication. Given that patients with RAI-refractory disease tend to do significantly worse than those with radioiodine-avid or non-progressive disease, an increasing number of phase I and II studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of new molecular targeted drugs such as the tyrosine kinase inhibitors and redifferentiation drugs. The overall response rate of these drugs ranged between 0–53%, depending on whether the patients had been previously treated with these drugs, performance status and extent of disease. However, drug toxicity remains a major concern in administration of target therapies. Nevertheless, there are also ongoing phase III studies evaluating the efficacy of these new drugs. The aim of the review was to summarize and discuss the results of these targeted drugs and redifferentiation agents for patients with progressive, radioiodine-refractory papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  8. Radioiodine Treatment of Well-Differentiated thyroid cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrenechea, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Well-differentiated thyroid cancer (DTCA) in children is quite different from the adult- onset disease in that they are more aggressive at the time of diagnosis and with metastases and has a higher risk for recurrence. Some studies claim it to be less lethal and hence treatment protocols may be different from that of the adult. This study was made to analyze the need for RAI therapy as one of the cornerstone of treatment aside from surgery and thyroid hormone suppression as well as to determine the behavior of WDTCA in children. Results: The incidence of DTCA is varied and ranges from 1-10% in several published series. In the Philippines where thyroid cancer in adults ranks 5th in mortality for both sexes, the incidence is likewise very low, around 0.5-1% for ages 18 years and below in a ten year study. It was predominantly a female population (74%) as compared to the males (26%). Fifteen cases were reviewed and included as most were given RAI (87%). Most presented as a solitary nodule and with lymph node metastases. Thirteen cases were papillary in nature and only two cases were follicular. The incidence of nodal metastases was 53% while lung metastases were seen in 20% of cases. Of the 13 cases that underwent RAI therapy, three cases of lung metastases needed repeat therapy. In the cases with lymph node metastases, 2 cases also had recurrence and which necessitated repeat RAI therapy. The two cases that did not get RAI therapy had progressive disease on follow- up after 5 and 7 years respectively from surgery. Discussion: Primary treatment for DTC should consist of surgery, radioiodine ablation and thyroid hormone suppression. We must rely on pediatric outcome studies and the high frequency of multifocal intrathyroidal disease, loco- regional spread and extra cervical metastases often seen as initial presentations of this particular group. The more advanced disease at diagnosis for children, propensity for recurrence as well as the greater radioiodine

  9. Radioiodine uptake in inactive pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakheet, S.M.; Powe, J.; Al Suhaibani, H.; Hammami, M.M.; Bazarbashi, M.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine may accumulate at sites of inflammation or infection. We have seen such accumulation in six thyroid cancer patients with a history of previously treated pulmonary tuberculosis. We also review the causes of false-positive radioiodine uptake in lung infection/inflammation. Eight foci of radioiodine uptake were seen on six iodine-123 diagnostic scans. In three foci, the uptake was focal and indistinguishable from thyroid cancer pulmonary metastases from thyroid cancer. In the remaining foci, the uptake appeared nonsegmental, linear or lobar, suggesting a false-positive finding. The uptake was unchanged, variable in appearance or non-persistent on follow-up scans and less extensive than the fibrocystic changes seen on chest radiographs. In the two patients studied, thyroid hormone level did not affect the radioiodine lung uptake and there was congruent gallium-67 uptake. None of the patients had any evidence of thyroid cancer recurrence or of reactivation of tuberculosis and only two patients had chronic intermittent chest symptoms. Severe bronchiectasis, active tuberculosis, acute bronchitis, respiratory bronchiolitis, rheumatoid arthritis-associated lung disease and fungal infection such as Allescheria boydii and aspergillosis can lead to different patterns of radioiodine chest uptake mimicking pulmonary metastases. Pulmonary scarring secondary to tuberculosis may predispose to localized radioiodine accumulation even in the absence of clinically evident active infection. False-positive radioiodine uptake due to pulmonary infection/inflammation should be considered in thyroid cancer patients prior to the diagnosis of pulmonary metastases. (orig.)

  10. Cardiac ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Ratheal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac ablation is a procedure that uses either radiofrequency or cryothermal energy to destroy cells in the heart to terminate and/or prevent arrhythmias. The indications for cardiac catheter ablation include refractory, symptomatic arrhythmias, with more specific guidelines for atrial fibrillation in particular. The ablation procedure itself involves mapping the arrhythmia and destruction of the aberrant pathway in an effort to permanently prevent the arrhythmia. There are many types of arrhythmias, and they require individualized approaches to ablation based on their innately different electrical pathways. Ablation of arrhythmias, such as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, AV nodal reentrant tachycardia, and atrial-fibrillation, is discussed in this review. Ablation has a high success rate overall and minimal complication rates, leading to improved quality of life in many patients.

  11. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  12. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-01

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s

  13. Radioiodine uptake by plants from soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    The uptake and accumulation of radioiodine by wheat, maize and peas from various types of soil have been studied. The uptake depends on the type of soil, on its content of organic matter and on the amount of fertilizer. Radioiodine is mainly accumulated in the roots. Accumulation in above-ground plant parts decreases in the following order: wheat, maize, peas. Uptake was highest from humus and clay soils and lowest from black and meadow soils. Application of chloride fertilizer or carrier iodine lead to an increase of radioiodine uptake in the whole plant. (author)

  14. Therapeutic outcome after radioiodine and surgery treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Zlatko P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate late follow-up results in surgery and radioiodine treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma and compare incidence of hypothyroidism and recurrence hyperthyroidism in treated patients. Material and Methods: We observed 93 treated patients (77 female, 26 male, age range 18-76 years) with adenoma toxicum. 29 (32.2 %) patients underwent surgery (adenectomia), while 64 (67.8 %) patients received 131 I therapy (555-1100 MBq).The long term results of the treatment were followed 1-15 years after therapy (median 9,2 years). Results: Recurrent hyperthyroidism occurred in 4/29 (13.8%) patients after surgery adenectomia in comparison to 5/64 (7.8 %) patients after radioiodine therapy. The patients after enucleation of autonomous nodule of the thyroid show increase incidence of late recurrent hyperthyroidism. These results are likely to be due to persistent functional autonomy in the parenchyma surrounding the autonomous adenoma. Apparently this persistent autonomy could be successfully removed by radioiodine. Appear of hypothyroidism was observed in 6/64 (9.3 %) patients treated with 131 I, while after surgery had in 3/29 (10.3 %) patients. Incidence of hypothyroidism between operated patients and radioiodine treated patients was approximately the same. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is useful, economical and effective treatment of toxic thyroid adenoma that provides a safe protection in preventing late recurrent hyperthyroidism and is more successful therapy that surgery treatment. (author)

  15. A review of age dependent radioiodine dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Age dependent models of radioiodine metabolism in humans have been described. These models have been used to calculate age dependent committed doses to the thyroid from intakes of radioiodines. A model of fetal iodine metabolism is also described and used to calculate fetal thyroid doses from intakes of radioiodines by the mother. These doses are calculated using model parameter values thought to be representative of average for North American/European populations. Considerable variability from these results can be expected for individuals. In addition, population with significant differences in stable iodine intake, and in body parameters, will have model parameters somewhat different than the ones described in this paper. These different model parameters will result in different doses from intakes of radioiodines, but it is doubtful if the differences in population would be as large as the variation between individuals. 25 refs.; 11 figs.; 1 table

  16. Grave's Eye disease developing following radioiodine treatment for toxic nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrani, A A; Rangan, S; Moulik, P

    2007-07-01

    The development of Grave's ophthalmopathy (GO) following radioiodine (RI) treatment for Grave's thyrotoxicosis, though controversial, is well described. The development of ophthalmopathy following RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre is much less recognised. We report a 49 year-old female patient who developed thyrotoxicosis and GO after receiving RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre and we also review the relevant literature.

  17. Benign thyroid disorders, radioiodine therapy and diagnosis related groups (DRGs): aspects of cost/benefit; Benigne Schilddruesenerkrankungen, Radioiodtherapie und Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs): Kosten-Nutzen-Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of goiter and thyroid nodules in older patients is accompanied by an increasing frequency of treatment and cost. Cost-effectiveness is given for programs of prophylaxis (primary prevention, e.g. alimentary iodine supplementation), for programs of screening (secondary prevention. e.g. TSH-screening), and for therapeutic strategies to avoid complications of thyroid dysfunction (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction, death for cardiac reasons) and to minimize iatrogenic complications (tertiary prevention). Examples of tertiary prevention are radioiodine-therapy of Graves' disease in patients who have an increased risk of relapse after antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioiodine therapy of ouvert or subclinical hyperthyroidism, and radioiodine therapy of large goiters in older patients or in patients suffering from a relevant co-morbidity. A cost-effectiveness-analysis for different therapeutic strategies of Graves' disease has been published using a lifelong time-horizon. The ablative radioiodine dose-regime is cost-effective as a first line therapy if the risk of relapse after ATD exceeds 60%. Cost-minimization-analysis, comparing resection of goiter and radioiodine, has shown lower cost of radioiodine therapy for toxic multinodular goiter up to 100 ml and for Graves' disease up to 60 ml goiter volume. Medical aspects (volume of goiter, uptake of nodules, regressive goiter, suspicion on malignancy, patients' age, co-morbidity, patients' decision) remain decisive for the choice of treatment. (orig.)

  18. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  19. Radioiodinated tracers for myocardial imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.V.; Corbett, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the efficient production of high purity radioiodine (123I) and new efficient radiolabeling techniques have allowed the development of new classes of cardiovascular radiopharmaceuticals. These include 123I-labeled fatty acids to assess myocardial metabolism, 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for myocardial neuronal activity, labeled monoclonal antibodies for myocardial necrosis, and labeled lipoproteins for receptor concentration. 123I-labeled fatty acids and MIBG are under clinical investigation with encouraging results. 123I- and 111In-labeled fragments of monoclonal antibodies to myosin have been used for imaging myocardial necrosis in humans. The development of radiotracers for imaging of cholinergic and adrenergic receptors is still in the experimental stage. Recent advances in imaging instrumentation and radiopharmaceuticals have resulted in cardiac imaging applications beyond blood pool ventriculography, perfusion, and infarct-avid imaging. Developments of radioiodine (123I)-labeled agents promise to play an important role in the assessment of myocardial metabolism, neuronal activity, and receptor concentration. The chemistry of iodine is well defined compared with that of 99mTc; therefore, iodine isotopes are well suited for labeling biologically important molecules. Among the iodine isotopes, 123I has nearly ideal nuclear properties for nuclear medical applications with a 13.3-hour half-life (T1/2) and 159 keV gamma emission (83%). Despite the nearly ideal chemical and nuclear properties of 123I, the widespread application of 123I-based radiopharmaceuticals in clinical practice has been limited by high production costs (123I is produced in a cyclotron), relatively limited availability, and the presence of undesirable radionuclidic impurities (124I, T1/2 = 4.2 days; 125I, T1/2 = 60 days; 126I, T1/2 = 13.1 days). 77 references

  20. A review of available countermeasures to reduce radioiodine transfer to milk. With special regard to the use of stable iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.

    1993-03-01

    Contamination of milk by 131 I constitutes an important potential component of the collective dose to the population after a nuclear accident, and a relatively large dose saving can be gained by applying suitable countermeasures. Stable iodine prophylaxis is recommended for humans to prevent or reduce by the thyroid of inhaled radioiodine but controls on food are more appropriate to reduce radioiodine intakes from ingestion. Therefore it is important to have effective, practical countermeasures available to prevent radioiodine contamination of milk. This review evaluates currently available countermeasures which can be used to reduce radioiodine contamination of milk. In particular, it critically assesses available data on the effectiveness of stable iodine administration. The simplest and most effective countermeasure is to provide dairy animals with uncontaminated feed, this countermeasure has the added advantage that it will be effective for other radionuclides which may be present in the fallout. Alternatively, another effective response is to process the milk into storable dairy products for an appropriate length of time to allow for physical decay. The use of additives given to ruminants to reduce radioiodine in milk should be viewed as an alternative countermeasure which could be effective, but would not be the preferred option. However, it should be considered, particularly if difficulties are anticipated with the first two options. Stable iodine administration is a practical, and feasible option which has the potential to reduce radioiodine levels in milk, by at most a factor of three and the radiation dose to the animals thyroid. However, the stable iodine supplementation at low doses, and after the ingestion of radioiodine, may lead to increases in radioiodine levels in milk. Similarly, if ruminants are already receiving high iodine intakes, stable iodine is unlikely to be effective. Currently available data is inadequate to recommend a suitable dose

  1. An engagement factor for caregiver radiation dose assessment with radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyun Kuk; Hong, Seong Jong; Jeong, Kyu Hwan; Jung, Jae Won; Kim, Seong Min; Kang, Yun-Hee; Han, Man Seok

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to suggest ways to better manage thyroid cancer patients treated with high- and low-activity radioiodine ( 131 I) by assessing external radiation doses to family members and caregivers and the level of radiation in the surrounding environment. The radiation doses to caregivers of 33 inpatients (who were quarantined in the hospital for 2-3 d after treatment) and 31 outpatients who received radioiodine treatment after thyroidectomy were measured using passive thermoluminescence dosemeters. In this study, 33 inpatients were administered high-activity (100-200 mCi) 131 I, and 31 outpatients were administered low-activity (30 mCi) 131 I. The average doses to caregivers were measured at 0.61 mSv for outpatients and 0.16 mSv for inpatients. The total integrated dose of the recovery (recuperation) rooms where the patients stayed after release from hospital was measured to be 0.83 mSv for outpatients and 0.23 mSv for inpatients. To reflect the degree of engagement between the caregiver and the patient, considering the duration and distance between two during exposure, the authors used the engagement factor introduced by Jeong et al. (Estimation of external radiation dose to caregivers of patients treated with radioiodine after thyroidectomy. Health Phys 2014;106:466-474.). This study presents a new engagement factor (K-value) of 0.82 obtained from the radiation doses to caregivers of both in- and out-patients treated with high- and low-activity radioiodine, and based on this new value, this study presented a new predicted dose for caregivers. A patient treated with high-activity radioiodine can be released after 24 h of isolation, whereas outpatients treated with low-activity radioiodine should be isolated for at least 12 h. (authors)

  2. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Rivero, Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of scintigraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  3. Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131) in the thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, Rivero Levi; Turcios Trista, Silvia Elena; Velasco Mirabal, Milagros

    2012-01-01

    Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses the tissular remains and the metastatic lesions that can be detected during the gammagraphic follow-up. Radioiodine 131 depends on the fulfillment of safety regulations against radioactivity

  4. The history of radioiodine therapy beginnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Olegovich Rumiantsev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This report contains historical review of radioiodine therapy invention and clinical implementation for the treatment of patients with diffuse toxic goiter and differentiated thyroid cancer. In 1923 Henry Plummer has strongly recommended to prescribe stable iodine in patients with Grave’s diseases after surgery in order to prevent thyrotoxic storm. Radioactive isotopes of iodine for the first time were obtained by Enrico Fermi in 1934 in laboratory. Clinical implementation of radioiodine was started in 40th years of past century. In 1940 experimentally have been shown that thyroid gland with Grave’s disease accumulated as much as 80% of radioiodine administered activity. Saul Hertz was the first physician who used radioactive iodine in January, 1941 with purpose to treat diffuse toxic goiter patients. Samuel Seidlin was first who used radioiodine in March, 1943 to treat patient with functioned differentiated thyroid cancer metastases. In Russia radioiodine treatment of patients started since 1982 in Medical Radiological Research Centre (former Institute of Medical Radiology, Obninsk.

  5. Results of preventive radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with history of hyperthyroidism prior to administration of amiodarone with permanent atrial fibrillation--a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Zgorzalewicz-Stachowiak, Małgorzata; Woliński, Kosma; Płazińska, Maria Teresa; Miechowicz, Izabela; Kwiecińska, Barbara; Czepczyński, Rafał; Królicki, Leszek; Ruchała, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine (RAI) therapy is a standard procedure in the treatment of hyperthyroidism. However, the use of RAI in euthyroid patients requiring chronic administration of amiodarone (AM) where other antiarrhythmic drugs may lack efficacy is still controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of an AM therapy prior to treatment with radioiodine therapy in euthyroid patients with permanent atrial fibrillation (PAF), who had been treated for hyperthyroidism in the past. This was a retrospective observational study. Patients were assessed at baseline and two, six, eight, and 12 months after RAI therapy. 17 euthyroid patients with PAF were qualified to the RAI (female/male 3/14; age range 65 to 87, median 71). The patients required chronic administration of AM as a prophylaxis against sudden death. Each patient received an ablative dose of 800 MBq (22 mCi) of 131I. At baseline and during follow-up, no side effects of the therapy and no signs of drug intolerance were observed. Subclinical hyperthyroidism occurred in two (11.8%) cases after two months of RAI and five weeks of AM administration. In this situation, RAI therapy was repeated. Three patients (17.6%) after six months, and another two (11.8%) after eight months, required an additional dose of 131I due to amiodarone-induced thyrotoxicosis (AIT). Twelve patients (70.6%) returned to spontaneous sinus rhythm within two months. Fourteen patients (82.4%) had sinus rhythm during follow-up after six and 12 months of treatment. Preventive RAI in euthyroid (but previously hyperthyroid) patients with PAF before administration of AM may be the method of choice. This is particularly important for patients who will require permanent AM administration as a life-saving drug.

  6. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  7. Radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter- the influence of carbimazole therapy and dietary iodine on relapse rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, S.; Muthu, G.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The relapse rate of radioiodine therapy in toxic multinodular goiter (TMNG) is reported to be around 34% at one year. The effect of antithyroid drugs on the response rate is controversial with studies reporting a higher relapse rate in patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs. Other studies report no influence of pretreatment with antithyroid drugs. The thyroid clinic at Tata Main Hospital is a referral center for thyroid disorders in Jamshedpur. 63 patients of TMNG (Group A) were treated with Radioiodine between 1995-2003. The demographic profile of these patients was as follows: M/F- 38%: 62%, 76% of patients were above 40 years, 85% had been on anti-thyroid drugs for more than 18 months. Fixed dose radioiodine in an oral dose varying from 5-10 mCi was given in all patients of Group A. 32.4 % of patients continued to be toxic or relapsed after a period of euthyroid status within 1 year of Radioiodine therapy. A change in protocol for radioiodine therapy was introduced in 2003. This included withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before radioiodine therapy and the use of noniodized salt and abstinence from seafood in diet during this period. 33 TMN Goiter patients (Group B) followed this protocol before receiving Radioiodine. The dose of Radioiodine remained 5-10 mCi. The age and sex profile of Group A and B were comparable. However, Group B patients had been on antithyroid drugs for a shorter period (p< 0.001). The dose of Radioiodine in 94% of Group B patients was between 7-10mCi, whereas this was 63.4% in Group A. The rest of the patients had received a dose between 5-7 mCi. The relapse rate in Group B was 9.1% compared to 32.4% in Group A. Improvement in response rates with increase in Radioiodine dose remains controversial.P PThe better response rate in Group B patients may be attributed to the withdrawal of antithyroid drugs for one month before therapy and the reduction in dietary intake of Iodine for a month before therapy. However, a

  8. Procedure guideline for radioiodine test (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Eschner, W.; Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik; Koeln Univ.; Lassmann, M.; Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik; Wuerzburg Univ.; Leisner, B.; Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg; Reiners, C.; Wuerzburg Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The version 3 of the procedure guideline for radioiodine test is an update of the guideline previously published in 2003. The procedure guideline discusses the pros and cons of a single measurement or of repeated measurements of the iodine-131 uptake and their optimal timing. Different formulas are described when one, two or three values of the radioiodine kinetic are available. The probe with a sodium-iodine crystal, alternatively or additionally the gamma camera using the ROI-technique are instrumentations for the measurement of iodine-131 uptake. A possible source of error is an inappropriate measurement (sonography) of the target volume. The patients' preparation includes the withdrawal of antithyroid drugs 2-3 days before radioiodine administration. The patient has to avoid iodine-containing medication and the possibility of additives of iodine in vitamin- and electrolyte-supplementation has to be considered. (orig.)

  9. Ablative radiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism: long term follow-up study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall-Taylor, P.; Keir, M.J.; Ross, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    A total of 225 patients were treated for hyperthyroidism with 555 MBq (15 mCi) radioiodine to ablate the thyroid and induce early hyperthyroidism. The efficacy of this treatment in eradicating hyperthyroidism and problems of follow up were assessed one to six years later from case records and questionnaires. Information was received from 197 out of 219 live patients (90%) and from 160 doctors concerning 207 patients (92%). Only three patients were not traced and six had died since treatment. The modal time to hyperthyroidism was three months, and 64% of patients were hyperthyroid at one year; 5.6% had failed to become euthyroid within one year. Ninety five per cent of patients had been seen by the doctor and 82% had had a thyroid test done within the past two years. Most doctors preferred patients to be returned to their care once thyroxine treatment was stabilised. An ablative dose of 131 I is recommended as an effective means of treatment which has clear advantages over conventional methods. Good communications and effective follow up should ensure success. (author)

  10. Research on removal of radioiodine by charcoal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wangchang; Huang Yuying; Wu Yianwei; Jia Ming; Guo Liangtian

    1993-01-01

    The major R and D work carried out in the CIRP laboratory on removal of radioiodine is introduced, which involves the adsorption performances of various kinds of fruit shell base and coal base charcoal impregnated with chemicals, the influence of various parameters, the technique of non-destructive test for commercial scale iodine adsorber, and the iodine samplers for both gross iodine and iodine in different forms. The experimental results have been applied to the design and test of iodine adsorber and the monitoring of airborne radioiodine

  11. Clinical significance of thyroglobulin autoantibodies enhancement in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer after thyroidectomy and radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N V Severskaya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to evaluate the clinical utility of antithyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb as a tumor marker in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation. Patients and methods. From 345 consecutive DTC patients after thyroidectomy and radioiodine ablation we select ed 148 patients with elevated TgAb level (with distant metastasis n = 93, without distant metastasis n = 55. Serum TgAb concentration was measured before radioiodine ablation and then every time before 131I treatment (RIT or diagnostic 131I whole body scanning (WBS. Results were compared with serum thyroglobulin (Tg concentration, neck echography, lung and bone roentgenography and 131I WBS findings. Results. TgAb level was elevated in 21% DTC patients before 131I ablation. The other 22% with initially normal TgAb displayed their rising during followup. In absence of distant metastasis TgAb declined after 1 st–2 nd cycle of RIT (an average 8.9 months after 131I ablation. Persistance or rising of TgAb in the longer term was associated with detectable thyroid remnant, residual tumor or metastatic lymph nodes. In case of negative TgAb status after sugery an increase of TgAb during first 3–6 months after ablation indicated mostly a response to the rise of Tg antigen secondary to 131I ablation. A rise TgAb in the longer term (after 3rd–5th cycles of RIT indicated to residual or recurrent disease in 86% cases. In patients with distant metastasis there were no correlation between change in TgAb concentration and clinical sta tus, including the rate of regression of metastatic disease. But in case of low or undetectable Tg and permanent high TgAb level only TgAb indicated the presence of disease. Conclusion: persistence or rising TgAb in longer term after 131I ablation can serve as surrogate tumor marker of per sistent or recurrent disease. It is critical to measure TgAb concentration, especially in patients with low or unde tectable Tg, because

  12. The usefulness of 131I radioiodine to thyroid papillary carcinoma with extra thyroidal extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Shogo; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Naito, Yasushi; Fujiwara, Keizo; Hori, Shinya; Tona, Yosuke; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Extra thyroidal extension (ETE) of thyroid papillary carcinoma (PAC) is known as a risk factor of poor prognosis. The American Thyroid Association (ATA) Guideline recommends total thyroidectomy (TT) with radioiodine ablation for patients of PACs with ETE and we have been following this strategy for cases of PACs with ETE. In this paper, we retrospectively examined the patients of PACs with ETE in terms of the following two issues: Does 131 I total body scan ( 131 I-TBS) after TT enable us to detect subclinical distant metastases of PACs? and Can 131 I ablation eliminate microscopic remnants of PACs after TT? The subjects consisted of 68 patients who had PACs with ETE and underwent 131 I-TBS and/or 131 I ablation after TT in our hospital in the past 20 years. Tumor, nodes and metastasis (TNM) classifications of the patients were pT3:pT4=12:56, pN0:pN1a:pN1b=13:15:40, M0:M1=62:6. Twenty-two cases underwent only 131 I-TBS and 46 cases underwent 131 I-ablation. Fourteen cases diagnosed as M0 preoperatively had distant focus detected using 131 I-TBS. Including M1 cases, 20 out of 68 cases (29%) turned out to have clinical or subclinical distant lesions in our study. 131 I ablation eliminated thyroid bed in 18 out of 22 cases, and distant foci in 5 out of 13 cases. However, the distant lesions which had been apparent before operation (M1 cases) did not reach complete response (CR) by 131 I ablation. In 22 out of those 23 cases successfully treated with the ablation, serum-thyroglobulin level was almost undetected after therapy. The overall 10-year survival rate was 82% and the cause-specific survival rate was 91%. (author)

  13. Effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Yongli; Jin Changqing; Chen Libo; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate effect of radioiodine therapy on pulmonary metastases from well-differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: Fifty-eight cases of pulmonary metastases were studied utilizing chest X-ray, pulmonary function test and 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance examination. Results: The data of pulmonary function test were of no difference between groups of various radiation doses cumulation (P > 0.05). The differences of vital capacity (VC), fast vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) were not remarkable between the two groups of male or female patients (P > 0.05), but the difference of maximal volume ventilation (MVV) was P 99 Tc m -DTPA aerosol clearance rates between various groups were of no difference (P > 0.05). Only for one female, 43 years old who had received an accumulative dose of 51.8 GBq radioiodine over an 8-yr period, her pulmonary function test showed evidence of restrictive lung disease, chest X-ray showed haziness and DTPA half-time clearance was 26.4 min, which is suggestive of interstitial fibrosis. Conclusion: The cumulative dose of radioiodine and gender of the patients had not statistically significant effects on the pulmonary function. Interstitial fibrosis must be carefully watched when the cumulative radioiodine dose is over 37 GBq

  14. The Chernobyl accident: Thyroid exposure among the population due to radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavrilin, Yu I; Shinkarev, S M [Biophysics Inst., Russian Federation State Science Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stepanenko, V F [Medical Radiological Research Centre, Academy of Medical Sciences, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Domaratskij, V P; Moroz, G L [Scientific Research Inst. for Industrial and Marine Medicine, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Hrushtch, V T [State Scientific Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    Different aspects of internal and external exposure to thyroid of inhabitants from the contaminated areas of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine are discussed in the paper. In the case of consumption of contaminated foods contribution to total absorbed dose from internal radioiodine exposure was more than 90%, otherwise (in the case of only inhalation radioiodine intake), not lesser than 85%. {sup 131}I exposure to thyroid was the main contribution to internal exposure, and exposure to thyroid from short-lived radioiodines was significant only for the inhabitants who did not consume contaminated foods. Peculiarities of formation of ``measured`` doses are considered. Semiempirical model of relationships between the average internal thyroid dose received by people in the rural settlements and the ground-deposition density of radionuclides in these settlements is presented. It has been indicated the necessity of intensification of {sup 129}I measurements in soil. Practical efficiency of used countermeasures for majority people to reduce radioiodine intake is estimated as high as approximately 2 times and caused mainly by removing people from contaminated areas. 11 refs, 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  15. Sertraline can be useful pre radioiodine in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geber de Almeida, Mariana; Netto Campos Silva, Marcia

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid hormone withdrawal is a standard approach for increased TSH before radioiodine, in patients with thyroid cancer. However, some patients with hypothyroidism present clinical depression for long time, in spite of the euthyroid state. Sertraline is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, which increases the neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine, and enhances the serum TSH level. Objectives: To analyze the efficacy of sertraline to increase TSH and improved symptoms of depression in these patients. Methods: In 12 patients with thyroid cancer without previous depression, we used 50 mg of sertraline one month before and after radioiodine and compare with group control. The serum TSH levels were performed ten days before radioiodine and the patients were evaluated 20, 40 and 60 days after started levothyroxine (The Montgomery -Asberg depression rating scale). Results: TSH levels were 85 ± 10 mU/L in the group that used sertraline vs 69 ± 8 mU/L in group control (p < 0,01). The patients who used sertraline reversed depression in (30 ± 5 days - median ± SD), significantly more rapidly if compared with the control group (50 ± 10 days - median ± SD). Three patients that received sertraline and five patients of the control group, severe depression persists, in spite of euthyroid state. Conclusion: This study suggests that sertraline can be useful pre radioiodine to increase TSH, and helps to restore the quality of life and mood, in a short period of time. (author)

  16. A review of countermeasures to reduce radioiodine in milk of dairy animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, B.J.; Voigt, G.; Segal, M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The most effective countermeasure for radioiodine contamination of milk is to provide dairy animals with uncontaminated feed, with the added advantage that it will be effective for other radionuclides in the fallout. Another effective response is to process the milk into storable dairy products for an appropriate length of time to allow for physical decay. The use of additives given to ruminants to reduce radioiodine in milk is an alternative countermeasure which could be effective. Stable iodine administration is a practically feasible option which has the potential to reduce radioiodine levels in milk by at most a factor of three. Stable iodine supplementation should be at sufficiently high rates to be effective (and at least 1 g d -1 for dairy cows), particularly for ruminants already receiving high amounts of iodine in the diet. Currently available data are inadequate to recommend a suitable stable iodine administration rate for different species of ruminants. Other compounds, such as perchlorate and thiocyanate, also reduce the transfer to radioiodine to milk (and thyroid). Some of these compounds seem to be potentially equally as effective as stable iodine. However, currently there is inadequate information on their effectiveness and possible toxicity to both ruminants and humans for these compounds to be considered as suitable countermeasure additives. 85 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Government-industry conference on airborne radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchsted, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    The Working Group on Airborne Radioiodine met at AEC Headquarters on March 28, 1974. Dr. Alex Perge gave the introduction for the Division of Waste Management and Transportation, noting the Commission hopes that private industry will take a bigger share in the future in funding and initiating needed research; that there should be a greater effort in the direction of reducing the quantity of material that becomes contaminated as an avenue toward reducing the airborne radioiodine problem, and toward reducing the waste generated to a form suitable for direct storage; and that the Commission must ensure valid bases for future regulations governing airborne releases and contamination. Dr. First discussed the background of the review committee and its outgrowth from the earlier organization meeting. He noted that its function will be the coordination of efforts concerned with the radioiodine problem and the dissemination of information and research data. A major objective of this meeting was to identify subjects for discussion at the Government-Industry Conference of Adsorbers and Adsorbents which will be held in conjunction with the 13th AEC Air Cleaning Conference in August. Mr. Dempsey noted that the gaseous effluent program had been inherited by WMT from the Division of Operational Safety, and that an important function of these continuing meetings of the Working Group will be to guide WMT in the expenditure of funds and assignment of research related to the radioiodine problem. (U.S.)

  18. Immobilization of radioiodine in synthetic boracite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babad, H.; Strachan, D.M.

    1982-09-23

    A nuclear waste storage product is disclosed in which radioiodine is incorporated in a synthetic boracite. The boracite may be prepared by reacting a transition metal iodide with an alkali horate under mild hydrothermal conditions, drying the reaction product, and then hot pressing.

  19. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Eschner, W.; Luster, M.; Reiners, C.; Schober, O.; Muenster Univ.

    2007-01-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for 131 I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative 131 I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC ≤1 cm 131 I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for 131 I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for 131 I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of 131 I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for 131 I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of 131 I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are 123 I or 124 I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  20. Percutaneous laser ablation of benign and malignant thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papini, Enrico; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Pacella, Claudio M

    2008-10-01

    Percutaneous image-guided procedures, largely based on thermal ablation, are at present under investigation for achieving a nonsurgical targeted cytoreduction in benign and malignant thyroid lesions. In several uncontrolled clinical trials and in two randomized clinical trials, laser ablation has demonstrated a good efficacy and safety for the shrinkage of benign cold thyroid nodules. In hyperfunctioning nodules, laser ablation induced a nearly 50% volume reduction with a variable frequency of normalization of thyroid-stimulating hormone levels. Laser ablation has been tested for the palliative treatment of poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas, local recurrences or distant metastases. Laser ablation therapy is indicated for the shrinkage of benign cold nodules in patients with local pressure symptoms who are at high surgical risk. The treatment should be performed only by well trained operators and after a careful cytological evaluation. Laser ablation does not seem to be consistently effective in the long-term control of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules and is not an alternative treatment to 131I therapy. Laser ablation may be considered for the cytoreduction of tumor tissue prior to external radiation therapy or chemotherapy of local or distant recurrences of thyroid malignancy that are not amenable to surgical or radioiodine treatment.

  1. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Noboru; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Okamoto, Yasuyuki; Konishi, Toshiaki; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism.

  2. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy predict increased risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism following radioiodine therapy for refractory hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Noboru; Konishi, Toshiaki; Momotani, Naoko; Ishikawa, Naofumi; Yoshimura Noh, Jaeduk; Ito, Koichi; Ito, Kunihiko; Okamoto, Yasuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Serum levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody (TRAb) often increase after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, and high-serum levels of maternal TRAb in late pregnancy indicate a risk of neonatal hyperthyroidism. The aim of this retrospective study is to investigate the characteristics of Graves' women who had a history of radioiodine treatment for intractable Graves' disease, and whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism. The subjects of this study were 45 patients with Graves' disease who became pregnant during the period from 1988 to 1998 after receiving radioiodine treatment at Ito Hospital. 25 of the 45 subjects had a relapse of hyperthyroidism after surgical treatment for Graves' disease. 19 pregnancies were excluded because of artificial or spontaneous abortion. In the remaining 44 pregnancies of 35 patients, neonatal hyperthyroidism developed in 5 (11.3%) pregnancies of 4 patients. Serum levels of TRAb at delivery were higher in patients whose neonates suffered from hyperthyroidism (NH mother) than those of patients who delivered normal infants (N mother). Furthermore, serum levels of TRAb in NH mother did not change during pregnancy, although those of 4 patients of N mother, in which serum levels of TRAb before radioiodine treatment were as high as in NH mother, decreased significantly during pregnancy. In conclusion, women who delivered neonates with hyperthyroidism following radioiodine treatment seem to have very severe and intractable Graves' disease. Persistent high TRAb values during pregnancy observed in those patients may be a cause of neonatal hyperthyroidism. (author)

  3. Radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism at 25 years experience in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai Trong Khoa; Phan Sy An; Phan Van Duyet; Tran Dinh Ha

    2004-01-01

    prevalence of hypothyroidism according to the doses of I-131 received (p > 0.05). No occurring thyroid nodules was detected on thyroid scintigrams and echosonograms of all patients. Before and after (3 months - 3 years) I-131 therapy the mean thyroid volume reduction was 66.1%. TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb) are recognized as cause of organ-specific autoimmune disorder in Graves' disease. So the long-term effects of 131 I treatment for Graves' disease on TRAb have been studied in Vietnam. The TRAb values decreased over a period of more than 2 years after 131I therapy for Graves' disease, and the TRAb values (negative or positive) before treatment may influence the long- term outcome of 1311 therapy. The overall success rate of therapy, recognized as the permanent resolution of hyperthyroidism was 98.7 % with 94.4% achieving resolution in not more than 2 dose.The main problem with radioiodine treatment is hypothyroidism and this is easily managed with L-thyroxine. In summary, radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism is safe, inexpensive and efficacious in Vietnam. (authors)

  4. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2007-01-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  5. Use of recombinant human thyrotropin (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy in thyroid disorders; Utilisation de la thyreostimuline humaine recombinante dans la preparation au traitement par iode-131 des pathologies thyroidiennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taieb, D.; Guillet, B.A.; Tessonnier, L.; Mundler, O. [Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de la Timone, Service Central de Biophysique et de Medecine Nucleaire, 13 - Marseille (France)

    2008-02-15

    The introduction of recombinant human TSH (rh TSH) as a method of preparation for radioiodine therapy of follicular-derived thyroid tumors (benign and malignant) is a significant medical advance. Rh TSH has been approved for use in remnants ablation after total thyroidectomy for carcinoma. There are other potential uses for rh TSH that have not yet been licensed. The use of rh TSH allows to reduce administrated doses in goiters through an increase of iodine uptake and a more homogeneous distribution of radioiodine in the gland. Rh TSH also improves thyroid cancer patients quality of life by avoiding hypothyroidism. (authors)

  6. Current status of radioiodine (131I) treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, D.V.; Hurley, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Radioiodine appears to be increasingly selected as the primary form of therapy for most hyperthyroid adults. Some controversy exists concerning the use of I-131 in children and adolescents as well as in some patients with toxic nodular goiter. The technical aspects of radioiodine administration reviewed in this chapter include the biologic basis of I-131 use, dose strategies, measurement and evaluation of radioiodine parameters, and I-125 treatment of hyperthyroidism. The management of patients before and after I-131 treatment is discussed as well as posttreatment hypothyroidism and complications of radioiodine treatment

  7. Thyrotoxicosis and radioiodine therapy: Does the dose matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are 3 treatment options for thyrotoxicosis: Antithyroid drugs, Surgery and radioiodine. The choice of treatment varies geographically. Radioiodine therapy is preferred in the United States. The aim of radioiodine is to destroy sufficient thyroid tissue to cure the hyperthyroidism. There is a lack of consensus towards what dose of radioiodine should be used. Several methods are used to determine the dose. In our practice we administer 400 MBq to patients with Graves and in patients with large multinodular goiter, we would administer 800 MBq.

  8. Radioiodination of proteins by reductive alkylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panuska, J.R.; Parker, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of the aliphatic aldehyde, para-hydroxyphenylacetaldehyde as the reactive moiety in the radioiodination of proteins by reductive alkylation is described. The para-hydroxyphenyl group is radiolabeled with 125 I, reacted through its aliphatic aldehyde group with primary amino groups on proteins to form a reversible Schiff base linkage which can then be stabilized with the mild reducing agent NaCNBH 3 . The introduction of the methylene group between the benzene ring and the aldehyde group increases its reactivity with protein amino groups permitting efficient labeling at low aldehyde concentrations. Using this method, radioiodinated proteins with high specific activity can be produced. The reductive alkylation procedure is advantageous in that the labeling conditions are mild, the reaction is specific for lysyl residues, and the modification of the epsilon-ammonium group of lysine results in ionizable secondary amino groups avoiding major changes in protein charge

  9. Results of radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, A.

    1980-01-01

    Between 1971 and 1977, 102 hyperthyroidism patients were treated with 131 I. The average age of the patients was 64 years. In 78 patients, hyperthyroidism was due to decompensated autonomous adenoma, 24 patients presented with diffuse hyperthyroidism. The patients were observed for 14 to 24 months. Until early 1976, diagnosis and therapy success assessment were based on thyroid scintiscanning, radioiodine two-phase tests, PBI 131 , T 4 tests, and T 3 tests. Since 1976, the radioiodine two-phase test has been replaced by the TRH test, the TRH-RIA, and the T 4 -RIA. The patients were given 3 to 25 mCi 131 I. In 88 cases, euthyroidism was reached after a single therapy; in 8 cases, after two therapies; in 1 case, after three therapies; in 4 cases, after 4 therapies; in 1 case, after 5 therapies. Euthyroidism was thus reached in 96% of all cases after 131 I therapy of hyperthyroidism. (orig./MG) [de

  10. Transmission of radioiodine through sampling lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unrein, P.J.; Pelletier, C.A.; Cline, J.E.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental program to measure radioiodine transmission through sampling lines is described. The transmission depends upon both deposition on and resuspension from the walls of the line. The deposition and resuspension processes are themselves controlled by the length, diameter, and material of the line and the conditions under which it is operated. The operating conditions under study are sampling flow rate, temperature and relative humidity. Measurement results have been interpreted in terms of a four-compartment model of radioiodine deposition and resuspension. The model is applied to each of twenty or more segments of the line. Experimental measurements of short-term transmission fractions and the deposition velocities derived from them are presented for six lines. Data on resuspension rates for the same lines were obtained and are also discussed

  11. Comparison of Fixed versus Calculated Activity of Radioiodine for the Treatment of Graves Disease in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail U. Canto

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRadioactive iodine as a treatment modality has been shown in several studies to be a safe and effective therapy for Graves disease. However, there is still no uniformity regarding optimal dosing method. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of calculated and fixed dosing of radioiodine for the treatment of Graves disease.MethodsA hundred twenty-two patients diagnosed with Graves disease were randomized to receive either fixed or calculated dose of radioiodine. Those randomized to fixed activity received either low fixed activity at 9.9 mCi for thyroid gland size <40 g or high fixed activity at 14.9 mCi for thyroid gland size 40 to 80 g, and those grouped to calculated activity received 160 µCi/g of thyroid tissue adjusted for 24 hours radioiodine uptake. Thyroid function tests (free thyroxine [T4] and thyroid stimulating hormone [TSH] were monitored at 10, 16, and 24 weeks after radioactive iodine therapy. The primary outcome, treatment failure was defined as persistently elevated free T4 and low TSH.ResultsOf the 122 patients randomized, 56 in the fixed dose group and 56 in the calculated dose group completed the follow-up. At the end of 6 months, the percentage of treatment failure was 37.50% in the calculated dose group versus 19.64% in the fixed dose group with a relative risk of 0.53 (95% confidence interval, 0.28 to 0.98 favoring the fixed dose group.ConclusionFixed dose radioiodine has a significantly lower incidence of persistent hyperthyroidism at 6 months post-radioactive therapy.

  12. Indirect labeling of proteins with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de; Lavinas, Tatiana; Muramoto, Emiko; Pereira, Nilda P.S. de; Silva, Constancia P.G.; Tavares, Leoberto C.

    2000-01-01

    A procedure is described for the radioiodination of proteins using an iodinated derivative of N succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl)benzoate (ATE), previously described by Zalutsky. ATE was obtained in a high pure form and the iodination has been performed with 131-Iodine in 70-80% yield. Protein labeling studies performed with human IgG indicate that the ATE intermediate is an important alternative to conventional labeling methods. (author)

  13. Radioiodination via isotope exchange in pivalic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichert, J.P.; Van Dort, M.E.; Groziak, M.P.; Counsell, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of benzoic and aryl aliphatic mono and polyiodinated acids and esters (sterol, triglyceride) were radioiodinated in 55-99% radiochemical yield by isotope exchange with Na 125 i in a melt of pivalic acid. In general, the reaction was complete in 1 h at 155 0 C with little or no substrate decomposition. High specific activity studies afforded 125 I-labeled iopanoic acid with a specific activity of over 700 Ci/mmol. (author)

  14. Radiofrequency Ablation of Lung Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA) / Microwave Ablation (MWA) of Lung Tumors ... and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? What are Radiofrequency and Microwave Ablation of Lung Tumors? Radiofrequency ablation, ...

  15. Labelling of some organic compounds with radioiodine and technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayoumy, A A M

    1994-07-01

    Amino acids have received significant attention in the evaluation of serotonergic and dopaminergic functions in the central nervous system. the wide distribution of {gamma}-cameras and SPECT create an increasing need for appropriated labelled radiopharmaceuticals . {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 123}I are the most important radionuclides for this purpose. In order to avoid pharmacological and toxicological effects, the radiolabelled compounds must be often produced with high specific activity. In the first part of this thesis, the work is therefore focused on labelling methods with no carrier added radioiodine. The radioiodinated analogues of two amino acids were chosen as model compounds of research. L-m-tyrosine is potentially useful for the evaluation of dopamine metabolism in Parkinson's disease, while L -{alpha} -methyl tyrosine is a well known indicator of amino acid transport useful for tumor studies.

  16. The Effect of High Dose Radioiodine Therapy on Formation of Radiation Retinopathy During Thyroid Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kaçar Güvel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Non-thyroidal complication of high-dose radioiodine therapy for thyroid carcinoma might cause salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction, which may be transient or permanent in a dose-dependent manner. However, radiation retinopathy complicating 131I therapy, has not been previously well characterized. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of retinal damage among patients who had received high doses of radioiodine treatment. Methods: Forty eyes of 20 patients (3 male, 17 female who received 250-1000 mCi during 131I therapy and on ophthalmological follow up for a year after the last treatment were included in the study. Mean age of the study group was 50 years (range 25-70 years. In ophthalmologic examination, visual acuity was measured in order to determine visual loss. Intraocular pressure was measured in all the patients. Then lens examination was carried out with slit lamp biomicroscopy in order to investigate cataract or partial lens opacities. Fundus observation was carried out through the dilated pupil with slit lamp biomicroscopy using 90 D noncontact lens. Result: The best corrected visual aquity with Snellen chart was found as 1.0 in 36 eyes (90% and between 0.6 and 0.9 (10% in 4 eyes (10%. At the biomicroscopic fundus examination, retinal hemorrhage consistent with radiation retinopathy, microaneurysm, microinfarction, edema or exudation, vitreus hemorrhage, partial or total optical disc pallor indicating papillopathy in the optic disc were not observed in any of the eyes. Conclusion: This result indicates that there is not any significant correlation between repeated high-dose radioiodine therapy and radiation retinopathy in differentiated thyroid carcinomas. Even though there is not a significant restriction in use of higher doses of radioiodine therapy in differentiated thyroid carcinoma, more extensive studies are needed in order to obtain more accurate data on possible occurrence of retinopathy.

  17. Effects of treatment with radioiodine (131 I) on the gonadal function of the hyperthyroid patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Nnsari-Gilani, K.; Akhzari, F.; Fard-Esfahani, A.; Beiki, D.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: hyperthyroidism is a relatively common disorder caused by different etiologies, Graves' disease and toxic-nodular goiter(Plummer's disease) are among the most common causes. Treatment with radioiodine is considered to be the treatment of choices in many of the patients. Higher biological half-life of 13I in hyperthyroid patients as compared with patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma who have undergone thyroidectomy, may lead to a higher frequency of complications with radioiodine at similar dosage. Therefore gonadal dysfunction in hyperthyroid patients treated with radioactive iodine is not likely. Materials and methods: hyperthyroid patients with the clinical diagnosis of Graves' disease , toxic multi nodular goiter and toxic adenoma were entered the study. Their age distribution was 16-40 years in women and 17-70 years in men (reproductive years). Patients were euthyroid at the time of radioiodine treatment. FSH, LH, testosterone and semen analysis in men; and FSH, LH, estrogen and progesterone in women were measured before and 3 months after radioiodine therapy. All patients with previous history of radioiodine treatment, those with known sexual hormone abnormalities, women with a history of tube ligation and men with a history of vasectomy, as well as those women who were receiving OCP contraception were excluded from the study. results: From 104 enrolled patients, 40(38.5%) were men and 64(61.5%) were women. The case of hyperthyroidism was Graves' disease in 66 cases(63.5%), toxic multi nodular goiter in 28 cases (26.9%), and toxic adenoma in 10 others (9.6%). Hormonal status was normal in all patients before therapy while this became abnormal in 20(19.2%) of patients after treatment. Semen analysis became abnormal in 8/20(40%) of the patients after treatment. Conclusion: among different variables which were analyzed during study, meaningful correlation was found in the following situations: FSH values in men and women were found to be

  18. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Pellet ablation and ablation model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.

    1989-01-01

    A broad survey of pellet ablation is given, based primarily on information presented at this meeting. The implications of various experimental observations for ablation theory are derived from qualitative arguments of the physics involved. The major elements of a more complete ablation theory are then outlined in terms of these observations. This is followed by a few suggestions on improving the connections between theory and experimental results through examination of ablation data. Although this is a rather aggressive undertaking for such a brief (and undoubtedly incomplete) assessment, some of the discussion may help us advance the understanding of pellet ablation. 17 refs

  20. Dose concepts and dosimetry for radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockisch, A.; Brandt-Mainz, K.; Goerges, R.

    1997-01-01

    Dose planning prior to radioiodine therapy of benign thyroidal disease is usually based on macrodosimetry. The paper shows that this assumption is acceptable. The common concepts for dose planning are given. The following target doses are nowadays widely accepted: 150 Gy for euthyroid goiter, 400 Gy for toxic adenoma, 150 Gy for disserminated autonomy, 200 Gy for hyperthyroid Grave's disease if posttherapeutic euthyroidism is intended, and 250 (to 300) Gy if the risk of recurrency is to be minimized ('ablative' concept). Finally, a surveyfis given concerning the precision in which the parameters relevant for the dose calcultion can be determined. For realistic favourable conditions, the dose can be determined with an accuracy of better than ±25%. (orig.) [de

  1. Is administered radioiodine activity appropriate? The effects of pre- treatment antithyroid drugs on the therapy outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanayakkara, D.; Udugama, C.; Perera, K.; Herath, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Although radioiodine (RAI) therapy has been used in the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, there are both wide variations in current practice and deficiencies in outcome. There is concern as to decide the optimum activity to achieve better therapeutic outcome and uncertainty over the effects of pretreatment antithyroid drugs (ATD) on the post therapy outcome. Use of ATD (carbimazole) to control the severity of the disease prior to RAI therapy is a common accepted practice. The Royal college of Physicians (RCP) guideline on radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis has recommended activity of 400mBq for Graves' disease (GD) and 15mCi for toxic multi nodular disease (TMND) to achieve euthyroidism with an incidence of hypothyroidism around 15-20% at 2 years. However, in the clinical setting, many patients have become hypothyroid very early than the expected time period. This study was carried out to see the fixed dose RAI therapy outcome of both GD and TMND. Another objective is to assess the effects of pre therapy ATD on the RAI therapy for both GD and TMND at 1 year. Post RAI therapy outcome was analyzed in thyrotoxic patients who received RAI at our institute from 2001-2005. Diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis was made on the basis of biochemical thyroid function tests and thyroid uptake scans. Both GD and TMND patients were selected. Patients who were treated with ATD were advised to stop drugs for at least 4 weeks before administration of RAI therapeutic dose. GD patients received 400mBq and TMND received 550mBq of RAI irrespective of the size of the thyroid gland. Both GD and TMND were further categorized into two groups on the basis of whether they have given ATD prior to RAI therapy. Patients with solitary toxic nodular disease were excluded from the study. Post therapy thyroid functions (free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were done at 1, 2, 3, 6 and 12 months intervals. Therapy outcome over time was defined on the basis of thyroid function and

  2. Long-term outcome of lobar ablation in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC): a comparative study with patients of completion thyroidectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santra, Amburanjan; Maharjan, S.; Bal, C.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Completion thyroidectomy (CT) is usually recommended after partial surgery in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Radioiodine lobar ablation (RAILA) is an easy alternative and avoids complications that might be associated with re-surgery. But its effectiveness in terms of long-term outcome and recurrence free survival is yet to be established. This study was aimed to compare long term outcome of RAILA with that of completion thyroidectomy. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was done from the case records of patients treated in our thyroid clinic for last 25 years. Records of all patients of RAILA (364) and CT (372) were analyzed. Complete ablation rate, cumulative dose needed for complete ablation, Recurrence rate and recurrence free survival was estimated in each group. Comparison was made between two groups by statistical method. Results: There was 73% ablation rate at 1st dose of RAILA itself. Second dose in LA and first dose of remnant ablation after CT is comparable (92% and 93% respectively). Cumulative dose to achieve 100% ablation rate is more for RAILA group. Seven patients developed recurrence in RAILA group, compared to 14 in CT group. No statistically significant difference was noted between recurrence rate and recurrence free survival between two groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine Lobar ablation is a safe, effective and less costly alternative to completion thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer with comparable long term outcome like recurrence rate and recurrence free survival

  3. Radiation exposure of the families of outpatients treated with radioiodine (iodine-131) for hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrington, S.F.; O`Doherty, M.J.; Seed, P. [Guy`s, King`s and St. Thomas` Schools of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Kettle, A.G. [Kent and Canterbury NHS Trust, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Thomson, W.H.; Harding, L.K. [City Hospitals NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mountford, P.J.; Farrell, R.J. [North Staffordshire Hospital NHS Trust, Stoke-on-Trent (United Kingdom); Burrell, D.N. [University Hospital, Birmingham NHS Trust, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Batchelor, S. [Guy`s and St. Thomas` Hospitals NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    Patients who receive radioiodine (iodine-131) treatment for hyperthyroidism (195-800 MBq) emit radiation and represent a potential hazard to other individuals. Critical groups amongst the public are fellow travellers on the patient`s journey home from hospital and members of the patient`s family, particularly young children. The dose which members of the public are allowed to receive as a result of a patient`s treatment has been reduced in Europe following recently revised recommendations from ICRP. The annual public dose limit is 1 mSv, though adult members of the patient`s family are allowed to receive higher doses, with the proviso that a limit of 5 mSv should not be exceeded over 5 years. Unless the doses received during out-patient administration of radioiodine can be demonstrated to comply with these new limits, hospitalisation of patients will be necessary. The radiation doses received by family members (35 adults and 87 children) of patients treated with radioiodine at five UK hospitals were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters mounted in wrist bands. Families were given advice (according to current practice) from their treatment centre about limiting close contact with the patient for a period of time after treatment. Doses measured over 3-6 weeks were adjusted to give an estimate of values which might have been expected if the dosimeters had been worn indefinitely. Thirty-five passengers accompanying patients home after treatment also recorded the dose received during the journey using electronic (digital) personal dosimeters. For the ``adjusted`` doses to infinity, 97% of adults complied with a 5-mSv dose limit (range:0.2-5.8 mSv) and 89% of children with a 1-mSv limit (range: 0.2-7.2 mSv). However 6 of 17 children aged 3 years or less had an adjusted dose which exceeded this 1 mSv limit. The dose received by adults during travel was small in comparison with the total dose received. The median travel dose was 0.03 mSv for 1 h travel (range: 2 {mu

  4. Radiation exposure of the families of outpatients treated with radioiodine (iodine-131) for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrington, S.F.; O'Doherty, M.J.; Seed, P.; Kettle, A.G.; Thomson, W.H.; Harding, L.K.; Mountford, P.J.; Farrell, R.J.; Burrell, D.N.; Batchelor, S.

    1999-01-01

    Patients who receive radioiodine (iodine-131) treatment for hyperthyroidism (195-800 MBq) emit radiation and represent a potential hazard to other individuals. Critical groups amongst the public are fellow travellers on the patient's journey home from hospital and members of the patient's family, particularly young children. The dose which members of the public are allowed to receive as a result of a patient's treatment has been reduced in Europe following recently revised recommendations from ICRP. The annual public dose limit is 1 mSv, though adult members of the patient's family are allowed to receive higher doses, with the proviso that a limit of 5 mSv should not be exceeded over 5 years. Unless the doses received during out-patient administration of radioiodine can be demonstrated to comply with these new limits, hospitalisation of patients will be necessary. The radiation doses received by family members (35 adults and 87 children) of patients treated with radioiodine at five UK hospitals were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters mounted in wrist bands. Families were given advice (according to current practice) from their treatment centre about limiting close contact with the patient for a period of time after treatment. Doses measured over 3-6 weeks were adjusted to give an estimate of values which might have been expected if the dosimeters had been worn indefinitely. Thirty-five passengers accompanying patients home after treatment also recorded the dose received during the journey using electronic (digital) personal dosimeters. For the ''adjusted'' doses to infinity, 97% of adults complied with a 5-mSv dose limit (range:0.2-5.8 mSv) and 89% of children with a 1-mSv limit (range: 0.2-7.2 mSv). However 6 of 17 children aged 3 years or less had an adjusted dose which exceeded this 1 mSv limit. The dose received by adults during travel was small in comparison with the total dose received. The median travel dose was 0.03 mSv for 1 h travel (range: 2

  5. Diet low in iodine as well as goitrogens (LILGD) enhanced radioiodine (I-131) uptake in treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaro, Erik; Gebre-Medhin, Mehari; Lindahl, Sten-AAke

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Low iodine diet (LID) is accepted as an adjuvant to post-thyroidectomy radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer since it is held to enhance radioiodine uptake in thyroid remnants and thyroid cancer tissue. However, in the few clinical investigations performed only an indirect and weak evidence of a positive effect of the LID has been demonstrated. Also we had discouraging experience in the application of a strict LID using the same design as in the present study. We therefore decided to investigate the effect of a diet low in iodine as well as in goitrogens (LILGD). Methods: Six patients with differentiated thyroid cancer entered the study and they were their own control. After thyroid hormone withdrawal (TSH > 30 m U/L) and on regular diet a diagnostic whole body scan was performed 24 h after administration of 50 MBq (1,4 mCi) 123 I. The day following diagnostic scan the patients were put on LILGD for 4 days prior and two days after radioiodine therapy. In LILGD beverages, fruits and vegetables containing flavonoids, glucosinolates, cyanides and thiocyanates were avoided and spices and smoking prohibited. Therapeutic radioiodine was administered one week after diagnostic procedures and in the morning after over-night fasting with an activity range of 3,7-5,4 GBq (100 -150 mCi) 131 I. A 24-h therapeutic whole body scan and calculations of percentage uptake U(24) were performed. Diagnostic (basal) D U(24)% and subsequent therapeutic T U(24)% uptake were compared and expressed as therapeutic/diagnostic uptake ratios T/D U(24). Results: A significant increase in therapeutic versus diagnostic uptake T/D U(24) was observed (mean 2,53, median 2,30, range 1,40 - 4,46, p 131 I uptake in radio-ablation of normal and thyroid cancer tissue. (author)

  6. Quality control of radioiodinated gastrin for radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginabreda, M.G.P.; Borghi, V.C.; Bettarello, A.

    1988-07-01

    Radioiodinated human gastrin has been prepared at IPEN laboratory for radioimmunoassay use. This work developed the quality control of this tracer analyzing parameters of the labelling reaction, chromatographic purification and radioimmunoassay. The radioiodination yield obtained in five experiments was reproducible and similar when analyzed on 7% polyaraylamide gel eletrophoresis - PAGE - (mean + - SD of 51.70 + - 10.76%) and by1 25 I incorporation checked through thrichloroacetic acid precipitation - TCA - (57-36 + - 9.69%). Similary, after purification the labelled gastrin revaled high and reproducible purity degree when submitted to PAGE (96.57 + - 1.06%) and CA (94.82 + - 4.20%) analysis. The respective specific activities varied from 62 to 307 uCi/ug, being determined by the self-displacement method, which is based on the immunoactivity of the tracer. In this way, the antibody titers required to bind 50% of the tracer ranged from 1:32.000 to 1:180.000. Consequently, the respective doses producing 50% fall in the maximum response of the radioimmunoassays ranged from 155.0 to 24.0 pmol/1, but remained unchanged for each tracer even after three months of its preparations. The tracers presented very low non-specific binding values (1.78 + - 0.79%), stablespecific binding values (46.49 + - 5.65%) and a good between-assay precision, evaluated by an internal quality control sample (25.71 + - 4.30%) with coefficient of variation of 16.74%). The PAGE analysis of the unlabeled gastrin used in the first and last radioiodination revealed an unique and unaltered component, confirming the quality of the tracers. (author) [pt

  7. Radio-iodine treatment of hyperthyroid cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.R.; Cayzer, J.; Dillon, E.A.; Smidt, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-two elderly domestic shorthaired cats (mean age 12.9 years) were treated with radioiodine (131I). The dose of 131I administered ranged from 39 mBq to 134 mBq. Twenty-eight cats became euthyroid after treatment, one became hypothyroid and three remained hyperthyroxaemic. Two of the hyperthyroxaemic cats were successfully re-treated with 131I. Five cats died from concurrent diseases within one year of treatment. The administration of a dose of 131I selected by assessing the severity of the clinical signs, the size of the thyroid gland(s) and the serum level of thyroxine was an effective treatment for hyperthyroidism

  8. Guidelines for radioiodinated MIBG scintigraphy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Pierre; Colarinha, Paula; Fettich, Jure; Fischer, Sibylle; Frökier, Jörgen; Giammarile, Francesco; Gordon, Isky; Hahn, Klaus; Kabasakal, Levent; Mann, Mike; Mitjavila, Mercedes; Piepsz, Amy; Porn, Ute; Sixt, Rune; van Velzen, Jeannette

    2003-05-01

    These guidelines on the use of radioiodinated (99m)Tc-MIBG scintigraphy in children, which summarise the views of the Paediatric Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, provide a framework which may prove helpful to nuclear medicine teams in daily practice. They have been influenced by the conclusions of the "Consensus Guidelines for MIBG Scintigraphy" (Paris, November 6, 1997) of the European Neuroblastoma Group and by those of the Oncological Committee of the French Society of Nuclear Medicine. The guidelines should be taken in the context of "good practice" and any local/national rules which apply to nuclear medicine examinations.

  9. Analysis on the childhood and adolescent differentiated thyroid cancer: clinical features and radioiodine treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zequan; Luo Quanyong; Chen Libo; Ding Yin; Yu Yongli; Lu Hankui; Zhu Ruisen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Children with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) frequently present with more extensive disease than adults. The aim of this study was to characterize the clinical features of child-hood and adolescent DTC and evaluate the outcome and safety of radioiodine treatment. Methods: The records of 38 childhood and adolescent DTC cases, with 28 females and 10 males (mean age: 16.4 years) were reviewed. At diagnosis, all had metastatic lesions with 38 at regional lymph nodes, 15 at lung, 2 at brain and bone. Twenty-three had a total thyroidectomy, 7 had subtotal thyroidectomy, 5 had lobectomy, and 3 had other treatment. All received post-operative radioiodine therapy. All had follow-up for at least one year. Results: At the time of follow-up, all were survive (with a median follow-up of 5.13 years). Four-teen patients had no evidence of disease, 16 had partial remission, and 8 were stable disease. Conclusions: DTC of the thyroid in childhood and adolescent has high risks of residual/recurrence and metastasis. Post-thyroidectomy oral administration of radioiodine was an effective and safety adjuvant therapy for outcomes. (authors)

  10. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-01-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with 131 I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after 131 I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women

  11. Temporary ovarian failure in thyroid cancer patients after thyroid remnant ablation with radioactive iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, J.P.; Izembart, M.; Marliac, V.; Dagousset, F.; Merceron, R.E.; Vulpillat, M.; Vallee, G.

    1989-07-01

    We studied ovarian function retrospectively in 66 women who had regular menstrual cycles before undergoing complete thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer and subsequent thyroid remnant ablation with /sup 131/I. Eighteen women developed temporary amenorrhea accompanied by increased serum gonadotropin concentrations during the first year after /sup 131/I therapy. No correlation was found between the radioactive iodine dose absorbed, thyroid uptake before treatment, oral contraceptive use, or thyroid autoimmunity. Only age was a determining factor, with the older women being the most affected. We conclude that radioiodine ablation therapy is followed by transient ovarian failure, especially in older women.

  12. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease; Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J. [Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge < 3,5 {mu}Sv/h at 2 m). An adjuvant treatment with cortisone is recommended in a simultaneous endocrine ophthalmopathy to prevent from deterioration. Radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is cost effective with a low probability of side-effects and is not associated with an increased genetic or somatic risk. Therapy control and life span follow up has to be carried out by the expert physician legally responsible for the radioiodine therapy. (orig.) [German] Die Radiojodtherapie des Morbus Basedow wird in Deutschland, bei Patienten aelter als 20 Jahre, erst nach mindestens einjaehriger, erfolgloser thyreostatischer Therapie, bei Thyreostatikaunvertraeglichkeit, Rezidiven nach Operation und kleinen Strumen durchgefuehrt. Die Beseitigung der Hyperthyreose wird mit einem ablativen Dosiskonzept (300 Gy) in > 90%, verbunden mit einer Hypothyreoserate von ebenfalls > 90% erreicht. Prognostisch unguenstige Einflussfaktoren sind eine zu niedrig gewaehlte Herddosis und/oder eine begleitende Thyreostase. Aus Gruenden der Qualitaetssicherung und des Strahlenschutzes muss in Deutschland die Radiojodtherapie stationaer als Einzeittherapie durchgefuehrt werden. Die

  13. Radioiodine treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre: effects of combination with lithium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vannucchi, Guia; Mannavola, Deborah; Dazzi, Davide; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Fugazzola, Laura [Ospedale Maggiore IRCCS (Pad. Granelli), Institute of Endocrine Sciences, Milan (Italy); Chiti, Arturo; Rodari, Marcello; Tadayyon, Sara [Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Milan (Italy)

    2005-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radioiodine ({sup 131}I), alone or in combination with lithium, on thyroid volume and the prevention of radioiodine-induced thyrotoxicosis. This is the first clinical trial including only patients with multinodular goitre, normal TSH values and negative anti-thyroid auto-antibodies at baseline. Eighty consecutive patients were randomised to receive {sup 131}I plus lithium (group I+L) or {sup 131}I alone (group I). Thyroid ultrasonography and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. At 1-4 weeks after treatment, {sup 131}I-induced hyperthyroidism was observed in 58.8% of patients and was prevented by lithium administration. A low incidence of hypothyroidism (19%) was recorded at 24 months, whereas up to 44% of patients developed anti-thyroid antibodies. A significant reduction in thyroid volume was observed after {sup 131}I, with a mean decrease of 47.2% (median 48.2%) at 24 months, without differences between the groups. Moreover, it was shown that the decrease in thyroid volume after {sup 131}I was also due to the significant shrinkage of thyroid nodules. This demonstrates that adjunctive lithium is able to reduce radioiodine-induced hyperthyroidism. Therefore, such treatment appears to be safe in older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease. In the present large series, {sup 131}I therapy was demonstrated to be highly effective in reducing thyroid and nodular volume even in patients treated with low {sup 131}I doses (2.5 MBq/ml of thyroid tissue), further supporting the view that radioiodine therapy represents a real alternative to surgery. (orig.)

  14. Radioiodine treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre: effects of combination with lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannucchi, Guia; Mannavola, Deborah; Dazzi, Davide; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Fugazzola, Laura; Chiti, Arturo; Rodari, Marcello; Tadayyon, Sara

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of radioiodine ( 131 I), alone or in combination with lithium, on thyroid volume and the prevention of radioiodine-induced thyrotoxicosis. This is the first clinical trial including only patients with multinodular goitre, normal TSH values and negative anti-thyroid auto-antibodies at baseline. Eighty consecutive patients were randomised to receive 131 I plus lithium (group I+L) or 131 I alone (group I). Thyroid ultrasonography and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after treatment. At 1-4 weeks after treatment, 131 I-induced hyperthyroidism was observed in 58.8% of patients and was prevented by lithium administration. A low incidence of hypothyroidism (19%) was recorded at 24 months, whereas up to 44% of patients developed anti-thyroid antibodies. A significant reduction in thyroid volume was observed after 131 I, with a mean decrease of 47.2% (median 48.2%) at 24 months, without differences between the groups. Moreover, it was shown that the decrease in thyroid volume after 131 I was also due to the significant shrinkage of thyroid nodules. This demonstrates that adjunctive lithium is able to reduce radioiodine-induced hyperthyroidism. Therefore, such treatment appears to be safe in older patients and those with underlying cardiovascular disease. In the present large series, 131 I therapy was demonstrated to be highly effective in reducing thyroid and nodular volume even in patients treated with low 131 I doses (2.5 MBq/ml of thyroid tissue), further supporting the view that radioiodine therapy represents a real alternative to surgery. (orig.)

  15. Is it worth to calculate the dose of radioiodine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikalauskas, V.; Kuprionis, G.; Vajauskas, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Administration of empirical doses of radioiodine (RAI) has been preferred to calculated doses in many hospitals, because the need to measure the size and the iodine uptake in the thyroid involves considerable inconvenience to the patient and additional costs. The preparation of RAI of varying activities also means extra work. Today there is no general consensus on whether radioiodine should be given as a fixed dose or should be calculated. There is also no consensus regarding the question of which radiation burden should be administered to a given volume of thyroid if the activity is calculated. However, while it is possible to deliver a relatively precise dose of radiation to the thyroid gland, maybe it is worth doing this?The aim of this study was to investigate the results of different uptake and volume dependent target doses on clinical outcome of patients with hyperthyroidism in Graves' disease, multi-nodular toxic goiter or toxic adenoma after radioiodine therapy. We reviewed the records of 428 patients (389 women and 39 men, mean age 56.8±12.9 years) who had received radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease and multinodular toxic goiter (n=312) or toxic adenoma (n=116) during the period of 2000-2004 in Kaunas Medical University Hospital. Most patients were given antithyroid drug therapy in order to achieve euthyroidism before treatment with RAI. Radioiodine uptake test with repeated measurements at 2, 6, 24, 48 and/or 72 and/or 96 hr to define the effective half-life was performed. In addition, all the patients underwent thyroid ultrasonography and scintigraphy to define the volume of the thyroid. The 131I activities were calculated according to the formula of Marinelli. In addition to the normal calculation individual target doses were adjusted to the thyroid volumes of each patient before therapy. For statistical evaluation, the patients were divided into four groups: group I included those with a thyroid volume 51 ml. Statistical analysis was

  16. Radioiodine and radiotherapy in the management of thyroid cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important adjuvant treatment in the management of resectable papillary and follicular thyroid cancers in all patients except those with the best prognostic features. External radiation is also an important adjuvant therapy in these patients, especially those with tumors that extend beyond the thyroid gland and invade the trachea, esophagus, nerves, and blood vessels; it is especially important in treating patients whose tumors do not concentrate radioiodine. Radioiodine may be curative in patients with microscopic distant metastases demonstrated by radioiodine scanning. Even unresectable primary papillary and follicular cancers may be eradicated by combined therapy with radioiodine and radiotherapy. Radioiodine plays no significant role in the treatment of medullary or anaplastic thyroid cancers, but external radiation may eradicate microscopic thyroid bed or nodal disease when persistent disease is indicated by elevated calcitonin levels in medullary thyroid cancer patients. Anaplastic thyroid cancers are usually unresectable and are not eradicated by conventional radiotherapy or by any of the novel radiation techniques, with or without chemotherapy. In all types of thyroid cancer, external radiotherapy may produce beneficial palliative results in patients with distant metastases, but the use of radioiodine should always be explored in papillary and follicular thyroid cancer patients. 30 references

  17. Thyroid-hormone concentrations after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamagna, E.I.; Levine, G.A.; Hershman, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    Fourteen hyperthyroid patients (11 men, three women), ages 28 to 66, were followed with serial measurements of serum thyroid hormone levels for 1 mo after therapy with I-131. Twelve patients had diffuse toxic goiters (25 to 70 g in size); two patients had multinodular glands (40 to 100 g). The patients were taking no antithyroid medications; ten patients were treated with propranolol. All patients received the equivalent of 5000 rad, except the two with multinodular glands, who received larger doses. There was no consistent pattern of serum T 4 and T 3 levels after the I-131 therapy. For the entire group, there was no significant increase of the mean serum hormone concentration. One group (three patients) had a mean T 4 increase of 28% and a T 3 increase of 91% above baseline at Days 10--11. Seven patients had minimal increases of hormone levels at Days 2--3, and a third group (four paients) had no increase of thyroid hormones after I-131 therapy. The patients with no rise in hormone concentrations had smaller goiters than the other groups. There was no correlation of the dose of radioactive iodine, or of the initial hormone concentration, with the rises or declines of T 4 and T 3 levels after I-131 therapy. Radioiodine therapy caused no significant increase of serum T 4 and T 3 concentrations in the majority of patients

  18. Radiation protection principles for radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Lassmann, M.

    1999-01-01

    In Germany, approximately 30,000 treatments with radioiodine are performed yearly on patients with benign or malignant thyroid diseases. These are carried out generally in specialized therapy wards which are equipped with radiation protection facilities. Ambulant (fractionated) radioiodine treatment is not permitted in Germany. More recently, the situation has been that the discharge of patients is permitted, when they have spent a stay of at least 48 hours in the ward without the dose rate exceeding 3.5 μSv/hour at 2 meters distance from them, corresponding to 1 mSv/year (this correlates to a residual activity in the body of the patient of 250 MBq). The radiation exposure of personnel in the therapy ward due to both external and internal exposure lies within a range of a few mSv per year. According to recent studies, the exposure to family members and close friends via external exposure, inhalation or incorporation does not exceed the effective dose of 1 mSv/year. This value has been laid down in a recommendation by the European Union as the dose constraint for children; for adults younger than 60 years of age, 3 mSv are recommended, for older persons 15 mSv. (orig.) [de

  19. Behaviour of radioiodine in gaseous effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, P.J.

    1968-01-01

    Because of the different chemical forms in which radioiodine occurs in the gaseous state, it is important when designing efficient filters to know the chemical forms which may be present in the effluent gases when various operations are being carried out and to know the effect of different gaseous environments on the filtration efficiency. To obtain this information it is necessary to have available reliable means of characterizing different chemical forms and to sample gaseous effluents when these operations are being carried out. This paper describes the use for identifying molecular iodine of metallic screens in a multi-component sampling pack in different gaseous environments. Using multi-component sampling packs, the fractionation of iodine nuclides between different chemical forms was measured in the effluent gases escaping from an in-pile test loop in which the fuel was deliberately ruptured by restricting the flow of coolant. Sequential samples were taken for six hours after the rupture and it was possible to follow during this period the individual behaviours of 13 '1I, 133 I and 135 I. Simultaneous samples were also obtained of the noble gases in the effluent gas stream and of the iodine nuclides in the loop coolant. Similar experiments have been carried out with a view to characterizing the different chemical behaviour of radioiodine as it is released from a variety of operations in the nuclear industry including the cutting of fuel sections in metallurgical examination caves and an incinerator. (author)

  20. Perioral Rejuvenation With Ablative Erbium Resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel L

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of the scanning full-field erbium laser, misconceptions regarding ablative erbium resurfacing have resulted in its being largely overshadowed by ablative fractional resurfacing. This case report illustrates the appropriateness of full-field erbium ablation for perioral resurfacing. A patient with profoundly severe perioral photodamage etched-in lines underwent full-field ablative perioral resurfacing with an erbium laser (Contour TRL, Sciton Inc., Palo Alto, CA) that allows separate control of ablation and coagulation. The pre-procedure consultations included evaluation of the severity of etched-in lines, and discussion of patient goals, expectations, and appropriate treatment options, as well as a review of patient photos and post-treatment care required. The author generally avoids full-field erbium ablation in patients with Fitzpatrick type IV and above. For each of 2 treatment sessions (separated by approximately 4 months), the patient received (12 cc plain 2% lidodaine) sulcus blocks before undergoing 4 passes with the erbium laser at 150 μ ablation, no coagulation, and then some very focal 30 μ ablation to areas of residual lines still visualized through the pinpoint bleeding. Similarly, full-field ablative resurfacing can be very reliable for significant wrinkles and creping in the lower eyelid skin--where often a single treatment of 80 μ ablation, 50 μ coagulation can lead to a nice improvement. Standardized digital imaging revealed significant improvement in deeply etched rhytides without significant adverse events. For appropriately selected patients requiring perioral (or periorbital) rejuvenation, full-field ablative erbium resurfacing is safe, efficacious and merits consideration.

  1. Radioiodination of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.; Wang, L.; Yin, D.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, increasing biochemical and radiochemical research has been performed to develop radiolabelled peptides as specific ligands for tumour associated receptors. VIP, a 28-amino acid peptide containing two tyrosines and three lysines, has demonstrated that various tumour cells express significantly higher amounts of VIP-receptors and could be applied to the clinic diagnosis. For these purposes, radiohalogenation of VIP by direct and indirect method was studied. Direct labelling works well for radioiodine but is limited to dehalogenation of labelling products in vivo. Conjugate labelling methods including Boltonhunter and wood reagents were developed but introduction of such a molecule to peptides may lead to the decrease of biological activity in vivo. In order to resolve these problems, N-Succinimidyl-3-(tri-nbutylstannyl) benzoate (ATE) was elected for the radioiodination of VIP and already employed to radioiodination of IgG successfully. The in vitro stability and biological activity would be compared in these two methods. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and human immunoglobulin (IgG) were radioiodinated by direct and indirect methods. Iodogen was employed in direct method and N-Succinimidyl-3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE) was applied as a prosthetic group in the conjugation labelling. The subject of our study was optimizing the radiohalogenation of IgG and VIP followed by separation and analysis of reaction products. The advantages and disadvantages were illustrated by comparing the in vitro stability and biological activity in these two methods. Na 123 I was prepared by nuclear reaction of 124 Te(p, 2n) 123 I using cyclone-30. More than 95% of radiochemical purity, more than 95% of radionuclide purity and about 100 mCi/mL of radioactivity concentration were obtained. ATE was supplied by Dr. Pozzi and radioiodinated with iodogen and 96% of labelling efficiency was obtained. The stability of radioactive S 125 IB kept well in dark at 4

  2. Reduction of thyroid volume following radioiodine therapy for functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luster, M.; Jacob, M.; Thelen, M.H.; Michalowski, U.; Deutsch, U.; Reiners, C.

    1995-01-01

    In a retrospective study we evaluated the data of 112 patients who underwent radioiodine treatment for functional autonomy of the thyroid at Essen University Hospital from 1988 to 1993. Therapeutic activities of radioiodine were administered after individual determination of activity for intended radiation doses (150-300 Gy) taking into consideration autonomously functioning volume, maximum uptake, and effective half-life. The achieved dose was calculated by means of measurement of the radioiodine kinetics during therapy. Depending on the type of autonomous function of the thyroid (solitary autonomously functioning nodule, multiple autonomously functioning nodules, autonomously functioning thyroid tissue) volume reductions between 39 and 46% were found approximately 6 months after treatment. (orig.) [de

  3. Labelling of proteins with radioiodine and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franek, M.; Hampl, J.; Rodak, L.; Hruska, K.; Prochazka, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Various techniques of labelling proteins and peptides with radioactive iodine are reviewed. Particular attention is focused on the mechanism of iodination of tyrosine used as a model substance for radioiodination of proteins. Particular consideration is given to recent techniques attaining high specific radioactivity without side effects on the protein molecule and to factors affecting the rate of iodination and its character (buffers, polarity of the reaction environment, molecule type, etc.). The suitability is shown of radioiodinated proteins in the studies of protein metabolism and in the radioimmunoanalytical determination of substances of both the protein and non-protein nature. The possibility of further application of radioiodinated protein is discussed. (author)

  4. 12-month efficacy of a single radiofrequency ablation on autonomously functioning thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Stella; Stacul, Fulvio; Michelli, Andrea; Giudici, Fabiola; Zuolo, Giulia; de Manzini, Nicolò; Dobrinja, Chiara; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Fabris, Bruno

    2017-09-01

    Radiofrequency ablation has been advocated as an alternative to radioiodine and/or surgery for the treatment of autonomously functioning benign thyroid nodules. However, only a few studies have measured radiofrequency ablation efficacy on autonomously functioning benign thyroid nodules. The aim of this work was to evaluate the 12-month efficacy of a single session of radiofrequency ablation (performed with the moving shot technique) on solitary autonomously functioning benign thyroid nodules. Thirty patients with a single, benign autonomously functioning benign thyroid nodules, who were either unwilling or ineligible to undergo surgery and radioiodine, were treated with radiofrequency ablation between April 2012 and May 2015. All the patients underwent a single radiofrequency ablation, performed with the 18-gauge needle and the moving shot technique. Clinical, laboratory, and ultrasound evaluations were scheduled at baseline, and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months from the procedure. A single radiofrequency ablation reduced thyroid nodule volume by 51, 63, 69, and 75 % after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. This was associated with a significant improvement of local cervical discomfort and cosmetic score. As for thyroid function, 33 % of the patients went into remission after 3 months, 43 % after 6 months, and 50 % after 12 months from the procedure. This study demonstrates that a single radiofrequency ablation allowed us to withdraw anti-thyroid medication in 50 % of the patients, who remained euthyroid afterwards. This study shows that a single radiofrequency ablation was effective in 50 % of patients with autonomously functioning benign thyroid nodules. Patients responded gradually to the treatment. It is possible that longer follow-up studies might show greater response rates.

  5. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinsiche Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Luster, M.; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Moser, E. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative {sup 131}I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC {<=}1 cm {sup 131}I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for {sup 131}I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for {sup 131}I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of {sup 131}I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for {sup 131}I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of {sup 131}I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  6. No evidence of chromosome damage in children and adolescents with differentiated thyroid carcinoma after receiving {sup 131}I radiometabolic therapy, as evaluated by micronucleus assay and microarray analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federico, Giovanni; Fiore, Lisa; Massart, Francesco; Saggese, Giuseppe [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Department of Pediatrics, Unit of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes, Pisa (Italy); Boni, Giuseppe; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Mariani, Giuliano [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Pisa (Italy); Fabiani, Barbara; Verola, Carmela; Scarpato, Roberto [University of Pisa, Department of Biology, Unit of Genetics, Mutagenesis and Environmental Epidemiology, Pisa (Italy); Traino, Claudio [Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Pisana, Health Physics Service, Pisa (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    As {sup 131}I therapy, used to achieve ablation of thyroid gland remnant, can cause chromosome damage in cultured peripheral lymphocytes especially, we investigated whether administration of radioiodine may induce early genome damage in peripheral T lymphocytes of adolescents with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC). We studied 11 patients, aged 14.8 {+-} 3.1 years, who assumed {sup 131}I (range: 1.11-4.44 GBq) to ablate thyroid remnant. A blood sample for micronucleus assay and for evaluating expression of some genes involved in the DNA repair or the apoptosis pathways was obtained from each patient 1 h before (T{sub 0}) and 24 (T{sub 1}) and 48 h (T{sub 2}) post-radioiodine administration. Compared to T{sub 0}, we did not find any difference in the number of micronucleated cells at both T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} in any subject. Nine out of 11 patients had altered expression levels in a majority of the DNA repair and apoptosis genes at T{sub 1}, which decreased at T{sub 2}. We demonstrated for the first time that peripheral cells of DTC children and adolescents who received {sup 131}I at a mean dosage of 3.50 {+-} 0.37 GBq did not show chromosome damage within 48 h from the end of radiometabolic therapy. This may be due to a prompt activation of the cell machinery that maintains the integrity of the genome to prevent harmful double-strand breaks from progressing to chromosome mutations, either by repairing the lesions or by eliminating the most seriously damaged cells via apoptosis. (orig.)

  7. Influence of antithyroid medication on effective half-life and uptake of 131 I following radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moka, D.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: A radioiodine therapy (RIT) in thyrotoxic patients receiving antithyroid drugs (ATD) leads in comparison to nonpretreated patients either to higher therapeutic doses or to higher treatment failure rates. Aim of this study was to optimize the effect of RIT in patients pretreated with ATD. Methods: Therefore, the influence of ATD was assessed in 109 patients with shortened effective half-life of 131 I. RIT was performed under stationary conditions. Radioiodine activity of the thyroid gland was stopped three days after RIT. The patients antithyroid medication was stopped three days after RIT. The progress of the first RIT and of a second radioiodine application, which still was necessary in 29 patients, was compared to 32 patients receiving ATD, continuously. Results: Values of effective half-life for 131 I rose significantly from 3.2±0.2 to 5.7±0.2 days (Graves' disease: 3.4 to 5.7 days; toxic goiters' disease: Multifocal autonomy 3.2 to 6.2 days; unifocal autonomy 2.5 auf 5.0 days) 2-3 days after stopping ATD. There was an increase of the 131 I-uptake of a second RIT decreased significantly in patients receiving ATD, continuously. Conclusion: Effective half-life and uptake of 131 I was affected significantly by ATD. The stop taking of ATD after RIT is useful to improve an apparent insufficient RIT in thyrotoxic patients receiving ATD. (orig.) [de

  8. The indirect radioiodination of vasoactive intestinal peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lihua; Li Junling; Yin Duanzhi; Zhang Lei; Zhang Xiuli; Wang Yongxian

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To seek for an effective way to acquire radiolabeled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) with excellent in vivo stability. N-succinimidyl-3-iodo-125-benzoate (S 125 IB) came from radioiodination of N-succinimidyl-3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE) precursor and then conjugated with VIP to form 125 IBA-VIP. The labelling procedure was optimized; the in vitro stability and biological activity were evaluated. Methods: 1) Radiolabeling of ATE precursor was achieved with iodogen oxidant and the influential factors were considered in this procedure. The labeling efficiency was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and the purification was carried out by Sep-pak silica gel cartridge. The stability was detected by TLC after 2 h storage in dark at 4 degree C. 2) Conjugation of S 125 IB and VIP. The labelling efficiency was determined with RP TLC and the purification was carried out with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, RP C18 column). Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation method was applied to evaluate the in vitro stability while the biological activity was determined by cell binding experiments with SGC7901 cell lines. Results: 1) S 125 IB experiments. The radioiodination of ATE was performed well for 5 min at 25 degree C with 10 micrograms of iodogen at suitable mole ratio (3-8:1) of ATE/Na 125 I, the labelling efficiency was about 96%. The stability was kept well at 4 degree C in dark, no significant decrease of S 125 IB was observed. 2) The conjugation efficiency of S 125 IB and VIP was above 75% with TLC. HPLC showed the different retention time (t R ) as follows, 125 IBA-VIP: 13.3 min, S 125 IB: 19.6 min, VIP: 8.32 min. The stability of 125 IBA-VIP was better than 125 I-VIP from direct radioiodination of VIP with iodogen oxidant, only 2.85% decrease was found after 7 d at 4 degree C. The biological activity of 125 IBA-VIP was kept as well as 125 I-VIP under the condition of 37 degree C 60 min. Conclusions: The indirect

  9. Obtention of a prosthetic group for labelling of radioiodinated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da S.; Colturato, Maria Tereza; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2000-01-01

    Antibodies and peptides labeled with radionuclides has been extensively used in radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunodetection. The principal problem with the use of radioiodinated proteins is the in vivo dehalogenation. The use of prosthetic groups for indirect labeling of proteins with radioiodine has showed to be useful on labeling proteins with greater in vivo stability. A procedure is described for the preparation of an radioiodinated prosthetic group (N-succinimidyl 4-radioiodine-benzoate-SIB), using procedure described by Stocklin et al, with the iodination of p-bromo-benzoic acid and subsequent reaction with TSTU. Preliminary labeling results showed that the prosthetic group can be obtained in a good yield. The coupling of the SIB to the protein will be studied using human IgG as protein model. (author)

  10. Radioiodination of melagenine-II with I-125 (preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caso, R.; Ruiz, M.

    1996-01-01

    Radioiodination of Melagenine-II with I-125 farmacokinetic studies was made, using Chloramine-T method. Radiochemical purity and stability of the labelled product were determined by radiochromatography. The labelled Melagenine-II showed two radioactive fractions

  11. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-08-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration.

  12. Radioiodine-induced thyroid storm. Case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDermott, M.T.; Kidd, G.S.; Dodson, L.E. Jr.; Hofeldt, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    Thyroid storm developed following radioiodine therapy in a 43-year-old man with Graves' disease, weight loss, myopathy, severe thyrotoxic hypercalcemia, and a pituitary adenoma. The hypercalcemia may have been a significant, and previously unreported, predisposing factor for the radioiodine-associated thyroid storm. This case and 15 other well-documented cases of radioiodine-associated storm found in the literature are reviewed, as are several other cases of less severe exacerbations of thyrotoxicosis associated with radioiodine therapy. Although not often seen, these complications are often fatal. High-risk patients, such as the elderly, those with severe thyrotoxicosis, and those with significant underlying diseases, may benefit from preventive measures such as the judicious use of thyrostatic medications during the periods before and after isotope administration

  13. Voltage and pace-capture mapping of linear ablation lesions overestimates chronic ablation gap size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Louisa; Harrison, James; Chubb, Henry; Whitaker, John; Mukherjee, Rahul K; Bloch, Lars Ølgaard; Andersen, Niels Peter; Dam, Høgni; Jensen, Henrik K; Niederer, Steven; Wright, Matthew; O'Neill, Mark; Williams, Steven E

    2018-04-26

    Conducting gaps in lesion sets are a major reason for failure of ablation procedures. Voltage mapping and pace-capture have been proposed for intra-procedural identification of gaps. We aimed to compare gap size measured acutely and chronically post-ablation to macroscopic gap size in a porcine model. Intercaval linear ablation was performed in eight Göttingen minipigs with a deliberate gap of ∼5 mm left in the ablation line. Gap size was measured by interpolating ablation contact force values between ablation tags and thresholding at a low force cut-off of 5 g. Bipolar voltage mapping and pace-capture mapping along the length of the line were performed immediately, and at 2 months, post-ablation. Animals were euthanized and gap sizes were measured macroscopically. Voltage thresholds to define scar were determined by receiver operating characteristic analysis as voltage, pace-capture, and ablation contact force maps. All modalities overestimated chronic gap size, by 1.4 ± 2.0 mm (ablation contact force map), 5.1 ± 3.4 mm (pace-capture), and 9.5 ± 3.8 mm (voltage mapping). Error on ablation contact force map gap measurements were significantly less than for voltage mapping (P = 0.003, Tukey's multiple comparisons test). Chronically, voltage mapping and pace-capture mapping overestimated macroscopic gap size by 11.9 ± 3.7 and 9.8 ± 3.5 mm, respectively. Bipolar voltage and pace-capture mapping overestimate the size of chronic gap formation in linear ablation lesions. The most accurate estimation of chronic gap size was achieved by analysis of catheter-myocardium contact force during ablation.

  14. Radioiodine treatment effects of lacrimal glands function in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard Esfahani, A.; Akhzari, F.; Mirshekarpour, H.; Saghari, M.; Izadyar, S.; Esmaili, J.; Fallahi, B.; Beiki, D.; Takavar, A.

    2005-01-01

    There is a limited number of case reports published in the past decade confirming the radio-iodine presence in the tear. These observations as well as reported cases of salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction after radioiodine therapy stimulated investigators to clarify whether lacrimal gland function can be affected post-radioiodine therapy. Hence we planned a historical cohort study to evaluate this effect. Methods: we studied 100 eyes of 50 patients who were referred to the nuclear medicine department of Dr. Shariati hospital from 01.1383 to 02.1384 and had received high doses (accumulative dose: 100-450mCi) of 1-131 treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with their latest admission at least 3 months previously. Dry eye symptoms (obtained via a standard questionnaire) and Schirmer I test results (mm/5min) of this group were compared with those of an unexposed group (1 00 eyes of 50 individuals) matched by sex and age. Cases with another known cause(s) of dry eye were not included in either group. Results: 51% of the exposed eyes and 50% of the unexposed ones revealed at least one of the dry eye symptoms in the questionnaire. Data analysis showed no significant difference between the number of symptoms of two groups, but 2 symptoms (burning, unrelated to light and rythema) were significantly higher in the exposed eyes. From 9 exposed eyes complaining of erythema, Schirmer test result was abnormal only in 2 (one patient). Also among the 10 eyes with burning symptom (unrelated to light) one patient (2 eyes) revealed abnormal Schirmer test result. The study also demonstrated a significantly lower wetting amount of the Schirmer paper in exposed group compared to others. In the patients undergone radio-iodine therapy, results were 0-4 mm in 21%, 5-9 mm in 20% and 10 mm or more in 59%. These results were seen in the unexposed group in 6%, 17% and 77%, respectively. File review of the 21 exposed eyes with 0-4 mm Schirmer test results revealed presence of the

  15. Three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Ken; Uchiyama, Masayuki; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    We report three cases of respiratory failure after I-131 radioiodine therapy. All cases involved relapsed cervical lesions, and two showed edema of the larynx. Emergency tracheostomy was performed to treat the respiratory failure in one case while the others were treated conservatively. All patients showed improvements without after-effects. Patients who undergo I-131 radioiodine therapy, especially those with cervical lesions, should be carefully monitored for this rare complication after treatment. (author)

  16. Metal organic framework MIL-101 for radioiodine capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assaad, Thaer; Assfour, Bassem

    2017-09-01

    we report on the use of metal organic frameworks(MOFs) for radioiodine recovery and storage. One MOF (namely MIL-101) was prepared and investigated in detail to demonstrate the iodine removal efficiency and capacity of MOFs. The typical sorption kinetics and uptake isotherms were measured using radioactive iodine (123 I) for the first time. Our measurements indicate that MOFs can capture and store radioiodine in very high efficiency and fast kinetics.

  17. Radioiodine in kelp from western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Wood, W.; Smith, C.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a program to survey low levels of radioactivity in the marine environment of the southern hemisphere, we have studied the distribution and uptake of 131 I found in the subtidal kelp Ecklonia radiata, on the west coast of Australia. Concentrations of 5 to 75 fCi/g of 131 I exist in this species over a considerable distance along the coast. We have characterized the principal source of the 131 I and found a general temporal correlation between the amount of radioiodine discharged from sewer outfalls and its concentration in kelp. Transplant experiments have enabled us to estimate uptake and depuration rates, and our results are consistent with laboratory measurements made by others

  18. Radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samuel, A.M.; Rajashekharrao, B.

    1999-01-01

    Radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy has been in use for the treatment of thyroid diseases. Although the use of 131 I has been in vogue for a long time, its use in therapy for well-differentiated thyroid cancer is still controversial. This is because, thyroid cancers (TC) are generally slow growing tumors, with low mortality and normal spans of survival. To record recurrence and mortality, long-term follow-up studies over a period of two to three decades are needed to establish definite conclusions on the acceptable modes of treatment. The most reliable conclusions regarding 131 I treatment are obtained from studies reported on a large series of patients followed over a period of 3 decades or more from a single institute with a more or less unchanged protocol of management

  19. Scintigraphy with radioiodinated free fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    In this thesis several clinical and animal experimental studies of free fatty acids labeled with radioiodine are discussed. These radiolabeled fatty acids are used for cardiac imaging. Besides, the elimination rate of the radioactivity from the myocardium, as observed during a scintigraphic study, is correlated with fatty acid metabolism. Uptake and distribution of I-heptadecanoic acid (I-HDA) and I-phenylpentadecanoic acid (I-PPA) are compared with those of thallium-201 (Tl-201) in the normal and ischemic canine myocardium. For determination of the elimination rate (expressed in terms of halftime values) of the radioactivity from the myocardium, regions of interest have to be drawn over a scintigram. A method is described resulting in more reliable demarcation of normal and abnormal regions within the scintigram. (Auth.)

  20. Radioiodine in kelp from Western Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Wood, W.

    1988-01-01

    As part of a program to survey low levels of radioactivity in the marine environment of the southern hemisphere, the distribution and uptake of 131 I found in the subtidal kelp Ecklonia radiata, on the west coast of Australia were studied. Concentrations of 5 to 75 fCi/g of 131 I exist in this species over a considerable distance along the coast. The principal source of the 131 I was characterized; a general temporal correlation was found between the amount of radioiodine discharged from sewer outfalls and its concentration in kelp. Transplant experiments enabled to estimate uptake and depuration rates, and the results are consistent with laboratory measurements, elsewhere. (author) 21 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  1. Radioiodine in kelp from western Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.V.; Buddemeier, R.W.; Wood, W.; Smith, C.

    1987-03-25

    As part of a program to survey low levels of radioactivity in the marine environment of the southern hemisphere, we have studied the distribution and uptake of /sup 131/I found in the subtidal kelp Ecklonia radiata, on the west coast of Australia. Concentrations of 5 to 75 fCi/g of /sup 131/I exist in this species over a considerable distance along the coast. We have characterized the principal source of the /sup 131/I and found a general temporal correlation between the amount of radioiodine discharged from sewer outfalls and its concentration in kelp. Transplant experiments have enabled us to estimate uptake and depuration rates, and our results are consistent with laboratory measurements made by others.

  2. Radioiodinated fatty acids for cardiological diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machulla, H.-J.; Knust, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    The development of fatty acids labelled with iodine-123 is reviewed. The variety of methods for producing 123 I and introducing radioiodine into the molecule is discussed and the important points of the biochemical background are recalled with the aim of finding a broad application for 123 I-labelled fatty acids. The results of the pharmacokinetic studies and biochemical analysis are presented as they prove that both 17- 123 I-heptadecanoic acid (IHA) and 15-(rho- 123 I-phenyl)pentadecanoic acid (IPPA) exhibit analogous behaviour to that of the naturally occurring fatty acids. Clinical applications demonstrated two fields of importance: (i) applications solely for imaging the heart and (ii) assessment of myocardial turnover rates of fatty acids for functional diagnosis. Moreover, very recent studies show that the provision of information about prognosis of myocardial diseases and the applied cardiological therapy appear to be possible. (author)

  3. Effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M N; Chakrabarty, R K; Akhter, M; Nahar, N; Swapan, M K; Alam, M M; Nahar, R; Sultana, N; Hallaz, M M; Alam, M M; Uddin, M M; Hossain, M A; Yasmin, S; Islam, M R

    2013-10-01

    The present non randomized clinical trial was conducted in the Center for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Mymensingh, Bangladesh for duration of one year. Total 30 patients with hyperthyroidism diagnosed by clinical and biochemical profile were included in the study. All patients received radioiodine treatment and regular follow up at 1st month, 3rd month, 6th month & 9th month were done to evaluate clinical and biochemical status and complications. Data were analyzed by computer with SPSS programme using 't' test and chi-square test. In the present study, out of 30 respondents more than three fourth of the respondents (76.6%) were in the age group of 31-50 years followed by less than 30 years are group (16.7%) and rest of respondents were in the age group of more than 50 years (06.7%). Mean±SD and range of age of the respondents were 39.80±10.02 years and 17-65 years respectively. Among the 30 respondents 11(36.7%) were male and 19(63.3%) were female. Male to female ratio was 1:1.73. Out of 30 patients 26(86.7%) presented with goiter and among them 21(80.8%) has diffused goiter and five (19.2%) had nodular goiter. Baseline mean±SD, median, range of serum T₃ level were 5.24±3.62, 4.34, 1.48-14.65nmol/L respectively. Base line mean±SD, median range of serum T₄ level were 192.25±99.17, 201.77, 1.75-336.25nmol/L respectively. Baseline mean±SD, median range of serum TSH level were 6.33±23.93, 0.15-0.07, 130.46nmol/L respectively. In the present study serum T₃, T₄ level among the respondents sharply decrease from baseline to 2nd follow up then gradually decrease from 2nd to 4th follow up. Serum TSH level gradually increases from baseline to 3rd follow up and then gradually decreases from 3rd to 4th follow up. The result showed radioiodine is an effective option for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis.

  4. Clinical experience with outpatient radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csenkey-Sinko, I.; Roka, R.; Sera, T.; Csernay, L.; Pavics, L.; Valkusz, Z.; Julesz, J.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1993, outpatient radioiodine therapy has been available in Hungary. The reported study evaluated the efficacy of outpatient radioiodine treatment in subjects with hyperthyroidism. The data on 238 patients with Graves' disease and 123 patients with thyroid autonomy were analyzed retrospectively. All patients were treated within the period 1994 - 1999. The activities of radioiodine were calculated individually. The dose applied in Graves' disease was 150 Gy, and that in thyroid autonomy was 300 Gy. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated 3,6 and 12 months after radioiodine therapy. In patients with persistent hyperthyroidism, repeated therapy was performed. Overall,the radioiodine therapy was successful in 84% of the Graves' disease patients. In thyroid autonomy, treatment with 300 Gy was successful in 79% of the patients. The efficacy of radioiodine treatment was similar to the results of one-dose application. It was concluded that radioidine therapy with an absorbed dose of 150 Gy in Graves' disease and with an absorbed dose of 300 Gy in thyroid autonomy proved successful by the method applied. (author)

  5. The principles of radioiodine dosimetry following a nuclear accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zvonova, I.A.

    1996-01-01

    Based upon the experience of radioiodine dosimetry after the Chernobyl accident main principals of radioiodine measurements and dosimetry in thyroid glands of population in case of a radiation accident are discussed in the report. For the correct dose estimation following the radioiodine measurement in the thyroid one should know the ''history'' of radionuclide intake into the body of a contaminated person. So a measurement of radioiodine thyroid content should be accompanied by asking questions of investigated persons about, their life style and feeding after a nuclear incident. These data coincidently with data of radionuclides dynamic in the air and food (especially in milk products) are used for the development of radioiodine intake model and then for thyroid dose estimation. The influence of stable iodine prophylaxis and other countermeasures on values are discussed in dependence on the time of its using. Some methods of thyroid dose reconstruction used after the Chernobyl accident in Russia for a situation of thyroid radioiodine measurements lacking in a contaminated settlement are presented in the report. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  6. The principles of radioiodine dosimetry following a nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvonova, I A [Institute of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01

    Based upon the experience of radioiodine dosimetry after the Chernobyl accident main principals of radioiodine measurements and dosimetry in thyroid glands of population in case of a radiation accident are discussed in the report. For the correct dose estimation following the radioiodine measurement in the thyroid one should know the ``history`` of radionuclide intake into the body of a contaminated person. So a measurement of radioiodine thyroid content should be accompanied by asking questions of investigated persons about, their life style and feeding after a nuclear incident. These data coincidently with data of radionuclides dynamic in the air and food (especially in milk products) are used for the development of radioiodine intake model and then for thyroid dose estimation. The influence of stable iodine prophylaxis and other countermeasures on values are discussed in dependence on the time of its using. Some methods of thyroid dose reconstruction used after the Chernobyl accident in Russia for a situation of thyroid radioiodine measurements lacking in a contaminated settlement are presented in the report. (author). 16 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  7. Graves' disease: cost-effectiveness of clinical and radioiodine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz junior, Antonio F.; Takahashi, Miriam H.; Albino, Claudio C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this study, we set out to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of the two most used therapies in Graves' disease: antithyroid drugs (ATD) and radioiodine (RAI). Twenty-tree patients, 7 men and 16 women, with a mean age of 35.4 years, treated with ATD and 35 patients, 5 men and 30 women, mean age of 39.4 years, treated with RAI were studied. After 2 years receiving ATD, 21 patients achieved euthyroidism and 2 remained hyperthyroid. In the RAI group, 21 patients presented hypothyroidism and 13 became euthyroid. To calculate the costs of each therapy, we analysed the number of visits during this period, the laboratory data and the drugs needed, such as tiamazol and/or thyroxine. The group treated only with ATD needed a higher number of visits and laboratory measurements, with the mean total cost of U$ 791.65, while the RAI group spent a mean amount of U$ 366.44. Therefore, the costs of the RAI treatment were 53,7 % lower than clinical therapy with ATD. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that RAI treatment has a lower cost than ATD, being very effective in controlling the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease. (author)

  8. Radioiodine 131I metabolism in human

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Toru

    1976-01-01

    Metabolic fate of orally administered 131 I in human was studied. Chronological observations of whole body radioactivity distribution and thyroid 131 I uptake curve revealed that 131 I metabolism was greatly affected by the amount of dietary iodine intake. Under the high iodine intake exceeding 1 mg per day, uptake curve showed biphasic descending type, that is, rapid accumulation during 3 to 6 hours and rapid fall up to 48 hours and gradual decrease afterwards. While, ascending type, monophasic and maximal at 24 hours, was found universary under low iodine intake less than 500 μg per day. Thyroid function should not be affected by the amount of iodine intake, and we analysed 131 I metabolism using a new four compartments which included intrathyroidal inorganic iodine pool. The results, especially hormone production rate, were found quite useful even under high iodine intake. Thyroidal organic iodine contents were calculated as approximately 2.5 mg and this value was much less than previously reported values from other countries. Administered radioiodine were mixed up with stable body iodine and reached equilibration by around 10 days. From seroimmunological, histological (microscopic and electron microscopic) studies, and irradiation studies to the cultured human thyroid cells, we concluded that this unexpected phenomenon was derived from chromosomal damage which induced gradual decrease in cell population because of inability to reproduce. Carcinogenic and genetic effects were not serious, and only three leukemic patients were reported in this country and 484 normal babies were born from 7,500 treated parents. Thus, therapeutic dose of 131 I was proved rather safe, and even when exposed to radioiodine, administration of perchlorate or thiocyanate, excessive iodine and TSH seemed effective to avoid radiation injuries. (auth.)

  9. Effects of Radioiodine Therapy on the Natural History of Graves' Ophtalmopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dreval

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available 21 patients with Graves’ disease and Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO received radioiodine treatment (RIT. Before 131-I therapy in all patients GO were non-active and no severe. Six patients not received any treatment before RIT; four patients received orbital radiotherapy and 11 patients received intravenous glucocorticoids. Thyreotoxicosis compensation were achieved by antithyroid medication before RIT. Antithyroid medication was stopped 10 days before RIT. Worsening of GO was seen on 47.7% patients 3 months after RIT, but only 9.5% of patients needed additional treatment GO. GO exacerbation take place in 90% of hypothyroid patients and its compensation reduced the symptoms of activity of GO for 3 months. 42.8% was without any symptoms of activity of GO by 9—12 months after RIT. Treatment of GO before RIT were improved the course of GO after RIT.

  10. Strategies of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET Center Klagenfurt, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Several therapeutic options are available for the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), including long-term antithyroid drug medication (ATD), near-total resection (NTR) and radioiodine therapy (RIT). These treatments are used with different frequencies depending on geographical location, size of the goitre, age of the patient and experience of the physician. It should be noted that RIT is still being applied more frequently in the United States than in Europe. Despite the fact that RIT was introduced as long ago as 1941, several questions are still the subject of debate: Should a fixed dose or a calculated dose be used. If the dose is calculated, how many Grays (Gy) should be delivered to the thyroid? What is the goal of RIT in GD? Which factors, including ATD, influence the outcome of RIT? Is RIT appropriate in GD with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO)? Although not all these questions have been answered yet, conclusions can be derived regarding a general strategy for use of RIT in GD. As with surgery, the goal of RIT in GD is euthyroidism with or without L-thyroxine medication. There is a clear advantage of dose calculation over use of a fixed dose because the only factor influencing the outcome is the dose delivered to a certain thyroid volume. To minimise recurrent hyperthyroidism, an ablative approach using a delivered dose of 250 Gy is widely accepted. Beside pretherapeutic T{sub 3} levels, thyroid volume and 24-h thyroid uptake, ATD may influence the outcome of RIT. Today it is accepted by most thyroidologists that, if ATD medication is necessary in overt hyperthyroidism, it should be withdrawn at least 2 days before RIT. In patients with GD and GO, RIT may worsen GO. If RIT is performed in GO it should be done under a 3-month steroid medication regimen. In conclusion, RIT can be considered an appropriate and cost-effective therapy in GD, although the decision regarding treatment should be taken on an individual basis, paying due respect to the course and

  11. Efficacy of different I-131 doses for thyroid remnant ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, X.C.; Thiep, T.V.; Hung, N.C.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioactive iodine 131 I has been widely used as a treatment modality of differentiated thyroid carcinoma. The need for high dose radioiodine ablation of thyroid remnant is still in question. The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of 131 I different single and fractionated doses in ablation of post-operative thyroid remnant. Patients and methods: One hundred-twelve patients were included in this study. Sixty-one patients with TSH≥30 μU/ml were treated 30 mCi in group 1 (36 patients) or 100 mCi in group 2 (25 patients). Fifty one patients with TSH 131 I high dose of 100 mCi and no severe adverse effect in the other groups. Conclusion: Single high dose (100 mCi) may be more efficient than single low dose (30 mCi) for post-operative remnant ablation with serum TSH≥30 μU/ml and the efficacy of low fractionated doses (30+30 mCi) was comparable with high-fractionated dose (30+100 mCi) for post-operative remnant ablation with low serum TSH in differentiated thyroid carcinoma. (author)

  12. High-dose radioiodine treatment for differentiated thyroid carcinoma is not associated with change in female fertility or any genetic risk to the offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Ajay; Tripathi, Madhavi; Chandrashekar, Narayana; Phom, Hentok; Murali, Nadig R.; Chandra, Prem; Pant, Gauri S.

    2005-01-01

    Background: We tried to evaluate the female fertility and genetic risk to the offspring from the exposure to high-dose 131 I by assessing the pregnancy outcomes and health status of the children of female patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who had received therapeutic doses of 131 I. Materials and Methods: From 1967 to 2002, a total of 1,282 women had been treated with 131 I. Of these patients, 692 (54%) were in the reproductive age group (18-45 years). Forty women had a total of 50 pregnancies after high-dose 131 I. Age at presentation ranged from 16 to 36 years (mean, 23 ± 4 years). Histopathology was papillary thyroid cancer in 32 cases and follicular thyroid cancer in 8 cases. Results: Single high-dose therapy was given in 30 cases, 2 doses were given in 7 cases, 3 doses were given in 2 cases, and four doses were given in 1 case in which lung metastases had occurred. In 37 patients (92%), disease was successfully ablated before pregnancy. Ovarian absorbed-radiation dose calculated by the MIRD method ranged from 3.5 to 60 cGy (mean, 12 ± 11 cGy). The interval between 131 I therapy and pregnancy varied from 7 to 120 months (37.4 ± 28.2 months). Three spontaneous abortions occurred in 2 women. Forty-seven babies (20 females and 27 males) were born. Forty-four babies were healthy with normal birth weight and normal developmental milestones. Twenty women delivered their first baby after 131 I therapy. The youngest child in our series is 11 months of age, and the oldest is 8.5 years of age. Conclusions: Female fertility is not affected by high-dose radioiodine treatment, and the therapy does not appear to be associated with any genetic risks to the offspring

  13. The imunocytochemical advances in prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant of papillary thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelyins'ka, G.V.

    2015-01-01

    The topical issues is the problem of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant metastasis. We offered the methods of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistant of papillary thyroid carcinoma with the help of immunocytochemical detection of the cytokeratin 17 and thyroid peroxidase. With the purpose of prognosis of metastasis radioiodine resistibility the cytokeratin 17 is taped in punctates of primary papillary carcinomas. This approach allows predict response of metastases on radioiodine therapy to choose proper therapeutic approach

  14. Radiation exposure for 'caregivers' during high-dose outpatient radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marriott, C. J.; Webber, C. E.; Gulenchyn, K. Y.

    2007-01-01

    On 27 occasions, radiation doses were measured for a family member designated as the 'caregiver' for a patient receiving high-dose radioiodine outpatient therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. For 25 of the administrations, patients received 3.7 GBq of 131 I. Radiation doses for the designated caregivers were monitored on an hourly basis for 1 week using electronic personal dosemeters. The average penetrating dose was 98±64 μSv. The maximum penetrating dose was 283 μSv. Measured dose rate profiles showed that, on average, one-third of the caregiver dose was received during the journey home from hospital. The mean dose rate profile showed rapid clearance of 131 I with three distinct phases. The corresponding clearance half-times were 131 I contaminating the home. (authors)

  15. The optimal time of discontinuing methimazole before radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosavi, Z.; Zakavi, R.

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a common disease and one of the best methods for its treatment is radioiodine therapy with Treatment with antithyroid drugs brings patients to euthyroidism before radioiodine therapy. Antithyroid drugs should be discontinued before radioiodine therapy to increase thyroid uptake. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimal time of methimazole discontinuation. One hundred eighty four patients, who were referred for radioiodine therapy were classified in 3 groups according to the duration of methimazole discontinuation before thyroid uptake (RAIU) measurement. Group 1,2 and 3 were patients who discontinued methimazole (48-72 h rs), (72-120 h rs) and more than 120 h rs before RAIU measurement, respectively. Mean thyroid uptake in group 1, 2 and 3 was (64±151.1%), (60.1±14.1%) and (59.3±12.8), respectively. No significant difference was noted in thyroid uptake between these groups (F= 1.83, P<0.16). This study shows that 48-72 h rs of methimazole discontinuation before radioiodine therapy is enough and longer term abstention is not associated with higher uptake

  16. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M.

    2002-01-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  17. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy in Graves disease and adenoma toxicum and incidence of hypothyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z.P.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the this study was to evaluate different states in hyperthyroid patients and incidence of hypothyroidism after I-131 therapy.We observed a total of 184 hyperthyroid pts, from which 108(58,7%)pts with Graves' disease,65(35,3%)pts with single toxicum nodule and 11(6%)pts with toxicum multinodular goitre,treated with radioiodine therapy during the period 1986-2001.Dose of I-131 orally administered ranged 150-1100MBq and was calculated according to the 'MBq/gram' method.The radioiodine-131 therapy was performed once in 69,5%(128/184)pts,twice in 21,2%(39/184)pts and in 9,3%(17/184)pts more than two doses. Completely cured of hyperthyroidism occurred in 61%(66/108)pts with Graves' disease,81,8%(9/11)pts with toxic multinodular goiter and 90,7%(59/65)pts with single toxic nodule. The patients in our study were evaluated 6 months to 15 years after received J-131 therapy. Incidence of early hypothyroidism within one year was 23,1%(25/108) in Graves' disease,9%(1/11) in toxic multinodular goiter and 4,6%(3/65) with single toxicum nodule.Overall incidence of hypothyroidism within one year was 17,6% and had cumulative increase of Graves' disease every following year approximately for 3%,while for adenoma toxicum there was no any significant changes. We concluded that radioiodine therapy is simple,comfortable radical method for medical treatment of hyperthyroidism and indicate higher incidence of hypothyroidism in patients treated with I-131 for Graves' disease than that of patients treated for toxicum multinodular goiters and single toxic nodule

  19. Pulmonary fibrosis in youth treated with radioiodine for juvenile thyroid cancer and lung metastases after Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hebestreit, Helge; Burkhardt, Antje; Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph; Drozd, Valentina; Demidchik, Yuri; Trusen, Andreas; Beer, Meinrad

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this project was to systematically determine the prevalence and consequences of pulmonary fibrosis in youth with thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases from Belarus who were treated with radioiodine ( 131 I). A total of 69 patients treated for juvenile thyroid carcinoma and lung metastasis with 131 I were assessed. A group of 29 patients without lung metastases and prior 131 I treatment served as controls. The assessments included a CT scan of the lungs, extensive pulmonary function testing and an incremental cycle test to volitional fatigue with measurements of oxygen uptake (V. O 2 ), oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure (ΔaaO 2 ). Five patients with lung metastases showed advanced pulmonary fibrosis on CT scans and also had poorer lung functions compared with the 62 patients with none or minor signs of fibrosis and the 29 controls. Furthermore, these five patients showed lower peak V.O 2 , lower oxygen saturation at peak exercise and higher exercise ΔaaO 2 . They were younger at the time of cancer diagnosis and had received chemotherapy more frequently than youth with pulmonary metastases who did not develop fibrosis. One of the five patients subsequently died from pulmonary fibrosis. Following the Chernobyl catastrophe, about 7% of children treated with radioiodine for thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases displayed pulmonary fibrosis which was associated with functional impairments. Based on the characteristics of affected individuals, the number of radioiodine courses may have to be limited, especially in young children, and chemotherapy should be avoided. (orig.)

  20. Factors influencing the success of radio-iodine dose in the treatment of Graves disease: one year outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamoun, T.; Sfar, R.; Regaieg, H.; Toumi, A.; Zanzouri, H.; Nouira, M.; Ben Fredj, M.; Ayachi, N.; Chatti, K.; Guezguez, M.; Essabbah, H.; Sakly, N.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: radioiodine ( 131 I) is increasingly used as the definitive treatment of Graves disease (GD). Many factors influence the curative effects of the 131 I, thus there are some difficulties to define the optimal dose of 131 I for the treatment of GD. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the factors influencing the success rate in patients having GD and treated with radioiodine dose modulated by thyroid mass. Materials and methods: this is a prospective study of 86 patients (aged 43 ± 11, 58 women and 28 men) treated for Graves disease by radioiodine during the year 2011 in Nuclear Medicine department CHU Sahloul, Sousse. Radioiodine dose are modulated by thyroid mass: 370 MBq, 444 MBq and 555 MBq respectively for mass strictly less than 30 g, between 30 g and 40 g and greater than to 40 g. Some patients received more than 555 MBq for other causes to reach hypothyroidism precociously. The thyroid function outcome (hyperthyroidism or euthyroidism/hypothyroidism) was verified 6 months and 1 year after 131 I treatment. Patient gender, age, ophthalmopathy, thyroid size, antithyroid drugs used prior to 131 I treatment and anti-TSH receptor antibodies (TRAb), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (ATPO) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (ATG) plasma concentrations before 131 I treatment were studied as potential interference factors for 131 I treatment success. Results: Thirty patients received 370 MBq, 29 received 444 MBq, 14 received 555 MBq and 13 more than 555 MBq. Outcome after treatment was determined in a total of 66 patients at 6 months and 63 at one year. Post-therapy follow-up revealed that treatment failed in 29% of the patients at 6 months and in 20% of patients at one year. No correlation was noted between the outcome of treatment and age, sex, ophthalmopathy, antithyroid drugs taking and ATG titer. A significant correlation was noted between the disease outcome at one year and TRAb titer: High TRAb levels are associated

  1. Long-lived radioiodine in Japanese environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, R.; Watanabe, M.; Kurihara, K.

    2000-01-01

    The amount of long-lived radioiodine, 129 I (half-life 1.57 x 10 7 y) in the Japanese environment has been studied by measuring thyroids of humans and animals. The collected samples thyroids of (1) humans in Ibaraki Prefecture, in Kanto district, the central part of Japan, (2) cattle in Aomori Prefecture, north part of Japan, and (3) wild deer in Chiba Prefecture, in Kanto district. The measured mean isotopic ratio 129 I/ 127 I for thyroids of cattle in Aomori Prefecture is 3.5 ± 1.8 x 10 -9 . A higher value of 14 ± 5 x 10 -9 has been obtained for thyroids of wild deer in Kanto district. On the other hand, the measured ratio for human thyroids in Kanto district is 1 ± 0.2 x 10 -9 . This value is significantly lower than that of cattle thyroids in Aomori and also those reported for human thyroids in Europe and USA. The higher mean ratio for cattle thyroid in Kanto district is possibly explained by the influence of nuclear reprocessing plant. Lower mean ratio for human thyroid might be due to higher dietary intake of algae. (author)

  2. labelling of some pharmaceutical compounds with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.F.M.

    2001-01-01

    electrophilic radioiodination of three of medically important compounds namely, pindolol (Pin) , benzamide (s(-)BZM) and lysuride (LIS) was carried out by using several oxidizing agents such as chloramine- T, iodogen, iodine monochloride at room temperature and hydrogen peroxide at 100 0 C. the factors affecting the percent radiochemical yield such as substrate concentration, Ph, oxidizing agent concentration , reaction time and the concentration of K1 carrier were studied. the conditions, which gave high radiochemical yield, were summarized in one reaction to give the optimum radiochemical yield . optimization of the radiochemical yield resulted in 90% for radioiodobenzamide ( * IBZM) when the reaction was carried out in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (Ph-3) or in ammonium acetate buffer (ph=4) for 5 minutes reaction time . A radiochemical yield of 50% of * IPIN was obtained when the reaction was carried out in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (Ph=7) for 30 min. a radiochemical yield of 70% of * ILIS was obtained when the reaction was affected in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (Ph=7) within 30 min reaction time

  3. Metastatic Follicular Thyroid Carcinoma Secreting Thyroid Hormone and Radioiodine Avid without Stimulation: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed A. Abid

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This is an extremely rare case of a patient with metastatic follicular thyroid cancer who continued to produce thyroid hormone and was iodine scan positive without stimulation after thyroidectomy and radioiodine (I-131 therapy. Patient Findings. A 76-year-old Caucasian male was diagnosed with metastatic follicular thyroid carcinoma on lung nodule biopsy. Total thyroidectomy was performed and he was ablated with 160 mCi of I-131 after recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH stimulation. Whole body scan (WBS after treatment showed uptake in bilateral lungs, right sacrum, and pelvis. The thyroglobulin decreased from 2,063 to 965 four months after treatment but rapidly increased to 2,506 eleven months after I-131. Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH remained suppressed and free T4 remained elevated after I-131 therapy without thyroid hormone supplementation. He was treated with an additional 209 mCi with WBS findings positive in lung and pelvis. Despite I-131, new metastatic lesions were noted in the left thyroid bed and large destructive lesion to the first cervical vertebrae four months after the second I-131 dose. Conclusions. This case is exceptional because of its rarity and also due to the dissociation between tumor differentiation and aggressiveness. The metastatic lesions continued to secrete thyroid hormone and remained radioiodine avid with rapid progression after I-131 therapy.

  4. Timing of post 131I ablation diagnostic whole body scan in differentiated thyroid cancer patients. Less than four months post ablation may be too early.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, M; Winter, J; Heinzel, A; Behrendt, F F; Krohn, T; Mottaghy, F M; Verburg, F A

    2015-01-01

    to determine whether the first three months after 131I ablation is too early to perform radioiodine diagnostic whole body scintigraphy (dxWBS) in differentiated thyroid carcinoma patients. The files of 462 patients who were treated for DTC in our hospital were reviewed. All patients underwent surgical thyroidectomy. 146 patients had data available on a. a dxWBS which was performed less than four months (max 120 days) after 131I ablation with concurrent stimulated TSH stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg) measurement without further therapeutic measures between ablation and dxWBS and b. a second dxWBS or 131I therapy (rxWBS) within 1.5 years after ablation. A discordance between the initial and follow-up scan was found in 25/129 (19%) patients: of 54 patients with a positive initial dxWBS, scan results of a second dxWBS or rxWBS obtained with a suitable distance to the initial scan contradicted the initial one in 15 patients (27%). New lesions were discovered in 10/74 negative first dxWBS cases (14%). A discordance between the initial and follow-up stimulated Tg was found in 5/129 (4%) patients: 2/90 (2%) of patients with a negative stimulated Tg at initial dxWBS subsequently showed a positive results whereas 3/29 (10%) patients with an initially positive Tg showed a negative Tg level at the second procedure. Less than four months after 131I ablation is too early to perform radioiodine diagnostic whole body scintigraphy with concurrent TSH stimulated Tg measurement. The identification of the right, later, timepoint however requires further research.

  5. Supporting Treatment Decisions in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma (DTC) under Radioiodine-131 Therapy: Role of Biological Dosimetry Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadel, A.M.; Chebel, G.M.; Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Taja, M.R.; Radl, A.; Bubniak, R.V.; Oneto, A.

    2010-01-01

    Radioiodine-131 therapy is applied in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), within the therapeutic scheme following thyroidectomy, for the ablation of thyroid remnants and treatment of metastatic disease. Several approaches for the selection of a therapeutic dose were applied. The aim of this therapy is to achieve a lethal dose in the tumor tissue, without exceeding the dose of tolerance in healthy tissues (doses greater than 2 Gy in bone marrow could lead to myelotoxicity). In this work, the treatment protocol used incorporates the assessment by biological dosimetry (BD) for estimating doses to whole body and bone marrow, to tailor patient's treatment. Biological Dosimetry prospective studies conducted on samples from patients with cumulative activities, before and after each therapeutic administration, allows to evaluate DNA damage and repair capacity in peripheral blood lymphocytes. (authors)

  6. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R D -value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY + ) and benzethonium (BE + ) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R D -values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA + ), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA + ) and tetramethylammonium (TMA + ) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.)

  7. Sorption of radioiodine in organo-clays and -soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bors, J. (Niedersaechsisches Inst. fuer Radiooekologie, Hannover (Germany, F.R.))

    1990-01-01

    In the framework of investigations on the sorption of radioiodine to natural and artificially altered soil components, a number of clay minerals and natural soils were treated with quaternary alkylammonium ions to replace the exchangeable metal cations. With help of batch experiments the resulting organo-clays were tested with respect to their sorption capability of radioiodine quantified by the distribution ratio (R{sub D}-value). Treatment of bentonite, vermiculite and cretaceous clay as well as of samples from natural horizons of chernozem soil with hexadecylpyridinium (HDPY{sup +}) and benzethonium (BE{sup +}) exhibited sorptions rates and amounts, which are several orders of magnitude higher than those of the respective untreated samples. Moderate increases of the R{sub D}-values were found after cation exchange with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA{sup +}), while the applications of trimethylphenylammonium (TMPA{sup +}) and tetramethylammonium (TMA{sup +}) were ineffective. Considerable sorption of radioiodine was observed with the commercially available Bentone. (orig.).

  8. Effect of temperature on the radioiodination of human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed-Ali, S.A.; Salacinski, P.R.; Landon, J.

    1981-01-01

    Studies have been undertaken to assess the effect of altering the temperature at which human growth hormone is radioiodinated on the incorporation of 125 I and the immunoreactivity and stability of the labelled hormone. Employing highly purified monomeric hormone it proved possible, by the iodogen procedure, to prepare a labelled product of high specific activity irrespective of temperature. However, in radioiodinations performed at ambient temperature (20 to 25 degrees) significant amounts of the labelled hormone were in an aggregated form which was less immunoreactive than the 125 I-labelled monomeric hormone. Such aggregation was largely prevented by radioiodinating at low temperature (0 to 4 degrees) and even the large monomeric peak was more immunoreactive (about 95% bound in antibody excess) than the monomeric peak from iodinations performed at room temperature

  9. Influence of radioiodine therapy on urinary iodine excretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, B.; Lauer, I.; Baehre, M.; Richter, E.

    1998-01-01

    In 214 patients with benign thyroid diseases the time-course of urinary iodine excretion (UIE) was investigated in order to identify changes after radioiodine therapy (RITh). Method: UIE was measured photometrically (cerium-arsenite method) and related to urinary creatinine on the first and last day of the radioiodine test and the three days, seven days, four weeks, and six months after 131 I administration. Results: As compared with the level found immediately before radioiodine therapy, median UIE had almost doubled four weeks after therapy and was still significantly elevated six months after therapy. This increase correlated significantly with the target volume as measured by scintigraphy and sonography. Conclusions: The persistent elevation of UIE for months after RITh is a measure of treatment-induced damage to thyrocytes. Therefore, in view of the unfavourable kinetics of iodine that follow it, RITh should if possible be given via a single-dose regime. (orig.) [de

  10. Sources of radioiodine at pressurized water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, C.A.; Cline, J.E.; Barefoot, E.D.; Hemphill, R.T.; Voilleque, P.G.; Emel, W.A.

    1978-11-01

    The report determines specific components and operations at operating pressurized water reactors that have a potential for being significant emission sources of radioactive iodine. The relative magnitudes of these specific sources in terms of the chemical forms of the radioiodine and the resultant annual averages from major components are established. The data are generalized for broad industry use for predictive purposes. The conclusions of this study indicate that the majority of radioiodine emanating from the primary side of pressurized water reactors comes from a few major areas; in some cases these sources are locally treatable; the interaction of radioiodine with plant interior surfaces is an important phenomenon mediating the source and affecting its release to the atmosphere; the chemical form varies depending on the circumstances of the release

  11. Evaluation of methods for retention of radioiodine during processing of irradiated 237Np

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.H.; Kelley, J.A.

    1975-06-01

    Methods of removing radioiodine from 237 Np-- 238 Pu dissolver solution and process off-gas were investigated. This program is part of a continuing effort to reduce releases of radionuclides from plant operations. Experimental data show: Greater than 99.9 percent of the radioiodine in dissolver solution can be removed by precipitation, in situ, of manganese dioxide. Silver zeolite will sorb greater than 99.9 percent of radioiodine in process off-gas. Other solid sorbents and nitric acid-mercuric nitrate scrubber solutions do not remove appreciable amounts of radioiodine from process off-gas, because radioiodine is present principally as relatively unreactive organic iodine compounds. (U.S.)

  12. Laser ablation principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    Laser Ablation provides a broad picture of the current understanding of laser ablation and its many applications, from the views of key contributors to the field. Discussed are in detail the electronic processes in laser ablation of semiconductors and insulators, the post-ionization of laser-desorbed biomolecules, Fourier-transform mass spectroscopy, the interaction of laser radiation with organic polymers, laser ablation and optical surface damage, laser desorption/ablation with laser detection, and laser ablation of superconducting thin films.

  13. Radioiodine therapy effect on lacrimal gland function in patients with thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fard-Esfahani, A.; Mirshekarpour, H.; Fallahi, B.; Eftekhari, M.; Takavar, A.; Beiki, D.; Ansari-Gilani, K.; Saghari, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: There is a limited number of case reports published in the past decade confirming the radioiodine presence in the tear. These observations as well as reported cases of salivary and lacrimal gland dysfunction after radioiodine therapy stimulated investigators to clarify whether lacrimal gland function can be affected postradioiodine therapy. Hence we planned a historical cohort study. Methods: We studied 100 eyes of 50 patients who had received high doses (accumulative dose: 100-450mCi) of I-131 (exposed group) for treatment of differentiated thyroid carcinoma with their latest admission at least 3 months ago. Dry eye symptoms (obtained via a standard questionnaire) and Schirmer I test results (mm/5 min) of this exposed group were compared with those of an unexposed group (100 eyes of 50 individuals) matched by sex and age. Cases with any other known cause(s) of dry eye were not included in either group. Results: The study demonstrated a significantly lower wetting amount of the Schirmer paper in exposed group compared to unexposed one. In the group of patients who have undergone radio-iodine therapy, results were 0-4 mm in 21%, 5-9 mm in 20% and 10 mm or more in 59%. These results were seen in the unexposed group in 6%, 17% and 77% respectively. In evaluating the symptoms, 51% of the exposed eyes and 50% of the unexposed ones revealed at least one of the mentioned dry eye symptoms in the questionnaire. Data analysis showed no significant difference between the number of symptoms of the two groups, but 2 symptoms (burning, unrelated to light and erythema) were significantly higher in the exposed eyes. From 9 exposed eyes complaining of erythema, Schirmer test result was abnormal only in 2 (one patient). Also among the 10 eyes with burning symptom (unrelated to light) one patient (2 eyes) revealed abnormal Schirmer test result. Conclusion: Long-term reduction in the tear secretion from major and/or minor lacrimal glands is seen after high

  14. Administration of additional inactive iodide during radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Who might benefit?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Reinholz, U.; Schmidt, M.; Schomaecker, K.; Schicha, H.; Wellner, U.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Graves' hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drugs empty the intrathyroid stores of hormones and iodine. The consequence is rapid 131 I turnover and impending failure of radioiodine therapy. Can administration of additional inactive iodide improve 131I kinetics? Patients, methods: Fifteen consecutive patients, in whom the 48 h post-therapeutically calculated thyroid dose was between 150 and 249 Gy due to an unexpectedly short half-life, received 3 x 200 μg inactive potassium-iodide ( 127 I) daily for 3 days (Group A), while 17 consecutive patients with a thyroid dose of = 250 Gy (Group B) served as the non-iodide group. 48 hours after 131 I administration (M1) and 4 or 5 days later (M2) the following parameters were compared: effective 131 I half-life, thyroid dose, total T3, total T4, 131 I-activity in the T3- and T4-RIAs. Results: In Group A, the effective 131 I half-life M1 before iodine (3.81 ± 0.93 days) was significantly (p 131 I half-life M2 (4.65 ± 0.79 days). Effective 131 I half-life M1 correlated with the benefit from inactive 127 I (r = -0.79): Administration of 127 I was beneficial in patients with an effective 131 I half-life M1 of 131 I activity of T3 and T4 showed lower specific 131 I activity after addition of inactive iodine compared with patients from the same group with a lower initial specific 131 I activity of T3 and T4 and compared with the patient group B who was given no additional inactive iodide. This correlation was mathematically described and reflected in the flatter gradient in Group A (y = 0.5195x + 0.8727 for 131 I T3 and y = 1.0827x - 0.4444 for 131 I T4) and steeper gradient for Group B (y = 0.6998x + 0.5417 for 131 I T3 and y = 1.3191x - 0.2901 for 131 I T4). Radioiodine therapy was successful in all 15 patients from Group A. Conclusion: The administration of 600 μg inactive iodide for three days during radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and an unexpectedly short half-life of <3 or 4 days was a safe

  15. Absorption of radioiodine in silver nitrate molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delfino, C.A.; Molinari, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Obtainment method and control techniques of materials for the retention of radioiodine in gaseous effluents of nuclear installations. The experimental section is referred to the following processes: preparation of absorbents using, as basis, a molecular sieve and zeolite; impregnation with AgNO 3 ; efficiency determination; efficiency study as a function of the specific charge and bed length; optimization of Ag-consumption; resistance to the gas flux, bed temperature, specific surface, and nitrogen oxides effects. With the described impregnation method, materials, whose properties made them suitable for use in filters for the radioiodine retention and comparable to the imported manufactured materials, may be obtained. (R.J.S.) [es

  16. Production of radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect protein labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Josefina da Silva

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments and, more recently, radiolabeled peptides have been extensively studied in order to develop radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic and therapy in Nuclear Medicine. The radioiodination of proteins can be done by a direct method, with radioiodine being incorporated in to a tyrosine residue of the protein by electrophilic substitution. The main problem in the use of radioiodinated proteins, is that they are often dehalogenated in vivo by the action of specific enzymes, probably because of the structural similarity between iodophenyl groups and thyroid hormones. Several protein radioiodination methods have been developed in order to minimize this in vivo dehalogenation using prosthetic groups for indirect labeling. In this case, the radioiodine is first incorporated in to the prosthetic group that is subsequently attached to a terminal amino group or to a ε-amino group of lysine residue. The aim of this work is to obtain a radioiodinated prosthetic group for indirect labeling of proteins. The prosthetic group selected was the N-succinimidyl-4-radioiodine benzoate (SIB), obtained by the iodination of the p-bromobenzoic acid followed by the reaction with TSTU (0-(N-succinimidyl)-N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl uronium tetrafluoroborate) The results of these studies showed that the p-radio iodobenzoic acid was obtained with a radiochemical purity greater than 92% and a labeling yield of about 65%. Some reaction parameters were studied like temperature, time and Cu Cl mass (cataliser). The SIB was quantitatively obtained from p-radio iodobenzoic acid, using basic medium and after removing the water from the reaction using an nitrogen stream. The kinetic of this reaction is very fast with complete consumption of the p-radioiodebenzoic acid after 5 minutes. The coupling of the SIB prosthetic group to the protein was studied using Human Immunoglobulin (IgG) as a protein model. In a comparative way, the same protein was used on direct labeling

  17. Radioiodine treatment in children with thyroid cancer from Belarus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.; Biko, J.; Geworski, L.; Olthoff, M.; Demidchik, E.P.; Streffer, C.; Paretzke, H.; Voigt, G.; Kenigsberg, Y.; Bauer, W.; Heinemann, G.; Pfob, H.

    1996-01-01

    Between 1st of April 1993 and 15th of November 1995, 95 children from Belarus with most advanced stages of thyroid cancer have been treated totally 305 times with radioiodine in Germany. In spite of a high frequency of advanced tumor stages pT4 (82%), lymph node metastases (95%) and distant metastases (55%) in those selected children, the preliminary results of radioiodine treatment are promising. In 55% of the children complete remission and in 44% partial remission of thyroid cancer could be achieved. In no case progressive disease under treatment has been observed

  18. Preparation and characterization of a radioiodinated bacterial lipopolysaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulevitch, R J [Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, Calif. (USA)

    1978-03-01

    Radioiodinated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E.coli 0111:B4 has been prepared by reacting p-OH methylbenzimidate with 0111:B4 LPS at alkaline pH. The resulting LPS derivative has been radiolabeled with Na/sup 125/I. Specific activities of up to 5..mu..Ci/..mu..g LPS may be obtained by this technique and significantly the preparation of the radioiodinated LPS does not alter the biophysical, immunologic or biologic properties of 0111:B4 LPS. The methods described here are applicable to any 'protein free' LPS preparation containing primary amino groups.

  19. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  20. Environmental radioiodine in thyroids of grazing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Middlesworth, L.

    1990-01-01

    Animal thyroids are excellent indicators of environmental contamination from radioiodine, a fact largely unappreciated before 1954. From continuous monitoring of excised thyroids in Nal well-detectors, we know that high-altitude releases of mixed fission products caused increases of 10 3 to 10 5 times the minimal detectable level of 131 I (3.7 mBq/g) in sheep thyroids from the United States, Europe, Asia, Australia, and New Zealand. Within 6 weeks after high-altitude releases, sheep thyroids from different continents of the same hemisphere contained comparable concentrations of 131 I: more than 10 4 times greater concentrations than cow's milk and 5 x 10 3 times greater concentrations than human thyroids from similar areas. In contrast, during the low-altitude Chernobyl release, average 131 I concentrations in animal thyroids, at distances greater than 1,200 km from Chernobyl, were distributed as the inverse square of the distance from the source. 129 I concentrations measured since 1984 with a germanium well-detector in thyroids of sheep slaughtered in Birmingham, England, ranged from 3 to 50 mBq/g organ weight. Similar quantities of 125 I were present intermittently in thyroids of sheep slaughtered in Birmingham since 1986. The source of the 125 I, which is not a fission product, is not clear. For comparison, deer thyroids from the Savannah River Reservation, USA, contained 10 to 7 x 10 5 mBq 129 I/g. Although this isotope is not a biological hazard, it is a long-lived tracer of fission products

  1. Pretreatment with betamethasone of patients with Graves' disease given radioiodine therapy: thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamstedt, A.; Karlsson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of betamethasone on thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of radioiodine therapy were determined over a period of 1 yr in a prospective randomized study of 40 patients with Graves' disease. Twenty patients were given placebo tablets, and 20 patients were treated with betamethasone from 3 weeks before until 4 weeks after 131 I therapy. At the time of inclusion in the study, the mean serum concentrations of TSH receptor antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were increased in both groups. Three weeks of treatment with betamethasone reduced the thyroid peroxidase antibody and TgAb titers as well as the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. A decrease in the TSH receptor antibody level was not statistically significant. After radioiodine therapy, transient increases in thyroid autoantibody levels were observed. The titers of the different antibodies generally changed in parallel. In some patients a detectable level of a given antibody was found only after the radioiodine treatment, and in two cases, TgAb did not appear at all, although the two other antibodies increased temporarily. Betamethasone delayed, but did not abolish, the 131 I-induced antibody peaks. Betamethasone also caused a reduction in the total serum immunoglobulin G, a reduction which persisted throughout the study period. When the study ended, 17 patients given placebo and 9 patients given betamethasone were receiving replacement therapy due to the development of hypothyroidism. These patients at this point in time had lower antibody levels than those not requiring T4. The results of this study demonstrate that betamethasone reduces and modifies the thyroid autoantibody responses as well as the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease

  2. Influence of oral rinsing on the exposure of salivary glands during radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luetzen, U.; Silvia, P.; Zhao, Y.; Marx, M.; Winkler, C.; Zuhayra, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the salivary glands (SG) constitute a risk organ during a radioiodine therapy of thyroid. A possible side effect is xerostomia. This study investigates whether repeated rinsing of the mouth with water during radioiodine therapy significantly extracts I-131 from the circuit between saliva and the gastrointestinal tract, and thus whether radiation exposure of the patient's SG is reduced. Methods: the control group consisted of 45 patients, ages 32 to 81 years, (mean 62 years, 8 male, 37 female), and received radioiodine therapy without rinsing their mouths. An intervention group of 42 patients, ages 36 to 88 years, (mean 61 years, 8 male, 34 female), with a benign or malignant thyroid disease, were asked 15-17 hours after capsule administration to rinse their mouths hourly with water for the next two days. The intervention group (n = 42) was divided into three groups. A low-risk group (n = 22) received between 0.4 and 1.0 GBq I-131 (mean 0.746), a medium risk group (n = 15) between 1.2 and 2.0 GBq (mean 1.783), and the high-risk group (n = 5) between 3.0 and 6.0 GBq (mean 3.600) respectively. To assess the function of the SG, scintigrams were performed prior to and 3 months after the radioiodine therapy. The estimation of the activity in the gastrointestinal tract was performed using whole-body scintigraphy on the day of release. Both, the SG and the whole body (WB) scintigraphies were evaluated using the region-of-interest technique. Furthermore, the activity of the collected saliva was quantified using a calibrated well-type detector. Results: the mean values of the activity extracted into the water-saliva mixture were 0.72% ± 0.3% and 0.14% ± 0.05% of the applied dose on the first and second day after capsule administration respectively. The analysis of the SG scintigrams of the low and medium risk groups showed no significant decrease in salivary gland function. Only in the high-risk group a significant loss of

  3. A survey of owners' perceptions and experiences of radioiodine treatment of feline hyperthyroidism in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Lara A; Murray, Jane K; Bovens, Catherine Pv; Hibbert, Angie

    2014-08-01

    The efficacy of radioiodine treatment of feline hyperthyroidism is well established; however, limited information is known about owners' perceptions or experiences of radioiodine. This study aimed to examine factors that influence owner treatment choices and their opinions following radioiodine. Surveys were sent to owners of cats referred for radioiodine treatment between 2002 and 2011 (radioiodine group; 264 cats) and owners of non-radioiodine-treated hyperthyroid cats seen at first-opinion practices (control group; 199 cats). The response rate was 67.0% (310 returned: 175 radioiodine, 135 control). Of 135 controls, 72 (53.3%) were unaware of radioiodine as a treatment option. Owners of cats ⩾15 years old and uninsured cats were less likely to pursue radioiodine. Cost of treatment, travel distance, potential human or animal health risks and waiting periods for radioiodine had a low impact on owners' treatment choice. Owners reported a moderate level of concern about treatment hospitalisation length, which included (158 respondents) the possibility of the cat being unhappy 130 (82.3%), owner missing the cat 102 (64.6%), inappetence 50 (31.6%), other pets missing the cat 32 (20.3%), development of co-morbid disease 28 (17.7%) and side effects 25 (15.8%). Owners assessed their cat's quality of life on a scale of 1 (very poor) to 10 (excellent), as 4 (4) (median [interquartile range]) pre-radioiodine (134 respondents) and 9 (2) post-radioiodine (131 respondents). Of 132 respondents, 121 (91.7%) were happy with their decision to choose radioiodine. The results of this questionnaire may assist veterinarians in addressing common owner concerns when discussing radioiodine as a treatment option for hyperthyroidism. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  4. Experimental peptide receptor radionuclide therapy in radioiodine negative somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilica, B.; Kroiss, A.; Putzer, D.; Uprimmy, C.; Warwitz, B.; Kendler, D.; Waitz, D.; Virgolini, I.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Purpose: This retrospective analysis evaluated the time to progression (TTP), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine negative thyroid cancer who had undergone peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) with 177 Lu-DOTA-TATE, 177 Lu-DOTA-LAN, 90 Y-DOTA-TOC or 90 Y-DOTA-LAN after tumor progression. Methods: Data derived from twenty patients with either differentiated (n=15), anaplastic (n=1) or medullary (n=4) somatostatin receptor positive thyroid cancer who had received treatment with PRRT after tumor progression. TTP, PFS and OS were defined according to the clinical trial endpoints suggested by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Progressive disease was defined by sonography, FDG-PET, Ga-DOTA-TOC-PET, or CT (RECIST Criteria). Results: In 17 patients the median overall survival time after the first PRRT was 17.3 (range: 0.1 - 109.7) months. Three patients still alive are actually showing stable disease. The median of PFS in 20 Patients (6 with more than one PRRT-cycle or PRRT-substance) has been 10.9 (range: 0.1 - 44.0) months. The median TTP was 15.6 (range 4.4 to 29.2) months. Conclusion: PRRT appears to be useful in patients with somatostatin receptor positive but radioiodine negative thyroid cancer as a complementary palliative cytotoxic therapy. (authors)

  5. Treatment with antithyroid drugs or iodine following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeto, Glaucia; Leal, B.M.B.; Souza, L.S.; Griva, B.L.; Moriguchi, S.M.; Moreira, C.C.; Lemos, A.C.; Kiy, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy in Graves' disease is gradual and the patients continue to be hyperthyroid for much time after this therapy. In a retrospective study, we compared the evolution of 196 patients in this situation treated with some therapeutic regimens. They received propylthiouracil or methimazole (ATD), one of them and potassium iodide (KI), KI only, or no drugs after 131 I therapy. ATD was started usually one day and KI two months after the radioiodine. The groups had similar age, pretreatment serum T 4 concentrations and 131 I treatment dose. Cure of the hyperthyroidism occurred in 83,9%, 75,5%, 75,0% and 70,6% in no-drugs, KI, ATD and KI-ATD groups, respectively. Hyperthyroidism was longer in KI and KI-ATD groups. Definitive hypothyroidism occurred in 39,2%, 47,2%, 52,9% and 66,1% in KI-ATD, KI, ATD and no-drugs groups, respectively. This condition appeared more quickly in no-drugs and ATD groups. Conclusion: We conclude that KI and ATD groups had similar evolutions as to cure of hyperthyroidism and occurrence of hypothyroidism. (author)

  6. 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the diagnosis of differentiated thyroid carcinoma refractory to radioiodine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepczyński, Rafał; Gryczyńska, Maria; Ruchała, Marek

    2016-01-01

    In majority of cases of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), the ablative radioiodine treatment shows high efficacy. In a small number of patients, mechanism of selective iodine uptake by the DTC cells is insufficient and alternative methods of diagnosis and treatment are needed. As demonstrated in vitro, DTC cells show expression of somatostatin recep-tors. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs are widely used in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of the study was to evaluate the utility of peptide receptor scintigraphy with the use of 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC in the diagnosis of DTC in patients with elevated thyroglobulin concentrations (Tg), negative WBS and no effect of the consecutive radioiodine therapies. Whole body scintigraphy as well as SPECT of neck and chest were performed 3 and 24 h after i.v. administration of 740 MBq 99mTc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC. The obtained images were compared with other radionuclide and ra-diological imaging methods. Forty-three patients with DTC after surgery and ablative radioiodine treatment with negative WBS and elevated Tg were qualified. Patients' age: 18-83 years (mean 58.0). SRS showed foci of tracer accumulation in 29 cases (67.4%). Sensitivity was 69.0% specificity 78.6%. SRS correctly identified local recurrence in 8 pts., metastatic lymph nodes in 19 pts., lung metastases in 12 pts. and bone metastases in 5 pts. SRS showed high sensitivity in the detection of metastatic lymph nodes (100%) and bone metastases (83.3%) and lung metastases (63.2%). Positive SRS was found in pts. with higher Tg concentrations (130 ± 144 vs. 30 ± 54 ng/ml). Scintigraphy with the use of the studied technetium-99m-labeled somatostatin analog is useful in the evaluation of patients with advanced DTC. It shows relatively good sensitivity and specificity but not high enough to be recommended as a routine imaging method. The role of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy in DTC is complementary to other imaging modalities.

  7. Radioiodine: a boon and a bane emergency preparedness during accidental release of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahuja, D.N.

    1997-01-01

    Radioiodine, can be a double edged sword and can be dangerous and lethal. It will turn out to be a bane rather than a boon, exposing millions of individuals in and far away from the side of accident across geographical borders depending upon the weather conditions. Iodine is an indispensable element because of its being a constituent of the thyroid hormones, biosynthesized and released from the thyroid gland for the growth and over all metabolic functions. This gland weighing 20-30 g in a normal human adult, is comparatively very vascular organ with 5 lit. of blood flowing through it every hour. It contains 90% of the body iodine amounting to 5000-7000 μg, in the form of iodo aminoacids

  8. Percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation of lung VX2 tumors in a rabbit model: evaluation with helical CT findings for the complete and partal ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Han, Young Min; Lim, Yeong Su; Jang, Kyu Yun; Lee, Sang Yong; Chung, Gyung Ho [School of Medicine, Chonbuk National Univ., Chonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-05-01

    To evaluate the radiologic findings for complete and partial ablation after percutaneous CT-guided transthoracic radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of lung VX2 tumor implanted in rabbits. Thirteen rabbits with successfully implanted lung VX2 were used. Three rabbits as controls did not receive RFA while the other ten rabbits underwent RFA; 5 complete and 5 partial. RFA was performed using an internally cooled, 17-gauge electrode (Radionics, Burlington, MA) with a 1-cm active tip under CT guidance. Postprocedural CT was performed within 3 days, and we analyzed the ablated size, enhancement pattern, shape, margin, and complications of the complete and partial ablation groups. Rabbits were sacrificed after postprocedural CT with an overdose of ketamine, and pathologic findings of the ablated groups were compared with those of the control group. The size of the ablated lesions and the enhancement pattern differed between the completely and partially ablated groups on chest CT. The size of the ablated lesions was increased by 47.1% in the completely ablated group and by 2.1% in the partially ablated group. In the completely ablated group, VX2 tumor showed absolutely no enhancement, whereas only ablated pulmonary parenchyma outside VX2 showed mild enhancement on enhanced CT. In the partial ablated group, a part of VX2 became strongly enhanced on enhanced CT. On microscopic examination, the completely ablated group demonstrated that a viable tumor cell was not visible. In the partially ablated group, however, a viable tumor cell within the surrounding fibrous capsule on the peripheral area of the VX2 was observed. The important CT findings for evaluation of complete and partial RFA are the ablated size and enhancement pattern of the ablated lesion.

  9. Clinical experience of 2-hour I-131 thyroid uptake significance in considering the radioiodine Graves' disease treatment dose: A retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shammeri, I.; Al-Deen Mahmood, S.; Al-Mohannadi, S.; Ballani, N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It has been noticed that Graves' disease patients with high turnover are likely to experience under dosage when calculating the radioiodine therapeutic dose. We aim to demonstrate our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in estimating the radioiodine dose for Graves' disease patients with rapid washout. Material and methods: We reviewed the medical records for 2080 Graves' disease patients who received radioiodine treatment(s). Patients were distinguished by 2-h I-131 thyroid uptake%: 249 patients (group I) exhibited a rapid washout (>25%), and 250 patients (group II control group) demonstrated normal uptake (6–15%); the age and sex were balanced for both groups. These cases were reviewed for the time taken to control the condition clinically (ideally 3 months is the time needed), the time taken to achieve hypothyroidism (average time is 6 months), and the number of repeated treatments for recurrent thyrotoxicosis or failure of treatment. Results: In 152/249 (61%) patients, the condition was not controlled in the 3 month period post treatment and subsequently they needed more frequent and closer follow up, as opposed to 47/250 patients (19%) in the control group-II. At 6 months, 119/249 (48%) patients in group-I had not achieved hypothyroidism, as opposed to 28/250 patients (11%) in group-II. Seventy-seven patients in group-I (31%) needed a second or third therapeutic dose, as opposed to 10/250 patients (4%) in group-II. Conclusion: We believe that a higher radioiodine dose with significant rapid washout in the thyroid gland of Graves' disease patients would give a greater treatment success rate. - Highlights: • We present our clinical experience of 2-h I-131 uptake% value in Graves' disease. • We reviewed records of hyperthyroid patients who received radioiodine treatment. • Two patients' groups were distinguished by normal and high 2-h I-131 uptake%. • The two groups showed different radioiodine treatment

  10. Chronic myeloid leukaemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundi, R S; Scott, J S; Halnan, K E [Institute of Radiotherapeutics, Glasgow (UK)

    1977-01-01

    The majority of cases reported in the literature of leukemia following treatment of thyroid disease (thyrotoxicosis and carcinoma) are of acute variety. A description is given of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia in a case of carcinoma of the thyroid treated with radioiodine and megavoltage X-ray therapy. The case history contains details of radioiodine and X-ray doses administered over the years 1961 to 1972 to a male patient, on whom a right hemithyroidectomy was carried out in 1960. The results of blood counts are also recorded for the period up to 1973. The patient died, at 57, in 1974. A total of 860 mCi of /sup 131/I was administered and the first abnormal blood count was noted two months after the last therapeutic dose. Estimates have been made of blood and thyroid doses from /sup 131/I. There has been only one other report in the literature of the development of chronic myeloid leukemia following radioiodine therapy for carcinoma of the thyroid, and although the leukemogenic hazard of /sup 131/I cannot be ruled out for this patient, it is possible that the development of leukemia was coincidental rather than due to the radioiodine therapy.

  11. The secondary hypothyroidism after radioiodine therapy and the replacement treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Ying; Xu Xiaohui

    2004-01-01

    The secondary hypothyroidism is the most important intercurrent disease after radioiodine therapy. The early hypothyroidism and the late hypothyroidism are incompletely different in pathogenesis. It needs researching further. there has not yet been an affirmable answer to choose the distillates from animal hypothyroid extract or complex preparation of levo-thyroxine in replacement treatment. (authors)

  12. Turbulent transfer characteristics of radioiodine effluents from air to grass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markee, E. H. [ARFRO, Environmental Science Services Administration, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

    1967-07-01

    A total of 20 controlled field releases of radioiodine have been performed at the National Reactor Testing Station in Idaho as a portion of a program to study the transmission of gaseous radioiodine through the air-vegetation-cow-milk-human chain. Most of the releases were conducted over typical pasture grasses during different wind and stability conditions. Radioiodine adherence to grass and carbon plates was measured during most of the tests. Vertical air concentration profiles and turbulence parameters were measured to determine flux characteristics. Analysis of the data reveals the complex interdisciplinary nature of transfer of radioiodine from air to a natural surface. The data are in reasonable agreement with the deposition models of Sheppard and Chamberlain when corrections for the physical and biological receptiveness of the grass and grass density are made. The average ratios of momentum to mass flux were found to be 0.9 in stable conditions and 1.4 in unstable conditions. These ratios demonstrate the effect on mass flux in the lowest 4m by a surface that acts as a partial sink for gaseous effluents. This series of releases indicates the need for further research on the biological receptiveness of grass and turbulent transfer within a grass canopy. (author)

  13. A New Technology Developed to Remove Aqueous Radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Yeop; Baik, Min Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Radioiodine is considered as a critical radionuclide by the International Commission on Radiological Protection(ICRP) in terms of the radiation and radiotoxicity risks to nature and human health. In addition, there were reports about great increases of thyroid cancer in children in Belarus from 1990. In natural environments, there were several reports for the unusual increase of radioactive iodine ratios in most environmental samples (i.e. soils, vegetables, and seafoods). Iodine usually exists as iodide, iodate, and organic iodine in the environment. Iodide is considered as the most difficult form among the iodine species to treat by the conventional adsorption-based technology. This is why urgent new technology is needed to suppress such a progressive accumulation of radioiodine in natural environments. The conventional methods based on the anion-exchange and adsorption techniques have been difficult to manage the growing release of radioiodine for decades. Here we suggest a new solution that uses a biostimulant way to isolate radioiodine. We discovered that natural SRB can play an important intermediary role to get anionic iodide and cationic copper combined strongly as perfect counterions by enzymatic Cu-reduction.

  14. Radioiodine therapy and subsequent pregnancy; Gravidez apos radioiodoterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Carmen Dolores G.; Miranda, Angelica E.; Corres, Nilson Duarte; Sieiro Neto, Lino; Corbo, Rossana; Vaisman, Mario [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Endocrinology and Nuclear Medicine; Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Hospital dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); E-mail: loloi@zaz.com.br

    2007-06-15

    Objectives: To evaluate abortion and fetal congenital anomaly rates in women previously submitted to radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Study design: A case-control study of 108 pregnant women, 48 cases whose pregnancies were evaluated after they had undergone radioiodine therapy for differentiated thyroid carcinoma, and the control group consisted of 60 healthy pregnant women. Results: Of a total of 66 pregnancies, 14 conceived within the first year, 51 one or more years after the last administration of {sup 131}I, the medical record of one patient was not available. The interval between the last radioiodine therapy administration and conception ranged from 1 month to 10 years. There were a total of 4 miscarriages, 2 of them for unknown reasons. There was one case of congenital anomaly and two preterms birth. Nine women presented the following pregnancy events: placental insufficiency, hypertensive crisis, placental detachment, risk of miscarriage, preterm labour and four miscarriages. No statistical difference was observed between the studied and control groups. Conclusion: Radioiodine was followed by no significant increase in untoward effects in neither the pregnancy nor the offspring. (author)

  15. Outcome of Radioiodine Therapy in a West African Population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onimode, Yetunde A; Ankrah, Alfred; Adedapo, Kayode S

    Hyperthyroidism continues to be a pressing public health concern in West Africa. Its prevalence in Africa has been quoted as 1.2%-9.9%, with Graves' disease as its most common cause. Radioiodine-131 (RAI) therapy of hyperthyroidism recently commenced in two government hospitals in Ghana and Nigeria.

  16. Results of radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pronath, A.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this work is the quantification of therapy results of a radioiodine therapy with Iodine 131 on 367 patients with the following benign thyroid diseases: euthyroidal struma, hyperthyroidism, hyperthyroidal struma and autonomous adenoma. 1. Euthyroidal struma - subjective improvement and objective diminution of the struma by 63%, subjective or objective improvement by 21% of the patients. Including the probable successful therapies the success rate was all together 90.1%. 2. Hyperthyroidism - after one-time/more-time (18.6%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 71.5/85.7% including latent (8.6/10.0%) and manifest (7.1/8.5%) hypothroidism. 3. Hyperthyroidal struma - after one-time/more-time (16.9%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 74.7/90.1% including latent (-/5.7%) and manifest (1.4/2.8%) hypothyroidism. 4. Autonomous adenoma - after one-time/two-time (5.2%) radioiodine therapy the success rate was 80.5/84.6% including 15.5% latent hypothyroidism. The results will be discussed in comparison to published data and to operation and thyrostatic treatment. (TRV) [de

  17. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Dressler, J.; Gruenwald, F.; Leisner, B.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schneider, P.; Schober, O.

    2004-01-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3 rd version. (orig.) [de

  18. Disparity of radioiodine and radiothallium concentrations in chronic thyroiditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, K.; Parthasarathy, K.L.; Friedman, M.; Rao, U.

    1980-01-01

    Three cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) presented with thyroid nodules, showed disparate uptakes of radioiodine and radiothallium. All patients were clinically euthyroid and had positive antithyroid antibody titers. On cytological and/or pathological examinations, they were consistent with chronic thyroiditis.

  19. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy and the influence of antithyroid medication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duldulao, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine therapy began to play a major role in the management of hyperthyroidism as early as 1941. It later evolved to become what it is today, the treatment of choice for majority of patients who are suffering from Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter. It is generally considered safe, inexpensive, effective, and devoid of major side effects. Despite the extensive experience with radioactive therapy, the adjunctive role of antithyroid medication remains controversial. Some authors claim that it has a positive influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy while others insist otherwise. The reasons behind the adjunctive use of antithyroid medication include a more rapid attainment of euthyroid state and a decrease in the rise of developing thyroid crisis. However, a higher treatment failure rate is observed compared to radioiodine alone. This is due to the reputed radioprotective effect of the antithyroid medication. As a result, higher doses of I-131 are needed in order to obtain the desired effect but, unfortunately, that would also increase the radiation exposure to the rest of the body. The majority of clinicians would require discontinuation of the medication a few days before therapy to overcome these undesirable effects but the question is, is this safe? The issue of when antithyroid medication is warranted is a big question to the clinician. For optimal use of radioiodine therapy, appropriate selection criteria and good clinical judgment concerning pretreatment with antithyroid medication are required. Otherwise, we may put some patients into unnecessary increased risk and added cost. (author)

  20. Synthesis, chemical and biological quality control of radioiodinated peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafii, H.; Khalaj, A.; Beiki, D.; Motameidi, F.; Maloobi, M.; Karimian-dehghan, M.; Keshavarrzi, F.

    2002-01-01

    Iodinated compounds with I-131, 125 and 123 have been widely used for biochemical function studies. In conjunction with SPECT, [I-123] labelled proteins have various diagnostic and therapeutic applications in nuclear medicine. Preparation of some radioiodinated peptides with tyrosine and/or lysine groups on their main chain molecules can be carried out with both direct and indirect methods, but lack of these groups in molecule cause the molecule dose not lend itself for direct radioiodination. In this study, human IgG and Formyl-Methyl-Leucyl-Phenylalanine, FMLF, have been chosen as a model compounds for direct and indirect radioiodination respectively. Here, we will describe the labelling procedure of [I-125] IgG using chloramine-T as a suitable oxidant agent and [I-125 and I-131] FMLF by indirect method using ATE/SIB as a prosthetic group in multi-step reactions. The obtained results for chemical quality control of intermediate radioiodinated SIB by HPLC and two labelled IgG and FMLF will be also discussed. Biological results, biodistribution studies and SPECT scans on mice per-injected labelled FMLF show a low uptake of thyroid but a high at urine and bladder, perhaps because of low molecular weight of FMLF. In this case, it seems to be better to separate the reaction mixture of labelled FMLF by BPLC than Sephadex-G50 gel filtration. (Author)

  1. Cytogenetic effects of radioiodine therapy: a 20-year follow-up study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, Gordon K. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Khvostunov, Igor K. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Gregoire, Eric [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, PRP-HOM/SRBE/LDB, BP 17, Fontenay aux roses Cedex (France); Barquinero, Joan-Francesc [Universtitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Facultat de Biociencies, Cerdanyola del Valles (Spain); Shi, Lin; Tashiro, Satoshi [Hiroshima University, Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to compare cytogenetic data in a patient before and after treatment with radioiodine to evaluate the assays in the context of biological dosimetry. We studied a 34-year-old male patient who underwent a total thyroidectomy followed by ablation therapy with {sup 131}I (19.28 GBq) for a papillary thyroid carcinoma. The patient provided blood samples before treatment and then serial samples at monthly intervals during the first year period and quarterly intervals for 5 years and finally 20 years after treatment. A micronucleus assay, dicentric assay, FISH method and G-banding were used to detect and measure DNA damage in circulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of the patient. The results showed that radiation-induced cytogenetic effects persisted for many years after treatment as shown by elevated micronuclei and chromosome aberrations as a result of exposure to {sup 131}I. At 5 years after treatment, the micronucleus count was tenfold higher than the pre-exposure frequency. Shortly after the treatment, micronucleus counts produced a dose estimate of 0.47 ± 0.09 Gy. The dose to the patient evaluated retrospectively using FISH-measured translocations was 0.70 ± 0.16 Gy. Overall, our results show that the micronucleus assay is a retrospective biomarker of low-dose radiation exposure. However, this method is not able to determine local dose to the target tissue which in this case was any residual thyroid cells plus metastases of thyroidal origin. (orig.)

  2. Radio-iodine therapy and Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gholamrezanezhad, A.; Mirpour, S.; Saghari, M.; Abdollahzadeh, J.; Pourmoslemi, A.; Yarmand, S.

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important cause of gastritis and related morbidities. Following consumption, radioactive iodine accumulates considerably in the stomach. On the basis of this observation, we decided to determine whether the high radiation induced by radio-iodine in the stomach is effective in the eradication of this infection. All consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma, who were referred for radio-iodine therapy [dose 117.1±24.4 mCi (4.3±0.9 GBq), range 100-200 mCi (3.7-7.4 GBq)], were enrolled. To detect H. pylori infection, the urease breath test (UBT) was performed 1-2 h before radio-iodine consumption and the test was repeated 2 months later. Of 88 patients, 71 had pre-treatment positive UBT. Of these, 23 patients had negative post-treatment result, which means a significant reduction (26.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 16.8-35.5%) in the number of positive UBT results in our treated population (32.4% of UBT-positive cases became UBT-negative). Considering the high prevalence of reinfection in developing countries, the therapeutic benefit would have been more considerable if the second UBT had been done with a lag time of less than 2 months. Although radio-iodine therapy is not a logical method for the treatment of patients suffering from H. pylori, our finding provides indirect evidence about the radiosensitivity of bacteria, the future clinical applications of which need to be further evaluated. Also this finding can be useful for the food industry, where radiation is used widely to sterilize food. Regarding the possibility of H. pylori suppression, we recommend not using UBT for screening for the infection for at least within 2 months following radio-iodine therapy. (author)

  3. Radioiodine therapy in non-toxic multinodular goitre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, S.R.; Rahman, H.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The effect of radioiodine in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre has not been adequately evaluated. The aim of the study was to see the effect of radioiodine on thyroid size and function in patients with non-toxic multinodular goitre. We prospectively studied 55 non-toxic multinodular goitre patients treated with radioiodine of which 15 were males and 40 were females with age ranged from 25 years to 60 years (mean ± SD 40.45 ± 10.70 years) for a minimum of 12 months. Patients who were selected were those with local compression symptoms or for cosmetic reasons and the treatment was chosen because of a high operative risk or refusal to be operated on. Thyroid volume and T3, T4, TSH of all patients were determined before treatment and 6 months interval after treatment. Radioiodine was given in the dose ranged from 333 MBq (9 mCi) to 555 MBq (15 mCi) (mean ± SD 11.45 ± 2.04 mCi). The mean thyroid volume was reduced from 44.75 ± 37.44 ml to 28.76 ± 27.25 ml at 12 months (p < 0.001) i.e., reduced by 35.73%. Thyroid volume reduction at 6 months was 21.07%. Hypothyroidism occurred in 9.1% of the patients at 12 months. Side effects were few. Three cases developed radiation thyroiditis and two cases developed hyperthyroidism that was managed conservatively. It has been concluded that radioiodine is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of non-toxic multinodular goitre and may be the treatment of choice in elderly patients, in patients in whom surgery is contraindicated and in patients who are unwilling to undergo surgery. (author)

  4. Efficiency of radioiodine therapy with a fix dose of I-131 in toxic thyroid adenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovski, Z

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate the results obtained using a fix dose of I-131 in the treatment of the solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. Material and Methods: We have performed radioiodine therapy m 64 patients, 49 female (50+ 1 7 yrs) and 15 male (43+-15 yrs) with solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. 45 patients received fix dose I-131 of 850 MBq, while 19 patients were treated with calculated (MBq/gr) dose 555-1100 MBq Previously 39(64%) patients were clinically hyperthyreotic and received thyreostatic meditication which were interruptecf one week before the administration of I-131. Those patients who were euthyreotic, TSH was suppressed(<0.25 MU/m1). 61(95.3%) patients received a single dose, while 3(4, 7%) patients needed two doses. Resulting thyroid matabolism and volume of nodules were evaluated 6-48 months after treatment. Results: From 45 radioiodine treated patients with fix dose 6(9, 8%) became hypothyroidism, 36(85, 3%) euthyroidism and 3(4, 9%) recurrent hyperthyroidism, in comparison with 19 treated patients with calculated I-131 dose: 2(10, 5%) hypothyroidism, 16(84, 3%) euthyroidism and 1(5, 2%) recurrent hyperthyroidism. The size of the nodules became unpalpable m 17(26, 2%), decreased evidently in 33(52, 5%) and remained unchanged in 14(21, 3%) of the treated patients. Conclusion: A fix dose of I-131 is simple, safe and efficient in the treatment of solitary toxic thyroid adenoma. There was not significant different in incidence of late follow-up results of hypothyroidism and recurrent hyperthyroidism between fix dose and calculated MBq/gr dose. (authors)

  5. Radiofrequency ablation in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachdeva Silonie

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofreqeuency ablation is a versatile dermatosurgical procedure used for surgical management of skin lesions by using various forms of alternating current at an ultra high frequency. The major modalities in radiofrequency are electrosection, electrocoagulation, electrodessication and fulguration. The use of radiofrequency ablation in dermatosurgical practice has gained importance in recent years as it can be used to treat most of the skin lesions with ease in less time with clean surgical field due to adequate hemostasis and with minimal side effects and complications. This article focuses on the major tissue effects and factors influencing radiofrequency ablation and its application for various dermatological conditions.

  6. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Books Received. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 118-118 Books Received. Books Received · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 120-120 Books Received. Books Received.

  7. Ablative skin resurfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nidhi; Smith, Greg; Heffelfinger, Ryan

    2014-02-01

    Ablative laser resurfacing has evolved as a safe and effective treatment for skin rejuvenation. Although traditional lasers were associated with significant thermal damage and lengthy recovery, advances in laser technology have improved safety profiles and reduced social downtime. CO2 lasers remain the gold standard of treatment, and fractional ablative devices capable of achieving remarkable clinical improvement with fewer side effects and shorter recovery times have made it a more practical option for patients. Although ablative resurfacing has become safer, careful patient selection and choice of suitable laser parameters are essential to minimize complications and optimize outcomes. This article describes the current modalities used in ablative laser skin resurfacing and examines their efficacy, indications, and possible side effects. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  8. Moldable cork ablation material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A successful thermal ablative material was manufactured. Moldable cork sheets were tested for density, tensile strength, tensile elongation, thermal conductivity, compression set, and specific heat. A moldable cork sheet, therefore, was established as a realistic product.

  9. Determination of the optimal minimum radioiodine dose in patients with Graves' disease: a clinical outcome study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howarth, D.; Tan, P.; Booker, J. [Pacific Medical Imaging, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Epstein, M. [Dept. of Endocrinology, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Lan, L. [High-Dependency Unit, St. George Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2001-10-01

    The study was performed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Commission, Vienna, Austria, with the aim of determining the optimal minimum therapeutic dose of iodine-131 for Graves' disease. The study was designed as a single-blinded randomised prospective outcome trial. Fifty-eight patients were enrolled, consisting of 50 females and 8 males aged from 17 to 75 years. Each patient was investigated by clinical assessment, biochemical and immunological assessment, thyroid ultrasound, technetium-99m thyroid scintigraphy and 24-h thyroid {sup 131}I uptake. Patients were then randomised into two treatment groups, one receiving 60 Gy and the other receiving 90 Gy thyroid tissue absorbed dose of radioiodine. The end-point markers were clinical and biochemical response to treatment. The median follow-up period was 37.5 months (range, 24-48 months). Among the 57 patients who completed final follow-up, a euthyroid state was achieved in 26 patients (46%), 27 patients (47%) were rendered hypothyroid and four patients (7%) remained hyperthyroid. Thirty-four patients (60%) remained hyperthyroid at 6 months after the initial radioiodine dose (median dose 126 MBq), and a total of 21 patients required additional radioiodine therapy (median total dose 640 MBq; range 370-1,485 MBq). At 6-month follow-up, of the 29 patients who received a thyroid tissue dose of 90 Gy, 17 (59%) remained hyperthyroid. By comparison, of the 28 patients who received a thyroid tissue dose of 60 Gy, 17 (61%) remained hyperthyroid. No significant difference in treatment response was found (P=0.881). At 6 months, five patients in the 90-Gy group were hypothyroid, compared to two patients in the 60-Gy group (P=0.246). Overall at 6 months, non-responders to low-dose therapy had a significantly larger thyroid gland mass (respective means: 35.9 ml vs 21.9 ml) and significantly higher levels of serum thyroglobulin (respective means: 597.6 {mu}g/l vs 96.9 {mu}g/l). Where low-dose radioiodine

  10. Correlation of stress with outcome of radioiodine therapy for Graves disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, T.; Rochon, J.; Lenfestey, R.; Wise, P.

    1985-06-01

    Between November 1965 and December 1983, 293 patients were treated for Graves disease using /sup 131/I. All patients were asked to identify a stressful event antedating the onset of overt clinical symptoms. Eighty-one patients were able to do this (27.6%). Two hundred forty-four patients received a single treatment, 49 required two or more treatments. Patients with stress initiating the symptoms of Graves disease became hypothyroid earlier, 50% at 12 mo compared with 36 mo for the nonstress group. At 10 yr 5% of the stress group remained euthyroid compared with 17% nonstress. The authors conclude that stress in the 12 mo or less before the onset of clinical symptoms potentiates the development of hypothyroidism induced by a standard dose of radioiodine.

  11. Treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioiodine: adjunctive therapy with antithyroid drugs reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velkeniers, B.; Vanhaelst, L.; Cytryn, R.; Jonckheer, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    To assess the value of antithyroid drugs as an adjunct to radioactive iodine for the treatment of hyperthyroidism the incidence of relapse or hypothyroidism after a mean follow-up of 51/2 years (range 2-7 years) was reviewed retrospectively for 206 patients, some treated with and others without antithyroid drugs after radioiodine therapy. Allocation to treatment group had been random, and both groups were similar in all respects except for the adjunctive treatment with antithyroid drugs. All doses of 131 I had been calculated by one physician. Compared with those who received 131 I alone, those starting on antithyroid drugs within 8 days after 131 I had a lower incidence of hypothyroidism but a higher incidence of early post-treatment recurrence or persistence of hyperthyroidism, and considerably lower incidence of remission. (author)

  12. Influence of dose, age at the onset of disease and ultrasonographic findings of the thyroid gland on the early outcome of the radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugrinska, A.; Pop Gjorceva, D.; Muratovska, L.; Crcareva, B.; Stojanovski, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Aim of the study: Estimation of the early effects of the treatment of hyperthyroidism with radioactive iodine in correlation with the radioiodine dose, the age at the onset of disease and ultrasonographic (US) findings of the thyroid. Material and methods: Retrospective analysis of the files of 80 patients that underwent a radioactive iodine treatment from the period of 1987 till 2006 because of a diffuse hyperthyroid goiter was performed. The patients were divided in two groups. Group C consisted of patients who were treated with calculated doses from 60-100μC/ml gland volume and group NC who received higher, non-calculated doses. According to age at the onset of disease patients were divided in two groups- group A younger than 40 years and group B older than 40 years. According to the US findings of the thyroid prior to radioiodine therapy patients were divided in two groups group N with predominantly normal US findings and group H with predominantly hypoechoic structure. Results: One year after the application of radioactive iodine 58% of the patients from the group C still remained hyperthyroid, 29% became euthyroid and only 13% developed early hypothyroidism. In the NC group only 7% remained hyperthyroid, 40% were euthyroid, while 54% of the patients developed early hypothyroidism. The occurrence of early hypothyroidism was significantly more frequent in NC than in C group (58% vs. 32%, p<0.05). The age was predictor for the probability of development of early hypothyroidism in C group: only 13% younger in group A, but 46% older patients from group B developed an early hypothyroidism. In the NC group the age was not a predictive factor. In 44 patients there were available records on the US findings prior to radioiodine therapy. In the N group patients that received calculated dose of radioiodine therapy remained euthyroid in 86%, while the patients that received non-calculated dose achieved euthyroidism only in 30%.In the H group there was no

  13. Real time assessment of RF cardiac tissue ablation with optical spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Sharareh, S

    2008-03-20

    An optical spectroscopy approach is demonstrated allowing for critical parameters during RF ablation of cardiac tissue to be evaluated in real time. The method is based on incorporating in a typical ablation catheter transmitting and receiving fibers that terminate at the tip of the catheter. By analyzing the spectral characteristics of the NIR diffusely reflected light, information is obtained on such parameters as, catheter-tissue proximity, lesion formation, depth of penetration of the lesion, formation of char during the ablation, formation of coagulum around the ablation site, differentiation of ablated from healthy tissue, and recognition of micro-bubble formation in the tissue.

  14. Characterization and restoration of performance of 'aged' radioiodine removing activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, W.P.

    1997-01-01

    The degradation of radioiodine removal performance for impregnated activated carbons because of ageing is well established. However, the causes for this degradation remain unclear. One theory is that this reduction in performance from the ageing process results from an oxidation of the surface of the carbon. Radioiodine removing activated carbons that failed radioiodine removal tests showed an oxidized surface that had become hydrophilic compared with new carbons. We attempted to restore the performance of these 'failed' carbons with a combination of thermal and chemical treatment. The results of these investigations are presented and discussed with the view of extending the life of radioiodine removing activated carbons. 4 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Primary hyperthyroidism--diagnosis and treatment. Indications and contraindications for radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgul, Edyta; Sowinski, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    Isotope therapy is one of the methods used in primary hyperthyroidism. The therapy is based on short-range beta radiation emitted from radioactive iodine. Radioiodine administration must always be preceded by pharmacological normalization of thyroid function. Otherwise, post-radiation thyrocyte destruction and thyroid hormones release may lead to hyperthyroidism exacerbation. Indications for radioiodine therapy in Graves-Basedow disease include recurrent hyperthyroidism after thyrostatic treatment or thyroidectomy and side-effects observed during thyrostatic treatment. In toxic nodule, isotope therapy is the first choice therapy. Radioiodine is absorbed only in autonomous nodule. Therefore, it destroys only this area and does not damage the remaining thyroid tissue. In toxic goitre, radioiodine is used mostly in recurrent nodules. Absolute contraindications for radioiodine treatment are pregnancy and lactation. Relative contraindications are thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy and age under 15 years. In patients with thyroid nodules suspected of malignancy, radioiodine treatment may be applied as a preparation for surgery, if thyrostatic drugs are ineffective or contraindicated. In children, radioiodine therapy should be considered in recurrent toxic goitre and when thyrostatic drugs are ineffective. In patients with Graves-Basedow disease and thyroid-associated orbitopathy, radioiodine treatment may increase the inflammatory process and exacerbate the ophthalmological symptoms. However, thyroid-associated orbitopathy cannot be considered as a contraindication for isotope therapy. The potential carcinogenic properties of radioiodine, especially associated with tissues with high iodine uptake (thyroid, salivary glands, stomach, intestine, urinary tract, breast), have not been confirmed.

  16. Behavior of gasketless deep bed charcoal filters for radioiodine removal in LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, J.G.; Deuber, H.; Furrer, J.; Gerlach, K.

    1981-01-01

    The removal efficiency of radioiodine filters can be affected by mechanical leakage, aging and poisoning, desorption of radioiodine originally removed by the activated carbon and also by the occurrence of penetrating iodine compounds. To provide high decontamination factors only the gasketless deep bed filter type seems to be appropriate. The experience gathered and the data given in this paper are based on the surveillance testing of radioiodine filters in all German nuclear power plants and on laboratory research work which has been done over years to evaluate the operating behavior of deep bed radioiodine filters and to prove their reliability

  17. Study of ablation efficiency of 3600 MBq of I-131 in the treatment of thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takavar, A.; Eftekhari, M.; Fard-Esfahani, A.; Beiki, D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The basic question of threshold for the ablation of thyroid remnant after surgery remains unanswered. However, radioiodine therapy is still being used as a standard method of treatment. In present investigation treatment responses of 100 patients with thyroid cancer treated with 3600 MBq of 131 I is studied. Response to treatment of 100 patients (33 males and 67 females) was evaluated by serum TSH, Tg levels and areas of thyroid remnant as measured by whole body scan with 131 I performed 6 months after therapy. Treatment response was evident by decreased or lack of 131 I uptake in the thyroid bed and Tg 5 ng/ml. Remnant area was decreased about 74.5% in females and 75.5% in males. No significant difference between sex groups was observed. Because of radiation protection concerns and socioeconomic reasons, lower ablations doses of 131 I ( 1110 MBq) might be as effective, and should be evaluated. (author)

  18. Protocol for thyroid remnant ablation after recombinant TSH in thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitoia, F.; Salvai, M.E.; Niepomniszcze, H.; Tamer, E. El

    2009-01-01

    In some countries, in order to perform rhTSH-aided thyroid remnant ablation (TRA) after surgery, it is generally necessary to confirm that thyroidectomy has been almost complete. Otherwise, the nuclear medicine specialist will not administer a high radioiodine dose because it might be hazardous due to the possibility of thyroid remnant actinic thyroiditis. Considering this, it would be necessary to use two rhTSH kits (one for diagnostic purposes and the other one to administer the 131 I dose). In this study, we used an alternative protocol for TRA with the use of one kit of rhTSH in twenty patients diagnosed with low risk papillary thyroid carcinoma. All patients had negative titers of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies. Successful thyroid remnant ablation was confirmed with an undetectable rhTSH stimulated thyroglobulin level ( [es

  19. Radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders: functional thyroid autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.

    2005-01-01

    In the last 15 years, several concepts have been developed to further improve the outcome of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy. Results of radioiodine therapy in functional autonomy are considerably better than in Graves' disease. All of the currently-applied concepts offer healing rates of 75-100%, but they differ considerably in the hypothyreosis rates attained. The target volume can be precisely determined by sonography only in unifocal autonomy. In the case of multifocal and disseminated autonomy, the entire thyroid is taken as the target volume and the focal dose is reduced ('dosimetric compromise'). TcTUs-based dose concepts calculate the functionally autonomous volume from the TcTUs and replace the target volume by sonography, in the TcTUs-adapted dose concepts, sonographic target volume is left and the focal dose varied in dependence of the suppression uptake. The objective is to attain a high rate of success with a low rate of hypothyreosis. (orig.)

  20. Radioiodine therapy within the German DRG-system 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.; Dressler, J.

    2005-01-01

    With introduction of a diagnosis-related groups system (DRG-system) in Germany the previous duration of stay based refunding is also replaced for the radioiodine therapies by a performance oriented reimbursement system. Since the at first optional start of the DRG-system in 2003 the adaptations which take place every year should lead, up to the planned end of the convergence phase in 2009, to a transparent, fair and economical financing system of the stationary hospital service. The physician is responsible for the right and complete coding of the diagnoses and procedures, which serve as essential parameters for the determination of the diagnosis related group (DRG) of a hospital case. In the actual version of the year 2005 the DRG-system still supplies for radioiodine therapy of thyroid carcinoma some unclarity in the coding of the diagnosis, as well as clear inadequacy with the fair mapping of the therapy costs. (orig.)

  1. Single dose planning for radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied one year after radioiodine-131 therapy to assess the relationship between the effectiveness of the therapy and the radioiodine doses used. Patients were classified into three groups according to thyroid function as hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism and hypothyroidism at one year after I-131 therapy. In these groups we compared the mean values of dose, dose per thyroid weight calculated with I-123 uptake before the therapy (pre D/W), dose per thyroid weight calculated with therapeutic I-131 uptake (post D/W), and absorbed dose. No significant differences were found between the three groups in terms of dose or pre D/W. The mean values of post D/W and absorbed dose in the non-hyperthyroid (euthyroid and hypothyroid) group were significantly greater than those in the hyperthyroid group. Post D/W of 6.3 MBq/g was a threshold separating the non-hyperthyroid group from the hyperthyroid group. There was no correlation between pre D/W and post D/W; however, the mean post D/W was significantly greater than the mean pre D/W. All patients with pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g showed non-hyperthyroidism at one year after the radioiodine treatment. No indicators before the radioiodine therapy had significant relationships with the effectiveness of the therapy at one year after the treatment. However, the single therapy planned for setting the pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g will certainly make the patients non-hyperthyroid. As this proposal of dose planning is based on a small number of patients, further study is needed. (author)

  2. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK)

  3. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  4. Airway complication occurring during radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Michigishi, Takatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Airway complications rarely occur in 131 I radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. This study presents two cases in which 131 I therapy caused this acute complication. The patients complained of the symptom 6 h and 33 h after administration of 131 I. A histamine H1 receptor antagonist and hydrocortisone rapidly resolved symptoms in both cases. These two cases remind physicians that 131 I therapy for Graves' disease may cause potentially life-threatening complications. (author)

  5. Radioiodine-treatment (RIT) of functional thyroidal autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meller, J.; Sahlmann, C.O.; Becker, W.

    2002-01-01

    Since 1942, therapy with radioiodine (RIT) has gained a major role in the treatment of benign thyroid disorders, notably hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease or toxic multinodular goitre (thyroid autonomy). In iodine deficient areas thyroid autonomy accounts for 40-50% of all cases with hyperthyroidism. RIT has become a cost-effective first-line procedure in autonomy-patients with latent or overt hyperthyroidism, especially in the absence of a large goitre, after thyroid surgery and in elderly patients with associated conditions who carry a high intra- or perioperative risk. Decisions concerning the definitive treatment of thyroid autonomy should take into account previous episodes of hyperthyroidism, objective parameters of risk stratification in euthyroid patients as well as concomitant diseases and the probability of iodine exposure in the future. In Central Europe the majority of investigators prefer to estimate the therapeutic activity individually by a radioiodine test. TCTUs (global 99m-Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under suppression) - based dose concepts have been proven to be highly effective in the elimination of autonomy and carry a low (< 10%) risk of postradioiodtherapeutic hypothyroidism. Radioiodine therapy for autonomy has been found to be both effective and safe and without major early or late side effects. The most frequent complication is hypothyroidism requiring lifelong follow-up. (author)

  6. Dry Distillation of Radioiodine from TeO2 Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Koziorowski

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available As medical cyclotrons are becoming more abundant, 123I and 124I are getting more attention as alternatives to 131I for diagnostics of thyroid disease. Both 123I and 124I provide better diagnostics, deliver less dose to patients and both reduce the risk of thyroid stunning, facilitating subsequent therapy. Dry distillation of radioiodine from tellurium dioxide targets has become the standard approach to producing these radioiodines. Setting up such a production of radioiodine is associated with a lengthy optimization of the process and for this purpose natural tellurium is often used for economical reasons. In this paper, the distillation parameters are scrutinized to ensure optimal distillation temperature, in order to minimize time spent and prevent loss of expensive target material. It is further demonstrated how the individual iodine isotopes, produced from proton bombardment of natTe, will diffuse out of the target in a time dependent ratio. We believe the effect is due to the isotopes having their maximum cross section at different energies. The individual isotopes produced will thus have their highest concentration at different depths in the target. This results in individual mean diffusion lengths and diffusion times for the different isotopes.

  7. Whether antithyroid drugs influence on the outcome of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuyevich, Viktar V.; Danilova, Larisa I.; Kaiser, Klaus P.; Ostwald-Lenz, Elisabeth; Wieler, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The purpose of research was an estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of FA were included in research and received treatment with radioiodine. From them uni-focal autonomy (UFA) was diagnosed in 65 person, multifocal (MFA) in 14 and disseminated (DA) in 21. Among the patients included in research 8 had relapse of hyperthyroidism after initial operative treatment and 1 after RIT. The data in work are submitted as a median (1-st and 3-rd quartiles). The age of surveyed was 65.5 (54; 72.5), from them 63 persons were a female, 37 were a male. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 person, initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made as a rule 2 day prior to RIT, and the second one included 50 person, not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multi morbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a dose of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as ATD. Therapeutic activity of 131 I was calculated by means of Marinelli's formula. The target dose for UFA has made 400 Gy, for MFA and DA - 150 Gy. For calculation of thyroid uptake 24-hour radioiodine test was carried 2-3 day prior to RIT. Used activity of I-131 have made from 4.08 up to 58.89 mCi. Duration of inpatient stay has made 3 days (2; 5). In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyroidism or hypothyroidism) has been achieved in 48 (96 %) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94 %) patients who were not accepting last. Conclusion: The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on the efficiency of RIT of FA was made. It was revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36 %) than in patients

  8. The influence of radioiodine therapy in 1470 patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, S.; Szumowski, P.; Mysliwiec, J.; Mojsak, M.; Kraszynska, A.; Amelian-Filonowicz, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy on the achievement of euthyroidism, prevention of adverse effects on the cardiovascular and prevent evolvement to overt hyperthyroidism. Material and methods: we treated 1470 patients sent to our department during the last 7 years, aged 24-76 years; 88% of them were female and 12% male; 490 patients with multi-nodular goitre (MNG), and 980 patients with autonomous nodule (ATN). Some of the patients were treated with antithyroid drugs for 1 to 3 months before 131 I therapy (140 patients). Malignant changes were excluded in all nodules by fine needle aspiration biopsy. All the patients had serum TSH levels <0.1 mU/l and effective T-half was more than 3 days at the time of treatment. The activity dose was calculated by the use of Marinelli's formula and ranged between 200 and 800 MBq. The absorbed dose (Gy) ranged between 180 and 300, and was proportional to thyroid volume. Follow up control was done every 6 weeks. Results: euthyroidism achieved in 99% of patient with ATN and 94% of MNG; 1% of patients with ATN and 5% of patients with MNG develop hypothyroidism. 1% of patients with MNG were in subclinical hyperthyroidism and received second dose of radioiodine therapy. In all of the patients, the symptoms and signs of subclinical hyperthyroidism disappeared (palpitation, tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, exercise tolerance improved, the blood pressure normalised and the quality of life improved). Conclusions: our result is good and is in the range of the existing literature. The achievement of euthyroidism and the remission of the symptoms and signs of subclinical hyperthyroidism, were due to good diagnosis, well preparation of the patients; accurate measurement of administered activity, effective half-life, and well-organised follow up. We recommend early treatment of subclinical hyperthyroidism, and long period of follow up visits in our department

  9. Effect of radioiodine therapy on thyroid nodule size in patients with toxic adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajkovaca, Z.; Mijatovic, J.; Skrobis, M.; Kovacevic, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Autonomously functioning toxic adenomas are a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Surgery, radioiodine and percutaneous ethanol injection into the nodule are effective therapies. Radioiodine therapy is increasingly used as first line therapy especially in elderly patients. Radioactive iodine I-131 seems to be a good therapeutic option with low incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The important therapeutic effect has also been the regression in nodule size. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radioiodine therapy on the size of toxic adenomas. Forty-six patients with age range of 37-76 years (Mean age=60.9 years) were followed up for a period of 12 months after I-131 therapy for toxic adenomas. Thyroid hormone levels (T3, T4 and TSH) were determined. Each patient was subjected to ultrasound and radionuclide scanning of thyroid gland at 3,6 and 12 months following I-131 therapy. Successful treatment was defined as control of hyperthyroidism and reappearance of extra-glandular thyroid tissue on Thyroid scan, which were suppressed by the hyperactive nodule prior to therapy. The volumes of the thyroid pre and post-therapy were estimated by US using the formula of ellipsoid model (δ/2π6 x length x width x depth). The therapeutic dose of I-131 was calculated for each patient by the following formula: 12 mCi x 100/24 hrs RAIU. Patients received a single dose of I-131 and the range of administered I-131 dose was 825 1221 MBq. Results revealed that 42 patients (91%) became euthyroid in three months after I-131. All patients became euthyroid in 6 months. The adenomas were reduced in size from a mean of 18.23+11.21 ml to 7.38+3.48 ml during the 12 months follow up. This was highly significant (p<0.05, t=3.408). The extra-nodular thyroid volume did not change following therapy (12.2+7.4 ml pre-therapy vs. 11.8+7.1 ml post therapy at 12 months). The results of our study showed that I-131 can successfully treat not only the functional state of

  10. Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma using 124-iodine. Predicted blood doses correlate with changes in blood cell counts after radioiodine therapy and depend on modes of TSH stimulation and number of preceding radioiodine therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung-Knemeyer, V.; Nagarajah, J.; Jentzen, W.; Ruhlmann, M.; Freudenberg, L.S.; Stahl, A.R.; Bockisch, A.; Rosenbaum-Krumme, S.J.

    2012-01-01

    Pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry prior to a high-dose radioiodine therapy (RAIT) is recommended and a blood dose of 2 Gy is considered to be safe. In this study, changes in the blood cell count after radioiodine therapy of high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) were analyzed and compared with the results of the pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. Moreover, the influence of different modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding radioiodine therapies on the blood dose were assessed. 198 patients with locally advanced or metastasized DTC received a pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry using 124 I. To analyze the influence of the modes of TSH stimulation and the number of preceding RAITs on blood dose subgroups were built as follows: patients with endogenous TSH stimulation versus patients with exogenous TSH stimulation and patients with no preceding RAIT versus patients with at least one preceding RAIT. In 124/198 patients subsequent RAIT was performed. In 73/124 patients, hemograms were performed from day 2 to 12 month after RAIT. There was no high-grade bone marrow toxicity (id est (i.e.) ≥grade 3) in patients receiving less than 2 Gy blood dose-independent of the therapeutic history. Within the first month after radioiodine therapy, there was an overall decrease in the white blood cell and platelet counts. The erythrocyte count was essentially stable. There was a correlation between cell count decrease and predicted blood doses (Spearman's correlation coefficient >-0.6 each) for the white cell line and the platelets. With regard to the subgroups, the blood dose per administered 131 I activity (BDpA) was significantly higher in patients with endogenous TSH stimulation (median 0.08 Gy/GBq) than in patients with exogenous TSH stimulation (0.06 Gy/GBq) and in patients with no previous RAIT (0.08 Gy/GBq) compared to patients who had previously undergone at least one RAIT (0.07 Gy/GBq). The range of BDpA among DTC patients is rather wide. Our

  11. Radioiodine therapy of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules: usefulness of an implemented dose calculation algorithm allowing reduction of radioiodine amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavo, M; Bagnara, M C; Pomposelli, E; Altrinetti, V; Calamia, I; Camerieri, L; Giusti, M; Pesce, G; Reitano, C; Bagnasco, M; Caputo, M

    2013-09-01

    Radioiodine is a common option for treatment of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. Due to the expected selective radioiodine uptake by adenoma, relatively high "fixed" activities are often used. Alternatively, the activity is individually calculated upon the prescription of a fixed value of target absorbed dose. We evaluated the use of an algorithm for personalized radioiodine activity calculation, which allows as a rule the administration of lower radioiodine activities. Seventy-five patients with single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule eligible for 131I treatment were studied. The activities of 131I to be administered were estimated by the method described by Traino et al. and developed for Graves'disease, assuming selective and homogeneous 131I uptake by adenoma. The method takes into account 131I uptake and its effective half-life, target (adenoma) volume and its expected volume reduction during treatment. A comparison with the activities calculated by other dosimetric protocols, and the "fixed" activity method was performed. 131I uptake was measured by external counting, thyroid nodule volume by ultrasonography, thyroid hormones and TSH by ELISA. Remission of hyperthyroidism was observed in all but one patient; volume reduction of adenoma was closely similar to that assumed by our model. Effective half-life was highly variable in different patients, and critically affected dose calculation. The administered activities were clearly lower with respect to "fixed" activities and other protocols' prescription. The proposed algorithm proved to be effective also for single hyperfunctioning thyroid nodule treatment and allowed a significant reduction of administered 131I activities, without loss of clinical efficacy.

  12. Power Laser Ablation Symposia

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, Claude

    2007-01-01

    Laser ablation describes the interaction of intense optical fields with matter, in which atoms are selectively driven off by thermal or nonthermal mechanisms. The field of laser ablation physics is advancing so rapidly that its principal results are seen only in specialized journals and conferences. This is the first book that combines the most recent results in this rapidly advancing field with authoritative treatment of laser ablation and its applications, including the physics of high-power laser-matter interaction. Many practical applications exist, ranging from inertial confinement fusion to propulsion of aerostats for pollution monitoring to laser ignition of hypersonic engines to laser cleaning nanoscale contaminants in high-volume computer hard drive manufacture to direct observation of the electronic or dissociative states in atoms and molecules, to studying the properties of materials during 200kbar shocks developed in 200fs. Selecting topics which are representative of such a broad field is difficu...

  13. Prognostic Value of Tc99m-Pertechnetate Thyroid Scintigraphy in Radioiodine Therapy in a Cohort of Chinese Graves’ Disease Patients: A Pilot Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Hou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study is to assess the prognostic value of Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy for predicting the outcomes of fixed low dose of radioiodine therapy (RIT in a cohort of Chinese Graves’ disease (GD patients. Materials and Methods. This is a retrospective study of GD patients who received RIT with a single dose of radioiodine (5 mCi. All the patients received Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy prior to RIT. Thyroid mass, Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake, gender, age at diagnosis, duration of the disease, ophthalmopathy, and serum levels of FT4, FT3, TT4, and TT3 prior to RIT were analyzed as potential interference factors for outcomes of RIT. Results. One hundred and eighteen GD patients who completed RIT were followed up for 12 months. The outcomes (euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and hyperthyroidism were found to be significantly associated with thyroid mass and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake. Patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g or Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2% had higher treatment success. Conclusions. A fixed low dose of 5 mCi radioiodine seems to be practical and effective for the treatment of Chinese GD patients with thyroid mass ≤ 40.1 g and Tc99m-pertechnetate uptake ≤ 15.2%. This study demonstrates Tc99m-pertechnetate thyroid scintigraphy is an important prognostic factor for predicting the outcomes of RIT.

  14. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, B.R.; Bhattacharya, A.; Dutta, P.; Bhansali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is a safe form of treatment for all patients with primary hyperthyroidism. The thyroid's unique capacity to store iodine (thus also radioiodine) makes it a natural target for radioiodine therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of radioiodine therapy in a cohort of 151 patients of primary hyperthyroidism treated on an outpatient basis in our institute from January 2001 to November 2006. Of these 151 patients, 113 (38 male, 75 female; age range: 17- 65 years) were of Graves' disease. The median duration of symptoms in these patients was 4 years. (Range: 3 months to 20 years). Diagnosis was established on basis of clinical, biochemical and scintigraphic features. All the patients were treated medically with Neomercazole (Carbimazole) for varying durations (median 3.5 years). The dose range varied from 5 to 80 mg per day (median 20 mg per day). Clinical assessment of thyroid size revealed 39 patients with grade 0, 14 with grade 1, 30 with grade 2, and 30 with grade 3 goiters. Pre-therapy radioactive iodine uptake was done in 28 patients, which showed median values of 50 % at 4 hrs, 57.45 % at 24 hrs, and 56.2 % at 48 hrs respectively. These patients were treated empirically with I-131 in a dose range of 5 to 15 mCi, depending upon the clinical presentation and the RAIU values. Remission of symptoms with a single dose therapy was noticed in 68 patients. Of the 83 patients, 15 became hypothyroid within 3 months. These patients were on Neomercazole for a varying period of 2 to 20 years, at a dose range of 10 to 80 mg per day. 14 patients achieved remission after 2 doses with a cumulative RAI dose in the range of 10 to 19 mCi, at a median period of 7 to 24 months. Eight patients still showed hyperthyroid activity even after a second dose and are on follow-up. Seven patients achieved remission with a cumulative dose range of 17 to 35 mCi at a median duration of 10 months. One patient of Graves' disease who took Neomercazole for 10 years, at

  15. The influence of immunosuppressive treatment on the progression of Graves' disease after radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurca, T.; Pirnat, E.; Hojker, S.; Avcin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for Graves' disease could produce a rise in autoimmune activity expressed as elevation of antibody against TSH receptors (TSI). In our retrospective study the influence of different immunosuppressive therapy on autoimmune activity was studied. Patients, treated with radioiodine or surgery for the first time, between January 1989 and March 1992 were included in the study, divided in the 5 groups (patients after thyroidectomy, and patients after RIT divided into groups according to treatment with different combinations of corticosteroids and cyclosporine A). Patients were examined and TT 4 , TT 3 TSH and TSI were collected before and 3, 6 and 9 months after treatment. There was no differences between groups before and according to the thyroid status the patients of all groups received antithyroid drugs or substitution therapy after the RIT or surgery. Immunosuppressive therapy was indicated because of Graves' ophthalmopathy. After surgery, the progressive fall of TSI and no relapses of the disease were stated. After first 3 months the situation was very similar in group of patients treated with cyclosporine A after RIT, later after the cessation of treatment, there were a slight elevation of TSI. In all other groups of patients after RIT there was a constant positive trend of TSI and the significant correlation was found between TSI before and after treatment. We conclude, that autoimmune response after RIT is a consequence of activity of T cells and therefore cyclosporine A could be taken in mind when we want to prevent it. Corticosteroids on the other hand had no such an effect. (author)

  16. Enhancement of radioiodine uptake in hyperthyroidism with hydrochlorothiazide: a prospective randomised control study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tepmongkol, Supatporn [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2002-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) could improve radioiodine uptake in low-uptake hyperthyroid patients. Eighteen hyperthyroid patients with low 3-h and 24-h iodine-131 uptake were recruited to the study. Eleven patients were assigned to the HCTZ group, and seven to the control group. Two weeks after the first, baseline uptake study, a second uptake study was performed. Patients in both groups had a low-iodine diet after the first uptake study. In the HCTZ group, 50 mg of HCTZ was administered twice a day for 5 days prior to the second uptake study. Improvement in uptake at 3 and 24 h in the second uptake study, as compared with the baseline study, was assessed within and between groups. In the control group, compared with the baseline study there was a significant improvement in uptake at 3 h (P=0.03) but a non-significant improvement at 24 h (P=0.07). In the HCTZ group, significant improvements were observed at both 3 h (P=0.0005) and 24 h (P=2.28 x 10{sup -5}). Patients in the HCTZ group had statistically greater improvement in uptake at both 3 h and 24 h compared with the control group (P=0.003 and 0.0008, respectively). There was a 7.18-fold average improvement in uptake in the HCTZ group at 24 h, compared with only a 1.33-fold improvement in the control group. Administration of HCTZ significantly improves 24-h radioiodine uptake in high-iodide pool, low-uptake hyperthyroid patients compared with patients who have received a low-iodine diet alone. (orig.)

  17. Radioiodine uptake in young carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) retarded in growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysak, A.

    1978-01-01

    In the light of results obtained in recent years, radioiodine disposition in young carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), retarded in growth is described. The pharynx centre accumulates most of the administered radioiodine. Activation of renal centre takes place already after 10 days of intensive feeding. (author)

  18. Radiation exposure and familial aggregation of cancers as risk factors for colorectal cancer after radioiodine treatment for thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubino, Carole; Adjadj, Elisabeth; Doyon, Francoise; Shamsaldin, Akhtar; Abbas, Tahaa Moncef; Caillou, Bernard; Colonna, Marc; Cecarreli, Claudia; Schvartz, Claire; Bardet, Stephane; Langlois, Christiane B.Sc.; Ricard, Marcel; Schlumberger, Martin; Vathaire, Florent de

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In thyroid cancer patients, radioiodine treatment has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of colon carcinoma. The aim of this study in thyroid cancer patients was to evaluate the role of familial factors in the risk of colorectal cancer and their potential interaction with radioiodine exposure. Methods and Materials: We performed a case-control study on 15 colorectal cancer patients and 76 matched control subjects, nested in a cohort of 3708 thyroid cancer patients treated between 1933 and 1998. For each patient, the radiation dose delivered to the colon by radioiodine was estimated by use of standard tables. In those who received external radiation therapy, the average radiation doses delivered to the colon and rectum were estimated by use of DOS E g software. A complete familial history was obtained by face-to-face interviews, and a familial index was defined to evaluate the degree of familial aggregation. Results: The risk of colorectal cancer increased with familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (p = 0.02). After adjustment for the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum, the risk of colorectal cancer was 2.8-fold higher (95% CI, 1.0-8.0) for patients with at least one relative affected by colorectal cancer than for patients without such a family history (p = 0.05). The radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum by 131 I and external radiation therapy was associated with an increase of risk near the significance threshold (p = 0.1). No significant interaction was found between radiation dose and having an affected relative (p = 0.9). Conclusions: The role of familial background in the risk of colorectal cancer following a differentiated thyroid carcinoma appears to increase with the radiation dose delivered to the colon and rectum. However, the study population was small and no interaction was found between these two factors

  19. Optimized protocol for the radioiodination of hydrazone-type polymer drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedláček, Ondřej; Kučka, Jan; Hrubý, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydrazone conjugates of polymers with doxorubicin represent a very promising tool for cancer chemotherapy. However, these conjugates are very difficult to radiolabel with iodine radionuclides, which possess otherwise very advantageous nuclear properties to, e.g., follow biodistribution. In this study, we developed a robust protocol for the high-yield radioiodination of hydrazone-type drug delivery systems with doxorubicin. In particular, it is crucial that the polymer radioiodination step be performed before the deprotection of the hydrazide and doxorubicin binding. - Highlights: • Hydrazone-type drug delivery systems with doxorubicin were radioiodinated. • Radioiodination was performed via polymer-bound phenolic moiety. • Radioiodination step must be performed before deprotection and drug binding

  20. Anti-thyrotropin receptor antibody levels after radioiodine therapy in patients of childbearing age with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Mizuho; Tojo, Katsuyoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Following radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease, transient elevation of anti-thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) is observed. Elevation of TRAb causes neonatal hyperthyroidism. Serum TRAb levels before radioiodine therapy, 2 months to 1 year, 1 to 2 years, 2 to 3 years, and 3 to 4 years after radioiodine therapy were retrospectively analyzed in 25 women of childbearing age with Graves' disease. The normal range for TRAb is ≤15%. The one patient with serum TRAb levels <10% before radioiodine therapy did not have TRAb levels ≥50% after radioiodine therapy. However, in patients with serum TRAb levels of 10% to 30% before radioiodine therapy (n=8), TRAb were ≥50% in 75.0% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 25.0% 1 to 2 years after, and in 37.5% 2 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels of 30% to 50% before radioiodine therapy (n=3), TRAb levels were ≥50% in 33.3% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy and in 0.0% 1 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels of 50% to 70% before radioiodine therapy (n=6), TRAb were ≥50% in 83.3% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 66.6% 1 to 2 years after, and in 33.3% 2 to 4 years after. In patients with serum TRAb levels ≥70% before radioiodine therapy (n=7), TRAb levels were ≥50% in 100% 2 months to 1 year after radioiodine therapy, in 85.7% 1 to 2 years after, in 71.4% 2 to 3 years after, and in 57.1% 3 to 4 years after. Serum TRAb levels are more likely to be ≥50% after radioiodine therapy in patients with high serum TRAb levels before radioiodine therapy. (author)

  1. Diversity receiver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to the reception of high rate radio signals (for example DVB-T signals) while the receiver is moving at a high speed (for example in or with a car). Two or more antennas (12, 16) are closely spaced and arranged behind each other in the direction of motion (v) for receiving

  2. Administration of additional inactive iodide during radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Who might benefit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Moka, D.; Reinholz, U.; Schmidt, M.; Schomaecker, K.; Schicha, H.; Wellner, U. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2007-07-01

    Aim: Graves' hyperthyroidism and antithyroid drugs empty the intrathyroid stores of hormones and iodine. The consequence is rapid {sup 131}I turnover and impending failure of radioiodine therapy. Can administration of additional inactive iodide improve 131I kinetics? Patients, methods: Fifteen consecutive patients, in whom the 48 h post-therapeutically calculated thyroid dose was between 150 and 249 Gy due to an unexpectedly short half-life, received 3 x 200 {mu}g inactive potassium-iodide ({sup 127}I) daily for 3 days (Group A), while 17 consecutive patients with a thyroid dose of = 250 Gy (Group B) served as the non-iodide group. 48 hours after {sup 131}I administration (M1) and 4 or 5 days later (M2) the following parameters were compared: effective {sup 131}I half-life, thyroid dose, total T3, total T4, {sup 131}I-activity in the T3- and T4-RIAs. Results: In Group A, the effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 before iodine (3.81 {+-} 0.93 days) was significantly (p <0.01) shorter than the effective {sup 131}I half-life M2 (4.65 {+-} 0.79 days). Effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 correlated with the benefit from inactive {sup 127}I (r = -0.79): Administration of {sup 127}I was beneficial in patients with an effective {sup 131}I half-life M1 of <3 or 4 days. Patients from Group A with high initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 showed lower specific {sup 131}I activity after addition of inactive iodine compared with patients from the same group with a lower initial specific {sup 131}I activity of T3 and T4 and compared with the patient group B who was given no additional inactive iodide. This correlation was mathematically described and reflected in the flatter gradient in Group A (y = 0.5195x + 0.8727 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.0827x - 0.4444 for {sup 131}I T4) and steeper gradient for Group B (y = 0.6998x + 0.5417 for {sup 131}I T3 and y = 1.3191x - 0.2901 for {sup 131}I T4). Radioiodine therapy was successful in all 15 patients from Group A

  3. Value of the Serum Thyroglobulin Level Alteration at the First High Dose Radioiodine Treatment in Patients with Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Hyun Yeol; Kim, In Joo; Kim, Yong Ki; Kim, Seong Jang; Jun, Sung Min; Kim, Bum Soo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate if short-term serum thyroglobulin (Tg) elevation after radioiodine administration can predict successful radioiodine remnant ablation (RRA) and whether comparable RRA effectiveness is exhibited between a group administered with recombinant human thyrotropin (rhTSH) and a group experiencing thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW), in preparation for RRA. A retrospective chart review was performed on 39 patients in the rhTSH group and 46 patients in the THW group. They were treated for differentiated thyroid carcinoma by total or near total thyroidectomy, and referred for RRA between 2003 and 2006 (the rhTSH group) and between January and June of 2006 (the THW group). They were assessed for serum Tg levels just before I-131 administration (TgD0), reassessed 9 days later (TgD9), and again 6-12 months later. RRA was successful in 64 (37 from the THW group and 27 from the rhTSH group) of the total 85 patients. The success rates of RRA had no statistically significant differences between the two groups. In both groups, TgD9/TgD0 values were significantly higher in the RRA success group (the rhTSH group; P=0.03, the THW group; P=0.04). By combining cutoff values of TgD0 and TgD9/TgD0, the successful RRA value was determined to be 96.7% (29/30) with TgD0≤5.28 ng/mL and TgD9/TgD0>4.37 in both groups (the rhTSH group; 100% (16/16), the THW group; 92.9% (13/14)). Using logistic multivariate analysis, only TgD0 was independently associated with successful RRA. We may predict successful ablation by evaluating short-term serum Tg elevation after I-131 administration for RRA, in both rhTSH and THW patients

  4. Laser ablation of tumors: current concepts and recent developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroszczynski, C.; Gaffke, G.; Gnauck, M.; Ricke, J.; Felix, R.; Puls, R.; Speck, U.; Hosten, N.; Oettle, H.; Hohenberger, P.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this paper is to present technical innovations and clinical results of percutaneous interventional laser ablation of tumors using new techniques. Methods. Laser ablation was performed in 182 patients (liver tumors: 131, non hepatic tumors - bone, lung, others: 51) after interdisciplinary consensus was obtained. The procedure was done using a combination of imaging modalities (CT/MRI, CT/US) or only closed high field MRI (1.5 T). All patients received an MRI-scan immediately after laser ablation. Results. In 90.9% of the patients with liver tumors, a complete ablation was achieved. Major events occurred in 5.4%. The technical success rate of laser ablation in non-hepatic tumors was high, clinical results differed depending on the treated organ. Conclusions. The treatment of tumors of the liver and other organs up to 5 cm by laser ablation was a safe procedure with a low rate of complications and side effects. Image guidance by MRI is advantageous for precise tumor visualization in all dimensions, therapy monitoring, and control of laser ablation results. (orig.) [de

  5. The deposition of radioiodine onto rice plant from atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Yoshida, Satoshi; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro.

    1994-01-01

    Radiation dose estimations are usually made with the aid of assessment models in which model parameters such as the transfer factors of radionuclides from one environmental compartment to another are involved. In simple models the parameters are often described as the concentration ratio of a radionuclide between two compartments, when the system is under equilibrium condition. In this paper, the authors introduce the values of the parameters of radioiodine obtained by tracer experiments. Laboratory experiments on the transfer parameters of radionuclides from the atmosphere to rice plant were carried out in the atmosphere-to-crops system (deposition pathway). It is known that the typical chemical species of gaseous iodine in the atmosphere are elemental iodine (I 2 ) and methyliodide (CH 3 I). The deposition characteristics of both chemical species of gaseous iodine to rice grains were obtained. Mass normalized deposition velocity (V D ) and grain number normalized deposition velocity (V S ) of gaseous elemental iodine (I 2 ) and also methyliodide (CH 3 I) on unhulled rice were measured. Both V D and V S of methyliodide were about one percent of those of elemental iodine. Distribution pattern of methyliodide between unhulled rice and brown rice was significantly lower than that of elemental one. For wet deposition, we investigated the retention of radioiodines (iodide [I - ] and iodate [IO 3 - ] on rice grains and their translocation from the surface of the grains to brown rice. Though the ears were dipped into the solution containing 125 I - or 125 IO 3 - more than 15 min., both iodine species in the solutions were hardly taken up to the rice grains. The transfer rates of iodide and iodate, which are defined as 'the amount of the iodine in brown rice' divided by 'the amount of iodide in unhulled rice' were about 0.015 and 0.04, respectively. The rates were not changed with time after the radioiodine application. (author)

  6. Tumor Seeding Following Lung Radiofrequency Ablation: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Akeboshi, Masao; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Takao, Motoshi; Kobayashi, Hiroyasu; Taguchi, Osamu; Takeda, Kan

    2005-01-01

    Lung radiofrequency (RF) ablation was performed for the treatment of a primary lung cancer measuring 2.5 cm in maximum diameter in a 78-year-old man. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) study performed 3 months after RF ablation showed incomplete ablation of the lung tumor and the appearance of a chest wall tumor 4.0 cm in maximum diameter that was considered to be the result of needle-tract seeding. RF ablation was performed for the treatment of both the lung and the chest wall tumors. Although tumor enhancement was eradicated in both of the treated tumors, follow-up CT studies revealed diffuse intra-pulmonary metastases in both lungs 2 months after the second RF session. He is currently receiving systemic chemotherapy

  7. Rapid labelling of rose bengal and iothalamate with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, J.

    1981-01-01

    Rapid and simple methods for tagging rose bengal and iothalamate with radioactive iodine are proposed. In both cases, the reaction takes place in a penicillintype vial. In the first method, Chloramine-T, was added to a vial containing rose bengal and radioiodide. Tagging iothalamate requires heating a mixture of iothalamate and radioactive iodine in the autoclave. A high radiochemical yield was obtained in the two procedures. This obviated the need of separating the small amount of free radioiodine present in the final product. (author)

  8. Fast radioiodination of rose bengal at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbruggen, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Polyhalogenated dyes based on aromatic ring systems such as fluorosceins have been used for the evaluation of hepatobiliary function since 1909. In 1955 rose bengal was radioiodinated and a radiocontrastdye become a radiopharmaceutical. In the present study an improved method, based on the chloramine-T method, has been developed for labelling rose bengal. This method was chosen for its short reaction time, its mild conditions and its high yield. The optimum values of the reaction parameters have been determined, and resulted in a slightly higher yield, within a shorter time and without breakdown products being present

  9. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. zu Koeln (Germany); Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Gruenwald, F. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Leisner, B. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin des Allg. Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Muenster (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    The version 3 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases presents first of all a revision of the version 2. The chapter indication for radioiodine therapy, surgical treatment or antithyroid drugs bases on an interdisciplinary consensus. The manifold criteria for decision making consider the entity of thyroid disease (autonomy, Graves' disease, goitre, goitre recurrence), the thyroid volume, suspicion of malignancy, cystic nodules, risk of surgery and co-morbidity, history of subtotal thyroidectomy, persistent or recurrent thyrotoxicosis caused by Graves' disease including known risk factors for relapse, compression of the trachea caused by goitre, requirement of direct therapeutic effect as well as the patient's preference. Because often some of these criteria are relevant, the guideline offers the necessary flexibility for individual decisions. Further topics are patients' preparation, counseling, dosage concepts, procedural details, results, side effects and follow-up care. The prophylactic use of glucocorticoids during radioiodine therapy in patients without preexisting ophthalmopathy as well as dosage and duration of glucocorticoid medication in patients with preexisting ophthalmopathy need to be clarified in further studies. The pragmatic recommendations for the combined use of radioiodine and glucocorticoids remained unchanged in the 3{sup rd} version. (orig.) [German] Die Version 3 der Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen stellt im Wesentlichen eine redaktionelle Ueberarbeitung der Version 2 dar. Im Kapitel Indikation und Empfehlungen fuer eine Radioiodtherapie, eine Operation oder eine thyreostatische Therapie bei gutartigen Schilddruesenerkrankungen basiert die Leitlinie auf einem interdisziplinaer abgestimmten Konzept. Die Entscheidungskriterien sind multifaktoriell und beruecksichtigen die Art der Schilddruesenerkrankung (Autonomie, Morbus Basedow, Struma, Rezidivstruma

  10. Extraction, radioiodination, and in vivo catabolism of equine fibrinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coyne, C.P.; Hornof, W.J.; Kelly, A.B.; O'Brien, T.R.; DeNardo, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Equine fibrinogen was isolated and aliquots were stored frozen at -70 C before radiolabeling with 125I (half-life = 60.2 days; gamma = 35 keV, using monochloroiodine reagent. Radioiodination efficiencies were 49% to 53%, resulting in a labeled product with 98% protein-bound activity and 91% clottable radioactivity. In 6 equine in vivo investigations, plasma half-lives of 125I-labeled fibrinogen were from 4.1 to 5.2 days, corresponding to a mean daily plasma elimination rate of approximately 15%

  11. Thyroid emergencies following radioiodine therapy - Two case reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasmine, Sufia; Haque, Fatema Sultana; Karim, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    Thyrotoxicosis and well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the two most common pathological conditions where radioiodine is used. Patients with well differentiated thyroid carcinomas are the candidates for post operative radio iodine therapy. It is currently the most popular and frequently used method of treatment. Its use is safe and cost effective. The results are usually eventless but in some exceptional cases emergencies that occurred after administration of I-131. One emergency occurred after I-131 administration for Graves' disease and the second case happened after therapeutic application of I-131 for treatment of local recurrences of thyroid cancer.(author)

  12. Radioiodinated free fatty acids; can we measure myocardial metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, F.C.; Eenige, M.J. van; Duwel, C.M.B.; Roos, J.P.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of radioiodinated free fatty acids for ''metabolic imaging'', the kinetics and distribution pattern of metabolites of heptadecanoic acid I 131 (HDA I 131) were studied in canine myocardium throughout metabolic interventions. In control dogs and in dogs during glucose/insulin and sodium lactate infusion, biopsy specimens were taken during a go-min period after HDA I 131 administration and analyzed. Clearly distinct patterns of distribution and elimination were seen during the metabolic interventions, indicating the usefulness of iodinated fatty acids for metabolic studies. (orig.)

  13. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J; Joe, Alexius Y; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  14. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger; Brink, Ingo; Krause, Thomas M.

    2002-01-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15±9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256±80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses. (orig.)

  15. Biodistribution and receptor imaging studies of insulin labelled with radioiodine in mice bearing H22 hepatocellular cacinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Gongshun; Kuang Anren; Liang Zenlu

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: It has been demonstrated that insulin receptor of hepatocellular carcinoma cells is overexpression. The biodistribution of 125I-insulin and receptor imaging studies of 131I-insulin in mice bearing solid liver tumor comprised of hepatic carcinoma H22 cells were performed to develop insulin as a carder of radioiodine. Methods: 1 )Insulin was radiolabeled with iodine-125 or iodine-131 using a Chloramines T method. Twenty mice bearing tumor were divided into 4 groups (n = 5 each) randomly. They were killed at 5, 15, 30, 60 min after 125I-insulin administered intravenously. The percentage of injected dose of 125I-insulin per gram of tissue(%ID/gdis) in mice bearing tumor were determined. 2) Another ten mice bearing tumor were selected to be as a inhibition group. They received cold insulin 2 mg intravenously 2 min ahead of administration of 125I-insulin and they were killed at 30 min (n=5) and 60 rain (n=5) randomly post 125I-insulin injection. The %ID/ginh and the inhibited rates[(%ID/gdis-%iD/ginh) %ID/gdis 100%] were obtained. 3) One tumor-mouse received 7.4 Mbq 13II-insulin intravenously, another received cold insulin 2 mg injection before 13II-insulin injection. Whole body images were carded out and the radioactivity ratios of tumor/normal were accounted at 60 min. Results: 1) The radiochemical purities of 125I-insulin and 13II-insulin were 96.7%-98.9%. The tumors uptake of the 125I-insulin increased gradually, its peak (%ID/gdis) was 3.44% 0.42% at 30 min, when the normal tissues uptake decreased sharply post-injection. The radioactivity ratio of the tumor/blood and tumor/muscle reached to 1.44 and 3.62 respectively at 60 min. 2)The tumor-inhibition rate was 32.07% at 30 min and 37.42% at 60 min. 3) A high radioactivity accumulation in tumor region could be seen in the mouse at 60 min post 131I-insulin injection. The radioactivity ratio of the tumor/normal tissue was 2.13 and it declined to 1.37 after received insulin 2 mg intervention. Conclusions

  16. Ablative thermal protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaniman, J.; Fisher, R.; Wojciechowski, C.; Dean, W.

    1983-01-01

    The procedures used to establish the TPS (thermal protection system) design of the SRB (solid rocket booster) element of the Space Shuttle vehicle are discussed. A final evaluation of the adequacy of this design will be made from data obtained from the first five Shuttle flights. Temperature sensors installed at selected locations on the SRB structure covered by the TPS give information as a function of time throughout the flight. Anomalies are to be investigated and computer design thermal models adjusted if required. In addition, the actual TPS ablator material loss is to be measured after each flight and compared with analytically determined losses. The analytical methods of predicting ablator performance are surveyed. 5 references

  17. Subjective perception of radioactivity. No change post successful treatment with radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freudenberg, L.S.; Mueller, S.P.; Beyer, T.; Bockisch, A.

    2009-01-01

    We assess the attitude of patients with thyroid disease towards radiation and radioactivity before and after radioiodine therapy by means of a cultural-anthropological approach. We evaluate in patient interviews how their subjective attitude towards radioactivity as an abstract term and towards radioactivity in the medical context on the basis of their personal experiences with radionuclide therapy. 29 patients with autonomously functioning thyroid lesions (17 women, 12 men, 35-79 years) were included in this study. All patients were interviewed prior to and 22-27 month post radioiodine therapy in an open dialogue with the principal investigator. Patients were asked to describe their attitude towards radioactivity in general and towards radioiodine therapy in particular. Patients were asked to use a scoring system (1: positive, 5: negative) to quantify their perception of radioactivity. The personal perception of radioactivity as an abstract term does not change significantly (p = 0.15) before and after radioiodine therapy. This perception is linked to mostly negative impressions of radiactivity. However, patients become more positive when assessing the value of radioactivity as part of their therapy regimen. Thus, we observe a significant increase in percepted value of radioactivity post radioiodine therapy (p = 0.03). Patients continue to view radioactivity as something negative despite treatment success following radioiodine therapy. Our results provide useful information for patient information by the nuclear medicine physician prior to a radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  18. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy in functional thyroid autonomy and mild immunothyropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Rudolph, F.; Prillwitz, A.; Groth, P.; Schuemichen, C.

    1998-01-01

    Aim: To examine all cases with Graves' disease after radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid tissue (AFFT) in order to find the cause. Methods: We retrospectively studied 1428 pts who were treated between 11/93 and 3/97 with radioiodine for AFTT and who underwent at least one control examination. Results: 15 (1.1%) of all pts developed Graves' disease 8.4 (4-13) months after radioiodine therapy. There was no direct suggestion of Graves' disease (TRAK negative, no endocrine ophthalmopathy) in any pt at the time of radioiodine therapy. More detailed analysis of anamnestic data, however, revealed evidence that immunothyropathy predated radioiodine therapy in 11 of the 15 pts. Paradoxical effects of radioiodine therapy manifested as an increase in immunothyropathy 14 pts, a deterioration in metabolism in 11 pts and a first occurrence of endocrine ophthalmopathy in 5 pts. Conclusion: Exacerbation of preexisting, functional primarily insignificant immunothyropathia is held responsible in most cases for the observed paradoxical effects after radioiodine therapy, resulting in radiation-induced manifest Graves' disease; however no therapeutical consequences are recommended. (orig.) [de

  19. The synthesis of radioiodinated carbohydrates and butyrothenones as potential imaging agents for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waterhouse, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    Positron Emission tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) are two relatively new imaging techniques which allow for the non-invasive evaluation of biochemical processes in living subjects. Currently, SPECT is more widely accessible than PET, however, only a limited number of radiotracers have been successfully developed for imaging by SPECT. Two classes of radioiodinated compounds were developed as potential imaging agents for SPECT: (1) Radioiodinated carbohydrates for the assessment of glucose metabolism and (2) Radioiodinated butyrothienones for the evaluation of dopamine D 2 receptors in the brain. In both classes of compounds, the radioiodine was attached to an sp 2 hybridized carbon atom to provide radiotracers that were chemically and metabolically stable. Radioiodine incorporation was easily accomplished by radioiododestannylation of vinyl- and aryl-trialkylstannanes in the presence of an oxidizing agent. The incorporation of radioiodine into small molecules can have a significant effect on the biological activity of the resulting radiotracer because of the relatively large size and lipophilicity of the iodine atom. Preliminary evaluations of the effectiveness of the radioiodinated carbohydrates and butyrothienones as imaging agents are presented

  20. Association of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Graves' Disease. Unexpected Development and Efficiency of Ablative Dose with Recombinant Human Thyrotropin (rhTSH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacenza, N.A.; Groppo, N.; Guibourg, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    athological uptake in middle and lower cervical region right and left lower neck. He was reoperated on 4 months after his initial S: R esection of epithelial proliferation with thyroid aspect in superior mediastinum region . Pathology: N ode with extensive infiltration of neoplastic proliferation of follicular variant of papillary carcinoma with areas of connective tissue infiltrated periganglionar of papillary thyroid cancer . Lab 40 days after the second surgery: TSH 2.3 μIU/mL, FT4 0.82 ng/dL, Tg 4.7 ng/mL. Neck and chest CT showed neither pathological lesions nor lymphadenopathy. I 131 uptake with 7.4 MBq was: 1st hour: 8 % and 24 hours: 12 %. Neck Scan: M ultiple areas of tracer fixation in the neck . No pathological signs on neck palpation. Ablative dose of 7.4 GBq of I 131 was performed to the patient, previously using rhTSH (two doses of 0.9 mg), reaching TSH >100 μIU/mL. Scan post ablative dose: I mportant focus on right paratracheal region. Neck MRI showed: Absence of thyroid gland. Rounded image of about 10 mm at right paratracheal level. The patient initiates suppressive therapy with levothyroxine (LT4). Six months after ablation therapy (without LT4): TSH >100 μIU/mL, Tg: 13.8 ng/mL, TGA: 431 IU/mL. Body Scan with 2 mCi: P athological focus of radioiodine behind the right sternoclavicular joint. New neck MRI: Image in right pretracheal region smaller than the previous study . The patient received 5.55 GBq of I 131 . The same radioiodine treatment was repeated 8 months later. At present, 4 years after the patient's initial surgery, he is in good general health, performing his normal activities, with TGA in sharp decline, negative I 131 body scan and without signs of persistent or recurrent disease. Conclusions: We report a case of follicular variant papillary TC associated with GD with concomitant development of hyperthyroidism, with positive TGA, in a 22-year-old obese man. Highlights: 1) The importance of initial US exploration in a patient with GD, 2

  1. Lesion size in relation to ablation site during radiofrequency ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H H; Chen, X; Pietersen, A

    1998-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation was perfor......This study was designed to investigate the effect of the convective cooling of the tip of the ablation electrode during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation. In vivo two different application sites in the left ventricle of anaesthetised pigs were ablated and in vitro ablation...... was performed during two different flow-velocities in a tissue bath, while electrode contact pressure and position were unchanged. Target temperature was 80 degrees C. Obtained tip temperature, power consumption and lesion dimensions were measured. In vivo lesion volume, depth and width were found significantly.......61 in vitro). We conclude that during temperature controlled radiofrequency ablation lesion size differs for septal and apical left ventricular applications. Differences in convective cooling might play an important role in this respect. This is supported by our in vitro experiments, where increased...

  2. Radioiodine Therapy: Care of the Helpless Patient and Handling of the Radioactive Corpse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geaves, C. D.; Tendale, W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Nurses caring for a helpless patient following a nominal 800 MBq administration of radioiodine were concerned about their radiation dose. Using published data, a nurse could receive an estimated 650 micro Sv per shift. A regime to restrict their dose was planned using a 500 micro Sv dose constraint. Thermoluminescent dosimeters indicated a maximum whole body effective dose of 250 micro Sv. Three days post 131 I administration the patient died (estimated activity in the body 400 MBq). A minimum delay of two weeks was advised prior to a post-mortem. Special precautions were issued to minimise contamination. Dose rates (micro Sv h-1), measured one day after the patient died, at the level of the thyroid, chest and bladder at 0.01 m from the corpse were 1800, 290 and 73 respectively. At 1.0 m the dose rate was 26 micro Sv h-1 at all levels. The pathologist was estimated to have received a maximum whole-body dose of 400 micro Sv during the postmortem. Contamination measurements (Bq cm-2) made following the postmortem were as follows: pathologist's hands 5, clothes 0, towels 1.8, saw 5, instruments 0.5, plastic sheet 0.8, scales 0.4 and floors/walls 1.1. These data indicate that with appropriate radiation protection guidelines, staff can be reassured that their doses in these circumstances are very low. (author)

  3. Stunning in radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease. Quantification and therapeutic relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, T.; Meyer, P.T.; Knollmann, D.; Nowak, B.; Schaefer, W.M.; Ocklenburg, C.

    2008-01-01

    In radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disease, a reduction of radioiodine uptake is known for consecutive administrations of 131I, which needs to be considered in therapy planning. Aim: Analysis of uptake reduction with regard on the time interval between radioiodine administration and the delivered dose to the thyroid tissue. Patients, methods: 200 patients were enrolled in the study and distributed into two groups (matched for diagnoses), each containing 32 patients with Graves' disease (target dose 250 Gy), 24 with focal (400 Gy), 44 with disseminated thyroid autonomy (150 Gy). In one group, a second fraction of radioiodine was given after 48 h (2d) due to an unexpected low radioiodine uptake or effective half-life, whereas in the other group the second fraction was given after 96 h (4d). Results: There was no significant difference between delivered doses due to the first fraction after four days: 2d: 86 ± 48 Gy (extrapolated) vs. 4d: 87 ± 41 Gy, p > 0.05. In 2d, delivered dose at time of second administration was significantly lower (51 μ 29 Gy) than in 4d (p < 0.01). The radioiodine uptake of the second fraction relative to the initial uptake was significantly lower in the 4d (4d: 63 ± 25% vs. 2d: 82 ± 24%, p < 0.01). In addition, a correlation between uptake reduction and delivered dose and an influence of the time interval between radioiodine administrations could be shown. Conclusions: Relative uptake of subsequent radioiodine fractions decreases with time after first administration and with increasing delivered dose to the thyroid. If a second fraction of 131I is given at an earlier time, the same therapeutic effect can be reached using lower amounts of activity, minimising radiation exposure and increasing efficiency of radioiodine therapy. (orig.)

  4. Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marter, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models

  5. A method for the radiohalogenation of proteins resulting in decreased thyroid uptake of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalutsky, M.R.; Narula, A.S.

    1987-01-01

    A procedure is described for the radioiodination of proteins using an iodinated derivative of N-succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate (ATE). Adequate removal of unreacted ATE from [ 125 I]ATE was necessary for optimal protein radioiodination. Labelling efficiencies of greater than 60% could be obtained after a 20 min incubation of goat IgG with [ 125 I]ATE at 4 0 C. Paired-label experiments with goat IgG labeled with 125 I using ATE and 131 I using Iodogen demonstrated that use of the ATE reagent for protein labeling significantly reduced (P < 0.005) the thyroid uptake of radioiodine. (author)

  6. Field enhancement induced laser ablation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiutowski, Jacek; Maibohm, Christian; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Sub-diffraction spatially resolved, quantitative mapping of strongly localized field intensity enhancement on gold nanostructures via laser ablation of polymer thin films is reported. Illumination using a femtosecond laser scanning microscope excites surface plasmons in the nanostructures....... The accompanying field enhancement substantially lowers the ablation threshold of the polymer film and thus creates local ablation spots and corresponding topographic modifications of the polymer film. Such modifications are quantified straightforwardly via scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Thickness...

  7. Radiofrequency ablation of pulmonary tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocetti, Laura, E-mail: l.crocetti@med.unipi.i [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy); Lencioni, Riccardo [Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Intervention, Department of Liver Transplants, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Pisa University School of Medicine (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    The development of image-guided percutaneous techniques for local tumor ablation has been one of the major advances in the treatment of solid tumors. Among these methods, radiofrequency (RF) ablation is currently established as the primary ablative modality at most institutions. RF ablation is accepted as the best therapeutic choice for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma when liver transplantation or surgical resection are not suitable options and is considered as a viable alternate to surgery for inoperable patients with limited hepatic metastatic disease, especially from colorectal cancer. Recently, RF ablation has been demonstrated to be a safe and valuable treatment option for patients with unresectable or medically inoperable lung malignancies. Resection should remain the standard therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but RF ablation may be better than conventional external-beam radiation for the treatment of the high-risk individual with NSCLC. Initial favourable outcomes encourage combining radiotherapy and RF ablation, especially for treating larger tumors. In the setting of colorectal cancer lung metastases, survival rates provided by RF ablation in selected patients, are substantially higher than those obtained with any chemotherapy regimens and provide indirect evidence that RF ablation therapy improves survival in patients with limited lung metastatic disease.

  8. COMBINATION OF MOLECULAR ADSORBENT RECIRCULATING SYSTEM AND RADIOIODINE FOR THE TREATMENT OF CONCURRENT HYPERTHYROIDISM AND SEVERE LIVER DYSFUNCTION: A RETROSPECTIVE COHORT STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Guan, Yanxing; Xiang, Tianxin; Liu, Shaozheng; Chen, Qingjie; Zhang, Qing

    2017-02-01

    The treatment of hyperthyroidism associated with severe liver dysfunction (LD) is a clinical challenge, and there has been no unified examination of this problem. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of radioiodine ( 131 I) in combination with a molecular adsorbent recirculating system (MARS) for the treatment of hyperthyroidism complicated by severe liver LD. A total of 116 hyperthyroidism patients with concomitant LD who received MARS treatment were studied retrospectively. The patients were grouped according to whether or not they also received 131 I treatment: Group 1 (59 patients) received 131 I following MARS treatment, while Group 2 (57 cases) received only MARS. Clinical outcomes, including thyroid hormone levels, liver function parameters, and therapeutic efficacy were calculated. The overall response rate was significantly greater in Group 1 than in Group 2 (Ptreatment compared with before treatment (Ptreatments (Ptreatment of hyperthyroidism complicated by severe LD was effective and safe. The use of this system could rapidly improve liver function and metabolism, allowing 131 I therapy to be applied as early as possible with a shortened recovery time of liver function. ALSS = artificial liver support system ALT = alanine transaminase AST = aspartate transaminase ATD = antithyroid drugs DBil = direct bilirubin FT3 = free tri-iodothyronine FT4 = free thyroxine 131 I = radioiodine INR = international normalized ratio LD = liver dysfunction MARS = molecular adsorbent recirculating system MELD = model for end-stage liver disease PT = prothrombin time TBil = total bilirubin TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  9. Application of lithium carbonate on radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Jinshun; Huang Chunling; Jiang Tingyin; Jiang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness of radioiodine for Graves' hyperthyroidism depends on retention time of 131 I in the thyroid, and may be effected by several factors, including previous treatment with antithyroid drugs,goiter volume, 24 h thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake and so on. A short course of therapy with low dose of lithium carbonate increased retention of 131 I in the thyroid and prolong the intrathyroidal effective half-life of 131 I before and after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease, because of the actions that lithium blocks the release of organic iodine and thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland without affecting thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake. Therefore, using lithium as adjunct to radioiodine therapy increases the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid, to result in reduced the activity required and whole-body radiation dose in patients with very short effective half-life, and so improve the cure rate of hyperthyroidism. A short course of lithium carbonate therapy can be considered a useful adjunct to 131 I therapy for obtaining a more rapid control of thyrotoxicosis and avoiding its transient exacerbation because of methimazole withdrawal prior to 131 I administration or in patients who cannot tolerate or do not respond to antithyroid drugs, and for helping to prevent the radioiodine-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations. In addition, lithium carbonate enhances the effectiveness of 131 I therapy, in terms of prompter control of hyperthyroidism in patients with small or large goiters. At the same time, lithium also may increases the rate of permanent control of hyperthyroidism in patients with large goiters. In summary, in the short-term lithium plays an important role as an adjunct to 131 I, since it helps to prevent the 131 I-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations and allows a more prompt control of thyrotoxicosis. This is of particular importance in high risk patients, such as the elderly

  10. Production and radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1988-12-01

    The basis of the monoclonal antibody production methodology, some immunological concepts which are important for the understanding of what is a Monoclonal Antibody, its radioiodination and acceptance as receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine are reviewed. (author) [pt

  11. Bilateral breast uptake of radioiodine in a male patient with gynecomastia: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uslu, Lebriz; Ozbayrak, Mustafa; Vatankulu, Betul; Sonmezoglu, Kerim

    2015-01-01

    A 56-year-old male patient with papillary thyroid carcinoma was given radioiodine for the treatment of persistent disease. Post radioiodine whole body scan revealed uptake at the thyroidal region and bilateral uptake at the upper thoracic region. Single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) confirmed uptake at the left thyroid lobe, and additional symmetrical mammary gland uptake was observed at both breasts. The patient had obesity-related gynecomastia, but he did not have any history of breast cancer, mastitis, hyperprolactinemia, or galactorrhea. Although breast uptake of radioiodine is a common finding in postpartum or lactating women, it is uncommon in male patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a male patient with breast uptake of radioiodine documented with SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT is useful in male patients in the differentiation of benign breast uptake with lung metastases or axillary metastases of thyroid cancer

  12. The catabolism of radioiodinated anti-lung-cancer monoclonal antibodies in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xubao

    1991-01-01

    Nude mice bearing humor lung cancer xenografts were injected intravenously or intraperitoneally with a mixture of radioiodinated anti-lung-cancer monoclonal antibodies, 2E3 and 6D1. The blood radioactivity versus time curve was fitted to a two-compartment open model with a 3.4 day blood radioactivity clearance half-life and a 636 ml/kg apparent distribution volume. Radioiodinated 2E3 and 6D1 given intraperitoneally were rapidly absorbed, with a 2.08 absorption half-life and 89% bioavailability. The highest radioactivity levels were found in the tumor, blood, liver and spleen 1-3 days after injection; next came the lung, kidney, stomach and intestine. The relative radioactivity increased in the tumor as levels in blood and normal tissues decreased. The in vivo deiodination of radioiodinated 2E3 and 6D1 was about 18.6% and free radioiodine was excreted in the urine

  13. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo; Monte, Osmar; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e; Duprat, Andre; Marone, Marilia; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  14. Characterization and restoration of performance of {open_quotes}aged{close_quotes} radioiodine removing activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, W.P. [NUCON International, Inc., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The degradation of radioiodine removal performance for impregnated activated carbons because of ageing is well established. However, the causes for this degradation remain unclear. One theory is that this reduction in performance from the ageing process results from an oxidation of the surface of the carbon. Radioiodine removing activated carbons that failed radioiodine removal tests showed an oxidized surface that had become hydrophilic compared with new carbons. We attempted to restore the performance of these {open_quotes}failed{close_quotes} carbons with a combination of thermal and chemical treatment. The results of these investigations are presented and discussed with the view of extending the life of radioiodine removing activated carbons. 4 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. The influence of saliva flow stimulation on the absorbed radiation dose to the salivary glands during radioiodine therapy of thyroid cancer using 124I PET(/CT) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentzen, Walter; Schmitz, Jochen; Freudenberg, Lutz; Eising, Ernst; Bockisch, Andreas; Stahl, Alexander; Balschuweit, Dorothee; Hilbel, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A serious side effect of high-activity radioiodine therapy in the treatment of differentiated thyroid cancer is radiogenic salivary gland damage. This damage may be diminished by lemon-juice-induced saliva flow immediately after 131 I administration. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of chewing lemon slices on the absorbed (radiation) doses to the salivary glands. Ten patients received (pretherapy) 124 I PET(/CT) dosimetry before their first radioiodine therapy. The patients underwent a series of six PET scans at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 48 and ≥96 h and one PET/CT scan at 24 h after administration of 27 MBq 124 I. Blood samples were also collected at about 2, 4, 24, 48, and 96 h. Contrary to the standard radioiodine therapy protocol, the patients were not stimulated with lemon juice. Specifically, the patients chewed no lemon slices during the pretherapy procedure and neither ate food nor drank fluids until after completion of the last PET scan on the first day. Organ absorbed doses per administered 131 I activity (ODpAs) as well as gland and blood uptake curves were determined and compared with published data from a control patient group, i.e. stimulated per the standard radioiodine therapy protocol. The calculations for both groups used the same methodology. A within-group comparison showed that the mean ODpA for the submandibular glands was not significantly different from that for the parotid glands. An intergroup comparison showed that the mean ODpA in the nonstimulation group averaged over both gland types was reduced by 28% compared to the mean ODpA in the stimulation group (p=0.01). Within each gland type, the mean ODpA reductions in the nonstimulation group were statistically significant for the parotid glands (p=0.03) but not for the submandibular glands (p=0.23). The observed ODpAs were higher in the stimulation group because of increased initial gland uptake rather than group differences in blood kinetics. The 124 I PET(/CT) salivary gland

  16. Radiofrequency ablation of osteoid osteoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderschueren, Geert Maria Joris Michael

    2009-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of CT-guided radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of spinal and non-spinal osteoid osteomas. Furthermore, the technical requirements needed for safe radiofrequency ablation and the clinical outcome after radiofrequency

  17. Unfavourable effect of prolonged treatment with antithyroid drugs on radioiodine therapy outcome in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Rajić, Milena; Vlajković, Marina; Ilić, Slobodan; Stević, Miloš; Sekulić, Vladan; Zečević, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) of Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is usually recommended after failure of primary therapy with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), which are commonly prescribed for up to 18-24 months. However, in our region, the prolonged ATDs treatment of the disease is very common. Thus, we assessed the efficacy of RIT after prolonged continual pretreatment with ATDs in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Therapy outcome using a single dose of radioiodine was evaluated after one year in 91 patients (f/m...

  18. The risk for cancer and genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, C.

    1997-01-01

    According to recent studies, the risk for thyroid cancer is not increased after radioiodine treatment in patients with hyperthyroidism. Only the risk of cancer of the stomach seems to be increased slightly in patents treated with I-131 because of functional autonomy. However, the risk for gastric cancer is not increased after higher activities of I-131 because of thyroid cancer. There is no increased risk for genetic abnormalities after radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  19. The management of metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer requires an integrated approach including both directed and systemic therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Shamil D; Topliss, Duncan J

    2017-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with metastatic radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) presented with left thigh and right flank numbness. He had known progressive and widespread bony metastases, for which he received palliative radiotherapy, and multiple bilateral asymptomatic pulmonary metastases. CT scan and MRI of the spine revealed metastases at right T10-L1 vertebrae with extension into the central canal and epidural disease at T10 and T11 causing cord displacement and canal stenosis but retention of spinal cord signal. Spinal surgery was followed by palliative radiotherapy resulting in symptom resolution. Two months later, sorafenib received approval for use in Australia and was commenced and up-titrated with symptomatic management of mild adverse effects. Follow-up CT scan three months after commencement of sorafenib revealed regression of pulmonary metastases but no evident change in most bone metastases except for an advancing lesion eroding into the right acetabulum. The patient underwent a right total hip replacement, intra-lesional curettage and cementing. After six months of sorafenib therapy, CT scanning showed enlarging liver lesions with marked elevation of serum thyroglobulin. Lenvatinib was commenced and sorafenib was ceased. He now has stable disease with a falling thyroglobulin more than 5 years after metastatic radioiodine-refractory DTC was diagnosed. In DTC, 5% of distant metastases become radioiodine-refractory, resulting in a median overall survival of 2.5-3.5 years. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy has recently been demonstrated to increase progression-free survival in these patients but poses some unique management issues and is best used as part of an integrated approach with directed therapy. Directed therapies may have greater potential to control localised disease and related symptoms when compared to systemic therapies.Consider TKI therapy in progressive disease where benefits outweigh risks.Active surveillance and

  20. Guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases (version 4); Leitlinie zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) bei benignen Schilddruesenerkrankungen (Version 4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany). Abteilung fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung des allgemeinen Krankenhauses St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Moser, E. [Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung der Radiologischen Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Reiners, C.; Schneider, P. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Schober, O. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    Version 4 of the guideline for radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid diseases includes an interdisciplinary consensus ondecision making for antithyroid drugs, surgical treatment and radioiodine therapy. The quantitative description of a specific goiter volume for radioiodine therapy or operation was cancelled. For patients with nodular goiter with or without autonomy, manifold circumstances are in favor of surgery (suspicion on malignancy, large cystic nodules, mediastinal goiter, severe compression of the trachea) or in favor of radioiodine therapy (treatment of autonomy, age of patient, co-morbidity, history of prior subtotal thyroidectomy, profession like teacher, speaker or singer). For patients with Graves' disease, radioiodine therapy or surgery are recommended in the constellation of high risk of relapse (first-line therapy), persistence of hyperthyroidism or relapse of hyperthyroidism. After counseling, the patient gives informed consent to the preferred therapy. The period after radioiodine therapy of benign disorders until conception of at least four months was adapted to the European recommendation. (orig.)

  1. [Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, Gerlig; Schullian, Peter; Bale, Reto

    2013-03-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is well established in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Due to its curative potential, it is the method of choice for non resectable BCLC (Barcelona Liver Clinic) 0 and A. RFA challenges surgical resection for small HCC and is the method of choice in bridging for transplantation and recurrence after resection or transplantation. The technical feasibility of RFA depends on the size and location of the HCC and the availability of ablation techniques (one needle techniques, multi-needle techniques). More recently, stereotactic multi-needle techniques with 3D trajectory planning and guided needle placement substantially improve the spectrum of treatable lesions including large volume tumors. Treatment success depends on the realization of ablations with large intentional margins of tumor free tissue (A0 ablation in analogy to R0 resection), which has to be documented by fusion of post- with pre-ablation images, and confirmed during follow-up imaging.

  2. A condition variation study for radioiodination via triazene intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, N.I.; Heindel, N.D.; Dannals, R.; Burns, H.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pyrrolidyl triazenes prepared by interception of the diazonium transient in the Sandmeyer reaction of amines can serve as useful intermediates in the iodination and radioiodination of aryl rings. Decomposition of such triazenes in the presence of iodide is acid-catalyzed and is sensitive to choice of solvent, acid, and triazene structure. A condition variation study by HPLC of four different solvent systems and two non-nucleophilic acids was carried out on the 123 I iodination of the triazenes of p-nitroaniline, p-anisidine and p-toluidine. This method has proven .useful in radiolabelling of two pharmaceutical analogs which were not amenable to labelling through the classic Sandmeyer method. (author)

  3. Radio-iodinated surface proteins of electrophoretically separated rat lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilg, W.; Hannig, K.; Zeiller, K.

    1980-01-01

    Rat thymocytes and lymph node cells were separated into three T and one B subpopulation by means of free flow electrophoresis. The surface proteins of the separated cells were labelled by lactoperoxidase catalysed radioiodination. Most of the label was demonstrated to be at the cell surface. Although the surface protein patterns of the four lamphocyte subpopulations were rather similar, distinctive differences could be found. B cells had six labelled proteins which seemed to be absent in the other cells. In the T cell group three protein bands were identified, each with specificity for peripheral T cells, thymocytes and all T cells respectively. Four other proteins were found which showed quantitative differences between the four cell groups. (orig.) [de

  4. Soil adsorption of various chemical forms of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.; Palagyi, S.

    1976-01-01

    The adsorption was studied of radioiodate and radioiodide by the soil in an experiment aimed at testing the behaviour of these two chemical forms of radioiodine. 131 IO 3 - was used in the experiment, prepared by the oxidation of carrier-free Na 131 I with NaClO in an acid medium. Thin-layer chromatography showed that the stability of radioiodate depended on the solution pH value. The highest stability was found at pH 7 to 11. When pH=7 was maintained, only a slow reduction was found of radioiodate to radioiodide. A significant difference was found in the adsorption of radioiodate and radioiodide. The iodide was sorbed faster and to a higher degree, especially by chernozem (due to the high content of organic mass in the soil) as against retzina. It is believed that soil contamination is primarily due to radioiodide. (L.O.)

  5. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies

  6. Transfer of radionuclides to crop plants through roots. Radioiodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Shigeo; Sumiya, Misako; Ohmomo, Yoichiro

    1987-07-01

    In an atmospheric discharge of radioiodines, direct deposition of the nuclides onto leaf surface must be the most significant pathway. However, root uptake is also of importance specifically for /sup 129/I because of its long half life of 1.57 x 10/sup 7/ years. In order to estimate the amount of the nuclide transferred to the crop plants from contaminated field, the experiments were carried out using solution culture. Rice plant, Oryza sativa cv. koshihikari, spinach, Spinacea oleracea L., radish, Raphanus sativus L., and the other four kinds of crop plants were exposed to culture solution in which Na/sup 131/I were contained. The transfer rates, defined as the ratio of activity of plant sample per day to the mean activity of culture solution, were calculated. And the differences by the organs of each crop plant and by plant species were discussed in this paper. Temporal critical crop plants for /sup 129/I were selected.

  7. Radioiodine 131 therapy in hyperthyroidism evaluation of French nuclear medicine practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, D.; Boin, C.; Desruet, M.; Roux, J.; Wolf, M.; Fagret, D.; Allenet, B.; Foroni, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim Radioiodine 131 I (RAI) is currently used routinely in the treatment of hyperthyroidism including Graves disease (GD), toxic multi-nodular goitre (TMNG) and toxic solitary nodule (TSN). It has proved to be safe, efficient and relatively inexpensive therapy. But after more than 60 years, many protocols are coexisting and no consensus exists on the most appropriate way to prescribe RAI dose: fixed dose regime or calculated doses based on gland size or turnover of RAI. This is the first nationwide French survey assessing the current practices about radioiodine treatment in thyrotoxicosis. Methods: we sent a questionnaire to French nuclear medicine hospital units and cancer treatment centres (n=69) about their practices in 2012. Questions were asked about RAI treatment: objectives, way to prescribe the therapeutic dose and its factors, radioisotope use to explore thyroid function and method of gland size measurement. Results: we received 40 responses. Euthyroidism was a successful treatment outcome for 33% of French respondents whereas hypothyroidism was the aim for 26%. Antithyroid drugs were stopped 7 days on average (range 3-21 days) before therapy. 68% of physicians used ultrasound for thyroid volume measurement. Calculated doses were used by 40% of clinicians (Marinelli's formula: 80%). Factors influencing prescription were thyroid uptake (100%) based on radiotracer iodine-131 (33%) or iodine-123 (67%), thyroid volume (93%) and disease (80%). Fixed activities represented 60% of the prescribed doses (72,5% for TMNG and TSN). The administered dose was chosen between 1 to 3 levels of standard doses, according to the patient characteristics. Factors influencing this choice were disease, with respectively a median of 370 MBq (range:185-740), 555 MBq (185-740), 555 MBq (296-925) for GD, TSN and TMNG, thyroid volume (59%) and thyroid uptake (52%) with the radiotracer iodine-123 (30%) or technetium-99m (70%). Even physicians

  8. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  9. Selective mono-radioiodination and characterization of a cell-penetrating peptide. L-Tyr-maurocalcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Mitra; Bacot, Sandrine; Perret, Pascale; Riou, Laurent; Ghezzi, Catherine [Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); INSERM U1039, Grenoble (France). Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques; Poillot, Cathy; Cestele, Sandrine [INSERM U836, Grenoble (France). Grenoble Inst. of Neuroscience; Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Desruet, Marie-Dominique [INSERM U1039, Grenoble (France). Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques; Couvet, Morgane; Bourgoin, Sandrine; Seve, Michel [CRI-INSERM U823, Grenoble (France). Inst. of Albert Bonniot; Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Waard, Michel de [INSERM U836, Grenoble (France). Grenoble Inst. of Neuroscience; Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Smartox Biotechnologies, Grenoble (France)

    2014-07-01

    Mono-and poly-iodinated peptides form frequently during radioiodination procedures. However, the formation of a single species in its mono-iodinated form is essential for quantitative studies such as determination of tissue concentration or image quantification. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to define the optimal experimental conditions in order to exclusively obtain the mono-iodinated form of L-maurocalcine (L-MCa). L-MCa is an animal venom toxin which was shown to act as a cell-penetrating peptide. In order to apply the current direct radioiodination technique using oxidative agents including chloramine T, Iodo-Gen {sup registered} or lactoperoxidase, an analogue of this peptide containing a tyrosine residue (Tyr-L-MCa) was synthesized and was shown to fold/oxidize properly. The enzymatic approach using lactoperoxidase/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was found to be the best method for radioiodination of Tyr-L-MCa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analyses were then used for identification of the chromatographic eluting components of the reaction mixtures. We observed that the production of different radioiodinated species depended upon the reaction conditions. Our results successfully described the experimental conditions of peptide radioiodination allowing the exclusive production of the mono-iodinated form with high radiochemical purity and without the need for a purification step. Mono-radioiodination of L-Tyr-MCa will be crucial for future quantitative studies, investigating the mechanism of cell penetration and in vivo biodistribution.

  10. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Alexander, W.D.; Glasgow Univ.

    1987-01-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine ( 131 I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive 131 I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before 131 I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic 131 I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of 131 I, biological half life of 131 I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics. (orig.)

  11. Radioprotective action of carbimazole in radioiodine therapy for thyrotoxicosis - influence of the drug on iodine kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connell, J.M.C.; Hilditch, T.E.; Robertson, J.; Alexander, W.D.

    1987-10-01

    Pretreatment with carbimazole of patients given radioiodine (/sup 131/I) therapy for thyrotoxicosis reduces the incidence of early hypothyroidism. The possibility that this radioprotective effect might be a consequence of drug induced alteration in thyroidal iodide turnover, leading to a reduction in thyroid irradiation, was investigated in a prospective study of 24 thyrotoxic patients. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive /sup 131/I alone or to be treated with carbimazole for a minimum of three months before /sup 131/I. Thyroxine supplements were given in the latter group to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. The effective half-life of therapeutic /sup 131/I in the thyroid was measured using a gamma camera/computer system after oral administration of the dose, allowing the biological half life of the anion and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid to be derived. Effective half life of /sup 131/I, biological half life of /sup 131/I and estimated radiation dose to the thyroid were similar in the two groups of subjects. It is concluded that the radioprotective action of carbimazole is not a consequence of altered thyroidal iodide kinetics.

  12. The influence of antithyroid drugs on the results of radioiodine therapy of thyroid functional autonomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valuevich, V.V.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the given research was the estimation of the influence of antithyroid medication on efficiency of radioiodine therapy (RIT) of nonimmune hyperthyroidism in patients with thyroid functional autonomy (FA). 100 patients with various clinical variants of thyroid FA were included in research and received treatment with radioactive iodine. From surveyed 2 groups of patients were formed. The first group consisted from 50 persons initially accepting during 4 months (2.5; 6) antithyroid drugs (ATD) which cancellation had been made, as a rule, 2 day prior to RIT, and the second included 50 persons not accepting ATD neither up to nor after RIT. 9 elderly and multimorbid patients from the first group continued to accept ATD within several months after RIT. Carbimazole (n=45) or methimazole (n=5) in a doze of 10 mg (5; 10) were used as antithyroid drugs. In 4 months (4; 5) after RIT the successful result (euthyrosis or hypothyroidism) was achieved in 48 (96%) patients accepting ATD, and in 47 (94%) patients who were not accepting last. The conclusion that antithyroid medication does not influence on efficiency of RIT of thyroid FA is made. It is revealed that frequency of hypothyroidism after RIT in patients of the first group was higher (36%), than in patients of the second group (20%). (authors)

  13. Radioiodinated cholesteryl ester analogs as residualizing tracers of lipoproteins disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeForge, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Due to the importance of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis, efforts were made to incorporate 125 I-cholesteryl iopanoate ( 125 I-CI), a residualizing cholesteryl ester (CE) analog, into the lipid core of LDL. This preparation is potentially useful as a scintigraphically detectable tracer of LDL uptake into atheroma and tissues such as the adrenal and liver. Initial studies using a cholesterol-fed rabbit model of atherosclerosis validated the use of 125 I-CI as a tracer of CE deposition. However, scintigraphy revealed considerable nonspecific 125 I-CI uptake due to tissue cholesterol loading. An alternative animal model was the guinea pig, which responds moderately to cholesterol feeding and carries the plasma cholesterol predominantly as LDL. Dietary fat and cholesterol, coupled with chronic aortic injury caused by an indwelling catheter, resulted in lipid containing, smooth muscle cell proliferative lesions in many animals. However, further studies are necessary to fully characterize this model. In additional studies, in vitro methods for incorporating 125 I-CI into LDL were examined. These included a reconstitution procedure described by Krieger et al. and a procedure involving incubation of detergent (Tween 20)-solubilized 125 I-CI with plasma. Although both LDL preparations were taken up normally by cultured fibroblasts, the plasma clearance rate of reconstituted LDL was markedly abnormal in guinea pigs. In contrast, LDL labeled by the detergent method cleared from the plasma identically to a radioiodinated LDL control. Therefore, this latter procedure was also used to incorporate two novel radioiodinated cholesteryl ether analogs 125 I-CI cholesteryl m-iodobenzyl ether [ 125 I-CIDE] and 125 I-cholesteryl 12-(miodophenyl)dodecyl ether [ 125 I-CIDE] into LDL

  14. Laboratory Simulations of Micrometeoroid Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan Williamson

    Each day, several tons of meteoric material enters Earth's atmosphere, the majority of which consist of small dust particles (micrometeoroids) that completely ablate at high altitudes. The dust input has been suggested to play a role in a variety of phenomena including: layers of metal atoms and ions, nucleation of noctilucent clouds, effects on stratospheric aerosols and ozone chemistry, and the fertilization of the ocean with bio-available iron. Furthermore, a correct understanding of the dust input to the Earth provides constraints on inner solar system dust models. Various methods are used to measure the dust input to the Earth including satellite detectors, radar, lidar, rocket-borne detectors, ice core and deep-sea sediment analysis. However, the best way to interpret each of these measurements is uncertain, which leads to large uncertainties in the total dust input. To better understand the ablation process, and thereby reduce uncertainties in micrometeoroid ablation measurements, a facility has been developed to simulate the ablation of micrometeoroids in laboratory conditions. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to accelerate iron particles to relevant meteoric velocities (10-70 km/s). The particles are then introduced into a chamber pressurized with a target gas, and they partially or completely ablate over a short distance. An array of diagnostics then measure, with timing and spatial resolution, the charge and light that is generated in the ablation process. In this thesis, we present results from the newly developed ablation facility. The ionization coefficient, an important parameter for interpreting meteor radar measurements, is measured for various target gases. Furthermore, experimental ablation measurements are compared to predictions from commonly used ablation models. In light of these measurements, implications to the broader context of meteor ablation are discussed.

  15. Estimation of radiation burden to relatives of patients treated with radioiodine for cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandon, Pankaj; Rohatgi, Rupali; Gaur, P.K.; Rao, B.S.; Gill, B.S.; Hari Babu, T.; Venkatesh, Meera

    2005-01-01

    Patients treated with radioiodine present a radiation hazard and precautions are necessary to limit the radiation dose to family members, nursing staff and members of the public. The precautions advised are usually based on the instantaneous dose rates or iodine retention and do not take into account the time spent in close proximity with a patient. The purpose of this study was to draw guidelines based on the actual measurements and confirm if the present guidelines for discharge of the 131 I-treated thyroid cancer patients are adequate or not. External exposure rates were measured on 37 patients using a calibrated ionization survey meter. The patients' exposure rates were measured at the time of the discharge from the hospital. The patient and their relatives were given lockets embedded with CaSO 4 :Dy dosimeters at the time of discharge from the hospital. These lockets were given with a chain to be worn in the neck for 15 days. These lockets were collected after a fortnight and read out in a conventional TLD reader. These dose estimates can be used to calculate the limits for the patient movements so as to limit doses received to less than 1 mSv for the family members. This study dealt only with the external exposure; the problem of internal contamination was not considered. In our study the doses to the patient have also been measured in order to estimate the percentage of dose received by their relatives. In our study, most of the cases the dose received by the relatives of the patients are more than 1 mSv, which is more than the limit prescribed by the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the general public. (author)

  16. A novel route to radioiodinated [{sup 123}I]-N-succinimidyl-3-iodobenzoate, a reagent for radioiodination of bioactive peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jammaz, I.; Al-Otaibi, B.; Amartey, J.K. E-mail: amarty@kfshrc.edu.sa

    2002-11-01

    Radiolabeled peptides continue to emerge as potential radiopharmaceuticals for targeting several diseases such as cancer, infection and inflammation and even tissue and organ rejection. The classical method for labeling these molecules has been the electrophilic route. Evidence suggests that most molecules labeled via this route perturb their biological activity. Moreover, this method is not applicable to peptides lacking a tyrosine moiety in their structure. Hence, there is the need to develop alternate methods such as the prosthetic approach. We have optimized a solid-state radioiodination by exchange to produce [{sup 123}I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine ([{sup 123}I]-mIBG). The mIBG served as a precursor to obtain an activated N-succinimidyl ester for efficient coupling to amine functions in peptides, preferably the lysine group(s). The method was used to label a model chemotactic peptide and evaluated in vivo.

  17. Dose selection for radioiodine therapy of borderline hyperthyroid patients according to thyroid uptake of 99mTc-pertechnetate: applicability to unifocal thyroid autonomy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Biermann, Kim; Brockmann, Holger; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Wissmeyer, Michael; Juengling, Freimut D.; Krause, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of applying a previously described dose strategy based on 99m Tc-pertechnetate thyroid uptake under thyrotropin suppression (TcTU s ) to radioiodine therapy for unifocal thyroid autonomy. A total of 425 consecutive patients (302 females, 123 males; age 63.1±10.3 years) with unifocal thyroid autonomy were treated at three different centres with 131 I, using Marinelli's formula for calculation of three different absorbed dose schedules: 100-300 Gy to the total thyroid volume according to the pre-treatment TcTU s (n=146), 300 Gy to the nodule volume (n=137) and 400 Gy to the nodule volume (n=142). Successful elimination of functional thyroid autonomy with either euthyroidism or hypothyroidism occurred at a mean of 12 months after radioiodine therapy in 94.5% of patients receiving 100-300 Gy to the thyroid volume, in 89.8% of patients receiving 300 Gy to the nodule volume and in 94.4% receiving 400 Gy to the nodule volume. Reduction in thyroid volume was highest for the 100-300 Gy per thyroid and 400 Gy per nodule strategies (36±19% and 38±20%, respectively) and significantly lower for the 300 Gy per nodule strategy (28±16%; p s can be used independently of the scintigraphic pattern of functional autonomous tissue in the thyroid. (orig.)

  18. Transcervical, intrauterine ultrasound-guided radiofrequency ablation of uterine fibroids with the VizAblate? System: three- and six-month endpoint results from the FAST-EU study

    OpenAIRE

    Bongers, Marlies; Br?lmann, Hans; Gupta, Janesh; Garza-Leal, Jos? Gerardo; Toub, David

    2014-01-01

    This was a prospective, longitudinal, multicenter, single-arm controlled trial, using independent core laboratory validation of MRI results, to establish the effectiveness and confirm the safety of the VizAblate? System in the treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids. The VizAblate System is a transcervical device that ablates fibroids with radiofrequency energy, guided by a built-in intrauterine ultrasound probe. Fifty consecutive women with symptomatic uterine fibroids received treatment w...

  19. Contribution of radio-iodine 131 in the treatment of Grave's Basedow disease in the department of nuclear medicine of Ibn Sina Hospital in Rabat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mbodj, M.; Amjad, I.; Guerrouj, H.; Ben Rais, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-nine Grave's Basedow diseases in any gender and variable age patients, coming from several cities of Morocco, were randomized in a study of radio-iodine treatment who took place at the nuclear medicine department of Ibn Sina Hospital (Rabat, Morocco) during the period (from January 2001 to December 2008). The radio-iodine treatment was a first, second or third option and radio-iodine activities delivered varied (from 222 to 555 MBq 6 to 15 mCi) according to the age, the thyroid volume, the degree of hyperthyroidism and socio-economical situation. The high amounts of 131 I were reserved especially to the patients who live far and whose socio-economic level is low with an aim of quickly obtaining an easily controllable state of hypothyroidism by a substitute treatment. The results showed that: (1) 57.36% of patients reverted to euthyroidism (n = 74) with a patient having received two 131 I cures. The second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure; (2) 34.88% passed in hypothyroidism (n = 45) with three patients having received two cures of 131 I, the second cure was justified by recurrence of hyperthyroidism after the first cure in two patients and by the persistence of the hyperthyroidism after the first cure for the third patient. The average time of passage in hypothyroidism was 4.5 months; (3) 7.76% had remained in hyperthyroidism after the radioactive iodine treatment. Finally, 92.24% of our patients treated by radioactive iodine had passed in euthyroidism or hypothyroidism against 7.76% whose hyperthyroidism had persisted or occurred. (authors)

  20. Use of recombinant, human TSH radioiodine therapy in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma; Radioiodtherapie des differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinoms nach Vorbehandlung mit rekombinantem, humanem TSH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luster, M. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2001-12-01

    We describe the use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH) in conjunction with ablative radioiodine therapy (RIT) in 11 patients (16 total treatments) with advanced and/or recurrent DTC (5 papillary, 6 follicular) for whom withdrawal of thyroid hormone suppressive therapy (THST) to increase serum TSH was not an option. Indications for rhTSH use in these patients included inability to tolerate withdrawal of thyroid hormones due to poor physical condition or inability to achieve sufficient serum TSH levels after THST withdrawal. All patients had undergone thyroidectomy and most (9/11) had received prior radioablative therapy after THST withdrawal. In 7 cases (5 patients), post-therapy Tg levels assessed at a mean of 4.3 months (range 2-10 months) after I-131 therapy were decreased by at least 30% compared to pre-therapy levels. In an additional 3 patients, whole body scans performed at follow-up indicated decreased or stabilized tumor burden compared to pre-therapy scans or marked clinical improvement was found. Three patients died of progressive disease within 2 months of therapy before follow-up assessments occurred. No adverse events were reported among the 8 surviving patients. The results suggest that rhTSH offers a promising alternative to THST withdrawal to allow radioablative therapy under maximal TSH stimulation in patients with advanced recurrent DTC who would not otherwise be able to receive this treatment. This therapeutic indication extends the clinical potential of the new agent, already demonstrated to be effective for use with I-131 for diagnostic purposes. However in some patients suffering from highly aggressive tumors the poor prognosis will not be improved. (orig.) [German] An unserer Klinik liegen bislang Erfahrungen mit 16 Radioiodtherapien (RIT) (z.T. mehrfache Anwendung) unter rhTSH vor. Die ueberwiegende Mehrzahl der Patienten wurde wegen einer fortgeschrittenen Tumorerkrankung mit dem Risiko einer lebensbedrohlichen Verschlechterung in

  1. US-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermal ablation for the treatment of solid benign hyperfunctioning or compressive thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deandrea, Maurilio; Limone, Paolo; Basso, Edoardo; Mormile, Alberto; Ragazzoni, Federico; Gamarra, Elena; Spiezia, Stefano; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria; Molinari, Filippo; Garberoglio, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the study was to define the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound-guided percutaneous radiofrequency (RF) thermal ablation in the treatment of compressive solid benign thyroid nodules. Thirty-one patients not eligible for surgery or radioiodine (131I) treatment underwent RF ablation for benign nodules; a total of 33 nodules were treated (2 patients had 2 nodules treated in the same session): 10 cold nodules and 23 hyperfunctioning. Fourteen patients complained of compressive symptoms. Nodule volume, thyroid function and compressive symptoms were evaluated before treatment and at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Ultrasound-guided RF ablation was performed using a Starbust RITA needle, with nine expandable prongs; total exposure time was 6 to 10 min at 95 degrees C in one area or more of the nodule. Baseline volume (measured at the time of RF ablation) was 27.7 +/- 21.5 mL (mean +/- SD), but significantly decreased during follow-up: 19.2 +/- 16.2 at 1 mo (-32.7%; p nodules remained euthyroid: five patients with hot nodules normalized thyroid function, and the remaining sixteen showed a partial remission of hyperthyroidism. Besides a sensation of heat and mild swelling of the neck, no major complications were observed. Improvement in compressive symptoms was reported by 13 patients, with a reduction on severity scale from 6.1 +/- 1.4 to 2.2 +/- 1.9 (p nodules. Hyperfunction was fully controlled in 24% of patients and partially reduced in the others.

  2. Comparison of 24 hr total body radio-iodine retention for hypothyroid vs. thyrogen (rhTSH) stimulated whole body surveillance scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jana, S.; Young, I.; Bukberg, P.; Luo, J.Q.; Dakhel, M.; Heiba, S.; El-Zeftawy, H.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: Recently rhTSH has been used for WBS to avoid hypothyroid symptoms from T4/T3 withdrawal. There is limited data available in the current literature comparing total body radio-iodine clearance between hypothyroid pts and pts receiving rhTSH. Significant differences in radio-iodine clearance may influence the dose of radio-iodine required for diagnostic scanning or treatment of pts on a rhTSH protocol. Methods: To retrospectively compare the 24 hr total body I-123 retention in thyroid cancer pts who were made hypothyroid in preparation for radio-iodine scanning with the I-123 retention in pts who received thyrogen (rhTSH) but were maintained on thyroid hormone replacement. Inclusion criteria were as follows: Histologically diagnosed well diff. thyroid Ca s/p surgery and I-131 Rx in the past who were clinically disease free at the time of scanning. No abn. visible I-123 uptake on WBS and 24 hr neck uptake ≤ 1%. Tg level ≤ 2ng off T4/T3 or ≤ 2ng increase from basal level after rhTSH. Anti-Tg Ab negative. Serum Creatine ≤ 1.4 mg/dl. Serum ALT < 35, AST < 35. Total 78 pts were divided into the following 3 groups (Gp): Gp-1 (29 pts) received 2 IM inj. Of 0.9 mg rhTSH 24 and 48 hrs prior to oral dose of 10 mCi I-123. Gp-2 (30 pts) followed hypothyroid protocol i.e., off T4 ≥ 4 wks or T3 ≥ 10 days in order to achieve TSH ≥ 30 MIU/L. The dose of I-123 was 5 mCi. Gp-3 (19 pts) similar to Gp-2 i.e., hypothyroid but scanned using 10 mCi of I-123. Imaging protocol: Pts were scanned 4 hrs and 24 hrs after I-123 administration in a dual head gamma camera for 30 mins. Total body and neck counting were obtained from the geometric mean of Ant and Post images with appropriate decay correction. 24 hr total body retention (TBR) of I-123 were calculated and expressed in %, considering 100% at 4 hrs. Results: Demographic Profile of 3 Patient Groups. AST/ALT was < 35 and 24 hrs neck uptake was ≤ 1.0% all pts. Comparison of 24 hr % TBR of I-123 in 3 Patient Groups

  3. Interest of a multidisciplinary and two-step consultation in radioiodine therapy to improve patient's support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillaumon, C.; Eberle, M.; Deshayes, E.; Savry, B.; Vinson, B.; Kotzki, P.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: the surgery of differentiated thyroid cancer may be followed by radioiodine therapy (I 131 ). This therapy requires a 3-day hospital stay in an isolation room without family visits, but also many precautions before, during and after the hospital stay. This clinical environment can give rise to increased anxiety for a number of patients. This is why we have set up a dedicated consultation, aimed at improving preparation of the hospital stay. The aim of our work was to assess the efficiency of such consultation for patient's understanding of their disease, related apprehensions, and coordination between the nuclear medicine (NM) unit and inpatient ward. Material and methods: we followed the recommendations of the first French Cancer Plan regarding the diagnosis or treatment announcement and the project was reviewed in the frame of Professional Practices Evaluation. Consultations were carried out according to a 2-step procedure in the NM unit. First, patients were informed by the NM physician about disease and treatment. Then, a technologist evaluated social and psychological conditions, and checked proper understanding of disease and treatment. He/she paid a special attention to radiation protection measures, especially for the discharge period. Patients received a guidance manual document, and when necessary were oriented towards the supportive care staff. A dedicated computerized form was used to share patient information between the NM unit and inpatient ward. These consultations ran every day (2 per day). To evaluate procedure efficiency, patients were asked to fulfill a satisfaction questionnaire. Inpatient ward nurses were also surveyed for patient's understanding of their disease, level of anxiety, and quality of care. Results: at Montpellier Cancer Institute, a total of 30 thyroid cancer patients and 15 nurses were surveyed about their perceptions about the consultation before radioiodine therapy from April to

  4. Variants and pitfalls on radioiodine scans in pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Mohamed; Vali, Reza; Chan, Jeffrey; Omarkhail, Yusuaf; Shammas, Amer [University of Toronto, Nuclear Medicine Division, Department of Medical Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-10-15

    Potentially false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma can mimic functioning thyroid tissue and functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue. Such false-positive findings comprise variants and pitfalls that can vary slightly in children as compared with adults. To determine the patterns and frequency of these potential false-positive findings on radioiodine scans in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. We reviewed a total of 223 radioiodine scans from 53 pediatric patients (mean age 13.3 years, 37 girls) with differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Focal or regional activity that likely did not represent functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue were categorized as variants or pitfalls. The final diagnosis was confirmed by reviewing the concurrent and follow-up clinical data, correlative ultrasonography, CT scanning, serum thyroglobulin and antithyroglobulin antibody levels. We calculated the frequency of these variants and pitfalls from diagnostic and post-therapy radioiodine scans. The most common variant on the radioiodine scans was the thymic activity (24/223, 10.8%) followed by the cardiac activity (8/223, 3.6%). Salivary contamination and star artifact, caused by prominent thyroid remnant, were the most important observed pitfalls. Variants and pitfalls that mimic functioning thyroid tissue or functioning thyroid carcinomatous tissue on radioiodine scan in children with differentiated thyroid carcinoma are not infrequent, but they decrease in frequency on successive radioiodine scans. Potential false-positive findings can be minimized with proper knowledge of the common variants and pitfalls in children and correlation with clinical, laboratory and imaging data. (orig.)

  5. Reinvestigation of the radiopharmaceutical production of radioiodinated long-chain fatty acids. Vol. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shaboury, G; El-Kolaly, M T; Raieh, M [Labelled Compounds Department, Hot Laboratories Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    An improved and simple radiopharmaceutical production technique for radioiodination of {omega} - (Br) or (I) fatty acids ({omega}) - Br or I-(C H{sub 2}){sub n} Co{sub 2} H, where n = 16 to 17 with Na{sup 13I} for myocardial imaging study is described. The technique of production is reported here based on an isotope or non - isotopic exchange reaction between the inactive halogenated fatty acids and lyophilized ethanolic solution of Na{sup 131} I (previously dispensed in 0.02 M NaOH solution) at 80 Degree C within 30 min in absolute ethanol (dehydrated and redistill at 78.5 to 80 degree C over nitrobenzene b.p. 208 to 212 degree C). Although considerable radiochemical yields have been obtained using a wide variety of organic solvents as an isotropic or non-isotropic exchange media such as acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, benzene as well as di-n-propyl ketone; certain problems due to the evaporation of these solvents during the process of purification have been observed. These problems were completely avoided by the initial dissolution of the reactants in dehydrated ethyl alcohol which facilitate direct dispensing of the final radioiodinated acids in diluted human serum albumen without any decomposition. Basically, following the radioiodination process the radioiodinated fatty acids ethanolic solution is passed through out an AgCl-impregnated filter to remove the untreated inorganic radioiodine (2 to 5%). The final pure solution (containing over 99.o% radioiodinated pure fatty acids) is dispensed in human serum albumen (4%), and then sterilized by passing it through 0.22 mum milli pore bacterial filter. The technique is being applied for the radiopharmaceutical production of radioiodinated-phenyl long-chain fatty acids such as iodo phenoxy-, and iodobenzamido-heptadecanoic acids. 3 figs.

  6. [Radioiodine 131I therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis - safe, effective and economic option].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskra, J; Kubinyi, J; Telička, Z

    2012-02-01

    Radioiodine 131I therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis is widely accepted over the world. In Czech Republic, however, radioiodine therapy is still not enough used, and has been realized on an inpatient basis to date. Our work is the first analysis of the experiences with radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism on an outpatient basis in Czech Republic. Capsule with 550 MBq of 131I was administered orally in 39 hyperthyroid patients (32 women and 8 men, 21 with autoimmune Graves hyperthyroidism and 18 with toxic thyroid nodules, mean age 66.8 years). In 32 of them we evaluated effectiveness and complications of therapy after 12-42 months. We also compared financial costs of the radioiodine treatment on an outpatient basis with the treatment in hospitalization and with surgery. After the treatment, 9/32 (28 %) patients were euthyroid without thyrostatic/thyroxine treatment, 18/32 (60 %) patients were hypothyroid with thyroxine therapy, 2/32 (6 %) patients significantly decreased doses of thyrostatic drugs. In 2/32 (6 %) patients the treatment was ineffective. The effect of the treatment did not depend on the etiology and severity of hyperthyroidism, but decreased with thyroid volume. Patients with ineffective or only partially effective treatment had median of thyroid volume more than 40 ml. In 1 patient thyroid associated ophthalmopathy was moderately worsened. Other complications were not observed. If we compared financial costs in model with 1 patient, we found that the costs of radioiodine therapy on an outpatient basis (118.7 €) comprise only 16 % of the costs of radioiodine therapy in hospitalization (728 €) and only 25 % of the costs of surgery (475.6 €). Radioiodine 131I is effective and safe in the treatment of hyperthyroidism and the therapy on an outpatient basis is much cheaper choice. The therapy with 131I on an outpatient basis is not suitable in patients with thyroid volume more than 40 ml.

  7. Reinvestigation of the radiopharmaceutical production of radioiodinated long-chain fatty acids. Vol. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shaboury, G.; El-Kolaly, M.T.; Raieh, M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved and simple radiopharmaceutical production technique for radioiodination of ω - (Br) or (I) fatty acids (ω) - Br or I-(C H 2 ) n Co 2 H, where n = 16 to 17 with Na 13I for myocardial imaging study is described. The technique of production is reported here based on an isotope or non - isotopic exchange reaction between the inactive halogenated fatty acids and lyophilized ethanolic solution of Na 131 I (previously dispensed in 0.02 M NaOH solution) at 80 Degree C within 30 min in absolute ethanol (dehydrated and redistill at 78.5 to 80 degree C over nitrobenzene b.p. 208 to 212 degree C). Although considerable radiochemical yields have been obtained using a wide variety of organic solvents as an isotropic or non-isotropic exchange media such as acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, benzene as well as di-n-propyl ketone; certain problems due to the evaporation of these solvents during the process of purification have been observed. These problems were completely avoided by the initial dissolution of the reactants in dehydrated ethyl alcohol which facilitate direct dispensing of the final radioiodinated acids in diluted human serum albumen without any decomposition. Basically, following the radioiodination process the radioiodinated fatty acids ethanolic solution is passed through out an AgCl-impregnated filter to remove the untreated inorganic radioiodine (2 to 5%). The final pure solution (containing over 99.o% radioiodinated pure fatty acids) is dispensed in human serum albumen (4%), and then sterilized by passing it through 0.22 mum milli pore bacterial filter. The technique is being applied for the radiopharmaceutical production of radioiodinated-phenyl long-chain fatty acids such as iodo phenoxy-, and iodobenzamido-heptadecanoic acids. 3 figs

  8. Doses of radioiodine administered for hyperthyroidism: a sampling of Belgian nuclear medicine physician's attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tondeur Dejonckheere, Marianne; Glinoer, Daniel; Verelst, Jean; Sand, Alain; Ham, Hamphrey

    2005-01-01

    Full text: While radioiodine (RI) is a well established treatment for hyperthyroidism, there is no consensus regarding the administration of fixed or calculated doses. Guidelines from scientific societies do not specify the preferable approach, nor the parameters to be used in order to calculate the latter. Therefore, the doses might, for the same patient, be different with regard to the chosen procedure. This study was undertaken to assess the variability of RI amounts administered in Belgium in various cases of hyperthyroidism. 21 Belgian nuclear medicine physicians issued from different departments and universities participated into the study. They received a file with clinical and biological data, iodine turnover rate, scintigraphic images and calculated thyroid surfaces from 10 patients (8 females, 2 males), 30-77 yrs suffering from hyperthyroidism of various etiologies: 7 patients had clinically overt hyperthyroidism and 3 subclinical hyperthyroidism; 7 patients had toxic goiters of various size (Graves' disease), 2 multi nodular goiter and 1 toxic nodule. None suffered from cardiac anomalies or ophthalmopathy. Participants were asked to define the amount of RI they would give in each case. Answers were received during a 8-week period. Analysing data from case 1 to case 10, the ranges of the proposed doses varied between 8 and 22 milli Curies (mCi) (sd : 2.4 - 6.07). Considering all the patients, the proposed doses varied between 2 mCi and 25 mCi. Analysing answers among the 21 participants, mean proposed doses varied between 4.5 and 17.3 mCi (sd: 0.69 - 7.99). Conclusion: These results demonstrate a wide variability among nuclear medicine physicians in the proposed RI doses and confirm that in Belgium there is no uniformity in the procedure used to determine the amount of RI to administer for various causes of hyperthyroidism. This emphasizes the notion that the determination of the amount of RI to be administered remains a matter of debate. (author)

  9. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakado, Koichiro; Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P 2 = 0.68, P 2 = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  10. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamakado, Koichiro, E-mail: yama@clin.medic.mie-u.ac.jp; Takaki, Haruyuki [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan); Yamada, Tomomi [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Translational Medicine (Japan); Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan [Mie University School of Medicine, Department of Interventional Radiology (Japan)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  11. Radiofrequency Ablation of Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have had a surgical procedure in which the liver bile duct has been connected to a loop of bowel are at much greater risk of developing a liver abscess after ablation. Women should always inform their ...

  12. Cryoballoon Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G. Andrade, MD

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Focal point-by-point radiofrequency catheter ablation has shown considerable success in the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. However, it is not without limitations. Recent clinical and preclinical studies have demonstrated that cryothermal ablation using a balloon catheter (Artic Front©, Medtronic CryoCath LP provides an effective alternative strategy to treating atrial fibrillation. The objective of this article is to review efficacy and safety data surrounding cryoballoon ablation for paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation. In addition, a practical step-by-step approach to cryoballoon ablation is presented, while highlighting relevant literature regarding: 1 the rationale for adjunctive imaging, 2 selection of an appropriate cryoballoon size, 3 predictors of efficacy, 4 advanced trouble-shooting techniques, and 5 strategies to reduce procedural complications, such as phrenic nerve palsy.

  13. Aplicaciones clínicas del radioyodo 131 (I131 en las enfermedades del tiroides Clinical applications of radioiodine 131 (I131 in the thyroid diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levi González Rivero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El radioyodo 131 es un isótopo radioactivo que se emplea exitosamente en el diagnóstico y tratamiento de las enfermedades benignas y malignas del tiroides. Su propiedad de integrarse selectivamente al metabolismo del tiroides y emitir una señal, le permite describir el funcionamiento glandular mediante estudios de captación, y delimitar la morfología y localización de los tejidos que capten yodo, a través de la gammagrafía. Es además una radioterapia sencilla, segura y coste-efectiva, usada como primera línea terapéutica en el control del hipertiroidismo, cuya dosis y momento de aplicación debería individualizarse según la etiología y la clínica de cada paciente. El radioyodo 131 ofrece una alternativa eficaz para reducir el tamaño del bocio no tóxico; además, respalda el tratamiento quirúrgico del carcinoma diferenciado del tiroides, y destruye a dosis ablativa los restos tisulares y las lesiones metastásicas que puede identificar durante el seguimiento gammagráfico. El empleo de radioyodo 131 está sujeto al cumplimiento de regulaciones de protección contra la radioactividad.Radioiodine 131 is a radioactive isotope that is successfully used for the diagnosis and the treatment of benign and malignant thyroid diseases. Its quality of selectively integrating to the thyroid metabolism and emitting a signal allows it to describe the gland functioning through capture studies, and to delimit the morphology and location of the tissues that capture iodine by means of gammagraphy. It is also a simple, safe and cost-effective radiotherapy used as first-line therapeutics in the control of hyperthyroidism. The dose and right time of application should be individualized according to the etiology and the clinic of each patient. Radioiodine 131 offers an efficient alternative to reduce the size of non-toxic goiter in addition to supporting the surgical treatment of the differentiated thyroid carcinoma and destroying with ablative doses

  14. Targeting breast carcinoma with radioiodinated anti-HER2 Nanobody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruszynski, Marek; Koumarianou, Eftychia; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Revets, Hilde; Devoogdt, Nick; Lahoutte, Tony; Zalutsky, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: With a molecular weight an order of magnitude lower than antibodies but possessing comparable affinities, Nanobodies (Nbs) are attractive as targeting agents for cancer diagnosis and therapy. An anti-HER2 Nb could be utilized to determine HER2 status in breast cancer patients prior to trastuzumab treatment. This provided motivation for the generation of HER2-specific 5F7GGC Nb, its radioiodination and evaluation for targeting HER2 expressing tumors. Methods: 5F7GGC Nb was radioiodinated with 125 I using Iodogen and with 131 I using the residualizing agent N ε -(3-[ 131 I]iodobenzoyl)-Lys 5 -N α -maleimido-Gly 1 -GEEEK ([ 131 I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK) used previously successfully with intact antibodies. Paired-label internalization assays using BT474M1 cells and tissue distribution experiments in athymic mice bearing BT474M1 xenografts were performed to compare the two labeled Nb preparations. Results: The radiochemical yields for Iodogen and [ 131 I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK labeling were 83.6 ± 5.0% (n = 10) and 59.6 ± 9.4% (n = 15), respectively. The immunoreactivity of labeled proteins was preserved as confirmed by in vitro and in vivo binding to tumor cells. Biodistribution studies showed that Nb radiolabeled using [ 131 I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK, compared with the directly labeled Nb, had a higher tumor uptake (4.65 ± 0.61% ID/g vs. 2.92 ± 0.24% ID/g at 8 h), faster blood clearance, lower accumulation in non-target organs except kidneys, and as a result, higher concomitant tumor-to-blood and tumor-to-tissue ratios. Conclusions: Taken together, these results demonstrate that 5F7GGC anti-HER2 Nb labeled with residualizing [ 131 I]IB-Mal-D-GEEEK had better tumor targeting properties compared to the directly labeled Nb suggesting the potential utility of this Nb conjugate for SPECT ( 129 I) and PET imaging ( 124 I) of patients with HER2-expressing tumors.

  15. Radioiodine treatment for complicated hyperthyroidism using a fixed dose regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, A.K.; Rahman, S.H.; Ansari, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Hyperthyroidism in the elderly and all those with cardiovascular and psychiatric problem has increased mortality and morbidity rate. These patients need special care to cure the disease promptly and permanently for avoidance of complications. Radioactive I-131 is one of the accepted forms of treatment for hyperthyroidism and increasingly being considered for the patients in whom rapid and permanent control of disease is desirable. To evaluate the success of I-131 to cure disease in-patients with complicated hyperthyroidism, we prospectively studied the outcome of radioiodine therapy using a fixed dose regime. Ninety-three patients with toxic diffuse goitre (65 female, 28 male) age ranging from 29-67 years (mean ? SD 41.35 ? 11.02 years) were evaluated. The subjects included 71 cases with cardiovascular problem, 13 elderly patients, 5 with poor drug compliance and 4 with associated psychiatric disease. The individual was excluded from the study who had autonomous toxic nodule. Every patient was pre-treated with antithyroid drugs for 4 weeks and the drug was discontinued for 3 days before administering I-131. No patients had post-treatment antithyroid drugs. All the patients were treated with a fixed oral dose of 15 mCi I-131 sodium iodide. Post-treatment follow-up examinations were done at 6 weeks without biochemical tests, at 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 1 year and then annually with biochemical tests. Patients were classified as cured if the biochemical status was either euthyroid or hypothyroid at one year without further treatment by antithyroid drugs or radioiodine. Of the 93 cases, 82 patients became euthyroid or hypothyroid requiring no further treatment for hyperthyroidism with an overall cure of 88.17%. Hypothyroidism was developed in 49 (52.69%) patients at one year of whom 39 became hypothyroid within 6 months and another 10 patients within 1 year. 4 patients were subclinical hyperthyroid at 6 months and still hyperthyroid at 9 months. 7

  16. Radioiodine therapy in non toxic multi nodular goitre, preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiti, A.; Travaini, L.L.; Tadayyon, S.; Vannucchi, G.; Fugazzola, L.; Beck-Peccoz, P.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Aim of our study was to assess the efficacy of 131 I therapy in patients (pts) affected by non toxic multinodular goitre (NTMG). NTMG is a thyroid disease with a high prevalence, especially in low-iodine intake regions. Treatment of NTMG often requires surgery. However, thyroidectomy may be risky in some patients and radioiodine therapy could be an alternative treatment to reduce thyroid volume. We also evaluated if lithium administration can improve the efficacy of radioiodine treatment in this pts. Material and Methods: We enrolled 39 pts (8 males, 31 females; mean age 59 y, range 40-79 y) affected by NTMG. Mean thyroid volume (TV) at ultrasound was of 46.8 ml (range 18.5-87.3). Pts were randomised in 2 groups. Group 1: iodine therapy + lithium therapy 900 mg/die for 6 days; Group 2: iodine therapy alone. We also define 3 clusters of pts by TV. A:15-30 ml; B:31-40 ml; C: > 40 ml. The 131 I activity (MBq) was calculated as follows: [4.44 (MBq) x 100/24 hours uptake (%)] x TV. All patients are evaluated for thyroid function and TV at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after treatment, since we postulate that major reduction in thyroid volume will occur 1 year after 131 I therapy. Results: Up to now 16 pts were treated with 131 I (mean activity: 512 MBq) and no side effects from 131 I and lithium therapy were reported. Four out of 5 pts evaluated at 3 months (2 of group 1 and 3 of group 2) had a reduction in TV (mean value: 8.8 ml). Five out of 10 pts had sub-clinical hyperthyroidism at 1 week, likely as a consequence of thyroid tissue destruction. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest the safety and effectiveness of 131 I treatment in NTMG. We expect to clarify the role of lithium administration in improving 131 I efficacy. This therapy could have a future role in patients with NTMG that can't be submitted to surgery

  17. Usefulness of radioiodine scanning in patients with moderate/high risk differentiated thyroid carcinoma in whom thyroglobulin after thyroxin withdrawal is undetectable after initial treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley S.; Cardoso, Ludmilla David; Fagundes, Tales Alvarenga; Reis, Janice Sepulveda; Maia, Frederico F. Ribeiro; Purisch, Saulo

    2004-01-01

    We selected 92 patients without anti thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb), in whom thyroglobulin (Tg) after L-thyroxin withdrawal was undetectable ( 1.5 cm; and lymph nodes metastases in 43 (46.7%), local invasion in 26 (28.2%) or distant metastases in 23 (25%). Control whole-body scanning was negative in 78.2% of the cases and showed cervical uptake in the others. Cases presenting thyroid bed uptake in the absence of tumor recurrence did not receive radioiodine and Tg remained undetectable one year after the initial evaluation in all. Cervical uptake was not observed in 4/13 cases on repeated scan. In contrast, even in the absence of uptake and with undetectable Tg, 7 patients with recurrence confirmed by ultrasound (US) received surgical treatment. US showed 92.8% sensitivity for the detection of local-regional disease. The present study suggests that even moderate/high-risk patients without TgAb and with undetectable T g levels (off T 4 ) do not require radioiodine scanning after initial treatment and can be evaluated by cervical US. (author)

  18. Variations in the chemical speciation behaviour of radioiodines in the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswaran, G.; Gokhale, A.S.; Moorthy, P.N.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical behaviour of radioiodines in the primary coolant of the Tarapur Boiling Water Reactor has been studied under different operating conditions. During normal operation, radioiodines speciated mainly as I - (≅60%) and IO 3 - (≅35%) with 2 . At 1-5 h into reactor shutdown conditions, radioiodines existed predominantly as IO 3 - species (>80%). Beyond 5 h after shutdown, quantitative conversion of IO 3 - to I - was observed to occur in about 20 h duration. Long time after reactor shutdown, radioiodines were present in the coolant as I - species only. A quantitative conversion of near carrier-free IO 3 - to I - was observed in laboratory low dose rate (0.95 kGy/h), low and high dose gamma irradiation experiments in near neutral solutions both in absence and presence of externally added H 2 O 2 . However, near carrier-free I - solutions irradiated under the same conditions yielded ≅15% IO 3 - species only which is in agreement with the literature data. The radioiodine speciation behaviour in reactor water has been explained by a qualitative model coupling iodine release from defective fuel elements and the associated gamma irradiation effects. (author)

  19. Detection of radioiodine-induced cytogenetic alterations in circulating lymphocytes of thyroid patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasuba, V [Inst. for Medical Recearch and Occupational Health, Zagreb (Croatia). Laboratory for Mutagenesis; Konrady, A; Koeteles, G J [Frederic Joliot-Curie National Research Institute for Radiobiology and Radiohygiene, Budapest (Hungary); Kusic, Z [Clinical Hospital Sestre Milosrdnice, Zagreb (Croatia). Dept. of Oncology and Nuclear Medicine

    1994-10-01

    Radioiodines are often used for experimental purposes and for diagnosis and therapy in clinical practice. Human population might also be exposed to radioiodines in nuclear accidents. The ionizing energy of radioiodine affects not only the thyroid where it concentrates but also other tissues, especially the lymphocytes during their circulation through and around the gland containing the radioisotopes. Therefore, it seemed to be of interest to carry out investigations concerning the cytogenetic alterations in blood lymphocytes of patients treated with iodine-131. The method of choice was the relatively easily performable micronucleus assay in cytokinesis-blocked cultures of human peripheral lymphocytes. The test was performed on blood samples of 30 patients before the radioisotope treatment and one, two and four days after, one as well as 6 and - in a few cases - 12 weeks later. The amounts of iodine-131 injected were dependent on the clinical practices to reach the therapeutic radiation doses for hyperthyroidism and adenomas and were in the range of 220 and 5180 MBq. it was observed that the micronucleus frequency increased in the treated hyperthyroid patients while in patients with toxic adenomas the radioiodine did not result in an increase or even as compared to the pretreatment values in a few cases decreased values were seen. The results suggest individual differences in radiosensitivity as well as that the frequency of cytogenetic alterations depend on the physiological or pathological conditions of the thyroid. The significance of this observation will be discussed for dose assessments by cytogenetic techniques due to internal radioiodine. (author).

  20. Personalized Medicine Based on Theranostic Radioiodine Molecular Imaging for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Byeong-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging based personalized therapy has been a fascinating concept for individualized therapeutic strategy, which is able to attain the highest efficacy and reduce adverse effects in certain patients. Theranostics, which integrates diagnostic testing to detect molecular targets for particular therapeutic modalities, is one of the key technologies that contribute to the success of personalized medicine. Although the term "theranostics" was used after the second millennium, its basic principle was applied more than 70 years ago in the field of thyroidology with radioiodine molecular imaging. Differentiated thyroid cancer, which arises from follicular cells in the thyroid, is the most common endocrine malignancy, and theranostic radioiodine has been successfully applied to diagnose and treat differentiated thyroid cancer, the applications of which were included in the guidelines published by various thyroid or nuclear medicine societies. Through better pathophysiologic understanding of thyroid cancer and advancements in nuclear technologies, theranostic radioiodine contributes more to modern tailored personalized management by providing high therapeutic effect and by avoiding significant adverse effects in differentiated thyroid cancer. This review details the inception of theranostic radioiodine and recent radioiodine applications for differentiated thyroid cancer management as a prototype of personalized medicine based on molecular imaging.

  1. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Martin A.; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat; Schindler, Christian; Mueller-Brand, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T 3 , fT 4 , TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p 4 , T 3 and TSH. (orig.)

  2. Water spray assisted ultrashort laser pulse ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, M.; Kaakkunen, J.J.J.; Paivasaari, K.; Vahimaa, P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We show the novel method to use multibeam processing with ultrashort pulses efficiently. ► Sprayed thin water layer on ablation zone enhances ablation rate and quality. ► In some cases this method also enables ablation of the deeper and straighter holes compared to ones made without the water layer. ► Method also makes possible to directly write features without the self-organizing structures. - Abstract: We have studied femtosecond ablation under sprayed thin water film and its influence and benefits compared with ablation in the air atmosphere. These have been studied in case of the hole and the groove ablation using IR femtosecond laser. Water enhances the ablation rate and in some situations it makes possible to ablate the holes with a higher aspect ratio. While ablating the grooves, the water spray allows using the high fluences without the generation of the self-organized structures.

  3. Determination of the most appropriate method for extrapolating overall survival data from a placebo-controlled clinical trial of lenvatinib for progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Tremblay,1 Christopher Livings,2 Lydia Crowe,2 Venediktos Kapetanakis,2 Andrew Briggs3 1Global Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment, Eisai Inc., Woodcliff Lake, NJ, USA; 2Health Economics, Decision Resources Group, Bicester, Oxfordshire, 3Health Economics and Health Technology Assessment, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK Background: Cost-effectiveness models for the treatment of long-term conditions often require information on survival beyond the period of available data. Objectives: This paper aims to identify a robust and reliable method for the extrapolation of overall survival (OS in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer receiving lenvatinib or placebo. Methods: Data from 392 patients (lenvatinib: 261, placebo: 131 from the SELECT trial are used over a 34-month period of follow-up. A previously published criterion-based approach is employed to ascertain credible estimates of OS beyond the trial data. Parametric models with and without a treatment covariate and piecewise models are used to extrapolate OS, and a holistic approach, where a series of statistical and visual tests are considered collectively, is taken in determining the most appropriate extrapolation model. Results: A piecewise model, in which the Kaplan–Meier survivor function is used over the trial period and an extrapolated tail is based on the Exponential distribution, is identified as the optimal model. Conclusion: In the absence of long-term survival estimates from clinical trials, survival estimates often need to be extrapolated from the available data. The use of a systematic method based on a priori determined selection criteria provides a transparent approach and reduces the risk of bias. The extrapolated OS estimates will be used to investigate the potential long-term benefits of lenvatinib in the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients and

  4. Ablative doses of radioiodine show a high efficacy and safety in the treatment of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juri, A.; Pitoia, Fabian; Lopaczek, N.; Mana, D.; Niepomniscze, Hugo; El Tamer, Elias A.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the frequency of healing and persistence/relapse of hyperthyroidism using two protocols of different 131 I doses in patients with Graves diseases, and to evaluate the presence of adverse effects observed in the patients after each of the protocols. (author) [es

  5. Radioiodinated carnitine and acylcarnitine analogs as potential myocardial imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.S.

    1991-01-01

    R-carnitine is extremely important in mammalian energy metabolism. Gamma-butyrobetaine, the immediate biosynthetic precursor to R-carnitine, is synthesized in many organs. However, only liver can hydroxylate gamma-butyrobetaine to carnitine. Thus the transport of carnitine from its site of synthesis to the site of utilization is of utmost importance. Carnitine is found in highest concentration in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it is required for the transport of fatty acids into the mitochondria. Before fatty acids are utilized as fuel for the myocyte by beta-oxidation, they are bound to carnitine as an acylcarnitine ester at the 3-hydroxyl, and transported across the micochondrial membranes. R,S-Carnitine has been shown to be taken up by myocytes. The author has begun a study on the use of carnitine derivatives as potential carriers for the site-specific delivery of radioiodine to bidning sites in the myocardium. Such agents labeled with a gamma-emitting nuclide such as iodine-123 would be useful for the noninvasive imaging of these tissues. The aim was to synthesize a variety of radiolabeled analogs of carnitine and acylcarnitine to address questions of transport, binding and availability for myocardial metabolism. These analogs consist of N-alkylated derivatives of carnitine, acylcarnitine esters as well as carnitine amides and ethers. One C-alkylated derivative showed interesting biodistribution, elevated myocardial uptake and competition with carnitine for binding in the myocardium

  6. Thyroid fractional deposition and half life of radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Minoru

    1974-01-01

    In order to measure the absorbed dose of radioiodine in the thyroid gland, which was incorporated by halation or ingestion, iodine intake (fa), 131 I thyroid uptake rate(fw), 131 I thyroid uptake rate compared to the rate in the whole body (f 2 ) and the half life of iodine in the thyroid gland(Teff) were examined. Thyroid fractional deposition of 131 I was compared between Japanese and European. The rate of 131 I which moved from the blood into the thyroid gland in children (f 2 ') and the effect of the iodine in meals on 131 I thyroid uptake (fw) were also studied. In Japanese, f 2 was 0.28 and the mean Teff was 6.9 +- 0.7 days in 11 Japanese adults. There was an individual difference in these biological parameter and the values in adults were different from those in children. A little difference in value between Japanese and European suggested to be caused by the greater amount of stable iodine in meals in Japanese. (Serizawa, K.)

  7. Development of radioiodinated fatty acids for applications in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.; Elmaleh, D.R.; Okada, R.; Strauss, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The use of radioiodinated fatty acids for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion and the assessment of regional fatty acid metabolism in relation to myocardial disease have seen rapid growth in the last few years. In this paper the development and use of these agents are reviewed. In addition to a discussion of the design of structurally modified fatty acids, the development of new radiolabeling methods for preparation of the iodine-123-labeled agents is presented. The development of these new agents is discussed, and their potential use in conjunction with single-photon tomography is an exciting new area. A summary of the clinical studies involving measurement of regional washout rate which have been performed with agents such as 17-([ 123 I]iodo)heptadecanoic acid and 15-(p-[ 123 I]iodo phenyl)pentadecanoic acid is also presented. The combined interest and expertise of chemists and clinicians have worked effectively together to make many recent contributions to this area of radiopharmaceutical development

  8. Radioiodinated BMIPP for myocardial imaging - current status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Kropp, J.; Franken, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Since the 1970's both basic research applications and clinical use of radioiodinated free fatty acids has continued to be of interest in nuclear cardiology. Clinical use of iodine-123-labeled fatty acids offers a unique opportunity for direct or indirect evaluation of alterations in myocardial metabolism by single photon computed tomography (SPECT). The relationship between the negative 'mismatches' often observed between regional fatty acid uptake and perfusion tracer distribution (i.e. BMIPP defect larger than flow tracer defect) has been an important observation which can often provide information on myocardial viability. Although the widespread use of the iodine-123-labeled 15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R, S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) analogue in Japan continues to provide extensive clinical data defining indications for the use of this agent, it remains to be seen, however, if iodine-123-labeled fatty acids such as BMIPP will enter routine clinical use in other countries, since their commercial availability as approved radiopharmaceuticals will be required. In this paper further studies describing the resolution and evaluation of the metabolism and myocardial uptake and release kinetics of the 3R- and 3S-BMIPP isomers are described. Although it is beyond the scope of this brief paper to review and discuss the voluminous data which have been published concerning both clincial applications and research studies with BMIPP over the last several years, the issues associated with the broader clinical use of BMIPP and other iodine-123-labeled fatty acid agents are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used

  10. Radio-iodination of plasma membranes of toad bladder epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, H J; Edelman, I S [California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Cardiovascular Research Inst.; California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Medicine; California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry and Biophysics)

    1979-01-01

    The present report describes high yield enzymatic radio-iodination of the apical and basal-lateral plasma membranes of toad bladder epithelium with /sup 125/I-Na, by a procedure that does not breach the functional integrity of the epithelium, as assessed by the basal and vasopressin-sensitive short-circuit current (SCC). Iodination of basal-lateral plasma membranes, at a yield comparable to that obtained with apical labelling, was attained after about 30 min of exposure of the intact bladder to the labelling solutions. Approximately 25% of the basal-lateral labeling was lost when the epithelial cells were harvested after collagenase treatment, implying that some iodination of the basement membrane had taken place. Less than 10% of iodination of the apical or basal-lateral surfaces was accounted for by lipid-labeling. Analysis of the labeled apical and basal-lateral species by enzymatic digestion and thin layer chromatography disclosed that virtually all the radioactivity was present as mono-iodotyrosine (MIT). (orig./AJ).

  11. Improved radioiodination of biomolecules using exhaustive Chloramine-T oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, Ana M.; Balter, Henia S.; Oliver, Patricia; Welling, Mick M.; Pauwels, Ernest K.J.

    2001-01-01

    To improve standardization in analytical reagents we investigated Chloramine-T radioiodination ( 125 I) of several biomolecules based on the use of a single amount of the oxidizing agent Chloramine-T as the limiting reagent being exhausted during the course of the reaction. Whenever the labeling yield resulted in less than one atom 125 I/molecule, a second amount of the oxidizing agent was added. Thereafter, the integrity of the various biomolecules was assessed using radioimmunoassays, radioreceptor binding assays, or radioimmunometric assays. Purification yields were done by gel permeation (56%±19%, n=230) or by precipitation with trichloroacetic acid (59%±19%, n=230). Specific activity (117±61 MBq/nmol) and the degree of iodine incorporation (1.4±0.8 atoms of 125 I/molecule) were achieved after 300 sec of incubation. A second addition of Chloramine-T resulted in an increased labeling yield of all biomolecules tested by a mean factor of 1.8±0.9. After the second addition of Chloramine-T, we observed for some biomolecules a significant (p<0.001) decreased effect in biological performance. In conclusion, the use of Chloramine-T as a limiting reagent resulted in molecules with appropriate immunological and biological performance. In general, tracers were minimally damaged and assessment of the shelf life as well as storing conditions showed the usefulness of the standardization of biomolecule labeling

  12. Novel radioiodinated sibutramine and fluoxetine as models for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motaleb, M.A.; El-Kolaly, M.T.; Rashed, H.M.; Abd El-Bary, A.

    2011-01-01

    Brain imaging is a process which allows scientists and physicians to view and monitor the areas of the brain which allow diagnosis and following up different abnormalities in the brain. The aim of this study was to develop potential radiopharmaceuticals for the non-invasive brain imaging. Sibutramine and fluoxetine (two drugs that have the ability to cross blood-brain barrier) were successfully labeled with 125 I via direct electrophilic substitution reaction at ambient temperature. The reaction parameters studied were substrate concentration, oxidizing agent concentration, pH of the reaction mixture, reaction temperature, reaction time and in vitro stability of the iodocompounds. The iodocompounds gave maximum labeling yield of 92 ± 2.77 and 93 ± 2.1%, respectively, and maintained stability throughout working period (24 h). Biodistribution studies showed that maximum in vivo uptake of the iodocompounds in the brain was 5.7 ± 0.19 and 6.14 ± 0.26% injected activity/g tissue organ, respectively, at 15 and 5 min post-injection, whereas the clearance from the mice appeared to proceed via the hepatobiliary pathway. Brain uptake of 125 I-sibutramine and 125 I-fluoxetine is higher than that of 99m Tc-ECD and 99m Tc-HMPAO (currently used radiopharmaceuticals for brain imaging) and so radioiodinated sibutramine and fluoxetine could be used instead of 99m Tc-ECD and 99m Tc-HMPAO for brain SPECT. (author)

  13. Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy of hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidhauer, K.; Odatzidu, L.; Schicha, H.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Methods: Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. Results: All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. Conclusions: An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas. (orig.) [de

  14. [Body weight gain after radioiodine therapy in hyperthyroidism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidhauer, K; Odatzidu, L; Kiencke, P; Schicha, H

    2002-02-01

    Analysis and follow up of body weight after radioiodine therapy (RITh) of hyperthyroidism, since excessive weight gain is a common complaint among these patients. Therapy and body weight related data of 100 consecutive RITh-patients were retrospectively analysed from the time before up to three years after RITh. All patients suffered from hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease or autonomy), but were adjusted to euthyroid levels after RITh. Patients' data were compared to a control group of 48 euthyroid patients out of the same ambulance and during the same time scale. All patients (RITh and controls) gained weight over the time. There was no statistically significant difference in BMI development over three years between RITh-patients and controls (5.5% resp. 4.9% increase). In the first year after RITh, weight gain of the RITh patients was higher indeed, but lower in the follow up, resulting in the same range of weight gain after three years as the controls. Besides that women showed a slightly higher increase of BMI than men, and so did younger patients compared to elder as well as patients with overweight already before RITh. An initially distinct increase of body weight after RITh of hyperthyroidism is mainly a compensation of pretherapeutic weight loss due to hyperthyroidism. Presupposing adequate euthyroid adjustment of thyroid metabolism after therapy, RITh is not responsible for later weight gain and adipositas.

  15. Development of a radioiodinated ligand for characterising α1-adrenoceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Jarrott, B.

    1982-01-01

    Two α-adrenoceptor antagonists, phentolamine and 2-(β-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethylaminomethyl)-tetralone (BE 2254) which are phenolic derivatives were radioiodinated after chloramine-T oxidation of Na 125 I and the labelled material isolated by chromatography. 125 I-Phentolamine does not bind selectively to α-adrenoceptors in guinea pig brain whereas the 125 I-BE 2254 derivative binds rapidly, reversibly and with high affinity to these receptors with a K/sub d/ of 230 pM. At low concentrations of 125 I-BE 2254 ( 1 subclass of adrenoceptors. Binding measurements to kidney and smooth muscle membrane preparations indicate that 125 I-BE 2254 may also be a useful tool in the study of α-adrenoceptors in peripheral tissues. The high specific activity of 125 I-BE 2254 permits the use of minimal quantities of membrane material for receptor assay and ligand displacement measurements, e.g. 250 μg per assay tube, and this provides a significant advantage over the use of existing radioligands such as 3 H-prazosin which requires approx. 40 times as much tissue

  16. Radioiodinated fenetylline (captagon) - a new radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Zschachlitz, L.; Breuel, H.P.; Reske, S.N.; Oehr, P.; Winkler, C.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radioiodinated fenetylline as a potential brain imaging agent. Thirty Wistar rats were injected with 125 I-N-isopropylamphetamine (IMP) and 131 I-fenetylline each simultaneously. The animals were sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min. p. i. The radioactivity content of tissue specimens of different organs was measured in a well counter (% dose/g tissue). After 5/10 min. p. i. fenetylline-uptake in the brain of rats was 1.0/1.3% compared to 1.3/1.9% (IMP). A fast decrease of cerebral fenetylline concentration was established after 30(0.2%) and 60 (0.5%) min. In 2 dogs sequential scintigraphy was performed following the injection of 131 I-fenetylline. Three patients underwent brain SPECT after injection of 123 I-fenetylline. The canine and human sequential scintigraphy revealed a rapid cerebral uptake suggesting that fenetylline is concentrated in the brain as a function of cerebral blood flow. From our first clinical findings it appears to be likely that the combined use of 123 I labeled IMP and fenetylline for SPECT may lead to a more differentiated evaluation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism. (orig.) [de

  17. Radioiodinated fenetylline (captagon) - a new radiopharmaceutical for brain imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biersack, H.J.; Zschachlitz, L.; Breuel, H.P.; Reske, S.N.; Oehr, P.; Winkler, C.; Kluenenberg, H.

    1984-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate radioiodinated fenetylline as a potential brain imaging agent. Thirty Wistar rats were injected with /sup 125/I-N-isopropylamphetamine (IMP) and /sup 131/I-fenetylline each simultaneously. The animals were sacrificed 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 120 min. p. i. The radioactivity content of tissue specimens of different organs was measured in a well counter (% dose/g tissue). After 5/10 min. p. i. fenetylline-uptake in the brain of rats was 1.0/1.3% compared to 1.3/1.9% (IMP). A fast decrease of cerebral fenetylline concentration was established after 30(0.2%) and 60 (0.5%) min. In 2 dogs sequential scintigraphy was performed following the injection of /sup 131/I-fenetylline. Three patients underwent brain SPECT after injection of /sup 123/I-fenetylline. The canine and human sequential scintigraphy revealed a rapid cerebral uptake suggesting that fenetylline is concentrated in the brain as a function of cerebral blood flow. From our first clinical findings it appears to be likely that the combined use of /sup 123/I labeled IMP and fenetylline for SPECT may lead to a more differentiated evaluation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism.

  18. 23 Lung Metastases Treated by Radiofrequency Ablation Over 10 Years in a Single Patient: Successful Oncological Outcome of a Metastatic Cancer Without Altered Respiratory Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crombé, Amandine, E-mail: amandine.crombe@ens-lyon.fr; Buy, Xavier [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Godbert, Yann [Institut Bergonié, Department of Nuclear Medicine (France); Alberti, Nicolas [Centre Hospitalier Alpes-Léman, Department of Radiology (France); Kind, Michèle [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France); Bonichon, Françoise [Institut Bergonié, Department of Nuclear Medicine (France); Palussière, Jean [Institut Bergonié, Department of Radiology (France)

    2016-12-15

    An 82-year-old man, who was diagnosed in 2002 with an oncocytic (Hürthle cell) thyroid carcinoma, was initially treated by local surgery and was refractory to radioiodine treatment. The patient had successive secondary recurrences from 2006 onwards. Metastases were suspected due to an elevation of thyroglobulin in serum. Hypermetabolic nodules were targeted using FDG PET as well as CT-guided radiofrequency ablations. Thyroglobulin levels decreased following each procedure. 10 years later, tolerance and efficacy are excellent; 23 lung metastases have been treated during 11 sessions without current relapse. Respiratory function and quality of life are not altered. This report illustrates how radiofrequency ablation can be efficiently integrated into the long-term management of poorly aggressive oligometastatic cancer, in combination with other local and/or systemic therapies.

  19. 23 Lung Metastases Treated by Radiofrequency Ablation Over 10 Years in a Single Patient: Successful Oncological Outcome of a Metastatic Cancer Without Altered Respiratory Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crombé, Amandine; Buy, Xavier; Godbert, Yann; Alberti, Nicolas; Kind, Michèle; Bonichon, Françoise; Palussière, Jean

    2016-01-01

    An 82-year-old man, who was diagnosed in 2002 with an oncocytic (Hürthle cell) thyroid carcinoma, was initially treated by local surgery and was refractory to radioiodine treatment. The patient had successive secondary recurrences from 2006 onwards. Metastases were suspected due to an elevation of thyroglobulin in serum. Hypermetabolic nodules were targeted using FDG PET as well as CT-guided radiofrequency ablations. Thyroglobulin levels decreased following each procedure. 10 years later, tolerance and efficacy are excellent; 23 lung metastases have been treated during 11 sessions without current relapse. Respiratory function and quality of life are not altered. This report illustrates how radiofrequency ablation can be efficiently integrated into the long-term management of poorly aggressive oligometastatic cancer, in combination with other local and/or systemic therapies.

  20. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment.......Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  1. Radioiodine concentration by the thymus in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: report of five cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Maria Eduarda; Flamini, Rodrigo C.; Corbo, Rossana; Mamede, Marcelo [Instituto Nacional do Cancer (INCa), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear], e-mail: mamede@inca.gov.br

    2009-10-15

    The radioactive iodine has been used with great value as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma previously submitted to total thyroidectomy. False-positive whole-body scans may occur due to misinterpretation of the physiologic distribution of the radioisotope or lack of knowledge on the existence of other pathologies that could eventually present radioiodine uptake. Thymic uptake is an uncommon cause of false-positive whole-body scan, and the mechanism through which it occurs is not completely understood. The present paper reports five cases of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who presented a mediastinum uptake of radioiodine in a whole-body scan during follow-up. The patients had either histological or radiological confirmation of the presence of residual thymus gland. It is very important to know about the possibility of iodine uptake by the thymus in order to avoid unnecessary treatment, such as surgery or radioiodine therapy. (author)

  2. Effect of pH value of applied solution on radioiodine sorption by soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabova, T.

    1976-01-01

    Sorption of radioiodine by soils was followed under static conditions at different pH values of the initial solution in five soil types. Sorption of radioiodine by soils is affected by the amount of the organic mass and by the pH of solutions. With the same pH, soils containing a higher amount of the organic mass absorb more radioiodine. The highest sorption percentage of 131 I - for all pH values was found in meadow chernozem soil and the lowest in the rendzina and in carboniferous meadow soils. The highest sorption of 131 I - for degraded chernozem, meadow chernozem soils and brown soil was recorded at pH 5 and for carboniferous meadow soil and rendzina at pH 7. (author)

  3. Development of a stable radioiodinating reagent to label monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, D.S.; Hadley, S.W.; Hylarides, M.D.; Abrams, P.G.; Beaumier, P.A.; Morgan, A.C.; Reno, J.M.; Fritzberg, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    A method of radioiodinating monoclonal antibodies such that the labeled antibodies do not undergo in vivo deiodination has been studied. The method utilizes conjugation of succinimidyl para-iodobenzoate to the antibody. The iodobenzoate was radiolabeled by using an organometallic intermediate to facilitate the reaction. Thus, succinimidyl para-tri-n-butylstannylbenzoate was radiolabeled in 60-90% radiochemical yield and subsequently conjugated to the antibody in 80-90% yield. Animal biodistribution studies were carried out with two separate anti-melanoma antibodies (9.2.27 and NR-M1-05) labeled by this method, and examined in nude mice bearing human melanoma tumor xenografts. Very large differences in the localization of radioactivity were observed in the thyroids and stomachs of mice when the iodobenzoyl-labeled antibodies were compared with the same antibodies labeled using the chloramine-T method of radioiodination. Few other significant differences in the tissue distribution of the radioiodinated antibodies were seen

  4. The role of multikinase inhibitors target therapy in radioiodine-resistant differentiated thyroid cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P O Rumyantsev

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available About 5-15% of patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC primary or within follow-up have had distant metastases or inoperable tumor mass that are resistant to radioiodine therapy as well as dramatically deteriorate survival prognosis. Other treatment modalities (radiotherapy, chemotherapy etc. also ineffective. Certain expectances are associated with target therapy with multikinase inhibitors with are selectively blocking onco-kinase molecular pathways. This review is devoted to analysis of those multikinase inhibitors which have been implemented in patients with radioiodine DTC. Comparative analysis of two most perspective multikinase inhibitors (sorafenib and lenvatinib with evaluation of efficacy and adverse effects was conducted. Both of them successfully underwent 3 rd phase of clinical trial and were recommended as treatment of choice in progressive radioiodine-resistant DTC patients.

  5. Procedure guideline for radioiodine test (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zum Radioiodtest (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinische Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. fuer Nuklearmedizin; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The version 3 of the procedure guideline for radioiodine test is an update of the guideline previously published in 2003. The procedure guideline discusses the pros and cons of a single measurement or of repeated measurements of the iodine-131 uptake and their optimal timing. Different formulas are described when one, two or three values of the radioiodine kinetic are available. The probe with a sodium-iodine crystal, alternatively or additionally the gamma camera using the ROI-technique are instrumentations for the measurement of iodine-131 uptake. A possible source of error is an inappropriate measurement (sonography) of the target volume. The patients' preparation includes the withdrawal of antithyroid drugs 2-3 days before radioiodine administration. The patient has to avoid iodine-containing medication and the possibility of additives of iodine in vitamin- and electrolyte-supplementation has to be considered. (orig.)

  6. The Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Thyroid Axis in Infants and Children: Protection from Radioiodines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Potassium iodide (KI is recommended as an emergency treatment for exposure to radioiodines, most commonly associated with nuclear detonation or mishaps at nuclear power plants. Protecting the thyroid gland of infants and children remains a priority because of increased incidence of thyroid cancer in the young exposed to radioiodines (such as 131I and 133I. There is a lack of clinical studies for KI and radioiodines in children or infants to draw definitive conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of KI administration in the young. In this paper, we compare functional aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT axis in the young and adults and review the limited studies of KI in children. The HPT axis in the infant and child is hyperactive and therefore will respond less effectively to KI treatment compared to adults. Research on the safety and efficacy of KI in infants and children is needed.

  7. Outcome of radioiodine therapy without, on or 3 days off carbimazole: a prospective interventional three-group comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, Martin A. [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Mueller, Beat [University Hospital Basel, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Clinical Nutrition, Basel (Switzerland); Schindler, Christian [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Basel (Switzerland); Mueller-Brand, Jan [University Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Basel (Switzerland)

    2006-06-15

    Carbimazole ameliorates hyperthyroidism but reduces radioiodine uptake and adversely affects the outcome of simultaneous radioiodine therapy. We explored whether withdrawal of carbimazole for 3 days can restore the outcome of radioiodine treatment without concurrent exacerbation of hyperthyroidism. By generating three groups with comparable radioiodine uptake, we also investigated whether the effect of carbimazole depends on the radioiodine uptake. Stratified by a radioiodine uptake >30%, 227 consecutive adult patients were prospectively assigned to radioiodine therapy (target dose 200 Gy) without, on or 3 days off carbimazole. Patients were clinically (Crooks-Wayne score) and biochemically (T{sub 3}, fT{sub 4}, TSH) followed up after 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary endpoint was outcome 12 months after radioiodine therapy. A total of 207 patients completed follow-up (toxic nodular goitre, n=117; Graves' disease, n=90). The overall success rate was 71.5%. Patients without and 3 days off carbimazole had similar biochemical (81.4% and 83.3%, respectively; p=0.82) and clinical outcomes [median (range) Crooks-Wayne score 0 (0-16) and 1 (0-10), respectively; p=0.73], which were both higher than in patients on carbimazole [42.6%, p<0.001; Crooks-Wayne score 3 (0-30), p<0.03]. Time to achieve cure was delayed on carbimazole. No changes in thyroid hormone levels occurred after 3 days' discontinuation of carbimazole. Logistic regression revealed that all observed cure rates were independent of entity, sex, age, thyroid volume, radioiodine uptake, radioiodine half-life, fT{sub 4}, T{sub 3} and TSH. (orig.)

  8. Influence of preceding diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1991-01-01

    Before and until 3 weeks after application of nonionic CA iodine and the 20-min-technetium-thyroid-uptake was measured in serum and urine in 23 euthyroid patients, which were given intravenously nonionic CA during heart catheterization. Concerning the possible influence of iodine contamination on a subsequent radioiodine therapy the following aspects result from the study: the time interval between application of CA and therapy has to be at least 4-6 weeks to avoid dilution of the radioiodine by iodine being released from the contrast agents. The thyroid-uptake of Technetium or Iodine after administration of CA is not constant over time but reaches its original value only in a gradual way (60% of the initial value 3 weeks after the CA were given); that means, the iodine-uptake during, radioiodine therapy can be higher than it was at the time the dose was calculated. Concerning the possible influence of preceding therapeutic procedures on the therapy with radioiodine the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs plays the most important role. Antithyroid drugs of the thiourylene group have been shown by many study groups to have a radioprotective effect. Other large studies however could not demonstrate any effect of antithyroid medication on the results of radioiodine therapy. All studies so far existing have in common that they are not strongly randomized with regard to the patient groups, because generally only in severe cases of hyperthyroidism additional antithyroid drug treatment has been employed, therefore it might be the case that the radioprotective effect of antithyroid drugs may be caused only by selection artifacts. The contradictory results of the different studies justify the practical way in so far as there are no reasonable objections against the pretreatment with antithyroid drugs to restore euthyroidism before starting the therapy with radioiodine. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Predictors of treatment failure, incipient hypothyroidism, and weight gain following radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, F W; Zammitt, N N; Beckett, G J; Strachan, M W J

    2013-10-01

    Following radioiodine ((131)I) therapy, both late recognition of hypothyroidism and treatment failure may result in adverse outcomes. We sought to assess indicators of both incipient hypothyroidism and treatment failure following (131)I and determine factors predictive of weight gain. Retrospective study of 288 patients receiving (131)I for treatment of Graves' thyrotoxicosis. Primary outcome measures were thyroid status and weight change at 1 yr following (131)I. The treatment failure rate at 1 yr was 13.5%. Hypothyroidism developed in 80.9%, with 58.5% of patients having levels of free T4 (fT4) treatment failure (23.3%) than those with no thionamide exposure (6.3%, p=0.003), but also had more active Graves' disease. Following (131)I, development of a detectable TSH or low-normal fT4 levels was not associated with recurrent thyrotoxicosis. Median weight gain was 5.3 kg, although patients with nadir fT4 levels 6 pmol/l (p=0.05). The main predictor of weight gain was fT4 level immediately prior to treatment; those in the lowest tertile gained a median 3.1 kg whilst those in the highest tertile gained 7.4 kg (median difference 4.3 kg; 95% confidence interval: 2.5-6.2). Marked hypothyroidism following (131)I is common and often occurs early. Simple biochemical parameters may help identify incipient hypothyroidism and potentially limit excess weight gain. Treatment failure is common in patients with severe thyrotoxicosis and in such cases larger doses of (131)I may be warranted.

  10. Results of radioiodine therapy of manifest hyperthyroidism and autonomous euthyroid goiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berding, G.; Schicha, H.

    1990-01-01

    In 200 patients follow-up examinations were performed up to one year after radioiodine therapy (RITh) with individual dose calculation. The mean applied dose was significantly lower in patients with immunogenic hyperhyroidism (Graves' disease) as compared to patients with non-immunogenic hyperthyroidism (disseminated/multifocal autonomy, HYDA). In Graves' disease the rate of recurrent hyperthyroidism was significantly higher and that of posttreatment hypothyroidism lower. Considering the high recurrence rate in Graves' disease a higher dose, e.g. 150 Gy, seems to be appropriate. In patients with HYDA who received antithyroid drugs during RITh, recurrence of hyperthyroidism appeared slightly more, and posttreatment hypothyroidism slightly less, frequent. The efficiency of RITh was not significantly reduced by additional treatment with antithyroid drugs. Posttreatment hypothyroidism in patients with euthyroid goiter and disseminated/multifocal autonomy (EUDA) occurred significnatly more frequent if the basal TSH level was ≥ 0.5 μIE/ml before therapy. The goiter size was reduced independent of the basal TSH level. In HYDA patients after thyroid surgery recurrence appeared less, and in those with EUDA posttreatment hypothyroidism significantly more, frequent. A lower dose seems to be suitable in patients who underwent thyroid surgery before. In patients with focal autonomy after RITh no recurrence of hyperthyroidism was observed. In 9% a suppressed basal TSH level indicating persistent autonomy was seen. Posttreatment hypothyroidism in focal autonomy appeared only in patients without manifest hyperthyroidism before RITh and was significantly more frequent in this group. In patients with focal autonomy who developed hypothyroidism the dose calculation was based on a significantly higher volume of the adenoma. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Long-term carbimazole pretreatment reduces the efficacy of radioiodine therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Shivaprasad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Data from several studies suggest that pretreatment with antithyroid drugs (ATD before 131 I increases the risk of treatment failure. This effect has been demonstrated more consistently with propylthiouracil than with carbimazole (CMZ or methimazole (MMI. Men with Graves′ disease (GD have a lower rate of remission with 131 I compared to women and the impact of long-term ATD pretreatment on the success of 131 I is unknown. The objective of our study was to compare the efficacy of fixed doses of radioiodine between patients with and without long-term CMZ pretreatment. Materials and Methods: We performed a retrospective study on 335 male patients with GD treated with 131 I from 1998 to 2008. 148 patients had been pretreated with CMZ, and the remaining 187 patients received 131 I without pretreatment. We compared the success rate of a single dose of 131 I, between patients with and without long-term CMZ pretreatment. Results: The success rate of a single dose of 131 I was significantly higher in patients without pretreatment than in patients who were pretreated with CMZ (91.4% vs. 82.3%, P = 0.01. The rate of hypothyroidism in the first 6 months after 131 I therapy was significantly higher in patients without pretreatment (55.1% vs. 44.6%, P = 0.05. There was also a trend for higher cumulative rate of hypothyroidism at last follow-up in nonpretreated patients (78.1% vs. 69.7%. Conclusion: Male patients with Graves′ hyperthyroidism pretreated with CMZ have lower efficacy with 131I therapy compared to nonpretreated patients. CMZ pretreatment given for a prolonged period reduces the efficacy of 131 I therapy.

  12. Femtosecond laser ablation of enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quang-Tri; Bertrand, Caroline; Vilar, Rui

    2016-06-01

    The surface topographical, compositional, and structural modifications induced in human enamel by femtosecond laser ablation is studied. The laser treatments were performed using a Yb:KYW chirped-pulse-regenerative amplification laser system (560 fs and 1030 nm) and fluences up to 14 J/cm2. The ablation surfaces were studied by scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Regardless of the fluence, the ablation surfaces were covered by a layer of resolidified material, indicating that ablation is accompanied by melting of hydroxyapatite. This layer presented pores and exploded gas bubbles, created by the release of gaseous decomposition products of hydroxyapatite (CO2 and H2O) within the liquid phase. In the specimen treated with 1-kHz repetition frequency and 14 J/cm2, thickness of the resolidified material is in the range of 300 to 900 nm. The micro-Raman analysis revealed that the resolidified material contains amorphous calcium phosphate, while grazing incidence x-ray diffraction analysis allowed detecting traces of a calcium phosphate other than hydroxyapatite, probably β-tricalcium phosphate Ca3), at the surface of this specimen. The present results show that the ablation of enamel involves melting of enamel's hydroxyapatite, but the thickness of the altered layer is very small and thermal damage of the remaining material is negligible.

  13. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease based on tissue-absorbed dose calculations: effect of pre-treatment thyroid volume on clinical outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhardt, Michael J.; Joe, Alexius Y.; Mallek, Dirk von; Ezziddin, Samer; Palmedo, Holger [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Strasse 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Brink, Ingo [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Freiburg (Germany); Krause, Thomas M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital Bern (Switzerland)

    2002-09-01

    This study was performed with three aims. The first was to analyse the effectiveness of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with and without goitres under conditions of mild iodine deficiency using several tissue-absorbed doses. The second aim was to detect further parameters which might be predictive for treatment outcome. Finally, we wished to determine the deviation of the therapeutically achieved dose from that intended. Activities of 185-2,220 MBq radioiodine were calculated by means of Marinelli's formula to deliver doses of 150, 200 or 300 Gy to the thyroids of 224 patients with Graves' disease and goitres up to 130 ml in volume. Control of hyperthyroidism, change in thyroid volume and thyrotropin-receptor antibodies were evaluated 15{+-}9 months after treatment for each dose. The results were further evaluated with respect to pre-treatment parameters which might be predictive for therapy outcome. Thyroidal radioiodine uptake was measured every day during therapy to determine the therapeutically achieved target dose and its coefficient of variation. There was a significant dose dependency in therapeutic outcome: frequency of hypothyroidism increased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 67.7% after 300 Gy, while the frequency of persistent hyperthyroidism decreased from 27.4% after 150 Gy to 8.1% after 300 Gy. Patients who became hypothyroid had a maximum thyroid volume of 42 ml and received a target dose of 256{+-}80 Gy. The coefficient of variation for the achieved target dose ranged between 27.7% for 150 Gy and 17.8% for 300 Gy. When analysing further factors which might influence therapeutic outcome, only pre-treatment thyroid volume showed a significant relationship to the result of treatment. It is concluded that a target dose of 250 Gy is essential to achieve hypothyroidism within 1 year after radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease patients with goitres up to 40 ml in volume. Patients with larger goitres might need higher doses

  14. Critical analysis of radioiodination techniques for micro and macro organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajid Mushtaq; Jongho Jeon; Beom Su Jang; Sang Hyun Park; Korea University of Science and Technology, Daejeon; Aqeela Shaheen

    2016-01-01

    A variety of radioiodination methods is available in the literature depending upon the nature of organic compound to be labeled, however only few can completely fulfill manufacturing requirements.Ideally a selected method should be one which offers maximum benefits like regioselectivity, minimum reaction steps, minimum reaction time, high radiochemical yield and high specific activity. In this review radioiodination techniques were critically analyzed. Advantages, drawbacks, possible mode of action and special reaction conditions required to get high radiochemical yield were taken into account. The influence of iodine introduction on physicochemical properties, in vivo or in vitro pharmacological properties of pharmaceutical due to increase of lipophilicity were discussed along with examples. (author)

  15. Radioiodine therapy increases the risk of cerebrovascular events in hyperthyroid and euthyroid patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Jeppe Lerche; Jensen, Lars Thorbjoern; Vej-Hansen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    to radiation and is capable of inducing atherosclerosis. The objective of the study was to elucidate whether ionizing radiation from radioiodine might contribute to cerebrovascular morbidity. METHODS: In a retrospective register cohort study, 4000 hyperthyroid and 1022 euthyroid goitre patients treated...... with radioiodine between 1975 and 2008 were matched 1:4 on age and sex with random controls. The cohort was followed from the date of treatment until hospitalization due to cerebrovascular event, death, 20 years of follow-up or March 2013. Data were analyzed in competing risk models adjusting for age, sex...

  16. Acute changes of peripheral thyroid hormone concentrations and serum thyroglobulin during radio-iodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.R.; Steinbaecher, M.; Heilig, B.

    1986-01-01

    TT3, FT3 and FT4 concentrations were measured in 28 patients with hyperthyroidism before and during therapy with radioiodine. In addition, in some patients serum thyroglobulin was evaluated, too. Only in the patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism FT3, FT4 and serum TG were elevated significantly within the first two days after radioiodine application. In the residual patients with diffuse autonomy, autonomous adenoma, and multifocal autonomy during the whole time of investigation there was no significant increase of the respective values. From these data it can be deducted that hyperthyroid storm is more likely to be provoked in patients with immunogenic hyperthyroidism compared to thyroidal autonomy. (orig.) [de

  17. Radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. An assessment of its potential risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, G.D.; Burman, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the side effects of radiation exposure has deterred physicians from using radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, although the efficacy and safety of this treatment have been established in the 35 years since its introduction. In that time, no significant side effects have been discovered. We believe iodine-131 should be considered the treatment of choice in most patients with Graves' disease. This article reviews the current understanding of the risks in radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease, including the risks for teratogenicity, genetic damage, carcinogenesis, and cellular dysfunction

  18. Radioiodine Accumulation in a Giant Ovarian Cystadenofibroma Detected Incidentally by 131-I Whole Body Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebarki, Mohammed; Menemani, Abdelghani; Medjahedi, Abdelkader; Boualou, Fouad; Slama, Abdelhak; Ouguirti, Sarah; Kherbouche, Fatima Zahra; Berber, Nécib

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cystadenofibroma is a relatively rare tumor; it is usually asymptomatic and is found incidentally. We present the case of a 24-year-old female patient, who had undergone total thyroidectomy for thyroid papillary carcinoma, with an asymptomatic giant cystadenofibroma, incidentally discovered by diagnostic 131I-SPECT/CT WBSs. We summarize the clinical history, imaging data, and histopathological study on a rare case of radioiodine accumulation in cystadenofibroma, and we discuss the mechanism of uptake of radioiodine in this case. PMID:23119215

  19. Synthesis, radioiodination, and biodistribution of some nido- and closo-monocarbon carborane derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilbur, D. Scott; Hamlin, Donald K.; Srivastava, Rajiv R.; Chyan, Ming-Kuan

    2004-01-01

    Iodination and radioiodination reactions of several anionic nido- and closo-monocarbon carboranes were conducted. Iodinations occurred more rapidly with nido-carboranes than with closo-carboranes. The most rapid iodination and radioiodination reactions occurred with unsubstituted carboranes. C-amino and C-ammonium derivatives did not iodinate under the conditions studied. Both nido- and closo-carboranes with C-NH-acetyl and C-NH-succinyl substituents iodinated, but the nido-carboranes iodinated under milder reaction conditions. Biodistributions of nido-1-succinylamido-[ 131 I]carborane and closo-1-succinylamido-[ 125 I]carborane were similar in mice, but blood clearance of the nido- compound was slower

  20. Determination of the radioiodine species in the exhaust air of nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuber, H.

    1977-01-01

    Using the selective I 2 sorption materials DSM 10 and DSM 11 measurements were performed with radioiodine species samplers in the exhaust air of a research reactor and of several nuclear power stations (BWR, PWR). The radioiodine species samplers were used upstream and downstream of iodine filters (containment exhaust air stand-by filter, shutoff room exhaust air filter) as well as in the exhaust air of the stack. The results obtained by use of DSM 10 and DSM 11 generally agreed. The percentage of aerosol iodine was low in all cases ( [de

  1. Isolation, lactoperoxidase catalyzed radioiodination, and recovery of proteins bound to insoluble immunoadsorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cort, S.; McDougall, J.S.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the direct radioiodination and recovery of proteins specifically adsorbed to an insoluble immunoadsorbent is described. The optimal conditions for adsorption, washing, radiolabelling by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, and elution of radio-labelled proteins from the immunoadsorbent have been determined. The technique is a rapid and efficient means of isolating and radioiodinating specific proteins present in biological fluids and has been applied to the detection of immunoglobulin and histocompatibility antigens in mouse cell culture supernates. This method should be particularly applicable in research situations in which the specific antisera are available but the antigen concentration is low or the volume of material to be analyzed is limited

  2. Radiostatine and radioiodine uptake characterization in sodium iodine symporter-expressing cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrich, T.; Helmeke, H.J.; Meyer, G.J.; Knapp, W.H.; Poetter, E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has been recognized as an attractive target for cancer gene therapy. Here we investigated NIS-mediated transport of the high LET α-emitter astatine, 211 At, in comparison to radioiodine. A constitutive expression vector harbouring the human NIS cDNA was used in combination with reporter gene vectors for transient transfection of 13 different human cancer cell lines. Radioiodine uptake was measured as well as transfection efficiencies. Six stable NIS-expressing cell lines (3 derived from thyroid carcinomas, 2 colon carcinoma, 1 glioblastoma) were generated by antibiotic selection. NIS expression was monitored by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Subsequently the radioastatine and radioiodine uptake characteristics of genetically modified cells were studied in comparison to the respective control cells. After xenotransplantation in nude mice in vivo tumor imaging by scintigraphy and biodistribution studies following organ removal were performed. Transient transfection of NIS cDNA led to high specific sodium perchlorate-sensitive radioiodine uptake in NIS-expressing cells that roughly correlates to transfection efficiencies. Similarly, stable NIS-expressing cell lines were able to concentrate high levels of radioiodine and in addition showed comparable transport capacity for radioastatine. Accumulation of 211 At was inhibited by sodium perchlorate like iodide uptake and displayed dependency an extracellular Na + - and I - -ions as well. Compared to wash-out experiments in cell culture the effective half life of radioiodine and radioastatine in vivo was significantly prolonged. Preliminary dose calculations by MIRD concepts indicated higher tumor radiation doses for 211 At compared to 131 I. Tumor cells of different origins transfected with the NIS-expression vector specifically and significantly take-up radioiodine and radioastatine in vitro and in vivo. The data provide direct evidence that the NIS efficiently transports

  3. Critical assessment of the test of 131I radioiodine uptake in the thyroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemec, J.; Roehling, S.; Vana, S.; Zamrazil, V.

    1979-01-01

    The value of radioiodine 131 I uptake by the thyroid gland was studied to differentiate the functional disorders of the thyroid gland by analysing a smaller group of patients using the classical method and the computer method for the evaluation of 2500 determinations. The conclusion may be drawn that the uptake of radioiodine was caused by a disturbance of the thyroid gland function only in a minority of cases whereas in the others it is dependent on the intake of iodine or of goitrogens. It is therefore not suitable as a screening method for the diagnosis of thyroid gland diseases. It is, however, useful for the differentation of various types of hyperthyroidism. (author)

  4. Can dosimetry help to predict euthyroidism after 131I radioiodine treatment of solitary thyroid nodule?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skanjeti, A.; Pia, A.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction: recent SNM guidelines suggest to administer 3-8 MBq for each gram of thyroid tissue in order to reach a non hyperthyroid status, while EANM guidelines suggest to reach a dose of 100-400 Gy depending on type of disease. This second point of view is based on the principle that dosimetry, i.e. the metabolism of radioiodine within the thyroid can determine the outcome of radiation in the gland. However, although reasonable, it has not been shown unequivocally that dosimetry allows better outcome. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether dosimetry and parameters that consent a dose evaluation can be useful in order to predict outcome in hyperthyroid patients with solitary nodule and successfully treated with radioiodine. Material and methods. Thirty-one consecutive patients with solitary nodule and successfully treated with 131 I radioiodine were included. In 27 patients euthyroidism was durably reached during the follow up, while in 4 hypothyroid state was the final outcome. All of them underwent Radioiodine Uptake Test (RUT) with 5 measurements (6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 72 h, and 96 h), thyroid scintigraphy to estimate gland mass and radioiodine administration. Bi-compartmental model was used to estimate residence time and dose was estimated according to EANM guidelines based on administered activities of radioiodine. Uptake at 6 h, uptake at 24 h, mass gland, dose, age, residence time, activity and activity/mass were compared in patients with stable euthyroidism versus patients with hypothyroidism in the follow up. Results: only uptake at 6 h was different in these groups of patients (p=0.05 at Welch t-test), the logistic regression seemed to confirm the significant correlation (p=0.08) between uptake at 6 h and outcome of the treatment. The other parameters were not significantly correlated with the treatment effect. Conclusion: this pilot study, performed in a very small population, did not show any significant

  5. Efficacy of microwave ablation versus radiofrequency ablation for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic liver disease: a randomised controlled phase 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietti Violi, Naïk; Duran, Rafael; Guiu, Boris; Cercueil, Jean-Pierre; Aubé, Christophe; Digklia, Antonia; Pache, Isabelle; Deltenre, Pierre; Knebel, Jean-François; Denys, Alban

    2018-05-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is the recommended treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who have lesions smaller than 3 cm and are therefore not candidates for surgery. Microwave ablation is a more recent technique with certain theoretical advantages that have not yet been confirmed clinically. We aimed to compare the efficacy of both techniques in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma lesions of 4 cm or smaller. We did a randomised controlled, single-blinded phase 2 trial at four tertiary university centres in France and Switzerland. Patients with chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma with up to three lesions of 4 cm or smaller who were not eligible for surgery were randomised to receive microwave ablation (experimental group) or radiofrequency ablation (control group). Randomisation was centralised and done by use of a fixed block method (block size 4). Patients were randomly assigned by a co-investigator by use of the sealed opaque envelope method and were masked to the treatment; physicians were not masked to treatment, since the devices used were different. The primary outcome was the proportion of lesions with local tumour progression at 2 years of follow-up. Local tumour progression was defined as the appearance of a new nodule with features typical of hepatocellular carcinoma in the edge of the ablation zone. All analyses were done in the per-protocol population. The study is completed, but patients will continue to be followed up for 5 years. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02859753. Between Nov 15, 2011, and Feb 27, 2015, 152 patients were randomly assigned: 76 patients to receive microwave ablation and 76 patients to receive radiofrequency ablation. For the per-protocol analysis, five patients were excluded from the microwave ablation group as were three patients from the radiofrequency ablation group. Median follow-up was 26 months (IQR 18-29) in the microwave ablation group and 25 months (18-34) in

  6. Radioiodine labeling of resveratrol and its biodistribution in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo; Yu Huixin; Tan Cheng; Lin Xiufeng; Zhang Li; Cao Guoxian; Luo Shineng

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate the preparation of radioiodinated resveratrol and its biodistribution in mice, resveratrol was labeled with 131 I using lactoperoxidase methods and purified by ethyl acetate. The radiolabeled compound was characterized by polyamide TLC, in which the substratum of V trichoromethane : V acetone : V ethanol : V Adam's ale =4 : 4 : 0.5 : 0.4 was used as the developing agent. Biodistribution studies were accomplished on KM mice. At different time after radiopharmaceutical i.v. administration (0.185 MBq 131 I- tetrahydropalmatine/mouse), the animals were sacrificed (n=5 animals for each time). Blood and the interested tissues were collected, washed, weighted and counted. The percent injected dose per gram (%ID·g -1 ) was calculated for each sample. The labeling yield of 131 I-resveratrol is 69.3% and its RCPs are 95.9%, 92.0%, 90.4%, and 90.1% after 1, 3, 7 and 15 d, respectively. Biodistribution in mice demonstrates that 131 I-resveratrol is distributed into broad organs and tissues. However, it reveals higher levels in liver, kidney and intestine than in other tissues. In liver and kidney, the %ID· g -1 are 16.35% and 13.05% at 5 min, respectively. 131 I-resveratrol is metabolized mainly through liver and kidney. Simultaneously, its high distribution is also found in intestine. The %ID·g -1 of 131 I-resveratrol is 11.70% at 10 min; the activity in thyroid increases with time. Therefore, the 131 I-resveratrol is worthy of further investigation to trace the compound in vivo and ex vivo. (authors)

  7. Radioiodine-labeling of tetrahydropalmatine and its biodistribution in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Cheng; Lin Xiufeng; Zhang Li; Chen Bo; Cao Guoxian; Yu Huixin; Song Cuicui

    2008-01-01

    The work was to investigate radioiodinated tetrahydropalmatine and its biodistribution in mice. Tetrahydropalmatine was labeled with 131 I using the chloramine-T method and the labeled compound were characterized by polyamide TLC. The animals were sacrificed at different times after radiopharmaceutical i.v. administration. The interested tissues samples were collected, and percent injected dose per gram (%ID·g -1 ) was calculated for each sample. The labeling yield of 131 I-tetrahydropalmatine was 76% and its RCPs were 97.3%, 95.4%, and 96.8% after 1, 7 and 20 days, respectively. Biodistribution in mice demonstrated that 131 I-tetrahydropalmatine was extensive, and it was metabolized mainly in liver and kidney, which contained of 14.35% and 6.55% ID·g -1 at 5 min, respectively, with 3.26% and 1.20% ID·g -1 at 4h, respectively. Comparatively high 131 I-tetrahydropalmatine was found in intestine and fat, but clearance was slow, 3.91% and 3.05% at 5 min and decreased to 0.79% and 0.37% at 4 h. The results also showed that 131 I-tetrahydropalmatine could well penetrate the blood-brain barrier to attain a maximal level in brain tissue within 5-10 min, but it mostly was cleaned out after 2 h. There was no significant difference in brain regions despite of highest biodistribution in parietal lobe. In conclusion, 131 I-tetrahydropalmatine was stable and it was metabolized mainly in liver and kidney, but there was no significant difference in brain regions. (authors)

  8. Radioiodine-Labeling of Chlorpyrifos and Its Biodistribution in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIAO Yao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the preparation of radioiodinated Chlorpyrifos and its biodistribution in mice, Chlorpyrifos was labeled with 131I using the Iodogen method. Biodistribution studies were carried out in KM mice. At different times after radiopharmaceutical i.v. administration (185 kBq 131I-Chlorpyrifos/mouse, n=5, the animals were sacrificed. Blood samples and the tissues of interested were collected, weighted and counted. The percentage of injected does per gram (%ID/g was calculated for each sample. The labeling yield of 131I-Chlorpyrifos was 93.5%, The radiochemical purity (RCP was 96.9%. Biodistribution in mice demonstrated that 131I-Chlorpyrifos was extensive, and the uptakes mainly occur in lung, stomach, small-intestine, colon, musle, and submaxillay gland, as indicated by their amount of 37.12%ID/g, 6.18%ID/g, 8.12%ID/g, 8.15%ID/g, 7.04%ID/g, and 7.02%ID/g at 10 min, respectively. And it was metabolized in liver and kidney, as indicated by their uptake of 4.34%ID/g and 8.50%ID/g at 5 min, and 0.22%ID/g and 0.69%ID/g at 4 h, respectively. In addition, 131I-Chlorpyrifos was cleared out from blood quickly, and the uptake of 131I-Chlorpyrifos in blood was 37.27%ID/g at 5 min, and decreased to 1.35%ID/g at 4 h post injection. In conclusion, 131I-Chlorpyrifos was stable in vitro and it was absorbed in lung and digestive tract, and it was metabolized mainly in liver and kidney, worthy of further investigation to trace the compound in vivo and in vitro.

  9. Radioiodinated fenetylline (captagon): A new potential brain imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biersack, H.J.; Klunenberg, H.; Breuel, H.P.; Reske, S.N.; Reichmann, K.; Winkler, C.

    1984-01-01

    Since about 2 years /sup 123/I-labeled iodamphetamines (IMP) and diamines (HIPDM) have been used for scintigraphic brain investigations. As another possibly useful brain imaging agent we studied radioiodine labeled Fenetylline which is metabolized into amphetamine. Thirty wistar rats were injected 5 μCi /sup 125/I-IMP and 2 μCi /sup 131/I-Fenetylline each simultaneously. The animals were sacrificed 5,10,15,30,60, and 120 min. p.i. The radioactivity content of tissue specimens (brain, cerebellum, liver, kidney, lung, myocardium, muscle) was measured in a well-counter (% dose/g tissue). In 2 dogs sequential cerebral scintigraphy was performed following the injection of 0.5 mCi /sup 131/I-Fenetylline. Three patients underwent brain SPECT after injection of 6.5 mCi /sup 123/I-Fenetylline. The results can be summarized as follows: after 5/10 min. p.i. Fenetylline-uptake in the brain of rats was 1.0/1.3% compared to 1.3/1.9% (IMP). A fast decrease of cerebral Fenetylline concentration was established after 30 (0.2%) and 60 (0.5%) min. The canine and human sequential scintigraphy revealed a rapid cerebral uptake (maximum after 2-10 min.) suggesting that Fenetylline is concentrated in the brain as a function of cerebral blood flow. From the first clinical findings it appears to be likely that the combined use of /sup 123/I labelled IMP and Fenetylline for SPECT may lead to a more differentiated evaluation of cerebral blood flow and metabolism

  10. Direct and indirect radioiodination of protein: comparative study of chemotactic peptide labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavinas, Tatiana

    2004-01-01

    The development of simple methods for protein radioiodination have stimulated the use of radioiodinated peptides in vivo. There are two basic methods for labeling proteins with radioiodine: direct labeling, reaction of an electrophilic radioiodine with functional activated groups on protein, like the phenol ring in the tyrosine residue, and the conjugation of a previously radioiodinated molecule to the protein, referred as indirect method. The great problem related to the direct radioiodination of proteins is the in vivo dehalogenation. This problem can be minimized if a non-phenolic prosthetic group is used in the indirect radioiodination of the peptide. The ATE prosthetic group, N-succinimidyl 3-(tri-n-butylstannyl) benzoate, when radioiodinated by electrophilic iododestannilation produces N-succinimidyl 3-[ 123 l/ 131 l] iodine benzoate (SIB) that is subsequently conjugated to the protein by the acylation of the lysine group. There are many radiopharmaceuticals employed in scintigraphic images of infection and inflammation used with some limitations. These limitations stimulated the improvement of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals, the receptor-specific related labeled peptides, as the mediators of the inflammatory response, that presents high affinity by receptors expressed in the inflammation process, and fast clearance from blood and non-target tissues. One of these molecules is the synthetic chemotactic peptide fNleLFNIeYK that presents potent chemotaxis for leukocytes, with high affinity by the receptors presented in polymorphonuclear leukocytes and mononuclear phagocytes. The objective of this work included the synthesis of ATE prosthetic group and comparative radioiodination of the chemotactic peptide fNleLFNIeYK by direct and indirect methods, with radiochemical purity determination and evaluation of in vivo and in vitro stability of the compounds. This work presented an original contribution in the comparative biological distribution studies of the

  11. Femtosecond laser ablation of dentin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, S; Vilar, R; Oliveira, V

    2012-01-01

    The surface morphology, structure and composition of human dentin treated with a femtosecond infrared laser (pulse duration 500 fs, wavelength 1030 nm, fluences ranging from 1 to 3 J cm -2 ) was studied by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average dentin ablation threshold under these conditions was 0.6 ± 0.2 J cm -2 and the ablation rate achieved in the range 1 to 2 µm/pulse for an average fluence of 3 J cm -2 . The ablation surfaces present an irregular and rugged appearance, with no significant traces of melting, deformation, cracking or carbonization. The smear layer was entirely removed by the laser treatment. For fluences only slightly higher than the ablation threshold the morphology of the laser-treated surfaces was very similar to the dentin fracture surfaces and the dentinal tubules remained open. For higher fluences, the surface was more porous and the dentin structure was partially concealed by ablation debris and a few resolidified droplets. Independently on the laser processing parameters and laser processing method used no sub-superficial cracking was observed. The dentin constitution and chemical composition was not significantly modified by the laser treatment in the processing parameter range used. In particular, the organic matter is not preferentially removed from the surface and no traces of high temperature phosphates, such as the β-tricalcium phosphate, were observed. The achieved results are compatible with an electrostatic ablation mechanism. In conclusion, the high beam quality and short pulse duration of the ultrafast laser used should allow the accurate preparation of cavities, with negligible damage of the underlying material. (paper)

  12. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley [Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Endocrinology Service

    2013-05-01

    Objective: To evaluate {sup 131}I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Subjects and methods: Thirty-six patients with TSH {<=} 0.1mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter (< 60 cm{sup 3} were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Results: Mean 24-h {sup 131}I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. Conclusions: In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. (author)

  13. Determination of the most appropriate method for extrapolating overall survival data from a placebo-controlled clinical trial of lenvatinib for progressive, radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Gabriel; Livings, Christopher; Crowe, Lydia; Kapetanakis, Venediktos; Briggs, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness models for the treatment of long-term conditions often require information on survival beyond the period of available data. This paper aims to identify a robust and reliable method for the extrapolation of overall survival (OS) in patients with radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer receiving lenvatinib or placebo. Data from 392 patients (lenvatinib: 261, placebo: 131) from the SELECT trial are used over a 34-month period of follow-up. A previously published criterion-based approach is employed to ascertain credible estimates of OS beyond the trial data. Parametric models with and without a treatment covariate and piecewise models are used to extrapolate OS, and a holistic approach, where a series of statistical and visual tests are considered collectively, is taken in determining the most appropriate extrapolation model. A piecewise model, in which the Kaplan-Meier survivor function is used over the trial period and an extrapolated tail is based on the Exponential distribution, is identified as the optimal model. In the absence of long-term survival estimates from clinical trials, survival estimates often need to be extrapolated from the available data. The use of a systematic method based on a priori determined selection criteria provides a transparent approach and reduces the risk of bias. The extrapolated OS estimates will be used to investigate the potential long-term benefits of lenvatinib in the treatment of radioiodine-refractory differentiated thyroid cancer patients and populate future cost-effectiveness analyses.

  14. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate 131I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Thirty-six patients with TSH ≤ 0.1 mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter (< 60 cm³) were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Mean 24-h 131I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia.

  15. Radioiodine therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism due to non-voluminous nodular goiter and its effect on bone metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, Pedro Weslley

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 131 I therapy in elderly patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCH) due to nodular disease and who did not receive antithyroid drugs (ATDs), and the effect of the treatment on bone metabolism. Subjects and methods: Thirty-six patients with TSH ≤ 0.1mIU/L and non-voluminous goiter ( 3 were studied. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed in 17 women with osteopenia. Results: Mean 24-h 131 I uptake was 17.5%. Symptoms of thyrotoxicosis were reported by two (5.5%) patients in the first week after therapy. One year after radioiodine treatment, SCH was resolved in 30 (83.3%) patients, and hypothyroidism was detected in one (2.7%). In the patients in whom TSH returned to normal, femoral and lumbar spine BMD increased by 1.9% and 1.6%, respectively, in average. Conclusions: In elderly patients with SCH and non-voluminous goiter, radioiodine not preceded by ATDs is a safe and effective therapeutic alternative. Resolution of SCH has beneficial effects on BMD in postmenopausal women with osteopenia. (author)

  16. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pua, Uei

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  17. Transhemangioma Ablation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Uei, E-mail: druei@yahoo.com [Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established treatment modality in the treatment of early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) [1]. Safe trajectory of the RFA probe is crucial in decreasing collateral tissue damage and unwarranted probe transgression. As a percutaneous technique, however, the trajectory of the needle is sometimes constrained by the available imaging plane. The presence of a hemangioma beside an HCC is uncommon but poses the question of safety related to probe transgression. We hereby describe a case of transhemangioma ablation of a dome HCC.

  18. Treatment of Metastatic Lymph Nodes in the Neck from Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma with Percutaneous Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauri, Giovanni, E-mail: vanni.mauri@gmail.com [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Cova, Luca [General Hospital of Busto Arsizio, Unit of Interventional Oncology (Italy); Ierace, Tiziana [IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Unit of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Baroli, Alberto; Di Mauro, Enzo [General Hospital of Busto Arsizio, Department of Nuclear Medicine (Italy); Pacella, Claudio Maurizio [Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Italy); Goldberg, Shraga Nahum [Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Image-guided Therapy and Interventional Oncology Unit (Israel); Solbiati, Luigi [IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Unit of Interventional Radiology (Italy)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeTo assess the effectiveness of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) of cervical lymph node metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma.Materials and Methods24 patients (62.3 ± 13.2 year; range 32–80) previously treated with thyroidectomy, neck dissection, and radioiodine ablation underwent ultrasound-guided PLA of 46 {sup 18}FDG-PET/CT—positive metachronous nodal metastases. All patients were at high surgical risk or refused surgery and were unsuitable for additional radioiodine ablation. A 300 µm quartz fiber and a continuous-wave Nd-YAG laser operating at 1.064 mm were used. Technical success, rate of complications, rate of serological conversion, and local control at follow-up were derived. Fisher’s exact test and Mann–Whitney U test were used and Kaplan–Meier curve calculated.ResultsTechnical success was obtained in all 46 lymph nodes (100 %). There were no major complications. Thyroglobulin levels decreased from 8.40 ± 9.25 ng/ml before treatment to 2.73 ± 4.0 ng/ml after treatment (p = 0.011), with serological conversion in 11/24 (45.8 %) patients. Overall, local control was obtained in 40/46 (86.9 %) lymph nodes over 30 ± 11 month follow-up, with no residual disease seen at imaging in 19/24 (79.1 %) patients. Local control was achieved in 40/46 (86.9 %) lymph nodes at 1 year and in all of the 25 nodes (100 %) followed for 3 years. Estimated mean time to progression was 38.6 ± 2.7 m.ConclusionUltrasound-guided PLA is a feasible, safe, and effective therapy for the treatment of cervical lymph node metastases from papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  19. Fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajirian, Ani L; Tarijian, Ani L; Goldberg, David J

    2011-12-01

    Ablative laser technology has been in use for many years now. The large side effect profile however has limited its use. Fractional ablative technology is a newer development which combines a lesser side effect profile along with similar efficacy. In this paper we review fractional ablative laser skin resurfacing.

  20. Radioiodine (1-131) Dose for the Treatment of Hyperthyroidism in Rajavithi Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuanrakcharoen, Pichit

    2016-02-01

    The main cause of hyperthyroidism is diffuse toxic goiter (Graves' disease), and the treatment of choice after medical therapy failure is radioiodine (I-131). There are two common methods of determining the optimal I-131 dose: calculated dose or fixed dose. The calculated dose method is based on the following formula: 75-200 microcuri/gram of thyroid gland divided by the percentage of radioiodine uptake at 24 hours (24-hour RAIU). As this is quite complex, some centers use fixed doses, such as 5, 10 or 15 mCi because it is simpler. At Rajavithi Hospital, the applied dose of I-131 is determined based on the thyroid gland weight assessed by palpation and other clinical factors. To study the mean I-131 dose for the initial treatment of hyperthyroidism in Rajavithi Hospital, to find the clinical factors that correlate with I-131 treatment dose, and to devise a formula to predict the optimal I-131 treatment dose. This was a retrospective study of 510 patients with a diagnosis of hyperthyroidism who received initial I-131 treatment at the Department of Nuclear Medicine in Rajavithi Hospital between January 2014 and June 2015. Baseline characteristics including age, sex, age at diagnosis, duration of antithyroid drug (ATD) therapy, gland weight (g), 3-hour RAIU and I-131 treatment dose were reviewed from medical records. The mean age ± SD was 41.93 ± 14.11 years (range 14-81 years), and the male to female ratio was 4.1:1. The mean duration of ATD therapy was 3.54 ± 4.02 years (min-max, 0.8-40.6 years). The mean gland weight was 54.35 ± 32.95 grams, and the mean 3-hour RAIU was 55.5 ± 23.69%. The mean I-131 treatment dose was 14.84 ± 5.71 mCi (min-max, 7-30 mCi). There was no significant correlation between dose and age, age at diagnosis, duration of A TD therapy or 3-hour RAIU. The study showed a significant correlation between I-131 dose and gland size, r = 0.938 (p treatment of choice for hyperthyroidism after medical therapy failure, and there are various

  1. Radioiodine (I-131) therapy in thyroid cancer differentiated type (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Carcinoma thyroid is not an uncommon malignancy in Pakistan because of its location in iodine deficient terrain. Painless palpable (solitary) thyroid nodule is the common presentation in majority (>90%) of the patients and > 25% cold nodules in females turned malignant on biopsy whereas in males >75% of cold nodules turned malignant on historical examination. The disease is more common in females as compared to males (3:1) and in females pure papillary carcinoma is more common whereas in males mostly follicular or mixed tumors are seen. Radical surgery (thyroidectomy) is not a routine surgical treatment in our country. In teaching hospitals the routine surgical procedure is lobectomy and Isthmectomy, whereas in DHQ Hospitals less surgical procedures, e.g. tumorectomy or partial labectomy etc. are done. Therefore, in view of limited/partial surgical ablation, I-131 ablation is mandatory for better and longer survival. We have treated 118 patients of thyroid carcinoma (Differential type) at our centre (AEMC) with therapeutic dose of Radioactive iodine (I-131) during the last 13 years with encouraging results (Disease free survival). (author)

  2. Changing trends in the treatment of Graves' disease with radioiodine: a 12-year experience in a university hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Marcus Vinicius Leitao de; Souza, Honomar Ferreira de; Buescu, Alexandru; Vaisman, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the changes in clinical parameters and in the approach to patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. Materials and methods: Dossiers of 226 patients submitted to radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in the period between January 1990 and December 2001 were retrospectively evaluated. For the purposes of statistical analysis, the 12-year period was subdivided into three periods of 4 years, with a comparison of clinical and laboratory variables in these periods. Results: The authors have observed that the total number of patients referred for radioiodine therapy as well as the percentage of female patients presented a significant increase (from 62% to 86%; p = 0.005). The percentage of patients pretreated with methimazole before radioiodine therapy increased significantly (from 9.1% to 35.6%; p = 0.03). The mean radioiodine dose delivered has also presented a significant increase (from 7.6 mCi to 12.7 mCi; p = 0.000003) with a direct reflection on a higher percentage of patients cured one year after the radioiodine therapy (from 55.6% to 83.7%; p = 0.004). Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy has increasingly been accepted for treatment of patients with Graves' disease and the doses delivered have increased to achieve a permanent cure as well as a reduction of the chances of recurrence. (author)

  3. Radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Mono or multipolar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Victoire; Boursier, Jérôme; Lebigot, Jérôme; Oberti, Frédéric; Fouchard-Hubert, Isabelle; Aubé, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    Thermo-ablation by radiofrequency is recognized as a curative treatment for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma. However, local recurrence may occur because of incomplete peripheral tumor destruction. Multipolar radiofrequency has been developed to increase the size of the maximal ablation zone. We aimed to compare the efficacy of monopolar and multipolar radiofrequency for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and determine factors predicting failure. A total of 171 consecutive patients with 214 hepatocellular carcinomas were retrospectively included. One hundred fifty-eight tumors were treated with an expandable monopolar electrode and 56 with a multipolar technique using several linear bipolar electrodes. Imaging studies at 6 weeks after treatment, then every 3 months, assessed local effectiveness. Radiofrequency failure was defined as persistent residual tumor after two sessions (primary radiofrequency failure) or local tumor recurrence during follow-up. This study received institutional review board approval (number 2014/77). Imaging showed complete tumor ablation in 207 of 214 lesions after the first session of radiofrequency. After a second session, only two cases of residual viable tumor were observed. During follow-up, there were 46 local tumor recurrences. Thus, radiofrequency failure occurred in 48/214 (22.4%) cases. By multivariate analysis, technique (P radiofrequency failure. Failure rate was lower with the multipolar technique for tumors radiofrequency, multipolar radiofrequency improves tumor ablation with a subsequent lower rate of local tumor recurrence. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Emergency bypass post percutaneous atrial ablation: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hargrove, M

    2010-11-01

    A 34-year-old male undergoing percutaneous atrial ablation procedure for paroxysmal fibrillation required emergency sternotomy for cardiac tamponade. The patient had been anticoagulated and had received plavix and aspirin prior to and during the ablation procedure. Seven units of red cell concentrate had been transfused in the cardiac catherisation laboratory. On arrival in theatre, the patient was hypotensive, but was awake on induction of anaesthesia. No recordable blood pressure with non-invasive monitoring was observed. A sternotomy was immediately performed and, on evacuation of the pericardium, a bleeding site was not visible. The patient was commenced on cardiopulmonary bypass. Bleeding site was identified and the defect closed. The patient was weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass with minimal inotropic support and made an uneventful recovery. Bypass time was 38 minutes. A literature review showed a 1% incidence of post-ablation bleeding(1). The incidence of reverting to bypass for such an event has not been reported previously. During these procedures, it might be wise to have the cardiothoracic team notified while atrial ablation procedures are being performed in the cardiac catheterization laboratory.

  5. Nationwide trends in surgery and radioiodine treatment for benign thyroid disease during iodization of salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerqueira, C.; Knudsen, N.; Ovesen, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Iodization of salt was introduced in Denmark in 1998 because of mild-to-moderate iodine deficiency (ID). The aim of this study was to analyze the utilization rate of surgery and radioiodine therapy for benign thyroid disorders before and after the introduction of iodization, and to stu...

  6. THE MANAGEMENT OF THYROID CARCINOMA--THE ROLE OF RADIO-IODINE (I-131)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James B.

    1963-06-15

    Experience from the management of 156 patients with proven thyroid cancer, followed from 1 to 11 years, is reported. Although no sweeping conclusions can be drawn, it appears that radioiodine continues to have a place in the overall management of most cases of this malignant disease. (auth)

  7. Sorption studies of radioiodine on soils with special references to soil microbial biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bors, J. (Niedersaechsisches Inst. fuer Radiooekologie, Hannover (Germany, F.R.)); Erten, H. (Bilkent Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry); Martens, R. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Bodenbiologie)

    1991-01-01

    In batch experiments with two types of soils, chernozem and podzol, radioiodine ({sup 125}I) showed an initial rapid sorption, followed by a long and slow further increase. Very little sorption (R{sub d} < 1) was detected in clay minerals. Generally, higher R{sub d}-values were observed for the chernozem soil, characterized by a higher amount of organic substance and of soil biomass. The sorption process was predominantly irreversible, the isotherms were linear at low ion concentrations and deviated from linearity starting at 10{sup -5} mmol.ml{sup -1}. Sorption ratio was found to increase with increasing volume to mass ratio. The composition of liquid phases (bidistilled water, synthetic soil water, rain water) highly affected iodine sorption. In experiments with KBr solution, the sorption of I{sup -} was found to be strongly preferred to Br{sup -}. Incubation of soil samples under varied conditions (decreased or increased soil biomass, O{sub 2}-concentration, incubation temperature, soil water content and storage conditions) delivered indications for the participation of soil microflora in iodine immobilization. Test with isolated soil bacteria and fungi showed that radioiodine can be incorporated by soil microorganisms under certain conditions only: Considerable uptake of radioiodine was found in washed (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}) cells with both bacteria and fungi, but no incorporation was detected into cells incubated with radioiodine in the culture medium. (orig.).

  8. Sorption studies of radioiodine on soils with special references to soil microbial biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bors, J.; Erten, H.; Martens, R.

    1991-01-01

    In batch experiments with two types of soils, chernozem and podzol, radioiodine ( 125 I) showed an initial rapid sorption, followed by a long and slow further increase. Very little sorption (R d d -values were observed for the chernozem soil, characterized by a higher amount of organic substance and of soil biomass. The sorption process was predominantly irreversible, the isotherms were linear at low ion concentrations and deviated from linearity starting at 10 -5 mmol.ml -1 . Sorption ratio was found to increase with increasing volume to mass ratio. The composition of liquid phases (bidistilled water, synthetic soil water, rain water) highly affected iodine sorption. In experiments with KBr solution, the sorption of I - was found to be strongly preferred to Br - . Incubation of soil samples under varied conditions (decreased or increased soil biomass, O 2 -concentration, incubation temperature, soil water content and storage conditions) delivered indications for the participation of soil microflora in iodine immobilization. Test with isolated soil bacteria and fungi showed that radioiodine can be incorporated by soil microorganisms under certain conditions only: Considerable uptake of radioiodine was found in washed (NaCl, CaCl 2 ) cells with both bacteria and fungi, but no incorporation was detected into cells incubated with radioiodine in the culture medium. (orig.)

  9. Improved radioiodination of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-IPPA via a tributyltin intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherson, D.W.; Luo, H.; Kropp, J.; Knapp, F.F.

    1999-01-01

    1,2-Palmitoyl-3-[15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecan-3-oyl]-rac-glyceroI (MIPAG) is a new agent for the clinical evaluation of pancreatic lipase activity and has demonstrated promise in preliminary clinical studies with patients affected with pancreatic insufficiency. Iodine-131-MIPAG was initially prepared via thallium-iodide displacement. Because of the need for a simple method which is amendable for the routine clinical use of MIPAG we have investigated the preparation and radioiodination of MIPAG utilizing the tributyltin precursor, 1,2-palmitoyl-3-[15-(-4-tributylstannylphenyl)pentadecan-3-oyl] -rac-glyceroI (TBT-MIPAG, 2). Compound 2 was prepared via the condensation of 1,2-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol with 15-(4-tributylstannylphenyl)pentadecanoic acid (TBT-PPA) prepared from 4-bromophenylacetylene. Electrophilic radioiodination using peracetic acid with sodium iodide-125 in ethanol at 80 deg. C for 60 min afforded I-125-MIPAG in 65.9% (±11.5%) yield and radiochemical purity of 94% (±3.0%) after C-18 Sep-Pak purification (n=6). This improved method for radioiodination utilizing TBT-MIPAG now provides radioiodinated MIPAG for routine clinical evaluation

  10. Improved radioiodination of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3-IPPA via a tributyltin intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, D.W. E-mail: phm@oml.gov; Luo, H.; Kropp, J.; Knapp, F.F

    1999-10-01

    1,2-Palmitoyl-3-[15-(4-iodophenyl)pentadecan-3-oyl]-rac-glyceroI (MIPAG) is a new agent for the clinical evaluation of pancreatic lipase activity and has demonstrated promise in preliminary clinical studies with patients affected with pancreatic insufficiency. Iodine-131-MIPAG was initially prepared via thallium-iodide displacement. Because of the need for a simple method which is amendable for the routine clinical use of MIPAG we have investigated the preparation and radioiodination of MIPAG utilizing the tributyltin precursor, 1,2-palmitoyl-3-[15-(-4-tributylstannylphenyl)pentadecan-3-oyl] -rac-glyceroI (TBT-MIPAG, 2). Compound 2 was prepared via the condensation of 1,2-palmitoyl-rac-glycerol with 15-(4-tributylstannylphenyl)pentadecanoic acid (TBT-PPA) prepared from 4-bromophenylacetylene. Electrophilic radioiodination using peracetic acid with sodium iodide-125 in ethanol at 80 deg. C for 60 min afforded I-125-MIPAG in 65.9% ({+-}11.5%) yield and radiochemical purity of 94% ({+-}3.0%) after C-18 Sep-Pak purification (n=6). This improved method for radioiodination utilizing TBT-MIPAG now provides radioiodinated MIPAG for routine clinical evaluation.

  11. Risk factors for persistent atrial fibrillation following successful hyperthyroidism treatment with radioiodine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Hu; Ma, Long-Le; Wang, Le-Xin

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the predicting factors for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Standard 12-lead ECG and 24-h Holter monitoring were performed in 94 patients (38 males, mean age 46.1±8.2 years) with persistent AF following radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism. Left ventricular (LV) function was assessed with two-dimensional echocardiography. Euthyroidism or hypothyroidism was achieved in 81% and 19% of the patients, respectively, after radioiodine therapy. At the end of follow-up (1.6±1.3 years), LV ejection fraction in the 52 patients with LV dysfunction was increased from 39.3±3.3% to 59.0±5.5% (ptreatment paroxysmal AF, no AF was documented during the follow-up. In the 45 patients with pre-treatment persistent AF, AF was found in 27 (60%) during the follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that more than 55 years old in age (RR 2.76, 95% CI: 1.16-8.79, phyperthyroidism (RR 3.08, 95% CI: 1.22-11.41, ptreatment atrial fibrillation (RR 2.96, 95% CI: 1.31-7.68, phyperthyroidism and pre-treatment duration of AF are risk factors for persistent AF following radioiodine therapy.

  12. Mammary radioiodine accumulation due to functional sodium iodide symporter expression in a benign fibroadenoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, F.; Unterholzner, S.; Diebold, J.; Knesewitsch, P.; Hahn, K.; Spitzweg, C.

    2006-01-01

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) has been characterized to mediate the active transport of iodide not only in the thyroid gland but also in various non-thyroidal tissues, including lactating mammary gland and the majority of breast cancers, thereby offering the possibility of diagnostic and therapeutic radioiodine application in breast cancer. In this report, we present a 57-year-old patient with multifocal papillary thyroid carcinoma, who showed focal radioiodine accumulation in a lesion in the right breast on a posttherapy 131 I scan following radioiodine therapy. CT and MR-mammography showed a focal solid lesion in the right breast suggestive of a fibroadenoma, which was confirmed by histological examination. Immunostaining of paraffin-embedded tumor tissue sections using a human NIS antibody demonstrated NIS-specific immunoreactivity confined to epithelial cells of mammary ducts. In conclusion, in a thyroid cancer patient we identified a benign fibroadenoma of the breast expressing high levels of functionally active NIS protein as underlying cause of focal mammary radioiodine accumulation on a posttherapy 131 I scan. These data show for the first time that functional NIS expression is not restricted to lactating mammary gland and malignant breast tissue, but can also be detected in benign breast lesions, such as fibroadenomata of the breast

  13. The results of the radioiodine-therapy of benign thyroid diseases respecting the applied radiation dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, C.

    1994-09-01

    452 patients with benign thyroid diseases had been explored after 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 5 years and 10 years after undergone radioiodine treatment retrospectively with regard to the applied radiation dose. A relevant relation between the radiation dose and the rate of hypothyroidism could only be proved as a tendency. Treating hyperthyroidism with radioiodine, the rates of hypothyroidism after therapy were not caused by significantly higher radiation doses. Therefore suggestions to change the used radiation-doses basically cannot be made. The applied doses of radiation are sufficient to achieve a rather satisfactory effect in healing hyperthyroidism. Cases of malignancy after radioiodine therapy could not be found in this population. The effective half-life determination before therapy can be neglected, because there was found a significant difference between the pre-therapeutically estimated half-life and the post-therapeutically measured effective half-life of radioiodine. Instead, fixed values of effective half-life should be used for each group of benign thyroid diseases. The radiation therapy still seems to be an efficient treatment to cure benign thyroid diseases with rare side effects. It also can be applied to patients below the age of 40. Generally it is an alternative to drug-therapy or surgery, always considering the individual relation between gain and risk. In this respect good results can be obtained and a relapse of hyperthyroidism is hardly to expect. (author)

  14. Chinese hamster ovary cell lysosomes retain pinocytized horseradish peroxidase and in situ-radioiodinated proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storrie, B.; Sachdeva, M.; Viers, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    We used Chinese hamster ovary cells, a cell line of fibroblastic origin, to investigate whether lysosomes are an exocytic compartment. To label lysosomal contents, Chinese hamster ovary cells were incubated with the solute marker horseradish peroxidase. After an 18-h uptake period, horseradish peroxidase was found in lysosomes by cell fractionation in Percoll gradients and by electron microscope cytochemistry. Over a 24-h period, lysosomal horseradish peroxidase was quantitatively retained by Chinese hamster ovary cells and inactivated with a t 1/2 of 6 to 8 h. Lysosomes were radioiodinated in situ by soluble lactoperoxidase internalized over an 18-h uptake period. About 70% of the radioiodine incorporation was pelleted at 100,000 X g under conditions in which greater than 80% of the lysosomal marker enzyme beta-hexosaminidase was released into the supernatant. By one-dimensional electrophoresis, about 18 protein species were present in the lysosomal membrane fraction, with radioiodine incorporation being most pronounced into species of 70,000 to 75,000 daltons. After a 30-min or 2-h chase at 37 degrees C, radioiodine that was incorporated into lysosomal membranes and contents was retained in lysosomes. These observations indicate that lysosomes labeled by fluid-phase pinocytosis are a terminal component of endocytic pathways in fibroblasts

  15. Peripheral blood T cell activation after radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Teng; Stark, R.; Borysiewicz, L.K.; Weetman, A.P. (Department of Medicine, University of Cambridge Clinical School, Level 5, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (UK)); Munro, A.J. (Department of Clinical Oncology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (UK)); McHardy Young, S. (Department of Medicine, Central Middlesex Hospital, London (UK))

    1990-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy for Graves' thyrotoxicosis produces a rise in thyroid autoantibodies in the first three months after treatment, but little is known of its effects on T cells. We have therefore followed the changes in T cell subsets in sequential samples from 23 patients with Graves' disease treated with radioiodine, using dualcolour flow cytometry. In the first month after treatment there was a significant rise in activated T cells, identified by the markers HLA-DR(la) and CDw26/Tal (p<0.025 in both cases). CD45RO-positive T cells, which are the primed population containing memory cells, also increased (p<0.025), but there was no change in CD45R-positive, resting T cells or in the CD4 to CD8 (helper to cytotoxic/suppressor) ratio. Vicia villosa-binding T cells, containing the contrasuppressor population, showed a more variable response, but the trend was to an overall increase from pre-treatment values (p<0.025). The changes did not appear to be related to antithyroid drug treatment, since they were seen irrespective of whether patients continued such therapy. These results suggest that T cell activation and enhanced contrasuppressor activity may in part be responsible for the rise in autoantibodies after radioiodine. The T cell changes could also contribute to the worsening of ophthalmopathy seen in some radioiodine-treated patients. (author).

  16. A randomized trial evaluating a block-replacement regimen during radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnema, Steen J; Grupe, Peter; Boel-Jørgensen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Eur J Clin Invest 2010 ABSTRACT: Background  Lack of consensus regarding the antithyroid drug regimen in relation to radioiodine ((131) I) therapy of hyperthyroidism prompted this randomized trial comparing two strategies. Design  Patients with Graves' disease (GD, n = 51) or toxic nodular goitre...

  17. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP); Monte, Osmar [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Physiology Department; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Speech Therapy School; Duprat, Andre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department; Marone, Marilia [Nuclimagem - Irmanity of the Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Nuclear Medicine Unit; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre [Sao Paulo Santa Casa de Misericordia, SP (Brazil). Medical Science School (FCMSCSP). Otorhinolaryngology Department. Endocrinology and Metabology Unit

    2008-07-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  18. A randomized prospective long-term (>1 year) clinical trial comparing the efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation to 980 nm laser ablation of the great saphenous vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sydnor, Malcolm; Mavropoulos, John; Slobodnik, Natalia; Wolfe, Luke; Strife, Brian; Komorowski, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To compare the short- and long-term (>1 year) efficacy and safety of radiofrequency ablation (ClosureFAST™) versus endovenous laser ablation (980 nm diode laser) for the treatment of superficial venous insufficiency of the great saphenous vein. Materials and methods Two hundred patients with superficial venous insufficiency of the great saphenous vein were randomized to receive either radiofrequency ablation or endovenous laser ablation (and simultaneous adjunctive therapies for surface varicosities when appropriate). Post-treatment sonographic and clinical assessment was conducted at one week, six weeks, and six months for closure, complications, and patient satisfaction. Clinical assessment of each patient was conducted at one year and then at yearly intervals for patient satisfaction. Results Post-procedure pain ( p radiofrequency ablation group. Improvements in venous clinical severity score were noted through six months in both groups (endovenous laser ablation 6.6 to 1; radiofrequency ablation 6.2 to 1) with no significant difference in venous clinical severity score ( p = 0.4066) or measured adverse effects; 89 endovenous laser ablation and 87 radiofrequency patients were interviewed at least 12 months out with a mean long-term follow-up of 44 and 42 months ( p = 0.1096), respectively. There were four treatment failures in each group, and every case was correctable with further treatment. Overall, there were no significant differences with regard to patient satisfaction between radiofrequency ablation and endovenous laser ablation ( p = 0.3009). There were no cases of deep venous thrombosis in either group at any time during this study. Conclusions Radiofrequency ablation and endovenous laser ablation are highly effective and safe from both anatomic and clinical standpoints over a multi-year period and neither modality achieved superiority over the other.

  19. Endometrial ablation with paracervical block

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penninx, Josien P. M.; Mol, Ben Willem; Bongers, Marlies Y.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of endometrial ablation under local anesthesia. STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study was performed at the gynecology department of a large teaching hospital. Women with dysfunctional uterine bleeding were included to undergo NovaSure

  20. Mucosal ablation in Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S J; Selvasekar, C R; Birbeck, N

    2002-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is a prevalent, premalignant condition affecting the gastroesophageal junction and distal esophagus. Ablation plus antireflux therapy has recently been advocated to prevent the development of adenocarcinoma or to treat those unfit or unwilling to undergo esophagectomy. The present article, based on a search of Medline/ISI databases and cross-referencing of relevant articles, reviews the literature on this subject. A number of techniques have been used to remove the affected mucosa, including laser, electrocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation and photodynamic therapy but, as yet, none has been shown to be superior. Depending on the method used, ablation results in complete removal of Barrett's esophagus in approximately one third of patients and a partial response in nearly two-thirds. The resultant squamous mucosa is apparently 'normal' but may regress. To promote and maintain regeneration, antireflux therapy must be sufficient to reduce repetitive injury to the esophageal mucosa. Whether ablation reduces the cancer risk or delays its occurrence is unknown, though recent data suggests benefit. Complications are infrequent and usually mild. Regular follow-up endoscopy and deep biopsies continue to be necessary. Careful data from much larger populations with long-term follow-up is required before ablation reaches the stage of broad clinical application.

  1. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F

    2004-01-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved

  2. Hydrodynamic instabilities in an ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A R; Portugues, R F [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2004-06-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of an ablation front is studied for situations in which the wavelength of the perturbations is larger than the distance to the critical surface where the driving radiation is absorbed. An analytical model is presented, and it shows that under conditions in which the thermal flux is limited within the supercritical region of the ablative corona, the front may behave like a flame or like an ablation front, depending on the perturbation wavelength. For relatively long wavelengths the critical and ablation surfaces practically lump together into a unique surface and the front behaves like a flame, whereas for the shortest wavelengths the ablation front substructure is resolved.

  3. Comparison of wet radiofrequency ablation with dry radiofrequency ablation and radiofrequency ablation using hypertonic saline preinjection: ex vivo bovine liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Jae Young; Park, Hee Sun; Hur, Hurn; Choi, Byung Ihn; Shin, Kyung Sook

    2004-01-01

    We wished to compare the in-vitro efficiency of wet radiofrequency (RF) ablation with the efficiency of dry RF ablation and RF ablation with preinjection of NaCl solutions using excised bovine liver. Radiofrequency was applied to excised bovine livers in a monopolar mode for 10 minutes using a 200 W generator and a perfused-cooled electrode with or without injection or slow infusion of NaCl solutions. After placing the perfused-cooled electrode in the explanted liver, 50 ablation zones were created with five different regimens: group A; standard dry RF ablation, group B; RF ablation with 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution preinjection, group C; RF ablation with infusion of 11 mL of 5% NaCl solution at a rate of 1 mL/min, group D; RFA with 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution preinjection, group E; RF ablation with infusion of 6 mL of 36% NaCl solution at a rate of 0.5 mL/min. In groups C and E, infusion of the NaCl solutions was started 1 min before RF ablation and then maintained during RF ablation (wet RF ablation). During RF ablation, we measured the tissue temperature at 15 mm from the electrode. The dimensions of the ablation zones and changes in impedance, current and liver temperature during RF ablation were then compared between the groups. With injection or infusion of NaCl solutions, the mean initial tissue impedance prior to RF ablation was significantly less in groups B, C, D, and E (43-75 Ω) than for group A (80 Ω) (ρ 3 in group A; 12.4 ± 3.8 cm 3 in group B; 80.9 ± 9.9 cm 3 in group C; 45.3 ± 11.3 cm 3 in group D and 81.6 ± 8.6 cm 3 in group E. The tissue temperature measured at 15 mm from the electrode was higher in groups C, D and E than other groups (ρ < 0.05): 53 ± 12 .deg. C in group A, 42 ± 2 .deg. C in group B, 93 ± 8 .deg. C in group C; 79 ± 12 .deg. C in group D and 83 ± 8 .deg.C in group E. Wet RF ablation with 5% or 36% NaCl solutions shows better efficiency in creating a large ablation zone than does dry RF ablation or RF ablation with

  4. Design and development of a lead jar for oral administration of radioiodine In hyperthyroid patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.S.; Paul, A.K.; Rahman, H.A.; Begum, F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear Medicine practices involve use of radioisotopes for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radioiodine is one of such radioisotopes, being used in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases since 1942. Handling of radioiodine involves radiation hazards both for the patients as well as for the technologists. Though radioiodine is supplied in a lead container, for treatment purpose, it is administered after dispensing into a glass jar that does not adequately protect radiation hazards. For this reason, we designed and developed a lead jar and radioiodine is dispensed into that lead jar to minimize radiation hazards. For oral administration of radioiodine to hyperthyroid patients, a lead jar was designed and developed with lead in Centre for Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Khulna in December 2004 by own expertise and technologies in such a way that a glass jar could be introduced into that lead jar. The thickness of lead was 4.04 mm and the thickness of glass jar was 0.7 mm and thus the whole thickness of lead jar became 4.74 mm. The desired dose of radioiodine (8 mCi) that should be given to the patients were dispensed into that lead jar and administered orally to the patients. Radiation levels in 10 such cases were measured by Mini-Rad Series-1000 survey meter at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances both lead jar and glass jar. The mean radiation level of lead jar and glass jar during oral administration of 8 mCi of Na 131 I solution in 10 cases at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances were 62.4 ± 1.96 microSv/h, 17.7 ±1.95 microSv/h, 3.39 ± .12 microSv/h and 20.3± 2.16 microSv/h, 79.8 ± 0.79 microSv/h, 1.97 ± 0.23 microSv/h respectively. We have found that radiation level reduced by 67.47%, 61.58%, and 41.89% with lead jar at 0.5 meter, 1 meter and 3 meters distances. In conclusion, the locally designed and developed lead jar is safe, easy to handle and reduces radiation burden significantly in oral administration of radioiodine to

  5. Biokinetic study of 131I following ablation dose administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, A.C.H.; Lipsztein, J.L.; Lucena, E.A.; Dantas, B.M.; Rebelo, A.M.O.; Mello, R.C.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this investigation is to study biokinetics from internally 131 I deposited for thyroid cancer patients during radioiodine therapy (2 to 3 days), after ablation dose administration (3.7 GBq). These data will help in the elaboration of a metabolic model, which will permit absorbed dose assessment for this specific case, since the biokinetic models for iodine available in scientific literature can not be applied to thyroidectomized patient's studies. Material and Methods: Four females patients, between 22 and 50 years old, without metastases, between 1.9 to 6% of remnant thyroid tissue uptake, agreed to contribute to this study. For the in vivo bioassay, periodical measurements were performed along internment time (2 to 3 days), just after Na 131 I dose administration (3.7 GBq). For this, we used the counting system for Nuclear Medicine model 13S002, IEN/CNEN- Brazil, which was adapted with lead filters, in order to allow the work with high rate counting. The measurements were performed in two geometries: thyroid region and thigh. Results: For each patient, we have done approximately 26 measurements for both geometries, starting at the first hour following dose administration until the release from hospital of patient. The results of counting rate (cps) were plotted against time (h). The measurements suggest a relation between remnant thyroid tissue uptake values and the time where counting rates start decreasing. In addition, it was observed a correlation between remnant thyroid tissue radioactive burdens and the circulating iodine through time. Conclusion: It is necessary to follow-up a greater number of patients aiming to confirm the observed correlations and with a greater number of measurements during the first 24 hours, in other to delimit the time range of increasing and decreasing counting rate

  6. Radiofrequency Ablation versus Cryoablation in the Treatment of Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H. Hachem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pulmonary vein isolation is commonly performed using radiofrequency energy with cryoablation gaining acceptance. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials which compared radiofrequency versus cryoablation for patients with atrial fibrillation. Methods. A systematic search strategy identified both published and unpublished articles from inception to November 10, 2016, in multiple databases. The primary outcomes for this meta-analysis were long-term freedom from atrial fibrillation at 12-month follow-up and overall postoperative complication rates. For all included studies, the methodological quality was assessed through the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool for risk of bias. Results. A total of 247 articles were identified with eight being included in this review as they satisfied the prespecified inclusion criteria. Overall, there was no significant difference in freedom from atrial fibrillation at ≥12-month follow-up between those receiving cryoballoon and radiofrequency ablation, respectively (OR = 0.98, CI = 0.67–1.43, I2 = 56%, p=0.90. Additionally, the secondary outcomes of duration of ablation, fluoroscopy time, and ablation time failed to reach significance. Cryoballoon ablation had significantly greater odds of postoperative phrenic nerve injury at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions. Our meta-analysis suggests that cryoballoon ablation provides comparable benefits with regard to freedom from atrial fibrillation at medium-term follow-up, fluoroscopy time, ablation time, operative duration, and overall complication rate in comparison to radiofrequency ablation.

  7. Nucleophilic radioiodination of 6-bromocholesterol via non-isotopic exchange reaction in molten state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shaboury, G.; Farah, K.; El-Tawoosy, M.

    2001-01-01

    A synthetic method for preparing radioiodinated 6-[ 125 I]iodocholesterol [CL-6- 125 I] for adrenal evaluation is described. The radioiodine atom was incorporated onto the cholesterol molecule via non-isotopic exchange between 6-bromocholesterol [CL-6-Br] and radioiodine as iodide ion [ 125 I - ] in a molten state. The different parameters affecting the yield of exchange were investigated using 125 I (T 1/2 ≅ 60 d) to centralize the different physical and chemical reaction conditions and purification of the final product as pure as 6-[ 125 I]iodocholesterol. The method was suitable to either 131 I (T 1/2 ≅ 8 d) nucleophilic radioiodination which facilitates the scanning of the adrenal for a few days after administration or the use of 124 I (T 1/2 ≅ 4.16 d) nucleophilic radioiodination for PET evaluation of the adrenal. TLC as well as HPLC chromatographic analysis is used to determine the efficiency of the exchange reactions under different chemical reaction conditions and to monitor the stability of the final product as pure as CL-6- 125 I with radiochemical purity of ≅99%. This no-carrier-added method improved the speed of the reaction and affords high radiochemical yield of 90% and suitable specific activity due to the use of CL-6-Br rather than CL-6-I as substrate. Kinetic studies revealed second order iodine-bromine exchange reaction. The activation energy for the exchange reaction in ammonium acetate (m.p. 114 deg C) was calculated to be 4.576 kcal/mole. (author)

  8. Use of corticosteroids to prevent progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy for hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Bogazzi, F.; Panicucci, M.; Lepri, A.; Pinchera, A. (Univ. of Pisa (Italy))

    1989-11-16

    We studied the effects of radioiodine treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease on Graves' ophthalmopathy and the possible protective role of corticosteroids. Between June 1985 and June 1988, 26 patients were randomly assigned to treatment with radioiodine alone (group 1) and 26 to treatment with this agent and concomitant administration of systemic prednisone for four months (group 2). The initial dose of prednisone was 0.4 to 0.5 mg per kilogram of body weight for one month; the drug was gradually withdrawn over the next three months. All patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for 18 months after they underwent radioiodine therapy. Ocular changes were assessed with the ophthalmopathy index; patients with moderate-to-severe changes (scores greater than or equal to 4) were excluded from the study. Before treatment, 10 patients in group 1 and 5 in group 2 had no evidence of ophthalmopathy: in none of them did ocular symptoms appear after radioiodine therapy. Among the patients in group 1 with an initial ophthalmopathy index greater than or equal to 1, ocular disease worsened in 56 percent (mostly involving soft-tissue changes and extraocular-muscle function) and did not change in 44 percent. In contrast, ophthalmopathy improved in 52 percent and did not change in 48 percent of group 2. The mean ophthalmopathy index increased from 1.5 to 3.0 in group 1 (P less than 0.005) and decreased from 2.2 to 1.3 in group 2 (P less than 0.05). We conclude that systemic corticosteroid treatment prevents the exacerbations of Graves' ophthalmopathy that occur after radioiodine therapy in a substantial proportion of patients with hyperthyroidism who have some degree of ocular involvement before treatment.