WorldWideScience

Sample records for receive honor prize

  1. Nobel Prize Honors Autophagy Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Japanese cell biologist Yoshinori Ohsumi, PhD, was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of autophagy. His groundbreaking studies in yeast cells illuminated how cells break down and recycle damaged material, a process that is critical to the survival of both normal cells and some cancer cells. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 3 September, four ALICE physicists were presented with the European Physical Society's 2014 Lise Meitner Prize for their outstanding contributions to nuclear physics (see here).   ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented with their awards at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation. In addition to members of the ALICE collaboration, the ceremony was attended by members of the CERN Management including the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, as well as the EPS Nuclear Physics Board Chair, Douglas MacGregor, and the EPS Lise Meitner Prize Committee Chair, Victor Zamfir. For more information, please see "EPS honours CERN's heavy-ion researchers".  From left to right: Douglas MacGregor (EPS); Prize recipients Jürgen Schukraft,&a...

  3. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    September 3rd, 2014: ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented the 2014 Lise Meitner Prize at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  4. Remark on receiving encouraging prize; Shoreisho jusho shokan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Tomichika [Meji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-31

    The 1998 fiscal year Japan Solar Energy Soc. encouraging prize is received this time, and it is really sure of thank you and this winning prize for future research activity with large encouragement, while research activity in the university becomes in the good commemoration. This study also put environmental problem in visual field oil crisis energy resource worldwide new, and it was noticed in the wave energy which was one of the natural energy, it was started. That the wave energy was noticed, when the research of various natural energy was advanced, Over 10 years, it is the idea which was produced by the process in which the mechanics laboratory studies the vibration problem, and it is regarded as connecting with present winning prize as a summing-up of research result kept since the front. In the keyword of 'new{exclamation_point}' it began to leave Mr.Taichi Matsuoka and cooperation of the science graduate student as a partner of the graduation thesis the research the present it was a start from the nothing as a thing of this type. It is negative to advance this study in which the failure was always given here, when the new work began, of Mr.Matsuoka of the passion for the research. Away from the research of the wave power generation, solar light and wind power generation are noticed a little, and I aim at the hybridization of the wave power generation, and the research is advanced. Therefore, the vibration-proof stage for installing sun and wind energy conversion system on the wave-power device at present has been designed. At the end, the gratitude is shown to the everybody who received the enthusiastic guidance for this study. (translated by NEDO)

  5. Honor Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Howard

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about "honor" and describes how the word has been taken for granted in schools. He explains that "honor" traditionally, has had two meanings, and that the National Honor Society (NHS) reflects the most ancient of them. Like Aristotle, who described honor in his "Nicomachean Ethics" as "the prize of virtue and the…

  6. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots. Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes. Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  7. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anonymous

    2012-05-01

    A number of AGU members were honored during the European Geosciences Union's (EGU) General Assembly, held on 22-27 April in Vienna. EGU Union awards were presented to the following people: Vincent Courtillot, University of Paris Diderot, France, received the 2012 Arthur Holmes Medal and EGU honorary membership for seminal contributions to geomagnetism and the geodynamics of mantle hot spots.Michael Ghil, University of California, Los Angeles, and École Normale Supérieure, France, received the 2012 Alfred Wegener Medal and EGU honorary membership for his leading contributions to theoretical climate dynamics; his innovative observational studies involving model assimilation of satellite data in meteorology, oceanography, and space physics; the breadth of his interdisciplinary studies, including macroeconomics; and his extensive supervision and mentoring of scores of graduate and postdoctoral students. Robin Clarke, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, received the 2012 Alexander von Humboldt Medal for fundamental contributions in statistical analysis and modeling of hydrological processes.Angioletta Coradini, Istituto Nazionale di Astrofsica, Italy, received the 2012 Jean Dominique Cassini Medal and EGU honorary membership in recognition of her important and wide range of work in planetary sciences and solar system formation and for her leading role in the development of space infrared instrumentation for planetary exploration.

  8. Tim Berners-Lee receives the Millennium Technology Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 15 April, for his invention of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee was awarded the first ever Millennium Technology Prize by the Finnish Technology Award Foundation, which recognises technological innovations of lasting benefit to society. "Tim Berners-Lee's invention perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the Prize. The Web is encouraging new types of social networks, contributing to transparency and democracy, and opening up new avenues for information management and business development," underlined Pekka Tarjanne, chairman of the jury and former Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Tim Berners-Lee is congratulated by Jukka Valtasaari, Finland's Ambassador to the United States. Tim Berners-Lee created the first server, browser and editor, the HTML code, the URL address and the HTTP transmission protocol at CERN in 1990. CERN released the Web into the public domain in 1993. Tim Berners-Lee is currently head of the World Wide Web Consortium, managed by ERCIM (Europe...

  9. Vision and the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Fábio Barreto

    2018-04-01

    The Nobel Prize is the world's foremost honor for scientific advances in medicine and other areas. Founded by Alfred Nobel, the prizes have been awarded annually since 1901. We reviewed the literature on persons who have won or competed for this prize in subjects related to vision and ophthalmology. The topics were divided into vision physiology, diagnostic and therapeutic methods, disease mechanism, and miscellaneous categories. Allvar Gullstrand is the only ophthalmologist to win a Nobel Prize; he is also the only one to receive it for work in ophthalmology. Other ophthalmologists that have been nominated were Hjalmar Schiötz (tonometer), Karl Koller (topical anesthesia), and Jules Gonin (retinal detachment). Other scientists have won the prize for eye-related research: Ragnar Granit, Haldan Hartline and George Wald (chemistry and physiology of vision), and David Hubel and Torsten Wiesel (processing in the visual system). Peter Medawar is the only person born in Brazil to have won the Nobel Prize.

  10. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    More than a dozen AGU members are among 94 researchers announced by U.S. president Barack Obama on 26 September as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers. The award, which is coordinated by the Office of Science and Technology Policy within the Executive Office of the President, is considered the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers. This year's recipients include Jeffrey Book, Naval Research Laboratory; Jonathan Cirtain, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center; Fotini Katopodes Chow, University of California, Berkeley; Elizabeth Cochran, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS); Ian Howat, Ohio State University; Christiane Jablonowski, University of Michigan; Justin Kasper, Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory; Elena Litchman, Michigan State University; James A. Morris Jr., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA); Erin M. Oleson, NOAA; Victoria Orphan, California Institute of Technology; Sasha Reed, USGS; David Shelly, USGS; and Feng Wang, University of California, Berkeley. Five AGU members are among 10 U.S. representatives recently selected for International Arctic Science Committee working groups. The AGU members, chosen as representatives through the U.S. National Academies review process, are Atmosphere Working Group member James Overland, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA; Cryosphere Working Group members Walter Meier, University of Colorado at Boulder, and Elizabeth Hunke, Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marine Working Group member Mary-Louise Timmermans, Yale University; and Terrestrial Working Group member Vanessa Lougheed, University of Texas at El Paso.

  11. Children’s spontaneous emotional expressions while receiving (unwanted prizes in the presence of peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandy eVisser

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although current emotion theories emphasize the importance of contextual factors for emotional expressive behavior, developmental studies that examine such factors are currently thin on the ground. In this research, we studied the course of emotional expressions of 8- and 11-year-old children after winning a (large first prize or a (substantially smaller consolation prize, while playing a game competing against the computer or a physically co-present peer. We analyzed their emotional reactions by conducting two perception tests in which participants rated children’s level of happiness. Results showed that co-presence positively affected children’s happiness only when receiving the first prize. Moreover, for children who were in the presence of a peer, we found that eye contact affected children’s expressions of happiness, but that the effect was different for different age groups: 8-year-old children were negatively affected, and 11-year-old children positively. Overall, we can conclude that as children grow older and their social awareness increases, the presence of a peer affects their nonverbal expressions, regardless of their appreciation of their prize.

  12. The Overview of Gifted Education in Israel in Terms of Rate of Receiving International Prizes Israelis and Jews Living Elsewhere?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna DAVID

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the indicators about countries’ quality of education is receiving the international prizes e.g. The Nobel Prize, The Fields Medal, The Turing Award, The IJCAI – Computers and Thought Award, and the Award for Research Excellence according to international criterions. In this study the comparison of prizes that Israelis and Jews living elsewhere Israel has been examined in terms of population of the country where they live, the number of prizes. It is clear that the numbers of prizes that Jewish living elsewhere has won are high in comparison to living in Israel. In this situation, enrichment programs for gifted children practiced for 40 years in Israel should be check out in terms of international criteria.

  13. Two members of the CERN personnel receive the 2002 Accelerator Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Kurt H bner and Frank Zimmermann have been awarded the 2002 Accelerator Prize by the Interdivisional Group on Accelerators of the European Physical Society (EPS-IGA).   Kurt H bner Frank Zimmermann Kurt H bner is well known to CERN, as he was Director of Accelerators from 1994 to 2001, after having been PS Division Leader. A member of the CERN personnel since 1966, Kurt H bner, who is of Austrian nationality, has taken part in the design and operation of many accelerators including the PS, the ISR and LEP. He has received the award for his major contributions to accelerator physics and for his excellent leadership in this field. In its citation, the Prize Selection Committee stated that «he has provided guidance for generations of accelerator physicists and engineers, thereby contributing immensely to the prosperity of accelerators at CERN and many other laboratories around the world.» Frank Zimmermann has been awarded the prize for an individual in the early part of his or her career who has made a rece...

  14. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, Peter; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2016-02-03

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)--a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientific research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, significant research to the fight against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pioneering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt's work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene amplification and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine.

  15. Queueing systems with heavy tails (Summary of Ph.D. thesis on the occasion of receiving the Gijs de Leve prize)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, A.P.

    2003-01-01

    This article gives a short summary of my PhD thesis Queueing Systems with Heavy-tails, winner of the Gijs De Leve prize for the best Dutch thesis in operations research in the period 2000-2002. Apart from the Gijs de Leve prize, this thesis also received the ASML prize, for best thesis in Ihe

  16. ESO Receives Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Award in Science Category

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    In a ceremony held in Washington, D.C. (USA) on June 6, 2005, ESO, the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the southern Hemisphere, received the coveted 21st Century Achievement Award from the Computerworld Honors Program for its visionary use of information technology in the Science category. Sybase, a main database server vendor and member of the Chairmen's Committee, nominated ESO's Data Flow System in recognition of its contributions to the global information technology revolution and its positive impact on society. The citations reads: "ESO has revolutionized the operations of ground-based astronomical observatories with a new end-to-end data flow system, designed to improve the transmission and management of astronomical observations and data over transcontinental distances." This year's awards, in 10 categories, were presented at a gala event at the National Building Museum, attended by over 250 guests, including leaders of the information technology industry, former award recipients, judges, scholars, and diplomats representing many of the 54 countries from which the 17-year-old program's laureates have come. "The Computerworld Honors Program 21st Century Achievement Awards are presented to companies from around the world whose visionary use of information technology promotes positive social, economic and educational change," said Bob Carrigan, president and CEO of Computerworld and chairman of the Chairmen's Committee of the Computerworld Honors Program. "The recipients of these awards are the true heroes of the information age and have been appropriately recognized by the leading IT industry chairmen as true revolutionaries in their fields." ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO PR Photo 18/05 ESO Receives the Award in the Science Category [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 496 pix - 53k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 992 pix - 470k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1250 x 1550 pix - 1.1M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 18/05: Receiving the Computerworld 21st Century Achievement Award for Science

  17. Citations Prize 2009 Citations Prize 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2009-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Photograph of the 2009 Citations Prize winners Some of the winning authors with their certificates, and Christian Morel with the Rotblat Medal, at the award ceremony in Orsay, near Paris. From left to right are Corinne Groiselle, Lydia Maigne, David Brasse, Irène Buvat, Dimitris Visvikis, Giovanni Santin, Uwe Pietrzyk, Pierre-François Honore, Christian Morel, Sébastien Jan and Arion Chatziioannou. The winner of the 2009 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2004-2008) is GATE: a simulation toolkit for PET and SPECT Authors: S Jan, G Santin, D Strul, S Staelens, K Assié, D Autret, S Avner, R Barbier, M Bardiès, P M Bloomfield, D Brasse, V Breton, P Bruyndonckx, I Buvat, A F Chatziioannou, Y Choi, Y H Chung, C Comtat, D Donnarieix, L Ferrer, S J Glick, C J Groiselle, D Guez, P-F Honore, S Kerhoas-Cavata, A S Kirov, V Kohli, M Koole, M Krieguer, D J van der Laan, F Lamare, G Largeron, C Lartizien, D Lazaro, M C Maas, L Maigne, F Mayet, F Melot, C Merheb, E Pennacchio, J Perez, U Pietrzyk, F R Rannou, M Rey, D R Schaart, C R Schmidtlein, L~Simon, T Y Song, J-M Vieira, D Visvikis, R Van de Walle, E Wieörs and C Morel Reference: S Jan et al 2004 Phys. Med. Biol. 49 4543-61 Since its publication in 2004 this article has received over 200 citations. This extremely high figure is a testament to the great influence and usefulness of the work to the nuclear medicine community. More discussion of the winning paper can be found on

  18. International Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research: basic and translational research recognition : Mary-Claire King received the 2016 Prize for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hali; Zhao, Jie; Ba, Sujuan

    2017-11-21

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award sponsored by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that supports innovative cancer research globally with the ultimate goal to cure cancer. The coveted Szent-Györgyi Prize annually honors a scientist whose seminal discovery or body of work has resulted in, or led toward, notable contributions to cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment; and the discovery has had a high direct impact of saving people's lives. In addition, the prize promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. In 2016, NFCR's Szent-Györgyi Prize Selection Committee was unanimous in its decision to recognize an icon in human disease genetics, Dr. Mary-Claire King, for her pioneering research that demonstrated the first evidence of genetic predisposition to breast cancer. Her proof of existence of BRCA1 gene and its location has made genetic screening for breast and ovarian cancers possible, saving lives of many people who are at high risk with inherited BRCA1 mutations.

  19. Fermilab's Helen Edwards receives prestigious 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize from the American Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Helen Edwards has been awarded the 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize. She was cited for "her pivotal achievement and critical contribution as the leader in the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the Tevatron, and for her continued contributions to the development of high gradient superconducting linear accelerators as well as bright and intense electron sources." (1/2 page).

  20. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize;, designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  1. Haagen-Smit Prize 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2014 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  2. Haagen-Smit Prize 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Hanwant

    2017-03-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2016 "Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  3. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    IEEE Council on Superconductivity

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity's Awards Committee (right).

  4. Pomeranchuk Prize awarded to André Martin

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2010-01-01

    Professor André Martin has been awarded the I.Ya.Pomeranchuk Prize 2010, alongside Professor Valentine Zakharov.   André Martin, CERN theorist, pictured at the ceremony held in honour of his 80th birthday (August 2009). Established by the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in memory of an outstanding scientist Isaak Yakovlevich Pomeranchuk, the prize is awarded for the study of analytic properties of the scattering amplitude; which lead to the Froissart—Martin bound on the cross section growth with energy. The prize comes as a great honor for Martin, who was in fact a good friend of Mr. Pomeranchuk, "I am surprised and delighted to learn that I will be receiving the 2010 Pomeranchuk Prize. I was an admirer of Pomeranchuk and we shared a great friendship. I met with him for the last time in Erevan (Armenia) in 1965. As a good-bye, he told me, 'Analyticity exists'. This is precisely what I proved to earn the prize"....

  5. Prize Draw

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Prize draw Go Sport vouchers 393 members of the Staff Association participated in our free prize draw in July where they could win one of the thirty Go Sport vouchers of 50 euros. The thirty winners have been contacted and can come and collect their voucher from the Staff Association Secretariat.

  6. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 8. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics - Honoring Achievements in Optics that have Changed Modern Life. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 15 Issue 8 August 2010 pp 723-732 ...

  7. Citations Prize 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat, a Nobel Prize winner who also was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winner of the 2013 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous five years (2008-2012) is Figure. Figure. Four of the prize winning authors. From left to right: Thomas Istel (Philips), Jens-Peter Schlomka (with medal, MorphoDetection), Ewald Roessl (Philips), and Gerhard Martens (Philips). Title: Experimental feasibility of multi-energy photon-counting K-edge imaging in pre-clinical computed tomography Authors: Jens Peter Schlomka1, Ewald Roessl1, Ralf Dorscheid2, Stefan Dill2, Gerhard Martens1, Thomas Istel1, Christian Bäumer3, Christoph Herrmann3, Roger Steadman3, Günter Zeitler3, Amir Livne4 and Roland Proksa1 Institutions: 1 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Hamburg, Germany 2 Philips Research Europe, Engineering & Technology, Aachen, Germany 3 Philips Research Europe, Sector Medical Imaging Systems, Aachen, Germany 4 Philips Healthcare, Global Research and Advanced Development, Haifa, Israel Reference: Schlomka et al 2008 Phys. Med. Biol. 53 4031-47 This paper becomes the first to win both this citations prize and also the PMB best paper prize (The Roberts Prize), which it won for the year 2008. Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found in this medicalphysicsweb article from the time of the Roberts Prize win (http://medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/39907). The author's enthusiasm for their prototype spectral CT system has certainly been reflected in the large number of citations the paper subsequently has

  8. Honoring Leslie A. Geddes - farewell ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentinuzzi, Max E

    2010-01-05

    Honor thy father and thy mother, say the Holy Scriptures1, for they at least gave thee this biological life, but honor thy teachers, too, for they gave thee knowledge and example.Leslie Alexander Geddes took off on a long, long trip, Sunday October 25, 2009, leaving his body for medical and research use. The departing station was West Lafayette, Indiana, where he set foot in 1974, at Purdue University, stamping there a unique deep imprint, similar and probably more profound than the one left at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM), Houston, Texas, in the period 1955-1974. Memories came back as a flood the minute after a message broke the news to me: When I first met him visiting the Department of Physiology at BCM back in 1962, my first Classical Physiology with Modern Instrumentation Summer Course ... The versatile Physiograph was the main equipment, an electronic-mechanical three or four channel recorder that could pick up a variety of physiological variables. Les and his collaborators had introduced also the impedance pneumograph, which was a simplified version of previous developments made by others. It became a ubiquitous unit that trod many roads in the hands of eager and curious students. Ventricular fibrillation and especially its counterpart, defibrillation, stand out as subjects occupying his concern along the years. Many were the students recruited to such effort and long is the list of papers on the subject. Physiological signals attracted considerable part of his activities because one of his perennial mottos was measurement is essential in physiology. He has written thirteen books and over eight hundred scientific papers, receiving also several prizes and distinctions. Not only his interests stayed within the academic environment but an industrial hue was manifested in over 20 USA patents, all applied to medical use. History of science and technology was another area in which, often with Hebbel Hoff, he uncovered astounding and delightful information. It

  9. Synthesis and the Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Jeffrey I.

    2017-10-01

    The question often arises as to who may have deserved a Nobel Prize but was not awarded one. Rarely is this discussion extended to who should have received more than one Nobel Prize, but in the field of organic synthesis there are some compelling candidates.

  10. Berners-Lee wins inaugural Millennium Technology prize

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    "World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee today was named recipient of the first-ever Millennium Technology Prize. The honor, which is accompanied by one million euros, is bestowed by the Finnish Technology Award Foundation as an international acknowledgement of outstanding technological innovation aimed at promoting quality of life and sustainable economic and societal development" (1 page)

  11. The 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlstein, Linda

    2013-01-01

    For millions of Americans, community colleges provide an essential pathway to well-paying jobs and continuing higher education. The Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence honors those institutions that strive for and achieve exceptional levels of success for all students, while they are in college and after they graduate. Community colleges…

  12. Dannie Heineman Prize for CERN theorist

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's Gabriele Veneziano, is the recipient of the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics 2004, which he receives "for his pioneering discoveries in dual resonance models which, partly through his own efforts, have developed into string theory and a basis for the quantum theory of gravity". The prize was established in 1959 by the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes, and is administered jointly by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics.

  13. ACFA and IPAC announce accelerator prizes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology. The Asian Committee for Future Accelerators (ACFA) has joined forces with the first International Particle Accelerator Conference, IPAC’10, to award prizes for outstanding work in the field of accelerators. The conference replaces the regional conferences of the Americas, Europe and Asia and will be hosted by the three regions on a rotational basis (see CERN Courier). The ACFA/IPAC’10 Prizes Selection Committee, chaired by Won Namkung of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, decided on the prizes and the names of the winners at a meeting on 20 January. The awards will be made during IPAC’10, which will be held in Kyoto on 23-28 May. Jie Wei. (Courtesy Tsinghua University.) Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology at CERN, receives an Achievement Prize for Outstanding Work in the Accelerator Field with no Age Limit “for his numerous outstanding contributions to the design, construction, commissio...

  14. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity’s Awards Committee (right). (Photo: IEEE Council on Superconductivity)With the magnets installed in the tunnel and work on the interconnections almost completed, Lucio Rossi has reaped the rewards of fifteen years of work. And yet, when the physicist from Milan arrived to take charge of the group responsible for the superconducting magnets in 2001, success seemed far from assured. Endowed with surprising levels of energy, Lucio Rossi, together with his team, ensured that production of these highly complex magnets got underway. Today, that achievement earns them the recognition not only of CERN but also of the international superconducting community. It is for this achievement that Lucio Rossi was awarded the prize by the IEEE’s (Institute of Electrical an...

  15. Housing Honors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Linda, Ed.; Kay, Lisa W., Ed.; Poe, Rachael, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Honors administrators spend much of their time explaining and describing what honors is and does. When they talk about what honors looks like nationally, they should have answers to the following important questions: How pervasive is the model of separate honors facilities?; How pervasive are the legendary closets that honors programs have so…

  16. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  17. Nobel prizes 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunbek, W.

    1975-01-01

    The 1975 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to A. Bohr, B. Mottelson and J. Rainwater for their new ideas about the structure of the heavier atomic nuclei and the foundation of the 'unified model' of these nuclei. (orig.) [de

  18. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  19. 2016 Lush Science Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Jenny; McCann, Terry

    2017-11-01

    The Lush Prize supports animal-free testing by awarding monetary prizes totalling £250,000 to the most effective projects and individuals who have been working toward the goal of replacing animals in product or ingredient safety testing. Prizes are awarded for developments in five strategic areas: Science; Lobbying; Training; Public Awareness; and Young Researchers. In the event of a major breakthrough leading to the replacement of animal tests in the area of 21st Century Toxicology, a Black Box Prize (equivalent to the entire annual fund of £250,000) is awarded. The Science Prize is awarded to the researchers whose work the judging panel believe has made the most significant contribution to the replacement of animal testing in the preceding year. This Background Paper outlines the research projects that were shortlisted and presented to the judging panel as potential candidates for the 2016 Lush Science Prize. This process involved reviewing recent work of the relevant scientific institutions and projects in this area, such as the OECD, CAAT, The Hamner Institutes, ECVAM, UK NC3Rs, and the US Tox21 Programme. Recent developments in toxicity testing research were also identified by searching for relevant published papers in the literature, and analysing abstracts from conferences focusing on animal replacement in toxicity testing that had been held in the preceding 12 months - for example the EUSAAT-Linz, Society of Toxicology, and SEURAT-1 conferences. 2017 FRAME.

  20. Wolf prize in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The Wolf Foundation began its activities in 1976, with an initial endowment donated by the Wolf family. Within a very short period of time after its initiation, the Wolf prize has become one of the major signs for recognition of scientific achievements and excellence. This volume is devoted to a selection of Wolf Prize laureates in Physics and each has included two respective major publications as well as a commentary written by the laureate describing his scientific career. Readers around the world are provided a unique opportunity to get a glimpse of how scientific processes work in physics, and to comprehend how these laureates have left an indelible imprint on scientific history.

  1. Honors Education and Global Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    An issue of "Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council" devoted to "Honors Around the Globe" is an important opportunity to consider the role of honors in creating international awareness and understanding. Honors faculty and administrators have become increasingly active in global cross-communication through, for…

  2. Nobel Prize ceremony 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 10 December 2013 particle physics took central stage at the Nobel ceremony in Stockholm. Among the invitees were Fabiola Gianotti, former ATLAS spokesperson, Joseph Incandela, CMS Spokesperson, and CERN theorist Luis Alvarez-Gaume. They share their feelings of the memorable day with us.   Overview of the 2013 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. © Nobel Media AB 2013. Photo: Alex Ljungdahl. Fabiola Gianotti and Joe Incandela, at the Nobel Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall.   "It was an honour and a thrill for us to attend such a memorable Nobel prize ceremony and we are very grateful to Peter Higgs for having included us among his invited guests. The ceremony held some special moments for the LHC. In his speech prior to the award of the Nobel prize to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Lars Brink (Chair of the Physics Nobel Prize Committee) stressed the importance of the results from the LHC exper...

  3. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  4. The Abel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Presents the winners of the first five Abel Prizes in mathematics: 2003 - Jean-Pierre Serre; 2004 - Sir Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer; 2005 - Peter D Lax; 2006 - Lennart Carleson; and 2007 - S R Srinivasa Varadhan. This book provides an autobiography or an interview, a curriculum vitae, and a complete bibliography of each laureate

  5. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  6. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  7. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ergonul

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31% in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p < 0.001. Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%; however before 1945, German scientists did so (p = 0.005. The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  8. Honored Teacher Shows Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratte, Kathy

    1987-01-01

    Part of the acceptance speech of the 1985 National Council for the Social Studies Teacher of the Year, this article describes the censorship experience of this honored social studies teacher. The incident involved the showing of a videotape version of the feature film entitled "The Seduction of Joe Tynan." (JDH)

  9. Mothers in Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Mimi; Binder-Hathaway, Rachel; Mitchell, Paige; Patrick, Emily

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of four honors mothers as they offer sage advice. They argue convincingly that they are motivated, focused students who bring rich diversity to college programs. They further report disturbing marginalization and isolation that could be ameliorated with support and increased sensitivity on the part of…

  10. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Educational - Medicine Prize Related The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to people and ... this page MLA style: "The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine – Educational". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media ...

  11. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  12. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  13. Two Nobel Prizes connected to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Physiology or Medicine, announced last week, both have connections with particle physics and CERN. Alexei Abrikosov, Vitaly Ginzburg and Anthony Leggett have received the prize in physics for their "pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids". The most important superconducting materials technically have proved to be those known as type II superconductors, which allow superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time and remain superconductive in high magnetic fields. The coils for the superconducting magnets in CERN's Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium alloy - a type II superconductor. The LHC will operate thanks to magnets made of type II superconductors. Here, superconducting cables for the LHC are on display during a VIP visit.Abrikosov, who is now at the Argonne National Laboratory, was working at the Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems in his native Moscow when he succeeded in formula...

  14. Gustav-Hertz-Prize for CERN Physicist

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Klaus Blaum, of GSI Darmstadt and project leader of the ISOLTRAP experiment at CERN, will receive the 2004 Gustav-Hertz-Prize for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei. Blaum extended the measuring capability of the ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility, which studies short-lived isotopes, by installing a source of carbon clusters. Using these carbon clusters as mass reference allows researchers to obtain higher-precision and absolute atomic mass measurements which are important to understand the weak interaction and the synthesis of chemical elements. The Gustav-Hertz-Prize is awarded to outstanding young physicists and is endowed with 7500 euro. It will be awarded at the Spring Conference of the German Physical Society in Munich on 24 March.

  15. Cicero, Retrieving the Honorable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A. Frank

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available From Marcus Tullius Cicero’s philosophical writings, the author first draws out a modest network of ideas that informs his understanding of what it means to be a good man (vir bonus. Then, he finds in Cicero the idea of a befitting mutuality among four distinctively human capacities: a faculty for inquiry into and love for truth manifest in words and actions (reason; a disposition for the recognition of and attraction to things of worth beyond self-interest (the honorable; an acute sense of one own spheres of responsibility along with facility for speaking and acting appropriately within them (appropriate action, and fostering and extending the bonds of mutual personal relations grounded in justice and benevolence (society. Against the background of deep commitments in modernity to hedonism and autonomous individualism, the author proposes a retrieval of the virtue of the honorable as an attractive alternative.

  16. Honoring our Nation's Veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. Today is Armistice Day, renamed Veterans Day in 1954, to honor our Nation's Veterans. In Washington the rhetoric from both the political right and left supports our Veterans. My cynical side reminds me that this might have something to do with Veterans voting in a higher percentage than the population as a whole, but let me give the politicians this one. Serving our Country in the military is something that deserves to be honored. I was proud to serve our Veterans over 30 years at the four Department of Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals. However, the VA has had a very bad year. First, in Washington there were the resignations of the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Eric Shinseki; the undersecretary for the Veterans Health Administration, Robert Petzel; and the undersecretary for the Veterans Benefits Administration, Allison Hickey. Locally, in the light of the VA wait scandal there were the firing of ...

  17. 2013 Physics Nobel Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orloff, J.

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Physics Nobel Prize was awarded conjointly to Englert F. and Higgs, P.W. for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contribute to our understanding of the origin of the mass of subatomic particles and which was recently confirmed by the discovery of the predicted Higgs boson in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) mechanism allows the conciliation of finite range interaction and then non-null mass with symmetry through the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking. As mass and couplings are relativist invariants, they stay unchanged in the rotation of the space for instance, the BEH field must be too and as a consequence must be a scalar field associated with a null spin particle called the Higgs boson. As the BEH mechanism explains the mass of elementary particles, it gives no hint about the reason of the broad range of particle masses we observe. (A.C.)

  18. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  19. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adloff, J.P.

    2012-01-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50 th anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  20. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  1. A Nobel Prize for empirical macroeconometrics: assessing the contributions of Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.; Sent, E.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the contributions of the 2011 Nobel Prize winners, Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims. They received the prize ‘for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy’. The paper illustrates that Sargent entertained different interpretations of

  2. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  3. Lowy, Schiller win 2018 Szent-Györgyi Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    A press release announcing that NCI scientists Douglas R. Lowy and John T. Schiller will receive the 2018 Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research from the National Foundation for Cancer Research for their work on HPV vaccines.

  4. The 2012 Nobel Prize in physics and David Wineland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, Um; Kihwan, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David Wineland, together with Serge Haroche. David Wineland received the prize for ground-breaking experimental methods that enabled the measurement and manipulation of individual quantum systems, especially systems with trapped ions. He improved a trapped ion system and opened a new quantum world leading to quantum computation. He also realized optical atomic ion clocks with unprecedented precision through his experimental research. This article briefly reviews the history of trapped ion systems, the development of trapped-ion based quantum computation, and the development of the atomic ion clock, which are closely related to Wineland's achievements. (authors)

  5. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  6. [Commentary on the Nobel Prize that has been granted in Medicine-Physiology, Chemistry and Physics to noteable investigators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo; Apolinar, Leticia Manuel; Saucedo, Renata; Basurto, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was established by Alfred Nobel in 1901 to award people who have made outstanding achievements in physics, chemistry and medicine. So far, from 852 laureates, 45 have been female. Marie Curie was the first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in 1903 for physics and eight years later also for chemistry It is remarkable that her daughter Irene and her husband also received the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1935. Other two married couples, Cori and Moser, have also been awarded the Nobel Prize. The present commentary attempts to show the female participation in the progress of scientific activities.

  7. Safety Day Prize Competition: results and answers

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The three winners of the Safety Day Prize Competition are...   • 1st Prize: Fernando LEITE PEREIRA – smoke detector • 2nd Prize: Thomas DE BORTOLI – water filter jug • 3rd Prize: Matti KALLIOKOSKI – safety goggles Please see the image below for the answers to the questionnaire. If you have any questions regarding the Safety Day, please contact: safety.communication@cern.ch. And again, thank you to all the participants!

  8. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  9. Nobel Prize in Physics 2006

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    B ut every once in a w hile,these prizes are also given to team lead- ers w ho spearhead a large collaboration w hich .... saying that `the w hole universe is expanding' w ith dis- .... body form was a ¯rm prediction from big bang m odel, it w as im ...

  10. Nobel Prize in Chemistry-1997

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 2. Nobel Prize in Chemistry – 1997 The Story of Two Extra-ordinary Enzymes. Subramania Ranganathan. General Article Volume 3 Issue 2 February 1998 pp 45-52 ...

  11. Nobel prizes that changed medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together in one volume fifteen Nobel Prize-winning discoveries that have had the greatest impact upon medical science and the practice of medicine during the 20th century and up to the present time. Its overall aim is to enlighten, entertain and stimulate. This is especially so for those who are involved in or contemplating a career in medical research. Anyone interested in the particulars of a specific award or Laureate can obtain detailed information on the topic by accessing the Nobel Foundation's website. In contrast, this book aims to provide a less formal and more personal view of the science and scientists involved, by having prominent academics write a chapter each about a Nobel Prize-winning discovery in their own areas of interest and expertise.

  12. The 2009 Physics Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the Nobel Prize in Physics 2009, granted to the physicists north-americans: Charles Kuen Kao (born in China, for its discovery of the process of transmission of light in optical fibers; and Willard Sterling Boyle (born in Canada and George Elwood Smith, for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit – the CCD sensor.

  13. ["If Berger had survived the second world war - he certainly would have been a candidate for the Nobel Prize". Hans Berger and the legend of the Nobel Prize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, U-J; Schönberg, A; Blanz, B

    2005-03-01

    The public opinion pays much attention to the Nobel Prize as an indicator for the scientific efficiency of a university or a country in connection with foundation of so-called elite universities. The former holder of the psychiatric chair in Jena and discoverer of the electroencephalogram Hans Berger (1873 - 1941) came into discussion as candidate for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. The current medical-historical publications maintain the view that Berger should have received the Nobel Prize in 1936 as well as in 1949. This was prevented in 1936 by an enactment from Hitler, which forbid him to accept the prize, and later in 1949 by Berger's own death. According to documents of the Nobel archives these statements can be disproved. Berger was only nominated three times out of 65 nominations in 1940. Because of his death the other two recommendations in 1942 and 1947 were never evaluated.

  14. Patents, Inducement Prizes, and Contestant Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Jerome; Davis, Lee N.

    2006-01-01

    Debate over the merits of patents versus inducement prizes has tended to ignore the signaling roles of patents, and totally ignores the impact of patent signaling on prize contests. This paper asks: How does patent signaling affect the strategic choices of firms considering entering prize contests......? First, we consider contests that do not allow patenting, then contests that do. If patenting is not allowed, we argue, patent-holders, both internal and external to the contest, can adversely impact prize contests by claiming prize winner violation of their patents, and suing for damages. The likelihood...... of such challenges being made can deter entry, particularly in contests requiring large sunk costs. Furthermore, the firm's decisionmaking process will discriminate against entering prize contests and favor R&D projects with patentable outcomes. Together, these problems may circumscribe any future wider role...

  15. Culture, Masculine Honor, and Violence Toward Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan P; Baughman, Kiersten; Carvallo, Mauricio

    2018-04-01

    Prior research has connected the cultural ideology of honor to intrasexual violence between men and to attitudes supporting intersexual aggression in response to perceived honor violations by female romantic partners. We extend this research to show that honor ideology is also associated with an increased likelihood of men actually engaging in violent and sexually coercive behaviors toward women. Extending previous research on honor-based schemas and scripts linked to relationship violence, comparisons between honor states and non-honor states in the United States show that official rape and domestic homicide rates by White male perpetrators (Study 1) and experiences of rape and violence in relationships anonymously reported by White female teenagers (Study 2) were higher in honor states, controlling for a variety of potential confounds. These results extend prior laboratory research on honor-based schemas and scripts into the realm of extreme, real-world behaviors.

  16. Full implementation of rank-dependent prizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midjord, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A manager/mechanism designer must allocate a set of money prizes ($1,$2,…,$n) between n agents working in a team. The agents know the state, i.e., who contributed most, second most, etc. The agents’ preferences over prizes are state independent. We incorporate the possibility that the manager knows...... the state with a tiny probability and present a simple mechanism that uniquely awards prizes that respect the true state....

  17. George E. Pake Prize Talk: A Peaceful and Free World Through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. Paul

    2003-03-01

    The award of the George E. Pake Prize honors not just me, but the many men and women who have devoted themselves to ``helping our nation secure a peaceful and free world through technology." These words comprise the core purpose of Sandia National Laboratories, and are also an apt description of Los Alamos, where I spent my early career, and of the US delegation to the Nuclear Testing Talks, where I served as the Ambassador and Chief Negotiator. In this talk, I will reflect on the opportunities to benefit the nation's and mankind's future through service in such endeavors.

  18. Urdu literature at the World Forum: Nobel Prize for literature and Urdu/Hindi recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Qadeer, Altaf

    2017-01-01

    Urdu language is well-known for literary beauty and other linguistic as well as social factors. Over centuries Urdu/Hindi has gone through many cultural, political and linguistic changes. Urdu language has also changed in some ways of spoken and written forms. Despite the long history and literary power of Urdu, no Urdu author received a Nobel Prize in literature. Some data is presented about the trends in awarding Nobel Prize for literature. This article analyzes and highlights pathways for ...

  19. Laureates of the Palladin Prize of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (1997–1998

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Vynogradova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available V. A. Baraboi received the O.V. Palladin prize in 1997 for the series of works “The role of lipid peroxidation in the mechanism of ionizing radiation damage and stress”. O. Iu. Petrenko, O. M. Sukochov, L. P. Kravchenko were awarded the O.V. Palladin prize in 1998 for the series of works “The function of intracellular structures in isolated hepatocytes depending on the metabolic status and the effects of low temperatures”.

  20. Laureates of the Palladin Prize of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (2005, 2007 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Vynogradova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents biographical information and analysis of scientific activity of laureates of the Palladin Prize of NAS of Ukraine. In 2005 L. I. Ostapchenko and A.A. Sibirny were awarded for the series of works “Molecular mechanisms of metabolism regulation and their application in biology and biotechnology” and in 2007 O. G. Minchenko received the prize for the series of works “Molecular mechanisms of regulation of gene expression” published between 2001 and 2005.

  1. The image of the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand, Gustav

    2018-05-01

    This article traces the origins of the Nobel Prize as a ubiquitous symbol of excellence in science. The public image of the Nobel Prize was created and became established quickly, which can be explained by it being such a useful phenomenon for the co-production of other values and ideas such as national prestige. Through being an easily recognizable symbol for excellence, the Nobel Prize is an important factor for the public image of science. And the image of the Nobel Prize is co-produced with several other sets of values and images that range from the large and thematic to the local and specific.

  2. Inking and Thinking: Honors Students and Tattoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundes, Lauren; Francis, Antonia

    2016-01-01

    This study examines whether academically accelerated students in a college Honors program are as likely as other students to acquire a tattoo and to spend the same amount of time contemplating this decision. A convenience sample of 71 honors students and 135 non-honors students completed a survey at a small mid-Atlantic liberal arts college in…

  3. BOS MOrth cases prize 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jigar Vipinchandra

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the orthodontic treatment of two cases awarded the prize by the British Orthodontic Society for best treated cases submitted for the Membership in Orthodontics. The first case reports on the treatment of a class III malocclusion with increased vertical lower anterior facial proportions and dentoalveolar compensation that was treated with orthodontic camouflage. The second case reports on the treatment of a class II division II malocclusion with reduced vertical lower anterior facial proportions and an overbite complete to the palate, which was treated with orthodontic camouflage.

  4. 2014 WSEAT X-Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosiljevac, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kramer, Sharlotte [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Laing, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The 2014 WSEAT X-Prize is modeled as a double blind study to challenge the computational and material mechanics communities methodologies to develop better capabilities in modeling and experimentation to predict the failure in ductile metals. The challenge is presented as a distinct, yet relatively, simple geometry with all reported modeling predictions blind to each of the modeling teams. The experimental testing is validated by two independent test labs to confirm the experimentally observed behavior and results are unbiased and repeatable. The WSEAT X-Prize was issued to both external participants and internal participants as the Sandia Fracture Challenge 2 (SFC2) on May 30, 2014. A Challenge Supplemental Information Packet was sent to participants on August 13, 2014 to Prior years SFCs focused on the ability to predict failures under a quasi-static loading condition that focused on either a shear or tensile-dominated failure mode. This year’s challenge focuses on a geometry with a shear and/or tensile-dominated failure mode influenced by a moderate strain-rate ductile fracture in a metallic alloy.

  5. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  6. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  7. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  8. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  9. Slovak National Prize for Quality 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steflik, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Competition for the Slovak National Prize for Quality is a milestone in the history of the Mochovce NPP. The Mochovce NPP won the prize in 2004. The article describes in detail the preparatory efforts including not only technological issues but also various administrative challenges. The impacts of this achievement on the plant's subsequent development are also highlighted. (orig.)

  10. MIT professor wins major international math prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Allen, S

    2004-01-01

    Mathematicians Isadore Singer of MIT and Sir Michael Francis Atiyah of the University of Edinburgh will share an $875,000 award as winners of the second Abel Prize, which some hope will come to be seen as a Nobel Prize for math.

  11. MIT Clean Energy Prize: Final Technical Report May 12, 2010 - May 11, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Chris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Campbell, Georgina [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Salony, Jason [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Aulet, Bill [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2011-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize (MIT CEP) is a venture creation and innovation competition to encourage innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy. The Competition invited student teams from any US university to submit student-led ventures that demonstrate a high potential of successfully making clean energy more affordable, with a positive impact on the environment. By focusing on student ventures, the MIT CEP aims to educate the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs. Teams receive valuable mentoring and hard deadlines that complement the cash prize to accelerate development of ventures. The competition is a year-long educational process that culminates in the selection of five category finalists and a Grand Prize winner and the distribution of cash prizes to each of those teams. Each entry was submitted in one of five clean energy categories: Renewables, Clean Non-Renewables, Energy Efficiency, Transportation, and Deployment.

  12. Pierre Darriulat is awarded the André Lagarrigue Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Pierre Darriulat at the VATLY Laboratory in Hanoï. Former CERN Research Director, Pierre Darriulat, who is now Professor of Physics at VATLY in Hanoi (Vietnam), has won the 2008 André Lagarrigue Prize. This prize, instituted by the Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) at Orsay under the aegis of the French Physical Society, is awarded to front-line researchers who have had responsibility for machine/detector construction and derived maximum scientific benefit from such projects, performed in a French laboratory or in close collaboration with French groups. Pierre Darriulat has received the award in recognition of his outstanding career at the CEA, at LBL (Berkeley) and at CERN from 1964 onwards. At CERN he managed the experiments at the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) before taking charge of the UA2 collaboration from 1980 to 1986, which participated in decisive discoveries at the ppbar collider. In particular, in 1982, the UA2 experiment began observing high trans...

  13. CERN physicist receives Einstein Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    On 29 June the CERN theorist Gabriele Veneziano was awarded the prestigious Albert Einstein Medal for significant contributions to the understanding of string theory. This award is given by the Albert Einstein Society in Bern to individuals whose scientific contributions relate to the work of Einstein. Former recipients include exceptional physicists such as Murray Gell-Mann last year, but also Stephen Hawking and Victor Weisskopf. Gabriele Veneziano, a member of the integrated CERN Theory Team since 1977, led the Theory Division from 1994 to 1997 and has already received many prestigious prizes for his outstanding work, including the Enrico Fermi Prize (see CERN Courier, November 2005), the Dannie Heineman Prize for mathematical physics of the American Physical Society in 2004 (see Bulletin No. 47/2003), and the I. Ya. Pomeranchuk Prize of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow) in 1999.

  14. [The 69th Congress-urologists nominated for the Nobel Prize : Not everyone got a prize: four biographical sketches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Halling, T; Krischel, M; Hansson, N; Fangerau, H

    2017-09-01

    Our research group has reconstructed why the board certified urologists Werner Forssmann (1904-1979) and Charles Huggins (1901-1997) received the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine (1956, and 1966, respectively). But the history of "Urology and the Nobel Prize" is in fact more multifaceted than the success stories of these two laureates suggest. James Israel (1848-1926), Berlin, Félix Guyon (1831-1920), Paris, Peter J. Freyer (1852-1921), London and Edwin Beer (1876-1938), New York were nominated for the award during the first three decades of the 20th century. Their candidacies mirror trends among leading urologists during the time when urology became a specialty in its own right.

  15. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  16. Stellar students win fantastic prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    School students and teachers across Europe and around the world are discovering today who has won fantastic prizes in "Catch a Star", the international astronomical competition run by ESO and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE). CAS2008 artwork ESO PR Photo 14/08 One of the winning artworks "We were extremely impressed by the high quality of the entries, and the number of participants was even higher than last year. We wish to congratulate everybody who took part," said Douglas Pierce-Price, Education Officer at ESO. "'Catch a Star' clearly shows astronomy's power to inspire and excite students of all ages," added Fernand Wagner, President of the EAAE. The top prize, of a week-long trip to Chile to visit the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal, was won by students Roeland Heerema, Liesbeth Schenkels, and Gerben Van Ranst from the Instituut Spijker in Hoogstraten, Belgium, together with their teacher Ann Verstralen. With their "story of aged binary stars... Live and Let Die", they take us on a vivid tour of the amazing zoo of binary stars, and the life and death of stars like our Sun. The students show how state-of-the-art telescopes, particularly those at ESO's sites of La Silla and Paranal, help us understand these stars. They take as an illustrative example the binary star system V390 Velorum. In the last phases of its life, V390 Velorum will shed its outer shell of gas and dust, turning from a celestial chrysalis into a beautiful cosmic butterfly. The students also involved other pupils from their school, showing them how to test their eyesight by observing the binary star system of Alcor and Mizar. But perhaps the most important discovery they made is that, as they write in their report, "Astronomy lives! Discoveries are being made each day and there is still very much to be found and learned by astronomers!" The team will travel to Chile and visit the ESO VLT - the world's most advanced optical/infrared telescope. At Paranal, they

  17. Nuclear Fusion prize laudation Nuclear Fusion prize laudation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, W.

    2011-01-01

    Clean energy in abundance will be of critical importance to the pursuit of world peace and development. As part of the IAEA's activities to facilitate the dissemination of fusion related science and technology, the journal Nuclear Fusion is intended to contribute to the realization of such energy from fusion. In 2010, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the IAEA journal. The excellence of research published in the journal is attested to by its high citation index. The IAEA recognizes excellence by means of an annual prize awarded to the authors of papers judged to have made the greatest impact. On the occasion of the 2010 IAEA Fusion Energy Conference in Daejeon, Republic of Korea at the welcome dinner hosted by the city of Daejeon, we celebrated the achievements of the 2009 and 2010 Nuclear Fusion prize winners. Steve Sabbagh, from the Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York is the winner of the 2009 award for his paper: 'Resistive wall stabilized operation in rotating high beta NSTX plasmas' [1]. This is a landmark paper which reports record parameters of beta in a large spherical torus plasma and presents a thorough investigation of the physics of resistive wall mode (RWM) instability. The paper makes a significant contribution to the critical topic of RWM stabilization. John Rice, from the Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge is the winner of the 2010 award for his paper: 'Inter-machine comparison of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks' [2]. The 2010 award is for a seminal paper that analyzes results across a range of machines in order to develop a universal scaling that can be used to predict intrinsic rotation. This paper has already triggered a wealth of experimental and theoretical work. I congratulate both authors and their colleagues on these exceptional papers. W. Burkart Deputy Director General Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna

  18. A different kind of honor culture : Family honor and aggression in Turks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Y.M.J.; Breugelmans, S.M.; Zeelenberg, M.; Bölük, P.

    2013-01-01

    Masculine honor has been found to explain the relationship between insults and aggression in the USA. However, detailed accounts of Mediterranean honor cultures suggest that family honor may be more important in explaining cross-cultural differences in aggression. Two studies revealed that people

  19. A different kind of honor culture : Family honor and aggression in Turks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, Yvette; Breugelmans, Seger M.; Zeelenberg, Marcel; Bölük, Pinar

    Masculine honor has been found to explain the relationship between insults and aggression in the USA. However, detailed accounts of Mediterranean honor cultures suggest that family honor may be more important in explaining cross-cultural differences in aggression. Two studies revealed that people

  20. Honor and I: Differential relationships between honor and self-esteem in three cultural groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novin, S.; Tatar, B.; Krabbendam, L.

    2015-01-01

    Honor is often defined as one's self-esteem through one's own eyes as through the eyes of others. This definition assumes that endorsing honor values is universally related to one's self-esteem. Yet, prior work shows that the salience of honor in individuals' lives differs across cultures, which

  1. Strong-force theorists scoop Noble Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2004-01-01

    Three US theorists have shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". Their theoretical work explains why quarks behave almost as free particles at high energies (½ page)

  2. Nobel Prize for work on broken symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for Physics goes to three physicists who have worked on broken symmetries in particle physics. The announcement of the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics was transmitted to the Globe of Science and Innovation via webcast on the occasion of the preview of the Nobel Accelerator exhibition.On 7 October it was announced that the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences had awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics to three particle physicists for their fundamental work on the mechanisms of broken symmetries. Half the prize was awarded to Yoichiro Nambu of Fermilab for "the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics". The other half is shared by Makato Kobayashi of Japan’s KEK Institute and Toshihide Maskawa of the Yukawa Institute at the University of Kyoto "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in Nature". At th...

  3. The 2016 Nobel Prize: Chemistry and Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we will deal with the 2016 Nobel Prizes: Chemistry and Physics, since they are related to the same theme: nanostructures / molecular machines (conception, fabrication and topological theoretical explanation.

  4. A Nobel Prize in Czechoslovakia; Yaroslav Geyrovskiy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brabernets, Irzhi

    1960-01-01

    The notification of the awarding of a Nobel Prize to Yaroslav Geyrovskiy in the field of chemistry in l959 came to the scientist while he was at work at the Polarographic Institute of the Czechoslovak...

  5. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  6. The Honors Thesis: A Handbook for Honors Directors, Deans, and Faculty Advisors. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark; Lyons, Karen; Weiner, Norman

    2014-01-01

    This handbook is intended to help all those who design, administer, and implement honors thesis programs--honors directors, deans, staff, faculty, and advisors--evaluate their thesis programs, solve pressing problems, select more effective requirements or procedures, or introduce an entirely new thesis program. The authors' goal is to provide…

  7. Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Marshall Shepherd, professor of geography in the University of Georgia's Franklin College of Arts and Sciences, Athens, began a 1-year term as president-elect of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) on 22 January. In 2013 he will assume the presidency of the society. Also, five AGU members recently were elected as AMS councilors, with terms expiring in 2015: José Fuentes, Department of Meteorology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Richard Johnson, Atmospheric Science Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Christa Peters-Lidard, Hydrological Sciences Branch at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.; Wassila Thiaw, Climate Prediction Center, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Camp Springs, Md.; and Chidong Zhang, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Fla.

  8. Toward a Science of Honors Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Beata M.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, Beata Jones attempts to organize the honors discipline into a comprehensive framework that can guide explorations and shed light on specific attributes of honors entities in the framework of their interrelationships. The framework offers an approach to deal with the inherent fragmentation of the field, which can lead to…

  9. The Fessenden Honors in Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giazzoni, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Developing honors opportunities for students in engineering programs can be difficult, and the experience at the University of Pittsburgh is no exception. Often these students' degree requirements are so demanding that their opportunities for participating in honors experiences are severely limited. In each of the two semesters of their freshman…

  10. Medal of Honor Recipients: 1979-2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Richardson, Glenda

    2004-01-01

    .... Although the Persian Gulf War, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation Iraqi Freedom are listed in the Table of Contents, as of this writing, no Medals of Honor have been awarded for actions in these conflicts. For further information, see CRS Report 95-519, "Medal of Honor: History and Issues." This report will be updated as new recipients are named.

  11. Honoring Teachers for Their Vocation and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Raymond Brady

    2007-01-01

    One goal of the Wabash Center is to honor teachers for their potential, and hospitality has been a primary means to that end. A lesson learned is that the intention and effort to honor teachers create contexts for meaningful discussions, creative learning, and personal renewal of those engaged in workshops and consultations. The lesson is valuable…

  12. Honor crimes: review and proposed definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elakkary, S.; Franke, B.; Shokri, D.; Hartwig, S.; Tsokos, M.; Puschel, K.

    2014-01-01

    There is every reason to believe that honor based violence is one of the forms of domestic violence that is being practiced against females all over the world. This type of violence includes a wide range of crimes, the severest of which is honor killing. Many studies have adopted different

  13. Honors in Honduras: Engaged Learning in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folds-Bennett, Trisha; Twomey, Mary Pat

    2013-01-01

    A significant challenge in honors education is providing experiences through which students deeply engage ideas and content so that their analytical abilities and core beliefs and values are transformed. The College of Charleston Honors College aimed to stimulate critical thinking and examination of core values through a more holistic approach to…

  14. Teaching for excellence: honors pedagogies revealed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfensberger, M.V.C.

    2012-01-01

    What are characteristics of honors pedagogies in higher education? What are the teaching strategies that are particularly relevant and successful for academically gifted and motivated students? In spite of the substantial body of literature about the practice of honors education, very little

  15. Life history, code of honor, and emotional responses to inequality in an economic game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Eric J; Forster, Daniel E; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-10-01

    The code of honor, which is characterized by a preoccupation with reputation and willingness to take retaliatory action, has been used extensively to explain individual and cultural differences in peoples' tendencies to behave aggressively. However, research on the relationship between the code of honor and emotional responses to social interactions has been limited in scope, focusing primarily on anger in response to insults and reputational threats. Here we broaden this scope by examining the relationship between code of honor and emotional reactions in response to an unfair economic exchange that resulted in unequal monetary earnings among 3 laboratory participants. We found that endorsement of the code of honor was related to anger and envy in response to unfair monetary distributions. Interestingly, code of honor predicted envy above and beyond what could be accounted for by anger, but the converse was not the case. This suggests that the code of honor influenced perceptions of how subjects viewed their own earnings relative to those of others, which consequently was responsible for their apparent anger as a result of the economic transaction. Furthermore, the unique relationship between code of honor and envy was present only for subjects who received unfair treatment and not for subjects who merely witnessed unfair treatment. Additionally, we replicated previous findings that harsh childhood environmental conditions are associated with endorsement of the code of honor, highlighting the potential value of incorporating a life history theoretical approach to investigating individual differences in endorsement of the code of honor. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. Cultural prototypes and dimensions of honor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Susan E; Uskul, Ayse K; Gerçek-Swing, Berna; Sunbay, Zeynep; Alözkan, Cansu; Günsoy, Ceren; Ataca, Bilge; Karakitapoglu-Aygün, Zahide

    2014-02-01

    Research evidence and theoretical accounts of honor point to differing definitions of the construct in differing cultural contexts. The current studies address the question "What is honor?" using a prototype approach in Turkey and the Northern United States. Studies 1a/1b revealed substantial differences in the specific features generated by members of the two groups, but Studies 2 and 3 revealed cultural similarities in the underlying dimensions of self-respect, moral behavior, and social status/respect. Ratings of the centrality and personal importance of these factors were similar across the two groups, but their association with other relevant constructs differed. The tripartite nature of honor uncovered in these studies helps observers and researchers alike understand how diverse responses to situations can be attributed to honor. Inclusion of a prototype analysis into the literature on honor cultures can provide enhanced coverage of the concept that may lead to testable hypotheses and new theoretical developments.

  17. School violence and the culture of honor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L; Barnes, Collin D

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the hypothesis that a sociocultural variable known as the culture of honor would be uniquely predictive of school-violence indicators. Controlling for demographic characteristics associated in previous studies with violent crime among adults, we found that high-school students in culture-of-honor states were significantly more likely than high-school students in non-culture-of-honor states to report having brought a weapon to school in the past month. Using data aggregated over a 20-year period, we also found that culture-of-honor states had more than twice as many school shootings per capita as non-culture-of-honor states. The data revealed important differences between school violence and general patterns of homicide and are consistent with the view that many acts of school violence reflect retaliatory aggression springing from intensely experienced social-identity threats.

  18. [The world of medicine encounters the world of halakha--the great medical halakhist and Israel Prize awardee Rabbi Eliezer Waldenberg (1915-2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strous, Rael D; Shenkelowsky, Eliezer

    2008-01-01

    Recently, one of the most important medical halakhists of all time, Rabbi Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg died. He was affectionately known as the Tzitz Eliezer after his monumental halakhic treatise of that name. He was a leading rabbi, a judge on the Supreme Rabbinical Court in Jerusalem, and an eminent authority on medical halakha. He also served as the rabbi of the Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem for many years prior to his death. His most important body of work, the Tzitz Eliezer, is a treatise of medical halakhic questions and many consider it as one of the great achievements of halakhic scholarship of the 20th century. Although he has written in all fields of halakha in general and medicine in particular, he is best known for his verdicts on physician responsibility, fertility, abortion, smoking, medicine on the Sabbath, organ transplantation, cosmetic surgery and determination of death. While some of his decisions on medical issues have proven controversial, they reflect scholarship and sensitivity and are respected by ethicists and clergy across the board. In 1976 he received the Israel Prize, the nation's highest honor, for Torah literature. His greatness lay in his ability to connect and gain respect across the board of the worlds of modern medicine and halakhic Judaism. Many of his decisions are today considered as routine and standard operating procedure, but, at the time, his definitions were considered new and original. He will be sorely missed by the medical and halakhic communities.

  19. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, I.

    1988-01-01

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'. (orig.)

  20. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, I.

    1988-01-01

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'.

  1. AGU honored for Antarctic book

    Science.gov (United States)

    AGU has won an honorable mention award at the Fifteenth Annual Awards Program for Excellence in Professional and Scholarly Publishing sponsored by the Association of American Publishers for the book Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. The book is part of AGU's Antarctic Research Series, an outgrowth of research done during the International Geophysical Year that was begun in 1963 with a grant from the National Science Foundation. The award was presented at the AAP Annual Awards Dinner on February 6 at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Washington, D.C. The award consists of a medallion and a plate on which the names of the publisher, title, and authors are engraved.

  2. Nobel prize winners from Siemens company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the history of discoveries and scientists which worked in the Siemens company. First Nobel prize winners from Siemens company was Gustav Ludwig Hertz from Hamburg. In his doctoral dissertation he deals with the study of collisions of electrons with molecules of gases. In the physics this experiment is known as 'Franc and Hertz experiment', which confirmed state of energy in Bohr theory and in 1925 he obtained Nobel prize. In 1945, as a director of the Department of physics in the research laboratories of Siemens, he constructed cyclotron kernel - magnet with mass of 80 tonnes. The second Nobel prize winner was Dennis Gabor worked in the Laboratory for measurement and medicinal technology in Siemensstadt (Berlin). When he tried to increase the resolution of electron microscopy he discovered the holography (method of 3-dimensional imaging). In 1971 he obtained the Nobel prize. The third scientist - Ernst Ruska discovered electron microscope. At Siemens, he was involved in developing the first commercially-produced electron microscope in 1939. In 1986, Ernst Ruska was awarded half of the Nobel Prize in Physics for his many achievements in electron optics.

  3. Pavlov and Cajal: Two different pathways to a Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozo, Jairo A; Andrade-Talavera, Yuniesky; Rodríguez-Moreno, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936) and Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934) were two contemporary scientists who not only had a great impact on Russian and Spanish science but also on the international stage. Both shared several common features in their life and work, yet they followed fundamentally different paths during their training as scientists. While Pavlov received his laboratory training under the guidance of Ilya Tsion (1843-1912), Cajal did not receive any formal training within a particular laboratory nor did he have a mentor in the traditional sense, rather he was mainly self-taught, although he was supported by key figures like Maestre de San Juan (1828-1890) and Luis Simarro (1851-1921). In this article, we compare the scientific training of these two Nobel Prize laureates and the influences they received during their scientific lives.

  4. Announcing the 2015 Viruses Young Investigator Prize and Graduate Student/Postdoctoral Fellow Travel Awards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric O. Freed

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of virology by early-career investigators, last year Viruses accepted nominations for a 2015 Young Investigator Prize in Virology. The target age was set at 40 and under. Over 50 nominations were received and were evaluated by a panel of judges comprised of Viruses editorial board members.[...

  5. Following Zahka: Using Nobel Prize Winners' Speeches and Ideas to Teach Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Martin P.; Wilson, John K.; Becker, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Over 20 years ago, the late William Zahka (1990, 1998) outlined how the acceptance speeches of those who received the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science could be used to teach undergraduates. This article updates and expands Zahka's work, identifying some of the issues discussed by recent Nobel Laureates, classifying their speeches by topic…

  6. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989); Norman Ramsey. Premio Nobel de fisica (1989)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  7. Laureates of the Palladin Prize of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (2008, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Vynogradova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2008 Z. R. Ulberg, O. V. Karpov and S. V. Veryovka were awarded the Palladin Prize of NAS of Ukraine for the series of scientific works “Colloid-chemical and physical-biochemical aspects of the interaction of nano- and microparticles with cells as a basis for the development of nanobiotechnology ” and in 2011 M. Ya. Spivak, L. M. Lazarenko and N. M. Zholobak received the Prize for the series of works “Molecular and biological characteristics of interferon and creation of scientific approaches to the application of interferon medications and their inducers under pathology“. The article also provides laureates’ biographies.

  8. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation

  9. Consider Your Man Card Reissued: Masculine Honor and Gun Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuffelton, Amy

    2015-01-01

    In this article, Amy Shuffelton addresses school shootings through an investigation of honor and masculinity. Drawing on recent scholarship on honor, including Bernard Williams's "Shame and Necessity" and Kwame Anthony Appiah's "The Honor Code," Shuffelton points out that honor has been misconstrued as exclusively a matter of…

  10. Row bubbles up over particle prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    "The European Physical Society (EPS) has defended its handling of the 2009 prize for high-energy and particle physics despite complaints that the awarding committee overlooked a vital scientific contribution to the prize-winning work. The biennial award, worth SwFr 5000, was given to collaborators on the Gargamelle bubble-chamber experiment at Cern for their descovery in 1973 of the "weak neutral current" - one of the ways in which the weak nuclear force is mediated between fundamental particles" (0.75 page)

  11. Two Nobel Prize winners in two days

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Living legend of physics, Professor Chen Ning Yang, delivered his CERN Colloquium in the Main Auditorium on 12th October (see photo). His numerous contributions to physics include the famous Yang-Mills theory, which underlies the Standard Model of particle physics, and the prediction of parity violation in weak interactions, for which he shared the Nobel prize with T. D. Lee in 1957. The day before, another Nobel laureate, Norman Ramsey, gave a TH Exceptional Seminar in the same auditorium. Ramsey shared the Nobel Prize with Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul in 1989 for developments in atomic precision spectroscopy.

  12. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  13. NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize News Release: NREL Solar Cell Wins Federal Technology Transfer Prize May 7, 2009 A new class of ultra-light, high-efficiency solar cells developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been awarded a national prize

  14. Chemical lasers in competition for Lenin Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khariton, Yu.

    1984-03-12

    A brief essay is given to support the entrance of the cycle fundamental investigations of chemical lasers in chain reactions presented by the Physics Institute and Institute of Chemical Physics, USSR Academy of Sciences, for the competition for the 1984 Lenin Prize.

  15. Venture Leaders Prize for innovative technology projects

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In co-operation with the GEBERT RÜF FOUNDATION and the Ernest & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, venturelab will be presenting the Venture Leaders Prize. The Venture Leaders Prize, which is the new guise of the NETS (New Entrepreneurs in Technology and Science) Prize, will give twenty research entrepreneurs with projects to develop innovative technologies the opportunity to win the chance of participating in a programme to assist them in starting up their companies. The winners will go to spend 10 days in the Boston area (United States) where they will take part in a development programme for their project, which will include an entrepreneurship course, opportunities to meet start-up companies and financing experts, etc. This prize has already spawned many companies such as id Quantique, Selexis or ABMI which have contributed to the economic development of regions, particularly in French-speaking Switzerland. The competition is open to students and scientists from all fields, who would like to s...

  16. Prizes reward high-energy physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS) has recognized four individuals and a collaboration for their work on charge-parity (CP) violation, gamma-ray astronomy, cosmology and outreach activities. Heinrich Wahl, formerly of CERN, and the NA31 collaboration share the 2005 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize for their work on CP violation at CERN (½ page)

  17. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1999

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 5. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 1999. Utpal Tatu. Research News Volume 5 Issue 5 May 2000 pp 91-95. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/005/05/0091-0095 ...

  18. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  19. 32 CFR 901.12 - Honor military and honor Naval schools-AFROTC and AFJROTC category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for nomination in this category applies to the administrative authority of the school involved. (b... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Honor military and honor Naval schools-AFROTC...) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS APPOINTMENT TO THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE ACADEMY...

  20. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.; Jaarsma, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n=72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n=72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn from

  1. Honors and Non-Honors Student Engagement: A Model of Student, Curricular, and Institutional Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Ellen; Shores, Melanie; Sloane, Michael; Dantzler, John; Shields, Catherine; Shader, Karen; Newcomer, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to apply several measures of learning and engagement to a comparable cohort of honors and non-honors students in order to generate a preliminary model of student engagement. Specific purposes were the following: (1) to determine the feasibility for use of several measures of student characteristics that may affect…

  2. Academic success and early career outcomes : Can honors alumni be distinguished from non-honors alumni?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, A.; Mainhard, M. T.; Jaarsma, A. D C; Brekelmans, M.; van Beukelen, P.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared Dutch alumni who previously participated in an honors program (n = 72) to non-honors alumni who entered university as high-achieving high school students (n = 72) with regard to (1) final university grade point average (GPA) and (2) early career outcomes. Final grades were drawn

  3. First Calderón Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  4. PRIze{sup TM} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    PRIze{sup TM} 1.2 is a computer program that evaluates the improved oil recovery (IOR) potential of petroleum reservoirs including the use of horizontal wells. It was created in 1992 and has since been used in over 800 reservoir evaluations. The tool provides information on the feasibility of IOR processes based on reservoir parameters. PRIze{sup TM} makes predictions for chemical, gas injection and thermal IOR processes based on both vertical and horizontal wells. The program provides a uniform data entry screen that allows the user to input 42 average values of geological parameters, fluid properties and oil production mechanism information into a data file. The data can be used to provide a production forecast, and enable the user to establish, to a first order approximation, the economic viability of a given process.

  5. A new prize system for drug innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, Afschin; Chernyak, Nadja

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new prize (reward) system for drug innovation which pays a price based on the value of health benefits accrued over time. Willingness to pay for a unit of health benefit is determined based on the cost-effectiveness ratio of palliative/nursing care. We solve the problem of limited information on the value of health benefits by mathematically relating reward size to the uncertainty of information including information on potential drug overuse. The proposed prize system offers optimal incentives to invest in research and development because it rewards the innovator for the social value of drug innovation. The proposal is envisaged as a non-voluntary alternative to the current patent system and reduces excessive marketing of innovators and generic drug producers. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Special 2005 EPS HEPP prize colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Wahl, Heinrich; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    First evidence and measurement of direct CP violation by the NA31 experiment This is a colloquium celebrating the awarding of the 2005 EPS High Energy Particle Physics prize to Heinrich Wahl and the NA31 collaboration which showed for the first time Direct CP Violation in the decay of neutral K mesons. There will be an introduction to direct CP violation, followed by a review of experimental results.

  7. The Brain Prize 2014: complex human functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigaityte, Kristina; Iacoboni, Marco

    2014-11-01

    Giacomo Rizzolatti, Stanislas Dehaene, and Trevor Robbins were recently awarded the 2014 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize for their 'pioneering research on higher brain mechanisms underpinning such complex human functions as literacy, numeracy, motivated behavior and social cognition, and for their effort to understand cognitive and behavioral disorders'. Why was their work highlighted? Is there anything that links together these seemingly disparate lines of research? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. EPS HEPP Prize 2013: Certificate and Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    Rao, Achintya

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, "for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism", and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni, and Tejinder Virdee, "for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments".

  9. Physics Nobel Prize (PNP in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Filardo Bassalo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the Nobel Prize in Physics 2008, granted  to  the Japanese  physicists  Yoichiro  Nambu,  Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa,  for  their  discovery  of  the mechanisms involving strong interactions symmetries (quiral, by Nambu, and in weak interactions (charge-parity, by Kobayashi and Maskawa.

  10. The Abel Prize 2008-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Piene, Ragni

    2014-01-01

    Covering the years 2008-2012, this book profiles the life and work of recent winners of the Abel Prize:   ·         John G. Thompson and Jacques Tits, 2008 ·         Mikhail Gromov, 2009 ·         John T. Tate Jr., 2010 ·         John W. Milnor, 2011 ·         Endre Szemerédi, 2012. The profiles feature autobiographical information as well as a description of each mathematician's work. In addition, each profile contains a complete bibliography, a curriculum vitae, as well as photos — old and new. As an added feature, interviews with the Laureates are presented on an accompanying web site (http://extras.springer.com/).   The book also presents a  history of the Abel Prize written by the historian Kim Helsvig, and includes a facsimile of a letter from Niels Henrik Abel, which is transcribed, translated into English, and placed into historical perspective by Christian Skau.    This book follows on The Abel Prize: 2003-2007, The First Five Years (Springer, 2010),...

  11. Honor Killing: Where Pride Defeats Reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Tandon, Abhishek; Krishan, Kewal

    2016-12-01

    Honor killings are graceless and ferocious murders by chauvinists with an antediluvian mind. These are categorized separately because these killings are committed for the prime reason of satisfying the ego of the people whom the victim trusts and always looks up to for support and protection. It is for this sole reason that honor killings demand strict and stern punishment, not only for the person who committed the murder but also for any person who contributed or was party to the act. A positive change can occur with stricter legislation and changes in the ethos of the society we live in today.

  12. IEEE prize awarded to CERN PhD student

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Rafael Ballabriga Suñe (right) receives the Student Paper Award. Rafael Ballabriga Suñe is the recipient of the 2006 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society (NPSS)'s Student Paper Award. Ballabriga's winning paper reported on a prototype chip, which belongs to a new generation of single photon counting hybrid pixel detector readout chips - Medipix3. The NPSS established this award in 2005 to encourage outstanding student contributions and greater student participation as principle or sole authors of papers. The prizes were presented at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium held in San Diego on 29 October to 4 November. The prototype chip was designed by Ballabriga based on ideas generated within the CERN Medipix team - part of the PH Microelectronics group. It could be used in various fields in the future, including medical imaging, neutron imaging, electron microscopy, radiation monitoring and other applications in high-energy physics. The novel aspe...

  13. NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board | News | NREL NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board NREL's Earl Christensen Honored with Two Awards from National Biodiesel Board February 16, 2018 Fuel stability research advances innovation and bolsters industry confidence in biodiesel. Scott

  14. The Study on Activation Strategy of Time-honored Brand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Jiankang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-honored brands have profound cultural heritage, a large part of glorious time-honored brands has gradually disappeared from the market. Brand activation is the core of management strategic of brand equity as well as the fundamental requirement of time-honored enterprise recovery. This paper constructs the time-honored brand purchase model and finds that consumers nostalgic psychology for the consumer’s perception and buying behavior has a positive effect.

  15. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines.

  16. Costs and Benefits in the Economy of Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhausen, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To be in honors is to be engaged in many different economic arrangements and exchanges. Honors educators work in concert with their admissions offices while recruiting high-achieving students whose decisions often hinge on how much money the institution can offer in the form of discounts to tuition and financial aid. Honors programs that tie…

  17. The role of honor concerns in emotional reactions to offences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Manstead, A.S.R.; Fischer, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    nvestigated the role of honor concerns in mediating the effect of nationality and gender on the reported intensity of anger and shame in reaction to insult vignettes. Spain, an honor culture, and The Netherlands, where honor is of less central significance, were selected for comparison. A total of

  18. Prioritizing Service to the Academically Talented: The Honors College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Deborah L.; Holloway, Alexandria

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes community college honors programs and courses, emphasizing in particular the Honors College at Miami Dade College in Florida. The chapter discusses pros and cons of honors programs and courses in the context of their appropriateness to the community college mission of open access and egalitarianism. (Contains 1 table.)

  19. Interdisciplinary Teaching of Theatre and Human Rights in Honors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since spring 2012, the author has taught a 300-level Theatre and Human Rights class in the University of New Mexico Honors College. One of the centerpieces of honors education is careful research and thorough analysis of what is taught and why it is taught. In creating the honors class Theatre and Human Rights, the author explored how she would…

  20. The Effect of Honors Courses on Grade Point Averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisak, Art L.; Squires, Suzanne Carter

    2016-01-01

    High-ability entering college students give three main reasons for not choosing to become part of honors programs and colleges; they and/or their parents believe that honors classes at the university level require more work than non-honors courses, are more stressful, and will adversely affect their self-image and grade point average (GPA) (Hill;…

  1. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-01-01

    Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (T...

  2. Honors pedagogy: tailoring learning preferences of honors and regular students for autonomy and structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, Tineke; Kamans, Elanor; Heijne, Marjolein; Wolfensberger, Marca; Jaarsma, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    Students differ in their learning preferences. When students are more intrinsically motivated this improves their well-being and involvement (Levesque, Zuehlke, Stanek, & Ryan, 2004). Teaching highly motivated honors students places different demands on teachers (Wolfensberger, 2012). High motivated

  3. Minorities and Women and Honors Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Maria Luisa Alvarez

    1986-01-01

    Although honors education can be a key to the liberation of women and minorities, both groups continue to be underrepresented, perhaps because bright women and minority students are uncomfortable displaying their talents and adding pressure in an already stressful situation. (MSE)

  4. 2000 Honor List: A Hopeful Bunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Alleen Pace; Donelson, Ken; Blasingame, James, Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Presents 11 titles selected for the 2000 Honor List for young adult literature. Notes that the books were selected by combining their favorites with the best-book list compiled by the editors of such publications as "School Library Journal,""Booklist," and "Horn Book." (SG)

  5. Tailoring an Honors Program to Your Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Marty

    The first step in developing the honors program at North Arkansas Community College (NACC) involved establishing the following four program objectives: (1) to develop students' skills in critical thinking, research, and the application of knowledge; (2) to explore the historical, philosophical, and cultural backgrounds of disciplines; (3) to…

  6. History of Great Ideas: An Honors Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrill, Marty; And Others

    The History of Great Ideas is an interdisciplinary seminar course for sophomore honor students at North Arkansas Community Technical College that teaches the intellectual history of western civilization. Each semester, students study 14 ideas from science, philosophy, history, religion, sociology, and economics to discover how philosophical…

  7. Honors Anthropology and the Four Rs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Claire R.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an honors introductory cultural anthropology course taught at California State University, Chico. Discusses the course design, how course information is made relevant and reinforced, and how students have partial responsibility for the course design. Discusses the use of science fiction books to make material relevant to students. (JS)

  8. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. On the Human Aspect of Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, G.

    1990-10-01

    One night, Nico invited for dinner all his postdoc and graduate students, in a German restaurant close to Harvard Square. Just before we were to pay for our meal, he told us: "Tomorrow, we shall know the Nobel prize winner. Can you people make a guess on his name?" All my colleagues nominated great physicists. In my turn, I suggested naively (and perhaps nationalistically) the name of Alfred Kastler who had been my thesis adviser. "Come on," joked Nico, "I know a lot of physicists who would deserve it much better.."

  10. Autophagy: one more Nobel Prize for yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Zimmermann

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent announcement of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for the discoveries of mechanisms governing autophagy, underscores the importance of intracellular degradation and recycling. At the same time, it further cements yeast, in which this field decisively developed, as a prolific model organism. Here we provide a quick historical overview that mirrors both the importance of autophagy as a conserved and essential process for cellular life and death as well as the crucial role of yeast in its mechanistic characterization.

  11. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  12. 55th electric science promotion prize (progress prize). Demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW first in the world; Dai 55 kai denki gakujutsu shinkosho (shinposho) jusho. Seiaihatsu no OPGW ni okeru hikari soriton denso no jissho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-10

    Electric science promotion prize (progress prize) is given to `Person who newly proposed a new concept, theory, material, device, system and method on electrical science and technology, or demonstrated these proposals` by the commendation committee of Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan every year. Eight promotion prizes including that for Kansai Electric Power`s `Demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW first in the world` were given. This research succeeded in development of the transmission/ receiving device suitable for optical soliton transmission, and the prediction method of an optimum transmission condition by computer simulation. In addition, this research succeeded in 10Gbit transmission of 784km and 40Gbit transmission (4-wave multiplex) of 392km by applying the above research result to Okurobe trunk line OPGW (98.2km). This demonstration of optical soliton transmission on OPGW is first in the world. (NEDO)

  13. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagner, Caroline S.; Horlings, Edwin; Whetsell, Travis A.; Mattson, Pauline; Nordqvist, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index,

  14. CERN exhibition wins yet another design prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    The “Universe of Particles” exhibition in CERN’s Globe wins the silver design prize from the German direct business communications association FAMAB.   Not only do tens of thousands of people visit the “Universe of Particles” exhibition each year, but juries for design prizes are crossing its threshold more and more frequently too. In 2011 alone it claimed 8 awards, including winning outright the 2011 Annual Multimedia award, the iF Communication Design for Corporate Architecture award and the Modern Decoration Media award (the Bulletin already reported on some of these in July 2011). The FAMAB award is the latest to join the prestigious list. The jury of FAMAB’s “ADAM 2011” award was particularly impressed by the hands-on nature of the exhibition, which encourages visitors to get interested in science. They also appreciated the way that the space in the Globe is not just a container for the exhibits, but itself ...

  15. Robert Aymar awarded Global Energy prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Director-General Robert Aymar was recently named one of three laureates of the 2006 Global Energy International Prize for 'the development of scientific and engineering foundation for the ITER project.' ITER is an experiment planned to be built in Europe at Cadarache (South of France) and designed to show the scientific and technological feasibility of a full-scale fusion power reactor. The other two laureates, who worked with Aymar on the project, are former President of the ITER Council, Russian Academician Evgeny Velikhov, and Japan's Dr Masaji Yoshikawa, ITER's former Vice President. Aymar headed ITER from 1994 to 2003. 'This prize is not only a great honour for me and my friends and colleagues of many years at ITER, Evgeny Velikhov and Masaji Yoshikawa,' Aymar said. 'It is above all a recognition of the effort of all those who have been involved with the ITER project and worked over the years to ensure the first step in proving that fusion will provide a new sustainable energy source for the plane...

  16. Briton wins Nobel physics prize for work on superfluids

    CERN Multimedia

    Connor, S

    2003-01-01

    A British born scientist, Anthony Leggett, 65, has jointly won this year's Nobel prize in physics for research into the arcane area of superfluids - when matter behaves in its lowest and most ordered state. He shares the 800,000 pounds prize with two Russian physicists who have worked in the field of superconductivity - when electrical conductors lose resistance (1/2 page).

  17. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma.

  18. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lever, Andrew M. L.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Francoise Barre-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus

  19. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak open-quotes for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.close quotes Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given

  20. To honor and obey: Perceptions and disclosure of sexual assault among honor ideology women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Caitlin L; Crowder, Marisa K; Kemmelmeier, Markus

    2018-05-15

    The overwhelming majority of rapes goes unreported. To better understand the sociocultural mechanisms behind why underreporting may occur, three studies (total n = 1,481) examine how women's endorsement of honor values influence the perceptions of rape. Using vignettes that varied the closeness of the perpetrator of a sexual assault (i.e., stranger, acquaintance, or husband), we found that women who endorse honor values of womanhood were less likely to label a forced sexual act as "rape" and to suggest that the victim discloses the rape to others, including to the police. This was especially true the closer the victim was to the perpetrator (e.g., husband vs. stranger). Our findings highlight the effects of honor values on perceived sexual assault and the consequences of disclosure, and may aid in understanding barriers to rape reporting and areas for intervention. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Arthur Vick Prize 2017 of the German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bause, L; Niemeier, A; Krenn, V

    2018-03-01

    The German Society of Orthopaedic Rheumatology (DGORh) honored Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn (MVZ-ZHZMD-Trier) with the Arthur Vick Prize 2017. With this award, scientific results with high impact on the diagnosis, therapy and pathogenetic understanding of rheumatic diseases are honored. In cooperation with pathologists and colleagues from various clinical disciplines Prof. Dr. med. Veit Krenn developed several histopathologic scoring systems which contribute to the diagnosis and pathogenetic understanding of degenerative and rheumatic diseases. These scores include the synovitis score, the meniscal degeneration score, the classification of periprosthetic tissues (SLIM classification), the arthrofibrosis score, the particle score and the CD15 focus score. Of highest relevance for orthopedic rheumatology is the synovitis score which is a semiquantitative score for evaluating immunological and inflammatory changes of synovitis in a graded manner. Based on this score, it is possible to divide results into low-grade synovitis and high-grade synovitis: a synovitis score of 1-4 is called low-grade synovitis and occurs for example in association with osteoarthritis (OA), post-trauma, with meniscal lesions and hemochromatosis. A synovitis score of 5-9 is called high-grade synovitis, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Lyme arthritis, postinfection and reactive arthritis as well as peripheral arthritis with Bechterew's disease (sensitivity 61.7%, specificity 96.1%). The first publication (2002) and an associated subsequent publication (2006) of the synovitis score has led to national and international acceptance of this score as the standard for histopathological assessment of synovitis. The synovitis score provides a diagnostic, standardized and reproducible histopathological evaluation method for joint diseases, particularly when this score is applied in the context with the joint pathology algorithm.

  2. Conductive concrete wins Popular Science prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    A conductive concrete developed by a research team at IRC (Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council of Canada) has won a prize in the home technology category because of its possible use in heating homes. Following the award, there have been a number of inquiries regarding possible applications for the concrete. Greatest interests in the concrete have been in its potential to heat buildings by using it as flooring. Other possible applications included de-icing pavements to building warming pads for parking aircraft. Essentially, carbon fibres and conductive particles are added to a concrete mix in such a quantity that they form a network within the mix, ensuring high electrical conductivity. A demonstration project is underway to build a 20 by 80 foot conductive concrete pad to test the material`s capability as a snow removal and de-icing tool.

  3. Riccardo Giacconi to Receive National Medal of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Riccardo Giacconi, very recently retired President of Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), will be awarded the National Medal of Science by President George W. Bush on March 14, according to the White House. Giacconi, who received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2002, will be honored for his pioneering research in X-ray astronomy and for his visionary leadership of major astronomy facilities. Established by Congress in 1959, the National Medal of Science is the Nation's highest honor for American scientists and is awarded annually by the President of the United States to individuals "deserving of special recognition for their outstanding contributions to knowledge." "We are extremely proud that Riccardo Giacconi has been selected to receive the nation's highest award for scientific achievement," said current AUI President Ethan J. Schreier, a long-term colleague of Dr. Giacconi. "It is another fitting recognition for an outstanding scientific career that has enhanced our basic understanding of the universe," Schreier added. Giacconi, known as the father of X-ray astronomy, used X-ray detectors launched on rockets to discover the first cosmic X-ray source in 1962. Because X-ray radiation is absorbed in Earth's atmosphere, space-based instruments are necessary to study it. Giacconi outlined a methodical program to investigate this new X-ray universe and, working with his research group at American Science and Engineering, Inc. in Cambridge, Massachusetts, developed the first space satellite dedicated to the new field of X-ray astronomy. Named Uhuru, this X-ray satellite observatory was launched in 1970 and subsequently discovered hundreds of X-ray sources. The ground-breaking work of Giacconi and his group led to the discovery of black holes, which to that point had been hypothesized but never seen. Giacconi was also the first to prove that the universe contains background radiation of X-ray light. Riccardo Giacconi has played a key role in many other landmark

  4. Honors Programs at Smaller Colleges. 3rd Edition. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    This monograph focuses upon areas of special concern to those working with honors at smaller colleges and universities: mission, recruitment, facilities, administration, budget, and curriculum. In each area, the author makes some general suggestions about overall operating principles, note specific issues that can lead to difficulties, and suggest…

  5. Demography of Honors: The Census of U.S. Honors Programs and Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Richard I.; Smith, Patricia J.; Cognard-Black, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Beginning in 2013 and spanning four research articles, we have implemented an empirical analysis protocol for honors education that is rooted in demography (Scott; Scott and Smith; Smith and Scott "Growth"; Smith and Scott, "Demography"). The goal of this protocol is to describe the structure and distribution of the honors…

  6. Honor as Cultural Mindset: Activated Honor Mindset Affects Subsequent Judgment and Attention in Mindset-Congruent Ways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheida Novin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Honor values articulate gender roles, the importance of reputation in maintaining one’s place in society, and maintaining respect for the groups one belongs to. In that sense honor provides a template for organizing social interactions and hence may be functional even among people and societies that do not report valuing and endorsing honor. We test the prediction that honor influences judgment and attention when activated in two experiments (N=538. Using a culture-as-situated cognition perspective, we predicted that activating one aspect of honor would activate other aspects, even among individuals who do not much endorse honor values. We tested these predictions among European Americans, a group that is not typically associated with honor values. In each study, participants were randomly assigned to experimental or control groups, which differed in one way: the experimental group read statements about honor values as a first step and the control group did not. Participants then judged stick-figure pairs (judging which is male; Study 1, n = 130 or made lexical decisions (judging whether a letter-string formed a correctly spelled word; Study 2, n = 408. In Study 1, experimental group participants were more likely to choose the visually agentic figure as male. In Study 2, experimental group participants were more accurate at noticing that the letter-string formed a word if the word was an honor-relevant word (e.g., noble, but they did not differ from the control group if the word was irrelevant to honor (e.g., happy. Participants in both studies were just above the neutral point in their endorsement of honor values. Individual differences in honor values endorsement did not moderate the effects of activating an honor mindset. Though honor is often described as if it is located in space, we did not find clear effects of where our letter strings were located on the computer screen. Our findings suggest a new way to consider how honor functions

  7. Recipients of 2013 EPS High Energy & Particle Physics Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    (From left) Joe Incandela, Peter Higgs, Francois Englert, Tejinder Virdee, Dave Charlton, and Peter Jenni. Higgs and Englert gave the prizes to the recipients of the 2013 European Physical Society's High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to high energy physics. "For the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism," the prize was awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Spokesperson for CMS, Incandela, and Spokesperson for ATLAS, Charlton, accepted the awards on their collaborations' behalf. "For their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments," the prize was awarded to Jenni, Virdee, and Michel Della Negra (not present). Image: ATLAS

  8. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (TQM and reached their goal of winning the prestigious Deming Prize. The common working principles of these companies and the various tools and techniques used by them are described in a concise manner in this paper. Further, the paper highlights the lessons from these companies to inspire others. The data taken from the respective websites of the companies has been used to list out the objectives, methodologies, and the benefits accrued by the companies.

  9. Ocular Injuries: Another Example of the Heavy Prize of Terrorism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... A 25‑year‑old air force personnel (lance corporal) presented to our accident and emergency ... Ocular Injuries: Another Example of the Heavy Prize of. Terrorism ..... Singapore: World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.; 2011. p.

  10. 1990 Nobel Prize for the 'discovery' of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall and Richard E. Taylor for pioneering investigations of deep inelastic electron scattering off protons and neutrons, which played a crucial role in the development of quark model in particle physics. This paper is an attempt to present some background to the 1990 Nobel Prize and outlines the consequences of the experiments cited

  11. Polio and Nobel prizes: looking back 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Erling; Prusiner, Stanley B

    2007-05-01

    In 1954, John Enders, Thomas Weller, and Frederick Robbins were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for their discovery of the ability of poliomyelitis viruses to grow in cultures of various types of tissue."5370 This discovery provided for the first time opportunities to produce both inactivated and live polio vaccines. By searching previously sealed Nobel Committee archives, we were able to review the deliberations that led to the award. It appears that Sven Gard, who was Professor of Virus Research at the Karolinska Institute and an adjunct member of the Nobel Committee at the time, played a major role in the events leading to the awarding of the Prize. It appears that Gard persuaded the College of Teachers at the Institute to decide not to follow the recommendation by their Nobel Committee to give the Prize to Vincent du Vigneaud. Another peculiar feature of the 1954 Prize is that Weller and Robbins were included based on only two nominations submitted for the first time that year. In his speech at the Nobel Prize ceremony, Gard mentioned the importance of the discovery for the future production of vaccines, but emphasized the implications of this work for growing many different, medically important viruses. We can only speculate on why later nominations highlighting the contributions of scientists such as Jonas Salk, Hilary Koprowski, and Albert Sabin in the development of poliovirus vaccines have not been recognized by a Nobel Prize.

  12. Alfred Nobel and His Prizes: From Dynamite to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Marshall A

    2017-07-01

    Alfred Nobel was one of the most successful chemists, inventors, entrepreneurs, and businessmen of the late nineteenth century. In a decision later in life, he rewrote his will to leave virtually all his fortune to establish prizes for persons of any nationality who made the most compelling achievement for the benefit of mankind in the fields of chemistry, physics, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace among nations. The prizes were first awarded in 1901, five years after his death. In considering his choice of prizes, it may be pertinent that he used the principles of chemistry and physics in his inventions and he had a lifelong devotion to science, he suffered and died from severe coronary and cerebral atherosclerosis, and he was a bibliophile, an author, and mingled with the literati of Paris. His interest in harmony among nations may have derived from the effects of the applications of his inventions in warfare ("merchant of death") and his friendship with a leader in the movement to bring peace to nations of Europe. After some controversy, including Nobel's citizenship, the mechanisms to choose the laureates and make four of the awards were developed by a foundation established in Stockholm; the choice of the laureate for promoting harmony among nations was assigned to the Norwegian Storting, another controversy. The Nobel Prizes after 115 years remain the most prestigious of awards. This review describes the man, his foundation, and the prizes with a special commentary on the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

  13. Creating Opportunities for Peer Leadership in Honors Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Marie E.

    2013-01-01

    Honors educators are privileged to work with exceptional students who are also some of the most engaged and motivated students on campus. These students often seek opportunities within their honors experience to study abroad, join community service organizations, conduct research, participate in internships, and develop their leadership skills.…

  14. Assessing Success in Honors: Getting beyond Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean K.

    2013-01-01

    An honors curriculum with realistic graduation requirements should have a respectable graduation rate. This number, when low, can indicate significant problems in the program. But a high graduation rate does not necessarily indicate success. A quality honors program, especially one that remains attentive to students' ability to thrive, might have…

  15. Honors Thesis Preparation: Evidence of the Benefits of Structured Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Steven

    2016-01-01

    A recent study of honors curricula across the nation indicates that 75.6% of honors programs and colleges at four-year institutions have thesis or capstone requirements (Savage and Cognard-Black). In addition to institutions with thesis requirements, many more also have the option for students to complete theses. For example, an earlier study…

  16. Turning Points: Improving Honors Student Preparation for Thesis Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation is an action research study that had as its primary goal to increase retention of honors college students at Arizona State University by implementing an additional advising session during the fifth semester of their academic career. Introducing additional, strategically-timed support for the honors thesis and demystifying the…

  17. An Augustinian Culture of Learning for Interdisciplinary Honors Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ste. Antoine, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Any attempt to discern the purpose of honors education and to integrate it with the unique ethos of a Christian institution can prove to be difficult. Yet, describing and articulating a sense of purpose is essential for an honors program to justify itself. This essay contends that a philosophy of education based on Augustine's…

  18. Hearts and Minds: Honors Programs in North American Christian Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    For readers outside North America, the concept of "honors education" may be confusing (since the word honours features in British and Commonwealth degree titles) or obscure (bringing to mind associations with aristocratic privilege or elitist competition). But in the United States the development of honors programs in colleges, and later honors…

  19. R&D 100 Awards Honor NREL Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    R&D 100 Awards Honor NREL Research For more information contact: George Douglas 303-275-4096 e National Renewable Energy Laboratory will be honored Thursday with two R&D 100 awards. The awards are given each year by the editors of R&D Magazine for what they consider to be among the year's 100

  20. Aan de slag met honors : praktijklessen uit Europa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; Hogenstijn, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    In de brochure ‘Aan de slag met honors’ worden onderzoeksresultaten van het onderzoeksproject Honors in Europe hertaald naar tips voor succesvol en inspirerend honorsonderwijs. De brochure is grotendeels gebaseerd op het boek Talent Development in European Higher Education – Honors programs in the

  1. Building Bridges between Science Courses Using Honors Organic Chemistry Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Timothy; Pontrello, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Introductory undergraduate science courses are traditionally offered as distinct units without formalized student interaction between classes. To bridge science courses, the authors used three Honors Organic Chemistry projects paired with other science courses. The honors students delivered presentations to mainstream organic course students and…

  2. An X-prize for transport airships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochstetler, R. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Prentice, B.E. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Transport Inst.

    2007-07-01

    Domestic air freight in the United States is expected to increase by at least 3 per cent every year for the next decade, while international demand will increase at twice that rate. As such, a new type of airship will be the most promising technological advance for the twenty-first century. Congestion in built up areas and demand for transport in remote areas has stimulated a resurgence of market interest in the potential value of lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles for transport. Although most technical challenges have been addressed, the greatest challenge facing shippers is a lack of business confidence and policy directions to support investment in technology. Shippers are reluctant to commit the initial development funds needed to construct operational prototypes for testing. In 2004 and 2005, SAIC Canada conducted studies on airship technologies for the United States Army, and for use in the construction of oil and gas pipelines in remote regions. This paper presented a literature review of LTA technology as well as a brief market assessment. The criterion for an airship X-prize was then proposed as a challenge to stimulate the development of a transport airship capable of year round operations. It was concluded that transport airships offer a more benign system of transport that reduce greenhouse gases and provide a means of mitigating the damages done by existing transport services. 5 refs.

  3. Fear of the Loss of Honor: Implications of Honor-Based Violence for the Development of Youth and Their Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedem, Mina; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background: Violence committed against young women, and in some cases young men, who are considered to have violated honor-based norms are reported in several countries, making honor-based violence (HBV) a global concern. This article is an overview of research in this area and summarizes key findings from a Swedish program of research dedicated…

  4. Honor as Cultural Mindset: Activated Honor Mindset Affects Subsequent Judgment and Attention in Mindset-Congruent Ways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novin, Sheida; Oyserman, Daphna

    2016-01-01

    Honor values articulate gender roles, the importance of reputation in maintaining one’s place in society, and maintaining respect for the groups one belongs to. In that sense honor provides a template for organizing social interactions and hence may be functional even among people and societies that

  5. Ecosystems Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. H.; Frame, M. T.; Ferriter, O.; Recker, J.

    2014-12-01

    Stimulating innovation and private sector entrepreneurship is an important way to advance the preparedness of communities, businesses and individuals for the impacts of climate change on certain aspects of ecosystems, such as: fire regimes; water availability; carbon sequestration; biodiversity conservation; weather-related hazards, and the spread of invasive species. The creation of tools is critical to help communities and natural resource managers better understand the impacts of climate change on ecosystems and the potential resulting implications for ecosystem services and conservation efforts. The Department of the Interior is leading an interagency effort to develop the Ecosystems Vulnerability theme as part of the President's Climate Action Plan. This effort will provide seamless access to relevant datasets that can help address such issues as: risk of wildfires to local communities and federal lands; water sensitivity to climate change; and understanding the role of ecosystems in a changing climate. This session will provide an overview of the proposed Ecosystem Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition, outlining the intended audience, scope, goals, and overall timeline. The session will provide an opportunity for participants to offer new ideas. Through the Challenge, access will be made available to critical datasets for software developers, engineers, scientists, students, and researchers to develop and submit applications addressing critical science issues facing our Nation today. Application submission criteria and guidelines will also be discussed. The Challenge will be open to all sectors and organizations (i.e. federal, non-federal, private sector, non-profits, and universities) within the United States. It is anticipated the Challenge will run from early January 2015 until spring of 2015.

  6. A Tradition Unlike Any Other: Research on the Value of an Honors Senior Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. Kay

    2016-01-01

    An honors senior thesis introduces students into a world of scholarship and professional activity in a way that no single course, either semester- or year-long, can do (Anderson, Lyons, and Weiner). Many honors educators consider honors thesis work to be the defining honors experience. For graduate schools, employers, and the students themselves,…

  7. Mission, Performance Indicators, and Assessment in U.S. Honors: A View from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelds, Vladimir; Drayer, Lyndsay; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.

    2012-01-01

    A mission statement that identifies the goals and aims of an honors program is a key step in program development. The National Collegiate Honors Council's Basic Characteristics of a Fully Developed Honors Program states unequivocally that a successful honors program "has a clear mandate from the institution's administration in the form of a…

  8. The Ripple Effect: Citation Chain Reactions of a Nobel Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possible citation chain reactions of a Nobel Prize using the mathematician Robert J. Aumann as a case example. The results show that the award of the Nobel Prize in 2005 affected not only the citations to his work, but also affected the citations to the references in his s...... citation network. The effect is discussed using innovation decision process theory as a point of departure to identify the factors that created a bandwagon effect leading to the reported observations....... scientific oeuvre. The results indicate that the spillover effect is almost as powerful as the effect itself. We are consequently able to document a ripple effect in which the awarding of the Nobel Prize ignites a citation chain reaction to Aumann's scientific ouvre and to the references in its nearest...

  9. W K H Panofsky prize awarded for CP violation

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Italo Mannelli (left) et Heinrich Wahl (right) at CERN after the announcement of the prize. The American Physical Society has recently announced its 2007 winners of the W K H Panofsky prize to CERN's Heinrich Wahl (now at the University of Ferrara), Italo Mannelli from Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa and Bruce Winstein of University of Chicago. These three physicists led experiments that resulted in a multitude of precision measurements of properties of neutral kaons, most notably the discovery of direct CP violation. The W K H Panofsky prize recognizes outstanding achievements in experimental particle physics. Wahl and Mannelli's important work at CERN with CP violation and neutral kaons in the 1970s paved the way for the NA31 experiment in the 1980s. This experiment, of which Wahl was the spokesperson, focused on and found the first evidence for direct CP violation. Mannelli played a leading role, particularly in implementing his knowledge of calorimetry using liquefied noble gases, a technique originally...

  10. IEEE Honors DeBlasio with Steinmetz Award | News | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    professional association, with the 2010 Charles Proteus Steinmetz Award. The award will be presented on Dec. 5 with the U.S. Department of the Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), will be honored

  11. Honor, Anger, and Belittlement in Aristotle’s Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sokolowski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The author considers the phenomenon of honor (timē by examining Aristotle’s description of it and its role in ethical and political life. His study of honor leads him to two related phenomena, anger (orgē and belittlement or contempt (oligōria; examining them helps him define honor more precisely. With his examination of honor the author shows how densely interwoven Aristotle’s ethical theory is; he illuminates such diverse things as the human good, political life and friendship, virtue, vice, incontinence, flattery, wealth and pleasure; he shows how the metaphysical principles of dunamis and energeia are at work in human affairs; he treats the passion of anger as well as the moral attitude of contempt that provokes it, and he situates both within the study of rhetoric.

  12. And the Top Honor Goes to Voc Ed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettinger, James

    1998-01-01

    Ray Chelewski is the first vocational-technical educator to win Walt Disney's top teaching honor. Chelewski is an agriculture teacher at the Presque Isle Regional Technology Center in northeast Maine. (JOW)

  13. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  14. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  15. 77 FR 58114 - SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ...This notice announces the release of the SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop competition. This competition offers $10 million in prizes to those who can lower the non-hardware installation cost of rooftop solar energy systems.

  16. Posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics available from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences produces three posters annually, each of which explains the motivation for the award of the Nobel prizes in Physics, Chemistry and Economics.   The files of the posters are available here: http://www.kva.se/en/Prizes/Nobel-prizes/Nobel-Posters/ The good news is that the CERN Library has got a stock of posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. They are available free from the Library (52-1-052).

  17. Symposium in Honor of Minoru M. Freund

    CERN Document Server

    Langhoff, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The presentations at this NASA-hosted Symposium in honor of Mino Freund will touch upon the fields, to which his prolific mind has made significant contributions. These include low temperature physics, cosmology, and nanotechnology with its wide-ranging applicability to material science, neuroscience, Earth sciences and satellite technology.  To learn more about Mino’s career you can download the "Tribute" , which outlines his journey from (i) low-temperature physics and superconductivity at the ETH Zürich to (ii) building one remarkable milliKelvin refrigerator for the US-Japan IRTS mission at UC Berkeley and ISAS in Japan to (iii) a decade in cosmology, to (iv) being on the micro-bolometer team at NASA Goddard for the HAWC instrument on SOFIA, to (v) developing at AFRL the nanotechnology portfolio for the entire Air Force.  This was followed by six years at the NASA Ames Research Center, where Mino formulated his far-ahead ideas about swarms of capable nanosats circling the Earth, which have since star...

  18. Effects of Mentioning the Incentive Prize in the Email Subject Line on Survey Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Janke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This study examined the effects that mentioning the survey incentive prize in the subject line of a reminder email had on the response rate and data quality. To date, manipulation of the subject line, specifically in terms of mentioning the incentive prize, has received limited attention in the survey design literature. Methods – The delivery of the survey invitation is discussed in terms of the timing of the launch and reminder emails. Particular emphasis is given to the design of the email subject line and justification of the format. Weekly response rates from four LibQUAL+TM surveys were compared. In addition, weekly responses for one year were analyzed using SPSS to investigate if there were any between means differences in terms of three elements of data quality. The three elements were: length of time it took to complete the survey, the number of core questions with an N/A response, and the number of illogical responses where minimum scores were higher than desired. Results – The response rates for the second week were grouped together based on the presence or absence of the subject line manipulation. There was a significant difference between these means (4.75%, p 0.033. There was no statistical difference in regards to the measures of data quality as determined by a one-way ANOVA test. Conclusions – Reminding survey participants with an email that mentions the incentive prize in the subject line appears to increase response rates with no deleterious effects on data quality. The results of this investigation are encouraging, and those running the LibQUAL+TM survey in their universities should consider implementing this method to increase response rates. Further research to replicate these findings in other contexts and using an experimental design would be beneficial.

  19. Students' participation in Hult Prize and their decision for entrepreneurship: Data gathered from Hult Prize 2018 regional finals in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluwatobi, Stephen; Oshokoya, Damilare; Atayero, Aderemi; Oludayo, Olumuyiwa; Nsofor, Colette; Oyebode, Adeola

    2018-08-01

    This data article is an expression of data that reflects how students' participation in the Hult Prize 2018 regional finals affects their decision to become entrepreneurs. The primary data was sourced using a questionnaire developed with Google doc form. Out of 120 students that participated in the Hult Prize 2018 regional finals in Nigeria, 103 of them responded. Their responses are as presented in this article. Such will be relevant to researchers who want to find out why students desire to become entrepreneurs and the best approach and timing to enable them.

  20. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ...The Department of Energy (DOE) announces in this notice the release of the SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar for public comment. Interested persons are encouraged to learn about the SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop rules at eere.energy.gov/solar/sunshot/prize.html.

  1. Recognizing mid-career productivity: the 2008 Retrovirology Prize, call for nomination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent analysis suggested a narrow age range for productivity of innovative work by researchers. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize the research of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2007 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Karen Beemon. Nominations are being solicited for the 2008 prize.

  2. DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOE-Supported Researcher Is Co-Winner of 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics October 3, 2006 WASHINGTON, DC Space Flight Center for co-winning the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics. "I offer my congratulations to with the 2006 Nobel Prize in Physics," Secretary Bodman said. "The groundbreaking work of

  3. Books Received

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Books Received. Articles in Resonance – Journal of Science Education. Volume 1 Issue 1 January 1996 pp 118-118 Books Received. Books Received · More Details Fulltext PDF. Volume 1 Issue 2 February 1996 pp 120-120 Books Received. Books Received.

  4. Artemisinin: The journey from natural product to Nobel Prize ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 2014 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was announced on 5th October. One-half ... The novel therapy that was given this huge recognition was artemisinin, a drug (isolated from the plant Artemisia annua) that has saved millions of lives and rekindled the dream of a world where malaria has been eradicated.

  5. Templeton Prize winner defends Christianity's credibility in a scientific age

    CERN Multimedia

    Heffern, Rich

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Templeton Prize has gone to the Rev. John C. Polkinghome, a British mathematical physicist and Anglican priest, and a key spokesperson for belief in God in an age of science, defending the ideal that faith is not against science but inconcert with it

  6. The Nobel Prize winner in physics 2013--Peter Higgs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyan

    2014-01-01

    Peter Higgs is a famous English physicist who was known for his works on Higgs mechanism and Higgs particle. He won the 2013 Noble Prize in physics. This paper briefly outlines his life, the proposition of Higgs mechanism and the origin of the name of Higgs particle. The discovery of Higgs particle is also given here. (author)

  7. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.' © London School of Economics and Political Science 2014.

  8. 2016 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Conferring Molecular Machines as ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2016 was awardedto three illustrious chemists, Professors Jean-Pierre Sauvage,Sir Fraser Stoddart, and Ben Feringa. Pioneering works ofthese chemists on designing molecules, chemically synthesizingthem, and extracting a work out of such designedmoleculesopen-up a new ...

  9. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  10. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.74-1 Prizes and awards. (a... goods or services, the fair market value of the goods or services is the amount to be included in income...

  11. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  12. Neutron scattering and the 1994 Nobel Physics Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiangdong

    1995-01-01

    Neutron scattering is an efficient method for detecting the microstructure of matter by which we can study, for example, details of the phonon spectrum in solids, and the isotopic effect. Bertram N. Brockhouse and Clifford G. Shull earned the Nobel Physics Prize in 1994 for their significant contributions in this domain

  13. Defining Excellence: Lessons from the 2013 Aspen Prize Finalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspen Institute, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In many respects, one couldn't find a group of 10 schools more diverse than the finalists for the 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. One community college serves 1,500 students, another 56,000. There are institutions devoted primarily--even solely--to technical degrees, and ones devoted mainly to preparing students for further…

  14. Harry Smith — recipient of the 2008 Molecular Ecology Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry Smith is a scholar, mentor, internationally renowned researcher, eloquent speaker and author, pioneering journal editor and highly valued colleague who has contributed greatly in multiple ways to plant science and the community. He richly deserves the honour of the Molecular Ecology Prize....

  15. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school…

  16. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  17. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  18. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorzkowski, W; Zuberek, R; Surya, Y

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  19. Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-28

    Jan 28, 2011 ... Giving Back — IDRC photo contest winner shares prize with Senegalese colleagues ... South or the developed world are tackling the challenges of urban living. ... Upon his return to Canada, the 26-year-old wrote to IDRC the ...

  20. SunShot Catalyst Prize Competition Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Catalyst Energy Innovation Prize, an open innovation program launched in 2014 by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This program aims to catalyze the rapid creation and development of products and solutions that address near-term challenges in the U.S. solar energy marketplace.

  1. 78 FR 40132 - Wave Energy Converter Prize Administration Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... to submit comments electronically to ensure timely receipt. Minutes and video recorded proceedings of... low cost to the sponsoring agency. A successful challenge strategy is one that quickly yields a number... achievable performance threshold. It is intended that a WEC Prize could spur game changing innovations for...

  2. Supporting Military Veteran Students: Early Lessons from Kohlberg Prize Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Melinda Mechur; Klempin, Serena

    2016-01-01

    Postsecondary education participation is critical for military-connected individuals as they transition back to civilian life. The Kisco Foundation's Kohlberg Prize, a competitive grant awarded in 2015 and 2016, is aimed at making community colleges more welcoming and better able to meet the needs of veteran students. This review details the early…

  3. "Not Censorship but Selection": Censorship and/as Prizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This essay calls for a fresh critical approach to the topic of censorship, suggesting that anticensorship efforts, while important and necessary, function much like literary prizing. The analysis draws especially on James English's recent study "The Economy of Prestige." There are two central arguments: first, that the librarian ethic of…

  4. Training Quality: Before and after Winning the Deming Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magennis, Jo P.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Quality Improvement Program developed by Florida Power and Light's Nuclear Training organization that was awarded the Deming Application Prize for quality control. Training quality, team activities, training's role in business planning, customer involvement and evaluation, and continuous improvement of training are discussed. (LRW)

  5. The 2010 Chemistry Nobel Prize: Pd(0)-Catalyzed Organic Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three scientists, R F ... reactions are scalable to industrial production level and satisfy several 'Green ... Ph Br. H2C CH2. Pd(PPh3)4 or Pd(OAc2). HC CH2. Ph base, solvent, heat. 1. 2. 3. (1).

  6. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Carter Jr., Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  7. IAEA Nobel Peace Prize cancer and nutrition fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D. III

    2006-05-01

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize to the IAEA and Director General ElBaradei in equal shares. The IAEA and its Director General won the 2005 Peace Prize for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. The IAEA Board of Governors subsequently decided that the IAEA's share of the prestigious prize would be used to create a special fund for fellowships and training to improve cancer control and childhood nutrition in the developing world. This fund is known as the 'IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund'. The money will be dedicated to enhancing human resources in developing regions of the world for improved cancer control and childhood nutrition. In the area of cancer control, the money will be spent on establishing regional cancer training institutes for the training of new doctors, medical physicists and technologists in radiation oncology to improve cancer treatment and care, as part of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). In the realm of nutrition, the focus of the Fund will be on capacity building in the use of nuclear techniques to develop interventions to contribute to improved nutrition and health for children in the developing world. Fund-supported fellowship awards will target young professionals, especially women, from Member States, through the IAEA's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme. Alongside such awards, regional events will be organized in Africa, Asia and Latin America in cancer control and nutrition during 2006. The IAEA Secretariat is encouraging Member States and donors to contribute to the IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund by providing additional resources, in cash and in-kind

  8. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-01-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  9. Georges Charpak, Nobel Physics Prize 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1992-12-15

    Wednesday 14 October looked like being a day like any other for detector specialist Georges Charpak. Except he had an unwelcome appointment with the dentist early that afternoon. Late that morning he was able to telephone to cancel the appointment. 'I have a small problem...', he explained. The problem was the announcement that Georges Charpak receives 1992's most prestigious award for physics.

  10. Georges Charpak, Nobel Physics Prize 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Wednesday 14 October looked like being a day like any other for detector specialist Georges Charpak. Except he had an unwelcome appointment with the dentist early that afternoon. Late that morning he was able to telephone to cancel the appointment. 'I have a small problem...', he explained. The problem was the announcement that Georges Charpak receives 1992's most prestigious award for physics

  11. The BINP receives its Golden Hadron award

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    On Thursday, 14 September, the LHC Project Leader, Lyn Evans, handed over a Golden Hadron award to Alexander Skrinsky of Russia's Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP). The prize is awarded in recognition of exceptional performances by suppliers and this year prizes were awarded to two firms, Cockerill-Sambre (Belgium) and Wah-Chang (United States), and to the Budker Institute, which was unable to receive the award at the same time as the two other recipients (see Bulletin No 34/2002, of 19 August 2002). The Russian institute has been rewarded for the particularly high-quality production of 360 dipole magnets and 185 quadrupole magnets for the LHC proton beam transfer lines.

  12. Understanding Fear of Opportunism in Global Prize-Based Science Contests: Evidence for Gender and Age Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Oguz Ali; van den Ende, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Global prize-based science contests have great potential for tapping into diverse knowledge on a global scale and overcoming important scientific challenges. A necessary step for knowledge to be utilized in these contests is for that knowledge to be disclosed. Knowledge disclosure, however, is paradoxical in nature: in order for the value of knowledge to be assessed, inventors must disclose their knowledge, but then the person who receives that knowledge does so at no cost and may use it opportunistically. This risk of potential opportunistic behavior in turn makes the inventor fearful of disclosing knowledge, and this is a major psychological barrier to knowledge disclosure. In this project, we investigated this fear of opportunism in global prize-based science contests by surveying 630 contest participants in the InnoCentive online platform for science contests. We found that participants in these science contests experience fear of opportunism to varying degrees, and that women and older participants have significantly less fear of disclosing their scientific knowledge. Our findings highlight the importance of taking differences in such fears into account when designing global prize-based contests so that the potential of the contests for reaching solutions to important and challenging problems can be used more effectively.

  13. Understanding Fear of Opportunism in Global Prize-Based Science Contests: Evidence for Gender and Age Differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Ali Acar

    Full Text Available Global prize-based science contests have great potential for tapping into diverse knowledge on a global scale and overcoming important scientific challenges. A necessary step for knowledge to be utilized in these contests is for that knowledge to be disclosed. Knowledge disclosure, however, is paradoxical in nature: in order for the value of knowledge to be assessed, inventors must disclose their knowledge, but then the person who receives that knowledge does so at no cost and may use it opportunistically. This risk of potential opportunistic behavior in turn makes the inventor fearful of disclosing knowledge, and this is a major psychological barrier to knowledge disclosure. In this project, we investigated this fear of opportunism in global prize-based science contests by surveying 630 contest participants in the InnoCentive online platform for science contests. We found that participants in these science contests experience fear of opportunism to varying degrees, and that women and older participants have significantly less fear of disclosing their scientific knowledge. Our findings highlight the importance of taking differences in such fears into account when designing global prize-based contests so that the potential of the contests for reaching solutions to important and challenging problems can be used more effectively.

  14. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  15. 'Exhibitions and experiments', in celebration of nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Nakanishi, Akira; Nakano, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2008 was awarded to Professors Yoichiro Nambu, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa. At this opportunity, we held an exhibition to introduce the achievements of the laureates for 10 days at the Omiya campus in May 2009. With the explanations of elementary particle physics, we prepared several experimental instruments with which visitors could play and learn the spontaneous symmetry breaking, cosmic rays, a circle path of an electron in a magnetic field and so on. Our main purpose of the exhibition was, however, not just to explain the contents of the Nobel Prize in Physics, but also to attract students' interests to physics. More than 800 individual students attended during the period, and the survey of questionnaires shows positive contributions to raise the students' awareness of the excitement of physics. (author)

  16. The discoveries of molecular mechanisms for the circadian rhythm: The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong-Chi

    2018-02-01

    Circadian clocks evolved to allow plants and animals to adapt their behaviors to the 24-hr change in the external environment due to the Earth's rotation. While the first scientific observation of circadian rhythm in the plant leaf movement may be dated back to the early 18th century, it took 200 years to realize that the leaf movement is controlled by an endogenous circadian clock. The cloning and characterization of the first Drosophila clock gene period in the early 1980s, independently by Jeffery C. Hall and Michael Rosbash at Brandeis University and Michael Young at Rockefeller University, paved the way for their further discoveries of additional genes and proteins, culminating in establishing the so-called transcriptional translational feedback loop (TTFL) model for the generation of autonomous oscillator with a period of ∼24 h. The 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to honor their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm. Copyright © 2018 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alert with destruction of stratospheric ozone: 95 Nobel Prize Winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Zurita, E.

    1995-01-01

    After briefly summarizing the discoveries of the 95 Nobel Prize Winners in Chemistry related to the threats to the ozone layer by chemical pollutants, we make a soft presentation of the overall problem of stratospheric ozone, starting with the destructive catalytic cycles of the pollutant-based free radicals, following with the diffusion mathematical models in Atmospheric Chemistry, and ending with the increasing annual drama of the ozone hole in the Antarctica. (Author)

  18. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry open-quotes for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.close quotes Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig

  19. Praise for the prize - Hopes for peace: World leaders react

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents highlights of words of praise and congratulations for the IAEA and its Director General up on the awarding of the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The list include Mr. Kofi Annan, the Secretary General of the UN; Mr. Hans Blix, Director General and Chief UN Weapons Inspector in Iraq; Ms. Condoleezza rice, US Secretary of State; Mr. Jacques Chirac, President of France and the European Commission

  20. Conversational AI: The Science Behind the Alexa Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Ram, Ashwin; Prasad, Rohit; Khatri, Chandra; Venkatesh, Anu; Gabriel, Raefer; Liu, Qing; Nunn, Jeff; Hedayatnia, Behnam; Cheng, Ming; Nagar, Ashish; King, Eric; Bland, Kate; Wartick, Amanda; Pan, Yi; Song, Han

    2018-01-01

    Conversational agents are exploding in popularity. However, much work remains in the area of social conversation as well as free-form conversation over a broad range of domains and topics. To advance the state of the art in conversational AI, Amazon launched the Alexa Prize, a 2.5-million-dollar university competition where sixteen selected university teams were challenged to build conversational agents, known as socialbots, to converse coherently and engagingly with humans on popular topics ...

  1. Student film clinches top prize in film competition

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech senior Tim Leaton earned the top prize in the widely acclaimed Film Your Issue (FYI) competition - an eight-week paid internship at Disney Studios in Los Angeles. Leaton's one-minute film, "Orphans in Africa," won the nationwide contest, an initiative to encourage young Americans, age 18 to 26, to engage in social issues and add their voices to the public dialogue.

  2. Naming patterns reveal cultural values: patronyms, matronyms, and the U.S. culture of honor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan P; Carvallo, Mauricio; Imura, Mikiko

    2014-02-01

    Four studies examined the hypothesis that honor norms would be associated with a pronounced use of patronyms, but not matronyms, for naming children. Study 1 shows that men who endorse honor values expressed a stronger desire to use patronyms (but not matronyms) for future children, an association that was mediated by patriarchal attitudes. Study 2 presents an indirect method for assessing state patronym and matronym levels. As expected, patronym scores were significantly higher in honor states and were associated with a wide range of variables linked previously to honor-related dynamics. Study 3a shows that following the terrorist attacks of 9/11, patronyms increased in honor states, but not in non-honor states. Likewise, priming men with a fictitious terrorist attack (Study 3b) increased the association between honor ideology and patronym preferences. Together, these studies reveal a subtle social signal that reflects the masculine values of an honor culture.

  3. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  4. Solomon M. Hsiang Receives 2013 Science for Solutions Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiang, Solomon M.

    2014-01-01

    I am honored to receive this award, created by Peter Schlosser, nominated by my postdoc advisor Michael Oppenheimer, and alongside my thesis advisor Mark Cane, recipient of this year's Maurice Ewing Medal—all role models and original pioneers in "the application and use of Earth and space sciences to solve societal problems."

  5. Effect of prize draw incentive on the response rate to a postal survey of obstetricians and gynaecologists: A randomised controlled trial. [ISRCTN32823119

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark T Justin

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Response rates to postal questionnaires are falling and this threatens the external validity of survey findings. We wanted to establish whether the incentive of being entered into a prize draw to win a personal digital assistant (PDA would increase the response rate for a national survey of consultant obstetricians and gynaecologists. Methods A randomised controlled trial was conducted. This involved sending a postal questionnaire to all Consultant Obstetricians and Gynaecologists in the United Kingdom. Recipients were randomised to receiving a questionnaire offering a prize draw incentive (on response or no such incentive. Results The response rate for recipients offered the prize incentive was 64% (461/716 and 62% (429/694 in the no incentive group (relative rate of response 1.04, 95% CI 0.96 – 1.13 Conclusion The offer of a prize draw incentive to win a PDA did not significantly increase response rates to a national questionnaire survey of consultant obstetricians and gynaecologists.

  6. Committed to the Honor Code: An Investment Model Analysis of Academic Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dix, Emily L.; Emery, Lydia F.; Le, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Educators worldwide face challenges surrounding academic integrity. The development of honor codes can promote academic integrity, but understanding how and why honor codes affect behavior is critical to their successful implementation. To date, research has not examined how students' "relationship" to an honor code predicts…

  7. Centauri High School Teacher Honored as Colorado Outstanding Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teacher Centauri High School Teacher Honored as Colorado Outstanding Biology Teacher For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., May 2, 1997 -- Tracy Swedlund, biology teacher at Centauri High School in LaJara, was selected as Colorado's 1997 Outstanding Biology Teacher and will be

  8. Laboratories for Educational Innovation: Honors Programs in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; Van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In Dutch universities, honors programs are a fast growing development. The first such programs started in 1993. Twenty years later a large number of programs are implemented at nearly all research universities and also at many universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Recent data have revealed significant diversity in the types and…

  9. An Honors Interdisciplinary Community-Based Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, David; Terlecki, Melissa; Watterson, Nancy; Ratmansky, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how two faculty members at Cabrini College--one from biology and the other from psychology--incorporated interdisciplinary community-based research in an honors course on environmental watershed issues. The course, Environmental Psychology, was team-taught in partnership with a local watershed organization, the Valley Creek…

  10. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  11. Codes, Ciphers, and Cryptography--An Honors Colloquium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karls, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    At the suggestion of a colleague, I read "The Code Book", [32], by Simon Singh to get a basic introduction to the RSA encryption scheme. Inspired by Singh's book, I designed a Ball State University Honors Colloquium in Mathematics for both majors and non-majors, with material coming from "The Code Book" and many other sources. This course became…

  12. Laboratories for educational innovation: honors programs in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; van Eijl, Pierre; Pilot, Albert

    2012-01-01

    In Dutch universities, honors programs are a fast growing development. The first such programs started in 1993. Twenty years later a large number of programs are implemented at nearly all research universities and also at many universities of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Recent data have

  13. The Gifted and Honors Program at Ridgeroad Jr. High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Bonnie

    1984-01-01

    Describes a science program for honors students that offers a blend of both teacher-directed and student-directed activities. Includes information on instructional strategies used, independent student study projects, financial considerations, grading, and student reaction to the program. (JN)

  14. Research Center Renaming Will Honor Senator Domenici

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    New Mexico Tech and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) will rename the observatory's research center on the New Mexico Tech campus to honor retiring U.S. Senator Pete V. Domenici in a ceremony on May 30. The building that serves as the scientific, technical, and administrative center for the Very Large Array (VLA) and Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescopes will be named the "Pete V. Domenici Science Operations Center." The building previously was known simply as the "Array Operations Center." Sen. Pete V. Domenici Sen. Pete V. Domenici "The new name recognizes the strong and effective support for science that has been a hallmark of Senator Domenici's long career in public service," said Dr. Fred Lo, NRAO Director. New Mexico Tech President Daniel H. Lopez said Sen. Domenici has always been a supporter of science and research in Socorro and throughout the state. "He's been a statesman for New Mexico, the nation -- and without exaggeration -- for the world," Lopez said. "Anyone with that track record deserves this recognition." Van Romero, Tech vice president of research and economic development, has served as the university's main lobbyist in Washington, D.C., for more than a decade. He said Sen. Domenici has always been receptive to new ideas and willing to take risks. "Over the years, Sen. Domenici has always had time to listen to our needs and goals," Romero said. "He has served as a champion of New Mexico Tech's causes and we owe him a debt of gratitude for all his efforts over the decades." Originally dedicated in 1988, the center houses offices and laboratories that support VLA and VLBA operations. The center also supports work on the VLA modernization project and on the international Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) project. Work on ALMA at the Socorro center and at the ALMA Test Facility at the VLA site west of Socorro has focused on developing and testing equipment to be deployed at the ALMA site in Chile's Atacama

  15. Diversity receiver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The invention is directed to the reception of high rate radio signals (for example DVB-T signals) while the receiver is moving at a high speed (for example in or with a car). Two or more antennas (12, 16) are closely spaced and arranged behind each other in the direction of motion (v) for receiving

  16. The Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize for 2017 Awarded to Hans Walter Lack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib

    2018-01-01

    The reasons for awarding the Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize to Hans Walter Lack are summarised and the prize described. It is also mentioned that Rosén's Linnaeus Medal in Gold was awarded to Arne Strid at the same ceremony.......The reasons for awarding the Rolf and Gertrud Dahlgren Prize to Hans Walter Lack are summarised and the prize described. It is also mentioned that Rosén's Linnaeus Medal in Gold was awarded to Arne Strid at the same ceremony....

  17. Honoring Choices Minnesota: preliminary data from a community-wide advance care planning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kent S; Kottke, Thomas E; Schettle, Sue

    2014-12-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) increases the likelihood that individuals who are dying receive the care that they prefer. It also reduces depression and anxiety in family members and increases family satisfaction with the process of care. Honoring Choices Minnesota is an ACP program based on the Respecting Choices model of La Crosse, Wisconsin. The objective of this report is to describe the process, which began in 2008, of implementing Honoring Choices Minnesota in a large, diverse metropolitan area. All eight large healthcare systems in the metropolitan area agreed to participate in the project, and as of April 30, 2013, the proportion of hospitalized individuals 65 and older with advance care directives in the electronic medical record was 12.1% to 65.6%. The proportion of outpatients aged 65 and older was 11.6% to 31.7%. Organizations that had sponsored recruitment initiatives had the highest proportions of records containing healthcare directives. It was concluded that it is possible to reduce redundancy by recruiting all healthcare systems in a metropolitan area to endorse the same ACP model, although significantly increasing the proportion of individuals with a healthcare directive in their medical record requires a campaign with recruitment of organizations and individuals. © 2014 The Authors.The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  19. Chronobiology --2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Li; Li, Yi-Rou; Xu, Xiao-Dong

    2018-01-20

    Chronobiology is a field of biology that examines the generation of biological rhythms in various creatures and in many parts of body, and their adaptive fitness to solar- and lunar-related periodic phenomena. The synchronization of internal circadian clocks with external timing signals confers accurate phase response and tissue homeostasis. Herein we state a series of studies on circadian rhythms and introduce the brief history of chronobiology. We also present a detailed timeline of the discoveries on molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythm in Drosophila, which was awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. The latest findings and new perspectives are further summarized to indicate the significance of circadian research.

  20. Director of IMCS - National Prize Laureate of Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial board of the "Computer Science Journal of Moldova"

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Vice Editor-in-Chief of CSJM, and our colleague, D.Hab. Svetlana Cojocaru, in 2011 became the National Prize Laureate of Moldova. In accordance with Government decision, this distinction is given for ``outstanding achievements whose results have substantially enriched science, culture and art, had a considerable contribution to promoting a positive image of the country in the international arena, a significant impact on the development of socio-economic, scientific and technical progress, national and world culture.''

  1. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  2. [Women in natural sciences--Nobel Prize winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuskin, Eugenija; Mustajbegović, Jadranka; Lipozencić, Jasna; Kolcić, Ivana; Spoljar-Vrzina, Sanja; Polasek, Ozren

    2006-01-01

    Alfred Bernhard Nobel was the founder of the Nobel Foundation, which has been awarding world-known scientists since 1901, for their contribution to the welfare of mankind. The life and accomplishments of Alfred Bernhard Nobel are described as well as scientific achivements of 11 women, Nobel prize winners in the field of physics, chemistry, physiology and/or medicine. They are Marie Sklodowska Curie, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Irene Joliot-Curie, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Gerty Theresa Radnitz Cori, Rosalyn Sussman Yalow, Barbara McClintock, Rita Levi-Montalcini, Gertrude Elion, Christine Nusslein-Volhard and Linda B. Buck.

  3. Google Science Fair 2012 : Grand Prize Winner Brittany Wenger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    17-18 age category AND Grand Prize Winner: Brittany Wenger (USA)—“Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.” Brittany’s project harnesses the power of the cloud to help doctors accurately diagnose breast cancer. Brittany built an application that compares individual test results to an extensive dataset stored in the cloud, allowing doctors to assess tumors using a minimally-invasive procedure. Brittany Michelle Wenger, and her mother, passed through the CERN Control Centre accompanied by Mike Lamont, CERN Beams Department, Operation Group Leader.

  4. Paul Ehrlich: the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine 1908.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piro, Anna; Tagarelli, Antonio; Tagarelli, Giuseppe; Lagonia, Paolo; Quattrone, Aldo

    2008-01-01

    We wish to commemorate Paul Ehrlich on the centennial of his being awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908. His studies are now considered as milestones in immunology: the morphology of leukocytes; his side-chain theory where he defined the cellular receptor for first time; and his clarification of the difference between serum therapy and chemotherapy. Ehrlich also invented the first chemotherapeutic drug: compound 606, or Salvarsan. We have used some original documents from the Royal Society of London, where Ehrlich was a fellow, and from Leipzig University, where he took a degree in medicine.

  5. The time-dependent prize-collecting arc routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Dan; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2013-01-01

    with the time of day. Two metaheuristic algorithms, one based on Variable Neighborhood Search and one based on Tabu Search, are proposed and tested for a set of benchmark problems, generated from real road networks and travel time information. Both algorithms are capable of finding good solutions, though......A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change...

  6. Editorial: The Sackler International Prize in Biophysical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Lucio

    2018-02-01

    The Raymond and Beverly Sackler International Prize is awarded alternatively in the fields of Biophysics, Chemistry and Physics on a yearly basis, by Tel Aviv University. The price is intended to encourage dedication to science, originality and excellence, by rewarding outstanding scientists under 45 years of age, with a total purse of 100,000. The 2016 Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize was awarded in the field of Magnetic Resonance last February in a festive symposium, to three excellent researchers: Professor John Morton (University College London), Professor Guido Pintacuda (Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon and CNRS), and Professor Charalampos Kalodimos (at the time at the University of Minnesota). John was recognized for his novel contributions to quantum information processing, by means of a range of highly elegant physical phenomena involving both NMR and EPR. Guido was recognized for his methodological advances in solid state NMR spectroscopy, including advances in proton detection under ultrafast MAS at ultrahigh magnetic field, and for his insightful applications to challenging biological systems. While Charalampos (Babis) was recognized for beautifully detailed characterizations of structure, function, and dynamics in challenging and important biological systems through solution NMR spectroscopy.

  7. Eugene F. Fama: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  8. Robert J. Shiller: Nobel prize for 2013: Capital market efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelić Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2013 the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences was awarded to the American economists, Eugene Fama, Lars Peter Hansen and Robert Shiller. The monetarists, Fama and Hansen, from the University of Chicago, and the Neo- Keynesian, Shiller, from the Yale University, according to the Swedish Royal Academy, won this prestigious prize for their research providing mathematical and economic models to determine (irregularities in the stock value trends at the stock exchanges. With his colleagues, in the 1960s Fama established that, in the short term, it is extremely difficult to forecast stock prices, given that new information gets embedded in the prices rather quickly. Shiller, however, determined that, although it is almost impossible to predict the stock prices for a period of few days, this is not true for a period of several years. He discovered that the stock prices fluctuate much more substantially than corporation dividents, and that the relationship between prices and dividends tends to decline when high, and to grow when low. This pattern does not apply only to stocks, but also to bonds and other forms of capital.

  9. Soviet Union in the context of the Nobel prize

    CERN Document Server

    Blokh, Abram M

    2018-01-01

    The result of meticulous research by Professor Abram Blokh, this book presents facts, documents, thoughts and comments on the system of the Nobel Prize awards to Russian and Soviet scientists. It provides a comprehensive overview of the relationship between the ideas expressed by the Nobel Foundation and those expressed by the autocratic and totalitarian regimes in Russia and the ex-Soviet Union during the 20th century who had the same attitude of revulsion toward the intellectual and humanistic values represented by the Nobel Prizes. To do his research, the author had access to the declassified documents in the archives of the Nobel Foundation for many years. Also included in the book are new materials obtained and developed by the author after the publication of the first two editions (in Russian). This additional information is from the archives of the Soviet Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Soviet Writers' Union et al. in Moscow and St Petersburg. These documents shed new...

  10. Developing Trustworthy Commissioned Officers: Transcending the Honor Codes and Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    prima   facie  evidence  that  one  has  been  honorable.  This  assumption  is...the   staff   and   faculty   at   each   commissioning   source  have  an   obligation   to   show  Cadets,  Midshipmen...and belief in the competency, character, and commitment of an institution, organization, group, or individual to fulfill obligations and

  11. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  12. Monsef Benkirane awarded 2013 Ming K. Jeang Foundation Retrovirology Prize: landmark HIV-1 research honoured

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Lever, Andrew; Wainberg, Mark; Fassati, Ariberto; Borrow, Persephone; Fujii, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Monsef Benkirane, from the Laboratoire de Virologie Moleculaire in Montpellier, France, has been announced as the recipient of the 2013 Retrovirology Prize. This bi-annual prize covers all aspects of the Retrovirology field and celebrates groundbreaking research from retrovirologists aged

  13. Feelings of discomfort in Ōe's “Prize Stock”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen Vilslev, Annette

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the feelings of discomfort in the works of Nobel Prize winner Kenzaburo Ōe. Focusing on Ōe's first short story “Prize Stock”, Shiiku (1957), the article discusses how the incredible event of a black pilot falling from the sky in the mountains near a small Japanese village...

  14. The young, not-so-young, and the 2007 Retrovirology Prize: call for nominations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent findings suggest an aging scientific work force and an almost static publishing productivity in the United States. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize and encourage the work of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2006 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Joseph G. Sodroski.

  15. Prizes for innovation : Impact analysis in the ICT for Education sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Arora (Payal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe use of prizes to stimulate innovation in education has dramatically increased in recent years, but, to date, no organization has attempted to critically examine the impact these prizes have had on education. This report attempts to fill this gap by conducting a landscape review of

  16. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  17. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners; Marie en IreneCurie. De eerste vrouwelijke Nobelprijswinnaars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordenbos, G. [Joke Smit Instituut voor Vrouwenstudies, Universiteit Leiden, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2003-07-01

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences. [Dutch] In 1903, precies honderd jaar geleden, ontving Marie Curie als eerste vrouw de Nobelprijs voor de Wetenschap, gevolgd door een tweede Nobelprijs in 1911. Ook haar dochter Irene Joliot-Curie kreeg de Nobelprijs voor de wetenschap in 1935. Marie and Irene Curie schetst een breed beeld van de academische wereld waarin beide vrouwen zich bewogen: de beperkte toegang van vrouwen tot de universiteit, hun carrisres in de natuurkunde en baanbrekende ontdekkingen, de afwijzing van Marie door de Franse Academie des Sciences, de toekenning van de Nobelprijs en de benoeming van Irene als eerste vrouwelijke minister in Frankrijk, de invloed van de twee Wereldoorlogen, hun huwelijks- en priveleven en de niet aflatende hetze van de pers tegen beiden. In de door mannen gedomineerde wereld van de natuurwetenschappen liep de uitzonderingspositie van beide vrouwen als rode draad door hun curieuze levens. Het leven en werk van de Curies wordt geactualiseerd door deze tegen het licht te houden van de huidige positie van vrouwen in de natuurwetenschappen. Het bereiken van de top van de wetenschap door vrouwen blijkt nog steeds uitzonderlijk.

  18. 2013 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2013 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, D.

    2015-01-01

    I would like to express gratitude to the IAEA, the journal Nuclear Fusion and its board for this acknowledgement of work carried out at the MIT Alcator C-Mod tokamak. I must begin by making it clear that this is in no way an award to an individual. The experiments, data analysis and paper were a true collaborative effort from the C-Mod team. It is a honor to work with them and to accept the award on their behalf. I would also like to thank the US Department of Energy for their support in funding this research. The paper describes the exploration of the 'improved' confinement regime dubbed 'I-mode'. The distinguishing feature of this operational mode is a robust boundary pedestal in temperature with the somewhat surprising lack of any form of density pedestal. Thus the regime exhibits an enhanced energy confinement similar to H-mode, roughly double of L-mode at fixed input power, yet has global fuel and impurity particle transport of L-mode. These features are intriguing from a scientific and practical point of view. On the science side it is extremely useful to obtain such a clear demarcation between the energy and particle transport. For example, soon after its discovery, the I-mode was used to extract the observation that the edge T pedestal is the strongest determinant for intrinsic rotation in work by John Rice, Pat Diamond and colleagues. Recent results regarding core transport by Anne White, Nate Howard and colleagues show that I-mode has intriguing properties with respect to core response of fluctuations and profile stiffness. Mike Churchill's recent Ph. D study on C-Mod shows that I-mode exhibits no strong poloidal impurity asymmetry, unlike H-mode. The I-mode posed an interesting test for the peeling-ballooning-KBM model of the pedestal, the subject of the 2014 Nuclear Fusion award of Phil Snyder, and was examined by John Walk and Jerry Hughes showing that in fact the lack of the density pedestal pushed the I-mode far away from the P-B limit, and thus the

  19. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  20. Physics Nobel prize 2004: Surprising theory wins physics Nobel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: David Politzer, David Gross and Frank Wilczek. For their understanding of counter-intuitive aspects of the strong force, which governs quarks inside protons and neutrons, on 5 October three American physicists were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. David J. Gross (Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), H. David Politzer (California Institute of Technology), and Frank Wilczek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) made a key theoretical discovery with a surprising result: the closer quarks are together, the weaker the force - opposite to what is seen with electromagnetism and gravity. Rather, the strong force is analogous to a rubber band stretching, where the force increases as the quarks get farther apart. These physicists discovered this property of quarks, known as asymptotic freedom, in 1976. It later became a key part of the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model, the current best theory to describe the interac...

  1. Nobel Prize in physics 1985: Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, R.

    1986-01-01

    The conditions (like very strong magnetic fields, ultralow temperatures, and occurrence of a two-dimensional electron gas in microelectronic structures) for the measurement of the quantum Hall effect are explained. Two possible measuring methods are described. Measuring results for p-Si-MOSFET, GaAs/AlGaAs heterojuntions and grain boundaries in InSb crystals are reported. Differences between normal (integer) and fractional quantum Hall effect are discussed. One of the important consequences is that by means of the quantum Hall effect the value h/e 2 can be determined with very high accuracy. In 1985 Klaus von Klitzing was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the quantum Hall effect

  2. From Tomato King to World Food Prize laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    This autobiographical article describes my early years, education, and career at Purdue University. Helping form and expand the Department of Food Science at Purdue was exciting and gratifying, and working with students in the classroom and on research projects was rewarding and kept me feeling young. My research on bulk aseptic processing allowed me to help solve problems relevant to the tomato industry, but I learned later that it had much broader relevance. I certainly never expected the impact and visibility of the work to result in my being awarded the World Food Prize. Being the first food scientist to win this award has enabled me to focus increased attention on the need to reduce food losses.

  3. Herbert A. Simon: Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahey, Thomas H

    2003-09-01

    In 1978, Herbert A. Simon won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences, the same Nobel won by Daniel Kahneman in 2002. Simon's work in fact paved the way for Kahneman's Nobel. Although trained in political science and economics rather than psychology, Simon applied psychological ideas to economic theorizing. Classical and neoclassical economic theories assume that people are perfectly rational and strive to optimize economic outcomes. Simon argued that human rationality is constrained, not perfect, and that people seek satisfactory rather than ideal outcomes. Despite his Nobel, Simon felt isolated in economics and ultimately moved into psychology. Nevertheless, his ideas percolated through the economic community, so that Kahneman, whose research advanced Simon's broad perspective, could be the psychologist who won the Nobel in economics.

  4. [From apprenticeship to Nobel Prize: Henri Moissan's fabulous destiny].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, O

    2008-01-01

    Born in Paris on September 28, 1852, son of an eastern railways' employee and of a dressmaker, Henri Moissan's secondary schooling in Meaux did not allow him to get access to the sesame diploma "baccalauréat" (GCE). In 1869, he did obtain a special certificate of secondary schooling so that he could become an apprentice in watch making. That could have been the end of the story, but dreadful event for France appeared to have beneficial effects for Moissan. Under the threat of the Prussian army, Moissan's family took refuge near Paris. This gave the young Henri the opportunity to register as a student for the second-class pharmacy diploma, which did not need, at the time, the GCE. Moissan became then a trainee in pharmacy in 1871. Meanwhile, he followed the special schooling of "Ecole de chimie" founded by E. Frémy, and then joined the laboratory of Dehérain at the Museum, where he worked in plant physiology. He finally obtained the famous "baccalauréat" (GCE) and could register as a student in first-class pharmacy. He became a pharmacist as well as a doctor in sciences. In 1883, Moissan was named professor at the school of pharmacy in Paris. In 1886, he isolated fluorine by electrolysis of fluorhydric acid, in the presence of potassium fluoride, at a low temperature. He then studied diamond synthesis and gave a start to high temperature chemistry, designing his famous furnace. These findings and many others allowed Moissan to rise to membership in many learned academies around the world. Crowning achievement, Moissan won the Nobel Prize in 1906. A man of culture, collector of autographs and paintings, he died in 1907. Nothing of that would have been possible if there had not been a second-class pharmacist diploma. The history of Henri Moissan is one of a rise from apprenticeship to the Nobel Prize.

  5. In the service of peace: 2005 Nobel Peace prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    Nobel Citation: The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2005 is to be shared, in two equal parts, between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its Director General, Mohamed ElBaradei, for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. At a time when the threat of nuclear arms is again increasing, the Norwegian Nobel Committee wishes to underline that this threat must be met through the broadest possible international cooperation. This principle finds its clearest expression today in the work of the IAEA and its Director General. In the nuclear non-proliferation regime, it is the IAEA which controls that nuclear energy is not misused for military purposes, and the Director General has stood out as an unafraid advocate of new measures to strengthen that regime. At a time when disarmament efforts appear deadlocked, when there is a danger that nuclear arms will spread both to states and to terrorist groups, and when nuclear power again appears to be playing an increasingly significant role, IAEA's work is of incalculable importance. In his will, Alfred Nobel wrote that the Peace Prize should, among other criteria, be awarded to whoever had done most for the abolition or reduction of standing armies. In its application of this criterion in recent decades, the Norwegian Nobel Committee has concentrated on the struggle to diminish the significance of nuclear arms in international politics, with a view to their abolition. That the world has achieved little in this respect makes active opposition to nuclear arms all the more important today. The full Nobel Lecture of the Director General of the IAEA, Mr. Mohamed ElBaradei is given in this paper

  6. Unclaimed Prize Information Biases Perceptions of Winning in Scratch Card Gambling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexander C; Stange, Madison; Fugelsang, Jonathan A; Koehler, Derek J; Dixon, Mike J

    2018-03-29

    Unclaimed prize information (i.e., the number of prizes still available to be won) is information commonly provided to scratch card gamblers. However, unless the number of tickets remaining to be purchased is also provided, this information is uninformative. Despite its lack of utility in assisting gamblers in choosing the most favourable type of scratch card to play, we hypothesized that unclaimed prize information would bias participants' judgments within a scratch card gambling context. In Experiment 1 (N = 201), we showed that participants are influenced by this information such that they felt more likely to win, were more excited to play, and preferred to hypothetically purchase more of the scratch card with the greatest number of unclaimed prizes. In Experiment 2 (N = 201), we attempted to ameliorate this bias by providing participants with the number of tickets remaining to be purchased and equating the payback percentages of all three games. The bias, although attenuated, still persisted in these conditions. Finally, in Experiment 3 (N = 200), we manipulated the hypothetical scratch cards such that games with the highest number of unclaimed prizes were the least favourable, and vice versa. As in Experiment 2, participants still favoured cards with greater numbers of unclaimed prizes. Possible mechanisms underlying this bias are discussed. In conclusion, across three experiments, we demonstrate that salient unclaimed prize information is capable of exerting a strong effect over judgments related to scratch card games.

  7. Do Nobel Laureates Create Prize-Winning Networks? An Analysis of Collaborative Research in Physiology or Medicine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline S Wagner

    Full Text Available Nobel Laureates in Physiology or Medicine who received the Prize between 1969 and 2011 are compared to a matched group of scientists to examine productivity, impact, coauthorship and international collaboration patterns embedded within research networks. After matching for research domain, h-index, and year of first of publication, we compare bibliometric statistics and network measures. We find that the Laureates produce fewer papers but with higher average citations. The Laureates also produce more sole-authored papers both before and after winning the Prize. The Laureates have a lower number of coauthors across their entire careers than the matched group, but are equally collaborative on average. Further, we find no differences in international collaboration patterns. The Laureates coauthor network reveals significant differences from the non-Laureate network. Laureates are more likely to build bridges across a network when measuring by average degree, density, modularity, and communities. Both the Laureate and non-Laureate networks have "small world" properties, but the Laureates appear to exploit "structural holes" by reaching across the network in a brokerage style that may add social capital to the network. The dynamic may be making the network itself highly attractive and selective. These findings suggest new insights into the role "star scientists" in social networks and the production of scientific discoveries.

  8. Global and local "teachable moments": The role of Nobel Prize and national pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram-Tsabari, Ayelet; Segev, Elad

    2018-05-01

    This study examined to what extent Nobel Prize announcements and awards trigger global and local searches or "teachable moments" related to the laureates and their discoveries. We examined the longitudinal trends in Google searches for the names and discoveries of Nobel laureates from 2012 to 2017. The findings show that Nobel Prize events clearly trigger more searches for laureates, but also for their respective discoveries. We suggest that fascination with the Nobel prize creates a teachable moment not only for the underlying science, but also about the nature of science. Locality also emerged as playing a significant role in intensifying interest.

  9. T-regulatory cells-Triumph of perseverance: The Crafoord Prize for Polyarthritis in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2018-02-01

    The Crafoord Prize in Polyarthritis ranks as one of the most prestigious prizes and can be awarded only if the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences decides the likelihood of prize worthy progress in the field, and at most every 4th year. This has happened only four times since 1982. This year the 5th Laureates were Shimon Sakaguchi, Fred Ramsdell, and Alexander Rudensky with the motivation "for their discoveries relating to regulatory T cells, which counteract harmful immune reactions in arthritis and other autoimmune diseases". Here I review the history of their contributions and its impact in rheumatology. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Essays on the future in honor of Nick Metropolis

    CERN Document Server

    Rota, Gian-Carlo

    2000-01-01

    This collection represents a unique undertaking in scientific publishing to honor Nick Metropolis. Nick was the last survivor of the World War II Manhattan Project in Los Alamos, and was an important member of the Los Alamos national Laboratory until his death in October, 1999. In this volume, some of the leading scientists and humanists of our time have contributed essays related to their respective disciplines, exploring various aspects of future developments in science and society, philosophy, national security, nuclear power, pure and applied mathematics, physics and biology, particle physics, computing, and information science.

  11. Puelles romero, Luis: Honoré Daumier: la risa republicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Ortega Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recientemente, Abada Editores ha puesto a disposición de sus lectores el nuevo ensayo de Luis Puelles Romero, titular de Estética y Teoría de las Artes de la Universidad de Málaga. Honoré Daumier: la risa republicana se interna en la vida y la obra de este marsellés nacido en 1808 y muerto en París en 1879, cuyo trabajo se desarrolló durante cincuenta años decisivos de la historia de Francia, desde el final del periodo legitimista hasta los inicios de la III República.

  12. Statement on occasion of receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize 2005, 7 October 2005. Nobel Peace Prize awarded to IAEA and Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2005-01-01

    On the occasion of receiving the Nobel Price the Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei expressed his feeling of gratitude, pride and hope. He stated that with this recognition, the Norwegian Nobel Committee underscores the value and the relevance of the work the IAEA has been doing. It recognizes the urgency of addressing the dangers we face: nuclear proliferation, nuclear armaments, and nuclear terrorism. The award will lend prominence and impetus to the IAEA's ultimate objective - of passing to our children a world free of nuclear weapons - and for that I am deeply grateful. He takes great pride in all the men and women who serve at the International Atomic Energy Agency. The IAEA was founded with a simple credo: 'Atoms for Peace' - meaning that nuclear science should be used safely and securely in the service of humankind - in peaceful applications related to energy production, health, water, agriculture and other aspects of development -- and not for its destruction. More than anything, this award suggests that, almost five decades later, we are still focused unwaveringly on living up to that objective. He believes that the road to international peace and security lies through multilateralism - the collective search by people of all racial, religious, ethnic and national backgrounds to find a common ground, based not on intimidation or rivalry but on understanding and human solidarity. In a practical sense, this means developing a functional system of international security that does not derive from a nuclear weapons deterrent - but rather based on addressing the security concerns of all. The fact that the IAEA was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize gives renewed hope that, working in concert, the international community can achieve this goal. It strengthens both aspects of the Agency's mandate: ensuring that the benefits of nuclear energy are distributed as broadly as possible in the service of humankind, and working

  13. Nexan receives two CMS Awards of the Year 2002 for its work in superconductivity

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Nexans has received one Crystal and one Gold CMS award for its contribution to the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector project. The CMS detector is designed to study the fundamental constituents of matter. The prizes recompense the excellent quality of Nexans' service in the supply of the necessary low-temperature superconducting cables sheathed in extruded aluminium.

  14. Honor, Dignidad y Reciprocidad Honra, dignidade e reciprocidade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís R. Cardoso de Oliveira

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El texto discute la articulación entre las nociones de honor, dignidad y reciprocidad en los procesos de resolución de disputas, teniendo como foco los juzgados de pequeñas causas. El papel del don es destacado en la comprensión de las diputas, cuya resolución demanda el examen de tres dimensiones temáticas: los derechos, los intereses y el reconocimiento. Esta última dimensión está asociada a la visibilización del insulto moral, caracterizado como una agresión a derechos de difícil procesamiento en el ámbito judicial.The text discusses how notions of honor, dignity and reciprocity articulate in processes of dispute resolution, focusing in small claims courts. The role of the gift is highlighted in the understanding of disputes whose equation demands the examination of three thematic dimensions: rights, interests and recognition. The latter is associated to the visibility of moral insults, which are characterized as aggressions to rights that are frequently excluded from judicial processes.

  15. Another Nobel Prize linked to synchrotron radiation work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasnain, S.

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry went to Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien 'for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP'. This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry rewards the initial discovery of GFP and a series of important developments which have led to its use as a tagging tool in bioscience. By using DNA technology, researchers can now connect GFP to other interesting, but otherwise invisible, proteins. This glowing marker allows the movements, positions and interactions of the tagged proteins to be monitored. Osamu Shimomura was the first to isolate GFP from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, found off the west coast of North America, and discovered the protein's green glow (Shimomura et al. (1962). J. Cell. Comp. Physiol. 59, 223-240). Martin Chalfie demonstrated the value of GFP as a luminous genetic tag. In one of his first experiments he coloured six individual cells in the transparent roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with the aid of GFP. He had obtained the GFP gene (gfp) clone from Prasher (Prasher et al. (1992). Gene, 111, 229-233) and expressed it in E. coli. The GFP protein displayed a bright green fluorescence in this heterologous organism, suggesting that it could indeed serve as a versatile genetic marker in virtually all organisms. Chalfie transformed C. elegans with gfp under the control of a promoter regulating the expression of β-tubulin, abundant in six touch receptor neurons in C. elegans. The organism subsequently expressed GFP from distinct positions in its body and at distinct times in its development (Chalfie et al. (1994). Science, 263, 802-805). Roger Tsien contributed to the general understanding of how GFP glows by determining the formation of the GFP chromophore, a chemical group that absorbs and emits light. Tsien is best known for extending the colour palette of GFP beyond green, allowing researchers to follow several different biological processes at the same time. According to background on

  16. FETTU Wins International Year of Astronomy 2009 Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    The "From Earth to the Universe" (FETTU) project -- a worldwide series of exhibitions featuring striking astronomical imagery -- has won the first Mani Bhaumik prize for excellence in astronomy education and public outreach. This award was given for the best of the tens of thousands of activities conducted during the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009. NASA was a major sponsor of the project, which was led by the Chandra X-ray Center, that placed these images into public parks, metro stations, libraries, and other non-traditional locations around the world. The exhibit showcases some of the best astronomical images taken from telescopes both on the ground and in space, representing the wide variety of wavelengths and objects observed. While FETTU has been a worldwide effort, a NASA grant provided the primary funding for the FETTU exhibits in the US. NASA funds also supplied the project's infrastructure as well as educational and other materials that helped the FETTU international efforts to thrive. "We are truly thrilled to see how many people FETTU has reached both in the US and around the world," said Hashima Hasan, NASA's Single Point of Contact for IYA2009. "It's an investment we feel has been well spent." In the US, FETTU has been placed on semi-permanent display at Chicago's O'Hare and Atlanta's Hartsfield airports. In addition, a traveling version of the exhibit has visited over a dozen US cities such as Washington, DC, Anchorage, AK, Memphis, TN, and New York City. Three tactile and Braille versions of the FETTU exhibit were also made possible by the NASA funds, each of which has traveled to multiple locations around the country. "It's been so rewarding to see how people - many of whom had never seen these images - have embraced the wonders of astronomy through these exhibits," said Kimberly Kowal Arcand, co-chair of the FETTU project at the Chandra X-ray Center, which is located at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Mass. "The

  17. Exploring the Uses of RNAi — Gene Knockdown and the Nobel Prize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded this year to Andrew Fire (Stanford University School of Medicine) and Craig Mello (University of Massachusetts Medical School) for their discovery of a new form of gene silencing.

  18. Léon Lederman, Mel Schwartz and Jack Steinberger wre awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize.

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service

    1988-01-01

    Léon Lederman (left), Mel Schwartz (right) and Jack Steinberger were awarded the 1988 Nobel Physics Prize for their 1962 experiment at Brookhaven which showed that neutrinos come in more than one kind.

  19. Increased Oil Recovery Prize for work on Troll; Fikk pris for Troll-arbeid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steensen, Anders J.

    2007-07-01

    Halliburton and Baker Hughes have developed tools that ensures increased oil recovery from the Troll platform. For this work, the companies were awarded the Increased Oil Recovery (IOR) Prize. Details on the technical principles are provided (ml)

  20. Incentives for research. Three projects awarded the 'BP Energy Research Prize'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    Three projects are described that have been awarded the BP-energy-research prize. These are: absorption heat pumps with a high heat ratio, fuels from sewage sludge, chemical heat storage of solar energy.

  1. Kaasaegse kunsti muuseum suurendab panuseid - Köler Prize / Hanno Soans

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soans, Hanno, 1974-

    2011-01-01

    Eesti Kaasaegse Kunsti Muuseumi loodud kaasaegse kunsti preemiast. 6. juunini EKKM-is avatud Köler Prize 2011 nominentide - Dénes Kalev Farkas, Tõnis Saadoja, Timo Toots, Sigrid Viir, Jevgeni Zolotko - näitusest

  2. Discovery of superfluid 3He phases wins 1996 nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shousheng

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson for their discovery of superfluidity in 3 He in 1971. A short account of the discovery and its importance is given

  3. The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science: three years of honouring outstanding achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchet, T.; Chatzichristou, E.; Heward, A.

    2012-09-01

    Europlanet launched an annual Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Sciences at the European Planetary Science Congress (EPSC) in 2009. At EPSC 2012, the prize will be presented for the third time. To date, the prize has been awarded to: • 2010 - Dr Jean Lilensten of the Laboratoire de Planétologie de Grenoble for his development and dissemination of his 'planeterrella' experiment; • 2011 - The Austrian Space Forum for their coordinated programme of outreach activities, which range from simple classroom presentations to space exhibitions reaching 15 000 visitors; • 2012 - Yaël Nazé, for the diverse outreach programme she has individually initiated over the years, carefully tailored to audiences across the spectrum of society, including children, artists and elderly people. These three prizes cover a spectrum of different approaches to outreach and provide inspiration for anyone wishing to become engaged in public engagement, whether at an individual and institutional level.

  4. 45 CFR 73.735-505 - Acceptance of awards and prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... which the employee knows, or should know, has a contractual or other business arrangement with, or is... trophies, entertainment, rewards, and prizes given to competitors in contests or events which are open to...

  5. Setting Them Free: Students as Co-Producers of Honors Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Bouke; Wolfensberger, Marca V. C.; de Jong, Nelleke

    2012-01-01

    While the attractions and advantages of freedom that differentiates honors education from regular teaching are both theoretically and practically significant, the authors' experience at Utrecht University in the Netherlands has demonstrated drawbacks that need to be addressed and resolved in creating effective honors education. Freedom poses…

  6. The Relationship between High School Math Courses, High School GPA, and Retention of Honors Scholarships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megert, Diann Ackerman

    2005-01-01

    This research examined the high school transcripts of honors scholarship recipients to identify a better criterion for awarding scholarships than high school grade point average (GPA) alone. Specifically, this study compared the honors scholarship retention rate when the scholarship was awarded based on completed advanced high school math classes…

  7. NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry |

    Science.gov (United States)

    News | NREL 7 » NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry News Release: NREL Senior Research Fellow Honored by The Journal of Physical Chemistry January 10, 2007 The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. The Dec. 21 issue was titled The Arthur J. Nozik Festschrift (Volume 110

  8. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  9. Recovering materiality in institutional work : prizes as an assemblage of human and material entities

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, Pedro do Nascimento; Nicolini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    In this article we utilize a (posthumanist) practice theory orientation to foreground the neglected role of material elements (e.g., objects and spaces) in institutional work. The paper builds on the results of an empirical study of two prizes in the Italian public sector for best practices in public administration and healthcare respectively. Our discussion centres on the critical role played by materiality in the legitimizing work performed by the two prizes. More specifically, we show that...

  10. Two paradigms and Nobel prizes in economics : a contradiction or coexistence?

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Haim; De Giorgi, Enrico; Hens, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Markowitz and Sharpe won the Nobel Prize in Economics more than a decade ago for the development of Mean-Variance analysis and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). In the year 2002, Kahneman won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the development of Prospect Theory. Can these two apparently contradictory paradigms coexist? In deriving the CAPM, Sharpe, Lintner and Mossin assume expected utility (EU) maximization following the approach proposed by Markowitz, normal distributions and risk avers...

  11. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2010-07-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2009 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have a clear, and very worthy, winner this year. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the 2009 Roberts Prize is awarded to E Z Zhang et al from University College London for their paper on photoacoustic tomography. In vivo high resolution 3D photoacoustic imaging of superficial vascular anatomy E Z Zhang, J G Laufer, R B Pedley and P C Beard 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1035-46 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Cheng Y-C N , Neelavalli J and Haacke E M 2009 Limitations of calculating field distributions and magnetic susceptibilities in MRI using a Fourier based method Phys. Med. Biol. 54 1169-89 Cho S, Ahn S, Li Q and Leahy R M 2009 Exact and approximate Fourier rebinning of PET data from time-of-flight to non time-of-flight 2009 Phys. Med. Biol. 54 467-84 Davidson S R H, Weersink R A, Haider M A, Gertner M R, Bogaards A, Giewercer D, Scherz A, Sherar M D, Elhilali M, Chin J L, Trachtenberg J and Wilson B C 2009 Treatment planning and dose analysis for interstitial

  12. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award an annual prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner has been made as thorough as possible, to try to ensure that an outstanding paper wins the prize. We started off with a shortlist of the 10 research papers published in 2010 which were rated the best based on the referees' quality assessments. Following the submission of a short 'case for winning' document by each of the shortlisted authors, an IPEM college of jurors of the status of FIPEM assessed and rated these 10 papers in order to choose a winner, which was then endorsed by the Editorial Board. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2010 is awarded to M M Paulides et al from Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, for their paper on hyperthermia treatment: The clinical feasibility of deep hyperthermia treatment in the head and neck: new challenges for positioning and temperature measurement M M Paulides, J F Bakker, M Linthorst, J van der Zee, Z Rijnen, E Neufeld, P M T Pattynama, P P Jansen, P C Levendag and G C van Rhoon 2010 Phys. Med. Biol. 55 2465 Our congratulations go to these authors. Of course all of the shortlisted papers were of great merit, and the full top-10 is listed below (in alphabetical order). Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher References Alonzo-Proulx O, Packard N, Boone J M, Al-Mayah A, Brock K K, Shen S Z and Yaffe M J 2010 Validation of a method for measuring the volumetric breast density from digital mammograms Phys. Med. Biol. 55 3027 Bian J, Siewerdsen J H, Han X, Sidky E Y, Prince J L, Pelizzari C A and Pan X 2010 Evaluation of sparse-view reconstruction from flat-panel-detector cone-beam CT Phys. Med. Biol. 55 6575 Brun M-A, Formanek F, Yasuda A, Sekine M, Ando N

  13. Word from the DG: A Nobel Prize for particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    I don't know about you, but for me that hour between 11:45 and 12:45 on Tuesday seemed to take a very long time to pass. What was going on in that room in Stockholm we'll never know, but whatever it was, it produced a fantastic result for particle physics. There could be no more deserving laureates than François Englert and Peter Higgs, embodying as they do all the hallmarks of great scientists: brilliance, of course, but also humility and a sense of teamwork.   Nobel Prize celebrations in Building 40.   I remember when they met each other at CERN for the first time on 4 July last year: the pleasure in that meeting was evident, and when Peter Higgs was asked for comment by the dozens of journalists who came to CERN that day, he politely declined, saying that this was a day for the experiments. Well, Peter, Tuesday was your day, and everyone at CERN shares the pride and joy that you and François must have felt, wherever you were! And like I&rs...

  14. The Pursuit of Excellence: An Analysis of the Honors College Application and Enrollment Decision for a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Honors colleges housed in public universities began only in the last half century, but have become nearly ubiquitous over the last 20 years. This paper, using recent data from the oldest stand-alone honors college in the country, is the first to study how the application and enrollment decisions of honors college students differ from the general…

  15. Mirror Neurons, Theatrical Mirrors and the Honor Code

    OpenAIRE

    Greer, M.G. (Margaret G.)

    2012-01-01

    Este artículo relaciona el descubrimiento de cierta clase de células cerebrales denominados «neuronas espejo», que pueden ayudar a explicar la base biológica de la naturaleza pre-conceptual, pre-lingüística de la cognición humana, a la teoría lacaniana de la formación de la subjetividad humana en el espacio del Otro. Así explica la naturaleza inter-sujetiva del honor que Lope describe en Los comendadores de Córdoba como «aquélla que consiste en otro». La teoría de las neuronas espejo muestra ...

  16. Hierarchical decision modeling essays in honor of Dundar F. Kocaoglu

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume, developed in honor of Dr. Dundar F. Kocaoglu, aims to demonstrate the applications of the Hierarchical Decision Model (HDM) in different sectors and its capacity in decision analysis. It is comprised of essays from noted scholars, academics and researchers of engineering and technology management around the world. This book is organized into four parts: Technology Assessment, Strategic Planning, National Technology Planning and Decision Making Tools. Dr. Dundar F. Kocaoglu is one of the pioneers of multiple decision models using hierarchies, and creator of the HDM in decision analysis. HDM is a mission-oriented method for evaluation and/or selection among alternatives. A wide range of alternatives can be considered, including but not limited to, different technologies, projects, markets, jobs, products, cities to live in, houses to buy, apartments to rent, and schools to attend. Dr. Kocaoglu’s approach has been adopted for decision problems in many industrial sectors, including electronics rese...

  17. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia [Division of Mathematical Physics, LTH, Lund University, Box 118, S-22100 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: cecilia.jarlskog@matfys.lth.se

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008.

  18. Vidas públicas, secretos privados: género, honor, sexualidad e ilegitimidad en la Hispanoamérica colonial. Fondo de Cultura Económica, Buenos Aires, 2009, 500 páginas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Celis Valderrama

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available En el momento en que un texto, a pocos meses de su primera edición en inglés, obtiene dos premios al me- jor libro de historia de América La- tina en 1999, el Thomas F. Mc Gann Book Prize y una honorable mención Bolton Prize, sin titubeo la urgencia llama a la puerta de cada uno de los traductores interesados en la materia. De este modo, Cecilia Inés Restrepo recogió el guante y dio cuenta de una traducción al español elegante y clara, demostrando que llegó a la ─complicada y muchas veces esquiva─ esencia del libro Public Lives, Priva- te Secret. Gender, Honor, Sexuality, and Illegitimacy in Colonial Spanich America. (Stanford University Press Es difícil superar la bella narra- ción de cómo una idea llegó a transformarse en la base para construir un libro tan ambicioso como el que me congrega reseñar en esta tribuna. Ann Twinam (Cairo, Illinois, 1946 relata cómo en una búsqueda ─siendo ella estudiante de posgrado de la Universidad de Yale─ en forma accidental, da con un archivo francamente epifánico, en el que desempolva un incidente ocurrido en una calle en Medellín, Colombia, en 1787. En este archivo, don Pedro Elefalde, un oficial de la Corona recién llagado a la Villa, intercambió saludos con Gabriel Muñoz, un comerciante local. “Es imposible saber con precisión lo que don Pedro dijo; bien pudo ser “Bue- nos días, Gabriel”, pero es claro que no fue “Buenos días, don Gabriel” (p.21. Según la autora, ese encuentro se hizo histórico precisamente por no haber utilizado por parte del oficial de la Corona, el apelativo de “don”, título honorífico invocado de manera invariable cuando los miembros de la élite se topaban públicamente unos con otros en la ciudad.

  19. The fabulous legacy of a Nobel Prize Laureate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Merad, Miriam; Kroemer, Guido

    2012-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medecine 2011 was awarded to Ralph M. Steinman, Jules A. Hoffman and Bruce A. Beutler for the discovery of essential elements of innate immunity, in particular dendritic cells (DCs) and toll-like receptors (TLRs). Antigens become immunogenic and capable of triggering an adaptive immune response involving antigen-specific, MHC- restricted effector T cells, only if they are captured and presented by “accessory” cells. In 1972, Ralph M. Steinman and Zanvil Cohn identified in lymphoid tissues, cells with treelike, arborescent morphology that they named “dendritic cells” (DC) (from the greek word “tree” for tree, δένδρον) with a superior ability to induce alloreactive T cell proliferation in vitro (1978) and to stimulate the rejection of kidney allotransplants in rodents (1982). Thirty years after their discovery, DCare now known to play a seminal role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity, In addition DC are being used in numerous clinical studies all over the world to increase immunity to infectious or tumor-associated antigens. This effort involved the contribution of an international network of basicand clinical scientists spearheaded by Ralph M. Steinman to defineappropriate culture conditions to generate ex vivo DC from circulating or bone marrow precursors, to definefunctionally distinct DC subsets, to identifytheir maturation pathways including those relying on the stimulation of TLRs, and finally to develop DC based-vaccines to immunize patients infected with HIV or affected by cancer. Here, we will detail the history of DC and outline the therapeutic implications of Ralph M. Steinman’s seminal discovery.

  20. "Shades of Foreign Evil": "Honor Killings" and "Family Murders" in the Canadian Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shier, Allie; Shor, Eran

    2016-09-01

    This article compares murder cases labeled "honor killings" with cases labeled "family/spousal murders" in the Canadian news media, exploring the construction of boundaries between these two practices. We conducted a systematic qualitative content analysis, examining a sample of 486 articles from three major Canadian newspapers between 2000 and 2012. Our analysis shows that "honor killings" are framed in terms of culture and ethnic background, presenting a dichotomy between South Asian/Muslim and Western values. Conversely, articles presenting cases as "family/spousal murders" tend to focus on the perpetrators' personalities or psychological characteristics, often ignoring factors such as culture, patriarchy, honor, and shame. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Prize-based contingency management for the treatment of substance abusers: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benishek, Lois A; Dugosh, Karen L; Kirby, Kim C; Matejkowski, Jason; Clements, Nicolle T; Seymour, Brittany L; Festinger, David S

    2014-09-01

    To review randomized controlled trials to assess efficacy of a prize-based contingency management procedure in reducing substance use (where a drug-free breath or urine sample provides a chance of winning a prize). A meta-analysis was conducted on papers published from January 2000 to February 2013 to determine the effect size of studies comparing prize-based contingency management to a treatment-as-usual control condition (k = 19 studies). Parallel analyses evaluated the efficacy of both short- (k = nine studies) and long-term outcomes (k = six studies) of prize-based contingency management. The average end-of-treatment effect size (Cohen's d) was 0.46 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.37, 0.54]. This effect size decreased at the short-term (≤3-month) post-intervention follow-up to 0.33 (95% CI = 0.12, 0.54) and at the 6-month follow-up time-point there was no detectable effect [d = -0.09 (95% CI = -0.28, 0.10)]. Adding prize-based contingency management to behavioral support for substance use disorders can increase short-term abstinence, but the effect does not appear to persist to 6 months. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  2. Translation, Littérisation, and the Nobel Prize for Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Washbourne

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is a cultural economics study of the problem of translation production and assessment in and leading up to the literary Nobel Prize deliberations. I argue that the constraints of assessing an unevenly and partially translated body of literary works, many of them from less common languages, present an unbreachable expertise gap. Translation as a sacralization, or consecration in Casanova’s (2004 term, of a writer’s work is considered in the context of the award. Ultimately the prize is shown to depend upon translations carried out in dissimilar circumstances for each candidate. The award of the Nobel is part of the founder’s call for works to be more widely circulated, not to reward fame; thus a Nobel is more an invitation to translate than a recognition of an author in translation, although evidence suggests that the post-Nobel translational impact may vary by writer and over time. This study sheds light on the degree to which the Prize is an authority-mediated phenomenon, and while critiquing the quixotic task of judging disparate forms and amounts of cultural capital side by side, and never from a point of neutrality, it also attempts to show how translation shapes this symbolic form of prestige in the struggle for existence. I posit that alternative prizes and prize-awarding in general as fraught with similar cross-language challenges. Possibilities for future research, qualitative analysis of the Nobel and translation demand, among other consequences, are briefly sketched.

  3. Parada ng Lechon in Balayan, Batangas Philippines to Honor St. John the Baptist: An Ethnographic Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Maria Luisa A. Valdez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thisstudy generally aimed to document the existing practice of the “Parada ng Lechon” in Balayan, Batangas Philippines to honor St. John the Baptist and the implications of the findings in relation to the study of Philippine culture. This paper employed the ethnographic research method which involved the use of documentary materials, participant observation method, questionnaires, and interviews with 150 purposively selected respondents. The results of the study revealed the world-famous “Parada ng Lechon” which originated as an old thanksgiving custom of the working class in what-used-to-be the poor and depressed area of the western district of Balayan, Batangas, Philippines. It was noteworthy to mention that during the Spanish and American regimes, families who were fortunate enough to receive some significant blessings during the past year would parade a lechon in the town plaza every June 24 - the Feast of St. John the Baptist. For the Balayeños, the parading of lechon is the best expression of thanksgiving and veneration to their patron saint. Even during these times, the sight of people parading lechons in Balayan - coupled with centuries-old practice of water dousing - was quite a spectacle to behold. The “Parada ng Lechon” is considered an invaluable asset that encapsulates the Philippine culture which may be cherished for posterity.

  4. In vitro fertilization – from concept to first child Commemorating the 2010 Nobel Prize in Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Janežič

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the birth of the world’s first test-tube baby in 1978, more than 4 million babies have been born worldwide with the help of in vitro fertilization (IVF. In Slovenia, the first babies were born in 1984. In 2005, the percentage of babies born with biomedically assisted reproduction was 3.9 % and was the highest in Europe. IVF is nowadays a widely available and accepted method for helping infertile couples. However, the path to success was long and difficult. In this article, we present the development of IVF from the first ideas about fertilizing eggs outside the body from the end of the 19th century, followed by experiments on different animal species, the first human pregnancy and finally the birth of the first child in the United Kingdom. Many pioneers from other countries, particularly Australia and the United States of America, were instrumental in developing IVF as we know it today. Unfortunately, covering the history of IVF would greatly exceed the purpose of this article. During its history, the method was modified with innovative improvements. In its beginnings, there was a great deal of scepticism and opposition from certain public as well as scientific circles, an attitude that changed radically. The fact that the pioneer Robert Edwards received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 2010 is proof of the growing acceptance of the method. Surely, IVF is a complex medical field, which raised and still raises ethical and legal questions. But from a merely human perspective, it is simply a method which gave infertile couples the opportunity to fulfill their lifetime dream.

  5. For Distinguished Public Service: Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine | NIH ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Library Association Honors FNLM and NIH MedlinePlus Magazine Past Issues / Summer 2011 Table of Contents MLA ... From You We want your feedback on the magazine and ideas for future issues, as well as ...

  6. 12 New England Organizations Honored for Outstanding Achievements in Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are honoring 12 New England businesses and organizations for their commitment to saving energy, saving money, and protecting the environment through superior energy efficiency achievements.

  7. Masculine and family honor and youth violence: The moderating role of ethnic-cultural affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the involvement in violent behavior of at-risk Arab and Jewish male youth from a large city in Israel. It explores the role masculine and family honor plays in predicting youth involvement in violence and tests whether this association is moderated by ethnic-cultural affiliation. A total of 282 males (59.2% Arab), aged 15-21, filled out a self-report closed-ended questionnaire. We found that among both Jewish and Arab youth a greater concern with masculine honor was positively associated with involvement in violence. We also found that Arab youth are significantly more involved in violent behavior than Jewish youth, and that Arab participants were more concerned with masculine and family honor. However, contrary to what was expected, greater concern with family honor was associated with lower levels of Arab youth involvement in violence. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Explaining how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, Judith; Kamans, Elanor; Tiesinga, Lammert; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2015-01-01

    Paper presentatie tijdens de EARLI Conference 2015, Limassol, Cypres, 28 augustus. In this line of research we take a social psychological approach to understanding how honors students position themselves when collaborating with regular students. More specifically, we explore whether stereotypes

  9. Statement of Honorable Donald C. Winter Secretary of the Navy Before the House Armed Services Committee

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winter, Donald C

    2007-01-01

    Mr. Chairman, Mr. Ranking Member, and Members of the Committee, it is an honor to appear before you representing the brave men and women of the United States Navy and the United States Marine Corps active, reserve...

  10. Male honor and female fidelity: implicit cultural scripts that perpetuate domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandello, Joseph A; Cohen, Dov

    2003-05-01

    Two studies explored how domestic violence may be implicitly or explicitly sanctioned and reinforced in cultures where honor is a salient organizing theme. Three general predictions were supported: (a) female infidelity damages a man's reputation, particularly in honor cultures; (b) this reputation can be partially restored through the use of violence; and (c) women in honor cultures are expected to remain loyal in the face of jealousy-related violence. Study 1 involved participants from Brazil (an honor culture) and the United States responding to written vignettes involving infidelity and violence in response to infidelity. Study 2 involved southern Anglo, Latino, and northern Anglo participants witnessing a "live" incident of aggression against a woman (actually a confederate) and subsequently interacting with her.

  11. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    To fight the looming cancer crisis in Africa, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is assembling many of the world's leading cancer experts in Cape Town on 11-16 December. Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and the IAEA has come to realize that we need to do much more to combat cancer in this part of the world, says IAEA Director General Mohamed ElBaradei in a video address to the conference. I hope this event will be the first of many events that would enable us to work together - national governments, international organisations, civil society - to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings. With the support of African Nobel Laureates Nelson Mandela, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and F.W. de Klerk, this unprecedented gathering will bring together senior representatives from major national and international cancer organisations. Together with leading public figures and specialists they will assess the growing cancer burden in Africa and focus on building effective cancer control programmes at the national and regional levels. The IAEA is sponsoring the intensive workshops using funds awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy, or 'PACT', was established in 2004 to help achieve these goals. Building on the IAEA's 30 years of expertise in promoting radiotherapy, PACT aims to help get more cancer treatment facilities up and running in the world's developing regions, along with the trained personnel to operate them. 'PACT' is building partnerships with the WHO and other international cancer-control organisations so that the battle against cancer can be waged at country level. This includes cancer prevention, early detection, diagnosis and palliation, and more importantly education and training of professionals, says PACT Head Massoud Samiei. Current estimates suggest that several billion US$ are needed in the next 10 to 15 years if the

  12. The end of a noble narrative? European integration narratives after the Nobel Peace Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manners, Ian James; Murray, Philomena

    The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee acknowled......The award of the Nobel Peace Prize 2012 to the European Union (EU) came as a shock and surprise. Not only was the Eurozone economic crisis undermining public support for the EU, but the crisis was also seriously challenging the EU’s image in global politics. Although the Nobel Committee...... integration both in the past and in the future. We differentiate between scholarly and policy-oriented narratives in the development of our argument. The critical question is whether these narratives have and should – or could - provide legitimation for the EU after the award of the Nobel Peace Prize....

  13. Methodology to Calculate the ACE and HPQ Metrics Used in the Wave Energy Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Frederick R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Weber, Jochem W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jenne, Dale S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Thresher, Robert W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fingersh, Lee J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bull, Dianna [Sandia National Laboratories; Dallman, Ann [Sandia National Laboratories; Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Laboratories; Ruehl, Kelley [Sandia National Laboratories; Newborn, David [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division; Quintero, Miguel [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division; LaBonte, Alison [U.S. Department of Energy; Karwat, Darshan [U.S. Department of Energy; Beatty, Scott [Cascadia Coast Research Ltd.

    2018-03-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wave Energy Prize Competition encouraged the development of innovative deep-water wave energy conversion technologies that at least doubled device performance above the 2014 state of the art. Because levelized cost of energy (LCOE) metrics are challenging to apply equitably to new technologies where significant uncertainty exists in design and operation, the prize technical team developed a reduced metric as proxy for LCOE, which provides an equitable comparison of low technology readiness level wave energy converter (WEC) concepts. The metric is called 'ACE' which is short for the ratio of the average climate capture width to the characteristic capital expenditure. The methodology and application of the ACE metric used to evaluate the performance of the technologies that competed in the Wave Energy Prize are explained in this report.

  14. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  15. Information Technology Strategies for Honor Society and Organization Membership Retention in Online Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Emily E; Wasco, Jennifer J

    Membership retention in an honor society or organization is of utmost importance for sustainability. However, retaining members in organizations that serve online education nursing students can be a challenging task. Understanding the importance of creating a sense of community to promote retention within an honor society chapter, nursing faculty at a small private university implemented different online approaches. This article highlights successful information technology strategies to promote membership retention in organizations for online nursing students.

  16. The Economic Returns to Graduating with Honors - Evidence from Law Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    Schumann, Mathias; Freier, Ronny; Siedler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the causal effects of graduating from university with an honors degree on subsequent labor market outcomes. While a rich body of literature has focused on estimating returns to human capital, few studies have analyzed returns at the very top of the education distribution. We highlight the importance of honors degrees for future labor market success in the context of German law graduates. Using a difference-in-differences research design combined with entropy balancing, we f...

  17. "Bird in the hand" cash was more effective than prize draws in increasing physician questionnaire response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Frances J; O'Leary, Eamonn; O'Neill, Ciaran; Burns, Richeal; Sharp, Linda

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the effects of two monetary incentives on response rates to postal questionnaires from primary care physicians (PCPs). The PCPs were randomized into three arms (n=550 per arm), namely (1) €5 sent with the questionnaire (cash); (2) entry into a draw on return of completed questionnaire (prize); or (3) no incentive. Effects of incentives on response rates and item nonresponse were examined, as was cost-effectiveness. Response rates were significantly higher in the cash (66.1%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 61.9, 70.4%) and prize arms (44.8%; 95% CI: 40.1, 49.3%) compared with the no-incentive arm (39.9%; 95% CI: 35.4, 44.3%). Adjusted relative risk of response was 1.17 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.35) and 1.68 (95% CI: 1.48, 1.91) in the prize and cash arms, respectively, compared with the no-incentive group. Costs per completed questionnaire were €9.85, €11.15, and €6.31 for the cash, prize, and no-incentive arms, respectively. Compared with the no-incentive arm, costs per additional questionnaire returned in the cash and prize arms were €14.72 and €37.20, respectively. Both a modest cash incentive and entry into a prize draw were effective in increasing response rates. The cash incentive was most effective and the most cost-effective. Where it is important to maximize response, a modest cash incentive may be cost-effective. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stress Testing of the Philips 60W Replacement Lamp L Prize Entry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poplawski, Michael E.; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Smith, Mark

    2012-04-24

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, worked with Intertek to develop a procedure for stress testing medium screw-base light sources. This procedure, composed of alternating stress cycles and performance evaluation, was used to qualitatively compare and contrast the durability and reliability of the Philips 60W replacement lamp L Prize entry with market-proven compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with comparable light output and functionality. The stress cycles applied simultaneous combinations of electrical, thermal, vibration, and humidity stresses of increasing magnitude. Performance evaluations measured relative illuminance, x chromaticity and y chromaticity shifts after each stress cycle. The Philips L Prize entry lamps appear to be appreciably more durable than the incumbent energy-efficient technology, as represented by the evaluated CFLs, and with respect to the applied stresses. Through the course of testing, all 15 CFL samples permanently ceased to function as a result of the applied stresses, while only 1 Philips L Prize entry lamp exhibited a failure, the nature of which was minor, non-destructive, and a consequence of a known (and resolved) subcontractor issue. Given that current CFL technology appears to be moderately mature and no Philips L Prize entry failures could be produced within the stress envelope causing 100 percent failure of the benchmark CFLs, it seems that, in this particular implementation, light-emitting diode (LED) technology would be much more durable in the field than current CFL technology. However, the Philips L Prize entry lamps used for testing were carefully designed and built for the competition, while the benchmark CFLs were mass produced for retail sale—a distinction that should be taken into consideration. Further reliability testing on final production samples would be necessary to judge the extent to which the results of this analysis apply to production versions

  19. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  20. IAEA Nobel Prize money fights cancer crisis in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Full text: More than 60 of the world's leading cancer experts are being brought together in Buenos Aires, 23-27 April 2007, by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess Latin America's growing cancer burden. Poor medical facilities and lack of trained personnel and funding are limiting countries' ability to expand cancer care services and treat patients, while cancer rates are expected to double by 2020. More than 70 per cent of all cancer deaths occur in low and middle income countries and globally cancer kills more people than AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis combined. Through its Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) the IAEA is using funds, awarded for the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize, to sponsor training workshops, such as the Buenos Aires event, that alert policy makers and health experts to the pressing need for national cancer control plans and programmes. 'I hope that this event in Latin America is the first of many that will enable us to work together to help combat this dreadful disease and provide quality of life to our fellow human beings,' said Director General of the IAEA, Dr. Mohamed ElBaradei. 'Cancer is a disease that is spreading very fast in the developing world and we have come to realise that we have to do much more to combat it in this part of the world.' In Latin America, there are an estimated 450,000 cancer deaths annually. The most commonly occurring cancers in men are prostate, stomach, lung, and colorectal and in women the most commonly occurring cancers are breast, cervix, stomach and colorectal. Breast and cervical cancer can be prevented through screening and early detection and can be cured in the early stages with effective treatment. The World Health Organization (WHO) warns that cancer will soon reach epidemic proportions, causing up to 10 million deaths a year by 2020. Yet at least one third of all cancers are preventable. A further one third of cases can be effectively treated if detected early. PACT was

  1. Nursing Care at the Time of Death: A Bathing and Honoring Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Debra; Calmes, Beth; Grotts, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    To explore family members' experience of a bathing and honoring practice after a loved one's death in the acute care setting.
. A descriptive, qualitative design using a semistructured telephone interview script.
. The Inpatient Adult Oncology Unit at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital in California. 
. 13 family members who participated in the bathing and honoring practice after their loved one's death on the oncology unit.
. Participants were selected by purposive sampling and interviewed by telephone three to six months after their loved one's death. Interviews using a semistructured script with open-ended questions were recorded, transcribed, verified, and analyzed using phenomenologic research techniques to identify common themes of experience.
. 24 first-level themes and 11 superordinate themes emerged from the data. All participants indicated that the bathing and honoring practice was a positive experience and supported the grieving process. The majority found the practice to be meaningful and stated that it honored their loved one. Many expressed that the bathing and honoring was spiritually significant in a nondenominational way and that they hope it will be made available to all families of patients who die in the hospital. 
. After patient death, a bathing and honoring practice with family member participation is positive and meaningful, and it supports family members' initial grieving.
. This study is a first step toward establishing specific nursing interventions as evidence-based practice that can be incorporated in routine nursing care for patients and families at the end of life.

  2. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: a spatial model for cognitive neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Neil

    2014-12-17

    Understanding how the cognitive functions of the brain arise from its basic physiological components has been an enticing final frontier in science for thousands of years. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2014 was awarded one half to John O'Keefe, the other half jointly to May-Britt Moser and Edvard I. Moser "for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain." This prize recognizes both a paradigm shift in the study of cognitive neuroscience, and some of the amazing insights that have followed from it concerning how the world is represented within the brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Causes and Effects in Macroeconomics: 2011 Nobel Prize Lecture in Economic Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlair Abdulkhaleq Al-Zanganee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Noble Laureates Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims have been granted the 2011 Noble Prize in economic sciences in appreciation of their empirical research on causes and effects in macroeconomics. The controversy on causality in macroeconomics was discussed in both of Sargent’s and Sims’s 2011 Prize lectures. While Sargent attempts to use the economic theory to interpret some historical events in order to gain insights on some contemporary issues, such as sovereign defaults, federal bailouts, and the coordination of monetary and fiscal policies, Sims is emphasizing the importance of large-scale economic models and calling for more research to be done in that area.

  4. Solar prize 2002: 21{sup st} century building intelligence; Solarpreis 2002: Bauintelligenz des 21. Jahrhunderts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glatthard, T.

    2002-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the award-winning projects that were presented with the Swiss Solar Prize 2002. The prizes, presented since 1991 by the Swiss Solar Agency and supported by various partners and associations, are awarded to the best solar and biomass energy installations and innovative persons and institutions of the year. The article describes a wide range of award-winning projects and installations in various categories including municipalities, new and refurbished buildings, best solar-thermal and photovoltaic installations and components, biomass-fuelled plant and innovative enterprises.

  5. Laureates of the Palladin Prize of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (1983–1984

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Vynogradova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the information about the life and scientific activity of the Palladin Prize laureats. In 1983, M. Ye. Kucherenko (1939-2007 was awarded for the mohnograph “Biological methylation and its modification in the early stage of ionizing radiation injury“. In 1984, G. V. Troitskiy (1913-1992 and O. P. Demchenko (born in 1944became the Palladin Prize laureates for the series of works “The study of protein structure” and for the monograph “Ultraviolet spectrophotometry and protein structure” (K.:Naukova Dumka, 1981, respectively.

  6. 8th Symposium Honoring Mathematical Physicist Jean-Pierre Vigier

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Louis H; Rowlands, Peter; The Physics of Reality : Space, Time, Matter, Cosmos

    2013-01-01

    A truly Galilean class volume as it also introduces a new method in theory formation this time completing the tools of epistemology. This book covers a broad spectrum of theoretical and mathematical physics by researchers from over 20 nations from four continents. Like Vigier himself, the Vigier symposia are noted for addressing avant-garde cutting-edge topics in contemporary physics. Among the six proceedings honoring J-P Vigier this is perhaps the most exciting one as several important breakthroughs are introduced for the first time. The most interesting breakthrough in view of the recent NIST experimental violations of QED is a continuation of pioneering work by Vigier on Tight Bound States in Hydrogen. The new experimental protocol described not only promises empirical proof of large-scale extra dimensions in conjunction with avenues for testing string theory but also implies the birth of the field of Unified Field Mechanics ushering in a new age of discovery. Work on quantum computing redefines the qubit...

  7. Activity Report: "Escola de Cultura de Pau", the Laureate of the First Evens Prize for Peace Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvou, Marjolein

    2011-01-01

    On March 18th 2011 an independent jury of experts convened in Antwerp, Belgium, to select the laureate of the first Evens Prize for Peace Education from a shortlist of eleven organizations from all over Europe. After a long day of intense discussions, the jury agreed unanimously to award the prize to the "Escola de Cultura de Pau"…

  8. Morel Receives 2005 Maurice Ewing Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Daniel P.; Morel, François M. M.

    2006-02-01

    François M. M. Morel received the Ewing Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 7 December 2005, in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is given for significant original contributions to the scientific understanding of the processes in the ocean; for the advancement of oceanographic engineering, technology, and instrumentation; and for outstanding service to marine sciences. François Morel has led the search to understand the role of metals in the ocean, starting with a focus on inorganic processes and aquatic chemistry, and leading to a blend of geochemistry, microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics. His influence comes from his research and from the way he has educated an entire community of scientists with his textbooks, with his teaching, and through his former students and postdocs who hold faculty positions at universities throughout the world.

  9. Squeeze: designing for playful experiences among co-located people in homes. (received first prize people's choice award)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2007-01-01

    Squeeze is a multi-person, flexible and interactive furniture that allows for collective and playful exploration of the family history among co-located people in homes. It is designed to explore how we can use digital technology to create settings where co-located family members can collectively ...

  10. Los reglamentos de honores y distinciones: una estrategia de interacción con los públicos. Los galardones otorgados y revocados por la Diputación Provincial de Sevilla / Honors and distinctions regulations: a strategy of interaction with publics. The awards granted and revoked by the Diputación Provincial de Seville

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Parrilla Amador

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A través de las Relaciones Públicas las organizaciones inician sistemas de comunicación dialógicos con los públicos de su entorno, posicionando mensajes a través de la interactividad con su entorno. Tradicionalmente concebidas desde el ámbito empresarial, han sido poco estudiadas desde el sector público como sistema a través del cual las administraciones públicas gestionan sus relaciones con sus administrados. En este sentido, desde el prisma de la comunicación organizacional, este trabajo pretende analizar cómo los reglamentos de honores y distinciones regulados y otorgados por la administración pública española, se erigen como un sistema de comunicación bidireccional que permite al Estado posicionar determinados mensajes relacionados con el ensalzamiento de determinados valores vigentes en cada contexto histórico, previamente detectados como dignos de respeto por la opinión pública. Para llevar a cabo el objetivo principal de este estudio, se selecciona como objeto de estudio la normativa de reglamentos de honores y distinciones de la Diputación de Sevilla para demostrar que la historia, la normativa y su ejecución nos hablan de honores y distinciones que ensalzan valores que deben ser referencia para la sociedad del momento. / Through public relations organizations starts a dialogic communication system with the public in their environment, positioning messages through the interactivity with their environment. Traditionally designed from the business sector, they have received little attention from the public administrations as a system through which government manages their relationships with their citizens. Thus, from the perspective of organizational communication, this paper analyzes how the regulations of honors and distinctions awarded by the Spanish publics administrations, stand as a bidirectional communication system that allows the state to position certain related messages exaltation of certain values

  11. EDITORIAL: Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Simon; Ruffle, Jon

    2013-08-01

    The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB), IOP Publishing, in association with the journal owners, the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM), jointly award the Roberts prize for the best paper published in PMB during the previous year. The procedure for deciding the winner is a two-stage process. First, a shortlist of contenders is drawn up based on those papers that had the best referees' quality assessments, with a further quality check and endorsement by the Editorial Board. The papers on the shortlist are then reviewed by a specially convened IPEM committee consisting of members with fellow status. This committee reads the shortlisted papers and selects the winner. We have much pleasure in advising readers that the Roberts Prize for the best paper published in 2012 is awarded to Michel Defrise, Ahmadreza Rezaei and Johan Nuyts from the Vrije Universiteit Brussels and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium for their breakthrough paper that describes how the information needed for attenuation correction in PET imaging can be extracted, to within a constant, from time-of-flight emission data: Time-of-flight PET data determine the attenuation sinogram up to a constant 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 885 Michel Defrise1, Ahmadreza Rezaei2 and Johan Nuyts2 1Department of Nuclear Medicine, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, B-1090 Brussels, Belgium 2Department of Nuclear Medicine, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium This paper represents an important and timely contribution to the literature as time-of-flight PET scanners are now offered by several manufacturers. In hybrid PET/CT scanners, the PET attenuation correction, necessary for quantitative reconstruction of the tracer distribution, can be derived directly from the CT data. Sometimes, however, the PET and CT scans may be poorly aligned due to patient motion and other approaches are needed. In addition, hybrid PET/MRI scanners also, have been developed recently, and in

  12. Electronic warfare receivers and receiving systems

    CERN Document Server

    Poisel, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Receivers systems are considered the core of electronic warfare (EW) intercept systems. Without them, the fundamental purpose of such systems is null and void. This book considers the major elements that make up receiver systems and the receivers that go in them.This resource provides system design engineers with techniques for design and development of EW receivers for modern modulations (spread spectrum) in addition to receivers for older, common modulation formats. Each major module in these receivers is considered in detail. Design information is included as well as performance tradeoffs o

  13. The long way to success. Jaroslav Heyrovský and the Nobel Prize

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindra, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, 17/18 (2010), s. 1933-1936 ISSN 1040-0397. [ Modern Electroanalytical Methods 2009. Prague, 09.12.2009-13.12.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80630520 Keywords : Jaroslav Heyrovský * Nobel Prize for chemistry 1959 Subject RIV: AB - History Impact factor: 2.721, year: 2010

  14. Discovery of the τ lepton and electron antineutrino awarded the 1995 Nobel Physics Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yifan

    1996-01-01

    American physicists Martin Perl and Fredrick Reines shared the 1995 Nobel Prize for physics for the discoveries of two of nature's most remarkable subatomic particles. Their pioneering contributions in lepton physics under-pinned subsequent developments in establishing the present picture of matter at the lepton-quark level

  15. Le Petit Parisien of 10 January 1904 and the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mould, R. F.; Asselain, B.

    2009-01-01

    This description of the discovery of radium and the award of the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physics is of historical interest as it represents public opinion in France in 1904. It has never previously been translated into English and neither has the French text been republished since 1904. (authors)

  16. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951); Cockcroft y Walton. Premio Nobel de Fisica (1951)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  18. The Nobel Prize in the Physics Class: Science, History, and Glamour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a novel strategy for teaching physics: using the Nobel Physics Prize as an organizational theme for high school or even first year university physics, bringing together history, social contexts of science, and central themes in modern physics. The idea underlying the strategy is that the glamour and glitter of the Nobel Prize…

  19. Firms vie to offer DOE a prize-winning recipe for cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Eager to get the most bang for its waste cleanup bucks, the US Department of Energy is conducting its own version of the Pillsbury bake-off. DOE is pitting two environmental contractors, Rust International Corp. and Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies Co., against each other to come up with the prize-winning recipe for cleaning up some nasty waste problems

  20. James Chadwick Nobel Prize for Physics 1935. Discovery of the neutron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    James Chadwick (1981-1974) was a key figure in the field of nuclear science. Through his studies, he researched the disintegration of atoms by bombarding alpha particles and proved the existence of neutrons. For this discovery, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1935. (Author)

  1. The asymmetry between discoveries and inventions in the Nobel Prize for Physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartneck, C.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical study on the frequency of discoveries and inventions that were awarded with the. More than 70 per cent of all Nobel Prizes were given to discoveries. The majority of inventions were awarded at the beginning of the twentieth century and only three inventions had a

  2. Languages for Learning: Granting All Students Access to New Skills. Fishman Prize Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Steven; Zunkiewicz, Kelly; Strait, Laura; Towne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A single great teacher can change a life by introducing a new language, helping you master a new skill or opening a door you never knew was there. That's why every year, TNTP awards the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice: to celebrate a select cohort of public school teachers who demonstrate exceptionally effective teaching with…

  3. Introducing Taiwanese undergraduate students to the nature of science through Nobel Prize stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haim Eshach

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a broad agreement among scientists and science educators that students should not only learn science, but also acquire some sense of its nature, it has been reported that undergraduate students possess an inadequate grasp of the nature of science (NOS. The study presented here examined the potential and effectiveness of Nobel Prize stories as a vehicle for teaching NOS. For this purpose, a 36-hour course, “Albert Einstein’s Nobel Prize and the Nature of Science,” was developed and conducted in Taiwan Normal University. Ten undergraduate physics students participated in the course. Analysis of the Views of Nature of Science questionnaires completed by the students before and after the course, as well as the students’ own presentations of Nobel Prize stories (with an emphasis on how NOS characteristics are reflected in the story, showed that the students who participated in the course enriched their views concerning all aspects of NOS. The paper concludes with some suggestions for applying the novel idea of using Nobel Prize stories in physics classrooms.

  4. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorzkowski, W; Zuberek, R [Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Science, Warsaw (Poland); Surya, Y [TOFI, Tangerang-Karawaci (Indonesia)

    2011-07-15

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  5. Nobel Prize Recipient Eric Betzig Presents Lecture on Efforts to Improve High-Resolution Microscopy | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric Betzig, Ph.D., a 2014 recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and a scientist at Janelia Research Campus (JRC), Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Ashburn, Va., visited NCI at Frederick on Sept. 10 to present a Distinguished Scientist lecture and discuss the latest high-resolution microscopy techniques. Betzig co-invented photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM)

  6. Nobel prize women in science their lives, struggles, and momentous discoveries

    CERN Document Server

    McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch

    1993-01-01

    An examination of the lives of Nobel Prize-winning women scientists discusses the work of Marie Curie, Emmy Noether, Lisa Meitner, and others, and explains why more than four hundred men and only nine women have won this prestigious award.

  7. Century of Nobel Prizes:1909 Chemistry Laureate -R-ES-O-N-A-N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Nobel Prize in 1909 for Chemistry was awarded to Wilhelm. Ostwald, for his pioneering ... It is reported that as an eleven-year old boy, he made his own ... member of the international peace conference and the permanent international ...

  8. Small prizes increased healthful school lunch selection in a Midwestern school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Barnes, Allison S; Hiller, Elizabeth; Kipp, Roger; Robison, Debora L; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Hudgens, Michelle E

    2016-04-01

    As obesity has become a pressing health issue for American children, greater attention has been focused on how schools can be used to improve how students eat. Previously, we piloted the use of small prizes in an elementary school cafeteria to improve healthful food selection. We hoped to increase healthful food selection in all the elementary schools of a small school district participating in the United States Department of Agriculture Lunch Program by offering prizes to children who selected a Power Plate (PP), which consisted of an entrée with whole grains, a fruit, a vegetable, and plain low-fat milk. In this study, the PP program was introduced to 3 schools sequentially over an academic year. During the kickoff week, green, smiley-faced emoticons were placed by preferred foods, and children were given a prize daily if they chose a PP on that day. After the first week, students were given a sticker or temporary tattoo 2 days a week if they selected a PP. Combining data from the 3 schools in the program, students increased PP selection from 4.5% at baseline to 49.4% (p small prizes as rewards dramatically improves short-term healthful food selection in elementary school children.

  9. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 21; Issue 4. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine: A Soil Bacterium and a Chinese Herb Steal the Show. Pundi N Rangarajan. General Article Volume 21 Issue 4 April 2016 pp 315-326 ...

  10. Web-based research publications on Sub-Saharan Africa's prized ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study confirms Africa's deep interest in the grasscutter which is not shared by other parts of the world. We recommend increased publication of research on cane rats in web-based journals to quickly spread the food value of this prized meat rodent to other parts of the world and so attract research interest and funding.

  11. Quality in Higher Education: Lessons Learned from the Baldrige Award, Deming Prize, and ISO 9000 Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Mahyar; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Compares the Baldrige Award, Deming Prize, and ISO 9000 registration in terms of purpose, focus, eligibility, time frame, information sharing, number of recipients, and assessment. Suggests that vocational-technical programs in higher education could be improved using the criteria for these awards. (SK)

  12. DOE-Supported Physicists are Co-Winners of 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    in Physics WASHINGTON, DC -- "On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, I congratulate Frank Wilczek, H. David Politzer and David J. Gross for winning the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics," said agencies, have been the leading Federal supporter of research in physics, enabling vital advances and

  13. Pasión y honor. elementos culturales del homicidio en la provincia de Soto (Santander) de 1903 a 1930

    OpenAIRE

    Jairo Antonio Melo Flórez

    2010-01-01

    Este artículo relaciona algunos elementos culturales de los conflictos interpersonales como son aquellos enmarcados en los conceptos de honor y pasión, entendiéndolos como sentimientos que adquieren sentido en las relaciones sociales, y que se pueden evidenciar en los casos de homicidio en la Provincia de Soto entre 1903 y 1930. El honor por lo general ha sido tratado desde la perspectiva de los hombres honorables, pero también existe una forma de honor en las personas del común, en un sentid...

  14. Computational simulations of frictional losses in pipe networks confirmed in experimental apparatusses designed by honors students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Nicholas A.; Hynes, Eric; Kutz, April

    2015-11-01

    Lectures in introductory fluid mechanics at NIU are a combination of students with standard enrollment and students seeking honors credit for an enriching experience. Most honors students dread the additional homework problems or an extra paper assigned by the instructor. During the past three years, honors students of my class have instead collaborated to design wet-lab experiments for their peers to predict variable volume flow rates of open reservoirs driven by gravity. Rather than learn extra, the honors students learn the Bernoulli head-loss equation earlier to design appropriate systems for an experimental wet lab. Prior designs incorporated minor loss features such as sudden contraction or multiple unions and valves. The honors students from Spring 2015 expanded the repertoire of available options by developing large scale set-ups with multiple pipe networks that could be combined together to test the flexibility of the student team's computational programs. The engagement of bridging the theory with practice was appreciated by all of the students such that multiple teams were able to predict performance within 4% accuracy. The challenges, schedules, and cost estimates of incorporating the experimental lab into an introductory fluid mechanics course will be reported.

  15. Tadeus Reichstein, co-winner of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine: on the occasion of the 110th anniversary of his birth in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2007-01-01

    Tadeus Reichstein (1897-1996) was the first scientist born in Poland to receive the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology (1950) for the "discovery of hormones of the adrenal cortex, their structure and biological effects", as stated by the Nobel Prize Committee. His family being deeply devoted to Polish cultural and historical heritage, his first name was given to him after Tadeus Kosciuszko, a chief commander of the 18th century Polish uprising named the Kosciuszko Insurrection. As a child, he emigrated with his family to Switzerland, where he was much later to become involved in numerous research studies on steroids on an international scale. It was Tadeus Reichstein who isolated and synthesized desoxycorticosterone, which still remains the drug of first choice in the treatment of Addison's disease. Additionally, thanks to his strategy for the mass production of Vitamin C, the cost of this agent was drastically reduced thus enabling its widespread therapeutic use. In our divided world so often torn by tremendous conflicts, there is a great need to both remember and commemorate such distinguished people as Tadeus Reichstein who, despite the apparent "borders" between different nationalities and cultures, have demonstrated through their work the huge need for harmonious collaboration in the development of science.

  16. Huss Receives 2013 Cryosphere Young Investigator Award: Citation: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    I would like to thank the AGU Cryosphere focus group for this award. Gaining such an important recognition at this stage of a scientific career is indeed both a great honor and a motivation to me. I was a little child when I first stepped onto a glacier. There was an unforgettable sensation of attraction and interest that touched me—one might call it a magic moment. Back then, I would never have imagined being a glaciologist one day. But it feels right, and I am grateful to have received the opportunity of exploring this wonderful element of nature.

  17. Bollasina Receives 2013 James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollasina, Massimo A.

    2014-08-01

    I am deeply honored to have been selected as this year's recipient of the James R. Holton Junior Scientist Award, and I receive it with heartfelt gratitude and humility. I clearly remember Peter Webster's call announcing the amazing news and how I literally remained speechless and overwhelmed. I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the Atmospheric Sciences section of AGU and the members of the award committee. I am even more appreciative to have been presented this award handed by two outstanding scientists—Peter Webster and Bill Lau—who have remarkably contributed to our understanding of the Asian monsoon and tropical climate, my area of expertise.

  18. Attitudes of Turkish Academics Regarding Violence Against Women in the Name of Honor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilçiçek Çalik, Kıymet

    2017-11-01

    Honor is an important concept that has a vital value in Turkey and affects many women's lives and even causes death. It is of utmost importance to know and scientifically demonstrate the value judgments of the academics that lead and pioneer the society in our country where honor culture is adopted. Therefore, in Turkey, where thousands of women are exposed to violence every year, 877 academics participated in this descriptive study to determine the attitudes of academics toward violence against women in the name of honor. The data were collected using "The Scale for Attitudes Towards Violence Against Women in the Name of Honor (SAVWNH)" in the form of electronic questionnaires through email addresses of the academics working at different faculties of the university in the official website of the university in September 1 to October 1, 2015. In our study, academics' "attitudes towards violence against women in the name of honor" were found low. That is, academics had negative attitudes toward the verbal or physical violence against women in the name of honor and opposed to the punishment of women for this reason. Nevertheless, the attitudes of those who were males; those who were not professors, associate professors, and assistant professors; those who were single; those who had lived in the district/village for a long time; those who had arranged marriages; those who used any kind of violence; and those who considered violence as a solution were found somewhat more conventional. These results showed that, for some academics, the traditional beliefs of the Turkish patriarchal society continued to be valid although they were included in university academic cultures. In fact, it is revealed here that social values, traditions, and customs are very effective and important on the formation of personality in socialization process.

  19. Medal of Honor Award Process Review: U.S. Army Noncommissioned Officer Nominee (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-04

    award the nominee the Silver Star. We determined Secretary McHugh acted within his authority when he decided to award the SS. We found no evidence...why the Honorable John M. McHugh , Secretary of the Army, downgraded the nominee’s MOH award recommendation to the Silver Star (SS).1 In a memorandum...valorous actions as documented in the MOH award 1 The Honorable John M. McHugh left his position as Secretary of the Army on November 1, 2015. 2 We did

  20. The Quest for Honor and Citizenship in Post-Slavery Borgu (Benin)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahonou, Eric Komlavi

    2015-01-01

    that is increasingly being contested in a number of forms. The paper explores the heritage of slavery in its cultural, spatial, social, economic, and political dimensions. The author sheds light on the concept of honor that is a central dimension of social and political life in West Africa. In nowadays Benin, Gando...... peasants take pride in nourrishing a number of noble families and put at stake their honor in ostentatious competition. By doing so, they not only question the central idea that slaves are honorless but enact new conceptions and new practices of citizenship....

  1. Honor killings in the Middle East and North Africa: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulczycki, Andrzej; Windle, Sarah

    2011-11-01

    A systematic review of the research literature on honor killings in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) indicates a paucity of studies relative to the presumed magnitude of the problem. Forty articles were reviewed and critically appraised, of which only 9 contained primary data and 11 presented original secondary analyses. Despite a recent increase in published studies, persistent methodological limitations restrict the generalizability of findings. Most studies focus on legal aspects, determinants, and characteristics of victims and perpetrators. Victims are mostly young females murdered by their male kin. Unambiguous evidence of a decline in tolerance of honor killings remains elusive.

  2. 32 CFR 887.7 - Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Persons separated under other than honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. 887.7 Section 887.7 National Defense... honorable conditions (undesirable or bad conduct) or dishonorable discharge. Those persons whose character...

  3. Receiver Test Selection Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    The DOT requests that GPS manufacturers submit receivers for test in the following TWG categories: - Aviation (non-certified), cellular, general location/navigation, high precision, timing, networks, and space-based receivers - Each receiver should b...

  4. Nobel Prize winning physicist to speak at Rensselaer Nov. 20 Leon Lederman to discuss pre college science education

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Leon Lederman, Nobel Prize-winner, will offer some radical ideas for improving pre-college science education when he delivers the annual Robert Resnick Lecture at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Russell Sage Laboratory (1/2 page).

  5. 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics Supernovae explosions and the Accelerating Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, B.

    2011-01-01

    This year, 2011, the nobel prize in physics is given to three astronomers (Perlmutter, Schmidt, Riess) 'for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae'. In my seminar talk, I will thus present first some basic astrophysics on supernovae star explosions and the cosmological principle of an expanding Universe. Next, I will summarize the observations and measurements of the two teams behind the noble prize winners and show how the simplest explanations of the unexpected findings lead to the concept of an accelerating Universe. I will end my talk with an outlook on ongoing and future efforts to measure the equation-of-state of the Dark Energy postulated to explain the observations. (author)

  6. The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics—ground-breaking experiments on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancock, Y

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Nobel Prize in physics was awarded to Professors Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov for their ground-breaking experiments on graphene, a single atomic layer of carbon, and more generally, for their pioneering work in uncovering a new class of materials, namely two-dimensional atomic crystals. This paper gives an accessible account and review of the story of graphene; from its first description in the literature, to the realization and confirmation of its remarkable properties, through to its impressive potential for broad-reaching applications. The story of graphene is written within the context of the enormous impact that Geim and Novoselovs' work has had on this field of research, and recounts their personal pathways of discovery, which ultimately led to their award of the 2010 Nobel Prize. (topical review)

  7. The first mathematical models of dynamic meteorology: The Berlin prize contest of 1746

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, J.; Pelkowski, J. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    2008-02-15

    The first models of dynamic meteorology were published in 1747 as a result of a prize contest of the Academy of Prussia. The topic of the contest concerned the determination of the winds 'if the Earth were surrounded everywhere by an ocean'. D'Alembert formulated a shallow water model for the first time in his prize-winning contribution and attempted to calculate tidal motions within the fluid layers. Daniel Bernoulli viewed the atmosphere as a boundary layer wherein the winds rotating with the earth at low elevations have to adjust their motion to a solar atmosphere at large heights. He is first in applying the principle of angular momentum conservation in continuum geophysics when calculating the zonal wind profile. An account of the historical background of the contest is given, as well as some later reactions to d'Alembert's solution. (orig.)

  8. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON–OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment. (invited comment)

  9. Awarded a prize for original use of natural gas. Praemieres for original brug af naturgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    Every year the Danish Natural gas companies award the natural gas prize of the year to a company, an instituion or a housing association that are using natural gas in a particularly good way. This year the judges have selected John Englyst, Market Gardener, Grundfoer at Hinnerup, as winner of the natural gas prize of the year. In connection with the introduction of natural gas John Englyst has been able to utilize the possibilities offered by the new energy source. Not only has he established a highly efficient boiler plant, but also, and that is what is now being rewarded, one of the very first combined heat and power plants for industrial application. (author).

  10. From the Big Bang to the Nobel Prize and the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, John C.

    2007-01-01

    I will describe the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to 2013, when the JWST is to be launched to look back towards our beginnings. I will discuss how the COBE results led to the Nobel Prize, how the COBE results have been confirmed and extended, and their implications for future observations. The James Webb Space Telescope will be used to examine every part of our history from the first stars and galaxies to the formation of individual stars and planets and the delivery of life-supporting materials to the Earth. I will describe the plans for the JWST and how observers may use it. With luck, the JWST may produce a Nobel Prize for some discovery we can only guess today.

  11. Promoting public health research in BRICS through a multinational public health prize fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes the establishment of a prize fund to incentivise public health research within the BRICS association, which comprises the five major emerging world economies: Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. This would stimulate cooperative healthcare research within the group and, on the proviso that the benefits of the research are made freely available within the association, would be rewarding for researchers. The results of the research stimulated by the prize would provide beneficial new healthcare technologies, targeting the most vulnerable and needy groups. The proposed fund is consistent with current international patent law and would not only avoid some of the problems associated with the "Health Impact Fund", but also create a new model for healthcare research.

  12. Chladniite: A New Mineral Honoring the Father of Meteoritics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, T. J.; Steele, I. M.; Keil, K.; Leonard, B. F.; Endress, M.

    1993-07-01

    cell. A total of 17 lines were observed in the powder pattern. Chladniite is hexagonal, R 3(bar), a = 14.967 angstroms, c = 42.595 angstroms, beta = 120 degrees. Attempts to determine the structure of chladniite are in progress. Chladniite is named for Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), who is widely regarded as the "Father of Meteoritics." After his initial training as a lawyer, Chladni turned his attention to science, particularly problems in acoustics. He was not, however, able to obtain a permanent position and embarked upon the life of a nomad, traveling among the great cities of Europe lecturing about acoustics. During these travels, he eventually gained an interest in meteoritics. It was Chladni's pioneering book of 1794 that, for the first time, presented strong evidence for an extraterrestrial origin of meteoritic stones and irons [5]. In addition, Chladni argued that meteorites must have been the building blocks of all planets and argued that a large iron core must exist inside the Earth. During his extensive travels, Chladni also established a meteorite collection that can still be seen at Humboldt University in Berlin. It is appropriate that a mineral be named in his honor as we approach the 200th anniversary of the publication of his monumental work. References: [1] McCoy et al. (1993) Meteoritics, in press. [2] Fuchs et al. (1967) GCA, 21, 1711-1719. [3] Araki and Moore (1981) Am. Mineral., 66, 827-842. [4] Livingstone (1980) Min. Mag., 43, 833-836. [5] Chladni (1794) Riga, J. F. Hartknoch (in German); reprinted (with introduction by G. Hoppe) by Akad. Verlagsgesellschaft Geest & Portig K.-G. (1982) (in German).

  13. A physarum-inspired prize-collecting steiner tree approach to identify subnetworks for drug repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yahui; Hameed, Pathima Nusrath; Verspoor, Karin; Halgamuge, Saman

    2016-12-05

    Drug repositioning can reduce the time, costs and risks of drug development by identifying new therapeutic effects for known drugs. It is challenging to reposition drugs as pharmacological data is large and complex. Subnetwork identification has already been used to simplify the visualization and interpretation of biological data, but it has not been applied to drug repositioning so far. In this paper, we fill this gap by proposing a new Physarum-inspired Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree algorithm to identify subnetworks for drug repositioning. Drug Similarity Networks (DSN) are generated using the chemical, therapeutic, protein, and phenotype features of drugs. In DSNs, vertex prizes and edge costs represent the similarities and dissimilarities between drugs respectively, and terminals represent drugs in the cardiovascular class, as defined in the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system. A new Physarum-inspired Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree algorithm is proposed in this paper to identify subnetworks. We apply both the proposed algorithm and the widely-used GW algorithm to identify subnetworks in our 18 generated DSNs. In these DSNs, our proposed algorithm identifies subnetworks with an average Rand Index of 81.1%, while the GW algorithm can only identify subnetworks with an average Rand Index of 64.1%. We select 9 subnetworks with high Rand Index to find drug repositioning opportunities. 10 frequently occurring drugs in these subnetworks are identified as candidates to be repositioned for cardiovascular diseases. We find evidence to support previous discoveries that nitroglycerin, theophylline and acarbose may be able to be repositioned for cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we identify seven previously unknown drug candidates that also may interact with the biological cardiovascular system. These discoveries show our proposed Prize-Collecting Steiner Tree approach as a promising strategy for drug repositioning.

  14. Artificial Intelligence to Win the Nobel Prize and Beyond: Creating the Engine for Scientific Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Kitano, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a new grand challenge for AI reasearch: to develop AI system to make major scientific discoveries in biomedical sciences that worth Nobel Prize. There are a series of human cognitive limitations that prevents us from making accerlated scientific discoveries, particularity in biomedical sciences. As a result, scientific discoveries are left behind at the level of cottage industry. AI systems can transform scientific discoveries into highly efficient practice, thereby enab...

  15. Laureates of the Palladin Prize of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (1995-1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Vynogradova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A. I. Bykoriz (born in 1934, O.O. Filchenkov (born in 1960 were awarded the O. V. Palladin prize for the monograph “Transforming growth factors” (K. Naukova Dumka, 1994 in 1995. A. I. Dvoretskyi (born in 1937, Ie. Iu. Chebotarev were awarded in 1996 for the series of works “The study of mechanisms of ionizing radiation affecting ion homeostasis in cells of animal organisms”.

  16. The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: cryo-EM comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Peter S

    2018-03-01

    The 2017 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson for "developing cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) for the high-resolution structure determination of biomolecules in solution." This feature article summarizes some of the major achievements leading to the development of cryo-EM and recent technological breakthroughs that have transformed the method into a mainstream tool for structure determination.

  17. Abraham Pais Prize Lecture: Shifting Problems and Boundaries in the History of Modern Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Mary-Jo

    A long established category of study in the history of science is the ``history of physical sciences.'' It is a category that immediately begs the question of disciplinary boundaries for the problems and subjects addressed in historical inquiry. As a historian of the physical sciences, I often have puzzled over disciplinary boundaries and the means used to create or justify them. Scientists most often have been professionally identified with specific institutionalized fields since the late 19th century, but the questions they ask and the problems they solve are not neatly carved up by disciplinary perimeters. Like institutional departments or professorships, the Nobel Prizes in the 20th century often have delineated the scope of ``Physics'' or ``Chemistry'' (and ``Physiology or Medicine''), but the Prizes do not reflect disciplinary rigidity, despite some standard core subjects. In this paper I examine trends in Nobel Prize awards that indicate shifts in problem solving and in boundaries in twentieth century physics, tying those developments to changing themes in the history of physics and physical science in recent decades.

  18. CCR’s Douglas Lowy and John Schiller receive the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas Lowy, M.D., and John Schiller, Ph.D., of CCR’s Laboratory of Cellular Oncology have received the 2017 Lasker~DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for their groundbreaking research leading to the development of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. The Lasker Awards are widely regarded as the country’s most prestigious biomedical research prizes.

  19. Pembangunan Aplikasi Perhitungan Honor dan Pengukuran Kinerja Asisten Praktikum Berbasis SaaS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Susanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Bagi suatu perguruan tinggi, kegiatan praktikum sangat penting untuk mendukung pembelajaran di kelas. Beberapa masalah yang muncul dalam pengelolaan kegiatan praktikum seperti keterlambatan pengumpulan berita acara praktikum (BAP sehingga memperlambat perhitungan, pembayaran dan pelaporan honor asprak. Dibutuhkan waktu sekitar dua minggu untuk rekapitulasi dan validasi ratusan lembar BAP yang telah terkumpul setiap bulannya. Dibutuhkan pengolahan data lebih lanjut untuk menilai kinerja asprak berdasarkan data BAP. Untuk mengatasi permasalahan di atas maka dibangun aplikasi perhitungan honor dan kinerja asprak. Aplikasi ini digunakan untuk mengelola data BAP, perhitungan dan pelaporan honor, perhitungan nilai transkrip aktivitas kemahasiswaan (TAK dan pencetakan sertifikat asprak. Keterbatasan SDM atau biaya menyebabkan tidak semua perguruan tinggi dapat langsung membuat aplikasi yang dibutuhkan. Oleh karena itu aplikasi ini dibangun berbasis Software as A Service (SaaS. Aplikasi ini dikembangkan dengan metode analisis perancangan terstruktur dengan model waterfall. Pengumpulan data kebutuhan aplikasi dilakukan dengan survey ke fakultas-fakultas di Universitas Telkom. Hasilnya dianalisis dan dikembangkan menjadi rancangan aplikasi. Aplikasi diimplementasikan pada pemrograman PHP. Pengujian dilakukan dengan metode black box testing. Hasilnya berupa aplikasi SaaS untuk perhitungan honor dan pengukuran kinerja asisten praktikum. Perguruan tinggi pengguna aplikasi SaaS ini dapat melakukan kostumisasi terhadap fitur yang ada sesuai dengan kebutuhan.

  20. Honoring and Building on the Rich Literacy Practices of Young Bilingual and Multilingual Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto-Manning, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author invites teachers of children who are bilingual, multilingual, and at promise for bi-/multilingualism to honor and build on their rich literacy practices. To do so, she challenges ideas and labels that continuously disempower bilingual and multilingual learners. Souto-Manning establishes the understanding that education…

  1. Honoring the Past, Changing the Future: Bringing Native American Voices into Dance Theory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Robin

    2016-01-01

    The inclusion of Native American perspectives adds an important voice in honoring the multiplicities of histories and cultures inherent in American society. And yet, teachers run the risk of committing unknown offenses if they are not familiar with the potential pitfalls that longstanding asymmetrical power relations between cultures can produce.…

  2. An Examination of Classroom Social Environment on Motivation and Engagement of College Early Entrant Honors Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    This study set out to examine the relationships between the classroom social environment, motivation, engagement and achievement of a group of early entrant Honors students at a large urban university. Prior research on the classroom environment, motivation, engagement and high ability students was examined, leading to the assumption that the…

  3. Playing with Light: Adventures in Optics and Spectroscopy for Honors and Majors General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staveren, Marie N.; Edwards, Kimberly D.; Apkarian, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    A lab was developed for use in an undergraduate honors and majors general chemistry laboratory to introduce students to optics, spectroscopy, and the underlying principles of quantum mechanics. This lab includes four mini-experiments exploring total internal reflection, the tunneling of light, spectra of sparklers and colored candles, and emission…

  4. Imagination and the Humanities in Honors across the Disciplines at a Jesuit University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Not every student has done honors work in the humanities, but all students experience research at a human level that necessarily recalls the work of the humanities. This article describes how Joe Kraus, a professor of literature at the University of Scranton, was inspired to see applied humanities in stories of human experiences, which helped him…

  5. Mobile Engagement at Scottsdale Community College: The Apple iPad in an English Honors Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tualla, Larry Tech

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation reports on an action research study that sought to discover how a new WiFi, tablet computing device, the Apple iPad, affected, enhanced, and impacted student engagement in an English Honors course at Scottsdale Community College. The researcher was also the instructor in the two semester, first-year, college composition sequence…

  6. Encouraging Self-Reflection by Business Honors Students: Reflective Writing, Films, and Self-Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    "The Moral Imagination," edited by Oliver F. Williams is a collection of essays written nearly twenty years ago on how honors educators might teach students to develop a sense of moral imagination through literature, art, and film. The book's subtitle--"How Literature and Films Can Stimulate Ethical Reflection in the Business…

  7. A Legacy of Sacrifice and Honor: Celebrating Tribal Resilience and Military Service at Haskell Nations University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Jacinta

    2017-01-01

    Haskell Indian Nations University opened 133 years ago, on September 17, 1884, as the U.S. Training and Industrial School--one of three original tribal boarding schools funded by the United States Congress. Three years later the school changed its name to Haskell Institute in honor of Chase Dudley Haskell, a U.S. representative from the Second…

  8. "The Endless Appetite": Honors Education and the Spirit of the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In a world that no longer privileges thinking, Andrew Martino writes here that we might need to consider what we are asking of our students--and why--when we ask them to think. This article presents a declaration of how Martino thinks honors education can serve as a resistant force against the increasing encroachment of a wholly utilitarian…

  9. Sea Lions and Honors Students: More in Common than You May Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann-Biolsi, Kristy L.

    2014-01-01

    One can easily find a link between the general principles of learning in relation to both nonhuman and human animals. What may be a more difficult but equally important parallel is how these learning principles are applied to the training of animals and the teaching of honors students. The author considers what teachers can learn from observing…

  10. The Honorable Dr Adolfo Urso, Vice Minister for Foreign Trade, "Viceministro delle Attivita' Produttive, Italia"

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: The Honorable Dr Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Italy, visiting SM18 with (from l to r): Dr Roberto Saban, Technical Coordination and Planning, LHC machine; Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General; Dr Mario Gerbino, Director General of the Ministry and Prof. Lucio Rossi, LHC Main Magnet and Superconductors (MMS) Group Leader. Photo 02: Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General and The Honorable Dr Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Italy, in front of one of the LHC superconducting magnet in SM18. Photo 03 :In front of one of the LHC superconducting magnets - from left to right Dr Roberto Saban, Technical Coordination and Planning, LHC machine; The Honorable Dr Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Italy and Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General. Photo 04: In the SM18 hall (from l. to r.) Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General, The Honorable Dr Adolfo Urso, Deputy Minister for Productive Activities, Italy and Dr Mario Ge...

  11. Too Smart to Fail: Perceptions of Asian American Students' Experiences in a Collegiate Honors Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henfield, Malik S.; Woo, Hongryun; Lin, Yi-Chun; Rausch, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    There is a considerable history of misunderstandings associated with Asian American in education. Although many educators and scholars have begun to pay more attention to unique issues associated with this population, studies exploring these students' experiences as honors students in collegiate contexts are scant in the educational literature.…

  12. Preparing students for global citizenship: the effects of a Dutch undergraduate honors course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, Ingrid W.; Kamans, Elanor; Wolfensberger, Marca; Veugelers, Wiel

    2017-01-01

    Using a mixed method approach, this case study investigates effects on the participating students () of an undergraduate honors course in the Netherlands, aimed at global justice citizenship. Knowledge about effects of global citizenship courses is still limited. The Ethical Sensitivity Scale

  13. Setting the Table for Diversity. National Collegiate Honors Council Monograph Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Lisa L., Ed.; Kotinek, Jonathan D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This monograph provides a cross section of policy and practice through the voices and experiences of honors faculty, staff, and students from across the nation. While far from comprehensive, this volume does pick up different strands of thinking on diversity to present a rich and complicated understanding of what diversity is, why it is important,…

  14. Highlighting the Transfer, Honors, and Excellence Workshop. CSCC Bulletin, Issue 7, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for the Study of Community Colleges, Los Angeles, CA.

    Summaries are provided for the major presentations given at a workshop on honors, transfer, and excellence, held in Los Angeles in October 1982. Following a brief overview of the main topics covered, highlights are presented from the talks of: (1) Robert McCabe, president of Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC), who urged participants to set high…

  15. Afghanistan...Another Chance for Peace With Honor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    brought an end to the First Indochina War.50 During the Geneva Peace Accords, Laos , Cambodia, and Vietnam received their independence and Vietnam...59Herring, America’s Longest War, 346. 26 60Mao Tse Tung, Guerrilla Warfare (MD: The Nautical and Aviation Publishing Company of America, 1992), 73

  16. Patrick Janot receives the CNRS silver medal

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Patrick Janot during the award ceremony. (Photo Schwemling, Paris) On 25 November, Patrick Janot of the CERN Physics Department received the CNRS silver medal for IN2P3 (Institut national de physique nucléaire et de physique des particules). This prize, one of the most prestigious awarded by the French research centre, is given to scientists for the 'originality, quality and importance of their work, as recognised both nationally and internationally'. Patrick Janot joined the ALEPH collaboration, one of the four experiments at LEP, then under construction, in 1987. First a CERN Fellow, he went on to work for the CNRS at LAL in 1989. Together with his team, he developed innovative algorithms for the reconstruction of events. This work and others earned him the bronze CNRS medal in 1993, which is awarded to scientists for their first achievements. In 1997, he became a permanent physicist at CERN, where he continued to work for ALEPH. He was appointed LEP scientific co-ordinator for the last two years of the ac...

  17. Between honor and shame :|bmartyrdom in 2 Maccabees 6-7 within the socio-cultural arena

    OpenAIRE

    Hefer, Barend Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The study, “Between honor and shame: Martyrdom in 2 Maccabees 6-7 within the socio-cultural arena”, presents a look at how the community viewed martyrdom in 2 Maccabees 6:18-7:42 from the perspective of honor and shame. The chief objective is to determine whether or not the community supported or challenged the notion of the martyrs’ death being either honorable or shameful. In order to reach a satisfactory conclusion to this objective, this study set as goals the identification of key themes...

  18. A flexible WLAN receiver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst, Roelof; Hoeksema, F.W.; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2003-01-01

    Flexible radio receivers are also called Software Defined Radios (SDRs) [1], [2]. The focus of our SDR project [3] is on designing the front end, from antenna to demodulation in bits, of a °exible, multi-standard WLAN receiver. We try to combine an instance of a (G)FSK receiver (Bluetooth) with an

  19. High T$_{c}$ superconductors and related transition metal oxides special contributions in honor of K. Alex Müller on the occasion of his 80th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This book containing 30 articles written by highly reputed experts is dedicated to K. Alex Müller on the occasion of his 80th birthday. The contributions reflect the major research areas of K. Alex Müller which he activated in high temperature superconductivity and phase transitions. They are theoretical as well as experimental ones and focus mainly on high temperature superconductivity. A smaller part deals with ferroelectricity and their applications. Also in this field there have recently been major break throughs experimentally as well as theoretically which will be addressed by the invited authors. During the scientific career of K. Alex Müller he made major advances in the understanding of ferroelectricity, which used to be his major research field. The discovery of superconductivity in cuprates for which he received together with J. Georg Bednorz the Nobel Prize in 1987 has not diminished his interest in this area, but has enlarged his activities considerably.

  20. Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Kerstin

    2006-01-01

    Highly Sensitive Optical Receivers primarily treats the circuit design of optical receivers with external photodiodes. Continuous-mode and burst-mode receivers are compared. The monograph first summarizes the basics of III/V photodetectors, transistor and noise models, bit-error rate, sensitivity and analog circuit design, thus enabling readers to understand the circuits described in the main part of the book. In order to cover the topic comprehensively, detailed descriptions of receivers for optical data communication in general and, in particular, optical burst-mode receivers in deep-sub-µm CMOS are presented. Numerous detailed and elaborate illustrations facilitate better understanding.

  1. Innovation for a better life: IdeaSquare to host a panel discussion for the 2016 Millennium Technology Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2015-01-01

    The one-million-euro Millennium Technology Prize promotes technological innovations that improve the quality of people’s lives. A series of panel discussions are being held worldwide to draw attention to the themes of the prize and to promote nominations for high-calibre candidates for the 2016 award. For the first time, IdeaSquare has been chosen as one of the venues and CERN people are invited to take part. Save the date: 30 June, 3 p.m.   The Millennium Technology Prize was established in 2004 by the Technology Academy Finland (TAF), an independent foundation whose mission is “to promote innovations that improve the quality of people’s lives in a sustainable manner”. Awarded every other year, the prize has already recognised the work of seven great innovators who developed technological innovations to tackle the great challenges of mankind: learning, health and a clean environment. The first prize was awarded to Tim Berners-Lee for the World Wide Web. E...

  2. The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Sarah M

    2008-01-01

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Gruenberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Gruenberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future. (topical review)

  3. The discovery, development and future of GMR: The Nobel Prize 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Sarah M [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-07

    One hundred and one years after J J Thomson was awarded the Nobel Prize for the discovery of the electron, the 2007 Nobel Prize for Physics was awarded to Professors Peter Gruenberg and Albert Fert for the discovery of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) in which the spin as well as the charge of the electron is manipulated and exploited in nanoscale magnetic materials. The journey to GMR started with Lord Kelvin who 150 years ago in 1857 made the first observations of anisotropic magnetoresistance and includes Sir Neville Mott who in 1936 realized that electric current in metals could be considered as two independent spin channels. Modern technology also has a significant role to play in the award of this Nobel Prize: GMR is only manifest in nanoscale materials, and the development of nanotechnology growth techniques was a necessary pre-requisite; further, the considerable demands of the magnetic data storage industry to drive up the data density stored on a hard disk fuelled an enormous international research effort following the initial discovery with the result that more than 5 billion GMR read heads have been manufactured since 1997, ubiquitous in hard disks today. This technology drive continues to inspire exploration of the spin current in the field now known as spintronics, generating new ideas and applications. This review explores the science underpinning GMR and spintronics, the different routes to its discovery taken by Professors Gruenberg and Fert, the new science, materials and applications that the discovery has triggered and the considerable potential for the future. (topical review)

  4. Paterson Receives 2004 Walter H. Bucher Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ian

    2005-01-01

    Mervyn S. Paterson received the Bucher Medal at the 2004 Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony on 15 December, in San Francisco, California. The medal is given for original contributions to the basic knowledge of the crust and lithosphere. Citation. It is the nature of modern research in the Earth sciences that observations of natural phenomena are often made and interpreted through the prism provided by the enabling sciences and technologies. Thus it has been with Mervyn Paterson's career. His undergraduate training in engineering in Adelaide formed the basis for his Ph.D. study of X-ray line-broadening in cold-worked metals under Orowan at Cambridge. This interest in the deformation of metals was fostered during his employment at the Aeronautical Research Laboratories in Melbourne and by postdoctoral experience at the Institute of Metals at the University of Chicago. Mervyn's general background in engineering and his particular interest in mechanical behavior have underpinned a distinguished career at the Australian National University in the experimental deformation of rocks, providing fundamental new insight into the mechanical behavior of the Earth's crust.

  5. A new window for detecting the universe. The 2002 nobel prize for physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Liming; Lu Tan

    2003-01-01

    The pioneering contributions to X-ray astronomy made by Riccaedo Giacconi who won the 2002 Nobel Prize for Physics are described, with emphasis on his extensive observations of the X-ray universe and development of X-ray imaging. The relationship between the advancement of astrophysics and the development of X-ray space observation is pointed out. The concepts of universal dark matter, binary accretion and X-ray jets are also presented. Finally, the outlook for high energy astrophysics is discussed

  6. The mantle of the heavens: Reflections on the 2014 Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard G M

    2015-06-01

    The award of the Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology in 2014 for the discovery of place and grid cells was both a personal award to three great scientists and also a mark of the maturity of systems neuroscience as a discipline. This article offers both personal and scientific reflections on these discoveries, detailing both how getting to know all three winners had an impact on my life and the research questions that we shared in common work together. It ends with brief reflections on three important outstanding questions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. 'PRIZE': A program for calculating collision probabilities in R-Z geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, H.H.W.

    1964-10-01

    PRIZE is an IBM7090 program which computes collision probabilities for systems with axial symmetry and outputs them on cards in suitable format for the PIP1 program. Its method of working, data requirements, output, running time and accuracy are described. The program has been used to compute non-escape (self-collision) probabilities of finite circular cylinders, and a table is given by which non-escape probabilities of slabs, finite and infinite circular cylinders, infinite square cylinders, cubes, spheres and hemispheres may quickly be calculated to 1/2% or better. (author)

  8. Colliding worlds: A journey in time and space through the solar system (Farinella Prize Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, S.

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the interiors, surfaces, and atmospheres of solid bodies in the solar system is affected by interplanetary collisions. From Mercury to the outskirts of the solar system, collisions with leftover planetesimals -asteroids, comets and their debris- provide a primary evolutionary process. Impact craters mark this evolution and provide a diagnostic tool, which coupled with modeling and, when possible, sample analysis, allow us to unravel the ancient history of the solar system. In this prize talk, I will present a few selected cutting-edge research topics at the frontier between modeling and space exploration that without any doubt would have deeply interested the curious mind of Paolo Farinella.

  9. From engaged citizen to lone hero: Nobel Prize laureates on British television, 1962-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouyon, Jean-Baptiste

    2018-05-01

    Between 1962 and 2004, Nobel Prize laureates appear in the British television science programme Horizon in various roles, denoting differing understandings of science in relation to society and culture. These representations are the outcome of an interplay of cultural and institutional factors. They vary with the broadcasting environment. Notably, the article establishes that the choice of presenting scientists as heroic characters in strongly determined storylines from the late-1990s onwards originates in a reaction to institutional imperatives as a means to preserve the existence of the Horizon series. The article shows that exigencies of the institutional context in which media professionals operate are major factors influencing the representation of science in public.

  10. 'PRIZE': A program for calculating collision probabilities in R-Z geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitcher, H.H.W. [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1964-10-15

    PRIZE is an IBM7090 program which computes collision probabilities for systems with axial symmetry and outputs them on cards in suitable format for the PIP1 program. Its method of working, data requirements, output, running time and accuracy are described. The program has been used to compute non-escape (self-collision) probabilities of finite circular cylinders, and a table is given by which non-escape probabilities of slabs, finite and infinite circular cylinders, infinite square cylinders, cubes, spheres and hemispheres may quickly be calculated to 1/2% or better. (author)

  11. Quantum optics and nuclear clocks: a look at the 2012 physics nobel prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera-Sancho, Oscar-Andrey

    2013-01-01

    Pioneering researches in the field of quantum optics are presented. These have laid the foundation for photonics research, that has grasped the particle properties of light to create new technologies and deepen the understanding of the physical laws. The quantum computation and quantum clocks have been highlighted. Individual particles have managed to manipulate without losing its properties in quantum, using photons to immobilize atoms with electric charges (ions) and study their properties. Researches conducted by the French scientist Serge Haroche and American David Wineland nobel prize winners for Physics 2012, have been commented [es

  12. The Beatles, the Nobel Prize, and CT scanning of the chest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lawrence R

    2010-01-01

    From its first test scan on a mouse, in 1967, to current medical practice, the CT scanner has become a core imaging tool in thoracic diagnosis. Initially financed by money from Beatles' record sales, the first patient scan was performed in 1971. Only 8 years later, a Nobel Prize in Physics and Medicine was awarded to Hounsfield and Cormack for their discovery. This article traces the history of CT scanner development and how each technical advance expanded chest diagnostic frontiers. Chest imaging now accounts for 30% of all CT scanning.

  13. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  14. Physics Nobel Prize Goes to Tsui, Stormer and Laughlin for the Fractional Quantum Hall Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzschild, Bertram

    1998-12-15

    This year's Nobel Prize in Physics is shared by Robert Laughlin (Stanford), Horst Stormer (Columbia University and Bell Laboratories) and Daniel Tsui (Princeton), for their roles in the discovery and explanation of the fractional quantum Hall effect. In 1982, when Stormer and Tsui were experimenters at Bell Labs, they and their colleague Arthur Gossard discovered this totally unexpected quantum effect in the transport properties of two‐dimensional electron gases at low temperature in strong magnetic fields.’ (See PHYSICS TODAY, July 1983, page 19.)

  15. The Time-Dependent Multiple-Vehicle Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Daniel; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2015-01-01

    -life traffic situations where the travel times change with the time of day are taken into account. Two metaheuristic algorithms, one based on Variable Neighborhood Search and one based on Tabu Search, are proposed and tested for a set of benchmark problems, generated from real road networks and travel time......In this paper, we introduce a multi vehicle version of the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-MPARP). It is inspired by a situation where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries to be performed by a fleet of vehicles. Real...

  16. Stephen Hall Receives 2012 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features: Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Stephen Hall, a freelance science writer and science-communication teacher, received the Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 5 December 2012 in San Francisco, Calif. Hall was honored for the article "At Fault?" published 15 September 2011 in Nature. The article examines the legal, personal, and political repercussions from a 2009 earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy for seismologists who had attempted to convey seismic risk assessments to the public. The 6.3 magnitude quake devastated the medieval town and caused more than 300 deaths. Six scientists and one government official were subsequently convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to prison for inadequately assessing and mischaracterizing the risks to city residents, despite the inexact nature of seismic risk assessment. The Sullivan award is for work published with a deadline pressure of more than 1 week.

  17. Handman and Senson Receive 2003 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism-Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Bob; Handman, Jim; Senson, Pat

    2004-03-01

    Patric Senson and James Handman received the Sullivan Award at AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on 10 December 2003, in San Francisco, California. The award honors ``a single article or radio/television report that makes geophysical material accessible and interesting to the general public.'' ``Jim Handman is one of the best kept secrets at CBC Radio. For more than 20 years he has been a bastion of integrity and an endless source of wit and has consistently produced award-winning programs in radio news and current affairs. ``Jim is currently the senior producer of Quirks & Quarks, our national science radio program, now in its 27th season, but this role is only one of many over the course of his extensive broadcasting career.

  18. Don't tread on me: masculine honor ideology in the U.S. and militant responses to terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Collin D; Brown, Ryan P; Osterman, Lindsey L

    2012-08-01

    Using both college students and a national sample of adults, the authors report evidence linking the ideology of masculine honor in the U.S. with militant responses to terrorism. In Study 1, individuals' honor ideology endorsement predicted, among other outcomes, open-ended hostile responses to a fictitious attack on the Statue of Liberty and support for the use of extreme counterterrorism measures (e.g., severe interrogations), controlling for right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, and other covariates. In Study 2, the authors used a regional classification to distinguish honor state respondents from nonhonor state respondents, as has traditionally been done in the literature, and showed that students attending a southwestern university desired the death of the terrorists responsible for 9/11 more than did their northern counterparts. These studies are the first to show that masculine honor ideology in the U.S. has implications for the intergroup phenomenon of people's responses to terrorism.

  19. De la difusión cultural de la virtud caballeresca a la defensa del honor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remedios Morán Martín

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A medida que la nobleza va perdiendo su carácter guerrero (bellatores, empieza a elaborar un concepto de virtud y de honor cercano a las nuevas corrientes humanistas que se difunden en la Península, lo que conlleva unas nuevas formas de defensa del honor como práctica social, que desembocarán en la tipificación del duelo como delito.As the same time as Nobility is on the way to lose its warlike attitude (bellatores, it begins to elabórate a new concept of virtue and honour cióse to the new humanistic tendencies spread in the Iberian Península, what implles new ways to defend the honour as a social practico, which wlll lead to the typification of the duel as an offense.

  20. CUANDO LAS AFRENTAS SE LAVABAN CON SANGRE: HONOR, MASCULINIDAD Y DUELOS DE ESPADAS EN EL SIGLO XVIII CHILENO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Undurraga Schüler

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo aborda la relación entre honor y prácticas sociales en el siglo XVIII chileno, analizando la figura de los duelos o expresiones de violencia masculina formalizada. Junto con indagar en los mecanismos restitutorios del honor y su vinculación a los fundamentos de una masculinidad tradicional, reflexiona sobre las gamas de manejo social de dicho valor en el período señalado. Teóricamente se rescatan los aportes de la antropología y se hace un balance del tratamiento historiográfico del problema. Desde los registros judiciales se plantea el carácter transversal del honor en términos sociales y se aborda su "doble naturaleza" en cuanto espacio relacional y ámbito de confrontación de los individuos.This works deals with the relationship between honor and social practices in Chile's eighteenth century and analyzes formal duels or expressions of legalized masculine violence. This article explores various manifestations of the social ways used to deal with honor at that time, together with the inquiries about mechanisms used to restore honor and its links with traditional masculinity. Theoretically, this work rescues contributions made by anthropologists and provides an overview of how honor and masculinity have been examined in the historiography. Starting from judicial records, the article considers the transversal character of honor in social terms and approaches its "double significance" as both a relational space for people and as a sphere for the confrontation of individuals.

  1. Marketingová strategie pro vzdělávací program Honors Academia

    OpenAIRE

    Šanová, Hana

    2017-01-01

    Diploma thesis deals with educational program of Honors Academia. The aim of the thesis is to set the marketing strategy of the program and to recommend suitable communication channels for marketing communication. The theoretical part deals with the marketing for education and services, with strategic management, namely with marketing strategy, tactics and analysis of internal and external environment. The pratical part consists of secondary research, one qualitative research, focus group, an...

  2. Delphi Accounts Receivable Module -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Delphi accounts receivable module contains the following data elements, but are not limited to customer information, cash receipts, line of accounting details, bill...

  3. Psychocultural Mechanisms of the Propensity toward Criminal Homicide: A Multidimensional View of the Culture of Honor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica G. T. C. Souza

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Theory of the Culture of Honor is one of the few models in criminology specifically geared toward homicide. It proposes that, in certain societies, men must never show weakness and are required to react violently to any perceived threats to their reputation, thereby increasing their probability of committing a homicide. This has been suggested as the main explanation for the high rates of this type of crime in Brazil, particularly in the Northeast. Underlying this explanation there are complex mechanisms and processes that have yet to be clarified.Objectives: The present research aimed to investigate the workings of the possible psychocultural mechanisms underlying the culture of honor and the process through which they might affect the individual propensity toward homicide.Methods: A total of 336 Brazilian adults were assessed regarding a broad range of sociodemographic, psychological, and sociocultural variables, including their attitudes toward homicide. The resulting dataset was analyzed using Smallest Space Analysis and Facet Theory.Results: It seems that certain cultural elements associated to traditional masculinity and enhanced anger tend to promote negative personality traits and increase one’s propensity toward committing homicide.Conclusion: The findings obtained not only confirm the Theory of the Culture of Honor for the propensity toward homicide, but also explicit and clarify some of the psychocultural processes and mechanisms involved, suggesting a new scientific framework.

  4. Cut throat injuries and honor killings: review of 15 cases in eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Bora; Celbis, Osman; Kaya, Atılhan

    2013-05-01

    Throat cuts could be of homicidal, suicidal or accidental origin. In the cases of death from cut throat, suicide can be distinguished from homicide based on the type and location of the wound and crime scene investigation. The purpose of the current study is to attract attention to the instructive findings for origin determination in deaths by cut throat according to the number and characteristics of the wounds and crime scene investigation. We have reviewed the files of autopsies performed between the years of 2000 and 2010, and compared with previously published case reports; all results were summarized in the current study. The results showed that 60% of cases were male, 40% were female, with 27.9 years of average age. The mean number of wounds was calculated to be 34.3 per case for honor homicides, 7.4 per case for other homicides, and 2.0 per case for suicides. Numbers of wounds were approximately 5 times higher in the honor homicides compared to other homicides. If the number of wounds were excessive, possibility of honor killings should be taken into account. When the killer was a parent not in psychosis, hesitation cuts were detected. Additional lesions were present in 46.7% of the cases, and they were assessed as homicide. Presence of vertebral notch and spinal cord cuts, which require a substantial amount of force and pressure via sharp tools, indicates homicide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. The influence of culture of honor and emotional intelligence in the acculturation of Moroccan immigrant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Zafra, Esther; El Ghoudani, Karima

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a normal process of people seeking new opportunities, work, or leisure in societies. The way people adapt to a new country (acculturation) is a complex process in which immigrants' evaluations about the culture of origin and their perceptions of the host country interact. The combination of these two factors produces four types of acculturation: separation, assimilation, integration, and marginalization. Several variables, such as personality, attitudes, and emotional intelligence, have been studied to help explain this process. However, the impact of a culture of honor and its interaction with other variables remains an open question that may help to explain how migrants can better adjust to their host culture. In this study, we examine the influence of the culture of honor (social) and emotional intelligence (individual) on acculturation. In a sample of 129 Moroccan women (mean age = 29, SD = 9.40) immigrants in Spain (mean time in Spain = 6 years, SD = 3.60), we investigated the relations among the variables of interest. Our results show that no significant differences emerged in the scores given for culture of honor (CH) and the acculturation strategies of the Moroccan immigrant women F(3, 99) = .233; p = .87. However women who preferred the integration strategy scored highest on emotional intelligence (EI), whereas the assimilated immigrants showed the lowest scores for EI F(3, 92) = 4.63; p = .005. Additionally, only in the case of integration does EI mediate between CH and the value given to the immigrant's own and host cultures (p <.001).

  6. Selman A. Waksman, winner of the 1952 Nobel Prize for physiology or medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, H Boyd

    2014-01-01

    The history of the discovery and development of streptomycin is reviewed here from the personal standpoint of a member of Dr. Selman Waksman's antibiotic screening research team. The team approach of eight individuals illustrates how the gradual enhancement of the screening methodology was developed. I illustrate three study periods with key aspects in the development of streptomycin which led to a Nobel Prize being granted to Professor Waksman. One item not previously emphasized is the employment of a submerged culture technique for large-scale production of streptomycin, thus enabling rapid animal testing and human clinical trials with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Another is that purified streptomycin was shown by Dr. Waksman to be distinctly different from the substances called natural products, which are no longer patentable in the United States; therefore, streptomycin was found to be patentable. A third item not previously emphasized is his emphasis on the screening of actinomycetes, including the newly named Streptomyces genus. All of these factors contributed to the success of streptomycin in the treatment of tuberculosis. In combination, their successes led to Dr. Waksman's department becoming a new pharmacological research area, specializing in drug discovery. These unique accomplishments all burnish the prior rationales used by the Karolinska Institute in granting Dr. Waksman alone the 1952 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

  7. Lecture by the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Professor Albert Fert, who has just been awarded the Nobel Prize for physics for his work on giant magneto-resistance and spintronics, will give a lecture at the University of Geneva on 16 November on this booming field of science. (c) CNRS Photothèque - C. LebedinskyOn 9 October, the 2007 Nobel Prize for physics was jointly awarded to Albert Fert of the CNRS and Peter Grünberg of the Jülich Research Centre for their simultaneous and independent discovery of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) in 1988. This discovery had a significant impact in the fields of information technology and communications as it was rapidly used to develop extremely sensitive hard disk read-out heads that are capable of reading information stored at very high densities, thereby allowing further progress in the miniaturisation of data-storage devices. Since the first GMR read-out head was launched in 1997, the technology has become the standard in the m...

  8. Expressing gambling-related cognitive biases in motor behaviour: rolling dice to win prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Matthew S M; Bowden-Jones, Henrietta; Rogers, Robert D

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive perspectives on gambling propose that biased thinking plays a significant role in sustaining gambling participation and, in vulnerable individuals, gambling problems. One prominent set of cognitive biases include illusions of control involving beliefs that it is possible to influence random gaming events. Sociologists have reported that (some) gamblers believe that it is possible to throw dice in different ways to achieve gaming outcomes (e.g., 'dice-setting' in craps). However, experimental demonstrations of these phenomena are lacking. Here, we asked regular gamblers to roll a computer-simulated, but fair, 6 sided die for monetary prizes. Gamblers allowed the die to roll for longer when attempting to win higher value bets, and when attempting to hit high winning numbers. This behaviour was exaggerated in gamblers motivated to keep gambling following the experience of almost-winning in gambling games. These results suggest that gambling cognitive biases find expression in the motor behaviour of rolling dice for monetary prizes, possibly reflecting embodied substrates.

  9. Call for Nominations The Nusselt Reynolds Prize Sponsored by Assembly of World Conferences on Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    2000-01-01

    The Nusselt Reynolds Prize has been established by the Assembly of World Conferences to commemorate outstanding contributions by Wilhelm Nusselt and Osborne Reynolds as experimentalists, researchers, educators, and authors. As many as three prizes may be bestowed at every World Conference, one in each of the areas of heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, or any combination of these.

  10. Initial Experience with "Honoring Choices Wisconsin": Implementation of an Advance Care Planning Pilot in a Tertiary Care Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Wendy L; Gani, Faiz; Blissitt, Jennifer; Walczak, Katherine; Opper, Kristi; Derse, Arthur R; Johnston, Fabian M

    2017-09-01

    Although previous research on advance care planning (ACP) has associated ACP with improved quality of care at the end of life, the appropriate use of ACP remains limited. To evaluate the impact of a pilot program using the "Honoring Choices Wisconsin" (HCW) model for ACP in a tertiary care setting, and to understand barriers to system-wide implementation. Retrospective review of prospectively collected data. Patients who received medical or surgical oncology care at Froedtert and the Medical College of Wisconsin. Patient demographics, disease characteristics, patient satisfaction, and clinical outcomes. Data from 69 patients who died following the implementation of the HCW program were reviewed; 24 patients were enrolled in the HCW program while 45 were not. Patients enrolled in HCW were proportionally less likely to be admitted to the ICU (12.5% vs. 17.8%) and were more likely to be "do not resuscitate" (87.5% vs. 80.0%), as well as have a completed ACP (83.3% vs. 79.1%). Furthermore, admission to a hospice was also higher among patients who were enrolled in the HCW program (79.2% vs. 25.6%), with patients enrolled in HCW more likely to die in hospice (70.8% vs. 53.3%). The HCW program was favorably viewed by patients, patient caregivers, and healthcare providers. Implementation of a facilitator-based ACP care model was associated with fewer ICU admissions, and a higher use of hospice care. System-level changes are required to overcome barriers to ACP that limit patients from receiving end-of-life care in accordance with their preferences.

  11. Report on Okochi-Prize awarded achievements for 1988(35th) commendation. Okochi-sho jusho gyoseki hokokusho 1988 nendo (dai 35 kai)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-02-20

    All of Okochi-Prizes awarded achievements at 35th commendation were reported. Reactive dye with two different functions'' was selected for Okochi-Prize. Development of new production process of acrylamide and its commercialization'' was awarded by Special Production Prize. Prize. for Technology were given to Development of three dimensional CAD system for atomic power plant'' and 4 others, while Prizes for Production were given to Development of large capacity ECL, RAM, and their mass production'' and 8 other achievements. All of 15 summarized reports of achievements explained history of each development, outline of its technology, characteristics of invention, patents applied, and results with economical effects. 166 figs., 29 tabs.

  12. Solar energy receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jacob

    1978-01-01

    An improved long-life design for solar energy receivers provides for greatly reduced thermally induced stress and permits the utilization of less expensive heat exchanger materials while maintaining receiver efficiencies in excess of 85% without undue expenditure of energy to circulate the working fluid. In one embodiment, the flow index for the receiver is first set as close as practical to a value such that the Graetz number yields the optimal heat transfer coefficient per unit of pumping energy, in this case, 6. The convective index for the receiver is then set as closely as practical to two times the flow index so as to obtain optimal efficiency per unit mass of material.

  13. Cryogenic microwave channelized receiver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, C.; Pond, J.M.; Tait, G.B.

    1996-01-01

    The channelized receiver being presented demonstrates the use of high temperature superconductor technology in a microwave system setting where superconductor, microwave-monolithic-integrated-circuit, and hybrid-integrated-circuit components are united in one package and cooled to liquid-nitrogen temperatures. The receiver consists of a superconducting X-band four-channel demultiplexer with 100-MHz-wide channels, four commercial monolithically integrated mixers, and four custom-designed hybrid-circuit detectors containing heterostructure ramp diodes. The composite receiver unit has been integrated into the payload of the second-phase NRL high temperature superconductor space experiment (HTSSE-II). Prior to payload assembly, the response characteristics of the receiver were measured as functions of frequency, temperature, and drive levels. The article describes the circuitry, discusses the key issues related to design and implementation, and summarizes the experimental results

  14. Alexandrite Lidar Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilkerson, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    ...". The chosen vendor, Orca Photonics, In. (Redmond, WA), in close collaboration with USU personnel, built a portable, computerized lidar system that not only is suitable as a receiver for a near IR alexandrite laser, but also contains an independent Nd...

  15. Receiver Gain Modulation Circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hollis; Racette, Paul; Walker, David; Gu, Dazhen

    2011-01-01

    A receiver gain modulation circuit (RGMC) was developed that modulates the power gain of the output of a radiometer receiver with a test signal. As the radiometer receiver switches between calibration noise references, the test signal is mixed with the calibrated noise and thus produces an ensemble set of measurements from which ensemble statistical analysis can be used to extract statistical information about the test signal. The RGMC is an enabling technology of the ensemble detector. As a key component for achieving ensemble detection and analysis, the RGMC has broad aeronautical and space applications. The RGMC can be used to test and develop new calibration algorithms, for example, to detect gain anomalies, and/or correct for slow drifts that affect climate-quality measurements over an accelerated time scale. A generalized approach to analyzing radiometer system designs yields a mathematical treatment of noise reference measurements in calibration algorithms. By treating the measurements from the different noise references as ensemble samples of the receiver state, i.e. receiver gain, a quantitative description of the non-stationary properties of the underlying receiver fluctuations can be derived. Excellent agreement has been obtained between model calculations and radiometric measurements. The mathematical formulation is equivalent to modulating the gain of a stable receiver with an externally generated signal and is the basis for ensemble detection and analysis (EDA). The concept of generating ensemble data sets using an ensemble detector is similar to the ensemble data sets generated as part of ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) with exception of a key distinguishing factor. EEMD adds noise to the signal under study whereas EDA mixes the signal with calibrated noise. It is mixing with calibrated noise that permits the measurement of temporal-functional variability of uncertainty in the underlying process. The RGMC permits the evaluation of EDA by

  16. Understanding fear of opportunism in global prize-based science contests : Evidence for gender and age differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.A. Acar (Oguz); J.C.M. van den Ende (Jan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlobal prize-based science contests have great potential for tapping into diverse knowledge on a global scale and overcoming important scientific challenges. A necessary step for knowledge to be utilized in these contests is for that knowledge to be disclosed. Knowledge disclosure,

  17. Unlocking Student Effort: How Five Irreplaceable Teachers Engage, Challenge and Inspire Students to Excellence. Fishman Prize Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Shira; Henderson, Whitney; Irish, Jamie; Lyons, Katie; Ross, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Founded by TNTP, the Fishman Prize for Superlative Classroom Practice is an annual award for the nation's best teachers in high-poverty public schools. The goal is to shine a spotlight on great teaching and amplify the voices of some of the nation's best educators so that others can gain insight into their remarkable classrooms. No more than five…

  18. The ozone hole and the 1995 Nobel prize in chemistry; Trou d`ozone et Prix Nobel 1995 de chimie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, A. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium). Inst. d`Astronomie et de Geophysique G. Lemaitre

    1996-03-01

    To mark to award of the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three world renowned atmospheric chemists, this paper recalls the history of scientific progress in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Then it summarizes current knowledge of ozone-layer depletion and its impact on climate, vegetation and human health. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs.

  19. Franklin Medal and Bower prize awarded to C.N. Yang. On the Yang-Mills gauge field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Zhongqi

    1995-01-01

    C.N. Yang was awarded the Benjamin Franklin Medal and 1995 Bower Prize mainly for his fundamental work on nonabelian gauge field theory. A brief introduction to this theory and its important role in the development of physics is given

  20. ["In Stockholm they apparently had some kind of countermovement" - Ferdinand Sauerbruch (1875-1951) and the Nobel prize].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Schagen, Udo

    2014-01-01

    The archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Solna, Sweden, is a remarkable repository that contains reports and dossiers of the Nobel Prize nominations of senior and junior physicians from around the world. Although this archive has begun to be used more by scholars, it has been insufficiently examined by historians of surgery. No other German surgeon was nominated as often as Ferdinand Sauerbruch for the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in the first half of the 20th century. This contribution reconstructs why and by whom Sauerbruch was nominated, and discusses the Nobel committee evaluations of his work. Political factors did not play an obvious role in the Nobel committee discussions, in spite of the fact that Adolf Hitler in 1937 had prohibited all German citizens to accept the Nobel Prize. The main reasons why Sauerbruch ultimately was not considered prize- worthy were that Sauerbruch's achievements were marked by scientific priority disputes, and that his work was not seen as original enough.

  1. A Valentine's Day bouquet for Temperature readers: pleasing with prizes, searching for the right words, and keeping things mysterious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2015-01-01

    This editorial tells its readers that the journal Temperature awards its first prizes for best papers to Boris Kingma and Assaf Yacobi. It also discusses the use of several thermoregulation-related terms and expressions, including "cold temperature," "thermoneutral temperature," and "warm-sensitive" and offers, arguably, better alternatives. The editorial also contains a new puzzle: how can color affect temperature perception?

  2. 'Chaos' in superregenerative receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commercon, Jean-Claude; Badard, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The superregenerative principle has been known since the early 1920s. The circuit is extremely simple and extremely sensitive. Today, superheterodyne receivers generally supplant superregenerative receivers in most applications because there are several undesirable characteristics: poor selectivity, reradiation, etc. Superregenerative receivers undergo a revival in recent papers for wireless systems, where low cost and very low power consumption are relevant: house/building meters (such as water, energy, gas counter), personal computer environment (keyboard, mouse), etc. Another drawback is the noise level which is higher than that of a well-designed superheterodyne receiver; without an antenna input signal, the output of the receiver hears in an earphone as a waterfall noise; this sound principally is the inherent input noise amplified and detected by the circuit; however, when the input noise is negligible with respect of an antenna input signal, we are faced to an other source of 'noise' self-generated by the superregenerative working. The main objective of this paper concerns this self-generated noise coming from an exponential growing followed by a re-injection process for which the final state is a function of the phase of the input signal

  3. Statement on President Obama winning 2009 Nobel Peace Prize, 9 October 2009, Vienna, Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: I am absolutely delighted to learn that President Barack Obama has been awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize. I cannot think of anyone today more deserving of this honour. In less than a year in office, he has transformed the way we look at ourselves and the world we live in and rekindled hope for a world at peace with itself. President Obama has provided outstanding leadership on moving towards a world free of nuclear weapons. He has shown an unshakeable commitment to diplomacy, mutual respect and dialogue as the best means of resolving conflicts. He has reached out across divides and made clear that he sees the world as one human family, regardless of religion, race or ethnicity. President Obama has brought a new vision of a world based on human decency, fairness and freedom which is an inspiration to us all. (IAEA)

  4. The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Thomas A. Steitz and the structure of the ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Over the past 200 years, there have been countless groundbreaking discoveries in biology and medicine at Yale University. However, one particularly noteworthy discovery with profoundly important and broad consequences happened here in just the past two decades. In 2009, Thomas Steitz, the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for "studies of the structure and function of the ribosome," along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan of the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology and Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. This article covers the historical context of Steitz's important discovery, the techniques his laboratory used to study the ribosome, and the impact that this research has had, and will have, on the future of biological and medical research.

  5. On the centenary of the Nobel Prize: Russian laureates in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhin, Konstantin N; Sustavov, Aleksandr F; Tikhonov, Viktor N

    2003-01-01

    The history and development of the branches of physics which profited significantly from the work of Russian Nobel laureates (P A Cherenkov, I E Tamm, I M Frank, L D Landau, N G Basov, A M Prokhorov, P L Kapitza, and Zh I Alferov) are reviewed in popular form to mark the recent Nobel Foundation centenary. Apart from the Russian prize winners' achievements, the major contributions of their colleagues - Russian and foreign, predecessors and successors - are briefly discussed. The current state of the branches of physics advanced with the participation of Russian laureates is reviewed, and the practical implications of their work for science, technology, and everyday life are discussed. (from the history of physics)

  6. On the centenary of the Nobel Prize: Russian laureates in physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhin, Konstantin N; Sustavov, Aleksandr F; Tikhonov, Viktor N [Institute of General and Nuclear Physics, Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2003-05-31

    The history and development of the branches of physics which profited significantly from the work of Russian Nobel laureates (P A Cherenkov, I E Tamm, I M Frank, L D Landau, N G Basov, A M Prokhorov, P L Kapitza, and Zh I Alferov) are reviewed in popular form to mark the recent Nobel Foundation centenary. Apart from the Russian prize winners' achievements, the major contributions of their colleagues - Russian and foreign, predecessors and successors - are briefly discussed. The current state of the branches of physics advanced with the participation of Russian laureates is reviewed, and the practical implications of their work for science, technology, and everyday life are discussed. (from the history of physics)

  7. Was Muller's 1946 Nobel Prize research for radiation-induced gene mutations peer-reviewed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2018-06-06

    This historical analysis indicates that it is highly unlikely that the Nobel Prize winning research of Hermann J. Muller was peer-reviewed. The published paper of Muller lacked a research methods section, cited no references, and failed to acknowledge and discuss the work of Gager and Blakeslee (PNAS 13:75-79, 1927) that claimed to have induced gene mutation via ionizing radiation six months prior to Muller's non-data Science paper (Muller, Science 66(1699):84-87, 1927a). Despite being well acclimated into the scientific world of peer-review, Muller choose to avoid the peer-review process on his most significant publication. It appears that Muller's actions were strongly influenced by his desire to claim primacy for the discovery of gene mutation. The actions of Muller have important ethical lessons and implications today, when self-interest trumps one's obligations to society and the scientific culture that supports the quest for new knowledge and discovery.

  8. A lecture by Saul Perlmutter, winner of the 2011 Nobel prize in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CNRS National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Pierre et Marie Curie University and the Laboratory of Nuclear and High-energy Physics (LPNHE) are happy to invite you to a talk by Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter.   Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel prize in physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." He will give a public talk in Paris on 17 December at 5pm: "Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe" Amphithéâtre Farabeuf des Cordeliers 21, rue de l’école de Médecine 75006 Paris Free entrance (places are limited) and live translation available.

  9. The meaning of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize. Microcredit evangelism, health, and social policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The awarding of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize to Muhammad Yunus, founder of the Grameen Bank, provides an opportunity to consider the use and abuse of microfinancing, especially because credit continues to be touted as a poverty-reduction strategy associated with health education and health care financing strategies. Not only is the Grameen diagnosis of poverty dubious, but many structural problems also plague the model, ranging from financial accounting to market failures. In Southern Africa, to illustrate, microcredit schemes for peasants and small farmers have been attempted for more than 70 years, on the basis that modem capitalism and peasant/informal system gaps can be bridged by an expanded financial system. The results have been disappointing. A critical reading of political economy posits an organic linkage between the "developed" and "underdeveloped" economies that is typically not mitigated by capitalist financial markets, but instead is often exacerbated. When applied to health and social policy, microcredit evangelism becomes especially dangerous.

  10. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  11. Nobel Prize 1992: Rudolph A. Marcus: theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulate Segura, Diego Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    A review of the theory developed by Rudolph A. Marcus is presented, who for his rating to the theory of electron transfer in chemical systems was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1992. Marcus theory has constituted not only a good extension of the use of a spectroscopic principle, but also has provided an energy balance and the application of energy conservation for electron transfer reactions. A better understanding of the reaction coordinate is exposed in terms energetic and establishing the principles that govern the transfer of electrons, protons and some labile small molecular groups as studied at present. Also, the postulates and equations described have established predictive models of reaction time, very useful for industrial environments, biological, metabolic, and others that involve redox processes. Marcus theory itself has also constituted a large contribution to the theory of complex transition [es

  12. [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokaj, J; John, C

    2008-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1908 was awarded to Ilya I. Mechnikov and Paul Ehrlich for recognition of their work on immunity. Mechnikov have discovered phagocytes and phagocytosis as the basis of natural cellular immunity. His ,,phagocytic theory" is the principle of immunological concept "self and not self" as the prerequisition of physiological inflammation, and selfmaintaining of organism. Ehrlich developed the methods for standardization of antibody activity in immune sera, described neutralizing and complement-depending effect of antibodies and enunciated the ,"ide-chain" theory of the formation of antibodies. Their concept of the key-stone of immunity was different, but they expressed the basic paradigma of immunology: immunity imply the protection of identity and guarantee the integrity of organism. Both are the founders of immunology as the scientific discipline. Discoveries and conceptions of I. Mechnikov and P. Ehrlich exceedingly influenced development of immunology and are also applicable, instructive and suggestive in contemporary immunology and microbiology.

  13. A course for developing interprofessional skills in pre-professional honor students using humanities and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I; Stamper-Carr, Connie; Newman, Kate

    2017-09-01

    To design and implement an undergraduate honors course for pre-health professional students that develops interpersonal skills through use of a variety of humanities. A three credit hour course in an honors seminar sequence was developed by pharmacy practice faculty and with input from faculty in mass communications, philosophy, applied communication studies and history. The course utilized a variety of media such as literature, film, and podcasts to foster student discussion about a variety of health-related topics. Topics included public health, stigmatization, portrayals of health care providers, patient experiences, health care ethics, aging, and death and dying. Students were assessed using pre-class assignments and reflective writings as well as a formal written and oral presentation on a selected health-related book. A quasi-experimental design was used to assess the impact of the course on desired course outcomes. The first course offering was to 22 undergraduate pre-health professional honors students. Pre- and post-course surveys on students' perceptions and students' reflective writings revealed achievement of desired course outcomes. Post-course evaluations also revealed positive perceptions about the course. The design of this course provided an outlet for students to read and enjoy various forms of media, while also meeting its goal of exposing students to a variety of humanities. The course allowed students to think critically about various health care issues, and to begin to develop interpersonal skills. The course could be adapted for pharmacy by developing affective domains of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Determinantes dos Honorários de Auditoria: um Estudo nas Empresas Listadas na BM&FBOVESPA, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Bottaro de Lima Castro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO Este trabalho analisa os determinantes dos honorários de auditoria pagos por empresas listadas na BM&FBOVESPA. Os dados referentes às empresas listadas para 2012 mostram relação positiva entre honorários com as variáveis porte, complexidade do cliente e auditores Big N. O risco percebido pelo auditor demonstrou afetar os valores dos honorários de forma diferente nos clientes de maior e menor porte. Nos de menor porte, os resultados sugerem que o auditor cobre menores honorários de clientes mais alavancados e com maior risco, contrariando a hipótese de que o auditor cobraria maiores honorários como prêmio pelo risco assumido. Já nos de maior porte, os resultados demonstram que clientes com maior risco, medido pela liquidez e alavancagem, ou com maiores práticas de governança, tendem a gastar mais com auditoria. Quanto à troca do auditor, os resultados apontaram que clientes maiores pagam menos no primeiro ano de auditoria. Esses resultados qualificam os achados de Hallak e Silva (2012, sugerindo a necessidade de novas pesquisas com bases temporalmente mais extensas.

  15. Pasión y honor. elementos culturales del homicidio en la provincia de Soto (Santander de 1903 a 1930

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Antonio Melo Flórez

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo relaciona algunos elementos culturales de los conflictos interpersonales como son aquellos enmarcados en los conceptos de honor y pasión, entendiéndolos como sentimientos que adquieren sentido en las relaciones sociales, y que se pueden evidenciar en los casos de homicidio en la Provincia de Soto entre 1903 y 1930. El honor por lo general ha sido tratado desde la perspectiva de los hombres honorables, pero también existe una forma de honor en las personas del común, en un sentido más conflictivo y complejo, que residía por lo general en el respeto generado por sus iguales y en la sexualidad de las mujeres. Así mismo, la pasión era un sentimiento que conllevaba a reacciones violentas, relacionado en buena medida con el honor, y cuya reacción podía ser más o menos ritualizada en un pleito o bastante impulsiva en una riña.

  16. Reflections on the Cultural Background to China's Reaction to the Nobel Prize Award

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunnar Haaland

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some complex and controversial issues that arose in connection with the 2010 Nobel Prize Peace award to the Chinese dissident Liu Xiao Bo. These issues involve different levels. On one level it is important not to confuse the Nobel committee’s independence of outside interference from political and other organized agencies, with the question of whether the Nobel Prize committee’s decisions can be ideological or politically unbiased in its decisions. Part of the strong Chinese reaction to the award is related to this issue. Another level deals with the Committee’s widening of the criteria to be taken into account in the selection of candidates from the original criterion focused on direct contribution to reduction of armed conflicts, to the wider issues of indirect contributions like alleviation of poverty, ecological sustainability and most crucial the issue of human rights. The last issue is particularly critical since different states have different perspectives of what constitute human rights, and what rights should be given priority on different levels of the country’s development. The main point of the article is to look at historical events and socio-cultural conditions that shape the Chine Government’s (and many citizens’ reaction to the 2010 award. This is placed in the context of the widening income differences emerging in the modern political economy of China and how these may affect the growth of civil society. The critical question is: will the reward contribute to promotion of civil society or will it lead to increased crackdown on dissident voices. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/dsaj.v5i0.6357 Dhaulagiri Journal of Sociology and Anthropology Vol. 5, 2011: 81-100

  17. Regulation strategies of contemporary school life: an analysis of the 8th brazilian teacher prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarice Salete Traversini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze some regulation strategies of contemporary school life taking place under the neoliberal governmentality in Brazil according to authors such as Foucault (2008, Veiga-Neto & Saraiva (2011 and Young (2011, and researchers of teacher education and contemporary teaching, such as Nóvoa (2009, 2012 and Silva (2014. The publication of the 8th Brazilian Teacher Prize, 2014 edition, with 39 teachers awarded, and the syntheses of the winning projects were selected for analysis. The question raised is which regulation strategies of contemporary school life are present in the set of projects in the 8th edition of the Brazilian Teacher Prize? Two regulation strategies of contemporary school life have been identified. In one of them, called pedagogy of protections, according to Silva (2014, knowledge related to social issues is central. The other one concerns the emphasis given on full-time education, which takes place by extending school hours, as a means for the early intervention of students in social issues. Based on Nóvoa (2013, the authors have proposed the refocusing of school roles by considering the appropriation of school knowledge as central to school. An intersectoral coordination is needed so that the political pedagogical project and school daily actions can be planned along with other social agencies that assist to the community. This enables the partner sectors to perform protection roles, and both the school and the teachers are able to focus on their specific functions, i.e. teaching and educating in the full sense of education.

  18. Solar thermal central receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vant-Hull, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Market issues, environmental impact, and technology issues related to the Solar Central Receiver concept are addressed. The rationale for selection of the preferred configuration and working fluid are presented as the result of a joint utility-industry analysis. A $30 million conversion of Solar One to an external molten salt receiver would provide the intermediate step to a commercial demonstration plant. The first plant in this series could produce electricity at 11.2 cents/kWhr and the seventh at 8.2 cents/kWhr, completely competitive with projected costs of new utility plants in 1992

  19. Wideband CMOS receivers

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This book demonstrates how to design a wideband receiver operating in current mode, in which the noise and non-linearity are reduced, implemented in a low cost single chip, using standard CMOS technology.  The authors present a solution to remove the transimpedance amplifier (TIA) block and connect directly the mixer’s output to a passive second-order continuous-time Σ∆ analog to digital converter (ADC), which operates in current-mode. These techniques enable the reduction of area, power consumption, and cost in modern CMOS receivers.

  20. Risk and reliability analysis theory and applications : in honor of Prof. Armen Der Kiureghian

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a unique collection of contributions from some of the foremost scholars in the field of risk and reliability analysis. Combining the most advanced analysis techniques with practical applications, it is one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date books available on risk-based engineering. All the fundamental concepts needed to conduct risk and reliability assessments are covered in detail, providing readers with a sound understanding of the field and making the book a powerful tool for students and researchers alike. This book was prepared in honor of Professor Armen Der Kiureghian, one of the fathers of modern risk and reliability analysis.