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Sample records for realistic nn interaction

  1. Nonsymmetrized hyperspherical harmonics with realistic NN potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Deflorian, Sergio; Leidemann, Winfried; Orlandini, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    The Schroedinger equation is solved for an A-nucleon system using an expansion of the wave function in nonsymmetrized hyperspherical harmonics. Our approach is both an extension and a modification of the formalism developed by Gattobigio et al.. The extension consists in the inclusion of spin and isospin degrees of freedom such that a calculation with more realistic NN potential models becomes possible, whereas the modification allows a much simpler determination of the fermionic ground state. The approach is applied to four- and six-body nuclei (4He, 6Li) with various NN potential models. It is shown that the results for ground-state energy and radius agree well with those from the literature.

  2. NN Interaction JISP16: Current Status and Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur E.A.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss realistic nonlocal NN interactions of a new type — J -matrix Inverse Scattering Potential (JISP. In an ab exitu approach, these interactions are fitted to not only two-nucleon data (NN scattering data and deuteron properties but also to the properties of light nuclei without referring to three-nucleon forces. We discuss recent progress with the ab initio No-core Shell Model (NCSM approach and respective progress in developing ab exitu JISP-type NN -interactions together with plans of their forthcoming improvements.

  3. NN Interaction in Chiral Constituent Quark Models

    CERN Document Server

    Valcarce, A; González, P

    2003-01-01

    We review the actual state in the description of the NN interaction by means of chiral constituent quark models. We present a series of relevant features that are nicely explained within the quark model framework.

  4. Dynamical Symmetries Reflected in Realistic Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; /Louisiana State U.; Vary, J.P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-06

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, derived within the framework of meson theory or more recently in terms of chiral effective field theory, yield new possibilities for achieving a unified microscopic description of atomic nuclei. Based on spectral distribution methods, a comparison of these interactions to a most general Sp(4) dynamically symmetric interaction, which previously we found to reproduce well that part of the interaction that is responsible for shaping pairing-governed isobaric analog 0{sup +} states, can determine the extent to which this significantly simpler model Hamiltonian can be used to obtain an approximate, yet very good description of low-lying nuclear structure. And furthermore, one can apply this model in situations that would otherwise be prohibitive because of the size of the model space. In addition, we introduce a Sp(4) symmetry breaking term by including the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the analysis and examining the capacity of this extended model interaction to imitate realistic interactions. This provides a further step towards gaining a better understanding of the underlying foundation of realistic interactions and their ability to reproduce striking features of nuclei such as strong pairing correlations or collective rotational motion.

  5. Three Dimensional SRG Evolution of the NN Interactions Using Picard Iteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadizadeh M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG evolution of nucleon-nucleon (NN interactions is calculated directly as function of momentum vectors for realistic potentials. To overcome the stiffness of the SRG flow equations in differential form for far off diagonal matrix elements, the differential equation is transformed to an integral form without employing a partial wave decomposition.

  6. Low Scale Saturation of Effective NN Interactions and Their Symmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Ruiz Arriola

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Skyrme force parameters can be uniquely determined by coarse graining the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN interactions at a characteristic momentum scale. We show how exact V lowk potentials to second order in momenta are saturated with physical NN scattering threshold parameters at Center of Mass (CM cut-off scales of about Λ = 250 MeV for the S-waves and Λ = 100 MeV for the P-waves. The pattern of Wigner and Serber symmetries unveiled previously and suggested by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD large N c contracted symmetry emerges at these scales.

  7. Renormalization of NN Interaction with Relativistic Chiral Two Pion Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, R; Valderrama, M Pavon; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2007-06-14

    The renormalization of the NN interaction with the Chiral Two Pion Exchange Potential computed using relativistic baryon chiral perturbation theory is considered. The short distance singularity reduces the number of counter-terms to about a half as those in the heavy-baryon expansion. Phase shifts and deuteron properties are evaluated and a general overall agreement is observed.

  8. Renormalizing the NN interaction with multiple subtractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timoteo, V.S. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13484-332 Limeira, SP (Brazil); Frederico, T. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Comando de Tecnologia Aeroespacial, 12228-900 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Delfino, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, 24210-150 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Tomio, L. [Instituto de Fisica Teorica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Szpigel, S.; Duraes, F.O. [Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, 01302-907 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this work is to show how to renormalize the nucleon-nucleon interaction at next-to-next-to-leading order using a systematic subtractive renormalization approach with multiple subtractions. As an example, we calculate the phase shifts for the partial waves with total angular momentum J=2. The intermediate driving terms at each recursive step as well as the renormalized T-matrix are also shown. We conclude that our method is reliable for singular potentials such as the two-pion exchange and derivative contact interactions.

  9. Realistic model for radiation-matter interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Pakula, R A

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a realistic model that describes radiation-matter interactions. This is achieved by a generalization of first quantization, where the Maxwell equations are interpreted as the electromagnetic component of the Schrodinger equation. This picture is complemented by the consideration of electrons and photons as real particles in three-dimensional space, following guiding conditions derived from the particle-wave-functions to which they are associated. The guiding condition for the electron is taken from Bohmian mechanics, while the photon velocity is defined as the ratio between the Poynting vector and the electromagnetic energy density. The case of many particles is considered, taking into account their statistical properties. The formalism is applied to a two level system, providing an intuitive description for spontaneous emission, Lamb shift, scattering, absorption, dispersion, resonance fluorescence and vacuum fields. This model describes quantum jumps by the entanglement between the photo...

  10. Skyrme-Model $\\pi NN$ Form Factor and Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Holzwarth, G

    1997-01-01

    We apply the strong $\\pi NN$ form factor, which emerges from the Skyrme model, in the two-nucleon system using a one-boson-exchange (OBE) model for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. Deuteron properties and phase parameters of NN scattering are reproduced well. In contrast to the form factor of monopole shape that is traditionally used in OBE models, the Skyrme form factor leaves low momentum transfers essentially unaffected while it suppresses the high-momentum region strongly. It turns out that this behavior is very appropriate for models of the NN interaction and makes possible to use a soft pion form factor in the NN system. As a consequence, the $\\pi N$ and the $NN$ systems can be described using the same soft $\\pi NN$ form factor, which is impossible with the monopole.

  11. Three-neutron resonance trajectories for realistic interaction models

    CERN Document Server

    Lazauskas, R

    2005-01-01

    Three-neutron resonances are searched using realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models. Resonance pole trajectories were explored by artificially binding three-neutron and then gradually removing additional interaction. The final pole positions for three-neutron states up to $|J|$=5/2 finish in the fourth energy quadrant with Re(E)$\\leqslant0$ before additional interaction is removed. This study shows that realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models exclude possible existence of observable three-neutron resonances.

  12. Pairing properties of realistic effective interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargano A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the pairing properties of an effective shell-model interaction defined within a model space outside 132Sn and derived by means of perturbation theory from the CD-Bonn free nucleon-nucleon potential. It turns out that the neutron pairing component of the effective interaction is significantly weaker than the proton one, which accounts for the large pairing gap difference observed in the two-valence identical particle nuclei 134Sn and 134Te. The role of the contribution arising from one particle-one hole excitations in determining the pairing force is discussed and its microscopic structure is also analyzed in terms of the multipole decomposition.

  13. N3LO NN interaction adjusted to light nuclei in ab exitu approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokov, A. M.; Shin, I. J.; Kim, Y.; Sosonkina, M.; Maris, P.; Vary, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    We use phase-equivalent transformations to adjust off-shell properties of similarity renormalization group evolved chiral effective field theory NN interaction (Idaho N3LO) to fit selected binding energies and spectra of light nuclei in an ab exitu approach. We then test the transformed interaction on a set of additional observables in light nuclei to verify that it provides reasonable descriptions of these observables with an apparent reduced need for three- and many-nucleon interactions.

  14. Relativistic scalar-vector models of the N-N and N-nuclear interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, A.E.S.

    1985-01-01

    This paper for the Proceedings of Conference an Anti-Nucleon and Nucleon-Nucleus Interactions summarizes work by the principal investigator and his collaborators on the nucleon-nucleon (N-N) and nucleon-nuclear (N-eta) interactions. It draws heavily on a paper presented at the Many Body Conference in Rome in 1972 but also includes a brief review of our phenomenological N-eta interaction studies. We first summarize our 48-49 generalized scalar-vector meson field theory model of the N-N interactions. This is followed by a brief description of our phenomenological work in the 50's on the N-eta interaction sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission (the present DOE). This work finally led to strong velocity dependent potentials with spin orbit and isospin terms for shell and optical model applications. This is followed by a section on the Emergence of One-Boson Exchange Models describing developments in the 60's of quantitative generalized one boson exchange potentials (GOBEP) including our purely relativistic N-N analyses. Then follows a section on the application of this meson field model to the N-eta interaction, in particular to spherical closed shell nuclei. This work was sponsored by AFOSR but funding was halted with the Mansfield amendment. We conclude with a discussion of subsequent collateral work by former colleagues and by others who have converged upon scalar-vector relativistic models of N-N, antiN-N, N-eta and antiN-eta interactions and some lessons learned from this extended endeavor. 61 refs.

  15. Exposure render: an interactive photo-realistic volume rendering framework.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kroes

    Full Text Available The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR by integrating a number of visually plausible but often effect-specific rendering techniques, for instance modeling of light occlusion and depth of field. Besides yielding more attractive renderings, especially the more realistic lighting has a positive effect on perceptual tasks. Although these new rendering techniques yield impressive results, they exhibit limitations in terms of their exibility and their performance. Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT, coupled with physically based light transport, is the de-facto standard for synthesizing highly realistic images in the graphics domain, although usually not from volumetric data. Due to the stochastic sampling of MCRT algorithms, numerous effects can be achieved in a relatively straight-forward fashion. For this reason, we have developed a practical framework that applies MCRT techniques also to direct volume rendering (DVR. With this work, we demonstrate that a host of realistic effects, including physically based lighting, can be simulated in a generic and flexible fashion, leading to interactive DVR with improved realism. In the hope that this improved approach to DVR will see more use in practice, we have made available our framework under a permissive open source license.

  16. Can realistic nuclear interactions tolerate a resonant tetraneutron ?

    CERN Document Server

    Lazauskas, R

    2005-01-01

    The possible existence of four-neutron resonances close to the physical energy region is explored. Faddeev-Yakubovsky equations have been solved in configuration space using realistic nucleon-nucleon interaction models. Complex Scaling and Analytical Continuation in the Coupling Constant methods were used to follow the resonance pole trajectories, which emerge out of artificially bound tetraneutron states. The final pole positions for four-neutron states lie in the third energy quadrant with negative real energy parts and should thus not be physically observable.

  17. σ Channel Chiral Loops in NN Interaction and Two-Pion Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, H. A.; Kaskulov, M. M.; Doroshkevich, E. A.

    After examination of the correlated two-pion exchange in the NN interaction in terms of chiral pion loops in the t-channel, we consider loops in the s-channel, which get lifted on mass shell in the two-pion production process. We show that the thus obtained dynamical correlations in the σ channel lead to a quantitative description of recent exclusive measuerements near threshold.

  18. RGM study of the NN interaction in an extended quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Hecht, K. T.

    1987-02-01

    The extended quark model study of the NN interaction, in which the ( q overlineq) excitations inherent in the quark-gluon interaction are explicitly incorporated into the model space, is completed with the inclusion of the ( q overlineq) ( q overlineq) excitations generated by RPA-type terms of the color Breit interaction. The new coupling kernels connecting the dominant (3q)-(3q) components of the NN system to the (3 q)-(3 q)( q overlineq)( q overlineq) components lead to potentials with the characteristics of conventional σ and δ meson exchange potentials and furnish the additional medium-range attraction needed to bind the deuteron. The full model is subjected to a quantitative test through a solution of the RGM equations in a coupled channel formalism. With one improvement of the model, to yield an Nπ tensor force with OPEP strength and long-range characteristics, this model leads to a prediction of the low-energy NN scattering data and deuteron bound state characteristics which is in semiquantitative agreement with the experimental data and is free of parameter adjustments.

  19. Realistic Haptic Rendering of Interacting Deformable Objects in Virtual Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Duriez, Christian; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Andriot, Claude

    2008-01-01

    A new computer haptics algorithm to be used in general interactive manipulations of deformable virtual objects is presented. In multimodal interactive simulations, haptic feedback computation often comes from contact forces. Subsequently, the fidelity of haptic rendering depends significantly on contact space modeling. Contact and friction laws between deformable models are often simplified in up to date methods. They do not allow a "realistic" rendering of the subtleties of contact space physical phenomena (such as slip and stick effects due to friction or mechanical coupling between contacts). In this paper, we use Signorini's contact law and Coulomb's friction law as a computer haptics basis. Real-time performance is made possible thanks to a linearization of the behavior in the contact space, formulated as the so-called Delassus operator, and iteratively solved by a Gauss-Seidel type algorithm. Dynamic deformation uses corotational global formulation to obtain the Delassus operator in which the mass and s...

  20. Generalized seniority with realistic interactions in open-shell nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Caprio, M A; Cai, K; Constantinou, Ch; Hellemans, V

    2014-01-01

    Generalized seniority provides a truncation scheme for the nuclear shell model, based on pairing correlations, which offers the possibility of dramatically reducing the dimensionality of the nuclear shell-model problem. Systematic comparisons against results obtained in the full shell-model space are required to assess the viability of this scheme. Here, we extend recent generalized seniority calculations for semimagic nuclei, the Ca isotopes, to open-shell nuclei, with both valence protons and valence neutrons. The even-mass Ti and Cr isotopes are treated in a full major shell and with realistic interactions, in the generalized seniority scheme with one broken proton pair and one broken neutron pair. Results for level energies, orbital occupations, and electromagnetic observables are compared with those obtained in the full shell-model space. We demonstrate that, even for the Ti isotopes, significant benefit would be obtained in going beyond the approximation of one broken pair of each type, while the Cr iso...

  1. Angular-momentum projection for Hartree-Fock and RPA with realistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erler, Bastian; Roth, Robert [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hartree-Fock (HF) with a Hamiltonian constructed from similarity transformed realistic NN potentials plus 3N contact interactions provides a good starting point for the description of closed shell nuclei. In conjunction with Many-Body-Perturbation-Theory, experimental ground-state energies and radii are well reproduced. To describe collective excitations, the Random-Phase-Approximation (RPA) is the method of choice. Beyond closed shells, e.g. in the sd-shell region, ground-states might exhibit intrinsic deformation, resulting in HF states where angular-momentum ceases to be a good quantum number. Lab-frame observables, like ground-state energies or rotational bands can be recovered from the intrinsic states via angular-momentum projection. We study axially deformed even-even sd-shell nuclei, namely {sup 20}Ne, {sup 28}Si and {sup 32}S. Starting from a HF ground state obtained by exact angular-momentum projection, we use the RPA to study collective excitations. The transition strengths obtained from the RPA are projected to good angular momentum in an exact formalism, without resorting to popular approximations. We investigate the effect of deformed intrinsic states on giant resonances.

  2. Off-shell behavior of relativistic NN effective interactions and charge symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersten, A.; Thomas, A. W.; Weyrauch, M.

    1990-04-01

    We examine in detail the suggestion of Iqbal et al. for calculating the class-four charge symmetry breaking amplitude in n-p scattering. By simplifying to a model problem, we show explicitly that the approximation scheme is unreliable if a phenomenological, effective nucleon-nucleon T matrix is used. Our results have wider implications for observables calculated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations. They reinforce the observation made in the literature that the procedure of fitting only positive energy matrix elements can lead to an NN interaction whose off-shell behavior is incorrect.

  3. Shell Model Description of the C14 Dating β Decay with Brown-Rho-Scaled NN Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, J. W.; Brown, G. E.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Holt, J. D.; Machleidt, R.

    2008-02-01

    We present shell model calculations for the beta decay of C14 to the N14 ground state, treating the states of the A=14 multiplet as two 0p holes in an O16 core. We employ low-momentum nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions derived from the realistic Bonn-B potential and find that the Gamow-Teller (GT) matrix element is too large to describe the known lifetime. By using a modified version of this potential that incorporates the effects of Brown-Rho scaling medium modifications, we find that the GT matrix element vanishes for a nuclear density around 85% that of nuclear matter. We find that the splitting between the (Jπ,T)=(1+,0) and (Jπ,T)=(0+,1) states in N14 is improved using the medium-modified Bonn-B potential and that the transition strengths from excited states of C14 to the N14 ground state are compatible with recent experiments.

  4. Foreword: In situ gas surface interactions: approaching realistic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundgren, Edvin; Over, Herbert

    2008-03-01

    This special issue is devoted to the application of in situ surface-sensitive techniques in the elucidation of catalysed reactions at (model) catalyst surfaces. Both reaction intermediates and the nature of the catalytically active phase are the targets of these investigations. In situ surface science techniques are also used to study the interaction of water with surfaces under realistic conditions. Since 80% of all technical chemicals are manufactured by utilizing (heterogeneous) catalysis, scientific understanding and technological development of catalysis are of central practical importance in modern society [1]. Heterogeneously catalysed reactions take place at the gas/solid interface. Therefore one of the major topics in surface chemistry and physics is closely related to heterogeneous catalysis, with the aim of developing novel catalysts and to improve catalysts' performances on the basis of atomic scale based knowledge. Despite the economical and environmental rewards—if such a goal is achieved—and despite 40 years of intensive research, practical catalysis is still safely in a black box: the reactivity and selectivity of a catalyst are commercially still optimized on a trial and error basis, applying the high throughput screening approach. The reason for this discrepancy between ambition and reality lies in the inherent complexity of the catalytic system, consisting of the working catalyst and the interaction of the catalyst with the reactant mixture. Practical (solid) catalysts consist of metal or oxide nanoparticles which are dispersed and stabilized on a support and which may be promoted by means of additives. These particles catalyse a reaction in pressures as high as 100 bar. Practical catalysis is in general considered to be far too complex for gaining atomic-scale understanding of the mechanism of the catalysed reaction of an industrial catalyst during its operation. Therefore it has been necessary to introduce idealization and simplification of

  5. Antinucleon-nucleus interaction near threshold from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, E; Loiseau, B; Wycech, S

    2015-01-01

    A general algorithm for handling the energy dependence of hadron-nucleon amplitudes in the nuclear medium, consistently with their density dependence, has been recently applied to antikaons, eta mesons and pions interacting with nuclei. Here we apply this approach to antiprotons below threshold, analyzing experimental results for antiprotonic atoms across the periodic table. It is also applied to antiproton and antineutron interaction with nuclei up to 400~MeV/c, comparing with elastic scattering and annihilation cross sections. The underlying $\\bar pN$ scattering amplitudes are derived from the Paris $\\bar NN$ potential, including modifications in the medium. Emphasis is placed on the role of the $P$-wave amplitudes with respect to the repulsive $S$-wave amplitudes.

  6. n alpha RGM by the quark-model G-matrix NN interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Suzuki, Y

    2007-01-01

    We calculate n alpha phase-shifts in the resonating-group method (RGM), using the nuclear-matter G-matrix of the SU6 quark-model NN interaction. The interaction RGM kernels are evaluated in the center-of-mass system with explicit treatments of the nonlocality and momentum dependence of the partial-wave G-matrix components determined in symmetric nuclear matter. The momentum dependence of the G-matrix components is different for each of the nucleon-exchange and interaction types. The direct potential and the knock-on term are treated in a common framework in the present formalism. A simplified assumption of some G-matrix parameters makes the numerical calculation feasible. Without introducing any free parameters, the central and spin-orbit components of the n alpha Born kernel are found to have reasonable strengths under the assumption of the rigid translationally invariant shell-model wave function of the alpha-cluster. The phase-shift equivalent local potentials are examined in the WKB-RGM approximation, by ...

  7. Can realistic interaction be useful for nuclear mean-field approaches?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakada, H.; Sugiura, K. [Chiba University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Inage, Chiba (Japan); Inakura, T. [Chiba University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Inage, Chiba (Japan); Kyoto University, Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics, Sakyo, Kyoto (Japan); Niigata University, Department of Physics, Niigata (Japan); Margueron, J. [Universite de Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2016-07-15

    Recent applications of the M3Y-type semi-realistic interaction to the nuclear mean-field approaches are presented: (i) Prediction of magic numbers and (ii) isotope shifts of nuclei with magic proton numbers. The results exemplify that the realistic interaction, which is derived from the bare 2N and 3N interaction, furnishes a new theoretical instrument for advancing nuclear mean-field approaches. (orig.)

  8. Low-momentum NN interactions and all-order summation of ring diagrams of symmetric nuclear matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, L.-W.; Holt, J. W.; Kuo, T. T. S.; Brown, G. E.

    2009-05-01

    We study the equation of state for symmetric nuclear matter using a ring-diagram approach in which the particle-particle hole-hole (pphh) ring diagrams within a momentum model space of decimation scale Λ are summed to all orders. The calculation is carried out using the renormalized low-momentum nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction Vlow-k, which is obtained from a bare NN potential by integrating out the high-momentum components beyond Λ. The bare NN potentials of CD-Bonn, Nijmegen, and Idaho have been employed. The choice of Λ and its influence on the single particle spectrum are discussed. Ring-diagram correlations at intermediate momenta (k≃2fm-1) are found to be particularly important for nuclear saturation, suggesting the necessity of using a sufficiently large decimation scale so that the above momentum region is not integrated out. Using Vlow-k with Λ~3fm-1, we perform a ring-diagram computation with the above potentials, which all yield saturation energies E/A and Fermi momenta kF(0) considerably larger than the empirical values. On the other hand, similar computations with the medium-dependent Brown-Rho scaled NN potentials give satisfactory results of E/A≃-15 MeV and kF(0)≃1.4fm-1. The effect of this medium dependence is well reproduced by an empirical three-body force of the Skyrme type.

  9. The NN final-state interaction in the helicity structure of $\\vec d(\\vec\\gamma,\\pi^-)pp$ reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Darwish, E M

    2005-01-01

    The influence of final-state $NN$-rescattering on the helicity structure of the $\\vec\\gamma\\vec d\\to\\pi^-pp$ reaction in the energy range from $\\pi$-threshold up to 550 MeV has been investigated. The differential polarized cross-section difference for the parallel and antiparallel helicity states is predicted and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the effect of $NN$-rescattering is much less important in the polarized differential cross-section difference than in the previously studied unpolarized differential cross section. Furthermore, the contribution of $\\vec\\gamma\\vec d\\to\\pi^-pp$ to the spin asymmetry of the deuteron is explicitly evaluated over the region of the $\\Delta$(1232)-resonance with inclusion of $NN$-rescattering. The effect of $NN$ final-state interaction is found to be much larger in the asymmetry than in the total cross section and leads to an appreciable reduction of the spin asymmetry in the $\\Delta$-region.

  10. Collective excitations in deformed sd-shell nuclei from realistic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Bastian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Collective excitations of nuclei and their theoretical descriptions provide an insight into the structure of nuclei. Replacing traditional phenomenological interactions with unitarily transformed realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions increases the predictive power of the theoretical calculations for exotic or deformed nuclei. Purpose: Extend the application of realistic interactions to deformed nuclei and compare the performance of different interactions, including phenomenological interactions, for collective excitations in the sd-shell. Method: Ground-state energies and charge radii of 20-Ne, 28-Si and 32-S are calculated with the Hartree-Fock method. Transition strengths and transition densities are obtained in the Random Phase Approximation with explicit angular-momentum projection. Results: Strength distributions for monopole, dipole and quadrupole excitations are analyzed and compared to experimental data. Transition densities give insight into the structure of collective excitations in def...

  11. Realistic tool-tissue interaction models for surgical simulation and planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misra, Sarthak

    2009-01-01

    Surgical simulators present a safe and potentially effective method for surgical training, and can also be used in pre- and intra-operative surgical planning. Realistic modeling of medical interventions involving tool-tissue interactions has been considered to be a key requirement in the development

  12. A microscopic NN to NN*(1440) potential

    CERN Document Server

    Julia-Diaz, B; González, P; Fernández, F

    2004-01-01

    By means of a NN to NN*(1440) transition potential derived in a parameter-free way from a quark-model based NN potential, we determine simultaneously the $\\pi NN^*(1440)$ and $\\sigma NN^*(1440)$ coupling constants. We also present a study of the target Roper excitation diagram contributing to the $p(d,d')$ reaction.

  13. Photodisintegration of light nuclei for testing a correlated realistic interaction in the continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Bacca, S

    2006-01-01

    An exact calculation of the photodisintegration cross section of 3H, 3He and 4He is performed using as interaction the correlated Argonne V18 potential, constructed within the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (VUCOM). Calculations are carried out using the Lorentz Integral Transform method in conjunction with an hyperspherical harmonics basis expansion. A comparison with other realistic potentials and with available experimental data is discussed. The VUCOM potential leads to a very similar description of the cross section as the Argonne V18 interaction with the inclusion of the Urbana IX three-body force for photon energies 45< w < 120 MeV, while larger differences are found close to threshold.

  14. Microscopic calculations of elastic scattering between light nuclei based on a realistic nuclear interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy [F.R.S.-FNRS (Belgium); Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Baye, Daniel, E-mail: jdoheter@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: jmspar@ulb.ac.be, E-mail: dbaye@ulb.ac.be [Physique Nucleaire et Physique Quantique, CP229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-09-16

    The elastic phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions are calculated in a cluster approach by the Generator Coordinate Method coupled with the Microscopic R-matrix Method. Two interactions are derived from the realistic Argonne potentials AV8' and AV18 with the Unitary Correlation Operator Method. With a specific adjustment of correlations on the {alpha} + {alpha} collision, the phase shifts for the {alpha} + {alpha} and {alpha} + {sup 3}He collisions agree rather well with experimental data.

  15. Modeling short-term dynamics and variability for realistic interactive facial animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoiber, Nicolas; Breton, Gaspard; Seguier, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    Modern modeling and rendering techniques have produced nearly photorealistic face models, but truly expressive digital faces also require natural-looking movements. Virtual characters in today's applications often display unrealistic facial expressions. Indeed, facial animation with traditional schemes such as keyframing and motion capture demands expertise. Moreover, the traditional schemes aren't adapted to interactive applications that require the real-time generation of context-dependent movements. A new animation system produces realistic expressive facial motion at interactive speed. The system relies on a set of motion models controlling facial-expression dynamics. The models are fitted on captured motion data and therefore retain the dynamic signature of human facial expressions. They also contain a nondeterministic component that ensures the variety of the long-term visual behavior. This system can efficiently animate any synthetic face. The video illustrates interactive use of a system that generates facial-animation sequences.

  16. Mean-field approach to collective excitations in deformed sd-shell nuclei using realistic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erler, Bastian

    2012-07-18

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions transformed via the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) or the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) have proven to be a suitable starting point for the description of closed-shell nuclei via mean-field methods like Hartree-Fock (HF). This allows the treatment of a number of heavy nuclei with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, which would otherwise only be possible with phenomenological interactions. To include three-nucleon forces in an approximate way, the UCOM or SRG transformed interactions can be augmented by a three-body contact interaction, which is necessary to reproduce measured charge radii. However, many interesting nuclei, including those near the neutron drip line, are far away from closed shells. These nuclei are of great importance for modeling nucleosynthesis processes in the universe, but experiments can only be performed at a few research facilities. In this work, the Hartree Fock (HF) approach with realistic interactions is extended to light deformed nuclei. Pairing correlations are not taken into account. A crucial step in this process is to allow deformed ground states on the mean-field level, as only nuclei with at least one closed shell can be described with spherical HF ground states. To restore the rotational symmetry in the lab frame, exact angular-momentum projection (AMP) is implemented. Constrained HF calculations are used for an approximate variation after projection approach. The AMP-HF description of open-shell nuclei is on par with the pure HF description of closed-shell nuclei. Charge-radii and systematics of binding energies agree well with experiment. However, missing correlations, lead to an underestimated absolute value of the binding energy. Projection on higher angular momenta approximately reproduces the energy systematics of rotational bands. To describe collective excitations, the Random Phase Approximation (RPA) constitutes a well tested approach, which can also be

  17. Interactive Web-based Floodplain Simulation System for Realistic Experiments of Flooding and Flood Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, I.

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments in web technologies make it easy to manage and visualize large data sets with general public. Novel visualization techniques and dynamic user interfaces allow users to create realistic environments, and interact with data to gain insight from simulations and environmental observations. The floodplain simulation system is a web-based 3D interactive flood simulation environment to create real world flooding scenarios. The simulation systems provides a visually striking platform with realistic terrain information, and water simulation. Students can create and modify predefined scenarios, control environmental parameters, and evaluate flood mitigation techniques. The web-based simulation system provides an environment to children and adults learn about the flooding, flood damage, and effects of development and human activity in the floodplain. The system provides various scenarios customized to fit the age and education level of the users. This presentation provides an overview of the web-based flood simulation system, and demonstrates the capabilities of the system for various flooding and land use scenarios.

  18. Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Calculations Using Realistic Two- and Three-Body Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Forssen, C; Caurier, E

    2004-11-30

    There has been significant progress in the ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. One such method is the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM). Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions this method can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications. We highlight our study of the parity inversion in {sup 11}Be, for which calculations were performed in basis spaces up to 9{Dirac_h}{Omega} (dimensions reaching 7 x 10{sup 8}). We also present our latest results for the p-shell nuclei using the Tucson-Melbourne TM three-nucleon interaction with several proposed parameter sets.

  19. Photodisintegration of light nuclei for testing a correlated realistic interaction in the continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacca, Sonia

    2007-04-01

    An exact calculation of the photodisintegration cross section of H3, He3, and He4 is performed by using as interaction the correlated Argonne V18 potential, constructed within the unitary correlation operator method (VUCOM). Calculations are carried out by using the Lorentz integral transform method in conjunction with a hyperspherical harmonics basis expansion. A comparison with other realistic potentials and with available experimental data is discussed. The VUCOM potential leads to a description of the cross section that is very similar to that of the Argonne V18 interaction with the inclusion of the Urbana IX three-body force for photon energies 45⩽ω⩽120 MeV, whereas larger differences are found close to threshold.

  20. Realistic quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interaction emerge in the generic static structure

    CERN Document Server

    Bashinsky, Sergei

    2015-01-01

    We study a finite basic structure that possibly underlies the observed elementary quantum fields with gauge and gravitational interactions. Realistic wave functions of locally interacting quantum fields emerge naturally as fitting functions for the generic distribution of many quantifiable properties of arbitrary static objects. We prove that in any quantum theory with the superposition principle, evolution of a current state of fields unavoidably continues along alternate routes with every conceivable Hamiltonian for the fields. This applies to the emergent quantum fields too. Yet the Hamiltonian is unambiguous for isolated emergent systems with sufficient local symmetry. The other emergent systems, without specific physical laws, cannot be inhabitable. The acceptable systems are eternally inflating universes with reheated regions. We see how eternal inflation perpetually creates new short-scale physical degrees of freedom and why they are initially in the ground state. In the emergent quantum worlds probabi...

  1. Collective multipole excitations based on correlated realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paar, N. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Fac. of Science, Physics Dept.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Hergert, H.; Roth, R. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-05-24

    We investigate collective multipole excitations for closed shell nuclei from {sup 16}O to {sup 208}Pb using correlated realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in the framework of the random phase approximation (RPA). The dominant short-range central and tensor correlations a re treated explicitly within the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM), which provides a phase-shift equivalent correlated interaction VUCOM adapted to simple uncorrelated Hilbert spaces. The same unitary transformation that defines the correlated interaction is used to derive correlated transition operators. Using VUCOM we solve the Hartree-Fock problem and employ the single-particle states as starting point for the RPA. By construction, the UCOM-RPA is fully self-consistent, i.e. the same correlated nucleon-nucleon interact ion is used in calculations of the HF ground state and in the residual RPA interaction. Consequently, the spurious state associated with the center-of-mass motion is properly removed and the sum-rules are exhausted within {+-}3%. The UCOM-RPA scheme results in a collective character of giant monopole, dipole, and quadrupole resonances in closed-shell nuclei across the nuclear chart. For the isoscalar giant monopole resonance, the resonance energies are in agreement with experiment hinting at a reasonable compressibility. However, in the 1{sup -} and 2{sup +} channels the resonance energies are overestimated due to missing long-range correlations and three-body contributions. (orig.)

  2. Stability on Adaptive NN Formation Control with Variant Formation Patterns and Interaction Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation task achieved by multiple robots is a tough issue in practice, because of the limitations of the sensing abilities and communicating functions among them. This paper investigates the decentralized formation control in case of parameter uncertainties, bounded disturbances, and variant interactions among robots. To design decentralized controller, a formation description is firstly proposed, which consists of two aspects in terms of formation pattern and interaction topology. Then the formation control using adaptive neural network (ANN is proposed based on the relative error derived from formation description. From the analysis on stability of the formation control under invariant/variant formation pattern and interaction topology, it is concluded that if formation pattern is of class Ck, k ≥1, and interaction graph is connected and changed with finite times, the convergence of the formation control is guaranteed, so that robots must form the formation described by the formation pattern.

  3. Stability on Adaptive NN Formation Control with Variant Formation Patterns and Interaction Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangmin Li

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation task achieved by multiple robots is a tough issue in practice, because of the limitations of the sensing abilities and communicating functions among them. This paper investigates the decentralized formation control in case of parameter uncertainties, bounded disturbances, and variant interactions among robots. To design decentralized controller, a formation description is firstly proposed, which consists of two aspects in terms of formation pattern and interaction topology. Then the formation control using adaptive neural network (ANN is proposed based on the relative error derived from formation description. From the analysis on stability of the formation control under invariant/variant formation pattern and interaction topology, it is concluded that if formation pattern is of class kC, 1k≥ , and interaction graph is connected and changed with finite times, the convergence of the formation control is guaranteed, so that robots must form the formation described by the formation pattern.

  4. Renormalization of the Off-shell chiral two-pion exchange NN interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Entem, D R

    2009-01-01

    The renormalization, finiteness and off-shellness of short distance power like singular interactions is discussed. We show analytically that the renormalizability of the off-shell scattering amplitude relies completely on the corresponding on-shell amplitude without proliferation of new counterterms. We illustrate the result by complementary calculations both in coordinate as well as in momentum space in the simplest 1S0 channel for chiral np interactions including Two Pion Exchange.

  5. Two-body interactions in the reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}{alpha}nn) at 14 MeV. 2. Cross-section measurements; Interactions a deux corps dans la reaction {sup 9}Be(n,{alpha}{alpha}nn) a 14 MeV. 2. Mesure des sections efficaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giorni, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-11-01

    We measure with a double time of flight spectrometer the momenta k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} of neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(n,nn){alpha}{alpha} reaction at E{sub n} = 14 MeV. After the analysis of corrections factors for the measurement of differential cross-sections, we appraise the importance of different interactions (nn,{sup 8}Be(0+): 1,8 {+-} 0.4 mb/sr{sup 2}, mn{sup 8}Be(2+): 2 {+-} 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, n{sup 9}Be, n{sup 8}Be, {alpha}-{alpha}) observed. Our results are compared with those In the literature. (author) [French] On mesure avec un spectrometre a double-temps-de-vol, les impulsions k{sub 1} et k{sub 2} des neutrons de la reaction {sup 9}Be (n,nn){alpha}{alpha} a E{sub n} = 14 MeV. Apres avoir analyse l'ensemble des facteurs de corrections a apporter aux mesures, pour determiner les sections efficaces differentielles, on estime l'importance des differentes interactions (nn{sup 8}Be(0+): 1,8 {+-} 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, nn{sup 8}Be(2+); 2 + 0,4 mb/sr{sup 2}, n{sup 9}Be, n{sup 8}Be, {alpha}-{alpha}) observees. Les valeurs obtenues sont ensuite comparees aux resultats anterieurs.

  6. Interaction between electromagnetic waves and energetic particles by a realistic density model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Using a realistic density model,we present a first study on the interactions between electromagnetic waves and energetic particles in the inner magnetosphere.Numerical calculations show that as the latitude λ increases,the number density ne increases,and resonant frequency range moves to lower pitch angles.During L-mode/electron and L-mode/proton interactions,the pitch angle diffusion dominates over the momentum diffusion.This indicates that L-mode waves are primarily responsible for pitch angle scattering.For R-mode/electron interaction,the momentum diffusion is found to be comparable to the pitch angle diffusion,implying that R-mode waves can play an important role in both pitch angle scattering and stochastic acceleration of electrons.For R-mode/proton interaction,diffusion coefficients locate primarily below pitch angle 60° and increase as kinetic energy increases,suggesting that R-mode waves have potential for pitch angle scattering of highly energetic (~1 MeV) protons but cannot efficiently accelerate protons.

  7. A realistic assessment of methods for extracting gene/protein interactions from free text

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Adrian J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The automated extraction of gene and/or protein interactions from the literature is one of the most important targets of biomedical text mining research. In this paper we present a realistic evaluation of gene/protein interaction mining relevant to potential non-specialist users. Hence we have specifically avoided methods that are complex to install or require reimplementation, and we coupled our chosen extraction methods with a state-of-the-art biomedical named entity tagger. Results Our results show: that performance across different evaluation corpora is extremely variable; that the use of tagged (as opposed to gold standard gene and protein names has a significant impact on performance, with a drop in F-score of over 20 percentage points being commonplace; and that a simple keyword-based benchmark algorithm when coupled with a named entity tagger outperforms two of the tools most widely used to extract gene/protein interactions. Conclusion In terms of availability, ease of use and performance, the potential non-specialist user community interested in automatically extracting gene and/or protein interactions from free text is poorly served by current tools and systems. The public release of extraction tools that are easy to install and use, and that achieve state-of-art levels of performance should be treated as a high priority by the biomedical text mining community.

  8. Coarse-grained versus atomistic simulations: realistic interaction free energies for real proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Ali; Pool, René; van Dijk, Erik; Bijlard, Jochem; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap; Feenstra, K Anton

    2014-02-01

    To assess whether two proteins will interact under physiological conditions, information on the interaction free energy is needed. Statistical learning techniques and docking methods for predicting protein-protein interactions cannot quantitatively estimate binding free energies. Full atomistic molecular simulation methods do have this potential, but are completely unfeasible for large-scale applications in terms of computational cost required. Here we investigate whether applying coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations is a viable alternative for complexes of known structure. We calculate the free energy barrier with respect to the bound state based on molecular dynamics simulations using both a full atomistic and a CG force field for the TCR-pMHC complex and the MP1-p14 scaffolding complex. We find that the free energy barriers from the CG simulations are of similar accuracy as those from the full atomistic ones, while achieving a speedup of >500-fold. We also observe that extensive sampling is extremely important to obtain accurate free energy barriers, which is only within reach for the CG models. Finally, we show that the CG model preserves biological relevance of the interactions: (i) we observe a strong correlation between evolutionary likelihood of mutations and the impact on the free energy barrier with respect to the bound state; and (ii) we confirm the dominant role of the interface core in these interactions. Therefore, our results suggest that CG molecular simulations can realistically be used for the accurate prediction of protein-protein interaction strength. The python analysis framework and data files are available for download at http://www.ibi.vu.nl/downloads/bioinformatics-2013-btt675.tgz.

  9. 22 MeV polarized proton scattering from 40Ca and effective NN interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Analyzing powers and differential cross sections have been measured for elastic scattering of 22 MeV polarized protons from 40Ca, 16O and 12C, and diferential cross sections for inelastic scattering of 22 MeV protons from 3- (3.736 MeV)and 5-(4.491 MeV) states of 40Ca have also been measured. The experimental data for polarized proton elastic scattering have been analyzed with a phenomenological optical potential parameters, the experimental data and theoretical values are in good agreement. In the theoretical frame of microscopic single scattering model, transition densities extracted from electron inelastic scattering and M3Y and Halderson’s effective interactions have been utilized to analyze the experimental data of 22 MeV proton inelastic scattering from 40Ca. Overall, it seems that Halderson’s effective interaction can better describe the experimental data than M3Y although the degree of agreement between experimental and theoretical values needs to be improved.

  10. Nucleon-pair states of even-even Sn isotopes based on realistic effective interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y. Y.; Qi, C.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we study yrast states of 128,126,124Sn and 104,106,108Sn by using the monopole-optimized realistic interactions in terms of both the shell model (SM) and the nucleon-pair approximation (NPA). For yrast states of 128,126Sn and 104,106Sn, we calculate the overlaps between the wave functions obtained in the full SM space and those obtained in the truncated NPA space, and find that most of these overlaps are very close to 1. Very interestingly, for most of these states with positive parity and even spin or with negative parity and odd spin, the SM wave function is found to be well represented by one nucleon-pair basis state, viz., a simple picture of "nucleon-pair states" (nucleon-pair configuration without mixings) emerges. In 128,126Sn, the positive-parity (or negative-parity) yrast states with spin J >10 (or J >7 ) are found to be well described by breaking one or two S pairs in the 101+ (or 71-) state, i.e., the yrast state of seniority-two, spin-maximum, and positive-parity (or negative-parity), into non-S pair(s). Similar regularity is also pointed out for 104,106Sn. The evolution of E 2 transition rates between low-lying states in 128,126,124Sn is discussed in terms of the seniority scheme.

  11. Interactions between energetic electrons and realistic whistler mode waves in the Jovian magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Soria-Santacruz, M.; Shprits, Y. Y.; Drozdov, A.; Menietti, J. D.; Garrett, H. B.; Zhu, H.; Kellerman, A. C.; Horne, R. B.

    2017-05-01

    The role of plasma waves in shaping the intense Jovian radiation belts is not well understood. In this study we use a realistic wave model based on an extensive survey from the Plasma Wave Investigation on the Galileo spacecraft to calculate the effect of pitch angle and energy diffusion on Jovian energetic electrons due to upper and lower band chorus. Two Earth-based models, the Full Diffusion Code and the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt code, are adapted to the case of the Jovian magnetosphere and used to resolve the interaction between chorus and electrons at L = 10. We also present a study of the sensitivity to the latitudinal wave coverage and initial electron distribution. Our analysis shows that the contribution to the electron dynamics from upper band chorus is almost negligible compared to that from lower band chorus. For 100 keV electrons, we observe that diffusion leads to redistribution of particles toward lower pitch angles with some particle loss, which could indicate that radial diffusion or interchange instabilities are important. For energies above >500 keV, an initial electron distribution based on observations is only weakly affected by chorus waves. Ideally, we would require the initial electron phase space density before transport takes place to assess the importance of wave acceleration, but this is not available. It is clear from this study that the shape of the electron phase space density and the latitudinal extent of the waves are important for both electron acceleration and loss.

  12. Covariant equations for the NN-πNN system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. R.; Afnan, I. R.

    1995-05-01

    We explain the deficiencies of the current NN-πNN equations, sketch the derivation of a set of covariant NN-πNN equations and describe the ways in which these equations differ from previous sets of covariant equations.

  13. Coarse-grained versus atomistic simulations: realistic interaction free energies for real proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. May; R. Pool; E. van Dijk; J. Bijlard; S. Abeln; J. Heringa; K.A. Feenstra

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: To assess whether two proteins will interact under physiological conditions, information on the interaction free energy is needed. Statistical learning techniques and docking methods for predicting protein-protein interactions cannot quantitatively estimate binding free energies. Full at

  14. Coarse-grained versus atomistic simulations: realistic interaction free energies for real proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, A.; Pool, R.; van Dijk, E.; Bijlard, J.; Abeln, S.; Heringa, J.; Feenstra, K.A.

    2014-01-01

    MOTIVATION: To assess whether two proteins will interact under physiological conditions, information on the interaction free energy is needed. Statistical learning techniques and docking methods for predicting protein-protein interactions cannot quantitatively estimate binding free energies. Full

  15. Realistic and interactive high-resolution 4D environments for real-time surgeon and patient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L N; Farooq, A R; Smith, M L; Ivanov, I E; Orlando, A

    2017-06-01

    Remote consultations that are realistic enough to be useful medically offer considerable clinical, logistical and cost benefits. Despite advances in virtual reality and vision hardware and software, these benefits are currently often unrealised. The proposed approach combines high spatial and temporal resolution 3D and 2D machine vision with virtual reality techniques, in order to develop new environments and instruments that will enable realistic remote consultations and the generation of new types of useful clinical data. New types of clinical data have been generated for skin analysis and respiration measurement; and the combination of 3D with 2D data was found to offer potential for the generation of realistic virtual consultations. An innovative combination of high resolution machine vision data and virtual reality online methods, promises to provide advanced functionality and significant medical benefits, particularly in regions where populations are dispersed or access to clinicians is limited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Towards More Realistic Simulation of Air-Sea Interaction over Lakes on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafkin, Scot; Soto, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    The exchange of methane between the atmosphere and surface liquid reservoirs dominates the short time-scale methanological cycle. In this study, previous two-dimensional simulations of the exchange of methane vapor, sensible heat and momentum between the atmosphere and lakes are updated with the inclusion of radiative forcing and extended to three dimensions, including the introduction of realistic coastlines. Previous studies of Titan's air-sea exchange in two dimensions suggested that the exchange process was self-limiting. Evaporation from lakes produced a shallow but extremely stable marine layer that suppressed turbulent exchange. Furthermore, the circulation associated with the higher buoyancy of methane-rich atmosphere over the lake was offset by the oppositely directed thermal sea breeze circulation, which muted the mean wind. Two major weaknesses of this previous work were the lack of radiative forcing and the imposition of two dimensionality that limited the full range of dynamical solutions. Based on early theoretical studies, it was thought that magnitude of turbulent energy flux exchanges would be much larger than radiative fluxes, thereby justifying the neglect of radiation, but the two-dimensional simulations indicated that this was not a valid assumption. The dynamical limitations of two-dimensional simulations are well known. Vorticity stretching (i.e., circulation intensification through vertical motion) is not possible and it is also not possible to produce dynamically balanced gradient wind-type circulations. As well, the irregular shape of a realistic coastline cannot be expressed in two dimensions, and these realistic structures will generally induce complex convergence and divergence circulations in the atmosphere. The impact of radiative forcing and the addition of the third dimension on the air-sea exchange are presented.

  17. Realistic Two-body Interactions in Many-nucleon Systems: Correlated Motion beyond Single-particle Behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; /Louisiana State U. /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2006-06-27

    In the framework of the theory of spectral distributions we perform an overall comparison of three modern realistic interactions, CD-Bonn, CD-Bonn+3terms, and GXPF1 in a broad range of nuclei in the upper fp shell and study their ability to account for the development of isovector pairing correlations and collective rotational motion in many-particle nuclear systems. Our findings reveal a close similarity between CD-Bonn and CD-Bonn+3terms, while both interactions possess features different from the ones of GXPF1. The GXPF1 interaction is used to determine the strength parameter of a quadrupole term that augments an isovector-pairing model interaction with Sp(4) dynamical symmetry, which in turn is shown to yield a reasonable agreement with the experimental low-lying energy spectra of {sup 58}Ni and {sup 58}Cu.

  18. β+/EC decay rates of deformed neutron-deficient nuclei in the deformed QRPA with realistic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongdong Ni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The weak-decay (β+ and EC rates of neutron-deficient Kr, Sr, Zr, and Mo isotopes are investigated within the deformed quasiparticle random-phase approximation with realistic nucleon–nucleon interactions. The particle–particle and particle–hole channels of residual interactions are handled in large single-particle model spaces, based on the Brückner G-matrix with charge-dependent Bonn nucleon–nucleon forces. Contributions from allowed Gamow–Teller and Fermi transitions as well as first-forbidden transitions are calculated. The calculated half-lives show good agreement with the experimental data over a wide range of magnitude, from 10−2 to 107 s. Moreover, predictions of β-decay half-lives are made for some extremely proton-rich isotopes, which could be useful for future experiments.

  19. Hyper-realistic and interactive three-dimensional visualization: Holy Chamber and Jewels of the Cathedral of Oviedo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Ruiz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The New developments in 3D data registration and post processing have enabled us to obtain models whose final design means a qualitative step in order to reach a much more realistic viewing of them for both cases: sculptures and architectural monuments. Uniting 3D scanning technologies, photogrammetry, texture mapping, 3D imaging software tools and interactive content, we found novel and higher levels of quality in the images. Thanks to the new software display - with these images made in Unity - a new field emerges which find applications in improved interactivity , cellular phones, tablets, augmented reality and related technologies, as well as in the development of future platforms such as holodisplays, auto stereoscopic 3D television computer vision, etc. In this way it provides an excellent tool for heritage but a valuable working tool for professionals too.

  20. Simulated evolution of protein-protein interaction networks with realistic topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, G Jack; Pressé, Steve; Peterson, Kristin S; Dill, Ken A

    2012-01-01

    We model the evolution of eukaryotic protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In our model, PPI networks evolve by two known biological mechanisms: (1) Gene duplication, which is followed by rapid diversification of duplicate interactions. (2) Neofunctionalization, in which a mutation leads to a new interaction with some other protein. Since many interactions are due to simple surface compatibility, we hypothesize there is an increased likelihood of interacting with other proteins in the target protein's neighborhood. We find good agreement of the model on 10 different network properties compared to high-confidence experimental PPI networks in yeast, fruit flies, and humans. Key findings are: (1) PPI networks evolve modular structures, with no need to invoke particular selection pressures. (2) Proteins in cells have on average about 6 degrees of separation, similar to some social networks, such as human-communication and actor networks. (3) Unlike social networks, which have a shrinking diameter (degree of maximum separation) over time, PPI networks are predicted to grow in diameter. (4) The model indicates that evolutionarily old proteins should have higher connectivities and be more centrally embedded in their networks. This suggests a way in which present-day proteomics data could provide insights into biological evolution.

  1. Semiclassical Path Integral Dynamics: Photosynthetic Energy Transfer with Realistic Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Huo, Pengfei; Coker, David F.

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews recent progress in the theoretical modeling of excitation energy transfer (EET) processes in natural light harvesting complexes. The iterative partial linearized density matrix path-integral propagation approach, which involves both forward and backward propagation of electronic degrees of freedom together with a linearized, short-time approximation for the nuclear degrees of freedom, provides an accurate and efficient way to model the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics at the heart of these EET processes. Combined with a recently developed chromophore-protein interaction model that incorporates both accurate ab initio descriptions of intracomplex vibrations and chromophore-protein interactions treated with atomistic detail, these simulation tools are beginning to unravel the detailed EET pathways and relaxation dynamics in light harvesting complexes.

  2. Faddeev equations for the coupled NN-πNN system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Stelbovics, A. T.

    1981-04-01

    We show that the two different formulations of the NN-πNN system proposed by Afnan-Blankleider and Stingl-Stelbovics lead to a set of three linear coupled operator equations which are identical in form to the Faddeev equations. The resulting equations include the fact that both nucleons are identical and either can emit a pion. They also have dressing for the πNN vertex and NN and πNN propagators. The final equations are shown to satisfy two-and three-body unitarity. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Feddeev-type equation for NN-πNN system, proof of two- and three-body unitarity.

  3. A correlated basis-function description of 16O with realistic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscá, M. C.

    1994-01-01

    The correlated basis-function theory is applied at the lowest order to analyze the ground state and low-energy spectrum of the 16O nucleus. Results are quoted for both the Urbana and the Argonne υ 14 nucleon-nucleon interactions. The work includes state-dependent correlations and their radial components are determined by solving a set of Euler-Lagrange equations. The matrix elements are computed by using a cluster expansion and the sequential condition is imposed in order to insure convergence. The results clearly disagree with the experimental values.

  4. Experimental determination of the nN --> sigma*P-O interaction energy of O-equatorial C-apical phosphoranes bearing a primary amino group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Takahiro; Matsukawa, Shiro; Nakamoto, Masaaki; Kajiyama, Kazumasa; Kojima, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Yohsuke; Akiba, Kin-ya; Re, Suyong; Nagase, Shigeru

    2006-09-04

    The reaction of a chlorophosphorane (9-Cl) with primary amines produced anti-apicophilic spirophosphoranes (5, O-equatorial phosphoranes), which violate the apicophilicity concept, having an apical carbon-equatorial oxygen configuration, along with the ordinarily expected O-apical stereoisomers (6) with the apical oxygen-equatorial carbon configuration. Although the amino group is electronegative in nature, the O-equatorial phosphoranes were found to be stable at room temperature and could still be converted to their more stable O-apical pseudorotamers (6) when they were heated in solution. X-ray analysis implied that this remarkable stability of the O-equatorial isomers could be attributed to the orbital interaction between the lone-pair electrons of the nitrogen atom (n(N)) and the antibonding sigma(P-O) orbital in the equatorial plane. A kinetic study of the isomerization of 5 to 6 and that between diastereomeric O-apical phosphoranes 13b-exo and 13b-endo revealed that 5b bearing an n-propylamino substituent at the central phosphorus atom was found to be less stable than the corresponding isomeric 6b by ca. 7.5 kcal mol(-1). This value was smaller than the difference in energy (11.9 kcal mol(-1)) between the O-equatorial (1b) and the O-apical n-butylphosphorane (2b) by 4.4 kcal mol(-1). This value of 4.4 kcal mol(-1) can be regarded as the stabilization energy induced by the n(N) --> sigma(P-O) interaction. The experimentally determined value was in excellent agreement with that derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations at the B3PW91 level (4.0 kcal mol(-1)) between the nonsubstituted aminophosphoranes (5g is less stable than 6g by 10.1 kcal mol(-1)) and their P-methyl-substituted counterparts (1a is less stable than 2a by 14.1 kcal mol(-1)).

  5. Realistic Modeling of Interaction of Quiet-Sun Magnetic Fields with the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiashvili, Irina; Kosovichev, Alexander G.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Wray, Alan A.

    2017-08-01

    High-resolution observations and 3D MHD simulations reveal intense interaction between the convection zone dynamics and the solar atmosphere on subarcsecond scales. To investigate processes of the dynamical coupling and energy exchange between the subsurface layers and the chromosphere we perform 3D radiative MHD modeling for a computational domain that includes the upper convection zone and the chromosphere, and investigate the structure and dynamics for different intensity of the photospheric magnetic flux. For comparison with observations, the simulation models have been used to calculate synthetic Stokes profiles of various spectral lines. The results show intense energy exchange through small-scale magnetized vortex tubes rooted below the photosphere, which provide extra heating of the chromosphere, initiate shock waves, and small-scale eruptions.

  6. Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-07-21

    The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

  7. Quartet correlations in N = Z nuclei induced by realistic two-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sambataro, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Sandulescu, N. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2017-03-15

    Two variational quartet models previously employed in a treatment of pairing forces are extended to the case of a general two-body interaction. One model approximates the nuclear states as a condensate of identical quartets with angular momentum J = 0 and isospin T = 0 while the other let these quartets to be all different from each other. With these models we investigate the role of alpha-like quartet correlations both in the ground state and in the lowest J = 0, T = 0 excited states of even-even N = Z nuclei in the sd -shell. We show that the ground-state correlations of these nuclei can be described to a good extent in terms of a condensate of alpha-like quartets. This turns out to be especially the case for the nucleus {sup 32}S for which the overlap between this condensate and the shell model wave function is found close to one. In the same nucleus, a similar overlap is found also in the case of the first excited 0{sup +} state. No clear correspondence is observed instead between the second excited states of the quartet models and the shell model eigenstates in all the cases examined. (orig.)

  8. A realistic model for Dark Matter interactions in the neutrino portal paradigm

    CERN Document Server

    González-Macías, Vannia; Wudka, José

    2016-01-01

    We discuss a simple extension of the Standard Model (SM) that provides an explicit realization of the dark-matter (DM) neutrino-portal paradigm. The dark sector is composed of a scalar $ \\Phi $ and a Dirac fermion $ \\Psi $, with the latter assumed to be lighter than the former. These particles interact with the SM through the exchange of a set of heavy Dirac fermion mediators that are neutral under all local SM symmetries, and also under the dark-sector symmetry that stabilizes the $ \\Psi $ against decay. We show that this model can accommodate all experimental and observational constraints provided the DM mass is below $\\sim 35\\, \\gev $ or is in a resonant region of the Higgs or $Z$ boson. We also show that if the dark scalar and dark fermion are almost degenerate in mass, heavier DM fermions are not excluded. We note that in this scenario DM annihilation in the cores of astrophysical objects and the galactic halo produces a monochromatic neutrino beam of energy $ \\mfe $, which provides a clear signature for...

  9. Λ p interaction studied via femtoscopy in p +Nb reactions at √{sNN}=3.18 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Agakishiev, G.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Maurus, S.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramos, S.; Ramstein, B.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.; Hades Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We report on the first measurement of p Λ and p p correlations via the femtoscopy method in p + Nb reactions at √{sNN}=3.18 GeV , studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). By comparing the experimental correlation function to model calculations, a source size for p p pairs of r0 ,p p=2.02 ±0.01 (stat)-0.12 +0.11(sys ) fm and a slightly smaller value for p Λ pairs of r0 ,Λ p=1.62 ±0.02 (stat)-0.08 +0.19(sys ) fm are extracted. Using the geometrical extent of the particle-emitting region, determined experimentally with p p correlations as reference together with a source function from a transport model, it is possible to study different sets of scattering parameters. The p Λ correlation is proven to be sensitive to predicted scattering length values from chiral effective field theory. We demonstrate that the femtoscopy technique can be used as a valid alternative to the analysis of scattering data to study the hyperon-nucleon interaction.

  10. CrashEd – A live immersive, learning experience embedding STEM subjects in a realistic, interactive crime scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie L. Bassford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Interactive experiences are rapidly becoming popular via the surge of ‘escape rooms’; part game and part theatre, the ‘escape’ experience is exploding globally, having gone from zero offered at the outset of 2010 to at least 2800 different experiences available worldwide today. CrashEd is an interactive learning experience that parallels many of the attractions of an escape room – it incorporates a staged, realistic ‘crime scene’ and invites participants to work together to gather forensic evidence and question a witness in order to solve a crime, all whilst competing against a ticking clock. An animation can enhance reality and engage with cognitive processes to help learning; in CrashEd, it is the last piece of the jigsaw that consolidates the students’ incremental acquisition of knowledge to tie together the pieces of evidence, identify a suspect and ultimately solve the crime. This article presents the background to CrashEd and an overview of how a timely placed animation at the end of an educational experience can enhance learning. The lessons learned, from delivering bespoke versions of the experience to different demographic groups, are discussed. The article will consider the successes and challenges raised by the collaborative project, future developments and potential wider implications of the development of CrashEd.

  11. Interpretation of the spin glass behaviour of diluted magnetic semiconductors below the nearest-neighbour percolation threshold via realistic Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Karaoulanis, D; Bacalis, N C

    2000-01-01

    We have performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic semiconductors above and below the nearest-neighbour percolation threshold (NNPT) using a classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian with up to third nearest-neighbour (nn) interactions. Large clusters were created allowing use of realistically low magnetic fields (10 G). Above NNPT our results, apart from confirming the existing picture of this class of materials, also show that the inclusion of the second and third (nn) interactions increases the frustration, thus making the transition temperature smaller and closer to experiment than calculated via the first nn interactions only. A physically plausible explanation is given. Below NNPT our results strongly support the validity of the hypothesis (D. Karaoulanis, J.P. Xanthakis, C. Papatriantafillou, J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 161 (1996) 231), that the experimentally observed susceptibility is the sum of two contributions: a paramagnetic one due to isolated magnetic clusters, and a spin-glass contribution due to an 'infi...

  12. Faddeev equations for the coupled NN-. pi. NN system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; Stelbovics, A.T.

    1981-04-01

    We show that the two different formulations of the NN-..pi..NN system proposed by Afnan-Blankleider and Stingl-Stelbovics lead to a set of three linear coupled operator equations which are identical in form to the Faddeev equations. The resulting equations include the fact that both nucleons are identical and either can emit a pion. They also have dressing for the ..pi..NN vertex and NN and ..pi..NN propagators. The final equations are shown to satisfy two- and three-body unitarity.

  13. Is realistic neuronal modeling realistic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almog, Mara; Korngreen, Alon

    2016-11-01

    Scientific models are abstractions that aim to explain natural phenomena. A successful model shows how a complex phenomenon arises from relatively simple principles while preserving major physical or biological rules and predicting novel experiments. A model should not be a facsimile of reality; it is an aid for understanding it. Contrary to this basic premise, with the 21st century has come a surge in computational efforts to model biological processes in great detail. Here we discuss the oxymoronic, realistic modeling of single neurons. This rapidly advancing field is driven by the discovery that some neurons don't merely sum their inputs and fire if the sum exceeds some threshold. Thus researchers have asked what are the computational abilities of single neurons and attempted to give answers using realistic models. We briefly review the state of the art of compartmental modeling highlighting recent progress and intrinsic flaws. We then attempt to address two fundamental questions. Practically, can we realistically model single neurons? Philosophically, should we realistically model single neurons? We use layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons as a test case to examine these issues. We subject three publically available models of layer 5 pyramidal neurons to three simple computational challenges. Based on their performance and a partial survey of published models, we conclude that current compartmental models are ad hoc, unrealistic models functioning poorly once they are stretched beyond the specific problems for which they were designed. We then attempt to plot possible paths for generating realistic single neuron models. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Unified theory of NN-->πd, πd-->πd, and NN-->NN reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankleider, B.; Afnan, I. R.

    1981-10-01

    Using a set of equations that couple the N-N to the π-d channel and satisfy two- and three-body unitarity, we have studied in detail the reaction pp-->π+d, and πd-->πd and NN-->NN scattering. We find that the equations give a very good description of the differential cross sections and some of the polarization data for both p-->p-->π+d and πd-->πd--> over the energy region 47π+d, higher partial waves (lπd>2) contribute significantly to both the differential cross section and analyzing power. Including the P11π-N interaction and thus true absorption in π-d elastic scattering, we find a cancellation between the pole and nonpole parts of the P11 amplitude. A major part of the effect of true absorption is in Jπ=0+, which contributes little to the absorption cross section. The sensitivity of the results to the D state of the deuteron and the choice of the πNN form factor is investigated. For N-N scattering the agreement with the experimental phase shifts is better in the singlet than triplet channels. This is due to the absence of vector meson exchange in the calculation. The 1D2 phase shift exhibits resonance behavior in the absence of a pole in the amplitude. NUCLEAR REACTIONS ppπd, πd-->πd. Total and differential cross section, polarization. 47N-N I=1 phase shifts.

  15. NN-πNN equations and the chiral bag model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Blankleider, B.

    1985-12-01

    The NN-πNN equations that describe, in a unified framework, pion production in nucleon-nucleon scattering, and pion-deuteron and nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering, have been extended to include the N(939) and Δ(1232) on an equal footing. This extension, motivated by the quark models of hadrons, has the bare N and Δ as three quark states with the same spacial wave function, but different spin isospin states. The final equations, referred to as the BB-πBB equations, are consistent with the chiral bag models to the extent that the πNN, πNΔ, and πΔΔ coupling constants and form factors are related, and can be taken from bag models. The resultant equations satisfy two- and three-body unitarity, and are derived by exposing the lowest unitarity cuts in the n-body Green's function. These equations retain important contributions missing from the NN-πNN equations. For pion production and N-N scattering they include the contribution of backward pions in the NN-->NΔ transition potential, which may overcome the problem of small pp-->πd cross section as predicted by the NN-πNN equations. For π-d elastic scattering they include an additional NΔ-->NΔ tensor force that can influence the tensor polarization.

  16. NN-. pi. NN equations and the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; Blankleider, B.

    1985-12-01

    The NN-..pi..NN equations that describe, in a unified framework, pion production in nucleon-nucleon scattering, and pion-deuteron and nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering, have been extended to include the N(939) and ..delta..(1232) on an equal footing. This extension, motivated by the quark models of hadrons, has the bare N and ..delta.. as three quark states with the same spacial wave function, but different spin isospin states. The final equations, referred to as the BB-..pi..BB equations, are consistent with the chiral bag models to the extent that the ..pi..NN, ..pi..N..delta.., and ..pi delta delta.. coupling constants and form factors are related, and can be taken from bag models. The resultant equations satisfy two- and three-body unitarity, and are derived by exposing the lowest unitarity cuts in the n-body Green's function. These equations retain important contributions missing from the NN-..pi..NN equations. For pion production and N-N scattering they include the contribution of backward pions in the NN..-->..N..delta.. transition potential, which may overcome the problem of small pp..--> pi..d cross section as predicted by the NN-..pi..NN equations. For ..pi..-d elastic scattering they include an additional N..delta -->..N..delta.. tensor force that can influence the tensor polarization.

  17. Measuring K$^0_S$K$^\\pm$ correlations using Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$=2.76 TeV ± interactions 3 using Pb-Pb collisions at √ s NN = 2 . 76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diakonov, Igor; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Garg, Prakhar; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Nobuhiro, Akihide; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    We present the first ever measurements of femtoscopic correlations between the K0S and K± particles. The analysis was performed on the data from Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 2.76 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment. The observed femtoscopic correlations are consistent with final-state interactions proceeding via the a0 (980) resonance. The extracted kaon source radius and correlation strength parameters for K0S K- are found to be equal within the experimental uncertainties to those for K0S K+ . Comparing the results of the present study with those from published identical-kaon femtoscopic studies by ALICE, mass and coupling parameters for the a0 resonance are constrained. Our resultsare also found to favor the interpretation of the a0 having a tetraquark structure over that of a di-quark.

  18. The quest for consistent representation of rainfall and realistic simulation of process interactions in flood risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiadis, Andreas; Papalexiou, Simon-Michael

    2010-05-01

    We present a methodological framework for the estimation of flood risk in the Boeoticos Kephisos river basin, in Greece, draining an area of 1850 km2. This is a challenging task since the basin has many peculiarities. Due to the dominance of highly-permeable geologic formations, significant portion of runoff derives from karst springs, which rapidly contribute to the streamflow, in contrast to the unusually low contribution of direct (flood) runoff. In addition, due to the combined abstractions from surface and groundwater recourses and the existence of an artificial drainage network in the lower part of the basin (where slopes are noticeably low), the system is heavily modified. To evaluate the probability of extreme floods, especially in such complex basins, it is essential to provide both a statistically consistent description of forcing (precipitation) and a realistic simulation of the runoff mechanisms. Typically, flood modelling is addressed through event-based tools that use deterministic design storms and empirical formulas for the estimation of the "effective" rainfall and its transformation to runoff. Yet, there are several shortcomings in such approaches, especially when employed to large-scale systems. First, the widely-used methodologies for constructing design storms fail to properly represent the variability of rainfall, since they do not account for the temporal and spatial correlations of the historical records. For instance, it is assumed that the input storms to all sub-basins correspond to the same return period. On the other hand, "event-based" models do not allow for interpreting flood risk as joint probabilities of all hydrological variables that interrelate in runoff generation (rainfall, stream-aquifer interactions, soil moisture accounting). Finally, for the estimation of model parameters, the typical approach is to calibrate them against normally few historical flood events, which is at least questionable - the information embedded within

  19. Three-body {lambda}NN force due to {lambda}-{sigma} coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myint, Khin Swe [Mandalay Univ., Mandalay (Myanmar); Akaishi, Yoshinori [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Inst. of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The {lambda}NN three - body force due to coherent {lambda} - {sigma} Coupling effect was derived from realistic Nijmegen model D potential. Repulsive and attractive three - body {lambda}NN forces were reconcilably accounted. For {sup 5}He, within one - channel description, {lambda}NN force is largely repulsive and its origin comes from Pauli forbidden terms. Within two - channel description, attractive Pauli allowed terms exist and resulting three - body force is always attractive. Large attractive {lambda}NN force effect due to coherent {lambda} - {sigma} coupling effect is predicted in neutron - rich nuclei. The attractive coherent {lambda} - {sigma} coupling effect is largely enhanced at high density neutron matter. The attractive three - body {lambda}NN force effect is essential dynamics of {lambda} - {sigma} coupling while the repulsive Nogami three - body effect arises from Pauli forbidden diagrams. (Y. Kazumata)

  20. Realistic calculations of correlations and final state interaction effects in the A(e,e'p)X process off complex nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alvioli, M; Morita, H

    2003-01-01

    A linked cluster expansion for the calculation of ground state observables of complex nuclei with realistic interactions has been used to calculate the ground state energy, density and momentum distribution of 16O and 40Ca. Using the same cluster expansion and the wave function and correlation parameters obtained from the energy calculation, we have evaluated the semi inclusive reaction A(e,e'p)X taking final state interaction (FSI) into account by a Glauber type approach; the comparison between the distorted and undistorted momentum distributions provides an estimate of the transparency of the nuclear medium to the propagation of the hit proton. The effect of color transparency is also included by considering the Finite Formation Time (FFT) that the hit hadron needs to reach its asymptotic physical state.

  1. The $\\bf{\\Lambda p}$ interaction studied via femtoscopy in p + Nb reactions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=3.18} ~\\mathrm{\\bf{GeV}}$

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczewski-Musch, J; Arnold, O; Atomssa, E T; Behnke, C; Berger-Chen, J C; Biernat, J; Blanco, A; Blume, C; Böhmer, M; Bordalo, P; Chernenko, S; Deveaux, C; Dybczak, A; Epple, E; Fabbietti, L; Fateev, O; Fonte, P; Franco, C; Friese, J; Fröhlich, I; Galatyuk, T; Garzon, J A; Gill, K; Golubeva, M; Guber, F; Gumberidze, M; Harabasz, S; Hennino, T; Hlavac, S; Höhne, C; Holzmann, R; Ierusalimov, A; Ivashkin, A; Jurkovic, M; Kämpfer, B; Karavicheva, T; Kardan, B; Koenig, I; Koenig, W; Kolb, B W; Korcyl, G; Kornakov, G; Kotte, R; Krasa, A; Krebs, E; Kuc, H; Kugler, A; Kunz, T; Kurepin, A; Kurilkin, A; Kurilkin, P; Ladygin, V; Lalik, R; Lapidus, K; Lebedev, A; Lopes, L; Lorenz, M; Mahmoud, T; Maier, L; Maurus, S; Mangiarotti, A; Markert, J; Metag, V; Müntz, J Michel C; Münzer, R; Naumann, L; Palka, M; Parpottas, Y; Pechenov, V; Pechenova, O; Petousis, V; Pietraszko, J; Przygoda, W; Ramstein, B; Rehnisch, L; Reshetin, A; Rost, A; Rustamov, A; Sadovsky, A; Salabura, P; Scheib, T; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K; Schuldes, H; Sellheim, P; Siebenson, J; Silva, L; Sobolev, Yu G; Spataro, S; Ströbele, H; Stroth, J; Strzempek, P; Sturm, C; Svoboda, O; Tarantola, A; Teilab, K; Tlusty, P; Traxler, M; Tsertos, H; Vasiliev, T; Wagner, V; Wendisch, C; Wirth, J; Wüstenfeld, J; Zanevsky, Y; Zumbruch, P

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first measurement of $p\\Lambda$ and $pp$ correlations via the femtoscopy method in p+Nb reactions at $\\mathrm{\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=3.18} ~\\mathrm{GeV}$, studied with the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). By comparing the experimental correlation function to model calculations, a source size for $pp$ pairs of $r_{0,pp}=2.02 \\pm 0.01(\\mathrm{stat})^{+0.11}_{-0.12} (\\mathrm{sys}) ~\\mathrm{fm}$ and a slightly smaller value for $p\\Lambda$ of $r_{0,\\Lambda p}=1.62 \\pm 0.02(\\mathrm{stat})^{+0.19}_{-0.08}(\\mathrm{sys}) ~\\mathrm{fm}$ is extracted. Using the geometrical extent of the particle emitting region, determined experimentally with $pp$ correlations as reference together with a source function from a transport model, it is possible to study different sets of scattering parameters. The $p\\Lambda$ correlation is proven sensitive to predicted scattering length values from chiral effective field theory. We demonstrate that the femtoscopy technique can be used as valid alternative to the an...

  2. A Realistic Description of Nucleon-Nucleon and Hyperon-Nucleon Interactions in the SU_6 Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, Y; Kohno, M; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2001-01-01

    We upgrade a SU_6 quark-model description for the nucleon-nucleon and hyperon-nucleon interactions by improving the effective meson-exchange potentials acting between quarks. For the scalar- and vector-meson exchanges, the momentum-dependent higher-order term is incorporated to reduce the attractive effect of the central interaction at higher energies. The single-particle potentials of the nucleon and Lambda, predicted by the G-matrix calculation, now have proper repulsive behavior in the momentum region q_1=5 - 20 fm^-1. A moderate contribution of the spin-orbit interaction from the scalar-meson exchange is also included. As to the vector mesons, a dominant contribution is the quadratic spin-orbit force generated from the rho-meson exchange. The nucleon-nucleon phase shifts at the non-relativistic energies up to T_lab=350 MeV are greatly improved especially for the 3E states. The low-energy observables of the nucleon-nucleon and the hyperon-nucleon interactions are also reexamined. The isospin symmetry break...

  3. Low-energy NN scattering with a Brazilian chiral potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batista, E.F. [Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), Vitoria da Conquista, BA (Brazil); Rocha, C.A. [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (IFSP), SP (Brazil); Szpigel, S. [Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie (UPM), SP (Brazil); Timoteo, V.S. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: We apply the subtracted kernel method (SKM), a renormalization approach based on recursive multiple subtractions performed in the kernel of the scattering equation, to a Brazilian chiral nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-order (N3LO). We evaluate the phase shifts in the 1S0 and 3P0 channels and explicitly demonstrate that the SKM procedure is renormalization group invariant under the change of the subtraction scale through a non-relativistic Callan-Symanzik flow equation for the evolution of the renormalized NN interactions. (author)

  4. From Skyrmions to NN phaseshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Walet, N R

    1993-01-01

    We study the $NN$ phaseshifts in a Hamiltonian obtained from quantization of the collective modes in the Skyrme model. We show that a combination of an adiabatic and diabatic approximation gives a good $NN$ force, with sufficient attraction to produce a bound deuteron. The description of the repulsive core appears to be the main cause for the remaining discrepancies between the Skyrme model force and phenomenology. Finally we discuss the possibility of finding non-strange dibaryon resonances in the $J^\\pi=3^+$ channel.

  5. On the K^+D Interaction at Low Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Tarasov, V E; Kudryavtsev, A E; Weinberg, V M

    2007-01-01

    The Kd reactions are considered in the impulse approximation with NN final-state interactions (NN FSI) taken into account. The realistic parameters for the KN phase shifts are used. The "quasi-elastic" energy region, in which the elementary KN interaction is predominantly elastic, is considered. The theoretical predictions are compared with the data on the K^+d->K^+pn, K^+d->K^0pp, K^+d->K^+d and K^+d total cross sections. The NN FSI effect in the reaction K^+d->K^+pn has been found to be large. The predictions for the Kd cross sections are also given for slow kaons, produced from phi(1020) decays, as the functions of the isoscalar KN scattering length a_0. These predictions can be used to extract the value of a_0 from the data.

  6. Electric dipole moment of the deuteron in the standard model with $NN - \\Lambda N - \\Sigma N$ coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the deuteron in the standard model with $|\\Delta S| =1$ interactions by taking into account the $NN - \\Lambda N - \\Sigma N$ channel coupling. The two-body problem is solved with the Gaussian Expansion Method using the realistic Argonne $v18$ nuclear force and the $YN$ potential which can reproduce the binding energies of $^3_\\Lambda$H, $^3_\\Lambda$He, and $^4_\\Lambda$He. The $|\\Delta S| =1$ interbaryon potential is modeled by the one-meson exchange process. It is found that the deuteron EDM is modified by less than 10\\%, and the main contribution to this deviation is due to the polarization of the hyperon-nucleon channels. The effect of the $YN$ interaction is small, and treating $ \\Lambda N$ and $ \\Sigma N$ channels as free is a good approximation for the EDM of the deuteron.

  7. Covariant equations for the {ital NN}{minus}{pi}{ital NN} system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R.; Afnan, I.R. [School of Physical Sciences, Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001 (Australia)

    1995-05-10

    We explain the deficiencies of the current {ital NN}{minus}{pi}{ital NN} equations, sketch the derivation of a set of covariant {ital NN}{minus}{pi}{ital NN} equations and describe the ways in which these equations differ from previous sets of covariant equations. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  8. 基于局部加权k近邻的多机器人系统异步互增强学习%Asynchronous interaction reinforcement learning for multi-robot systems based on local weighted kNN-TD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨月全; 韩飞; 金露; 倪春波; 曹志强; 张天平

    2012-01-01

    To accelerate the learning speed of robots for multi-robot systems and make full use of experience and results of other robots in the communication domain, two kinds of multi-robot learning strategies based on the local weighted k-nearest neighbor temporal difference (kNN-TD) algorithm are proposed. Without consideration of time delays during the communications of robots, based on the method of local weighted kNN-TD state selection by using environment sense information and task destination information, the optimal iteration of Q value table of a robot is updated by the employment of comparison and analysis of Q value tables of itself and other communicating robots. After that, asynchronous interaction reinforcement learning schemes are presented in the case of global communication and local communication in the working environment, respectively. Finally, the simulations verify the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed strategy.%针对多机器人系统的增强学习问题,为提高机器人的学习速度和充分利用通信范围内其他机器人的增强学习的经验和结果,给出了2类基于局部加权k近邻时间差分的多机器人系统的交互式学习策略.对于机器人之间通信无时滞情形,基于环境感测和任务信息状态描述的局部加权k近邻状态选择方法,机器人通过对自身和通信范围内其他机器人Q值表的比较和分析,对其自身的Q值表进行优化迭代更新.在此基础上,分别给出了基于全局通信条件下和局部通信条件下多机器人系统的异步的互增强学习方案.最后,通过仿真实验进一步验证了所提方案的可行性和有效性.

  9. Application of BP NN and RBF NN in Modeling Activated Sludge System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王维斌; 郑丕谔; 李金勇

    2003-01-01

    Based on the operation data from a certain wastewater treatment plant(WWTP) in northeast China, the models of back propagation neural network(BP NN) and radial basis function neural network(RBF NN) have been designed respectively and the ability of convergence and generalization has been analyzed separately. As for BP NN, the effects of numbers of layers and nodes have been studied; as for RBF NN, the influences of the number of nodes and the RBF′s width have been studied. It is concluded that BP NN has converged much slowly in comparison with RBF NN. The conclusion that the RBF NN is suitable for modeling activated sludge system has been drawn. An automatically optimum design program for RBF NN has been developed, through which the RBF NN model of traditional activated sludge system has been established.

  10. Investigating the origin of cyclical wind variability in hot massive stars - II. Hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions using realistic spot parameters for the O giant ξ Persei

    Science.gov (United States)

    David-Uraz, A.; Owocki, S. P.; Wade, G. A.; Sundqvist, J. O.; Kee, N. D.

    2017-09-01

    OB stars exhibit various types of spectral variability historically associated with wind structures, including the apparently ubiquitous discrete absorption components (DACs). These features have been proposed to be caused either by magnetic fields or non-radial pulsations. In this second paper of this series, we revisit the canonical phenomenological hydrodynamical modelling used to explain the formation of DACs by taking into account modern observations and more realistic theoretical predictions. Using constraints on putative bright spots located on the surface of the O giant ξ Persei derived from high precision space-based broad-band optical photometry obtained with the Microvariability and Oscillations of Stars (MOST) space telescope, we generate 2D hydrodynamical simulations of corotating interaction regions in its wind. We then compute synthetic ultraviolet (UV) resonance line profiles using Sobolev Exact Integration and compare them with historical timeseries obtained by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) to evaluate if the observed behaviour of ξ Persei's DACs is reproduced. Testing three different models of spot size and strength, we find that the classical pattern of variability can be successfully reproduced for two of them: the model with the smallest spots yields absorption features that are incompatible with observations. Furthermore, we test the effect of the radial dependence of ionization levels on line driving, but cannot conclusively assess the importance of this factor. In conclusion, this study self-consistently links optical photometry and UV spectroscopy, paving the way to a better understanding of cyclical wind variability in massive stars in the context of the bright spot paradigm.

  11. Charged-current quasielastic neutrino cross sections on $^{12}$C with realistic spectral and scaling functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, M V; Caballero, J A; Megias, G D; Barbaro, M B; de Guerra, E Moya; Udias, J M

    2014-01-01

    Charge-current quasielastic (CCQE) (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a $^{12}$C target are analyzed using a spectral function $S(p,{\\cal E})$ that gives a scaling function in accordance with the ($e,e'$) scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, it has a realistic energy dependence and natural orbitals (NO's) from the Jastrow correlation method are used in its construction. In all calculations the standard value of the axial mass $M_A= 1.032$ GeV/c$^2$ is used. The results are compared with those when NN correlations are not included, as in the Relativistic Fermi Gas (RFG) model, or when harmonic-oscillator (HO) single-particle wave functions are used instead of NO's. The role of the final-state interactions (FSI) on the theoretical spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections is accounted for. A comparison of the results for the cases with and without FSI, as well as to results from the phenomenological scaling function obtained f...

  12. Solving the four-dimensional {ital NN}-{pi}{ital NN} equations for scalars below the meson-production threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R.; Afnan, I.R. [Department of Physics, The Flinders University of South Australia, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide 5001 (Australia)

    1996-10-01

    The four-dimensional {ital NN}-{pi}{ital NN} equations are adapted to the case of scalar particles with a {phi}{sup 2}{sigma} interaction Lagrangian and solved for energies below the {sigma}-production threshold. This is achieved in the approximation where {phi}{sigma} scattering is dominated by the {ital s}-channel {phi}-pole term. The importance of the removal of double counting is investigated and a detailed comparison of the results of a covariant coupled-channel formulation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder and ladder plus crossed-box approximations is presented. A brief discussion of the extension of the method to energies above the {sigma}-production threshold is given. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Solving the four-dimensional NN-πNN equations for scalars below the meson-production threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. R.; Afnan, I. R.

    1996-10-01

    The four-dimensional NN-πNN equations are adapted to the case of scalar particles with a φ2σ interaction Lagrangian and solved for energies below the σ-production threshold. This is achieved in the approximation where φσ scattering is dominated by the s-channel φ-pole term. The importance of the removal of double counting is investigated and a detailed comparison of the results of a covariant coupled-channel formulation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder and ladder plus crossed-box approximations is presented. A brief discussion of the extension of the method to energies above the σ-production threshold is given.

  14. Covariant four-dimensional scattering equations for the NN - {pi}NN system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R.; Afnan, I.R. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Adelaide (Australia)

    1996-04-10

    The authors derive a set of coupled four-dimensional integral equations for the NN - {pi}NN system using their modified version of the Taylor method of classification-of-diagrams. These equations are covariant, obey two- and three-body unitarity and contain subtraction terms which eliminate the double-counting present in some previous four-dimensional NN - {pi}NN equations. The equations are then recast into a form convenient for computation by grouping the subtraction terms together and obtaining a set of two-fragment scattering equations for the amplitudes of interest. 43 refs., 20 figs.

  15. Kuhn: Realist or Antirealist?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Ghins

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Although Kuhn is much more an antirealist than a realist, the earlier and later articulations of realist and antirealist ingredients in his views merit close scrutiny. What are the constituents of the real invariant World posited by Kuhn and its relation to the mutable paradigm-related worlds? Various proposed solutions to this problem (dubbed the "new-world problem" by Ian Hacking are examined and shown to be unsatisfactory. In The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, the stable World can reasonably be taken to be made up of ordinary perceived objects, whereas in Kuhn's later works the transparadigmatic World is identified with something akin to the Kantian world-in-itself. It is argued that both proposals are beset with insuperable difficulties which render Kuhn's earlier and later versions of antirealism implausible.

  16. Charged-current quasielastic neutrino scattering cross sections on 12C with realistic spectral and scaling functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. V.; Antonov, A. N.; Caballero, J. A.; Megias, G. D.; Barbaro, M. B.; de Guerra, E. Moya; Udías, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Charge-current quasielastic (anti)neutrino scattering cross sections on a 12C target are analyzed using a spectral function S (p,E) that gives a scaling function in accordance with the (e ,e') scattering data. The spectral function accounts for the nucleon-nucleon (NN) correlations, it has a realistic energy dependence, and natural orbitals (NOs) from the Jastrow correlation method are used in its construction. In all calculations the standard value of the axial mass MA=1.032 GeV/c2 is used. The results are compared with those when NN correlations are not included, as in the relativistic Fermi gas model, or when harmonic-oscillator single-particle wave functions are used instead of NOs. The role of the final-state interactions (FSIs) on the theoretical spectral and scaling functions, as well as on the cross sections, is accounted for. A comparison of the results for the cases with and without FSI, as well as to results from the phenomenological scaling function obtained from the superscaling analysis, is carried out. Our calculations based on the impulse approximation underpredict the MiniBooNE data but agree with the data from the NOMAD experiment. The possible missing ingredients in the considered theoretical models are discussed.

  17. Experiments on the search for the NN-decoupled NN{pi}-resonance d'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, E.; Brodowski, W.; Paetzold, J.; Clement, H.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G.J. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2003-11-01

    The status on the search for NN-decoupled NN{pi}-resonances is reviewed with regard to recent experimental searches in the pionic double-charge exchange in nuclei, the two-pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions, the photo pion-production on the deuteron and the electro pion-production in nuclei. (orig.)

  18. Conformational preference of 'CαNN' short peptide motif towards recognition of anions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tridip Sheet

    Full Text Available Among several 'anion binding motifs', the recently described 'C(αNN' motif occurring in the loop regions preceding a helix, is conserved through evolution both in sequence and its conformation. To establish the significance of the conserved sequence and their intrinsic affinity for anions, a series of peptides containing the naturally occurring 'C(αNN' motif at the N-terminus of a designed helix, have been modeled and studied in a context free system using computational techniques. Appearance of a single interacting site with negative binding free-energy for both the sulfate and phosphate ions, as evidenced in docking experiments, establishes that the 'C(αNN' segment has an intrinsic affinity for anions. Molecular Dynamics (MD simulation studies reveal that interaction with anion triggers a conformational switch from non-helical to helical state at the 'C(αNN' segment, which extends the length of the anchoring-helix by one turn at the N-terminus. Computational experiments substantiate the significance of sequence/structural context and justify the conserved nature of the 'C(αNN' sequence for anion recognition through "local" interaction.

  19. Conjecture: A Possible nnΛ Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    2016-03-01

    We address the question of whether there might exist a resonance in the nnΛ system, using a rank one separable potential formulation of the Hamiltonian. We explore the eigenvalues of the kernel of the Faddeev equation in the complex energy plane using contour rotation to allow us to analytically continue the kernel onto the second energy sheet. We follow the largest eigenvalue as the nΛ potentials are scaled and the nnΛ continuum is turned into a resonance and then into a bound state of the system.

  20. Conjecture: A Possible nnΛ Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson B. F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the question of whether there might exist a resonance in the nnΛ system, using a rank one separable potential formulation of the Hamiltonian. We explore the eigenvalues of the kernel of the Faddeev equation in the complex energy plane using contour rotation to allow us to analytically continue the kernel onto the second energy sheet. We follow the largest eigenvalue as the nΛ potentials are scaled and the nnΛ continuum is turned into a resonance and then into a bound state of the system.

  1. The detection of dust around NN Ser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Adam; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Parsons, Steven G.; Caceres, Claudio; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Veras, Dimitri; Gänsicke, Boris T.; Marsh, Thomas R.; Cieza, Lucas

    2016-07-01

    Eclipse timing variations observed from the post-common-envelope binary (PCEB) NN Ser offer strong evidence in favour of circumbinary planets existing around PCEBs. If real, these planets may be accompanied by a disc of dust. We here present the ALMA detection of flux at 1.3 mm from NN Ser, which is likely due to thermal emission from a dust disc of mass ˜0.8 ± 0.2 M⊕. We performed simulations of the history of NN Ser to determine possible origins of this dust, and conclude that the most likely origin is, in fact, common-envelope material which was not expelled from the system and instead formed a circumbinary disc. These discs have been predicted by theory but previously remained undetected. While the presence of this dust does not prove the existence of planets around NN Ser, it adds credibility to the possibility of planets forming from common-envelope material in a `second-generation' scenario.

  2. Activity Recognition in Egocentric video using SVM, kNN and Combined SVMkNN Classifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanal Kumar, K. P.; Bhavani, R., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Egocentric vision is a unique perspective in computer vision which is human centric. The recognition of egocentric actions is a challenging task which helps in assisting elderly people, disabled patients and so on. In this work, life logging activity videos are taken as input. There are 2 categories, first one is the top level and second one is second level. Here, the recognition is done using the features like Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), Motion Boundary Histogram (MBH) and Trajectory. The features are fused together and it acts as a single feature. The extracted features are reduced using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The features that are reduced are provided as input to the classifiers like Support Vector Machine (SVM), k nearest neighbor (kNN) and combined Support Vector Machine (SVM) and k Nearest Neighbor (kNN) (combined SVMkNN). These classifiers are evaluated and the combined SVMkNN provided better results than other classifiers in the literature.

  3. Parity-violating $\\pi NN$ coupling constant from the flavor-conserving effective weak chiral Lagrangian

    CERN Document Server

    Hyun, Chang Ho; Lee, Hee-Jung

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the parity-violating pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constant $h^1_{\\pi NN}$, based on the chiral quark-soliton model. We employ an effective weak Hamiltonian that takes into account the next-to-leading order corrections from QCD to the weak interactions at the quark level. Using the gradient expansion, we derive the leading-order effective weak chiral Lagrangian with the low-energy constants determined. The effective weak chiral Lagrangian is incorporated in the chiral quark-soliton model to calculate the parity-violating $\\pi NN$ constant $h^1_{\\pi NN}$. We obtain a value of about $10^{-7}$ at the leading order. The corrections from the next-to-leading order reduce the leading order result by about 20~\\%.

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Adsorption of Polymer Chains on the Surface of BmNn Graphyne-Like Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi, Saeed; Atfi, Amin

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used here to study the interactions between BmNn graphyne-like monolayers and four different polymer chains. BN, B1N9, and B2N8 graphyne-like monolayers are selected from the family of BmNn graphyne-like monolayers. It is observed that increasing the number of B atoms in the structure of BmNn graphyne-like monolayers results in larger interaction energies of nanosheet/polymer systems. It is also shown that the polymer chains with the linear adsorbed configurations on the nanosheets have larger interaction energies with the nanosheets. Investigating the effect of number of polymer repeat units on the polymer/nanosheet interaction energy, it is observed that increasing the number of repeat units of polymers leads to enhancing the polymer/nanosheet interaction energy.

  5. Realistic Virtual Cuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Lasse Farnung

    Pigs and pig meat are major sources of income for Denmark. As one of the country's primary exports, it is no wonder that Denmark strives to maintain its competitive edge in the meat market. As part of an on-going effort to lower costs and maintain high standards, X-ray computed tomography (CT...... technology in the product prototyping process. In broad terms, the focus can be divided into two areas of focus: visualization and interaction. Visualizing volume data, obtained via CT-scanning, is a common area of research within other areas of research, e.g. for medical applications. The availability...... when concerned with product development. Product earnings projection, product specifications, and interactive training are just a few of the applicable areas. In this thesis we present an interaction method intended for the commercial development of meat product prototypes. The interaction method...

  6. Computational design of model scaffold for anion recognition based on the 'C(α) NN' motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheet, Tridip; Ghosh, Suvankar; Pal, Debnath; Banerjee, Raja

    2017-01-01

    The 'novel phosphate binding 'C(α) NN' motif', consisting of three consecutive amino acid residues, usually occurs in the protein loop regions preceding a helix. Recent computational and complementary biophysical experiments on a series of chimeric peptides containing the naturally occurring 'C(α) NN' motif at the N-terminus of a designed helix establishes that the motif segment recognizes the anion (sulfate and phosphate ions) through local interaction along with extension of the helical conformation which is thermodynamically favored even in a context-free, nonproteinaceous isolated system. However, the strength of the interaction depends on the amino acid sequence/conformation of the motif. Such a locally-mediated recognition of anions validates its intrinsic affinity towards anions and confirms that the affinity for recognition of anions is embedded within the 'local sequence' of the motif. Based on the knowledge gathered on the sequence/structural aspects of the naturally occurring 'C(α) NN' segment, which provides the guideline for rationally engineering model scaffolds, we have modeled a series of templates and investigated their interactions with anions using computational approach. Two of these designed scaffolds show more efficient anion recognition than those of the naturally occurring 'C(α) NN' motif which have been studied. This may provide an avenue in designing better anion receptors suitable for various biochemical applications.

  7. Resonances in the Sigma NN system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    We first review certain unique aspects of few-body Lambda-hypernuclei and then explore the physics of Sigma-hypernuclei that would produce structure near the Sigma threshold in few-body elastic scattering and reactions. In particular, we discuss a predicted enhancement in the lambda(d) cross section near the Sigma NN threshold in terms of poles in the Tau = 0 Y N N amplitude. A brief discussion of anticipated poles in the Tau = 1 amplitudes is also given.

  8. Resonances in the {Sigma}NN system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, B.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Afnan, I.R. [Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Physical Sciences

    1993-06-01

    We first review certain unique aspects of few-body {Alpha}- hypernuclei and then explore the physics of {summation} threshold in few-body elastic scattering and reactions. In particular, we discuss a predicted enhancement in the {Alpha}d cross section near the {summation}NN threshold in terms of poles in the {Tau}=0YNN amplitude. A brief discussion of anticipated poles in the {Tau}=1 amplitudes is also given.

  9. Resonances in the [Sigma]NN system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, B.F. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Afnan, I.R. (Flinders Univ. of South Australia, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Physical Sciences)

    1993-01-01

    We first review certain unique aspects of few-body [Alpha]- hypernuclei and then explore the physics of [summation] threshold in few-body elastic scattering and reactions. In particular, we discuss a predicted enhancement in the [Alpha]d cross section near the [summation]NN threshold in terms of poles in the [Tau]=0YNN amplitude. A brief discussion of anticipated poles in the [Tau]=1 amplitudes is also given.

  10. Relativistic NN scattering without partial wave decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Ramalho, G; Peña, M T

    2004-01-01

    We consider the covariant Spectator equation with an appropriate OBE kernel, and apply it to the NN system. We develop a method, based on the Pad\\'e method,to solve the Spectator equation without partial wave decomposition, which is essential for high energies. Relativistic effects such as retardation and negative energy state components are considered. The on- and off-mass-shell amplitudes are calculated. The differential cross section obtained agrees fairly well with data at low energies.

  11. Algorithm for Realistic Modeling of Graphitic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Khomenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm for molecular dynamics simulations of graphitic systems using realistic semiempirical interaction potentials of carbon atoms taking into account both short-range and long-range contributions is proposed. Results of the use of the algorithm for a graphite sample are presented. The scalability of the algorithm depending on the system size and the number of processor cores involved in the calculations is analyzed.

  12. A HΛ4+n+n model of HΛ6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    2013-09-01

    A three-body calculation for the HeΛ6 and HΛ6 hypernuclei, in which the respective cores are He4 and HΛ4, has been initiated. The interactions in the HeΛ6 system are reasonably well known. For example, the Λn interaction is approximately determined by bubble-chamber Λ-p scattering data, the He4-Λ interaction can be fitted to the HeΛ5 binding energy, and the He4-n interaction can be fitted to α-n scattering data. For He4-n the s-wave can be modeled alternatively as a repulsive potential (Eskandarian and Afnan, 1992 [1]) or as an attractive potential with a forbidden bound state (Lehman, 1982 [2]). We examine the effect of these alternatives on He6 and Li6, because the interaction comes into play in modeling HeΛ6 as well as in our HΛ4+n+n model of HΛ6, where the valence neutrons are Pauli blocked from the s-shell of the core.

  13. RAMESES publication standards: realist syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Geoff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is growing interest in realist synthesis as an alternative systematic review method. This approach offers the potential to expand the knowledge base in policy-relevant areas - for example, by explaining the success, failure or mixed fortunes of complex interventions. No previous publication standards exist for reporting realist syntheses. This standard was developed as part of the RAMESES (Realist And MEta-narrative Evidence Syntheses: Evolving Standards project. The project's aim is to produce preliminary publication standards for realist systematic reviews. Methods We (a collated and summarized existing literature on the principles of good practice in realist syntheses; (b considered the extent to which these principles had been followed by published syntheses, thereby identifying how rigor may be lost and how existing methods could be improved; (c used a three-round online Delphi method with an interdisciplinary panel of national and international experts in evidence synthesis, realist research, policy and/or publishing to produce and iteratively refine a draft set of methodological steps and publication standards; (d provided real-time support to ongoing realist syntheses and the open-access RAMESES online discussion list so as to capture problems and questions as they arose; and (e synthesized expert input, evidence syntheses and real-time problem analysis into a definitive set of standards. Results We identified 35 published realist syntheses, provided real-time support to 9 on-going syntheses and captured questions raised in the RAMESES discussion list. Through analysis and discussion within the project team, we summarized the published literature and common questions and challenges into briefing materials for the Delphi panel, comprising 37 members. Within three rounds this panel had reached consensus on 19 key publication standards, with an overall response rate of 91%. Conclusion This project used multiple

  14. Unified theory of N-N and. pi. -d scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; Blankleider, B.

    1980-10-01

    Using a time ordered diagrammatic method, we derive a set of linear integral equations that couple the N-N to the ..pi..-d channel and satisfy two- and three-body unitarity. The resultant equations have dressed propagators for the nucleons, and dressed form factors for the ..pi..NN vertex. The inclusion of the full ..pi..-N amplitude in the P/sub 11/ channel leads to a dressing of both the ..pi..NN vertex and N-N propagator without changing the basic structure of the equations.

  15. Should scientific realists be platonists?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Jacob; Morrison, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Realists about are arrived at by any inferen- tial route which eschews causes (§3), and nor is there any direct pressure for Scientific Real- ists to change their inferential methods (§4). We suggest that in order to maintain inferential parity with Scientific Realism, proponents of EIA need to give......Enhanced Indispensability Arguments (EIA) claim that Scientific Realists are committed to the existence of mathematical entities due to their reliance on Inference to the Best Explana- tion (IBE). Our central question concerns this purported parity of reasoning: do people who defend the EIA make...... an appropriate use of the resources of Scientific Realism (in particular, IBE) to achieve platonism? (§2) We argue that just because a variety of different inferential strategies can be employed by Scientific Realists does not mean that ontological conclusions concerning which things we should be Scientific...

  16. Realistic Visualization of Virtual Views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Computer Graphics allows us today to visualize in real-time innumerable and amazing scenarios with no limits on viewpoint and viewing direction. However, to design accurate object models and to simulate all the physical phenomena occurring in analogous real situations often represents a job...... that can be impractical and sometime impossible. In addition, the artificial nature of data often makes visualized virtual scenarios not realistic enough. Not realistic in the sense that a synthetic scene is easy to discriminate visually from a natural scene. A new field of research has consequently...... developed and received much attention in recent years: Realistic Virtual View Synthesis. The main goal is a high fidelity representation of virtual scenarios while easing modeling and physical phenomena simulation. In particular, realism is achieved by the transfer to the novel view of all the physical...

  17. Cluster decay half-lives of trans-lead nuclei based on a finite-range nucleon–nucleon interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adel, A., E-mail: aa.ahmed@mu.edu.sa [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia); Alharbi, T. [Physics Department, College of Science, Majmaah University, Zulfi (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-02-15

    Nuclear cluster radioactivity is investigated using microscopic potentials in the framework of the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation of quantum tunneling by considering the Bohr–Sommerfeld quantization condition. The microscopic cluster–daughter potential is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model. A realistic M3Y-Paris NN interaction with the finite-range exchange part as well as the ordinary zero-range exchange NN force is considered in the present work. The influence of nuclear deformations on the cluster decay half-lives is investigated. Based on the available experimental data, the cluster preformation factors are extracted from the calculated and the measured half lives of cluster radioactivity. Some useful predictions of cluster emission half-lives are made for emissions of known clusters from possible candidates, which may guide future experiments.

  18. Cluster decay half-lives of trans-lead nuclei based on a finite-range nucleon-nucleon interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear cluster radioactivity is investigated using microscopic potentials in the framework of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation of quantum tunneling by considering the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The microscopic cluster-daughter potential is numerically constructed in the well-established double-folding model. A realistic M3Y-Paris NN interaction with the finite-range exchange part as well as the ordinary zero-range exchange NN force is considered in the present work. The influence of nuclear deformations on the cluster decay half-lives is investigated. Based on the available experimental data, the cluster preformation factors are extracted from the calculated and the measured half lives of cluster radioactivity. Some useful predictions of cluster emission half-lives are made for emissions of known clusters from possible candidates, which may guide future experiments.

  19. Quantum coding theory with realistic physical constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshida, Beni

    2010-01-01

    The following open problems, which concern a fundamental limit on coding properties of quantum codes with realistic physical constraints, are analyzed and partially answered here: (a) the upper bound on code distances of quantum error-correcting codes with geometrically local generators, (b) the feasibility of a self-correcting quantum memory. To investigate these problems, we study stabilizer codes supported by local interaction terms with translation and scale symmetries on a $D$-dimensional lattice. Our analysis uses the notion of topology emerging in geometric shapes of logical operators, which sheds a surprising new light on theory of quantum codes with physical constraints.

  20. FDI and Accommodation Using NN Based Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ramon Ferreiro; de Miguel Catoira, Alberto; Sanz, Beatriz Ferreiro

    Massive application of dynamic backpropagation neural networks is used on closed loop control FDI (fault detection and isolation) tasks. The process dynamics is mapped by means of a trained backpropagation NN to be applied on residual generation. Process supervision is then applied to discriminate faults on process sensors, and process plant parameters. A rule based expert system is used to implement the decision making task and the corresponding solution in terms of faults accommodation and/or reconfiguration. Results show an efficient and robust FDI system which could be used as the core of an SCADA or alternatively as a complement supervision tool operating in parallel with the SCADA when applied on a heat exchanger.

  1. Time management: a realistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Valerie P

    2009-06-01

    Realistic time management and organization plans can improve productivity and the quality of life. However, these skills can be difficult to develop and maintain. The key elements of time management are goals, organization, delegation, and relaxation. The author addresses each of these components and provides suggestions for successful time management.

  2. Simple and Realistic Data Generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kenneth Houkjær; Torp, Kristian; Wind, Rico

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generic, DBMS independent, and highly extensible relational data generation tool. The tool can efficiently generate realistic test data for OLTP, OLAP, and data streaming applications. The tool uses a graph model to direct the data generation. This model makes it very simple...

  3. Assessment and realistic mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M. van den

    1996-01-01

    This book describes the consequences of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) for assessing students’ understanding of mathematics in primary school. RME is the Dutch answer to the worldwide need to reform mathematics education. Changed ideas about mathematics as a school subject, its goals, ideas a

  4. Probabilistic Bisimulation for Realistic Schedulers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisentraut, Christian; Godskesen, Jens Christian; Hermanns, Holger

    2015-01-01

    . This holds in the classical context of arbitrary schedulers, but it has been argued that this class of schedulers is unrealistically powerful. This paper studies a strictly coarser notion of bisimilarity, which still enjoys these properties in the context of realistic subclasses of schedulers: Trace...

  5. Assessment and realistic mathematics education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M. van den

    1996-01-01

    This book describes the consequences of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) for assessing students’ understanding of mathematics in primary school. RME is the Dutch answer to the worldwide need to reform mathematics education. Changed ideas about mathematics as a school subject, its goals,

  6. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting...... this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data...... class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. CONCLUSION: The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http...

  7. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  8. True-to-Life? Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that modern realistic fiction for young readers is intensely moralistic and directive at the spoken and unspoken behest of the adults who write, select, and buy that literature. Discusses moral tales, early realistic fiction, modern realistic fiction, and choosing realistic fiction. (RS)

  9. Unified theory of. gamma. d. -->. np,. pi. /sup 0/d,. pi. NN, and pp. -->. pp. gamma. and the chiral bag model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, M.; Afnan, I.R.

    1988-07-01

    A unified theory of photopion reactions in two-nucleon systems (..gamma..d..-->..pn, ..pi../sup 0/d, and ..pi..NN) and NN bremsstrahlung (NN..-->..NN..gamma..) is presented. By exposing the two-body (BB, where B = N or ..delta..(1232)) and three-body (..pi..BB and ..gamma..BB) unitarity, we derive a set of coupled integral equations to determine the amplitudes for these reactions. These equations have the same kernel as the equations one gets for the BB-..pi..BB system. The two-body input amplitudes are the result of a coupled channel unitary theory for ..pi..N..--> pi..N and pion photoproduction on a single baryon, within the framework of a gauge and chirally invariant Lagrangian, which is obtained from the chiral bag model Lagrangian. The renormalization due to the ..pi..B interaction is incorporated in a consistent manner.

  10. Hyperon-Nucleon Interaction in a Quark Model

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, M

    1993-01-01

    A lecture given at the International School Seminar on {\\sl Hadrons and Nuclei from QCD}, Tsuruga-Vladivostok-Sapporo, August-September, 1993. A realistic hyperon ($Y$)-nucleon ($N$) interaction based on the quark model and the one-boson-exchange potential is constructed. The Nijmegen potential model D with the SU(3) flavor symmetry is modified with a quark exchange interaction at the short-distance, which replaces the short-range repulsive core in the original model. The flavor-spin dependences of the short-range repulsion are qualitatively different from the original hard-core potential. We also study a two-body weak decay, $\\Lambda N \\to NN$, in the quark model. An effective weak interaction, where one-loop QCD corrections are explicitly taken into account, is employed. Differences from the conventional meson-exchange processes are discussed.

  11. Realist Criminology and its Discontents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Winlow

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical criminology must move beyond twentieth-century empiricist and idealist paradigms because the concepts and research programmes influenced by these paradigms are falling into obsolescence. Roger Matthews’ recent work firmly advocates this position and helps to set the ball rolling. Here we argue that Matthews’ attempt to use critical realist thought to move Left Realism towards an advanced position can help to put criminology on a sound new footing. However, before this becomes possible numerous philosophical and theoretical issues must be ironed out. Most importantly, critical criminology must avoid political pragmatism and adopt a more critical stance towards consumer culture’s spectacle. A searching analysis of these issues suggests that, ultimately, criminology is weighed down with obsolete thinking to such an extent that to remain intellectually relevant it must move beyond both Left Realism and Critical Realism to construct a new ultra-realist position.

  12. Assessment and realistic mathematics education

    OpenAIRE

    Heuvel-Panhuizen, M.H.A.M. van den

    1996-01-01

    This book describes the consequences of Realistic Mathematics Education (RME) for assessing students’ understanding of mathematics in primary school. RME is the Dutch answer to the worldwide need to reform mathematics education. Changed ideas about mathematics as a school subject, its goals, ideas about teaching and learning mathematics, require new forms of assessment. Within RME this means a preference for observation and individual interviews. However, written tests have not been abandoned...

  13. Third-order particle-hole ring diagrams with contact-interactions and one-pion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, N. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department T39, Garching (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    The third-order particle-hole ring diagrams are evaluated for a NN-contact interaction of the Skyrme type. The pertinent four-loop coefficients in the energy per particle anti E(k{sub f}) ∝ k{sub f}{sup 5+2n} are reduced to double integrals over cubic expressions in Euclidean polarization functions. Dimensional regularization of divergent integrals is performed by subtracting power divergences and the validity of this method is checked against the known analytical results at second order. The complete O(p{sup 2}) NN-contact interaction is obtained by adding two tensor terms and their third-order ring contributions are also calculated in detail. The third-order ring energy arising from long-range 1π-exchange is computed and it is found that direct and exchange contributions are all attractive. The very large size of the three-ring energy due to point-like 1π-exchange, anti E(k{sub f0}) ≅ -92 MeV at saturation density, is however in no way representative for that of realistic chiral NN-potentials. Moreover, the third-order (particle-particle and hole-hole) ladder diagrams are evaluated with the full O(p{sup 2}) contact interaction, and the simplest three-ring contributions to the isospin-asymmetry energy A(k{sub f}) ∝ k{sub f}{sup 5} are studied. (orig.)

  14. Cameron Trading Post; Proposed NPDES Permit NN0021610

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is proposing to issue NPDES permit (No. NN0021610) to Cameron Trading Post for the wastewater treatment facility located on private land in Cameron (Township 29N, Range 9E, Section 22), Coconino County, Arizona.

  15. The planets around NN Ser: still there

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, T R; Bours, M C P; Littlefair, S P; Copperwheat, C M; Dhillon, V S; Breedt, E; Caceres, C; Schreiber, M R

    2013-01-01

    We present 25 new eclipse times of the white dwarf binary NN Ser taken with the high-speed camera ULTRACAM on the WHT and NTT, the RISE camera on the Liverpool Telescope, and HAWK-I on the VLT to test the two-planet model proposed to explain variations in its eclipse times measured over the last 25 years. The planetary model survives the test with flying colours, correctly predicting a progressive lag in eclipse times of 36 seconds that has set in since 2010 compared to the previous 8 years of precise times. Allowing both orbits to be eccentric, we find orbital periods of 7.9 +/- 0.5 yr and 15.3 +/- 0.3 yr, and masses of 2.3 +/- 0.5 Mjup and 7.3 +/- 0.3 Mjup. We also find dynamically long-lived orbits consistent with the data, associated with 2:1 and 5:2 period ratios. The data scatter by 0.07 seconds relative to the best-fit model, by some margin the most precise of any of the proposed eclipsing compact object planet hosts. Despite the high precision, degeneracy in the orbit fits prevents a significant measu...

  16. Alkali metal control over N-N cleavage in iron complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubel, Katarzyna; Brennessel, William W; Mercado, Brandon Q; Holland, Patrick L

    2014-12-03

    Though N2 cleavage on K-promoted Fe surfaces is important in the large-scale Haber-Bosch process, there is still ambiguity about the number of Fe atoms involved during the N-N cleaving step and the interactions responsible for the promoting ability of K. This work explores a molecular Fe system for N2 reduction, particularly focusing on the differences in the results obtained using different alkali metals as reductants (Na, K, Rb, Cs). The products of these reactions feature new types of Fe-N2 and Fe-nitride cores. Surprisingly, adding more equivalents of reductant to the system gives a product in which the N-N bond is not cleaved, indicating that the reducing power is not the most important factor that determines the extent of N2 activation. On the other hand, the results suggest that the size of the alkali metal cation can control the number of Fe atoms that can approach N2, which in turn controls the ability to achieve N2 cleavage. The accumulated results indicate that cleaving the triple N-N bond to nitrides is facilitated by simultaneous approach of least three low-valent Fe atoms to a single molecule of N2.

  17. Polarization observables in πd-->πd and pp-->πd and the NN-πNN equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; McLeod, R. J.

    1985-05-01

    Here we compare the results from the NN-πNN equation with some of the available data on pp-->πd and πd-->πd polarization observables. In particular, we investigate some of the uncertainties in the theoretical results due to variations in the input to the calculation. We find no major discrepancy between theory and experiment that warrants the introduction of new degrees of freedom such as dibaryons.

  18. Polarization observables in. pi. d. --> pi. d and pp. --> pi. d and the NN-. pi. NN equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afnan, I.R.; McLeod, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Here we compare the results from the NN-..pi..NN equation with some of the available data on pp..--> pi..d and ..pi..d..--> pi..d polarization observables. In particular, we investigate some of the uncertainties in the theoretical results due to variations in the input to the calculation. We find no major discrepancy between theory and experiment that warrants the introduction of new degrees of freedom such as dibaryons.

  19. Realistic Real-Time Outdoor Rendering in Augmented Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems. PMID:25268480

  20. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolivand, Hoshang; Sunar, Mohd Shahrizal

    2014-01-01

    Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR) has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps). Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  1. Realistic real-time outdoor rendering in augmented reality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoshang Kolivand

    Full Text Available Realistic rendering techniques of outdoor Augmented Reality (AR has been an attractive topic since the last two decades considering the sizeable amount of publications in computer graphics. Realistic virtual objects in outdoor rendering AR systems require sophisticated effects such as: shadows, daylight and interactions between sky colours and virtual as well as real objects. A few realistic rendering techniques have been designed to overcome this obstacle, most of which are related to non real-time rendering. However, the problem still remains, especially in outdoor rendering. This paper proposed a much newer, unique technique to achieve realistic real-time outdoor rendering, while taking into account the interaction between sky colours and objects in AR systems with respect to shadows in any specific location, date and time. This approach involves three main phases, which cover different outdoor AR rendering requirements. Firstly, sky colour was generated with respect to the position of the sun. Second step involves the shadow generation algorithm, Z-Partitioning: Gaussian and Fog Shadow Maps (Z-GaF Shadow Maps. Lastly, a technique to integrate sky colours and shadows through its effects on virtual objects in the AR system, is introduced. The experimental results reveal that the proposed technique has significantly improved the realism of real-time outdoor AR rendering, thus solving the problem of realistic AR systems.

  2. Simulating realistic enough patient records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John

    2015-01-01

    Information systems for storing, managing and manipulating electronic medical records must place an emphasis on maintaining the privacy and security of those records. Though the design, development and testing of such systems also requires the use of data, the developers of these systems, rarely also their final end users, are unlikely to have ethical or governance approval to use real data. Alternative test data is commonly either randomly produced or taken from carefully anonymised subsets of records. In both cases there are potential shortcomings that can impact on the quality of the product being developed. We have addressed these shortcomings with a tool and methodology for efficiently simulating large amounts of realistic enough electronic patient records which can underpin the development of data-centric electronic healthcare systems.

  3. Realist RCTs of complex interventions - an oxymoron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchal, Bruno; Westhorp, Gill; Wong, Geoff; Van Belle, Sara; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Kegels, Guy; Pawson, Ray

    2013-10-01

    Bonell et al. discuss the challenges of carrying out randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to evaluate complex interventions in public health, and consider the role of realist evaluation in enhancing this design (Bonell, Fletcher, Morton, Lorenc, & Moore, 2012). They argue for a "synergistic, rather than oppositional relationship between realist and randomised evaluation" and that "it is possible to benefit from the insights provided by realist evaluation without relinquishing the RCT as the best means of examining intervention causality." We present counter-arguments to their analysis of realist evaluation and their recommendations for realist RCTs. Bonell et al. are right to question whether and how (quasi-)experimental designs can be improved to better evaluate complex public health interventions. However, the paper does not explain how a research design that is fundamentally built upon a positivist ontological and epistemological position can be meaningfully adapted to allow it to be used from within a realist paradigm. The recommendations for "realist RCTs" do not sufficiently take into account important elements of complexity that pose major challenges for the RCT design. They also ignore key tenets of the realist evaluation approach. We propose that the adjective 'realist' should continue to be used only for studies based on a realist philosophy and whose analytic approach follows the established principles of realist analysis. It seems more correct to call the approach proposed by Bonell and colleagues 'theory informed RCT', which indeed can help in enhancing RCTs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Classification in medical images using adaptive metric k-NN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.; Chernoff, K.; Karemore, G.; Lo, P.; Nielsen, M.; Lauze, F.

    2010-03-01

    The performance of the k-nearest neighborhoods (k-NN) classifier is highly dependent on the distance metric used to identify the k nearest neighbors of the query points. The standard Euclidean distance is commonly used in practice. This paper investigates the performance of k-NN classifier with respect to different adaptive metrics in the context of medical imaging. We propose using adaptive metrics such that the structure of the data is better described, introducing some unsupervised learning knowledge in k-NN. We investigated four different metrics are estimated: a theoretical metric based on the assumption that images are drawn from Brownian Image Model (BIM), the normalized metric based on variance of the data, the empirical metric is based on the empirical covariance matrix of the unlabeled data, and an optimized metric obtained by minimizing the classification error. The spectral structure of the empirical covariance also leads to Principal Component Analysis (PCA) performed on it which results the subspace metrics. The metrics are evaluated on two data sets: lateral X-rays of the lumbar aortic/spine region, where we use k-NN for performing abdominal aorta calcification detection; and mammograms, where we use k-NN for breast cancer risk assessment. The results show that appropriate choice of metric can improve classification.

  5. PyNN: a common interface for neuronal network simulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Davison

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational neuroscience has produced a diversity of software for simulations of networks of spiking neurons, with both negative and positive consequences. On the one hand, each simulator uses its own programming or configuration language, leading to considerable difficulty in porting models from one simulator to another. This impedes communication between investigators and makes it harder to reproduce and build on the work of others. On the other hand, simulation results can be cross-checked between different simulators, giving greater confidence in their correctness, and each simulator has different optimizations, so the most appropriate simulator can be chosen for a given modelling task. A common programming interface to multiple simulators would reduce or eliminate the problems of simulator diversity while retaining the benefits. PyNN is such an interface, making it possible to write a simulation script once, using the Python programming language, and run it without modification on any supported simulator (currently NEURON, NEST, PCSIM, Brian and the Heidelberg VLSI neuromorphic hardware. PyNN increases the productivity of neuronal network modelling by providing high-level abstraction, by promoting code sharing and reuse, and by providing a foundation for simulator-agnostic analysis, visualization, and data-management tools. PyNN increases the reliability of modelling studies by making it much easier to check results on multiple simulators. PyNN is open-source software and is available from http://neuralensemble.org/PyNN.

  6. Convolution approach to the piNN system

    CERN Document Server

    Blankleider, B

    1994-01-01

    The unitary NN-piNN model contains a serious theoretical flaw: unitarity is obtained at the price of having to use an effective piNN coupling constant that is smaller than the experimental one. This is but one aspect of a more general renormalization problem whose origin lies in the truncation of Hilbert space used to derive the equations. Here we present a new theoretical approach to the piNN problem where unitary equations are obtained without having to truncate Hilbert space. Indeed, the only approximation made is the neglect of connected three-body forces. As all possible dressings of one-particle propagators and vertices are retained in our model, we overcome the renormalization problems inherent in previous piNN theories. The key element of our derivation is the use of convolution integrals that have enabled us to sum all the possible disconnected time-ordered graphs. We also discuss how the convolution method can be extended to sum all the time orderings of a connected graph. This has enabled us to cal...

  7. Study of n-n correlations in d + 2H --> p + p + n + n reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Konobeevsky, E; Mordovskoy, M; Zuyev, S; Lebedev, V; Spassky, A

    2016-01-01

    A kinematically complete measurement of the four-body breakup reaction d+2H-->2ps+2ns --> p +p +n +n has been performed at 15 MeV deuteron beam of the SINP MSU. The two protons and neutron were detected at angles close to those of emission of 2ps and 2ns systems. The energy of singlet dineutron state was determined by comparing experimental TOF spectrum of breakup neutrons with simulated spectra depending on this energy. A low value Enn = 0.076 +/- 0.006 keV obtained by fitting procedure apparently indicates an effective enhancement of nn-interaction in the intermediate state of studied reaction.

  8. Conjecture Regarding a Possible nnΛ Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, B. F.; Afnan, I. R.

    The question of whether there may exist a resonance in the nnΛ system is addressed. A rank-one separable potential formulation of the Hamiltonian is utilized. We examine the eigenvalues of the kernel of the relevant Faddeev equations in the complex energy plane in order that we may analytically continue the kernel onto the second Riemann energy sheet. In particular, we follow the largest eigenvalue as the nΛ potentials are scaled and the pole in the nnΛ continuum evolves from a sub-threshold resonance into a physically observable resonance and then into a bound state as the scale factor is increased.

  9. New approach to the theory of coupled πNN-NN systems (II). Further elaborations and relativistic extensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Y.; Mizutani, T.

    1980-04-01

    We continue our investigation into the theory of coupled πNN-NN systems in succession of an earlier work, in which practical equations and unitarity have been established for all the pertinent amplitudes. First, the equivalence of our theory with that of Mizutani and Koltun is proved. Then, the question of whether theories which adopt the bound-state picture are appropriate for the description of systems of pions and nucleons is carefully discussed. We also show how the equations should be modified when we include the non-pole contribution to the πN P 11 channel. Finally, we extend our equations to include relativity and show how to arrive at numerically solvable equations, with relativistic invariance guaranteed. In the NN sector, these equations contain the two time orderings of the OPEP in a correct manner.

  10. Frustrated classical Heisenberg model with biquadratic interactions in a rhombic lattice: exact ground-state phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, L. X.; Kaplan, T. A.; Mahanti, S. D.

    2010-03-01

    The model cited has nearest-neighbor (nn) ferromagnetic and nnn Heisenberg interactions plus nn biquadratic interactions. The rhombic symmetry comes from assuming the nnn interaction only between sites on a square lattice connected by (1,1) (not (1,-1)) diagonals, as done for various multiferroic manganitesfootnotetextT. Kimura et al., Phys. Rev. B 68, 060403(R) (2003)^,footnotetextM. Mochizuki and N. Furukawa, J. Phys. Soc. Japan 78, 053704 (2009). The biquadratic interactions replace the much smaller anisotropic terms usually used^2. The ground state problem in the thermodynamic limit is reduced, exactly, to a 3-spin problem, enabled by the LK cluster methodfootnotetextD. H. Lyons and T. A. Kaplan, J. Phys. Chem. Solids 25, 645 (1964), leading to the phase diagram. We find 4 phases: (1) ferromagnetic, (2) general-wave-vector (Q) spiral, (3) up-up-down- down or ``E-type", degenerate with Q=(,), and (4) disordered. The uudd- (,) degeneracy is removed in favor of uudd by a small ferromagnetic nnn interaction connecting sites along the (1,-1) diagonal (such an interaction was in fact found in ref. 1, where the observed uudd state was discussed). It is argued that the present model is probably realistic for these materials.

  11. Collision integrals for the interaction of the ions of nitrogen and oxygen in a plasma at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcop, James R.; Partridge, Harry; Levin, E.

    1992-01-01

    The corrections to the transport cross-sections and collision integrals for Coulomb interactions arising from the application of realistic interaction energies of the ions of nitrogen and oxygen are investigated. Accurate potential-energy curves from an ab initio electronic-structure calculation and a semiclassical description of the scattering are used to determine the difference between the cross-sections for the real interaction forces and a Coulomb force for large values of the Debye shielding parameter. Graphs of the correction to the diffusion and viscosity-collision integrals are presented for temperatures from about 10,000 K to 150,000 K. This correction can be combined with tabulations of the collision integrals for shielded Coulomb potentials to determine the contribution of N(+)-N(+), N(+)-O(+), and O(+)-O(+) interactions to the transport properties of high-temperature air. Analytical forms are fitted to the calculated results to assist this application.

  12. Ab initio description of continuum effects in A=11 exotic systems with chiral NN+3N forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calci, Angelo; Navratil, Petr; Roth, Robert; Dohet-Eraly, Jeremy; Quaglioni, Sofia; Hupin, Guillaume

    2016-09-01

    Based on the fundamental symmetries of QCD, chiral effective field theory (EFT) provides two- (NN), three- (3N) and many-nucleon interactions in a consistent and systematically improvable scheme. The rapid developments to construct divers families of chiral NN+3N interactions and the conceptual and technical improvements of ab initio many-body approaches pose a great opportunity for nuclear physics. By studying particular interesting phenomena in nuclear structure and reaction observables one can discriminate between different forces and study the predictive power of chiral EFT. The accurate description of the 11Be nucleus, in particular, the ground-state parity inversion and exceptionally strong E1 transition between its two bound states constitute an enormous challenge for the developments of nuclear forces and many-body approaches. We present a sensitivity analysis of structure and reaction observables to different NN+3N interactions in 11Be and n+10Be as well as the mirror p+10C scattering using the ab initio NCSM with continuum (NCSMC). Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Work Proposal No. SCW1158. TRIUMF receives federal funding via a contribution agreement with the National Research Council of Canada.

  13. [Leo Bormans. Õnn on] / Krista Kivisalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kivisalu, Krista, 1968-

    2015-01-01

    Tutvustus: Õnn on : kogu maailma õnneraamat : teadmisi ja tarkusi enam kui sajalt õnneasjatundjalt kogu maailmast / toimetanud Leo Bormans ; [inglise keelest tõlkinud Triin Aimla-Laid ; toimetanud Violetta Riidas ; originaali kujundus: Kris Demey] Ilmunud [Tallinn] : Pegasus, c2015

  14. 76 FR 46652 - Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions (Regulation NN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-03

    ... otherwise mitigating its own exposure to retail forex transactions or any other foreign exchange risk... CFR Part 240 RIN 7100-AD 79 Retail Foreign Exchange Transactions (Regulation NN) AGENCY: Board of... into, certain types of foreign exchange transactions described in section 2(c)(2)(B)(i)(I) of the CEA...

  15. Stress Assignment in N+N Combinations in Arabic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman Mitib Altakhaineh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The validity of stress as a criterion to distinguish between compounds and phrases has been investigated in many languages, including English (see e.g. Lieber 2005: 376; Booij 2012: 84. However, the possibility of using stress as a criterion in this way has not been investigated for Arabic. Siloni (1997: 21 claims that in N+N combinations in Semitic languages, stress always falls on the second element. However, the results of a study using PRAAT reveal that, in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA and Jordanian Arabic (JA, stress plays no role in distinguishing between various N+N combinations, i.e. compounds and phrases, e.g.ˈmuʕallim lfiizyaaʔ ‘the physics teacher’ vs.ˈbayt lwalad ‘the boy’s house’, respectively. Analysis shows that the default position of stress in N+N combinations in MSA and JA is on the first element. There is only one systematic exception, which is phonetically conditioned: in N+N combinations with assimilated geminates on the word boundary, a secondary stress or perhaps double stress is assigned.

  16. The ABC effect in the reaction NN to d pi pi

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Nir, I; Shuster, M D

    1975-01-01

    A simple peripheral model for the reaction NN to NN pi pi is extended to the reaction NN to d pi pi . Predictions for the differential and total cross sections are compared with recent experiments. The enhancement of the deuteron recoil-momentum spectrum near the pi pi threshold (ABC effect) is well reproduced. (12 refs).

  17. Unified theory of γd-->np, π0d, πNN, and pp-->ppγ and the chiral bag model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, M.; Afnan, I. R.

    1988-07-01

    A unified theory of photopion reactions in two-nucleon systems (γd-->pn, π0d, and πNN) and NN bremsstrahlung (NN-->NNγ) is presented. By exposing the two-body [BB, where B=N or Δ(1232)] and three-body (πBB and γBB) unitarity, we derive a set of coupled integral equations to determine the amplitudes for these reactions. These equations have the same kernel as the equations one gets for the BB-πBB system. The two-body input amplitudes are the result of a coupled channel unitary theory for πN-->πN and pion photoproduction on a single baryon, within the framework of a gauge and chirally invariant Lagrangian, which is obtained from the chiral bag model Lagrangian. The renormalization due to the πB interaction is incorporated in a consistent manner.

  18. Nucleon-nucleon interactions in the double folding model for fusion reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Gao-Long; Liu Hao; Le Xiao-Yun

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus-nucleus potentials are determined in the framework of double folding model for M3Y-Reid and M3Y-Paris effective nucleon nucleon (NN) interactions. Both zero-range and finite-range exchange parts of NN interactions are considered in the folding procedure. In this paper the spherical projectile-spherical target system 16O+208Pb is selected for calculating the barrier energies, fusion cross sections and barrier distributions with the density-independent and density-dependcnt NN interactions on the basis of M3Y-Reid and M3Y-Paris NN interactions. The barrier energies become lower for Paris NN interactions in comparison with Reid NN interactions, and also for finite-range exchange part in comparison with zero-range exchange part. The density-dependent NN interactions give similar fusion cross sections and barrier distributions, and the density-independent NN interaction causes the barrier distribution moving to a higher position. However, the density-independent Reid NN interaction with zero-range exchange part gives the lowest fusion cross sections. We find that the calculated fusion cross sections and the barrier distributions are in agreement with the experimental data after rcnormalization of the nuclear potential due to coupled-channel effect.

  19. A consistent analysis of (p,p`) and (n,n`) reactions using the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, S.; Watanabe, Y.; Harada, M. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Double-differential proton emission cross sections were measured for proton-induced reactions on several medium-heavy nuclei ({sup 54,56}Fe, {sup 60}Ni, {sup 90}Zr, and {sup 93}Nb) at two incident energies of 14.1 and 26 MeV. The (p,p`) data for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 93}Nb were compared with available data of (n,n`) scattering for the same target nuclei and incident energies, and both data were analyzed using the Feshbach-Kerman-Koonin model to extract the strength V{sub 0} of the effective N-N interaction which is the only free parameter used in multistep direct calculations. (author)

  20. Leadership research in healthcare: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lega, Federico; Prenestini, Anna; Rosso, Matilde

    2017-05-01

    Being largely considered a human right, healthcare needs leaders who are able to make choices and to set directions. Following the recommendations expressed by Gilmartin and D'Aunno's review and roadmap compiled in 2008, today, it is important to acknowledge researchers' contributions to outline this landscape. The realist review of 77 publications answered questions such as "what works, for whom, and in which circumstances" highlighting: the effectiveness and acceptance of transformational and collaborative approaches; professionalism, expertise, and good task delegation within operational teams; distributed leadership, relationships, and social responsibility at a systemic level. The relevancy and need of leadership development programs, framed within a wider strategy, emerged. Nonetheless, gaps still exist and require further investigation: particular needs in public vs. private contexts; professionals' and women's differentiating characters; generational gaps; associations between leadership and recruitment HR practices research; how (and if) leaders (should) influence the organizational culture and values; and developing countries specific challenges. Also, a greater proportion of relevant findings should be drawn by empirical and more rigorous studies. Finally, a major attention could be paid to interactions happening at the team, organizational, and systemic level among different leaders and among leaders, followers and external actors.

  1. Parity Violation in the NN System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindler M.J.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We briefly review the apparent experimental discrepancies that sustain interest in the field of lowenergy few-nucleon parity violation. We argue that it is not possible to determine whether present experimental measurements are consistent unless each is understood in terms of a complete EFT with consistent power counting. Towards this end, we present the EFT that describes very low energy parity violating observables associated with two-nucleon scattering and photon-deuteron interactions.

  2. Hybrid NN/SVM Computational System for Optimizing Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2009-01-01

    A computational method and system based on a hybrid of an artificial neural network (NN) and a support vector machine (SVM) (see figure) has been conceived as a means of maximizing or minimizing an objective function, optionally subject to one or more constraints. Such maximization or minimization could be performed, for example, to optimize solve a data-regression or data-classification problem or to optimize a design associated with a response function. A response function can be considered as a subset of a response surface, which is a surface in a vector space of design and performance parameters. A typical example of a design problem that the method and system can be used to solve is that of an airfoil, for which a response function could be the spatial distribution of pressure over the airfoil. In this example, the response surface would describe the pressure distribution as a function of the operating conditions and the geometric parameters of the airfoil. The use of NNs to analyze physical objects in order to optimize their responses under specified physical conditions is well known. NN analysis is suitable for multidimensional interpolation of data that lack structure and enables the representation and optimization of a succession of numerical solutions of increasing complexity or increasing fidelity to the real world. NN analysis is especially useful in helping to satisfy multiple design objectives. Feedforward NNs can be used to make estimates based on nonlinear mathematical models. One difficulty associated with use of a feedforward NN arises from the need for nonlinear optimization to determine connection weights among input, intermediate, and output variables. It can be very expensive to train an NN in cases in which it is necessary to model large amounts of information. Less widely known (in comparison with NNs) are support vector machines (SVMs), which were originally applied in statistical learning theory. In terms that are necessarily

  3. Stability of realistic strange stars (RSS)

    CERN Document Server

    Bhowmick, S; Dey, M; Ray, S; Ray, R; Bhowmick, Siddhartha; Dey, Jishnu; Dey, Mira; Ray, Subharthi; Ray, Ranjan

    2001-01-01

    Strange stars (SS) calculated from a realistic equation of state (EOS) are very stable, for example under fast rotation but have a soft surface, on which ripples may occur when radiation is emitted close to it. We suggest this as a natural explanation of the fluctuations observed in the intensity profile of X-ray pulsars. In contrast, SS based on EOS derived from the bag models (Bag SS) are less stable against fast rotation and do not have a hard surface and cannot explain these ripples. There are other important differences between Bag SS and the SS, based on a realistic EOS, which we call realistic strange stars (RSS).

  4. A Covariant OBE Model for $\\eta$ Production in NN Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Gedalin, E; Razdolskaya, L A

    1998-01-01

    A relativistic covariant one boson exchange model, previously applied to describe elastic nucleon-nucleon scattering, is extended to study $\\eta$ production in NN collisions. The transition amplitude for the elementary BN->$\\eta$N process with B being the meson exchanged (B=$\\pi$, $|sigma$,$\\eta$, corresponding to s and u-channels with a nucleon or a nucleon isobar N*(1535MeV) in the intermediate states. Taking the relative phases of the various exchange amplitudes to be +1, the model reproduces the cross sections for the $NN\\to X\\eta$ reactions in a consistent manner. In the limit where all overall contributions from the exchange of pseudoscalart and scalar mesons with that of vector mesons cancel out. Consequently, much of the ambiguities in the model predictions due to unknown relative phases of different vector pseudoscalar exchanges are strongly reduced.

  5. Generating realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs, and show a connection with the straight skeleton of P. We show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ( ⌊(n-4)/4⌋ (n-4)/2) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n 4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n 5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  6. Sotsialistlik realist Keskküla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Londonis 1998. a. ilmunud inglise kunstikriitiku Matthew Cullerne Bowni monograafias "Socialist Realist Painting" on eesti kunstnikest Enn Põldroos, Nikolai Kormashov, Ando Keskküla, Kormashovi ja Keskküla maalide reproduktsioonid

  7. Sotsialistlik realist Keskküla

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Londonis 1998. a. ilmunud inglise kunstikriitiku Matthew Cullerne Bowni monograafias "Socialist Realist Painting" on eesti kunstnikest Enn Põldroos, Nikolai Kormashov, Ando Keskküla, Kormashovi ja Keskküla maalide reproduktsioonid

  8. Realistic Approach for Phasor Measurement Unit Placement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rather, Zakir Hussain; Chen, Zhe; Thøgersen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a realistic cost-effectivemodel for optimal placement of phasor measurement units (PMUs) for complete observability of a power system considering practical cost implications. The proposed model considers hidden or otherwise unaccounted practical costs involved in PMU...

  9. Precise strength of the $\\pi$NN coupling constant

    CERN Document Server

    Ericson, Torleif Eric Oskar; Rahm, J; Blomgren, J; Olsson, N; Thomas, A W

    1998-01-01

    We report here a preliminary value for the piNN coupling constant deduced from the GMO sumrule for forward piN scattering. As in our previous determination from np backward differential scattering cross sections we give a critical discussion of the analysis with careful attention not only to the statistical, but also to the systematic uncertainties. Our preliminary evaluation gives $g^2_c$(GMO) = 13.99(24).

  10. Towards an agential realist thinking of learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plauborg, Helle

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores what can be understood by learning based on agential realist thinking. An agential realist thinking about learning is sensitive to the complexity that characterizes learning as a phenomenon. Thus, learning, from an agential realist perspective, is a dynamic and emergent phenom...... or a radical change in the sense of 'penny dropped'. For although learning processes that are not recognized as 'aha moments' do not call much attention to themselves, this is how they occur most often.......This paper explores what can be understood by learning based on agential realist thinking. An agential realist thinking about learning is sensitive to the complexity that characterizes learning as a phenomenon. Thus, learning, from an agential realist perspective, is a dynamic and emergent...... human, which means that it is not only the human and the discursive possessing empowerment in relation to learning; the non-human also is woven into - and makes constitutive difference to - human learning processes. An excerpt from a field note will be used to illustrate these mutual shaping processes...

  11. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule plays a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response to infections. MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T cells, whereas MHC class II molecules stimulate cellular and humoral immunity through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting this binding event. Results Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. Conclusion The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.0.

  12. GPU-FS-kNN: a software tool for fast and scalable kNN computation using GPUs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Shamsul Arefin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The analysis of biological networks has become a major challenge due to the recent development of high-throughput techniques that are rapidly producing very large data sets. The exploding volumes of biological data are craving for extreme computational power and special computing facilities (i.e. super-computers. An inexpensive solution, such as General Purpose computation based on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU, can be adapted to tackle this challenge, but the limitation of the device internal memory can pose a new problem of scalability. An efficient data and computational parallelism with partitioning is required to provide a fast and scalable solution to this problem. RESULTS: We propose an efficient parallel formulation of the k-Nearest Neighbour (kNN search problem, which is a popular method for classifying objects in several fields of research, such as pattern recognition, machine learning and bioinformatics. Being very simple and straightforward, the performance of the kNN search degrades dramatically for large data sets, since the task is computationally intensive. The proposed approach is not only fast but also scalable to large-scale instances. Based on our approach, we implemented a software tool GPU-FS-kNN (GPU-based Fast and Scalable k-Nearest Neighbour for CUDA enabled GPUs. The basic approach is simple and adaptable to other available GPU architectures. We observed speed-ups of 50-60 times compared with CPU implementation on a well-known breast microarray study and its associated data sets. CONCLUSION: Our GPU-based Fast and Scalable k-Nearest Neighbour search technique (GPU-FS-kNN provides a significant performance improvement for nearest neighbour computation in large-scale networks. Source code and the software tool is available under GNU Public License (GPL at https://sourceforge.net/p/gpufsknn/.

  13. Unified theory of N-N and π-d scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afnan, I. R.; Blankleider, B.

    1980-10-01

    Using a time ordered diagrammatic method, we derive a set of linear integral equations that couple the N-N to the π-d channel and satisfy two- and three-body unitarity. The resultant equations have dressed propagators for the nucleons, and dressed form factors for the πNN vertex. The inclusion of the full π-N amplitude in the P11 channel leads to a dressing of both the πNN vertex and N-N propagator without changing the basic structure of the equations. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Nucleon-nucleon and pion-deuteron scattering. Derived coupled equations for NN, NΔ, πd with dressed nucleons and πNN vertex.

  14. Realistic roofs over a rectilinear polygon

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-11-01

    Given a simple rectilinear polygon P in the xy-plane, a roof over P is a terrain over P whose faces are supported by planes through edges of P that make a dihedral angle π/4 with the xy-plane. According to this definition, some roofs may have faces isolated from the boundary of P or even local minima, which are undesirable for several practical reasons. In this paper, we introduce realistic roofs by imposing a few additional constraints. We investigate the geometric and combinatorial properties of realistic roofs and show that the straight skeleton induces a realistic roof with maximum height and volume. We also show that the maximum possible number of distinct realistic roofs over P is ((n-4)(n-4)/4 /2⌋) when P has n vertices. We present an algorithm that enumerates a combinatorial representation of each such roof in O(1) time per roof without repetition, after O(n4) preprocessing time. We also present an O(n5)-time algorithm for computing a realistic roof with minimum height or volume. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Development of a realistic human airway model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizal, Frantisek; Elcner, Jakub; Hopke, Philip K; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2012-03-01

    Numerous models of human lungs with various levels of idealization have been reported in the literature; consequently, results acquired using these models are difficult to compare to in vivo measurements. We have developed a set of model components based on realistic geometries, which permits the analysis of the effects of subsequent model simplification. A realistic digital upper airway geometry except for the lack of an oral cavity has been created which proved suitable both for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and for the fabrication of physical models. Subsequently, an oral cavity was added to the tracheobronchial geometry. The airway geometry including the oral cavity was adjusted to enable fabrication of a semi-realistic model. Five physical models were created based on these three digital geometries. Two optically transparent models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for flow velocity measurements, two realistic segmented models, one with and one without the oral cavity, were constructed for particle deposition measurements, and a semi-realistic model with glass cylindrical airways was developed for optical measurements of flow velocity and in situ particle size measurements. One-dimensional phase doppler anemometry measurements were made and compared to the CFD calculations for this model and good agreement was obtained.

  16. The Nuclear $\\sigma$ Term in the Skyrme Model Pion-Nucleus Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gammal, A

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear sigma term is calculated including the nuclear matrix element of the derivative of the NN interaction with respect to the quark mass, $m_q\\frac{\\partial V_{NN}}{\\partial m_q}$. The NN potential is evaluated in the skyrmion-skyrmion picture within the quantized product ansatz. The contribution of the NN potential to the nuclear sigma term provides repulsion to the pion-nucleus interaction. The strength of the s-wave pion-nucleus optical potential is estimated including such contribution. The results are consistent with the analysis of the experimental data.

  17. Role of dissipation in realistic Majorana nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Xiao; Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-02-01

    We carry out a realistic simulation of Majorana nanowires in order to understand the latest high-quality experimental data [H. Zhang et al., arXiv:1603.04069 (2016)] and, in the process, develop a comprehensive picture for what physical mechanisms may be operational in realistic nanowires leading to discrepancies between minimal theory and experimental observations (e.g., weakness and broadening of the zero-bias peak and breaking of particle-hole symmetry). Our focus is on understanding specific intriguing features in the data, and our goal is to establish matters of principle controlling the physics of the best possible nanowires available in current experiments. We identify dissipation, finite temperature, multi-sub-band effects, and the finite tunnel barrier as the four most important physical mechanisms controlling the zero-bias conductance peak. Our theoretical results including these realistic effects agree well with the best available experimental data in ballistic nanowires.

  18. Molecular Cloning and Expression Analysis of a Catalase Gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chen; Zheng, Xingfei; Diao, Ying; Wang, Youwei; Zhou, Mingquan; Hu, Zhongli

    2015-11-01

    Rapid amplification cDNA end (RACE) assay was established to achieve the complete cDNA sequence of a catalase gene (NnCAT) from Nelumbo nucifera. The obtained full-length cDNA was 1666 bp in size and contained a 1476-bp open reading frame. The 3D structural model of NnCAT was constructed by homology modeling. The putative NnCAT possessed all the main characteristic amino acid residues and motifs of catalase (CAT) protein family, and the phylogenetic analysis revealed that NnCAT grouped together with high plants. Moreover, recombinant NnCAT showed the CAT activity (758 U/mg) at room temperature, holding high activity during temperature range of 20-50 °C, then the optimal pH of recombinant protein was assessed from pH 4 to pH 11. Additionally, real-time PCR assay demonstrated that NnCAT mRNA was expressed in various tissues of N. nucifera, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest level in the root, and mRNA level of NnCAT was significantly augmented in response to short-time mechanical wounding. Different expression pattern of NnCAT gene suggested that NnCAT probably played a defensive role in the initial stages of oxidative stress, regulating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by extracellular stimuli such as short-time mechanical wounding.

  19. Neo-realistic Features in Snow Child

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏静林

    2013-01-01

    This essay illustrates neo-realistic features in Snow Child. This short story inherits and develops“the typical character in the typical environment”and the traditional linear time order in realistic works. At the same time, it has some changes and transcendent. It uses real brands, events and goods in reality to create a-true to-life picture of the contemporary world. It ex⁃plores deeper in character’s psychology and creates a circular narration with three flashbacks.

  20. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  1. Keeping It Real: How Realistic Does Realistic Fiction for Children Need to Be?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    O'Connor, an author of realistic fiction for children, shares her attempts to strike a balance between carefree, uncensored, authentic, realistic writing and age-appropriate writing. Of course, complicating that balancing act is the fact that what seems age-appropriate to her might not seem so to everyone. O'Connor suggests that while it may be…

  2. Timing variations in the secondary eclipse of NN Ser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Bours, M. C. P.; Littlefair, S. P.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Breedt, E.; Caceres, C.; Schreiber, M. R.

    2014-02-01

    The eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binary NN Serpentis provides one of the most convincing cases for the existence of circumbinary planets around evolved binaries. The exquisite timing precision provided by the deep eclipse of the white dwarf has revealed complex variations in the eclipse arrival times over the last few decades. These variations have been interpreted as the influence of two planets in orbit around the binary. Recent studies have proved that such a system is dynamically stable over the current lifetime of the binary. However, the existence of such planets is by no means proven and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed that could drive similar variations. One of these is apsidal precession, which causes the eclipse times of eccentric binaries to vary sinusoidally on many year time-scales. In this Letter, we present timing data for the secondary eclipse of NN Ser and show that they follow the same trend seen in the primary eclipse times, ruling out apsidal precession as a possible cause for the variations. This result leaves no alternatives to the planetary interpretation for the observed period variations, although we still do not consider their existence as proven. Our data limit the eccentricity of NN Ser to e detect a 3.3 ± 1.0 s delay in the arrival times of the secondary eclipses relative to the best planetary model. This delay is consistent with the expected 2.84 ± 0.04 s Rømer delay of the binary, and is the first time this effect has been detected in a white dwarf plus M dwarf system.

  3. Nuclear response functions for the N-N*(1440) transition

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Ruso, L; Donnelly, T W; Molinari, A

    2003-01-01

    Parity-conserving and -violating response functions are computed for the inclusive electroexcitation of the N*(1440)(Roper) resonance in nuclear matter modeled as a relativistic Fermi gas. Using various empirical parameterizations and theoretical models of the N-N*(1440) transition form factors, the sensitivity of the response functions to details of the structure of the Roper resonance is investigated. The possibility of disentangling this resonance from the contribution of Delta electroproduction in nuclei is addressed. Finally, the contributions of the Roper resonance to the longitudinal scaling function and to the Coulomb sum rule are also explored.

  4. Blend Shape Interpolation and FACS for Realistic Avatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkawaz, Mohammed Hazim; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Basori, Ahmad Hoirul; Saba, Tanzila

    2015-03-01

    The quest of developing realistic facial animation is ever-growing. The emergence of sophisticated algorithms, new graphical user interfaces, laser scans and advanced 3D tools imparted further impetus towards the rapid advancement of complex virtual human facial model. Face-to-face communication being the most natural way of human interaction, the facial animation systems became more attractive in the information technology era for sundry applications. The production of computer-animated movies using synthetic actors are still challenging issues. Proposed facial expression carries the signature of happiness, sadness, angry or cheerful, etc. The mood of a particular person in the midst of a large group can immediately be identified via very subtle changes in facial expressions. Facial expressions being very complex as well as important nonverbal communication channel are tricky to synthesize realistically using computer graphics. Computer synthesis of practical facial expressions must deal with the geometric representation of the human face and the control of the facial animation. We developed a new approach by integrating blend shape interpolation (BSI) and facial action coding system (FACS) to create a realistic and expressive computer facial animation design. The BSI is used to generate the natural face while the FACS is employed to reflect the exact facial muscle movements for four basic natural emotional expressions such as angry, happy, sad and fear with high fidelity. The results in perceiving the realistic facial expression for virtual human emotions based on facial skin color and texture may contribute towards the development of virtual reality and game environment of computer aided graphics animation systems.

  5. The KM phase in semi-realistic heterotic orbifold models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giedt, Joel

    2000-07-05

    In string-inspired semi-realistic heterotic orbifolds models with an anomalous U(1){sub X},a nonzero Kobayashi-Masakawa (KM) phase is shown to arise generically from the expectation values of complex scalar fields, which appear in nonrenormalizable quark mass couplings. Modular covariant nonrenormalizable superpotential couplings are constructed. A toy Z{sub 3} orbifold model is analyzed in some detail. Modular symmetries and orbifold selection rules are taken into account and do not lead to a cancellation of the KM phase. We also discuss attempts to obtain the KM phase solely from renormalizable interactions.

  6. Hyperon Single-Particle Potentials Calculated from SU6 Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kohno, M; Fujita, T; Nakamoto, C; Suzuki, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the SU6 quark-model baryon-baryon interaction recently developed by the Kyoto-Niigata group, we calculate NN, Lambda N and Sigma N G-matrices in ordinary nuclear matter. This is the first attempt to discuss the Lambda and Sigma single-particle potentials in nuclear medium, based on the realistic quark-model potential. The Lambda potential has the depth of more than 40 MeV, which is more attractive than the value expected from the experimental data of Lambda-hypernuclei. The Sigma potential turns out to be repulsive, the origin of which is traced back to the strong Pauli repulsion in the Sigma N (I=3/2) ^3S_1 state.

  7. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  8. The romantic paradigm of realist Dostoyevsky

    OpenAIRE

    LIPICH V.V.; LIPICH T.I.

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to the inheritance of the traditions of romanticism in the creative activity of young F. M. Dostoyevsky. The article dwells upon the certain points of integration and the typological interrelation of the artistic views of F. M. Dostoyevsky a writer-realist with the esthetic system and poetics of romanticism.

  9. Satellite Maps Deliver More Realistic Gaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    When Redwood City, California-based Electronic Arts (EA) decided to make SSX, its latest snowboarding video game, it faced challenges in creating realistic-looking mountains. The solution was NASA's ASTER Global Digital Elevation Map, made available by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which EA used to create 28 real-life mountains from 9 different ranges for its award-winning game.

  10. A Look at Young Children's Realistic Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jane M.; Wickersham, Elaine B.

    1980-01-01

    Analyzes recent realistic fiction for children produced in the United States in terms of ethnicity, stereotyped behavior, and themes. Concludes that the sample did not reflect equivalent treatment of males and females nor the culturally pluralistic makeup of U.S. society. Provides an annotated bibliography of the books analyzed. (Author/FL)

  11. Improving Intuition Skills with Realistic Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirza, Bonita; Kusumah, Yaya S.; Darhim; Zulkardi

    2014-01-01

    The intention of the present study was to see the improvement of students' intuitive skills. This improvement was seen by comparing the Realistic Mathematics Education (RME)-based instruction with the conventional mathematics instruction. The subject of this study was 164 fifth graders of elementary school in Palembang. The design of this study…

  12. Culture from the Perspective of Realistic Philosophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Daszkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article underlines the moments that define the metaphysical understanding of culture. According to this conception, culture in its most basic meaning is rationalization (intellectualization of nature. The article is focused on the following areas: genetic-exemplarist analysis of cultural works and definition of culture from the perspective of realistic philosophy.

  13. Metrology in CNEN NN 3.05/13 standard; A metrologia na norma CNEN NN 3.05/13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Marina Santiago de, E-mail: marinademello@yahoo.com.br

    2014-07-01

    The nuclear medicine exams are widely used tools in health services for a reliable clinical and functional diagnosis of a disease. In Brazil, the National Nuclear Energy Commission, through the norm CNEN-NN 3:05/13, provides for the requirements of safety and radiological protection in nuclear medicine services. The objective of this review article was to emphasize the importance of metrology in compliance with this norm. We observed that metrology plays a vital role as it ensures the quality, accuracy, reproducibility and consistency of the measurements in the field of nuclear medicine. (author)

  14. Timing variations in the secondary eclipse of NN Ser

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, S G; Bours, M C P; Littlefair, S P; Copperwheat, C M; Dhillon, V S; Breedt, E; Caceres, C; Schreiber, M R

    2013-01-01

    The eclipsing white dwarf plus main-sequence binary NN Serpentis provides one of the most convincing cases for the existence of circumbinary planets around evolved binaries. The exquisite timing precision provided by the deep eclipse of the white dwarf has revealed complex variations in the eclipse arrival times over the last few decades. These variations have been interpreted as the influence of two planets in orbit around the binary. Recent studies have proved that such a system is dynamically stable over the current lifetime of the binary. However, the existence of such planets is by no means proven and several alternative mechanisms have been proposed that could drive similar variations. One of these is apsidal precession, which causes the eclipse times of eccentric binaries to vary sinusoidally on many year timescales. In this paper we present timing data for the secondary eclipse of NN Ser and show that they follow the same trend seen in the primary eclipse times, ruling out apsidal precession as a poss...

  15. SYNTHESIS OF POLYMERS CONTAINING N-N LINKAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zaza Gomurashvili; Allan S. Hay

    2003-01-01

    The N-N linkage in hydrazine is thermally stable when it is tetrasubstituted and there are electron-withdrawing groups attached to the nitrogen atoms. Our research on the synthesis of polymers containing N-N linkages is reviewed. The N,N-bisimide structure has been introduced in the backbone of polymers as well as a pendant group in poly(aryl ether)s to give very thermoxidatively stable polymers with very high glass transition temperatures. Most of the polymers form tough,flexible films. N-Aminotriazoles also form stable imides by reaction with anhydrides and these N-imidotriazole groups have been introduced as pendent groups on poly(aryl ether)s. The polymers are highly fluorescent materials. Three methods for the synthesis of polymers containing the tetrasubstituted-azine structure will be discussed: (1) oxidative coupling of bisimines;(2) condensation of bishydrazones with diketones; (3) poly(aryl ether azines) from the azine formed from 4-fluorobenzophenone by reaction with salts of bisphenols.

  16. IMMERSE: Interactive Mentoring for Multimodal Experiences in Realistic Social Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    val) relations, and permission levels for access to objects ranging from “no access” (0) to “can consume /destroy” (5). The motivations are...a VC, the code causes VC action, and when that role is fulfilled by the player, the code recognizes (and generally consumes ) the corresponding...being judgmental and ethnocentric . Klein, H. A. & Borders, J. – Good Stranger Diagnostic Tool ! 3 The Good Stranger Diagnostic Tool Our earlier

  17. Exposure Render: An Interactive Photo-Realistic Volume Rendering Framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroes, T.; Post, F.H.; Botha, C.P.

    2012-01-01

    The field of volume visualization has undergone rapid development during the past years, both due to advances in suitable computing hardware and due to the increasing availability of large volume datasets. Recent work has focused on increasing the visual realism in Direct Volume Rendering (DVR) by i

  18. An Improved SVM: NN-SVM%一种改进的支持向量机NN-SVM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李红莲; 王春花; 袁保宗

    2003-01-01

    支持向量机(SVM)是一种较新的机器学习方法,它利用靠近边界的少数向量构造一个最优分类超平面.在训练分类器时,SVM的着眼点在于两类的交界部分,那些混杂在另一类中的点往往无助于提高分类器的性能,反而会大大增加训练器的计算负担,同时它们的存在还可能造成过学习,使泛化能力减弱.为了改善支持向量机的泛化能力,该文在其基础上提出了一种改进的SVM--NN-SVM:它先对训练集进行修剪,根据每个样本与其最近邻类标的异同决定其取舍,然后再用SVM训练得到分类器.实验表明,NN-SVM相比SVM在分类正确率、分类速度以及适用的样本规模上都表现出了一定的优越性.

  19. Nucleon-nucleon scattering above the pion production threshold. Test of a force model for the. pi. NN system. Nukleon-Nukleon Streuung oberhalb der Pionproduktionsschwelle. Test eines Kraftmodells fuer das. pi. NN-System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulla, A.

    1990-05-31

    The traditional formulation of nuclear physics with purely nucleonic degrees of freedom is only in the low-energy region acceptable; already in the intermediate-energy range, in which in scattering experiments inelastic processes as the production of pions occur, a conceptual extension is inevitably neccessary. In front of this background a force model is constructed, in which beside the nucleons additionally the {Delta} isobar as well as the pions occur as constituents. The support of the formulated approach form static interactions between the baryons respectively between the baryons and the pion. Essential characteristic of this approach is the inclusion of pion production and absorption processes in form of pion-baryon vertices. Self-interactions lead in the {Delta} isobar to an energy dependent mass and decay widths. The {pi}NN system allows a manifold of reactions, of which here the nucleon-nucleon scattering below and above the pion production threshold is treated. Scattering phases, inelasticities (and mixing parameters in the phase of coupled NN partial waves) as well as spin-averaged and spin dependent total cross sections are calculated and compared with experimental data. (orig./HSI).

  20. Spectral tunability of realistic plasmonic nanoantennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portela, Alejandro; Matsui, Hiroaki; Tabata, Hitoshi, E-mail: tabata@bioeng.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Yano, Takaaki; Hayashi, Tomohiro; Hara, Masahiko [Department of Electronic Chemistry, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8502 (Japan); Santschi, Christian; Martin, Olivier J. F. [Nanophotonics and Metrology Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, Lausanne CH-1015 (Switzerland)

    2014-09-01

    Single nanoantenna spectroscopy was carried out on realistic dipole nanoantennas with various arm lengths and gap sizes fabricated by electron-beam lithography. A significant difference in resonance wavelength between realistic and ideal nanoantennas was found by comparing their spectral response. Consequently, the spectral tunability (96 nm) of the structures was significantly lower than that of simulated ideal nanoantennas. These observations, attributed to the nanofabrication process, are related to imperfections in the geometry, added metal adhesion layer, and shape modifications, which are analyzed in this work. Our results provide important information for the design of dipole nanoantennas clarifying the role of the structural modifications on the resonance spectra, as supported by calculations.

  1. Realistic face modeling based on multiple deformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Xun; WANG Guo-yin

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the assumption that the human face belongs to a linear class, a multiple-deformation model is proposed to recover face shape from a few points on a single 2D image. Compared to the conventional methods, this study has the following advantages. First, the proposed modified 3D sparse deforming model is a noniterative approach that can compute global translation efficiently and accurately. Subsequently, the overfitting problem can be alleviated based on the proposed multiple deformation model. Finally, by keeping the main features, the texture generated is realistic. The comparison results show that this novel method outperforms the existing methods by using ground truth data and that realistic 3D faces can be recovered efficiently from a single photograph.

  2. Presupernova neutrinos: realistic emissivities from stellar evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    We present a new calculation of neutrino emissivities and energy spectra from a presupernova, a massive star going through the advanced stages of nuclear burning in the months before becoming a supernova. The contributions from beta decay and electron capture, pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and the photoneutrino process are modeled in detail, using updated tabulated nuclear rates. We also use realistic conditions of temperature, density, electron fraction and nuclear isotopic composition of the star from the state of the art stellar evolution code MESA. It is found that beta processes contribute substantially to the neutrino flux above realistic detection thresholds of few MeV, at selected positions and times in the evolution of the star.

  3. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  4. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  5. Realistic level density calculation for heavy nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerf, N. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Orsay (France); Pichon, B. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France); Rayet, M.; Arnould, M. [Institut d`Astronomie et d`Astrophysique, Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1994-12-31

    A microscopic calculation of the level density is performed, based on a combinatorial evaluation using a realistic single-particle level scheme. This calculation relies on a fast Monte Carlo algorithm, allowing to consider heavy nuclei (i.e., large shell model spaces) which could not be treated previously in combinatorial approaches. An exhaustive comparison of the predicted neutron s-wave resonance spacings with experimental data for a wide range of nuclei is presented.

  6. Humanoid robot simulator: a realistic dynamics approach

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, José; Gonçalves, José; Costa, Paulo; Moreira, António

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a humanoid robot simulator with realistic dynamics. As simulation is a powerful tool for speeding up the control software development, the suggested accurate simulator allows to accomplish this goal. The simulator, based on the Open Dynamics Engine and GLScene graphics library, provides instant visual feedback and allows the user to test any control strategy without damaging the real robot in the early stages of the development. The proposed simulator also captures some c...

  7. Realistic Behaviour Simulation of a Humanoid Robot

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a humanoid robot simulator with realistic dynamics. As simulation is a powerful tool for speeding up the control software development, the proposed accurate simulator allows to fulfil this goal. The simulator is based on the Open Dynamics Engine and GLScene graphics library, providing instant visual feedback. User is able to test any control strategy without bringing damage to the real robot in the early stages of the development. The proposed simulator also captures some...

  8. Realistic shell model; 132Sn region; 208Pb region

    CERN Document Server

    Covello, A; Gargano, A; Itaco, N

    2008-01-01

    We report on a study of exotic nuclei around doubly magic 132Sn in terms of the shell model employing a realistic effective interaction derived from the CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The short-range repulsion of the latter is renormalized by constructing a smooth low-momentum potential, V-low-k, that is used directly as input for the calculation of the effective interaction. In this paper, we focus attention on proton-neutron multiplets in the odd-odd nuclei 134Sb, 136Sb. We show that the behavior of these multiplets is quite similar to that of the analogous multiplets in the counterpart nuclei in the 208Pb region, 210Bi and 212Bi.

  9. Exophobic quasi-realistic heterotic string vacua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assel, Benjamin [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Christodoulides, Kyriakos [Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZL (United Kingdom); Faraggi, Alon E., E-mail: faraggi@amtp.liv.ac.u [Dept. of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZL (United Kingdom); Kounnas, Costas [Lab. Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, F-75231 Paris 05 (France); Rizos, John [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2010-01-25

    We demonstrate the existence of heterotic string vacua that are free of massless exotic fields. The need to break the non-Abelian GUT symmetries in k=1 heterotic string models by Wilson lines, while preserving the GUT embedding of the weak hypercharge and the GUT prediction sin{sup 2}theta{sub w}(M{sub GUT})=3/8, necessarily implies that the models contain states with fractional electric charge. Such states are severely restricted by observations, and must be confined or sufficiently massive and diluted. We construct the first quasi-realistic heterotic string models in which the exotic states do not appear in the massless spectrum, and only exist, as they must, in the massive spectrum. The SO(10) GUT symmetry is broken to the Pati-Salam subgroup. Our PS heterotic string models contain adequate Higgs representations to break the GUT and electroweak symmetry, as well as colour Higgs triplets that can be used for the missing partner mechanism. By statistically sampling the space of Pati-Salam vacua we demonstrate the abundance of quasi-realistic three generation models that are completely free of massless exotics, rendering it plausible that obtaining realistic Yukawa couplings may be possible in this space of models.

  10. Neural networks (NN applied to the commercial properties valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Núñez Tabales

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several agents, such as buyers and sellers, or local or tax authorities need to estimate the value of properties. There are different approaches to obtain the market price of a dwelling. Many papers have been produced in the academic literature for such purposes, but, these are, almost always, oriented to estimate hedonic prices of residential properties, such as houses or apartments. Here these methodologies are used in the field of estimate market price of commercial premises, using AI techniques. A case study is developed in Cordova —city in the South of Spain—. Neural Networks are an attractive alternative to the traditional hedonic modelling approaches, as they are better adapted to non-linearities of causal relationships and they also produce smaller valuation errors. It is also possible, from the NN model, to obtain implicit prices associated to the main attributes that can explain the variability of the market price of commercial properties.

  11. The GMO Sumrule and the πNN Coupling Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, T. E. O.; Loiseau, B.; Thomas, A. W.

    The isovector GMO sumrule for forward πN scattering is critically evaluated using the precise π-p and π-d scattering lengths obtained recently from pionic atom measurements. The charged πNN coupling constant is then deduced with careful analysis of systematic and statistical sources of uncertainties. This determination gives directly from data gc2(GMO)/4π = 14.17±0.09 (statistic) ±0.17 (systematic) or fc2/ 4π=0.078(11). This value is half-way between that of indirect methods (phase-shift analyses) and the direct evaluation from from backward np differential scattering cross sections (extrapolation to pion pole). From the π-p and π-d scattering lengths our analysis leads also to accurate values for (1/2)(aπ-p+aπ-n) and (1/2) (aπ-p-aπ-n).

  12. Improved Neural Network Algorithm NN-LMBP%一种改进型神经网络算法NN-LMBP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠儒生; 王学宁; 刘宝宏; 黄柯棣

    2007-01-01

    提出最近邻Levenberg-Marquardt误差反向传播神经网络算法.针对BP神经网络收敛速度慢的不足,利用Levenberg-Marquardt优化算法进行改进.同时为了提高神经网络的泛化能力,进一步基于最近邻算法对样本进行修剪.试验表明,与一般神经网络算法相比,NN-LMBP在改善神经网络泛化能力的基础上,有效地提高了神经网络收敛的速度.

  13. Preliminary Physics Summary: Centrality dependence of inclusive J/$\\psi$ production in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=8.16$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The inclusive J/$\\psi$ production in p-Pb interactions at the centre-of mass energy per nucleon-nucleon collision $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=8.16$ TeV is studied with the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC. The measurement has been performed reconstructing J/$\\psi$ mesons via their dimuon decay channel, in the centre-of-mass rapidities 2.03 $<$$y_{\\rm cms}$$<$3.53 and $-$4.46 $<$$y_{\\rm cms}$$<$$-$2.96, down to zero transverse momentum. Preliminary results on the J/$\\psi$ nuclear modification factor will be presented as a function of the centrality of the collision, estimated through the energy deposited in forward-rapidity calorimeters. Results will be compared with those obtained by ALICE in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=5.02$ TeV.

  14. Convective aggregation in realistic convective-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Christopher E.

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the real-world relevance of idealized-model convective self-aggregation, five 15 day cases of real organized convection in the tropics are simulated. These include multiple simulations of each case to test sensitivities of the convective organization and mean states to interactive radiation, interactive surface fluxes, and evaporation of rain. These simulations are compared to self-aggregation seen in the same model configured to run in idealized radiative-convective equilibrium. Analysis of the budget of the spatial variance of column-integrated frozen moist static energy shows that control runs have significant positive contributions to organization from radiation and negative contributions from surface fluxes and transport, similar to idealized runs once they become aggregated. Despite identical lateral boundary conditions for all experiments in each case, systematic differences in mean column water vapor (CWV), CWV distribution shape, and CWV autocorrelation length scale are found between the different sensitivity runs, particularly for those without interactive radiation, showing that there are at least some similarities in sensitivities to these feedbacks in both idealized and realistic simulations (although the organization of precipitation shows less sensitivity to interactive radiation). The magnitudes and signs of these systematic differences are consistent with a rough equilibrium between (1) equalization due to advection from the lateral boundaries and (2) disaggregation due to the absence of interactive radiation, implying disaggregation rates comparable to those in idealized runs with aggregated initial conditions and noninteractive radiation. This points to a plausible similarity in the way that radiation feedbacks maintain aggregated convection in both idealized simulations and the real world.Plain Language SummaryUnderstanding the processes that lead to the organization of tropical rainstorms is an important challenge for weather

  15. Adiabatic hyperspherical analysis of realistic nuclear potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Daily, K M; Greene, Chris H

    2015-01-01

    Using the hyperspherical adiabatic method with the realistic nuclear potentials Argonne V14, Argonne V18, and Argonne V18 with the Urbana IX three-body potential, we calculate the adiabatic potentials and the triton bound state energies. We find that a discrete variable representation with the slow variable discretization method along the hyperradial degree of freedom results in energies consistent with the literature. However, using a Laguerre basis results in missing energy, even when extrapolated to an infinite number of basis functions and channels. We do not include the isospin $T=3/2$ contribution in our analysis.

  16. Cellular automaton for realistic modelling of landslides

    CERN Document Server

    Segrè, E; Enrico Segre; Chiara Deangeli

    1994-01-01

    We develop a numerical model for the simulation of debris flow in landslides over a complex three dimensional topography. The model is based on a lattice, in which debris can be transferred among nearest neighbours according to established empirical relationships for granular flows. The model is validated comparing its results with reported field data. Our model is in fact a realistic elaboration of simpler ``sandpile automata'', which have in recent years been studied as supposedly paradigmatic of ``self organized criticality''. Statistics and scaling properties of the simulation are examined, showing that the model has an intermittent behaviour.

  17. Realistic searches on stretched exponential networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Parogama Sen

    2008-08-01

    We consider navigation or search schemes on networks which have a degree distribution of the form () ∝ exp(−). In addition, the linking probability is taken to be dependent on social distances and is governed by a parameter . The searches are realistic in the sense that not all search chains can be completed. An estimate of = ρ/d, where is the success rate and d the dynamic path length, shows that for a network of nodes, ∝ - in general. Dynamic small world effect, i.e., ≃ 0 is shown to exist in a restricted region of the - plane.

  18. An Introduction to a Realistic Quantum Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Preparata, Giuliano

    2003-01-01

    This book is a remarkable synthesis, a clear and simple introduction to Quantum Physics with a sort of Galilean dialogue on the supreme systems of contemporary Physics. The author, whose research interests and work extended from quarks to liquid systems and from crystals to stars, introduces the common conceptual and mathematical framework of all quantum theories, realistic enough to successfully confront Nature: Quantum Field Theory applied to the study of both dilute and condensed matter. In the dilute limit, quantum mechanics is shown to be a good approximation to Quantum Field Theory. Howe

  19. Accurate white matter lesion segmentation by k nearest neighbor classification with tissue type priors (kNN-TTPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwijk, Martijn D; Pouwels, Petra J W; Daams, Marita; van Dalen, Jan Willem; Caan, Matthan W A; Richard, Edo; Barkhof, Frederik; Vrenken, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The segmentation and volumetric quantification of white matter (WM) lesions play an important role in monitoring and studying neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) or cerebrovascular disease. This is often interactively done using 2D magnetic resonance images. Recent developments in acquisition techniques allow for 3D imaging with much thinner sections, but the large number of images per subject makes manual lesion outlining infeasible. This warrants the need for a reliable automated approach. Here we aimed to improve k nearest neighbor (kNN) classification of WM lesions by optimizing intensity normalization and using spatial tissue type priors (TTPs). The kNN-TTP method used kNN classification with 3.0 T 3DFLAIR and 3DT1 intensities as well as MNI-normalized spatial coordinates as features. Additionally, TTPs were computed by nonlinear registration of data from healthy controls. Intensity features were normalized using variance scaling, robust range normalization or histogram matching. The algorithm was then trained and evaluated using a leave-one-out experiment among 20 patients with MS against a reference segmentation that was created completely manually. The performance of each normalization method was evaluated both with and without TTPs in the feature set. Volumetric agreement was evaluated using intra-class coefficient (ICC), and voxelwise spatial agreement was evaluated using Dice similarity index (SI). Finally, the robustness of the method across different scanners and patient populations was evaluated using an independent sample of elderly subjects with hypertension. The intensity normalization method had a large influence on the segmentation performance, with average SI values ranging from 0.66 to 0.72 when no TTPs were used. Independent of the normalization method, the inclusion of TTPs as features increased performance particularly by reducing the lesion detection error. Best performance was achieved using variance scaled intensity

  20. CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder toward realistic biological membrane simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Emilia L; Cheng, Xi; Jo, Sunhwan; Rui, Huan; Song, Kevin C; Dávila-Contreras, Eder M; Qi, Yifei; Lee, Jumin; Monje-Galvan, Viviana; Venable, Richard M; Klauda, Jeffery B; Im, Wonpil

    2014-10-15

    CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder, http://www.charmm-gui.org/input/membrane, is a web-based user interface designed to interactively build all-atom protein/membrane or membrane-only systems for molecular dynamics simulations through an automated optimized process. In this work, we describe the new features and major improvements in Membrane Builder that allow users to robustly build realistic biological membrane systems, including (1) addition of new lipid types, such as phosphoinositides, cardiolipin (CL), sphingolipids, bacterial lipids, and ergosterol, yielding more than 180 lipid types, (2) enhanced building procedure for lipid packing around protein, (3) reliable algorithm to detect lipid tail penetration to ring structures and protein surface, (4) distance-based algorithm for faster initial ion displacement, (5) CHARMM inputs for P21 image transformation, and (6) NAMD equilibration and production inputs. The robustness of these new features is illustrated by building and simulating a membrane model of the polar and septal regions of E. coli membrane, which contains five lipid types: CL lipids with two types of acyl chains and phosphatidylethanolamine lipids with three types of acyl chains. It is our hope that CHARMM-GUI Membrane Builder becomes a useful tool for simulation studies to better understand the structure and dynamics of proteins and lipids in realistic biological membrane environments.

  1. NMR investigations of protein-carbohydrate interactions : Studies on the relevance of Trp/Tyr variations in lectin binding sites as deduced from titration microcalorimetry and NMR studies on hevein domains. Determination of the NMR structure of the complex between pseudohevein and N,N ',N ''-triacetylchitotriose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, JL; Siebert, HC; von der Lieth, CW; Laynez, J; Bruix, M; Soedjanaamadja, UM; Beintema, JJ; Canada, FJ; Gabius, HJ; Jimenez-Barbero, J

    2000-01-01

    Model studies on lectins and their interactions with carbohydrate ligands in solution are essential to gain insights into the driving forces for complex formation and to optimize programs for computer simulations. The specific interaction of pseudohevein with N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose has been an

  2. Lambda femtoscopy in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV Pb-Pb collisions at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00361540

    In this thesis, we present lambda baryon femtoscopy measured by the ALICE collaboration in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76$ TeV Pb-Pb collision. Correlation functions are shown in three centrality ranges for $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and two for the combined $\\Lambda\\Lambda\\oplus\\bar{\\Lambda}\\bar{\\Lambda}$ results. Femtoscopy is capable of measuring the femtometer-scale spatial and temporal aspects of particle collisions by looking at relative momentum correlations among pairs of particles. In addition, femtoscopy can extract information about the final state interactions of the strong nuclear forces that occur between those particles. The femtoscopic radii and scattering parameters (scattering length and effective range of interaction) of $\\Lambda\\Lambda\\oplus\\bar{\\Lambda}\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$ are presented. Following recent measurements of $\\mathrm{p}\\bar{\\Lambda}$ and $\\bar{\\mathrm{p}}\\bar{\\mathrm{p}}$, we have expanded the standard femtoscopic fitting process to account for the correlated effects of ...

  3. Realistic affective forecasting: The role of personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Ben; Duberstein, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Affective forecasting often drives decision-making. Although affective forecasting research has often focused on identifying sources of error at the event level, the present investigation draws upon the "realistic paradigm" in seeking to identify factors that similarly influence predicted and actual emotions, explaining their concordance across individuals. We hypothesised that the personality traits neuroticism and extraversion would account for variation in both predicted and actual emotional reactions to a wide array of stimuli and events (football games, an election, Valentine's Day, birthdays, happy/sad film clips, and an intrusive interview). As hypothesised, individuals who were more introverted and neurotic anticipated, correctly, that they would experience relatively more unpleasant emotional reactions, and those who were more extraverted and less neurotic anticipated, correctly, that they would experience relatively more pleasant emotional reactions. Personality explained 30% of the concordance between predicted and actual emotional reactions. Findings suggest three purported personality processes implicated in affective forecasting, highlight the importance of individual-differences research in this domain, and call for more research on realistic affective forecasts.

  4. Realistic Radio Communications in Pilot Simulator Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burki-Cohen, Judith; Kendra, Andrew J.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Lee, Alfred T.

    2000-01-01

    Simulators used for total training and evaluation of airline pilots must satisfy stringent criteria in order to assure their adequacy for training and checking maneuvers. Air traffic control and company radio communications simulation, however, may still be left to role-play by the already taxed instructor/evaluators in spite of their central importance in every aspect of the flight environment. The underlying premise of this research is that providing a realistic radio communications environment would increase safety by enhancing pilot training and evaluation. This report summarizes the first-year efforts of assessing the requirement and feasibility of simulating radio communications automatically. A review of the training and crew resource/task management literature showed both practical and theoretical support for the need for realistic radio communications simulation. A survey of 29 instructor/evaluators from 14 airlines revealed that radio communications are mainly role-played by the instructor/evaluators. This increases instructor/evaluators' own workload while unrealistically lowering pilot communications load compared to actual operations, with a concomitant loss in training/evaluation effectiveness. A technology review searching for an automated means of providing radio communications to and from aircraft with minimal human effort showed that while promising, the technology is still immature. Further research and the need for establishing a proof-of-concept are also discussed.

  5. Realistic theory of electronic correlations in nanoscopic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Malte; Barthel, Stefan; Wehling, Tim; Karolak, Michael; Valli, Angelo; Sangiovanni, Giorgio

    2017-07-01

    Nanostructures with open shell transition metal or molecular constituents host often strong electronic correlations and are highly sensitive to atomistic material details. This tutorial review discusses method developments and applications of theoretical approaches for the realistic description of the electronic and magnetic properties of nanostructures with correlated electrons. First, the implementation of a flexible interface between density functional theory and a variant of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) highly suitable for the simulation of complex correlated structures is explained and illustrated. On the DMFT side, this interface is largely based on recent developments of quantum Monte Carlo and exact diagonalization techniques allowing for efficient descriptions of general four fermion Coulomb interactions, reduced symmetries and spin-orbit coupling, which are explained here. With the examples of the Cr (001) surfaces, magnetic adatoms, and molecular systems it is shown how the interplay of Hubbard U and Hund's J determines charge and spin fluctuations and how these interactions drive different sorts of correlation effects in nanosystems. Non-local interactions and correlations present a particular challenge for the theory of low dimensional systems. We present our method developments addressing these two challenges, i.e., advancements of the dynamical vertex approximation and a combination of the constrained random phase approximation with continuum medium theories. We demonstrate how non-local interaction and correlation phenomena are controlled not only by dimensionality but also by coupling to the environment which is typically important for determining the physics of nanosystems.

  6. Mergers of binary neutron stars with realistic spin

    CERN Document Server

    Bernuzzi, Sebastiano; Tichy, Wolfgang; Bruegmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of binary neutron stars have seen great advances in terms of physical detail and numerical quality. However, the spin of the neutron stars, one of the simplest global parameters of binaries, remains mostly unstudied. We present the first, fully nonlinear general relativistic dynamical evolutions of the last three orbits for constraint satisfying initial data of spinning neutron star binaries, with astrophysically realistic spins aligned and anti-aligned to the orbital angular momentum. The initial data is computed with the constant rotational velocity approach. The dynamics of the systems is analyzed in terms of gauge-invariant binding energy vs. orbital angular momentum curves. By comparing to a binary black hole configuration we can estimate the different tidal and spin contributions to the binding energy for the first time. First results on the gravitational wave forms are presented. The phase evolution during the orbital motion is significantly affected by spin-orbit interactions, leading to d...

  7. Transforming the patient care environment with Lean Six Sigma and realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma (LSS) is a structured methodology for transforming processes, but it does not fully consider the complex social interactions that cause processes to form in hospital organizations. By combining LSS implementations with the concept of Realistic Evaluation, a methodology that promotes change by assessing and considering the individual characteristics of an organization's social environment, successful and sustainable process improvement is more likely.

  8. Amplitude analysis without ambiguity in the transition NN {yields} {Delta}N; Analyse en amplitudes sans ambiguite de la transition NN {yields} {Delta}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, J.P. [Orleans Univ., 45 Orleans (France); Lazard, C. [Theoretical Physics Division, Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France)

    1999-10-01

    A three step method is developed for determining without ambiguity the NN {yields} {Delta}N transition amplitudes. The purpose of the study is to select a set of observables, which determines, first, the 16 values of the amplitudes, secondly, the 15 independent relative phases, and thirdly, some dependent relative phases for resolving the remaining ambiguities. For determining NN {yields} (N{pi})N experiments needed to such an amplitude analysis, the decay distribution is expressed in the density matrix formalism. For particular {Delta} - production angles, an unambiguously amplitude analysis is performed with experiments involving polarized beam and target, only, avoiding the detection of the polarization of the outgoing nucleons. (authors) 2 refs.

  9. Teaching Practice in a Realistic Context

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    Introduction For two academic years, Teaching Practice (TP), an important component of the in-service Advanced Teacher Training Course at Chongqing University, was set up in an almost ideal context: students specially recruited, materials selected by the trainees and photo-copying facilities provided. While trainees felt very excited by their performances during TP, when all the excitement had gone, they felt less optimistic at the thought of the constraints which would be placed on their teaching in their own institutions. So their evaluation of TP ended with a "Yes, but" statement. Drawing on insights gained from those two years, the British lecturers and Chinese counterparts generally felt that TP should, in future, operate within a realistic context. In this paper, we shall report how TP was conducted within our Foreign Languages Department.

  10. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Nathaniel V; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C

    2016-01-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no interstellar comets have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Mart\\'in et al. 2009 have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the interstellar comet population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider "close" interstellar comets, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a "detectable" object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The inf...

  11. Realistic page-turning of electronic books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chaoran; Li, Haisheng; Bai, Yannan

    2014-01-01

    The booming electronic books (e-books), as an extension to the paper book, are popular with readers. Recently, many efforts are put into the realistic page-turning simulation o f e-book to improve its reading experience. This paper presents a new 3D page-turning simulation approach, which employs piecewise time-dependent cylindrical surfaces to describe the turning page and constructs smooth transition method between time-dependent cylinders. The page-turning animation is produced by sequentially mapping the turning page into the cylinders with different radii and positions. Compared to the previous approaches, our method is able to imitate various effects efficiently and obtains more natural animation of turning page.

  12. Realistic Multimedia Simulations for Informatics Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Pachoulaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Realistic multimedia simulations are effective in helping students overcome their fear of physics and gain fundamental knowledge of physical processes. An elective course has been designed in the Applied Informatics and Multimedia Department at TEI of Crete to help informatics students overcome their physics shyness by hands-on experience on scientific multimedia simulations. The approach is justified in terms of the rich employment opportunities in the game and multimedia industries where a sound basis in physics, mathematics and numerical analysis is a necessity. Student feedback shows that they embrace the adopted approach, which uses open source tools to minimize programming so as to allow both instructor and students to focus on the science and complete a greater number of simulations.

  13. Performance Evaluation of MANET in Realistic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailender Gupta

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to facilitate communication in Mobile Ad hoc Network (MANET, routing protocols are developed. The performance of these protocols depends upon various factors such as: transmission range, number of nodes deployed and mobility of the nodes. Another factor which affects the performance of MANET routing protocols is the environment in which ad hoc network is deployed. The MANET environment may contain obstacles such as mountains lakes, buildings and river. These obstacles restrict nodes movement but may or may not obstruct the effective transmission range of nodes deployed. This paper is an effort to evaluate the performance of MANET routing protocols in presence of obstacles by designing a simulator in MATLAB-10. To make the situation more realistic obstacle of different shapes, size, number and type were introduced in the simulation region. We found significant impact of the same on the performance of routing protocols

  14. E. H. Carr: En kompleks realist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyn, Carina Ann

    2008-01-01

    Edward Hallett Carr er blevet kaldt alt fra realist til utopist til slet og ret ,,farlig". Denne artikel giver en bedre forstaelse af, hvorfor et centralt pejlemærke i disci­plinen international politik bliver beskrevet på så mange - tilsyneladende - modsætningsfyldte måder. I stedet for at tage...... udgangspunkt i en realistisk eller en utopisk læsning af Carrs værker bidrager denne artikel med en tredje læsning af Carrs teori, der samtænker ,,den realistiske Carr" og ,,den utopiske Carr". Det overordnede argument i artiklen er, at for at kunne finde mening og sammen­hæng i Carrs politiske teori, ma man...... nødvendigvis samtænke Carrs realisme og utopisme med hans underliggende radikalisme....

  15. The Radiative Tail of Realistic Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, S

    2000-01-01

    An astrophysically realistic model of wave dynamics in black-hole spacetimes must involve a {\\it non}-spherical background geometry with {\\it angular momentum}. We consider the evolution of {\\it gravitational} (and electromagnetic) perturbations in {\\it rotating} Kerr spacetimes. We show that a rotating Kerr black hole becomes ``bald'' {\\it slower} than the corresponding spherically-symmetric Schwarzschild black hole. Moreover, our results {\\it turn over} the traditional belief (which has been widely accepted during the last three decades) that the late-time tail of gravitational collapse is universal. In particular, we show that different fields have {\\it different} decaying rates. Our results are also of importance both to the study of the no-hair conjecture and the mass-inflation scenario (stability of Cauchy horizons).

  16. Helioseismology of a Realistic Magnetoconvective Sunspot Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, D. C.; Birch, A. C.; Rempel, M.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    We compare helioseismic travel-time shifts measured from a realistic magnetoconvective sunspot simulation using both helioseismic holography and time-distance helioseismology, and measured from real sunspots observed with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Michelson Doppler Imager instrument on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory. We find remarkable similarities in the travel-time shifts measured between the methodologies applied and between the simulated and real sunspots. Forward modeling of the travel-time shifts using either Born or ray approximation kernels and the sound-speed perturbations present in the simulation indicates major disagreements with the measured travel-time shifts. These findings do not substantially change with the application of a correction for the reduction of wave amplitudes in the simulated and real sunspots. Overall, our findings demonstrate the need for new methods for inferring the subsurface structure of sunspots through helioseismic inversions.

  17. Presupernova neutrinos: realistic emissivities from stellar evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Kelly; Lunardini, Cecilia; Farmer, Rob; Timmes, Frank

    2017-01-01

    We present a calculation of neutrino emissivities and energy spectra from a presupernova, a massive star going through the advanced stages of nuclear burning before becoming a supernova. Neutrinos produced from beta decay and electron capture, as well as pair annihilation, plasmon decay, and the photoneutrino process are included. We use the state of the art stellar evolution code MESA to obtain realistic conditions for temperature, density, electron fraction, and nuclear isotopic composition. We have found that beta processes contribute significantly to the neutrino flux at potentially detectable energies of a few MeV. Estimates for the number of events at several current and future detectors are presented for the last few hours before collapse.

  18. Light nuclei from chiral EFT interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrátil, P.; Gueorguiev, V. G.; Vary, J. P.; Ormand, W. E.; Nogga, A.; Quaglioni, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recent developments in nuclear theory allow us to make a connection between quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and low-energy nuclear physics. First, chiral effective field theory (χEFT) provides a natural hierarchy to define two-nucleon ( NN), three-nucleon ( NNN), and even four-nucleon interactions. Second, ab-initio methods have been developed capable to test these interactions for light nuclei. In this contribution, we discuss ab-initio no-core shell-model (NCSM) calculations for s-shell and p-shell nuclei with NN and NNN interactions derived within χEFT.

  19. Investigation of the $nn\\Lambda$ bound state in pionless effective theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Shung-Ichi; Oh, Yongseok

    2015-01-01

    The possibility of an $nn\\Lambda$ bound state is investigated in the framework of pionless effective field theory at leading order. A system of coupled integral equations are constructed in the spin-isospin basis, of which numerical solutions are investigated. In particular, we make use of the limit cycle behavior, i.e., cyclic singularities of coupled integral equations of the system, which would be associated with the formation of a three-body bound state, so-called the Efimov state, in the unitary limit. Furthermore, we find that, when the sharp momentum cutoff introduced in the integral equations is taken significantly larger than the hard scale of the effective theory, the coupling of a three-body contact interaction becomes cyclically singular indicating the onset of Efimov-like bound state formation. However, the paucity of empirical information to determine the parameters of the theory precludes a definitive conclusion on the existence of such a bound state. As a simple test of the feasibility of the ...

  20. Study of W boson production in PbPb and pp collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hammer, J.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Pernicka, M.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, C.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Wagner, P.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Maes, T.; Mucibello, L.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Selvaggi, M.; Staykova, Z.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dero, V.; Gay, A. P. R.; Hreus, T.; Léonard, A.; Marage, P. E.; Reis, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Garcia, G.; Grunewald, M.; Klein, B.; Lellouch, J.; Marinov, A.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Vanelderen, L.; Verwilligen, P.; Walsh, S.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Militaru, O.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Schul, N.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Alves, G. A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; Martins, T.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Carvalho, W.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Oguri, V.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Soares Jorge, L.; Sznajder, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dias, F. A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Lagana, C.; Marinho, F.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Trayanov, R.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Jiang, C. H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Meng, X.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Xiao, H.; Xu, M.; Zang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, S.; Guo, Y.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Teng, H.; Wang, S.; Zhu, B.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Osorio Oliveros, A. F.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Plestina, R.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Duric, S.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Morovic, S.; Attikis, A.; Galanti, M.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Khalil, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Tiko, A.; Azzolini, V.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Heikkinen, A.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Ungaro, D.; Wendland, L.; Banzuzi, K.; Korpela, A.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Choudhury, S.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Millischer, L.; Nayak, A.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Shreyber, I.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benhabib, L.; Bianchini, L.; Bluj, M.; Broutin, C.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Daci, N.; Dahms, T.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Haguenauer, M.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Sabes, D.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bodin, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Cardaci, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Drouhin, F.; Ferro, C.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Juillot, P.; Karim, M.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Fassi, F.; Mercier, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Bondu, O.; Boudoul, G.; Brun, H.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sordini, V.; Tosi, S.; Tschudi, Y.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Anagnostou, G.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heracleous, N.; Hindrichs, O.; Jussen, R.; Klein, K.; Merz, J.

    2012-08-01

    A measurement is presented of W-boson production in PbPb collisions carried out at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) centre-of-mass energy √{sNN} of 2.76 TeV at the LHC using the CMS detector. In data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3μb-1, the number of W → μνμ decays is extracted in the region of muon pseudorapidity |ημ | 25 GeV / c. Yields of muons found per unit of pseudorapidity correspond to (159 ± 10 (stat.) ± 12 (syst.)) ×10-8W+ and (154 ± 10 (stat.) ± 12 (syst.)) ×10-8W- bosons per minimum-bias PbPb collision. The dependence of W production on the centrality of PbPb collisions is consistent with a scaling of the yield by the number of incoherent NN collisions. The yield of W bosons is also studied in a sample of pp interactions at √{ s} = 2.76 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 231nb-1. The individual W+ and W- yields in PbPb and pp collisions are found to agree, once the neutron and proton content in Pb nuclei is taken into account. Likewise, the difference observed in the dependence of the positive and negative muon production on pseudorapidity is consistent with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations.

  1. Study of W boson production in PbPb and pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Siguang; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Fischer, David; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Krajczar, Krisztian; Radics, Balint; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Fernandes, Miguel; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korotkikh, Vladimir; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Vardanyan, Irina; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; 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Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Mall, Orpheus; Miceli, Tia; Nelson, Randy; 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Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Timciuc, Vladlen; Traczyk, Piotr; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hahn, Alan; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; 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Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hamdan, Saleh; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Jindal, Pratima; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Cuplov, Vesna; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Richards, Alan; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-07-16

    A measurement is presented of W-boson production in PbPb collisions carried out at a nucleon-nucleon (NN) centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ of 2.76 TeV at the LHC using the CMS detector. In data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 inverse microbarns, the number of W to mu mu-neutrino decays is extracted in the region of muon pseudorapidity abs(eta[mu])25 GeV. Yields of muons found per unit of pseudorapidity correspond to (159 +/- 10 (stat.) +/- 12 (syst.)) 10E-8 W(plus) and (154 +/- 10 (stat.) +/- 12 (syst.)) 10E-8 W(minus) bosons per minimum-bias PbPb collision. The dependence of W production on the centrality of PbPb collisions is consistent with a scaling of the yield by the number of incoherent NN collisions. The yield of W bosons is also studied in a sample of pp interactions at sqrt(s)= 2.76 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 231 inverse nanobarns. The individual W(plus) and W(minus) yields in PbPb and pp collisions are found to agree, once the neutron and proton content i...

  2. Multiclass Boosting with Adaptive Group-Based kNN and Its Application in Text Categorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei La

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available AdaBoost is an excellent committee-based tool for classification. However, its effectiveness and efficiency in multiclass categorization face the challenges from methods based on support vector machine (SVM, neural networks (NN, naïve Bayes, and k-nearest neighbor (kNN. This paper uses a novel multi-class AdaBoost algorithm to avoid reducing the multi-class classification problem to multiple two-class classification problems. This novel method is more effective. In addition, it keeps the accuracy advantage of existing AdaBoost. An adaptive group-based kNN method is proposed in this paper to build more accurate weak classifiers and in this way control the number of basis classifiers in an acceptable range. To further enhance the performance, weak classifiers are combined into a strong classifier through a double iterative weighted way and construct an adaptive group-based kNN boosting algorithm (AGkNN-AdaBoost. We implement AGkNN-AdaBoost in a Chinese text categorization system. Experimental results showed that the classification algorithm proposed in this paper has better performance both in precision and recall than many other text categorization methods including traditional AdaBoost. In addition, the processing speed is significantly enhanced than original AdaBoost and many other classic categorization algorithms.

  3. Realist trials and the testing of context-mechanism-outcome configurations: a response to Van Belle et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Chris; Warren, Emily; Fletcher, Adam; Viner, Russell

    2016-10-01

    Van Belle et al. argue that our attempt to pursue realist evaluation via a randomised trial will be fruitless because we misunderstand realist ontology (confusing intervention mechanisms with intervention activities and with statistical mediation analyses) and because RCTs cannot comprehensively examine how and why outcome patterns are caused by mechanisms triggered in specific contexts. Through further consideration of our trial methods, we explain more fully how we believe complex social interventions work and what realist evaluation should aim to do within a trial. Like other realists, those undertaking realist trials assume that: social interventions provide resources which local actors may draw on in actions that can trigger mechanisms; these mechanisms may interact with contextual factors to generate outcomes; and data in the 'empirical' realm can be used to test hypotheses about mechanisms in the 'real' realm. Whether or not there is sufficient contextual diversity to test such hypotheses is a contingent not a necessary feature of trials. Previous exemplars of realist evaluation have compared empirical data from intervention and control groups to test hypotheses about real mechanisms. There is no inevitable reason why randomised trials should not also be able to do so. Random allocation merely ensures the comparability of such groups without necessarily causing evaluation to lapse from a realist into a 'positivist' or 'post-positivist' paradigm. Realist trials are ontologically and epistemologically plausible. Further work is required to assess whether they are feasible and useful but such work should not be halted on spurious philosophical grounds.

  4. Nuclear structure with unitarily transformed two-body plus phenomenological three-body interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Anneke

    2011-02-02

    The importance of three-nucleon forces for a variety of nuclear structure phenomena is apparent in various investigations. This thesis provides a first step towards the inclusion of realistic three-nucleon forces by studying simple phenomenological threebody interactions. The Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) and the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) provide two different approaches to derive soft phase-shift equivalent nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions via unitary transformations. Although their motivations are quite different the NN interactions obtained with the two methods exhibit some similarities. The application of the UCOM- or SRG-transformed Argonne V18 potential in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation and including the second-order energy corrections emerging from many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) reveals that the systematics of experimental ground-state energies can be reproduced by some of the interactions considering a series of closed-shell nuclei across the whole nuclear chart. However, charge radii are systematically underestimated, especially for intermediate and heavy nuclei. This discrepancy to experimental data is expected to result from neglected three-nucleon interactions. As first ansatz for a three-nucleon force, we consider a finite-range three-body interaction of Gaussian shape. Its influence on ground-state energies and charge radii is discussed in detail on the basis of HF plus MBPT calculations and shows a significant improvement in the description of experimental data. As the handling of the Gaussian three-body interaction is time-extensive, we show that it can be replaced by a regularized three-body contact interaction exhibiting a very similar behavior. An extensive study characterizes its properties in detail and confirms the improvements with respect to nuclear properties. To take into account information of an exact numerical solution of the nuclear eigenvalue problem, the No-Core Shell Model is applied to

  5. Water or realistic compositions in proton radiotherapy? An analytical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2017-03-01

    Pre-clinical tests and simulation studies for radiotherapy are generally carried out using water or simplified materials. Investigating the effects of defining compositionally realistic media in proton transport studies was the objective of this work. Accurate modeling of the Bragg curve is a fundamental requirement for such a study. An equation previously validated by experiments provides an appropriate analytical method for proton dose calculation in depth of the target. Owing to the dependency on protons ranges and the probability of undergoing non-elastic nuclear interactions (NNI), this formula comprises three parameters with values specified for initial proton energy and for the target material. As a result, knowledge of the depth-dose distribution using this analytical model is limited to the materials for which the data has been provided in nuclear data tables. In this study, we used our general formulas for calculating the protons ranges and the probability of undergoing NNI in desired compounds and mixtures with an arbitrary number of constituent elements. Furthermore, the protons dose distribution in the depth of these targets was leading off with determining the parameters appeared in the employed model using our mathematically easy to handle relations. For a number of tissues which may be of interest in proton radiotherapy studies but are missing in reference data tables, the mentioned parameters were calculated. Moreover, the resultant values for the protons ranges and the probability of undergoing NNIs were compared with those in water. The results showed that the differences between the position of Bragg peaks in water and realistic media considered in this study were energy dependent, and ranged between a few millimeters. For proton beams of arbitrary chosen initial energies, the maximum dose delivered to the realistic media varied between about -0.02-4.42% in comparison with that to water. The effects observed (both in penetration and in the

  6. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  7. Proton - Lambda Correlations in Central Pb+Pb Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Anticic, T; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Beck, H; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Blume, C; Bogusz, M; Boimska, B; Book, J; Botje, M; Buncic, P; Cetner, T; Christakoglou, P; Chung, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J; Eckardt, V; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Friese, V; Gazdzicki, M; Grebieszkow, K; Hohne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kolesnikov, V; Kowalski, M; Kresan, D; Laszlo, A; Lacey, R; van Leeuwen, M; Mackowiak, M K; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A; Mateev, M; Melkumov, G; Mitrovski, M; Mrowczynski, St; Nicolic, V; Palla, G; Panagiotou, A; Peryt, W; Pluta, J; Prindle, D; Puhlhofer, F; Renfordt, R; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczynski, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T; Seyboth, P; Sikler, F; Skrzypczak, E; Slodkowski, M; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Strobele, H; Susa, T; Szuba, M; Utvic, M; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G; Vesztergombi, G; Vranic, D; Wlodarczyk, Z; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A

    2011-01-01

    The momentum correlation between protons and lambda particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_{NN}) = 17.3 GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN SPS. A clear enhancement is observed for small relative momenta (q_{inv} < 0.2 GeV). By fitting a theoretical model, which uses the strong interaction between the proton and the lambda in a given pair, to the measured data a value for the effective source size is deduced. Assuming a static Gaussian source distribution we derive an effective radius parameter of R_G = 3.02 \\pm 0.20$(stat.)^{+0.44}_{-0.16}(syst.) fm.

  8. Realistic Scheduling Mechanism for Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danish Mahmood

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we propose a Realistic Scheduling Mechanism (RSM to reduce user frustration and enhance appliance utility by classifying appliances with respective constraints and their time of use effectively. Algorithms are proposed regarding functioning of home appliances. A 24 hour time slot is divided into four logical sub-time slots, each composed of 360 min or 6 h. In these sub-time slots, only desired appliances (with respect to appliance classification are scheduled to raise appliance utility, restricting power consumption by a dynamically modelled power usage limiter that does not only take the electricity consumer into account but also the electricity supplier. Once appliance, time and power usage limiter modelling is done, we use a nature-inspired heuristic algorithm, Binary Particle Swarm Optimization (BPSO, optimally to form schedules with given constraints representing each sub-time slot. These schedules tend to achieve an equilibrium amongst appliance utility and cost effectiveness. For validation of the proposed RSM, we provide a comparative analysis amongst unscheduled electrical load usage, scheduled directly by BPSO and RSM, reflecting user comfort, which is based upon cost effectiveness and appliance utility.

  9. Towards a realistic description of hadron resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, R. A.; Canton, L.; Schweiger, W.; Plessas, W.

    2016-08-01

    We report on our attempts of treating excited hadron states as true quantum resonances. Hitherto the spectroscopy of mesons, usually considered as quark-antiquark systems, and of baryons, usually considered as three-quark systems, has been treated through excitation spectra of bound states (namely, confined few-quark systems), corresponding to poles of the quantum-mechanical resolvent at real negative values in the complex energy plane. As a result the wave functions, i.e. the residua of the resolvent, have not exhibited the behaviour as required for hadron resonances with their multiple decay modes. This has led to disturbing shortcomings in the description of hadronic resonance phenomena. We have aimed at a more realistic description of hadron resonances within relativistic constituent-quark models taking into account explicitly meson-decay channels. The corresponding coupled-channels theory is based on a relativistically invariant mass operator capable of producing hadron ground states with real energies and hadron resonances with complex energies, the latter corresponding to poles in the lower half-plane of the unphysical sheet of the complex energy plane. So far we have demonstrated the feasibility of the coupled-channels approach to hadron resonances along model calculations producing indeed the desired properties. The corresponding spectral properties will be discussed in this contribution. More refined studies are under way towards constructing a coupled-channels relativistic constituent-quark model for meson and baryon resonances.

  10. Pricing European Options in Realistic Markets

    CERN Document Server

    Schaden, M

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the fair price for European-style vanilla options and the distribution of short-term returns on the underlying asset ignoring transaction and other costs. We compute the risk-neutral probability density conditional on the total variance of the asset's returns when the option expires. If the asset's future price has finite expectation, the option's fair value satisfies a parabolic partial differential equation of the Black-Scholes type in which the variance of the asset's returns rather than a trading time is the evolution parameter. By immunizing the portfolio against large-scale price fluctuations of the asset, the valuation of options is extended to the realistic case\\cite{St99} of assets whose short-term returns have finite variance but very large, or even infinite, higher moments. A dynamic Delta-hedged portfolio that is statically insured against exceptionally large fluctuations includes at least two different options on the asset. The fair value of an option in this c...

  11. Determination of Realistic Fire Scenarios in Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Daniel L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Urban, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper expands on previous work that examined how large a fire a crew member could successfully survive and extinguish in the confines of a spacecraft. The hazards to the crew and equipment during an accidental fire include excessive pressure rise resulting in a catastrophic rupture of the vehicle skin, excessive temperatures that burn or incapacitate the crew (due to hyperthermia), carbon dioxide build-up or accumulation of other combustion products (e.g. carbon monoxide). The previous work introduced a simplified model that treated the fire primarily as a source of heat and combustion products and sink for oxygen prescribed (input to the model) based on terrestrial standards. The model further treated the spacecraft as a closed system with no capability to vent to the vacuum of space. The model in the present work extends this analysis to more realistically treat the pressure relief system(s) of the spacecraft, include more combustion products (e.g. HF) in the analysis and attempt to predict the fire spread and limiting fire size (based on knowledge of terrestrial fires and the known characteristics of microgravity fires) rather than prescribe them in the analysis. Including the characteristics of vehicle pressure relief systems has a dramatic mitigating effect by eliminating vehicle overpressure for all but very large fires and reducing average gas-phase temperatures.

  12. Sialendoscopy Training: Presentation of a Realistic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoto, Gabriela Robaskewicz; Stamm, Aldo Cassol; Lyra, Marcos

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several surgical training simulators have been created for residents and young surgeons to gain experience with surgical procedures. Laboratory training is fundamental for acquiring familiarity with the techniques of surgery and skill in handing instruments. Objective The aim of this study is to present a novel simulator for training sialendoscopy. Method This realistic simulator was built with a synthetic thermo-retractile, thermo-sensible rubber which, when combined with different polymers, produces more than 30 different formulas. These formulas present textures, consistencies, and mechanical resistance are similar to many human tissues. Results The authors present a training model to practice sialendoscopy. All aspects of the procedure are simulated: month opening, dilatation of papillae, insert of the scope, visualization of stones, extraction of these stones with grasping or baskets, and finally, stone fragmentation with holmium laser. Conclusion This anatomical model for sialendoscopy training should be considerably useful to abbreviate the learning curve during the qualification of young surgeons while minimizing the consequences of technical errors.

  13. Cerebral blood flow simulations in realistic geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szopos Marcela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to perform the computation of the blood flow in all the cerebral network, obtained from medical images as angiographies. We use free finite elements codes as FreeFEM++. We first test the code on analytical solutions in simplified geometries. Then, we study the influence of boundary conditions on the flow and we finally perform first computations on realistic meshes. L’objectif est ici de simuler l’écoulement sanguin dans tout le réseau cérébral (artériel et veineux obtenu à partir d’angiographies cérébrales 3D à l’aide de logiciels d’éléments finis libres, comme FreeFEM++. Nous menons d’abord une étude détaillée des résultats sur des solutions analytiques et l’influence des conditions limites à imposer dans des géométries simplifiées avant de travailler sur les maillages réalistes.

  14. The long-acting GLP-1 derivative NN2211 ameliorates glycemia and increases beta-cell mass in diabetic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolin, Bidda; Larsen, Marianne O; Gotfredsen, Carsten F;

    2002-01-01

    NN2211 is a long-acting, metabolically stable glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) derivative designed for once daily administration in humans. NN2211 dose dependently reduced the glycemic levels in ob/ob mice, with antihyperglycemic activity still evident 24 h postdose. Apart from an initial reduction...... for increased proliferation. In db/db mice, exendin-4 and NN2211 decreased blood glucose compared with vehicle, but NN2211 had a longer duration of action. Food intake was lowered only on day 1 with both compounds, and body weight was unaffected. beta-Cell proliferation rate and mass were significantly...

  15. Accelerating k-NN Algorithm with Hybrid MPI and OpenSHMEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jian; Hamidouche, Khaled; Zheng, Jie; Lu, Xiaoyi; Vishnu, Abhinav; Panda, Dhabaleswar

    2015-08-05

    Machine Learning algorithms are benefiting from the continuous improvement of programming models, including MPI, MapReduce and PGAS. k-Nearest Neighbors (k-NN) algorithm is a widely used machine learning algorithm, applied to supervised learning tasks such as classification. Several parallel implementations of k-NN have been proposed in the literature and practice. However, on high-performance computing systems with high-speed interconnects, it is important to further accelerate existing designs of the k-NN algorithm through taking advantage of scalable programming models. To improve the performance of k-NN on large-scale environment with InfiniBand network, this paper proposes several alternative hybrid MPI+OpenSHMEM designs and performs a systemic evaluation and analysis on typical workloads. The hybrid designs leverage the one-sided memory access to better overlap communication with computation than the existing pure MPI design, and propose better schemes for efficient buffer management. The implementation based on k-NN program from MaTEx with MVAPICH2-X (Unified MPI+PGAS Communication Runtime over InfiniBand) shows up to 9.0% time reduction for training KDD Cup 2010 workload over 512 cores, and 27.6% time reduction for small workload with balanced communication and computation. Experiments of running with varied number of cores show that our design can maintain good scalability.

  16. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathaniel V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C.

    2016-07-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (ICs) (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no ICs have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Martín et al. have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the IC population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider “close” ICs, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a “detectable” object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The influence of several of the assumed model parameters on the frequency of detections is explored in detail. Based on the expectation from Moro-Martín et al., we expect that LSST will detect 0.001-10 ICs during its nominal 10 year lifetime, with most of the uncertainty from the unknown number density of small (nuclei of ˜0.1-1 km) ICs. Both asteroid and comet cases are considered, where the latter includes various empirical prescriptions of brightening. Using simulated LSST-like astrometric data, we study the problem of orbit determination for these bodies, finding that LSST could identify their orbits as hyperbolic and determine an ephemeris sufficiently accurate for follow-up in about 4-7 days. We give the hyperbolic orbital parameters of the most detectable ICs. Taking the results into consideration, we give recommendations to future searches for ICs.

  17. On the realistic validation of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Lin, C.-A.; Ishida, E. E. O.; Gieseke, F.; de Souza, R. S.; Costa-Duarte, M. V.; Hattab, M. W.; Krone-Martins, A.

    2017-07-01

    Two of the main problems encountered in the development and accurate validation of photometric redshift (photo-z) techniques are the lack of spectroscopic coverage in the feature space (e.g. colours and magnitudes) and the mismatch between the photometric error distributions associated with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. Although these issues are well known, there is currently no standard benchmark allowing a quantitative analysis of their impact on the final photo-z estimation. In this work, we present two galaxy catalogues, Teddy and Happy, built to enable a more demanding and realistic test of photo-z methods. Using photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and spectroscopy from a collection of sources, we constructed data sets that mimic the biases between the underlying probability distribution of the real spectroscopic and photometric sample. We demonstrate the potential of these catalogues by submitting them to the scrutiny of different photo-z methods, including machine learning (ML) and template fitting approaches. Beyond the expected bad results from most ML algorithms for cases with missing coverage in the feature space, we were able to recognize the superiority of global models in the same situation and the general failure across all types of methods when incomplete coverage is convoluted with the presence of photometric errors - a data situation which photo-z methods were not trained to deal with up to now and which must be addressed by future large-scale surveys. Our catalogues represent the first controlled environment allowing a straightforward implementation of such tests. The data are publicly available within the COINtoolbox (https://github.com/COINtoolbox/photoz_catalogues).

  18. ΛΛ Correlation function in Au+Au collisions at √[S(NN)]=200  GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Page, B S; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Simko, M; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2015-01-16

    We present ΛΛ correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s_{NN}]=200  GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider. The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ΛΛ correlation function and interaction parameters for dihyperon searches are discussed.

  19. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  20. General aspects of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear matter properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plohl, Oliver

    2008-07-25

    The subject of the present thesis is at first the investigation of model independent properties of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction in the vacuum concerning the relativistic structure and the implications for nuclear matter properties. Relativistic and non-relativistic meson-exchange potentials, phenomenological potentials s well as potentials based on effective field theory (EFT) are therefore mapped on a relativistic operator basis given by the Clifford Algebra. This allows to compare the various approaches at the level of covariant amplitudes where a remarkable agreement is found. Furthermore, the relativistic self-energy is determined in the Hartree-Fock (HF) approximation. The appearance of a scalar and vector field of several hundred MeV magnitude is a general feature of relativistic descriptions of nuclear matter. Within QCD sum rules these fields arise due to the density dependence of chiral condensates. We find that independent of the applied NN interaction large scalar and vector fields are generated when the symmetries of the Lorentz group are restored. In the framework of chiral EFT (chEFT) it is shown, that these fields are generated by short-range next-to-leading order (NLO) contact terms, which are connected to the spin-orbit interaction. To estimate the effect arising from NN correlations the equation of state of nuclear and neutron matter is calculated in the Brueckner-HF (BHF) approximation applying chEFT. Although, as expected, a clear over-binding is found (at NLO a saturating behavior is observed), the symmetry energy shows realistic properties when compared to phenomenological potentials (within the same approximation) and other approaches. The investigation of the pion mass dependence within chEFT at NLO shows that the magnitude of the scalar and vector fields persists in the chiral limit - nuclear matter is still bound. In contrast to the case of a pion mass larger than the physical one the binding energy and saturation density are

  1. Growth hormone secretagogues derived from NN703 with hydrazidesas c-terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankersen, M; Kramer Nielsen, K; Kruse Hansen, T; Raun, K; Sehested Hansen, B

    2000-05-01

    A series of GH secretagogues based on modifications in the C-terminal of NN703 is reported. The C-terminal N-methyl amide of NN703 has been replaced with alkylated hydrazides in order to decrease the volume of distribution and identify GH secretagogues with shorter duration of action. Most of the prepared compounds show high potency in a rat pituitary assay. Subsequent to an initial in vivo screening in dogs, four compounds were selected for further pharmacological and pharmacokinetic evaluation. The four compounds showed oral bioavailability around 35% and equipotency in vitro compared to NN703. The relationship between lipophilicity and volume of distribution is discussed and it is speculated whether the lower volume of distribution is attributed to the observed higher in vivo potency and shorter plasma elimination half-life.

  2. Block and parallel modelling of broad domain nonlinear continuous mapping based on NN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Guowei; Tu Xuyan; Wang Shoujue

    2006-01-01

    The necessity of the use of the block and parallel modeling of the nonlinear continuous mappings with NN is firstly expounded quantitatively. Then, a practical approach for the block and parallel modeling of the nonlinear continuous mappings with NN is proposed. Finally, an example indicating that the method raised in this paper can be realized by suitable existed software is given. The results of the experiment of the model discussed on the 3-D Mexican straw hat indicate that the block and parallel modeling based on NN is more precise and faster in computation than the direct ones and it is obviously a concrete example and the development of the large-scale general model established by Tu Xuyan.

  3. Dibaryon Signals in NN Scattering Data and Further Measurement at COSY,LEPS and CSR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fan; PING Jia-lun; HUANG Hong-xia; PANG Hou-rong; C.W.Wong

    2009-01-01

    The NΔ and ΔΔ dibaryon resonances are studied by calculating the NN scattering phase shifts with explicitly coupling these dibaryon channels in a multi-channel coupling calculation with two quark models.These quark models,the chiral quark model and quark delocalization color screening model,describe the NN S-,D-wave phase shifts below the π production threshold quantitatively well.Both quark models predict the ~1D_2 resonance discovered in NN partial wave phase shift analysis and the J=1 or 3 isoscalar resonance recently reported by CELSIUS-WASA Collaboration are NΔ~5S_2 and ΔΔ~7S_3 resonance,respectively.Further measurements at COSY,LEPS and Lanzhou Cooling Storage Ring(CSR) to check the ΔΔ resonance are discussed.

  4. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert, E-mail: herbert.shea@epfl.ch [Microsystems for Space Technologies Laboratory (LMTS), Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-15

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  5. A 10 nN resolution thrust-stand for micro-propulsion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subha; Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a nano-Newton thrust-stand that can measure up to 100 μN thrust from different types of microthrusters with 10 nN resolution. The compact thrust-stand measures the impingement force of the particles emitted from a microthruster onto a suspended plate of size 45 mm × 45 mm and with a natural frequency over 50 Hz. Using a homodyne (lock-in) readout provides strong immunity to facility vibrations, which historically has been a major challenge for nano-Newton thrust-stands. A cold-gas thruster generating up to 50 μN thrust in air was first used to validate the thrust-stand. Better than 10 nN resolution and a minimum detectable thrust of 10 nN were achieved. Thrust from a miniature electrospray propulsion system generating up to 3 μN of thrust was measured with our thrust-stand in vacuum, and the thrust was compared with that computed from beam diagnostics, obtaining agreement within 50 nN to 150 nN. The 10 nN resolution obtained from this thrust-stand matches that from state-of-the-art nano-Newton thrust-stands, which measure thrust directly from the thruster by mounting it on a moving arm (but whose natural frequency is well below 1 Hz). The thrust-stand is the first of its kind to demonstrate less than 3 μN resolution by measuring the impingement force, making it capable of measuring thrust from different types of microthrusters, with the potential of easy upscaling for thrust measurement at much higher levels, simply by replacing the force sensor with other force sensors.

  6. A multiple-point spatially weighted k-NN method for object-based classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunwei; Jing, Linhai; Li, Hui; Atkinson, Peter M.

    2016-10-01

    Object-based classification, commonly referred to as object-based image analysis (OBIA), is now commonly regarded as able to produce more appealing classification maps, often of greater accuracy, than pixel-based classification and its application is now widespread. Therefore, improvement of OBIA using spatial techniques is of great interest. In this paper, multiple-point statistics (MPS) is proposed for object-based classification enhancement in the form of a new multiple-point k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) classification method (MPk-NN). The proposed method first utilises a training image derived from a pre-classified map to characterise the spatial correlation between multiple points of land cover classes. The MPS borrows spatial structures from other parts of the training image, and then incorporates this spatial information, in the form of multiple-point probabilities, into the k-NN classifier. Two satellite sensor images with a fine spatial resolution were selected to evaluate the new method. One is an IKONOS image of the Beijing urban area and the other is a WorldView-2 image of the Wolong mountainous area, in China. The images were object-based classified using the MPk-NN method and several alternatives, including the k-NN, the geostatistically weighted k-NN, the Bayesian method, the decision tree classifier (DTC), and the support vector machine classifier (SVM). It was demonstrated that the new spatial weighting based on MPS can achieve greater classification accuracy relative to the alternatives and it is, thus, recommended as appropriate for object-based classification.

  7. Similarity Renormalization Group Evolution of Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions in the Subtracted Kernel Method Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szpigel, S. [Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Timoteo, V.S. [Faculdade de Tecnologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Limeira, SP (Brazil); Duraes, F. de O [Centro de Ciencias e Humanidades, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    In this work we study the Similarity Renormalization Group (SRG) evolution of effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions derived using the Subtracted Kernel Method (SKM) approach. We present the results for the phaseshifts in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} channel calculated using a SRG potential evolved from an initial effective potential obtained by implementing the SKM scheme for the leading-order NN interaction in chiral effective field theory (ChEFT).

  8. Study on Missile Intelligent Fault Diagnosis System Based on Fuzzy NN Expert System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to study intelligent fault diagnosis methods based on fuzzy neural network (NN) expert systemand build up intelligent fault diagnosis for a type of mis-sile weapon system, the concrete implementation of a fuzzyNN fault diagnosis expert system is given in this paper. Based on thorough research of knowledge presentation, theintelligent fault diagnosis system is implemented with artificial intelligence for a large-scale missile weapon equipment.The method is an effective way to perform fuzzy fault diagnosis. Moreover, it provides a new way of the fault diagnosisfor large-scale missile weapon equipment.

  9. Burn Rate Studies on AN-Based Propellants: Effect of N-N Bonded Binders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Oommen

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available New epoxy resins having N-N bonds in their structures have been employed as binders for ammonium nitrate (AN-based propellants. The resins have been characterized by various analytical techniques. The effect of the new binders on the burn rates of AN-based compositions including the metallized systems has been examined. The overall enhancement in the burn rate, as compared to that observed with conventional binders, has been explained in terms of the combustion reactivity of the N-N bondwiththe oxidizing speciesproduced duringcombustion. Furtherincreasein burn rate canbe achieved by inclusion of magnesium metal or ammonium perchlorate into these compositions.

  10. Efficient kNN Classification With Different Numbers of Nearest Neighbors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shichao; Li, Xuelong; Zong, Ming; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Wang, Ruili

    2017-04-12

    k nearest neighbor (kNN) method is a popular classification method in data mining and statistics because of its simple implementation and significant classification performance. However, it is impractical for traditional kNN methods to assign a fixed k value (even though set by experts) to all test samples. Previous solutions assign different k values to different test samples by the cross validation method but are usually time-consuming. This paper proposes a kTree method to learn different optimal k values for different test/new samples, by involving a training stage in the kNN classification. Specifically, in the training stage, kTree method first learns optimal k values for all training samples by a new sparse reconstruction model, and then constructs a decision tree (namely, kTree) using training samples and the learned optimal k values. In the test stage, the kTree fast outputs the optimal k value for each test sample, and then, the kNN classification can be conducted using the learned optimal k value and all training samples. As a result, the proposed kTree method has a similar running cost but higher classification accuracy, compared with traditional kNN methods, which assign a fixed k value to all test samples. Moreover, the proposed kTree method needs less running cost but achieves similar classification accuracy, compared with the newly kNN methods, which assign different k values to different test samples. This paper further proposes an improvement version of kTree method (namely, k*Tree method) to speed its test stage by extra storing the information of the training samples in the leaf nodes of kTree, such as the training samples located in the leaf nodes, their kNNs, and the nearest neighbor of these kNNs. We call the resulting decision tree as k*Tree, which enables to conduct kNN classification using a subset of the training samples in the leaf nodes rather than all training samples used in the newly kNN methods. This actually reduces running cost of

  11. Covariant Four-Dimensional Scattering Equations for the NN- πNNSystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. R.; Afnan, I. R.

    1996-04-01

    We derive a set of coupled four-dimensional integral equations for theNN-πNNsystem using our modified version of the Taylor method of classification-of-diagrams. These equations are covariant, obey two- and three-body unitarity and contain subtraction terms which eliminate the double-counting present in some previous four-dimensionalNN-πNNequations. The equations are then recast into a from convenient for computation by grouping the subtraction terms together and obtaining a set of two-fragment scattering equations for the amplitudes of interest.

  12. Asiakastyytyväisyyskysely vantaalaisessa isännöintitoimistossa

    OpenAIRE

    Forss, Mariina

    2013-01-01

    Opinnäytetyössäni tehdään asiakastyytyväisyyskysely vantaalaisen isännöintitoimiston asiakkaille. Tavoitteena on saada lisätietoa nykyisten asiakkaiden tilasta; ovatko he tyytyväisiä vai tyytymättömiä sekä kuinka heitä voitaisiin palvella paremmin. Toimeksiantajayritys on isännöinti- ja kiinteistöhuoltoyritys, joka on asiakkaidensa omistama ja toiminta on jatkunut yli 40 vuotta. Yhtiön arvoina ovat vuorovaikutus, palveluhalukkuus, luotettavuus ja keskinäinen arvostus. Jokaiselle osakkeeno...

  13. Realistic Data-Driven Traffic Flow Animation Using Texture Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Qianwen; Deng, Zhigang; Ren, Jiaping; Ye, Qianqian; Jin, Xiaogang

    2017-01-11

    We present a novel data-driven approach to populate virtual road networks with realistic traffic flows. Specifically, given a limited set of vehicle trajectories as the input samples, our approach first synthesizes a large set of vehicle trajectories. By taking the spatio-temporal information of traffic flows as a 2D texture, the generation of new traffic flows can be formulated as a texture synthesis process, which is solved by minimizing a newly developed traffic texture energy. The synthesized output captures the spatio-temporal dynamics of the input traffic flows, and the vehicle interactions in it strictly follow traffic rules. After that, we position the synthesized vehicle trajectory data to virtual road networks using a cage-based registration scheme, where a few traffic-specific constraints are enforced to maintain each vehicle's original spatial location and synchronize its motion in concert with its neighboring vehicles. Our approach is intuitive to control and scalable to the complexity of virtual road networks. We validated our approach through many experiments and paired comparison user studies.

  14. The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Sam; O'Halloran, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The use and limitation of realistic evaluation as a tool for evidence-based practice: a critical realist perspective In this paper, we assess realistic evaluation's articulation with evidence-based practice (EBP) from the perspective of critical realism. We argue that the adoption by realistic evaluation of a realist causal ontology means that it is better placed to explain complex healthcare interventions than the traditional method used by EBP, the randomized controlled trial (RCT). However, we do not conclude from this that the use of RCTs is without merit, arguing that it is possible to use both methods in combination under the rubric of realist theory. More negatively, we contend that the rejection of critical theory and utopianism by realistic evaluation in favour of the pragmatism of piecemeal social engineering means that it is vulnerable to accusations that it promotes technocratic interpretations of human problems. We conclude that, insofar as realistic evaluation adheres to the ontology of critical realism, it provides a sound contribution to EBP, but insofar as it rejects the critical turn of Bhaskar's realism, it replicates the technocratic tendencies inherent in EBP. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Fault-Tolerant Robot Programming through Simulation with Realistic Sensor Models

    OpenAIRE

    Axel Waggershauser; Thomas Braeunl; Andreas Koestler

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a simulation system for mobile robots that allows a realistic interaction of multiple robots in a common environment. The simulated robots are closely modeled after robots from the EyeBot family and have an identical application programmer interface. The simulation supports driving commands at two levels of abstraction as well as numerous sensors such as shaft encoders, infrared distance sensors, and compass. Simulation of on-board digital cameras via synthetic images allows the ...

  16. Effect of energy level sequences and neutron–proton interaction on α-particle preformation probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ismail, M.; Adel, A., E-mail: ahmedshosha200@yahoo.com

    2013-08-21

    A realistic density-dependent nucleon–nucleon (NN) interaction with finite-range exchange part which produces the nuclear matter saturation curve and the energy dependence of the nucleon–nucleus optical model potential is used to calculate the preformation probability, S{sub α}, of α-decay from different isotones with neutron numbers N=124,126,128,130 and 132. We studied the variation of S{sub α} with the proton number, Z, for each isotone and found the effect of neutron and proton energy levels of parent nuclei on the behavior of the α-particle preformation probability. We found that S{sub α} increases regularly with the proton number when the proton pair in α-particle is emitted from the same level and the neutron level sequence is not changed during the Z-variation. In this case the neutron–proton (n–p) interaction of the two levels, contributing to emission process, is too small. On the contrary, if the proton or neutron level sequence is changed during the emission process, S{sub α} behaves irregularly, the irregular behavior increases if both proton and neutron levels are changed. This behavior is accompanied by change or rapid increase in the strength of n–p interaction.

  17. Quantitative analysis of the fusion cross sections using different microscopic nucleus-nucleus interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, A.; Alharbi, T.

    2017-01-01

    The fusion cross sections for reactions involving medium and heavy nucleus-nucleus systems are investigated near and above the Coulomb barrier using the one-dimensional barrier penetration model. The microscopic nuclear interaction potential is computed by four methods, namely: the double-folding model based on a realistic density-dependent M3Y NN interaction with a finite-range exchange part, the Skyrme energy density functional in the semiclassical extended Thomas-Fermi approximation, the generalized Proximity potential, and the Akyüz-Winther interaction. The comparison between the calculated and the measured values of the fusion excitation functions indicates that the calculations of the DFM give quite satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, being much better than the other methods. New parameterized forms for the fusion barrier heights and positions are presented. Furthermore, the effects of deformation and orientation degrees of freedom on the distribution of the Coulomb barrier characteristics as well as the fusion cross sections are studied for the reactions 16 O + 70 Ge and 28 Si + 100 Mo. The calculated values of the total fusion cross sections are compared with coupled channel calculations using the code CCFULL and compared with the experimental data. Our results reveal that the inclusion of deformations and orientation degrees of freedom improves the comparison with the experimental data.

  18. Realist Stronghold in the Land of Thucydides? - Appraising and Resisting a Realist Tradition in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakos Mikelis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the integration of the discipline of International Relations in Greece into the global discipline since a few decades, the article addresses the reflection of the ‘realism in and for the globe’ question to this specific case. Although the argument doesn’t go as far as to ‘recover’ forgotten IR theorists or self-proclaimed realists, a geopolitical dimension of socio-economic thought during interwar addressed concerns which could be related to the intricacies of realpolitik. Then again at current times, certain scholars have been eager to maintain a firm stance in favor of realism, focusing on the work of ancient figures, especially Thucydides or Homer, and on questions of the offensive-defensive realism debate as well as on the connection with the English School, while others have offered fruitful insights matching the broad constructivist agenda. Overall, certain genuine arguments have appeared, reflecting diversified views about sovereignty and its function or mitigation.

  19. Photo-Realistic Image Synthesis and Virtual Cinematography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Synthesis is a new field of research that has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the grown popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of computer generated......: the augmented actor. Fundamental concepts and examples of methods proposed for realistic view synthesis based on the transfer of photo-realism from reference photographs to novel views, will be presented. The application of methods for realistic image synthesis to virtual cinematography will also be illustrated...

  20. Realistic Visualization of Virtual Views and Virtual Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Visualization is a new field of research which has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the increased popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of computer...... is then gaining consensus: the augmented actor. Fundamental concepts and examples of methods proposed for realistic view synthesis, based on the transfer of photorealism from reference photographs to novel views, will be presented. The application of methods for realistic image synthesis to virtual cinematography...

  1. Photo-Realistic Image Synthesis and Virtual Cinematography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Synthesis is a new field of research that has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the grown popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of computer generated......: the augmented actor. Fundamental concepts and examples of methods proposed for realistic view synthesis based on the transfer of photo-realism from reference photographs to novel views, will be presented. The application of methods for realistic image synthesis to virtual cinematography will also be illustrated...

  2. Measurement of the gπNN(t) Form Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vansyoc, Kelley Gene [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2001-08-01

    Cross sections were measured for the reaction 1H(e, e' π+ )n at the energy W = 1.95 GeV and momentum transfer Q 2 = 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . At this W and Q 2 , the longitudinal cross section is dominated by t-channel production, giving a unique opportunity to examine the strong coupling form factor g πNN(t). The measured cross sections were separated using a method similar to a Rosenbluth separation. For the extraction of g πNN (t), the Actor and Korner model [42] and a parameterization of the MAID2000 model [3] were employed to fit the longitudinal cross section. Three parameterizations gπNN(π) were used in both models. These fits resulted in a strong coupling constant gπNN(m$2\\atop{2}$) that is consistent with theoretical predictions. However, this coupling constant leads to a cutoff parameter that is less than 1 GeV.

  3. Double pion production in $NN$ and $\\bar{N}N$ collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xu; Xu, Hu-Shan

    2010-01-01

    With an effective Lagrangian approach, we give a full analysis on the $NN \\to NN\\pi\\pi$ and $\\bar{N}N\\to \\bar{N}N\\pi\\pi$ reactions by exploring the roles of various resonances with mass up to 1.72 GeV. We find large contributions from $\\Delta$, $N^*(1440)$, $\\Delta(1600)$ and $\\Delta(1620)$ resonances. Our calculations also indicate sizeable contributions from nucleon poles for the energies close to the threshold. A good description to the existing data of different isospin channels of $NN\\to NN\\pi\\pi$ and $\\bar{N}N\\to \\bar{N}N\\pi\\pi$ for beam energies up to 2.2 GeV is reached. Our results provide important implications to the ABC effect and guildlines to the future experimental projects at COSY, HADES and HIRFL-CSR. We point out that the \\={P}ANDA at FAIR could be an essential place for studying the properties of baryon resonances and the data with baryon and anti-baryon in final states are worth analyzing.

  4. Maximum-entropy parameter estimation for the k-NN modified value-difference kernel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, I.H.E.; van den Bosch, A.; Verbruggen, R.; Taatgen, N.; Schomaker, L.

    2004-01-01

    We introduce an extension of the modified value-difference kernel of $k$-nn by replacing the kernel's default class distribution matrix with the matrix produced by the maximum-entropy learning algorithm. This hybrid algorithm is tested on fifteen machine learning benchmark tasks, comparing the hybri

  5. Maximum-Entropy Parameter Estimation for the k-nn Modified Value-Difference Kernel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendrickx, Iris; Bosch, Antal van den

    2005-01-01

    We introduce an extension of the modified value-difference kernel of k-nn by replacing the kernel's default class distribution matrix with the matrix produced by the maximum-entropy learning algorithm. This hybrid algorithm is tested on fifteen machine learning benchmark tasks, comparing the hybrid

  6. Soft-pion production in n-n collisions. [n + n. -->. pi. /sup -/ + d

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, A.W. (CERN, Geneva); Afnan, I.R.

    1976-01-01

    The matrix element for s-wave pion production nn ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/d is examined as a function of the external pion mass. Quite unexpectedly, in view of the well-known failure of soft pion theory for this reaction, it is found to be constant within a few per cent. Both the reason for this result and its implications are briefly discussed.

  7. Measurement of the g{sub piNN} Form Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley Vansyoc

    2001-08-01

    Cross sections were measured for the reaction 1H(e, e' {pi}+ )n at the energy W = 1.95 GeV and momentum transfer Q 2 = 0.6 (GeV/c) 2 . At this W and Q 2 , the longitudinal cross section is dominated by t-channel production, giving a unique opportunity to examine the strong coupling form factor g {pi}NN (t). The measured cross sections were separated using a method similar to a Rosenbluth separation. For the extraction of g {pi}NN (t), the Actor and Korner model [42] and a parameterization of the MAID2000 model [3] were employed to fit the longitudinal cross section. Three parameterizations g {pi}NN (t) were used in both models. These fits resulted in a strong coupling constant g {pi}NN (m 2 / {pi} ) that is consistent with theoretical predictions. However, this coupling constant leads to a cutoff parameter that is less than 1 GeV.

  8. The tool for building an NN based on improved BP algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Back propagation(BP)algorithm is a very useful algorithm in many areas, but its leaning process is a very complicated non-linear convergence process, in which, chaos often happens, and slow convergence speed and local least often make it difficult for the non-experts to use it widely, and an improved BP(IBP)al gorithm is therefore suggested to expedite the convergence speed. The algorithm can judge local least and take some steps automatically to jump out from the local least. Furthermore, this algorithm introduces the expert knowledge base. An IBP-based agile and current neural network(NN)constructed tool is designed. An initial NN can be constructed automatically using an expert knowledge base. And an Aitken's △2 process method is used to expedite the convergent speed for NN. Besides, the method of changing the parameter of Sigmoid func tion and increasing the hidden node is used to bring surge for NN to jump out from the local least.

  9. Status on the Search for the Nn-Decoupled NNπ Resonance d'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshkevich, E.; Brodowski, W.; Pätzold, J.; Clement, H.; Meier, R.; Wagner, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    The status on the search for the as of yet hypothetical NN-decoupled NNπ resonance d' is reviewed with regard to recent experimental searches in the pionic double charge exchange in nuclei, the two-pion production in nucleon-nucleon collisions, the photo pion-production on the deuteron and the electro pion-production in nuclei.

  10. Improving GPU-accelerated adaptive IDW interpolation algorithm using fast kNN search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Gang; Xu, Nengxiong; Xu, Liangliang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an efficient parallel Adaptive Inverse Distance Weighting (AIDW) interpolation algorithm on modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The presented algorithm is an improvement of our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm by adopting fast k-nearest neighbors (kNN) search. In AIDW, it needs to find several nearest neighboring data points for each interpolated point to adaptively determine the power parameter; and then the desired prediction value of the interpolated point is obtained by weighted interpolating using the power parameter. In this work, we develop a fast kNN search approach based on the space-partitioning data structure, even grid, to improve the previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm. The improved algorithm is composed of the stages of kNN search and weighted interpolating. To evaluate the performance of the improved algorithm, we perform five groups of experimental tests. The experimental results indicate: (1) the improved algorithm can achieve a speedup of up to 1017 over the corresponding serial algorithm; (2) the improved algorithm is at least two times faster than our previous GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm; and (3) the utilization of fast kNN search can significantly improve the computational efficiency of the entire GPU-accelerated AIDW algorithm.

  11. Estimation of broadband emissivity (8-12 um) from ASTER data by using RM-NN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, K B; Ma, Y; Shen, X Y; Li, B P; Li, C Y; Li, Z L

    2012-08-27

    Land surface window emissivity is a key parameter for estimating the longwave radiative budget. The combined radiative transfer model (RM) with neural network (NN) algorithm is utilized to directly estimate the window (8-12 um) emissivity from the brightness temperature of the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) with 90 m spatial resolution. Although the estimation accuracy is very high when the broadband emissivity is estimated from AST05 (ASTER Standard Data Product) by using regression method, the accuracy of AST05 is about ± 0.015 for 86 spectra which is determined by the atmosphere correction for ASTER 1B data. The MODTRAN 4 is used to simulate the process of radiance transfer, and the broadband emissivity is directly estimated from the brightness temperature of ASTER 1B data at satellite. The comparison analysis indicates that the RM-NN is more competent to estimate broadband emissivity than other method when the brightness temperatures of band 11, 12, 13, 14 are made as input nodes of dynamic neural network. The estimation average accuracy is about 0.009, and the estimation results are not sensitive to instrument noise. The RM-NN is applied to extract broadband emissivity from an image of ASTER 1B data in China, and the comparison against a classification based multiple bands with 15 m spatial resolution shows that the estimation results from RM-NN are very good.

  12. The structural classification of the highly disordered crystal phases of [Nn][BF4], [Nn][PF6], [Pn][BF4], and [Pn][PF6] salts (Nn(+) = tetraalkylammonium and Pn(+) = tetraalkylphosphonium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Harinaga, Ukyo; Tanaka, Ryo; Koyama, Akira; Hagiwara, Rika; Tsunashima, Katsuhiko

    2014-11-21

    The structures of 16 symmetric tetraalkylammonium (Nn(+)) and tetraalkylphosphonium (Pn(+)) salts ([Nn][BF4], [Nn][PF6], [Pn][BF4], and [Pn][PF6], where n = 1 to 4, and denotes the number of carbon atoms in each alkyl chain) have been investigated by X-ray diffraction in order to elucidate the effect of ion size on the disordered structure of organic salts. All the salts exhibit one or more solid-solid phase transitions in differential scanning calorimetric curves. Powder X-ray diffraction revealed that the highest temperature solid phase of these salts belongs to a crystal system with a high cubic or hexagonal symmetry. The structures are classified into 5 different types: CsCl', NaCl, NaCl', inverse NiAs, and TBPPF6. The CsCl'-type whose octant corresponds to the original CsCl unit cell is observed for [N1][PF6] owing to the orientational difference for the cation or the anion. The NaCl-type structure is observed for the N2(+) and P2(+) salts while the NaCl'-type structure is observed for [N3][PF6], where the configuration of ions is based on the NaCl-type but the four equivalent positions in the original NaCl lattice split into two sets of equivalent positions (three and one). The inverse NiAs structure is observed for [P3][PF6]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that the disordering of ions in [P4][PF6] becomes more significant with increasing temperature. The new structure of a cubic phase, the TBPPF6-type structure, is found for the salts with long alkyl chains. The structure is roughly determined at 333 K and the ions therein are highly disordered but not rotating. The validity of the radius ratio rule is confirmed through appropriate assessment of the ion size.

  13. Generating Realistic Environments for Cyber Operations Development, Testing, and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    capture comparator ................................................................. 11  Figure 9. Detailed view of social net behavioral analysis scoring...of social net behavioral analysis scoring 5.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS Truly realistic traffic generation can arguably only be achieved

  14. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available of the 9th International Joint Conference on Biomedical Engineering Systems and Technologies, Rome, Italy. 21-23 February, 2016 A Framework for Creating Realistic Synthetic Fluorescence Microscopy Image Sequences Matsilele Mabaso1, Daniel Withey1...

  15. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  16. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  17. Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    hippocampal slice samples to better understand blast-induced brain damage. 15. SUBJECT TERMS RDX spheres , organotypic cultures of hippocampus, small...Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices by Thuvan Piehler, Rohan Banton, Lars Piehler, Richard Benjamin, Ray...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-TR-7197 April 2015 Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices Thuvan

  18. Phi photoproduction near threshold with Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka evading phi NN interactions

    CERN Document Server

    William, R A

    1998-01-01

    Existing intermediate and high energy phi-photoproduction data is consistent with purely diffractive production (i.e., Pomeron exchange). However, near threshold (1.574 GeV K sup + K sup - decay angular distribution. We stress the importance of measurements with linearly polarized photons near the phi threshold to separate natural and unnatural parity exchange mechanisms. Approved and planned phi photoproduction and electroproduction experiments at Jefferson Lab will help establish the relative dynamical contributions near threshold and clarify outstanding theoretical issues related to apparent Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka violations.

  19. Toward realistic gauge-Higgs grand unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furui, Atsushi; Hosotani, Yutaka; Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    The SO(11) gauge-Higgs grand unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is presented. The 4D Higgs field is identified as the zero mode of the fifth-dimensional component of the gauge potentials, or as the fluctuation mode of the Aharonov-Bohm phase θ along the fifth dimension. Fermions are introduced in the bulk in the spinor and vector representations of SO(11). SO(11) is broken to SO(4)×SO(6) by the orbifold boundary conditions, which is broken to SU2×U1×SU3 by a brane scalar. Evaluating the effective potential V(θ), we show that the electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken to U1. The quark-lepton masses are generated by the Hosotani mechanism and brane interactions, with which the observed mass spectrum is reproduced. Proton decay is forbidden thanks to the new fermion number conservation. It is pointed out that there appear light exotic fermions. The Higgs boson mass is determined with the quark-lepton masses given; however, it turns out to be smaller than the observed value.

  20. Toward Realistic Gauge-Higgs Grand Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Furui, Atsushi; Yamatsu, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The $SO(11)$ gauge-Higgs grand unification in the Randall-Sundrum warped space is presented. The 4D Higgs field is identified as the zero mode of the fifth dimensional component of the gauge potentials, or as the fluctuation mode of the Aharonov-Bohm phase $\\theta_H$ along the fifth dimension. Fermions are introduced in the bulk in the spinor and vector representations of $SO(11)$. $SO(11)$ is broken to $SO(4) \\times SO(6)$ by the orbifold boundary conditions, which is broken to $SU(2)_L \\times U(1)_Y \\times SU(3)_C$ by a brane scalar. Evaluating the effective potential $V_{\\rm eff} (\\theta_H)$, we show that the electroweak symmetry is dynamically broken to $U(1)_{\\rm EM}$. The quark-lepton masses are generated by the Hosotani mechanism and brane interactions, with which the observed mass spectrum is reproduced. The proton decay is forbidden thanks to the new fermion number conservation. It is pointed out that there appear light exotic fermions. The Higgs boson mass is determined with the quark-lepton masses ...

  1. Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN): a New Alternative for Data-driven Modelling in Hydrology and Water Resources Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, S.; Tolson, B.; Burn, D.; Seglenieks, F.

    2012-04-01

    Reformulated Neural Network (ReNN) has been recently developed as an efficient and more effective alternative to feedforward multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural networks [Razavi, S., and Tolson, B. A. (2011). "A new formulation for feedforward neural networks." IEEE Transactions on Neural Networks, 22(10), 1588-1598, DOI: 1510.1109/TNN.2011.2163169]. This presentation initially aims to introduce the ReNN to the water resources community and then demonstrates ReNN applications to water resources related problems. ReNN is essentially equivalent to a single-hidden-layer MLP neural network but defined on a new set of network variables which is more effective than the traditional set of network weights and biases. The main features of the new network variables are that they are geometrically interpretable and each variable has a distinct role in forming the network response. ReNN is more efficiently trained as it has a less complex error response surface. In addition to the ReNN training efficiency, the interpretability of the ReNN variables enables the users to monitor and understand the internal behaviour of the network while training. Regularization in the ReNN response can be also directly measured and controlled. This feature improves the generalization ability of the network. The appeal of the ReNN is demonstrated with two ReNN applications to water resources engineering problems. In the first application, the ReNN is used to model the rainfall-runoff relationships in multiple watersheds in the Great Lakes basin located in northeastern North America. Modelling inflows to the Great Lakes are of great importance to the management of the Great Lakes system. Due to the lack of some detailed physical data about existing control structures in many subwatersheds of this huge basin, the data-driven approach to modelling such as the ReNN are required to replace predictions from a physically-based rainfall runoff model. Unlike traditional MLPs, the ReNN does not necessarily

  2. An improved k-NN method based on multiple-point statistics for classification of high-spatial resolution imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Jing, L.; Li, H.; Liu, Q.; Ding, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the potential of multiple-point statistics (MPS) for object-based classification is explored using a modified k-nearest neighbour (k-NN) classification method (MPk-NN). The method first utilises a training image derived from a classified map to characterise the spatial correlation between multiple points of land cover classes, overcoming the limitations of two-point geostatistical methods, and then the spatial information in the form of multiple-point probability is incorporated into the k-NN classifier. The remotely sensed image of an IKONOS subscene of the Beijing urban area was selected to evaluate the method. The image was object-based classified using the MPk-NN method and several alternatives, including the traditional k-NN, the geostatistically weighted k-NN, the Bayesian method, the decision tree classifier (DTC), and the support vector machine classifier (SVM). It was demonstrated that the MPk-NN approach can achieve greater classification accuracy relative to the alternatives, which are 82.05% and 89.12% based on pixel and object testing data, respectively. Thus, the proposed method is appropriate for object-based classification.

  3. 核子-核子散射过程的研究和矢量介子交换势%Studies of NN Scattering Process and Vector Meson Exchange Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴连荣; 张宗烨; 余友文; 袁淑立

    2004-01-01

    In this work, the vector meson exchange effect in NN interaction is studied on quark level in the extended chiral SU(3) quark model. The r, ρ and ω-meson exchange GCM potentials of central force and NN scattering phase shifts for all scattering partial waves are given. It shows that the vetor meson exchange potential can substitute one-gluon exchange (OGE) potential to explain repulsive core of the NN interaction.%在推广的手征SU(3)夸克模型下讨论了核子-核子散射过程和矢量介子交换势.给出了赝标π介子和矢量ρ和ω介子的GCM中心力的交换势和NN散射14个分波的相移.研究表明,矢量介子交换势可以替代单胶子交换势以解释核力的短程排斥.

  4. Simulation of realistic instrument noise for GRACE follow-on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellmer, Matthias; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Computer simulations have been an indispensable tool in assessing and predicting the performance of gravity recovery satellite missions, both present and future. Future satellite missions like GRACE follow-on will measure Earth's gravity with a much higher precision than their predecessors. This increased precision makes it necessary to reevaluate the applicability of current simulation strategies to future gravity missions. In past simulation efforts, effects that are known to be relevant factors for mission performance are often approximated or modeled incompletely. One such effect is the noise applied to simulated observables like precise orbits or K-Band ranges. These noisy observables are generated by adding simple white noise of a specific power to noise-free raw measurements. The noisy observables are then used in closed-loop simulations to quantify the performance of specific instruments, or a mission scenario as a whole. This work presents strategies to generate more realistic noise for satellite missions as implemented in the GROOPS (Gravity Recovery Object Orientated Programming System) software package. A generic interface for different noise generators is implemented in GROOPS. This interface is used to add different types of noise, such as white noise, colored or correlated noise, or noise with a given power spectral density to generated observables. It is thus possible to study the effect of the chosen noise model on the generated observable, and conversely the recovered gravity field as a whole. A better knowledge of the noise characteristics of the instruments on GRACE and GRACE follow-on will allow us to improve our understanding of their complex interactions. It will also allow us to improve our processing strategies for both simulated and real data, and will thus lead to a more precise and better understood recovered gravity field.

  5. N-&-N, a new class of cell death-inducing kinase inhibitors derived from the purine roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettayeb, Karima; Sallam, Hatem; Ferandin, Yoan; Popowycz, Florence; Fournet, Guy; Hassan, Moustapha; Echalier, Aude; Bernard, Philippe; Endicott, Jane; Joseph, Benoît; Meijer, Laurent

    2008-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their regulators show frequent abnormalities in tumors. Ten low molecular weight pharmacologic inhibitors of CDKs are currently in clinical trials against various cancers, including the 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine (R)-roscovitine (CYC202/Seliciclib). We here report the characterization of N-&-N1, a bioisoster of roscovitine displaying improved antitumoral properties. N-&-N1 shows exquisite selectivity for CDKs, with 2- to 3-fold enhanced potency compared with (R)-roscovitine. Inhibition of retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and RNA polymerase II Ser2 phosphorylation in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exposed to N-&-N1 indicates that N-&-N1 is able to inhibit CDKs in a cellular context. N-&-N1 also down-regulates the expression of RNA polymerase. Cocrystal structures of N-&-N1 and (R)-roscovitine in complex with CDK2/cyclin A reveal that both inhibitors adopt similar binding modes. A competitive assay shows that, compared with (R)-roscovitine, N-&-N1 has reduced affinity for Erk2 and pyridoxal kinase. N-&-N1 triggers cell death in a panel of diverse cell lines. Cell death is accompanied by events characteristic of apoptosis: cytochrome c release, activation of effector caspases, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Induction of p53 and p21CIP1 and down-regulation of the Mcl-1 antiapoptotic factor were also observed. Studies in mice show that N-&-N1 has pharmacokinetics properties similar to those of (R)-roscovitine. Altogether, these results show that analogues of (R)-roscovitine can be designed with improved antitumor potential.

  6. cis-Diaquabis(di-2-pyrimidinyl sulfide- K2N,N) Cobalt(II) Ditetrafluoridoborate: Lone Pair-aromatic and Anion-П Interactions in the Self-assembly of Coordination Complex%cis-Diaquabis(di-2-pyrimidinyl sulfide- K2N,N) Cobalt(II) Ditetrafluoridoborate: Lone Pair-aromatic and Anion-П Interactions in the Self-assembly of Coordination Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The title complex, [Co(DprS)2(H20)2]2(BF4)4 (DprS is di-2-pyrimidinyl sulfide), was obtained and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR and X-ray crystallography. The complex crystallizes in space group P21/c with a = 11.742(1), b = 22,439(2), c = 20.538(2) A, β = 109.713(5)°, Z = 4, V = 5094.3(3)A, Dc = 1.692 g.cm-3, μ = 0.929 mm-I, F(000) = 2600, R = 0.0756 and wR = 0.1929. The asymmetric unit of the title complex is comprised of two isomeric cobalt(II) centers (Co(l) and Co(2)) with a cis-[Co(DprS)2(H20)2]2+ moiety. Each Co(II) center exhibits a similar distorted N402-octahedral coordination geometry surrounded by a pair of DprS in a N,N'-chelate mode and two aqua ligands in a cis-relationship. Unconventional S-π(pyrimidinyl), N-π(pyrimidinyl), and anion(BF4)...π(pyrimidinyl) are found to combine with the C-H-.-F and O-H...F interactions to stabilize a whole three-dimensional framework with the mononuclear units (Co(l) and Co(2)). The ligand conformation will be also discussed.

  7. Toxicity of environmentally realistic concentrations of chlorpyrifos and terbuthylazine in indoor microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ana Santos; Cerejeira, Maria José; Daam, Michiel A

    2017-09-01

    Few studies have been conducted into the evaluation of environmentally realistic pesticide mixtures using model ecosystems. In the present study, the effects of single and combined environmentally realistic concentrations of the herbicide terbuthylazine and the insecticide chlorpyrifos were evaluated using laboratory microcosms. Direct toxic effects of chlorpyrifos were noted on copepod nauplii and cladocerans and the recovery of the latter was likely related with the decrease observed in rotifer abundances. Terbuthylazine potentiated the effect of chlorpyrifos on feeding rates of Daphnia magna, presumably by triggering the transformation of chlorpyrifos to more toxic oxon-analogs. Possible food-web interactions resulting from multiple chemical (and other) stressors likely to be present in edge-of-field water bodies need to be further evaluated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of ultrasonic wave propagation in composite laminates with realistic discontinuity representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenyak, Andreea-Manuela; Schorer, Nora; Sause, Markus G R

    2017-06-20

    This paper presents a method for embedding realistic defect geometries of a fiber reinforced material in a finite element modeling environment in order to simulate active ultrasonic inspection. When ultrasonic inspection is used experimentally to investigate the presence of defects in composite materials, the microscopic defect geometry may cause signal characteristics that are difficult to interpret. Hence, modeling of this interaction is key to improve our understanding and way of interpreting the acquired ultrasonic signals. To model the true interaction of the ultrasonic wave field with such defect structures as pores, cracks or delamination, a realistic three dimensional geometry reconstruction is required. We present a 3D-image based reconstruction process which converts computed tomography data in adequate surface representations ready to be embedded for processing with finite element methods. Subsequent modeling using these geometries uses a multi-scale and multi-physics simulation approach which results in quantitative A-Scan ultrasonic signals which can be directly compared with experimental signals. Therefore, besides the properties of the composite material, a full transducer implementation, piezoelectric conversion and simultaneous modeling of the attached circuit is applied. Comparison between simulated and experimental signals provides very good agreement in electrical voltage amplitude and the signal arrival time and thus validates the proposed modeling approach. Simulating ultrasound wave propagation in a medium with a realistic shape of the geometry clearly shows a difference in how the disturbance of the waves takes place and finally allows more realistic modeling of A-scans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiplicity distribution and spectra of negatively charged hadrons in Au+Au collisions at square root of (sNN) = 130 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schweda, K; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-09-10

    The minimum-bias multiplicity distribution and the transverse momentum and pseudorapidity distributions for central collisions have been measured for negative hadrons ( h(-)) in Au+Au interactions at square root of ([s(NN)]) = 130 GeV. The multiplicity density at midrapidity for the 5% most central interactions is dN(h(-))/d(eta)/(eta = 0) = 280+/-1(stat)+/-20(syst), an increase per participant of 38% relative to pp collisions at the same energy. The mean transverse momentum is 0.508+/-0.012 GeV/c and is larger than in central Pb+Pb collisions at lower energies. The scaling of the h(-) yield per participant is a strong function of p( perpendicular). The pseudorapidity distribution is almost constant within /eta/<1.

  10. Preliminary Physics Summary: Inclusive J/$\\psi$ production at forward rapidity in p-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}_{\\rm {NN}} = 8.16$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The inclusive J/$\\psi$ production has been studied in p-Pb interactions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon-nucleon collision $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=8.16$ TeV, using the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC. The J/$\\psi$ meson is detected, via its decay to a muon pair, in the centre-of-mass rapidity intervals $2.03NN}}=5.02$ TeV and to available theory calculations.

  11. Production of non-photonic electrons in U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV at the STAR experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdosova, Katarina

    2016-11-01

    Heavy quarks are suitable probes to study the properties of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), a strongly interacting medium, which can be created in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Non-photonic electrons (NPE) that originate from semileptonic decays of D and B mesons can serve as a good proxy for heavy flavor quarks. Nuclear modification factor RAA of NPE is measured in heavy-ion collisions, which is sensitive to the effect of QGP on heavy quarks. Measurements of NPE RAA in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV reveal that NPE production is strongly suppressed. In year 2012 STAR collected data from U+U collisions at √sNN = 193 GeV. In most central collisions higher energy density can be achieved in comparison to collisions of gold nuclei. In this proceedings the preliminary results on NPE in 0-5% most central U+U collisions at a transverse momentum range 1.2 < pT < 6 GeV/c are presented. The nuclear modification factor in U+U collisions is compared to that in Au+Au collisions and theoretical models.

  12. Identified Light and Strange Hadron Spectra at √sNN = 14.5 GeV with STAR at RHIC BES I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandenburg, James Daniel

    2016-08-01

    With the recently measured Au+Au collisions at √sNN=14.5 GeV, RHIC completed its first phase of the Beam Energy Scan (BES) program. The main motivation of the BES program is the search for a conjectured critical point and possible first order phase transition. Amongst the various collision energies of 7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, and 39 GeV, that have been previously presented by STAR, collisions at 14.5 GeV will provide data set in the relatively large chemical potential gap between the 11.5 and 19.6 GeV center-of-mass energies. In this contribution, we report new STAR measurements of Au+Au at √sNN=14.5 GeV that include identified light particle RCP and spectra, as well as measurements of the strange hadrons (K0 s, A, ξ, and ω). The spectra from both light and strange particles cover a significant range of the intermediate transverse momentum (2 < pT < 5 GeV/c) in all beam energies. We will discuss the physics implications of these observables and whether hadronic or partonic interactions dominate the collision dynamics at a given center-of-mass energy.

  13. J/$\\psi$ suppression at forward rapidity in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Shakeel; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; An, Mangmang; Andrei, Cristian; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Balasubramanian, Supraja; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Grachov, Oleg Anatolievich; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Horak, David; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Incani, Elisa; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Isakov, Vladimir; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; 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Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Mishra, Tribeni; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Martin; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; 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Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vickovic, Linda; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yalcin, Serpil; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2017-01-01

    The inclusive J/$\\psi$ production has been studied in Pb-Pb and pp interactions at the centre-of-mass energy per nucleon-nucleon collision $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 5.02$ TeV, using the ALICE detector at the CERN LHC. The J/$\\psi$ meson is detected, in the centre-of-mass rapidity interval $2.5NN}} = 2.76$ TeV. The ratio of the $R_{\\rm AA}$ values at the two energies is also computed and compared to calculations of statistical and dyn...

  14. Parallel BDD-based monolithic approach for acoustic fluid-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Satsuki; Kawai, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Shinobu

    2012-12-01

    Parallel BDD-based monolithic algorithms for acoustic fluid-structure interaction problems are developed. In a previous study, two schemes, NN-I + CGC-FULL and NN-I + CGC-DIAG, have been proven to be efficient among several BDD-type schemes for one processor. Thus, the parallelization of these schemes is discussed in the present study. These BDD-type schemes consist of the operations of the Schur complement matrix-vector (Sv) product, Neumann-Neumann (NN) preconditioning, and the coarse problem. In the present study, the Sv product and NN preconditioning are parallelized for both schemes, and the parallel implementation of the solid and fluid parts of the coarse problem is considered for NN-I + CGC-DIAG. The results of numerical experiments indicate that both schemes exhibit performances that are almost as good as those of single solid and fluid analyses in the Sv product and NN preconditioning. Moreover, NN-I + CGC-DIAG appears to become more efficient as the problem size becomes large due to the parallel calculation of the coarse problem.

  15. Binding in light nuclei: Statistical NN uncertainties vs Computational accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the impact of the statistical uncertainties of the the nucleon-nucleon interaction, based on the Granada-2013 np-pp database, on the binding energies of the triton and the alpha particle using a bootstrap method, by solving the Faddeev equations for $^3$H and the Yakubovsky equations for $^4$He respectively. We check that in practice about 30 samples prove enough for a reliable error estimate. An extrapolation of the well fulfilled Tjon-line correlation predicts the experimental binding of the alpha particle within uncertainties.

  16. The construction of context-mechanisms-outcomes in realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsley, Paul; Howard, David; Owen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    To discuss the construction of context-mechanisms-outcomes (CMOs) developed as part of a realistic evaluation study of two aggression management training programmes. Realistic evaluation draws on theories and methods derived from the social sciences. It provides a distinctive account of the nature of programmes and how they work. Realistic evaluation is a form of evaluation that is driven by theory, and was based by Pawson and Tilley ( 1997 ) on the philosophy of critical realism. Critical realism is an important perspective in modern philosophy and social science, but it is largely absent in the field of healthcare research. This paper provides a critical discussion on the construction of CMOs as part of a realistic evaluation study. This paper draws on the personal experiences of the author in using realistic evaluation to evaluate training in aggression management. Realistic evaluation stresses four key linked concepts for explaining and understanding programmes: 'mechanism', 'context', 'outcome pattern' and 'context-mechanisms-outcomes (CMO) pattern configuration'. A CMO configuration is a proposition stating what it is about an initiative that works, for whom and in what circumstances. In this way, the effectiveness of the programme is understood, with an explanation of why the outcomes developed as they did and how the programme was able to react to underlying mechanisms and in what contexts. Therefore, a realistic evaluation researcher is not just inspecting outcomes to see if an initiative (implementation) works, but is analysing the outcomes to discover if the conjectured mechanism or context theories are confirmed. This analysis provides not only evidence of effectiveness, but also an explanation that helps to develop and improve the content and the targeting of future programmes. The development of CMOs requires a great deal of skill on the part of the researcher and requires a flexibility of approach when collecting and analysing the data and in

  17. Realistic modeling of neurons and networks: towards brain simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Egidio; Solinas, Sergio; Garrido, Jesus; Casellato, Claudia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Mapelli, Jonathan; Gandolfi, Daniela; Prestori, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    Realistic modeling is a new advanced methodology for investigating brain functions. Realistic modeling is based on a detailed biophysical description of neurons and synapses, which can be integrated into microcircuits. The latter can, in turn, be further integrated to form large-scale brain networks and eventually to reconstruct complex brain systems. Here we provide a review of the realistic simulation strategy and use the cerebellar network as an example. This network has been carefully investigated at molecular and cellular level and has been the object of intense theoretical investigation. The cerebellum is thought to lie at the core of the forward controller operations of the brain and to implement timing and sensory prediction functions. The cerebellum is well described and provides a challenging field in which one of the most advanced realistic microcircuit models has been generated. We illustrate how these models can be elaborated and embedded into robotic control systems to gain insight into how the cellular properties of cerebellar neurons emerge in integrated behaviors. Realistic network modeling opens up new perspectives for the investigation of brain pathologies and for the neurorobotic field.

  18. Dihadron Azimuthal Correlations in p-p Collisions at sNN=7 TeV and p-Pb Collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dihadron azimuthal correlations in p-p collisions at sNN=7 TeV and p-Pb collisions at sNN=5.02 TeV are investigated in the framework of a multisource thermal model. The model can approximately describe the experimental results measured in the Large Hadron Collider. We find the px amplitude of the source is magnified and the source translates along the direction.

  19. γ v NN^{*} Electrocouplings in Dyson-Schwinger Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    A symmetry preserving framework for the study of continuum Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is obtained from a truncated solution of the QCD equations of motion or QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs). A nonperturbative solution of the DSEs enables the study of, e.g., hadrons as composites of dressed-quarks and dressed-gluons, the phenomena of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB), and therefrom an articulation of any connection between them. It is within this context that we present a unified study of Nucleon, Delta and Roper elastic and transition electromagnetic form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector ⊗ vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running coupling and masses in QCD and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of DCSB in the bound-state problem.

  20. γ v NN^{*} Electrocouplings in Dyson-Schwinger Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    A symmetry preserving framework for the study of continuum Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is obtained from a truncated solution of the QCD equations of motion or QCD's Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs). A nonperturbative solution of the DSEs enables the study of, e.g., hadrons as composites of dressed-quarks and dressed-gluons, the phenomena of confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB), and therefrom an articulation of any connection between them. It is within this context that we present a unified study of Nucleon, Delta and Roper elastic and transition electromagnetic form factors, and compare predictions made using a framework built upon a Faddeev equation kernel and interaction vertices that possess QCD-like momentum dependence with results obtained using a symmetry-preserving treatment of a vector ⊗ vector contact-interaction. The comparison emphasises that experiment is sensitive to the momentum dependence of the running coupling and masses in QCD and highlights that the key to describing hadron properties is a veracious expression of DCSB in the bound-state problem.

  1. Continually Answering Constraint k-NN Queries in Unstructured P2P Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Xiao-Chun Yang; Guo-Ren Wang; Ge Yu; Lei Chen; X. Sean Wang,; Xue-Min Lin

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of efficiently computing distributed geographical k-NN queries in an unstructured peer-to-peer (P2P) system, in which each peer is managed by an individual organization and can only communicate with its logical neighboring peers. Such queries are based on local filter query statistics, and require as less communication cost as possible, which makes it more difficult than the existing distributed k-NN queries. Especially, we hope to reduce candidate peers and degrade communication cost. In this paper, we propose an efficient pruning technique to minimize the number of candidate peers to be processed to answer the k-Nnqueries. Our approach is especially suitable for continuous k-Nnqueries when updating peers, including changing ranges of peers, dynamically leaving or joining peers, and updating data in a peer.In addition, simulation results show that the proposed approach outperforms the existing Minimum Bounding Rectangle (MBR)-based query approaches, especially for continuous queries.

  2. Main-sequence progenitor configurations of the NN Ser candidate circumbinary planetary system are dynamically unstable

    CERN Document Server

    Mustill, Alexander J; Villaver, Eva; Veras, Dimitri; Davis, Philip J; Horner, Jonathan; Wittenmyer, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Recent observations of the NN Serpentis post-common envelope binary system have revealed eclipse timing variations that have been attributed to the presence of two Jovian-mass exoplanets. Under the assumption that these planets are real and survived from the binary's Main Sequence state, we reconstruct initial binaries that give rise to the present NN Ser configuration and test the dynamical stability of the original system. Under standard assumptions about binary evolution, we find that survival of the planets through the entire Main Sequence life-time is very unlikely. Hence, we conclude that the planets are not survivors from before the Common Envelope phase, implying that either they formed recently out of material ejected from the primary, or that the observed signals are of non-planetary origin.

  3. Proficient Feature Extraction Strategy for Performance Enhancement of NN Based Early Breast Tumor Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khondker Jahid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultra Wideband is one of the promising microwave imaging techniques for breast tumor prognosis. The basic principle of tumor detection depends on the dielectric properties discrepancies between healthy and tumorous tissue. Usually, the tumor affected tissues scatter more signal than the healthy one and are used for early tumor detection through received pulses. Feedforward backpropagation neural network(NN was so far used for some research works by showing its detection efficiency up to 1mm (radius size with 95.8% accuracy. This paper introduces an efficient feature extraction method to further improve the performance by considering four main features of backpropagation NN. This performance is being increased to 99.99%. This strategy is well justified for classifying the normal and tumor affected breast with 100% accuracy in its early stage. It also enhances the training and testing performances by reducing the required duration. The overall performance is 99.99% verified by using thirteen different tumor sizes.

  4. Vesihuollon suunnitteluohje : Suunnittelukäytännöt pääkaupunkiseudulla

    OpenAIRE

    Myllylä, Hanna

    2012-01-01

    Pääkaupunkiseudun kunnissa, Espoossa, Helsingissä, Kauniaisissa ja Vantaalla, on ollut omat käytäntönsä vesihuollon suunnittelussa. Näiden kuntien vesilaitosten yhdistyessä Helsingin seudun ympäristöpalvelut HSY Vesihuolloksi, tuli tarve yhtenäistää kuntien suunnittelukäytäntöjä. Insinöörityön tavoitteena oli laatia Verkostosuunnittelukäytännöt-ohje pääkaupunkiseudun kuntien vesihuollon suunnittelukäytäntöjen yhtenäistämiseksi. Pääkaupunkiseudun suun-nittelukäytännöt kartoitettiin ja niis...

  5. Improved NN-GM(1,1 for Postgraduates’ Employment Confidence Index Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Postgraduates’ employment confidence index (ECI forecasting can help the university to predict the future trend of postgraduates’ employment. However, the common forecast method based on the grey model (GM has unsatisfactory performance to a certain extent. In order to forecast postgraduates’ ECI efficiently, this paper discusses a novel hybrid forecast model using limited raw samples. Different from previous work, the residual modified GM(1,1 model is combined with the improved neural network (NN in this work. In particullar, the hybrid model reduces the residue of the standard GM(1,1 model as well as accelerating the convergence rate of the standard NN. After numerical studies, the illustrative results are provided to demonstrate the forecast performance of the proposed model. In addition, some strategies for improving the postgraduates’ employment confidence have been discussed.

  6. Experimental study of structural damage identification based on WPT and coupling NN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian; CHEN Yong; SUN Bing-nan

    2005-01-01

    Too many sensors and data information in structural health monitoring system raise the problem of how to realize multi-sensor information fusion. An experiment on a three-story frame structure was conducted to obtain vibration test data in 36damage cases. A coupling neural network (NN) based on multi-sensor information fusion is proposed to achieve identification of damage occurrence, damage localization and damage quantification, respectively. First, wavelet packet transform (WPT) is used to extract features of vibration test data from structure with different damage extent. Then, data fusion is conducted by assembling feature vectors of different type sensors. Finally, three sets of coupling NN are constructed to implement decision fusion and damage identification. The results of experimental study proved the validity and feasibility of the proposed methodology.

  7. Breaking with fun, educational and realistic learning games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus Henriksen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    between the game and other didactic activities that formed the learning process; and, the game might have been intended to be realistic, but it was in the gaps where this realism was critically assessed that learned understanding was forged. While thinking learning games as fun, educative and realistic......This paper addresses the game conceptions and values that learning games inherit from regular gaming, as well as how they affect the use and development of learning games. Its key points concern the issues of thinking learning games as fun, educative and realistic, which is how learning games...... are commonly conceived as means for staging learning processes, and that thinking learning games so has an inhibiting effect in regard to creating learning processes. The paper draws upon a qualitative study of participants' experiences with ‘the EIS Simulation', which is a computer-based learning game...

  8. Survey of Approaches to Generate Realistic Synthetic Graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lee, Sangkeun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Sarah S [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Imam, Neena [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A graph is a flexible data structure that can represent relationships between entities. As with other data analysis tasks, the use of realistic graphs is critical to obtaining valid research results. Unfortunately, using the actual ("real-world") graphs for research and new algorithm development is difficult due to the presence of sensitive information in the data or due to the scale of data. This results in practitioners developing algorithms and systems that employ synthetic graphs instead of real-world graphs. Generating realistic synthetic graphs that provide reliable statistical confidence to algorithmic analysis and system evaluation involves addressing technical hurdles in a broad set of areas. This report surveys the state of the art in approaches to generate realistic graphs that are derived from fitted graph models on real-world graphs.

  9. Performance Evaluation of Realistic Vanet Using Traffic Light Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Nidhi,

    2012-01-01

    Vehicular Ad-hoc Networks (VANETs) is attracting considerable attention from the research community and the automotive industry to improve the services of Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). As today's transportation system faces serious challenges in terms of road safety, efficiency, and environmental friendliness, the idea of so called "ITS" has emerged. Due to the expensive cost of deployment and complexity of implementing such a system in real world, research in VANET relies on simulation. This paper attempts to evaluate the performance of VANET in a realistic environment. The paper contributes by generating a real world road Map of JNU using existing Google Earth and GIS tools. Traffic data from a limited region of road Map is collected to capture the realistic mobility. In this work, the entire region has been divided into various smaller routes. The realistic mobility model used here considers the driver's route choice at the run time. It also studies the clustering effect caused by traffic lights...

  10. Principles of maximally classical and maximally realistic quantum mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S M Roy

    2002-08-01

    Recently Auberson, Mahoux, Roy and Singh have proved a long standing conjecture of Roy and Singh: In 2-dimensional phase space, a maximally realistic quantum mechanics can have quantum probabilities of no more than + 1 complete commuting cets (CCS) of observables coexisting as marginals of one positive phase space density. Here I formulate a stationary principle which gives a nonperturbative definition of a maximally classical as well as maximally realistic phase space density. I show that the maximally classical trajectories are in fact exactly classical in the simple examples of coherent states and bound states of an oscillator and Gaussian free particle states. In contrast, it is known that the de Broglie–Bohm realistic theory gives highly nonclassical trajectories.

  11. Comparative analysis for NN inverse model controller and backstepping controller on mobile robots

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Gjonaj; Betim Çiço; Arnisa Myrtellari

    2016-01-01

    This work addresses the design and implementation of a neural network based controller for the trajectory tracking of a differential drive mobile robot. A neural network based tracking control algorithm is proposed and simulation and experimental results are presented. The algorithm is a control structure that makes possible the integration of a back-stepping controller and a neural network (NN) computed-torque controller for a nonholonomic mobile robot. Integration of a neural network contro...

  12. Comparative Analysis for NN-Based Adaptive Back-stepping Controller and Back-stepping Controller

    OpenAIRE

    Margarita Gjonaj; BetimÇiço; ArnisaMyrtellari

    2016-01-01

    This work primarily addresses the design and implementation of a neural network based controller for the trajectory tracking of a differential drive mobile robot. The proposed control algorithm is an NN-based adaptive controller which tunes the gains of the back-stepping controller online according to the robot reference trajectory and its initial posture. In this method, a neural network is needed to learn the characteristics of the plant dynamics and make use of it to determine the future i...

  13. Capture cross sections of 15N(n, {\\gamma})16N at astrophysical energies

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Guang-wei; Sheng, Zong-qiang; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We have reanalyzed reaction cross sections of 16N on 12C target. The nucleon density distribution of 16N, especially surface density distribution, was extracted using the modified Glauber model. On the basis of dilute surface densities, the discussion of 15N(n, {\\gamma})16N reaction was performed within the framework of the direct capture reaction mechanism. The calculations agreed quite well with the experimental data.

  14. Signal peptide discrimination and cleavage site identification using SVM and NN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemian, H B; Yusuf, S A; White, K

    2014-02-01

    About 15% of all proteins in a genome contain a signal peptide (SP) sequence, at the N-terminus, that targets the protein to intracellular secretory pathways. Once the protein is targeted correctly in the cell, the SP is cleaved, releasing the mature protein. Accurate prediction of the presence of these short amino-acid SP chains is crucial for modelling the topology of membrane proteins, since SP sequences can be confused with transmembrane domains due to similar composition of hydrophobic amino acids. This paper presents a cascaded Support Vector Machine (SVM)-Neural Network (NN) classification methodology for SP discrimination and cleavage site identification. The proposed method utilises a dual phase classification approach using SVM as a primary classifier to discriminate SP sequences from Non-SP. The methodology further employs NNs to predict the most suitable cleavage site candidates. In phase one, a SVM classification utilises hydrophobic propensities as a primary feature vector extraction using symmetric sliding window amino-acid sequence analysis for discrimination of SP and Non-SP. In phase two, a NN classification uses asymmetric sliding window sequence analysis for prediction of cleavage site identification. The proposed SVM-NN method was tested using Uni-Prot non-redundant datasets of eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins with SP and Non-SP N-termini. Computer simulation results demonstrate an overall accuracy of 0.90 for SP and Non-SP discrimination based on Matthews Correlation Coefficient (MCC) tests using SVM. For SP cleavage site prediction, the overall accuracy is 91.5% based on cross-validation tests using the novel SVM-NN model.

  15. NN robust based-PID Control of A Two-Link Flexible Robot Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Khairudin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents control of a two-link flexible robot manipulator. A planar two-link flexible manipulator that moves in the horizontal plane is considered. A dynamic model of the system is developed using an assumed mode methods. The NN robust based-PID controller is used to reduce a nonlinearities problem that can be efficiently solved. The system responses namely hub angular position, deflection and end-point acceleration responses at both links are obtained and analysed.

  16. Pattern-Based NN Control of a Class of Uncertain Nonlinear Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feifei; Wang, Cong

    2017-02-07

    This paper presents a pattern-based neural network (NN) control approach for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems. The approach consists of two phases of identification and another two phases of recognition and control. First, in the phase (i) of identification, adaptive NN controllers are designed to achieve closed-loop stability and tracking performance of nonlinear systems for different control situations, and the corresponding closed-loop control system dynamics are identified via deterministic learning. The identified control system dynamics are stored in constant radial basis function (RBF) NNs, and a set of constant NN controllers are constructed by using the obtained constant RBF networks. Second, in the phase (ii) of identification, when the plant is operated under different or abnormal conditions, the system dynamics under normal control are identified via deterministic learning. A bank of dynamical estimators is constructed for all the abnormal conditions and the learned knowledge is embedded in the estimators. Third, in the phase of recognition, when one identified control situation recurs, by using the constructed estimators, the recurred control situation will be rapidly recognized. Finally, in the phase of pattern-based control, based on the rapid recognition, the constant NN controller corresponding to the current control situation is selected, and both closed-loop stability and improved control performance can be achieved. The results presented show that the pattern-based control realizes a humanlike control process, and will provide a new framework for fast decision and control in dynamic environments. A simulation example is included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  17. Binding in light nuclei: Statistical NN uncertainties vs Computational accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Pérez, R.; Nogga, A.; Amaro, J. E.; Ruiz Arriola, E.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the impact of the statistical uncertainties of the the nucleon-nucleon interaction, based on the Granada-2013 np-pp database, on the binding energies of the triton and the alpha particle using a bootstrap method, by solving the Faddeev equations for 3H and the Yakubovsky equations for 4He respectively. We check that in practice about 30 samples prove enough for a reliable error estimate. An extrapolation of the well fulfilled Tjon-line correlation predicts the experimental binding of the alpha particle within uncertainties. Presented by RNP at Workshop for young scientists with research interests focused on physics at FAIR 14-19 February 2016 Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany).

  18. A Synthesis of 1H-Indazoles via a Cu(OAc)2-Catalyzed N-N Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheng-yi; Tang, Guangrong; He, Fengxian; Wang, Zhaobin; Jing, Hailin; Faessler, Roger

    2016-04-01

    A facile synthesis of 1H-indazoles featuring a Cu(OAc)2-catalyzed N-N bond formation using oxygen as the terminal oxidant is described. The reaction of readily available 2-aminobenzonitriles with various organometallic reagents led to o-aminoaryl N-H ketimine species. The subsequent Cu(OAc)2-catalyzed N-N bond formation in DMSO under oxygen afforded a wide variety of 1H-indazoles in good to excellent yields.

  19. ECG De-noising: A comparison between EEMD-BLMS and DWT-NN algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kærgaard, Kevin; Jensen, Søren Hjøllund; Puthusserypady, Sadasivan

    2015-08-01

    Electrocardiogram (ECG) is a widely used non-invasive method to study the rhythmic activity of the heart and thereby to detect the abnormalities. However, these signals are often obscured by artifacts from various sources and minimization of these artifacts are of paramount important. This paper proposes two adaptive techniques, namely the EEMD-BLMS (Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition in conjunction with the Block Least Mean Square algorithm) and DWT-NN (Discrete Wavelet Transform followed by Neural Network) methods in minimizing the artifacts from recorded ECG signals, and compares their performance. These methods were first compared on two types of simulated noise corrupted ECG signals: Type-I (desired ECG+noise frequencies outside the ECG frequency band) and Type-II (ECG+noise frequencies both inside and outside the ECG frequency band). Subsequently, they were tested on real ECG recordings. Results clearly show that both the methods works equally well when used on Type-I signals. However, on Type-II signals the DWT-NN performed better. In the case of real ECG data, though both methods performed similar, the DWT-NN method was a slightly better in terms of minimizing the high frequency artifacts.

  20. Ontological and Epistemological Foundations of Contemporary Pragmatic and Realistic Philosophy of Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Önal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Pragmatism, which is one of the mainstreams of the philosophy of law, became popular in the UK especially after the 18th century on the basis of utilitarianism, and in the USA and Scandinavian countries after the 19th century on the basis of realism. Books on philosophy of law and legal theory discuss these philosophies under the headings of pragmatist and realist philosophies of law, and present it basically as a continuation of the British and American philosophy. However, the roots of these legal movements, which are epistemologically experimental and sensational, ontologically realistic, and ethically utilitarian and relativist should be sought in the whole history of philosophy especially in Ancient Greek Philosophy. Thus, to show this historical background, in the article, we try to return to the history of utilitarianism, pragmatism, realism and relativism in philosophical thought. In the last part of the article, with the help of examples taken from some assessments of contemporary pragmatist and realist philosophers of law, how pragmatism respond to today's complex and interactive social reality is discussed.

  1. 2 types of spicules "observed" in 3D realistic models

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Realistic numerical 3D models of the outer solar atmosphere show two different kind of spicule-like phenomena, as also observed on the solar limb. The numerical models are calculated using the 2 types of spicules "observed" in 3D realistic models Oslo Staggered Code (OSC) to solve the full MHD equations with non-grey and NLTE radiative transfer and thermal conduction along the magnetic field lines. The two types of spicules arise as a natural result of the dynamical evolution in the models. We discuss the different properties of these two types of spicules, their differences from observed spicules and what needs to be improved in the models.

  2. Putting a Realistic Theory of Mind into Agency Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Stea, Diego

    2014-01-01

    concerning other such content. More realistically, individuals have some limited access to the minds of others. We explore the implications for classical agency theory of realistic assumptions regarding the human potential for interpersonal sensemaking. We discuss implications for the design and management......Agency theory is one of the most important foundational theories in management research, but it rests on contestable cognitive assumptions. Specifically, the principal is assumed to hold a perfect (correct) theory regarding some of the content of the agent's mind, while he is entirely ignorant...... of rewards, and trace implications for value creation in principal-agent relations....

  3. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Field Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of 'realistic' solenoids on low energy particle transport. The finding in this paper may be applicable to some lower energy particle transport system design.

  4. Nuclear Modification Factor of D0 Meson in Au + Au Collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guannan

    2016-12-01

    Heavy-flavor quarks are dominantly produced in initial hard scattering processes and experience the whole evolution of the system in heavy-ion collisions at RHIC energies. Thus they are suggested to be an excellent probe to the medium properties through their interaction with the medium. In this proceedings, we report our first measurement of D0 production via topological reconstruction using STAR's recently installed Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT). We also report our new measurement of Nuclear Modification Factor (RAA) of D0 mesons in central Au+Au collisions at √{sNN} = 200 GeV as a function of transverse momentum (pT). New results confirm the strong suppression at high pT with a much improved precision, and show that the RAA at high pT are comparable with light hadrons (π) and with D meson measurements at the LHC. Furthermore, several theoretical calculations are compared to our data, and with charm diffusion coefficient 2 πTDS ∼ 2- 12 can reproduce both the D0RAA and v2 data in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

  5. Kaon femtoscopy in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Shreyasi; The ALICE collaboration; Adamova, Dagmar; Adolfsson, Jonatan; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Bazo Alba, Jose Luis; Silva De Albuquerque, Danilo; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altenkamper, Lucas; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andreou, Dimitra; Andrews, Harry Arthur; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anson, Christopher Daniel; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Anwar, Rafay; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arnold, Oliver Werner; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barioglio, Luca; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Espinoza Beltran, Lucina Gabriela; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biro, Gabor; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Boca, Gianluigi; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Bonomi, Germano; Bonora, Matthias; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Botta, Elena; Bourjau, Christian; Bratrud, Lars; Braun-munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Broker, Theo Alexander; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buhler, Paul; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Cabala, Jan; Caffarri, Davide; Caines, Helen Louise; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Capon, Aaron Allan; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chandra, Sinjini; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chauvin, Alex; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Chowdhury, Tasnuva; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Concas, Matteo; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Costanza, Susanna; Crkovska, Jana; Crochet, Philippe; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danisch, Meike Charlotte; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Conti, Camila; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Derradi De Souza, Rafael; Franz Degenhardt, Hermann; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Deplano, Caterina; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Di Ruzza, Benedetto; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Van Doremalen, Lennart Vincent; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Duggal, Ashpreet Kaur; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Endress, Eric; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Esumi, Shinichi; Eulisse, Giulio; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Fabbietti, Laura; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Francisco, Audrey; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fronze, Gabriele Gaetano; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gajdosova, Katarina; Gallio, Mauro; Duarte Galvan, Carlos; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-solis, Edmundo Javier; Garg, Kunal; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; De Leone Gay, Maria Beatriz; Germain, Marie; Ghosh, Jhuma; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Sanchez Gonzalez, Andres; Gonzalez, Victor; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Greiner, Leo Clifford; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grion, Nevio; Gronefeld, Julius Maximilian; Grosa, Fabrizio; Grosse-oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grosso, Raffaele; Gruber, Lukas; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Bautista Guzman, Irais; Haake, Rudiger; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hamon, Julien Charles; Haque, Md Rihan; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hassan, Hadi; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Hellbar, Ernst; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Herrmann, Florian; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hills, Christopher; Hippolyte, Boris; Hladky, Jan; Hohlweger, Bernhard; Horak, David; Hornung, Sebastian; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Hughes, Charles; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Iga Buitron, Sergio Arturo; Ilkaev, Radiy; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Islam, Md Samsul; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacak, Barbara; Jacazio, Nicolo; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovsky, Jan; Jaelani, Syaefudin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jakubowska, Monika Joanna; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jercic, Marko; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karczmarczyk, Przemyslaw; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Ketzer, Bernhard Franz; Khabanova, Zhanna; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Khatun, Anisa; Khuntia, Arvind; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw Marek; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Byungchul; Kim, Daehyeok; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Minjung; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-boesing, Christian; Klewin, Sebastian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Lokesh; Kumar, Shyam; Kundu, Sourav; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lai, Yue Shi; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lapidus, Kirill; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lavicka, Roman; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Seongjoo; Lehas, Fatiha; Lehner, Sebastian; Lehrbach, Johannes; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Levai, Peter; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lim, Bong-hwi; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lindsay, Scott William; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Litichevskyi, Vladyslav; Llope, William; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Loncar, Petra; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Luhder, Jens Robert; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Lupi, Matteo; Lutz, Tyler Harrison; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Mao, Yaxian; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martinengo, Paolo; Lucio Martinez, Jose Antonio; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Mas, Alexis Jean-michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Masson, Erwann; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Mathis, Andreas Michael; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzilli, Marianna; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Mhlanga, Sibaliso; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mihaylov, Dimitar Lubomirov; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milosevic, Jovan; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Montes Prado, Esther; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Perez Moreno, Luis Alberto; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Munning, Konstantin; Munzer, Robert Helmut; Murakami, Hikari; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Myers, Corey James; Myrcha, Julian Wojciech; Nag, Dipanjan; Naik, Bharati; Nair, Rahul; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Narayan, Amrendra; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Nattrass, Christine; Rosado Navarro, Sebastian; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Ranjit; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Negrao De Oliveira, Renato Aparecido; Nellen, Lukas; Nesbo, Simon Voigt; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Cabanillas Noris, Juan Carlos; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Oravec, Matej; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pacik, Vojtech; Pagano, Davide; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Palni, Prabhakar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Panebianco, Stefano; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Jonghan; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Pathak, Surya Prakash; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Pei, Hua; Peitzmann, Thomas; Peng, Xinye; Pereira, Luis Gustavo; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Peretti Pezzi, Rafael; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Ozelin De Lima Pimentel, Lais; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pliquett, Fabian; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Poppenborg, Hendrik; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Pozdniakov, Valeriy; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Rami, Fouad; Rana, Dhan Bahadur; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Ratza, Viktor; Ravasenga, Ivan; Read, Kenneth Francis; Redlich, Krzysztof; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-lucian; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Rokita, Przemyslaw Stefan; Ronchetti, Federico; Dominguez Rosas, Edgar; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Rotondi, Alberto; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Vazquez Rueda, Omar; Rui, Rinaldo; Rumyantsev, Boris; Rustamov, Anar; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Saarinen, Sampo; Sadhu, Samrangy; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Saha, Sumit Kumar; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Baidyanath; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sandoval, Andres; Sarkar, Debojit; Sarkar, Nachiketa; Sarma, Pranjal; Sas, Mike Henry Petrus; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Scheid, Horst Sebastian; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schmidt, Marten Ole; Schmidt, Martin; Schmidt, Nicolas Vincent; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Sefcik, Michal; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Sekihata, Daiki; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Senyukov, Serhiy; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sett, Priyanka; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shaikh, Wadut; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Anjali; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Mona; Sharma, Monika; Sharma, Natasha; Sheikh, Ashik Ikbal; Shigaki, Kenta; Shou, Qiye; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singhal, Vikas; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Sozzi, Federica; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stankus, Paul; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Stocco, Diego; Storetvedt, Maksim Melnik; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Suljic, Miljenko; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Suzuki, Ken; Swain, Sagarika; Szabo, Alexander; Szarka, Imrich; Tabassam, Uzma; Takahashi, Jun; Tambave, Ganesh Jagannath; Tanaka, Naoto; Tarhini, Mohamad; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thakur, Dhananjaya; Thakur, Sanchari; Thomas, Deepa; Thoresen, Freja; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Tikhonov, Anatoly; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Rojas Torres, Solangel; Tripathy, Sushanta; Trogolo, Stefano; Trombetta, Giuseppe; Tropp, Lukas; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Trzeciak, Barbara Antonina; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Umaka, Ejiro Naomi; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vala, Martin; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vazquez Doce, Oton; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Velure, Arild; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Vertesi, Robert; Vickovic, Linda; Vigolo, Sonia; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Villatoro Tello, Abraham; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Voscek, Dominik; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Wagner, Boris; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Yosuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Weiser, Dennis Franz; Wenzel, Sandro Christian; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Whitehead, Andile Mothegi; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Willems, Guido Alexander; Williams, Crispin; Willsher, Emily; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Witt, William Edward; Yalcin, Serpil; Yamakawa, Kosei; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-kwon; Yoon, Jin Hee; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correa Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Chunhui, Zhang; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zmeskal, Johann; Zou, Shuguang

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional femtoscopic analyses for charged and neutral kaonsrecorded by ALICE in Pb–Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=2.76$ Femtoscopy is used to measure the space-time characteristics of particle production from the effects of quantum statistics and final-state interactions in two-particle correlations. Kaon femtoscopy is an important supplement to that of pions because it allows one to distinguish between different model scenarios working equally well for pions. In particular, we compare the measured 3D kaon radii with a purely hydrodynamical calculation and a model where the hydrodynamic phase is followed by a hadronic rescattering stage. The former predicts an approximate transverse mass ($m_{\\rm T}$) scaling of source radii obtained from pion and kaon correlations. This $m_{\\rm T}$ scaling appears to be broken in our data, which indicates the importance of the hadronic rescattering phase at LHC energies. A $k_{\\rm T}$ scaling of pion and kaon source r...

  6. Ab Initio Calculations of the N-N Bond Dissociation for the Gas-phase RDX and HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin-Lin; Liu, Pei-Jin; Hu, Song-Qi; He, Guo-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    NO2 fission is a vital factor for 1,3,5-Trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) decomposition. In this study, the geometry of the gas-phase RDX and HMX molecules was optimized, and the bond order and the bond dissociation energy of the N-N bonds were examined. Moreover, the rate constants of the gas-phase RDX and HMX conformers, concerning the N-N bond dissociation, were evaluated using the microcanonical variational transition state theory (μVT). The calculation results have shown that HMX is more stable than RDX in terms of the N-N bond dissociation, and the conformers stability parameters were as follows: RDXaaa HMX I HMX II. In addition, for the RDX conformers, the N-N bond of the pseudo-equatorial positioning of the nitro group was more stable than the N-N bond of the axial positioning of the nitro group, while the results were opposite in the case of the HMX conformers. Moreover, it has been shown that the dissociation rate constant of the N-N bond is influenced by the temperature significantly, thus the rate constants were much lower (<10-10 s-1) when the temperature was less than 1000 K.

  7. Towards a unified realistic shell-model Hamiltonian with the monopole-based universal force

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Sun, Y; Tazaki, S

    2013-01-01

    We propose a unified realistic shell-model Hamiltonian employing the pairing plus multipole Hamiltonian combined with the monopole interaction constructed starting from the monopole-based universal force by Otsuka it et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 012501 (2010)). It is demonstrated that the proposed PMMU model can consistently describe a large amount of spectroscopic data as well as binding energies in the pf and pf5/2g9/2 shell spaces, and could serve as a practical shell model for even heavier mass regions.

  8. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  9. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  10. Creating a Realistic Context for Team Projects in HCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, H.; Dijk, van E.M.A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Team projects are nowadays common practice in HCI education. This paper focuses on the role of clients and users in team projects in introductory HCI courses. In order to provide projects with a realistic context we invite people from industry to serve as clients for the student teams. Some of them

  11. The Potential and Challenges of Critical Realist Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Ian

    2013-01-01

    This article revisits the critical realist ethnographic process that was adopted in my doctoral thesis, which was concerned with the experiences of ethnic identity of white British and Pakistani British children as they started kindergarten in the northwest of England. The article focuses on the ethnography that emerged from the visits that I…

  12. Hope in Janusz Korczak's Pedagogy of Realistic Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Marc

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the approach of "Realistic Idealism" to moral education developed by the humanist-progressive moral educator Janusz Korczak, and the role hope plays in it. This pair of terms seems to be an oxymoron. However, their employment is intentional and the article will demonstrate their dialectical interdependence:…

  13. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  14. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. Copyright © 2015 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Using a Realist Research Methodology in Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourie, Megan; Rata, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the usefulness of a realist methodology in linking sociological theory to empirically obtained data through the development of a methodological device. Three layers of analysis were integrated: 1. the findings from a case study about Maori language education in New Zealand; 2. the identification and analysis of contradictions…

  16. Realistic Fiction and the Social Studies. Children's Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell-Powell, Brenda, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Asserts that children's literature is an effective tool to access and present sophisticated social studies concepts in the elementary classroom. Maintains that realistic fiction can integrate the social sciences with philosophy and religion. Presents a bibliographic essay including children's books and teacher resources. (CFR)

  17. Representations of Adoption in Contemporary Realistic Fiction for Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Sue Christian; Fuxa, Robin; Kander, Faryl; Hardy, Dana

    2017-01-01

    In this critical content analysis of thirty-seven contemporary realistic fiction books about adoption, the authors examine how adoption and adoptive families are depicted in young adult (YA) literature. The critical literacy theoretical frame brings into focus significant social implications of these depictions as the researchers illuminate and…

  18. A Sense of Responsibility in Realistic Children's Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochelle, Warren

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the qualities of successful realistic children's fiction and examines issues involved in writing and publishing for children. A historical overview of the image of children in fiction is presented; dealing with sensitive, emotional topics is discussed; and concerns of editors and publishers of children's fiction are addressed. (12…

  19. "Shut My Mouth Wide Open": Realistic Fiction and Social Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Cynthia A.

    1999-01-01

    Shares the responses of seven urban, male, African-American fifth graders to contemporary realistic fiction, discussing how the tying of this literature to the events in the boys' lives had the potential to move them toward social action. The paper examines the following: literature as a catalyst, reader responses to texts, critical literacy, and…

  20. Highly realistic, immersive training for navy corpsmen: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth-Kewley, Stephanie; McWhorter, Stephanie K

    2014-12-01

    Highly realistic, immersive training has been developed for Navy corpsmen based on the success of the Infantry Immersion Trainer. This new training is built around scenarios that are designed to depict real-life, operational situations. Each scenario used in the training includes sights, sounds, smells, and distractions to simulate realistic and challenging combat situations. The primary objective of this study was to assess corpsmen participants' satisfaction with highly realistic training. The study sample consisted of 434 male Navy service members attending Field Medical Training Battalion-West, Camp Pendleton, California. Corpsmen participants completed surveys after receiving the training. Participants expressed high levels of satisfaction with the training overall and with several specific elements of the training. The element of the training that the corpsmen rated the highest was the use of live actors. The vast majority of the participants reported that the training had increased their overall confidence about being successful corpsmen and had strengthened their confidence in their ability to provide care under pressure. Additional research should extend highly realistic training to other military medical provider populations. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  1. Using Concrete and Realistic Data in Evaluating Initial Visualization Designs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren; Pedersen, Jeppe Gerner; Herdal, Thor

    2016-01-01

    We explore means of designing and evaluating initial visualization ideas, with concrete and realistic data in cases where data is not readily available. Our approach is useful in exploring new domains and avenues for visualization, and contrasts other visualization work, which typically operate u...

  2. How outcomes are achieved through patient portals: A realist review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T. Otte-Trojel (Eva Terese); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.G. Rundall (Thomas); J.J. van de Klundert (Joris)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To examine how patient portals contribute to health service delivery and patient outcomes. The specific aims were to examine how outcomes are produced, and how variations in outcomes can be explained. Methods: We used a realist review method, which aims to describe how 'an

  3. Realistic Visualization of Virtual Views and Virtual Cinema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    Realistic Virtual View Visualization is a new field of research which has received increasing attention in recent years. It is strictly related to the increased popularity of virtual reality and the spread of its applications, among which virtual photography and cinematography. The use of compute...

  4. Improving Mathematics Teaching in Kindergarten with Realistic Mathematical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Stamatios; Kalogiannakis, Michail; Zaranis, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates and compares the influence of teaching Realistic Mathematics on the development of mathematical competence in kindergarten. The sample consisted of 231 Greek kindergarten students. For the implementation of the survey, we conducted an intervention, which included one experimental and one control group. Children in…

  5. Using a Realist Research Methodology in Policy Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourie, Megan; Rata, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The article describes the usefulness of a realist methodology in linking sociological theory to empirically obtained data through the development of a methodological device. Three layers of analysis were integrated: 1. the findings from a case study about Maori language education in New Zealand; 2. the identification and analysis of contradictions…

  6. An Overview of Westinghouse Realistic Large Break LOCA Evaluation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Frepoli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1988 amendment of the 10 CFR 50.46 rule in 1988, Westinghouse has been developing and applying realistic or best-estimate methods to perform LOCA safety analyses. A realistic analysis requires the execution of various realistic LOCA transient simulations where the effect of both model and input uncertainties are ranged and propagated throughout the transients. The outcome is typically a range of results with associated probabilities. The thermal/hydraulic code is the engine of the methodology but a procedure is developed to assess the code and determine its biases and uncertainties. In addition, inputs to the simulation are also affected by uncertainty and these uncertainties are incorporated into the process. Several approaches have been proposed and applied in the industry in the framework of best-estimate methods. Most of the implementations, including Westinghouse, follow the Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty (CSAU methodology. Westinghouse methodology is based on the use of the WCOBRA/TRAC thermal-hydraulic code. The paper starts with an overview of the regulations and its interpretation in the context of realistic analysis. The CSAU roadmap is reviewed in the context of its implementation in the Westinghouse evaluation model. An overview of the code (WCOBRA/TRAC and methodology is provided. Finally, the recent evolution to nonparametric statistics in the current edition of the W methodology is discussed. Sample results of a typical large break LOCA analysis for a PWR are provided.

  7. Realist synthesis: illustrating the method for implementation research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rycroft-Malone Jo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Realist synthesis is an increasingly popular approach to the review and synthesis of evidence, which focuses on understanding the mechanisms by which an intervention works (or not. There are few published examples of realist synthesis. This paper therefore fills a gap by describing, in detail, the process used for a realist review and synthesis to answer the question ‘what interventions and strategies are effective in enabling evidence-informed healthcare?’ The strengths and challenges of conducting realist review are also considered. Methods The realist approach involves identifying underlying causal mechanisms and exploring how they work under what conditions. The stages of this review included: defining the scope of the review (concept mining and framework formulation; searching for and scrutinising the evidence; extracting and synthesising the evidence; and developing the narrative, including hypotheses. Results Based on key terms and concepts related to various interventions to promote evidence-informed healthcare, we developed an outcome-focused theoretical framework. Questions were tailored for each of four theory/intervention areas within the theoretical framework and were used to guide development of a review and data extraction process. The search for literature within our first theory area, change agency, was executed and the screening procedure resulted in inclusion of 52 papers. Using the questions relevant to this theory area, data were extracted by one reviewer and validated by a second reviewer. Synthesis involved organisation of extracted data into evidence tables, theming and formulation of chains of inference, linking between the chains of inference, and hypothesis formulation. The narrative was developed around the hypotheses generated within the change agency theory area. Conclusions Realist synthesis lends itself to the review of complex interventions because it accounts for context as well as

  8. Jet-hadron correlations in √[s(NN)]=200  GeV p+p and central Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-03-28

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at √[s(NN)]=200  GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au+Au collisions compared to p+p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  9. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-10-03

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D(0)) production via the hadronic decay channel (D(0) → K(-) + π(+)) in Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)] = 200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, N(bin), from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D(0) meson yields in central Au + Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by N(bin), for transverse momenta p(T) > 3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate p(T) is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  10. Observation of $D^0$ meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}$ = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; B{ü}ltmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-01-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron ($D^0$) production via the hadronic decay channel ($D^0\\rightarrow K^- + \\pi^+$) in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\mathrm{NN}}}}$ = 200\\,GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross-section per nucleon-nucleon collision at mid-rapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, $N_{bin}$, from $p$+$p$ to central Au+Au collisions. The $D^0$ meson yields in central Au+Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in $p$+$p$ scaled by $N_{bin}$, for transverse momenta $p_{T}>3$ GeV/$c$, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate $p_{T}$ is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  11. Coherent J/Psi photoproduction in ultra-peripheral PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV with the CMS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2016-05-23

    The cross section for coherent J/psi photoproduction accompanied by at least one neutron on one side of the interaction point and no neutron activity on the other side, X[n]0[n], is measured with the CMS experiment in ultra-peripheral PbPb collisions at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 159 inverse microbarns, collected during the 2011 PbPb run. The J/psi mesons are reconstructed in the dimuon decay channel, while neutrons are detected using zero degree calorimeters. The measured cross section is d sigma[coh,X[n]0[n

  12. Charge separation relative to the reaction plane in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$= 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abelev, Betty; Adamova, Dagmar; Adare, Andrew Marshall; Aggarwal, Madan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agocs, Andras Gabor; Agostinelli, Andrea; Aguilar Salazar, Saul; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmad, Arshad; Ahmad, Nazeer; Ahn, Sang Un; Akindinov, Alexander; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Almaraz Avina, Erick Jonathan; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altini, Valerio; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshauser, Harald; Arbor, Nicolas; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas Robert; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Awes, Terry; Aysto, Juha Heikki; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldini Ferroli, Rinaldo; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldit, Alain; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Ban, Jaroslav; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Barret, Valerie; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batyunya, Boris; Baumann, Christoph Heinrich; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont-Moreno, Ernesto; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bergognon, Anais Annick Erica; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, F; Blanco, Francesco; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Nicolas; Boettger, Stefan; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Bogolyubsky, Mikhail; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Bose, Suvendu Nath; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Boyer, Bruno Alexandre; Braidot, Ermes; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brun, Rene; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Bugaiev, Kyrylo; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Canoa Roman, Veronica; Cara Romeo, Giovanni; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carminati, Federico; Casanova Diaz, Amaya Ofelia; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Catanescu, Vasile; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chawla, Isha; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chiavassa, Emilio; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Coccetti, Fabrizio; Colamaria, Fabio; Colella, Domenico; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa del Valle, Zaida; Constantin, Paul; Contin, Giacomo; Contreras, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Cotallo, Manuel Enrique; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Alaniz, Emilia; Cuautle, Eleazar; Cunqueiro, Leticia; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dainese, Andrea; Dalsgaard, Hans Hjersing; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Kushal; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; de Barros, Gabriel; De Caro, Annalisa; de Cataldo, Giacinto; de Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; de Rooij, Raoul Stefan; Delagrange, Hugues; Deloff, Andrzej; Demanov, Vyacheslav; Denes, Ervin; Deppman, Airton; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Giglio, Carmelo; Di Liberto, Sergio; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Dominguez, Isabel; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Driga, Olga; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Dutta Majumdar, AK

    2013-01-02

    Measurements of charge dependent azimuthal correlations with the ALICE detector at the LHC are reported for Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. Two- and three-particle charge-dependent azimuthal correlations in the pseudo-rapidity range $|\\eta | < 0.8$ are presented as a function of the collision centrality, particle separation in pseudo-rapidity, and transverse momentum. A clear signal compatible with the expectation of a charge-dependent separation relative to the reaction plane is observed, which shows little or no collision energy dependence when compared to measurements at RHIC energies. Models incorporating effects of local parity violation in strong interactions fail to describe the observed collision energy dependence.

  13. Jet-Hadron Correlations in sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV Au+Au and p+p Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai,; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bruna, E; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chung, P; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks,; Ding, F; Dion, A; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Fersch, R G; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Gliske, S; Grebenyuk, O G; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jena, C; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Mioduszewski, S; Mitrovski, M K; Mohammed, Y; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Naglis, M; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Novak, J; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Powell, C B; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, B; Schmitz, N; Schuster, T R; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, W; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan,; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au+Au and p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au+Au collisions is biased towards jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au+Au and p+p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum ($p_{T}^{assoc}$) and enhanced at low $p_{T}^{assoc}$ in Au+Au collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  14. Collision geometry scaling of Au+Au pseudorapidity density from sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6 to 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Back, B B; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Decowski, M P; García, E; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K H; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Lin, W T; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Mignerey, A C; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L J; Sagerer, J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Skulski, W; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Tonjes, M B; Tang, J L; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Verdier, R; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyslouch, B

    2004-01-01

    The centrality dependence of the midrapidity charged particle multiplicity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 19.6 and 200 GeV is presented. Within a simple model, the fraction of hard (scaling with number of binary collisions) to soft (scaling with number of participant pairs) interactions is consistent with a value of x = 0.13 +/- 0.01(stat) +/- 0.05(syst) at both energies. The experimental results at both energies, scaled by inelastic p(pbar)+p collision data, agree within systematic errors. The ratio of the data was found not to depend on centrality over the studied range and yields a simple linear scale factor of R_(200/19.6) = 2.03 +/- 0.02(stat) +/- 0.05(syst).

  15. Disappearance of back-to-back high p {sub T} hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li (Wayne State U.), Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; LoCurto, G.; et al.

    2002-10-25

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudo-rapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at = {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes already observed in elementary collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au + Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  16. Disappearance of back-to-back high-pT hadron correlations in central Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s NN ] =200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Corral, M M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Magestro, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Thompson, M; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2003-02-28

    Azimuthal correlations for large transverse momentum charged hadrons have been measured over a wide pseudorapidity range and full azimuth in Au+Au and p+p collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The small-angle correlations observed in p+p collisions and at all centralities of Au+Au collisions are characteristic of hard-scattering processes previously observed in high-energy collisions. A strong back-to-back correlation exists for p+p and peripheral Au+Au. In contrast, the back-to-back correlations are reduced considerably in the most central Au+Au collisions, indicating substantial interaction as the hard-scattered partons or their fragmentation products traverse the medium.

  17. Proton-Lambda correlations in central Pb plus Pb collisions at root s(NN)=17.3 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Botje, M; Karev, A; Chvala, O; Roland, G; Skrzypczak, E; Kowalski, M; Panagiotou, A D; Malakhov, A I; Prindle, D; Sikler, F; Bartke, J; Strobele, H; Vranic, D; Cetner, T; Vesztergombi, G; Makariev, M; Laszlo, A; Schmitz, N; Grebieszkow, K; Rybczynski, M; Wojtaszek-Szwarc, A; Szuba, M; Beck, H; Palla, G; Bogusz, M; Peryt, W; Kresan, D; Eckardt, V; Lacey, R; Betev, L; Kolesnikov, V I; Susa, T; Gazdzicki, M; Sandoval, A; Friese, V; Mateev, M; Foka, P; Mitrovski, M; Utvic, M; Mrowczynski, S; Boimska, B; Christakoglou, P; Stock, R; Seyboth, P; Blume, C; Bialkowska, H; Rybicki, A; Barna, D; Buncic, P; Schuster, T; Vassiliou, M; Wlodarczyk, Z; Stefanek, G; Book, J; Renfordt, R; Veres, G I; Nicolic, V; Varga, D; Pluta, J; Anticic, T; Melkumov, G L; Mackowiak, M; Hohne, C; Fodor, Z; Cramer, J G; Baatar, B; Puhlhofer, F; Chung, P; Kadija, K; van Leeuwen, M

    2011-01-01

    The momentum correlation between protons and Lambda particles emitted from central Pb+Pb collisions at root s(NN) = 17.3 GeV was studied by the NA49 experiment at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron. A clear enhancement is observed for small relative momenta (q(inv) < 0.2 GeV). By fitting a theoretical model, which uses the strong interaction between the proton and the Lambda in a given pair, to the measured data, a value for the effective source size is deduced. Assuming a static Gaussian source distribution, we derive an effective radius parameter of R(G) = 3.02 +/- 0.20(stat.)(-0.16)(+0.44)(syst.) fm.

  18. PREFACE: 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-An; Natowitz, Joseph B.

    2013-03-01

    The 11th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2012) was held from 27 May to 1 June 2012, in San Antonio, Texas, USA. It was jointly organized and hosted by The Cyclotron Institute at Texas A&M University, College Station and The Department of Physics and Astronomy at Texas A&M University-Commerce. Among the approximately 300 participants were a large number of graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The Keynote Talk of the conference, 'The State of Affairs of Present and Future Nucleus-Nucleus Collision Science', was given by Dr Robert Tribble, University Distinguished Professor and Director of the TAMU Cyclotron Institute. During the conference a very well-received public lecture on neutrino astronomy, 'The ICEcube project', was given by Dr Francis Halzen, Hilldale and Gregory Breit Distinguished Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The Scientific program continued in the general spirit and intention of this conference series. As is typical of this conference a broad range of topics including fundamental areas of nuclear dynamics, structure, and applications were addressed in 42 plenary session talks, 150 parallel session talks, and 21 posters. The high quality of the work presented emphasized the vitality and relevance of the subject matter of this conference. Following the tradition, the NN2012 International Advisory Committee selected the host and site of the next conference in this series. The 12th International Conference on Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (NN2015) will be held 21-26 June 2015 in Catania, Italy. It will be hosted by The INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania and the Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia of the University of Catania. The NN2012 Proceedings contains the conference program and 165 articles organized into the following 10 sections 1. Heavy and Superheavy Elements 2. QCD and Hadron Physics 3. Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collisions 4. Nuclear Structure 5. Nuclear Energy and Applications of

  19. p(-p) final state interaction in J/Ψ→γp(-p)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhuo-Quan; GUO Xin-Heng; SHEN Peng-Nian; DING Yi-Bing

    2012-01-01

    The phenomenon of the near p(-p)-threshold enhancement observed in the J/Ψ → γp(-p) decay is studied by using the enhancement factor method with a simpler one-pion-exchange potential between p and (-p).The Jost function caused by the mentioned potential is perturbatively calculated in the zero-th order approximation,and the corresponding enhancement factor is obtained.It is found that such a final state interaction offers an important contribution to the decay width near the p(-p)-threshold,although it is not large enough.To explain the decay data,a pheuomenological factor G(p) with the form of 285500/(m2/π +p2) should be introduced.A further calculation including the p-dependent bare T-matrix,a more realistic N(-N) potential and the contribution from the higher-order wave functions would provide a better understanding of the decay data and even the existence of the baryonium p(-p).The near p(-p)-threshold behavior of the decay width in the J/Ψ →π0p(-p) process is also discussed.

  20. Protocol for a realist review of workplace learning in postgraduate medical education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Anel; Kilty, Caroline; Bergin, Colm; Flood, Patrick; Fu, Na; Horgan, Mary; Higgins, Agnes; Maher, Bridget; O'Kane, Grainne; Prihodova, Lucia; Slattery, Dubhfeasa; Bennett, Deirdre

    2017-01-19

    Postgraduate medical education and training (PGMET) is a complex social process which happens predominantly during the delivery of patient care. The clinical learning environment (CLE), the context for PGMET, shapes the development of the doctors who learn and work within it, ultimately impacting the quality and safety of patient care. Clinical workplaces are complex, dynamic systems in which learning emerges from non-linear interactions within a network of related factors and activities. Those tasked with the design and delivery of postgraduate medical education and training need to understand the relationship between the processes of medical workplace learning and these contextual elements in order to optimise conditions for learning. We propose to conduct a realist synthesis of the literature to address the overarching questions; how, why and in what circumstances do doctors learn in clinical environments? This review is part of a funded projected with the overall aim of producing guidelines and recommendations for the design of high quality clinical learning environments for postgraduate medical education and training. We have chosen realist synthesis as a methodology because of its suitability for researching complexity and producing answers useful to policymakers and practitioners. This realist synthesis will follow the steps and procedures outlined by Wong et al. in the RAMESES Publication Standards for Realist Synthesis and the Realist Synthesis RAMESES Training Materials. The core research team is a multi-disciplinary group of researchers, clinicians and health professions educators. The wider research group includes experts in organisational behaviour and human resources management as well as the key stakeholders; doctors in training, patient representatives and providers of PGMET. This study will draw from the published literature and programme, and substantive, theories of workplace learning, to describe context, mechanism and outcome configurations for

  1. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ to 200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Al-Jamel, A.; Al-Ta'ani, H.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of midrapidity charged particle multiplicity distributions, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, $dE_T/d\\eta$, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ and 62.4 GeV, Cu$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, U$+$U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=193$ GeV,...

  2. The work is never ending: uncovering teamwork sustainability using realistic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykman, Mandus; von Thiele Schwarz, Ulrica; Muntlin Athlin, Åsa; Hasson, Henna; Mazzocato, Pamela

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to uncover the mechanisms influencing the sustainability of behavior changes following the implementation of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach Realistic evaluation was combined with a framework (DCOM®) based on applied behavior analysis to study the sustainability of behavior changes two and a half years after the initial implementation of teamwork at an emergency department. The DCOM® framework was used to categorize the mechanisms of behavior change interventions (BCIs) into the four categories of direction, competence, opportunity, and motivation. Non-participant observation and interview data were used. Findings The teamwork behaviors were not sustained. A substantial fallback in managerial activities in combination with a complex context contributed to reduced direction, opportunity, and motivation. Reduced direction made staff members unclear about how and why they should work in teams. Deterioration of opportunity was evident from the lack of problem-solving resources resulting in accumulated barriers to teamwork. Motivation in terms of management support and feedback was reduced. Practical implications The implementation of complex organizational changes in complex healthcare contexts requires continuous adaption and managerial activities well beyond the initial implementation period. Originality/value By integrating the DCOM® framework with realistic evaluation, this study responds to the call for theoretically based research on behavioral mechanisms that can explain how BCIs interact with context and how this interaction influences sustainability.

  3. Role-playing for more realistic technical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikendei, C; Zeuch, A; Dieckmann, P; Roth, C; Schäfer, S; Völkl, M; Schellberg, D; Herzog, W; Jünger, J

    2005-03-01

    Clinical skills are an important and necessary part of clinical competence. Simulation plays an important role in many fields of medical education. Although role-playing is common in communication training, there are no reports about the use of student role-plays in the training of technical clinical skills. This article describes an educational intervention with analysis of pre- and post-intervention self-selected student survey evaluations. After one term of skills training, a thorough evaluation showed that the skills-lab training did not seem very realistic nor was it very demanding for trainees. To create a more realistic training situation and to enhance students' involvement, case studies and role-plays with defined roles for students (i.e. intern, senior consultant) were introduced into half of the sessions. Results of the evaluation in the second term showed that sessions with role-playing were rated significantly higher than sessions without role-playing.

  4. Towards a Realistic Parsing of the Feynman Path Integral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Wharton

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Feynman path integral does not allow a one real path interpretation, because the quantum amplitudes contribute to probabilities in a non-separable manner. The opposite extreme, all paths happen, is not a useful or informative account. In this paper it is shown that an intermediate parsing of the path integral, into realistic non-interfering possibilities, is always available. Each realistic possibility formally corresponds to numerous particle paths, but is arguably best interpreted as a spacetime-valued field. Notably, one actual field history can always be said to occur, although it will generally not have an extremized action. The most obvious concerns with this approach are addressed, indicating necessary follow-up research. But without obvious showstoppers, it seems plausible that the path integral might be reinterpreted to explain quantum phenomena in terms of Lorentz covariant field histories.Quanta 2016; 5: 1–11.

  5. A general realistic treatment of the disk paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Pantazis, George

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical angular momentum is not conserved in systems involving electromagnetic fields with non-zero electromagnetic field angular momentum. Conservation is restored only if the total (mechanical and field) angular momentum is considered. Previous studies have investigated this effect, known as "Feynman's Electromagnetic Paradox" or simply "Disk Paradox" in the context of idealized systems (infinite or infinitesimal solenoids and charged cylinders \\etc). In the present analysis we generalize previous studies by considering more realistic systems with finite components and demonstrating explicitly the conservation of the total angular momentum. This is achieved by expressing both the mechanical and the field angular momentum in terms of charges and magnetic field fluxes through various system components. Using this general expression we demonstrate explicitly the conservation of total angular momentum in both idealized and realistic systems (finite solenoid concentric with two charged long cylinders) taking ...

  6. Bell's inequalities with realistic noise for polarization-entangled photons

    CERN Document Server

    Cabello, A; Lamas-Linares, A; Cabello, Adan; Feito, Alvaro; Lamas-Linares, Antia

    2005-01-01

    Contrary to the usual assumption that the experimental preparation of pure entangled states can be described by mixed states due to white noise, a more realistic description for polarization-entangled states produced by parametric down-conversion is that they are mixed states due to decoherence in a preferred polarization basis. This distinction between white and colored noise is crucial when we look for maximal violations of Bell's inequalities for two-qubit and two-qutrit entangled states. We find that violations of Bell's inequalities with realistic noise for polarization-entangled photons are extremely robust for colored noise, whereas this is not the case for white noise. In addition, we study the difference between white and colored noise for maximal violations of Bell's inequalities for three and four-qubit entangled states.

  7. Modeling of biofuel pellets torrefaction in a realistic geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artiukhina Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature pyrolysis also known as torrefaction is considered as a promising pretreatment technology for conversion of biomass into a solid biofuel with enhanced properties in terms of lower moisture and volatile matter content, hydrophobicity and increased heating value. A thermal treatment leads to a non-uniform temperature field and chemical reactions proceeding unevenly within the pellets. However the temperature is assumed to be uniform in the pellets in the majority of models. Here we report on the model of single pellet biomass torrefaction, taking into account the heat transfer and chemical kinetics in the realistic geometry. The evolution of temperature and material density in the non-stationary thermo-chemical process is described by the system of non-linear partial differential equations. The model describing the high-temperature drying of biomass pellet was also introduced. The importance of boundary effects in realistic simulations of biomass pellets torrefaction is underlined in this work.

  8. An iterative approach for generating statistically realistic populations of households

    CERN Document Server

    Gargiulo, Floriana; Huet, Sylvie; Deffuant, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Background: Many different simulation frameworks, in different topics, need to treat realistic datasets to initialize and calibrate the system. A precise reproduction of initial states is extremely important to obtain reliable forecast from the model. Methodology/Principal Findings: This paper proposes an algorithm to create an artificial population where individuals are described by their age, and are gathered in households respecting a variety of statistical constraints (distribution of household types, sizes, age of household head, difference of age between partners and among parents and children). Such a population is often the initial state of microsimulation or (agent) individual-based models. To get a realistic distribution of households is often very important, because this distribution has an impact on the demographic evolution. Usual techniques from microsimulation approach cross different sources of aggregated data for generating individuals. In our case the number of combinations of different hous...

  9. Applying a realistic evaluation model to occupational safety interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Louise Møller

    2017-01-01

    of occupational safety interventions. Conclusion: The revised realistic evaluation model can help safety science forward in identifying key factors for the success of occupational safety interventions. However, future research should strengthen the link between the immediate intervention results and outcome.......Background: Recent literature characterizes occupational safety interventions as complex social activities, applied in complex and dynamic social systems. Hence, the actual outcomes of an intervention will vary, depending on the intervention, the implementation process, context, personal...... characteristics of key actors (defined mechanisms), and the interplay between them, and can be categorized as expected or unexpected. However, little is known about ’how’ to include context and mechanisms in evaluations of intervention effectiveness. A revised realistic evaluation model has been introduced...

  10. A comparison of the spatial linear model to Nearest Neighbor (k-NN) methods for forestry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ver Hoef, Jay M; Temesgen, Hailemariam

    2013-01-01

    Forest surveys provide critical information for many diverse interests. Data are often collected from samples, and from these samples, maps of resources and estimates of aerial totals or averages are required. In this paper, two approaches for mapping and estimating totals; the spatial linear model (SLM) and k-NN (k-Nearest Neighbor) are compared, theoretically, through simulations, and as applied to real forestry data. While both methods have desirable properties, a review shows that the SLM has prediction optimality properties, and can be quite robust. Simulations of artificial populations and resamplings of real forestry data show that the SLM has smaller empirical root-mean-squared prediction errors (RMSPE) for a wide variety of data types, with generally less bias and better interval coverage than k-NN. These patterns held for both point predictions and for population totals or averages, with the SLM reducing RMSPE from 9% to 67% over some popular k-NN methods, with SLM also more robust to spatially imbalanced sampling. Estimating prediction standard errors remains a problem for k-NN predictors, despite recent attempts using model-based methods. Our conclusions are that the SLM should generally be used rather than k-NN if the goal is accurate mapping or estimation of population totals or averages.

  11. Effects of a recombinant FVIIa analogue, NN1731, on blood loss and survival after liver trauma in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaar, M; Secher, N H; Johansson, P I

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We considered whether haemorrhage after a liver trauma would be reduced by early administration of a pro-haemostatic agent and evaluated the effect of i.v. vs i.m. administration of the coagulation factor VIIa analogue NN1731 on haemorrhage after a liver trauma in the pig. METHODS......: The pharmacokinetics of i.v. and i.m. NN1731 was evaluated in eight minipigs, and the effects of dose and administration route of NN1731 (i.v. 180 microg kg(-1), n=6; i.m. 540 microg kg(-1), n=4, or 2000 microg kg(-1), n=6) vs vehicle (n=16) were studied on a liver laceration injury in pigs. To simulate a pre......-hospital setting, the administration of NN1731 was delayed by 1 min for i.m. administration and 7 min for i.v. administration, at which time fluid resuscitation also began. RESULTS: In the minipigs, NN1731 exposure was similar after i.v. 180 microg kg(-1) and i.m. 540 microg kg(-1), with a bioavailability...

  12. Highly Realistic, Immersive Training for Navy Corpsmen: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    the actors who play the role of casualties are actual amputees , some of whom were injured in combat. The scenarios require that corpsmen demonstrate...black (9%), Hispanic (5%), and other race groups. A quarter of respon- dents (25%) marked “mixed or multiple races.” Measures To evaluate satisfaction...feel realistic Participants’ Suggestions for Improving the Training Give more scenarios and more time at MOUT Do the training multiple times, so that

  13. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, T; Porter, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. METHOD: We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therap...

  14. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, T.; Porter, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. METHOD: We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therap...

  15. Simulation of human ischemic stroke in realistic 3D geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Thierry; Duarte, Max; Descombes, Stéphane; Dronne, Marie-Aimée; Massot, Marc; Louvet, Violaine

    2013-06-01

    In silico research in medicine is thought to reduce the need for expensive clinical trials under the condition of reliable mathematical models and accurate and efficient numerical methods. In the present work, we tackle the numerical simulation of reaction-diffusion equations modeling human ischemic stroke. This problem induces peculiar difficulties like potentially large stiffness which stems from the broad spectrum of temporal scales in the nonlinear chemical source term as well as from the presence of steep spatial gradients in the reaction fronts, spatially very localized. Furthermore, simulations on realistic 3D geometries are mandatory in order to describe correctly this type of phenomenon. The main goal of this article is to obtain, for the first time, 3D simulations on realistic geometries and to show that the simulation results are consistent with those obtain in experimental studies or observed on MRI images in stroke patients. For this purpose, we introduce a new resolution strategy based mainly on time operator splitting that takes into account complex geometry coupled with a well-conceived parallelization strategy for shared memory architectures. We consider then a high order implicit time integration for the reaction and an explicit one for the diffusion term in order to build a time operator splitting scheme that exploits efficiently the special features of each problem. Thus, we aim at solving complete and realistic models including all time and space scales with conventional computing resources, that is on a reasonably powerful workstation. Consequently and as expected, 2D and also fully 3D numerical simulations of ischemic strokes for a realistic brain geometry, are conducted for the first time and shown to reproduce the dynamics observed on MRI images in stroke patients. Beyond this major step, in order to improve accuracy and computational efficiency of the simulations, we indicate how the present numerical strategy can be coupled with spatial

  16. An Argument Against the Realistic Interpretation of the Wave Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovelli, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Testable predictions of quantum mechanics are invariant under time reversal. But the evolution of the quantum state in time is not so, neither in the collapse nor in the no-collapse interpretations of the theory. This is a fact that challenges any realistic interpretation of the quantum state. On the other hand, this fact raises no difficulty if we interpret the quantum state as a mere calculation device, bookkeeping past real quantum events.

  17. Extending AI Planning to Solve more Realistic Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Zalaket, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we have presented multiple extensions for classical planning algorithms in order to allow them to solve more realistic problems. This kind of problems can contain any type of knowledge and can require complex handling which is not yet supported by the existing planning algorithms. Some complicated problems can be expressed with the recent extensions to PDDL language, but the main lack remains especially because of the incapacity of the current planners. We have suggested and ...

  18. Capture cross sections of 15N(n, γ)16N at astrophysical energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guang-Wei; Ma, Jun-Bing; Sheng, Zong-Qiang; Shi, Guo-Zhu; Tian, Feng; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Chao

    2016-12-01

    We have reanalyzed reaction cross sections of 16N on a 12C target. The nucleon density distribution of 16N, especially surface density distribution, was extracted using the modified Glauber model. On the basis of dilute surface densities, the 15N(n, γ)16N reaction is discussed within the framework of the direct capture reaction mechanism. The calculations agree quite well with the experimental data. Support given by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11447236, 11505002, 11247001) and Foundation of Anhui University of Science and Technology (11130, 12608)

  19. Classification in medical image analysis using adaptive metric k-NN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Chen; Chernoff, Konstantin; Karemore, Gopal

    2010-01-01

    with respect to different adaptive metrics in the context of medical imaging. We propose using adaptive metrics such that the structure of the data is better described, introducing some unsupervised learning knowledge in k-NN. We investigated four different metrics are estimated: a theoretical metric based...... on the assumption that images are drawn from Brownian Image Model (BIM), the normalized metric based on variance of the data, the empirical metric is based on the empirical covariance matrix of the unlabeled data, and an optimized metric obtained by minimizing the classification error. The spectral structure...

  20. Anisotropic flow in the forward directions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Markus D.

    2004-03-09

    The addition of the two Forward TPCs to the STAR detector allows one to measure anisotropic flow at forward pseudorapidities. This made possible the first measurement of directed flow at collision energies of {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. PHOBOS' results on elliptic flow at forward rapidities were confirmed, and the sign of v{sub 2} was determined to be positive for the first time at RHIC energies. The higher harmonic, v{sub 4}, is consistent with the recently suggested v{sub 2}2 scaling behavior.

  1. ITIL-malli käytännössä

    OpenAIRE

    Salomäki, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia, millaisia kokemuksia ITIL-mallin käyttöönotosta, sen käytöstä ja käytännön toimivuudesta organisaatioilla ja asiantuntijoilla on. Työn teoriapohjana käytettiin ITIL 2011 -painoksen viittä julkaisua, sekä erilaisia sähköisiä julkaisuja selvitettäessä mm. ISO/IEC 20000 -standardin kytköstä ITIL-malliin.

  2. Pion mass effects on axion emission from neutron stars through NN bremsstrahlung processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, S. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Horia Hulubei Foundation, Atomistilor 407, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: stoica@theory.nipne.ro; Pastrav, B. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: bpastrav@theory.nipne.ro; Horvath, J.E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, 05508-900 Cidade Universitaria Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: foton@astro.iag.usp.br; Allen, M.P. [CEFET-SP, R. Pedro Vicente 625, 01109-010 Caninde, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-09-15

    The rates of axion emission by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung are calculated with the inclusion of the full momentum contribution from a nuclear one pion exchange (OPE) potential. The contributions of the neutron-neutron (nn), proton-proton ( pp) and neutron-proton (np) processes in both the non-degenerate and degenerate limits are explicitly given. We find that the finite-momentum corrections to the emissivities are quantitatively significant for the non-degenerate regime and temperature-dependent, and should affect the existing axion mass bounds. The trend of these nuclear effects is to diminish the emissivities.

  3. ITIL-malli käytännössä

    OpenAIRE

    Salomäki, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia, millaisia kokemuksia ITIL-mallin käyttöönotosta, sen käytöstä ja käytännön toimivuudesta organisaatioilla ja asiantuntijoilla on. Työn teoriapohjana käytettiin ITIL 2011 -painoksen viittä julkaisua, sekä erilaisia sähköisiä julkaisuja selvitettäessä mm. ISO/IEC 20000 -standardin kytköstä ITIL-malliin.

  4. Pop up-ravintolat – lainsäädännön huomiointi

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Opinnäytetyö tehtiin kiinnostuksesta perustaa oma pop up-ravintola ja tutkimuksessa selvitettiin lainsäädännöllisiä ongelmia perustettaessa pop up-ravintolaa. Tutkimuksella haluttiin myös saada tietoa erilaisista ideoista, jotka ovat toteutettu pop up-ravintolaa perustettaessa ja miten asiakkaat ovat ottaneet ilmiön vastaan. Tutkimusmenetelmänä käytettiin laadullista teemahaastattelua, joka toteutettiin yksilöhaastatteluina. Teoriaosuudessa käsitellään pop up:in määritelmää, sekä kerrotaa...

  5. GPU based cloud system for high-performance arrhythmia detection with parallel k-NN algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae Joon Jun; Hyun Ji Park; Hyuk Yoo; Young-Hak Kim; Daeyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an GPU based Cloud system for high-performance arrhythmia detection. Pan-Tompkins algorithm is used for QRS detection and we optimized beat classification algorithm with K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN). To support high performance beat classification on the system, we parallelized beat classification algorithm with CUDA to execute the algorithm on virtualized GPU devices on the Cloud system. MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database is used for validation of the algorithm. The system achieved about 93.5% of detection rate which is comparable to previous researches while our algorithm shows 2.5 times faster execution time compared to CPU only detection algorithm.

  6. Pyhännän Rakennustuote Oy:n suurelementtilinjan tuottavuuden parantaminen

    OpenAIRE

    Pietilä, Aki-Veikko

    2014-01-01

    Tämä opinnäytetyö tehtiin Pyhännän Rakennustuote Oy:n suurelementtitehtaalle. Opinnäytetyön tavoitteena oli selvittää keinoja suurelementtilinjan tuottavuuden parantamiseksi teorian ja tutkimuksen avulla. Nykysysteemissä esiintyvä vaihtelu on aiheuttanut keskinäisiä riippuvuussuhteita työvaiheiden välille ja sen myötä tehokkuus on laskenut. Vaihtelu on ollut suurta ennen kaikkea eri työvaiheiden jaksoaikoja verrattaessa. Työssä selvitettiin, miten suurelementtilinjan toimintaa saisi tehostet...

  7. Elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$=130 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, K H; Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Ahmad, S; Allgower, C; Amsbaugh, J; Anderson, M; Anderssen, E; Arnesen, H; Arnold, L; Averichev, G S; Baldwin, A R; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Beddo, M E; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Bennett, S; Bercovitz, J; Berger, J; Betts, W; Bichsel, H; Bieser, F; Bland, L C; Bloomer, M A; Blyth, C O; Böhm, J; Bonner, B E; Bonnet, D; Bossingham, R R; Botlo, M; Boucham, A; Bouillo, N; Bouvier, S; Bradley, K; Brady, F P; Braithwaite, E S; Braithwaite, W; Brandin, A B; Brown, R L; Brugalette, G; Byrd, C; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carr, L; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Caylor, B; Cebra, D; Chathopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, W; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Chrin, J; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Consiglio, C; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Danilov, V I; Dayton, D; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Dialinas, M; Díaz, H; De Young, P A; Didenko, L; Dimassimo, D; Dioguardi, J; Dominik, Wojciech; Drancourt, C; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Eggert, T; Emelyanov, V I; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Etkin, A; Fachini, P; Feliciano, C; Ferenc, D; Ferguson, M I; Fessler, H; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Flores, I; Foley, Kenneth J; Fritz, D; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gazdzicki, M; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Gojak, C; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Grau, M; Greiner, D E; Greiner, L; Grigoriev, V; Grosnick, D P; Gross, J; Guilloux, G; Gushin, E M; Hall, J; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harper, G; Harris, J W; He, P; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hill, D; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Howe, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Hunt, W; Hunter, J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jacobson, S; Jared, R; Jensen, P; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kenney, V P; Khodinov, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Koehler, G; Konstantinov, A S; Kormilitsyne, V; Kotchenda, L; Kotov, I V; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Krupien, T; Kuczewski, P; Kühn, C E; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Leonhardt, W; Leontiev, V M; Leszczynski, P; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Z; Liaw, C J; Lin, J; Lindenbaum, S J; Lindenstruth, V; Lindstrom, P J; Lisa, M A; Liu, H; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Lopiano, D; Love, W A; Lutz, Jean Robert; Lynn, D; Madansky, L; Maier, R S; Majka, R; Maliszewski, A; Margetis, S; Marks, K; Marstaller, R; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; Matyushevsky, E A; McParland, C P; McShane, T S; Meier, J; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Middlekamp, P; Mikhalin, N; Miller, B; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Minor, B; Mitchell, J; Mogavero, E; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D M; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; Morse, R; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Ngo, T; Nguyen, M; Nguyen, T; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Noggle, T; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Nussbaum, T; Nystrand, J; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Ogilvie, C A; Olchanski, K; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Ososkov, G A; Ott, G; Padrazo, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Pentia, M; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V; Pinganaud, W; Pirogov, S; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Polk, I; Porile, N T; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Puskar-Pasewicz, J; Rai, G; Rasson, J E; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J; Renfordt, R E; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Riso, J; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Röhrich, D; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sánchez, R; Sandler, Z; Sandweiss, J; Sappenfield, P; Saulys, A C; Savin, I A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Scheblien, J; Scheetz, R; Schlüter, R; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schulz, M; Schüttauf, A; Sedlmeir, J; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, J; Seyboth, P; Seymour, R; Shakaliev, E I; Shestermanov, K E; Shi, Y; Shimansky, S S; Shuman, D B; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Smykov, L P; Snellings, R; Solberg, K; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Stone, N; Stone, R; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Ströbele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Symons, T J M; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarchini, A; Tarzian, J; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tonse, S R; Trainor, T; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V N; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Vakula, I; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevskii, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Visser, G; Voloshin, S A; Vu, C; Wang, F; Ward, H; Weerasundara, D D; Weidenbach, R; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitfield, J P; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wilson, K; Wirth, J; Wisdom, J; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wolf, J; Wood, L; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zhang, J; Zhang, W M; Zhu, J; Zimmerman, D; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=130 GeV using the STAR TPC at RHIC. The elliptic flow signal, v_2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  8. Robust control of decoherence in realistic one-qubit quantum gates

    CERN Document Server

    Protopopescu, V; D'Helon, C; Schmulen, J

    2003-01-01

    We present an open-loop (bang-bang) scheme to control decoherence in a generic one-qubit quantum gate and implement it in a realistic simulation. The system is consistently described within the spin-boson model, with interactions accounting for both adiabatic and thermal decoherence. The external control is included from the beginning in the Hamiltonian as an independent interaction term. After tracing out the environment modes, reduced equations are obtained for the two-level system in which the effects of both decoherence and external control appear explicitly. The controls are determined exactly from the condition to eliminate decoherence, i.e. to restore unitarity. Numerical simulations show excellent performance and robustness of the proposed control scheme.

  9. A Preliminary Real-Time and Realistic Simulation Environment for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhuang Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI is a minimally invasive surgery procedure that is widely used in the treatment of coronary artery disease. This procedure requires interventional cardiologists to have high proficiency and therefore demands an extensive training period in order to ensure successful surgical outcome. In this paper, a realistic and real-time interactive simulator for training PCI procedure is presented. A set of new approaches for core simulation components is devised and integrated into the simulator. Trainees can interact with the virtual simulation environment with real instruments and essential maneuvers encountered in real PCI procedure. Although presently targeted at PCI, our simulator could be easily extended to mimic the necessities of any vascular interventional radiology procedures by updating vascular anatomy. Preliminary validation of the proposed physical model of instruments is conducted on vascular phantom to demonstrate its performance and effectiveness.

  10. A Fibrocontractive Mechanochemical Model of Dermal Wound Closure Incorporating Realistic Growth Factor Kinetics

    KAUST Repository

    Murphy, Kelly E.

    2012-01-13

    Fibroblasts and their activated phenotype, myofibroblasts, are the primary cell types involved in the contraction associated with dermal wound healing. Recent experimental evidence indicates that the transformation from fibroblasts to myofibroblasts involves two distinct processes: The cells are stimulated to change phenotype by the combined actions of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) and mechanical tension. This observation indicates a need for a detailed exploration of the effect of the strong interactions between the mechanical changes and growth factors in dermal wound healing. We review the experimental findings in detail and develop a model of dermal wound healing that incorporates these phenomena. Our model includes the interactions between TGFβ and collagenase, providing a more biologically realistic form for the growth factor kinetics than those included in previous mechanochemical descriptions. A comparison is made between the model predictions and experimental data on human dermal wound healing and all the essential features are well matched. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  11. MRXCAT: Realistic numerical phantoms for cardiovascular magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissmann, Lukas; Santelli, Claudio; Segars, William P; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2014-08-20

    Computer simulations are important for validating novel image acquisition and reconstruction strategies. In cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), numerical simulations need to combine anatomical information and the effects of cardiac and/or respiratory motion. To this end, a framework for realistic CMR simulations is proposed and its use for image reconstruction from undersampled data is demonstrated. The extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) anatomical phantom framework with various motion options was used as a basis for the numerical phantoms. Different tissue, dynamic contrast and signal models, multiple receiver coils and noise are simulated. Arbitrary trajectories and undersampled acquisition can be selected. The utility of the framework is demonstrated for accelerated cine and first-pass myocardial perfusion imaging using k-t PCA and k-t SPARSE. MRXCAT phantoms allow for realistic simulation of CMR including optional cardiac and respiratory motion. Example reconstructions from simulated undersampled k-t parallel imaging demonstrate the feasibility of simulated acquisition and reconstruction using the presented framework. Myocardial blood flow assessment from simulated myocardial perfusion images highlights the suitability of MRXCAT for quantitative post-processing simulation. The proposed MRXCAT phantom framework enables versatile and realistic simulations of CMR including breathhold and free-breathing acquisitions.

  12. An anatomically realistic temperature phantom for radiofrequency heating measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, Nadine N; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Guerin, Bastien; Gagoski, Borjan; Wald, Lawrence L

    2015-01-01

    An anthropomorphic phantom with realistic electrical properties allows for a more accurate reproduction of tissue current patterns during excitation. A temperature map can then probe the worst-case heating expected in the unperfused case. We describe an anatomically realistic human head phantom that allows rapid three-dimensional (3D) temperature mapping at 7T. The phantom was based on hand-labeled anatomical imaging data and consists of four compartments matching the corresponding human tissues in geometry and electrical properties. The increases in temperature resulting from radiofrequency excitation were measured with MR thermometry using a temperature-sensitive contrast agent (TmDOTMA(-)) validated by direct fiber optic temperature measurements. Acquisition of 3D temperature maps of the full phantom with a temperature accuracy better than 0.1°C was achieved with an isotropic resolution of 5 mm and acquisition times of 2-4 minutes. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of constructing anatomically realistic phantoms with complex geometries incorporating the ability to measure accurate temperature maps in the phantom. The anthropomorphic temperature phantom is expected to provide a useful tool for the evaluation of the heating effects of both conventional and parallel transmit pulses and help validate electromagnetic and temperature simulations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Depigmented Skin and Phantom Color Measurements for Realistic Prostheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Paul; Leachman, Sancy; Boucher, Kenneth; Ozçelik, Tunçer Burak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that regardless of human skin phototype, areas of depigmented skin, as seen in vitiligo, are optically indistinguishable among skin phototypes. The average of the depigmented skin measurements can be used to develop the base color of realistic prostheses. Methods and Materials Data from 20 of 32 recruited vitiligo study participants. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy measurements were made from depigmented skin and adjacent pigmented skin, then compared to 66 pigmented polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to determine pigment concentrations in turbid media for making realistic facial prostheses. Results The Area Under spectral intensity Curve (AUC) was calculated for average spectroscopy measurements of pigmented sites in relation to skin phototype (p=0.0505) and depigmented skin in relation to skin phototype (p=0.59). No significant relationship exists between skin phototypes and depigmented skin spectroscopy measurements. The average of the depigmented skin measurements (AUC 19,129) was the closest match to phantom 6.4 (AUC 19,162) Conclusions Areas of depigmented skin are visibly indistinguishable per skin phototype, yet spectrometry shows that depigmented skin measurements varied and were unrelated to skin phototype. Possible sources of optical variation of depigmented skin include age, body site, blood flow, quantity/quality of collagen, and other chromophores. The average of all depigmented skin measurements can be used to derive the pigment composition and concentration for realistic facial prostheses. PMID:23750920

  14. Relating realist metatheory to issues of gender and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergin, M; Wells, John S G; Owen, Sara

    2010-06-01

    This paper seeks to advance the debate that considers critical realism as an alternative approach for understanding gender and mental health and its relatedness to mental health research and practice. The knowledge base of how 'sex' and 'gender' affect mental health and illness is expanding. However, the way we conceptualize gender is significant and challenging as quite often our ability to think about 'gender' as independent of 'sex' is not common. The influences and interplay of how sex (biological) and gender (social) affect mental health and illness requires consideration. Critical realism suggests a shared ontology and epistemology for the natural and social sciences. While much of the debate surrounding gender is guided within a constructivist discourse, an exploration of the concept 'gender' is reflected on and some key realist propositions are considered for mental health research and practice. This is achieved through the works of some key realist theorists. Critical realism offers potential for research and practice in relation to gender and mental health because it facilitates changes in our understanding, while simultaneously, not discarding that which is already known. In so doing, it allows the biological (sex) and social (gender) domains of knowledge for mental health and illness to coexist, without either being reduced to or defined by the other. Arguably, greater depth and explanations for gender and mental health issues are presented within a realist metatheory.

  15. Behaviorly realistic simulations of stock market traders with a soul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Sorin

    1999-09-01

    The price fluctuations of the stocks in the financial markets are the result of the individual operations by many individual investors. However for many decades the financial theory did not use directly this “microscopic representation” of the markets. The main difficulties preventing this approach were solved recently with the advent of modern computer technology: - massive detailed data on the individual market operations became available; - “microscopic simulations” of the stock markets in terms of their individual participating agents allow very realistic treatment of the problem. By taking advantage of the modern computer processing and simulation techniques, we are now able to confront real market data with the results of simulating “microscopic” realistic models of the markets. These models have the potential to include and study the effects on the market of any desired feature in the investors behavior: departures from rationality, herding effects, heterogeneous investor-specific trading strategies. We propose to use the comparison of computer simulations of microscopic models with the actual market data in order to validate and enhance the knowledge on the financial behavior of individuals. Moreover we hope to explain, understand (and may be predict and control) macroscopic market dynamical features (e.g., cycles of booms and crashes, investors wealth distribution, market returns probability distribution etc.) based on realistic models using this knowledge.

  16. Towards Performance Evaluation of Cognitive Radio Network in Realistic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kukreja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The scarcity of free spectrum compels us to look for alternatives for ever increasing wireless applications. Cognitive Radios (CR is one such alternative that can solve this problem. The network nodes having CR capability is termed as Cognitive Radio Network (CRN. To have communication in CRN a routing protocol is required. The primary goal of which is to provide a route from source to destination. Various routing protocols have been proposed and tested in idealistic environment using simulation software such as NS-2 and QualNet. This paper is an effort in the same direction but the efficacy is evaluated in realistic conditions by designing a simulator in MATLAB-7. To make the network scenario realistic obstacles of different shapes, type, sizes and numbers have been introduced. In addition to that the shape of the periphery is also varied to find the impact of it on routing protocols. From the results it is observed that the outcomes in the realistic and idealistic vary significantly. The reason for the same has also been discussed in this paper.

  17. Fast Rendering of Realistic Virtual Character in Game Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengzhao Yang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is made up of multiple translucent layers and rendering of skin appearance usually acquire complex modeling and massive calculation. In some practical applications such as 3D game development, we not only approximate the realistic looking skin but also develop efficient method to implement easily for meeting needs of real-time rendering. In this study, we solve the problem of wrap lighting and introduce a surface details approximation method to give realistic rendering of virtual character. Our method considers that different thicknesses of geometry on the skin surface can result in different scattering degree of incident light and so pre-calculate the diffuse falloff into a look-up texture. Also, we notice that scattering is strongly color dependent and small bumps are common on the skin surface and so pre-soften the finer details on the skin surface according to the R/G/B channel. At last, we linearly interpolate the diffuse lighting with different scattering degree from the look-up texture sampled with the curvature and NdotL. Experiment results show that the proposed approach yields realistic virtual character and obtains high frames per second in real-time rendering.

  18. {rho}(770){sup 0}, K*(892){sup 0} and f{sub 0}(980) production in Au-Au and pp collisions at {radical}{sup S}NN = 220 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fachini, P

    2003-03-10

    Preliminary results on {rho}(770){sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K{sup *}(892){sup 0} {yields} {pi}K and f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} production using the mixed-event technique are presented. The measurements are performed at mid-rapidity by the STAR detector in {radical}{sup S}NN= 200 GeV Au-Au and pp interactions at RHIC. The results are compared to different measurements at various energies.

  19. The standard aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L. inhibits toxic PLA2 - NN-XIb-PLA2 of Indian cobra venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhananjaya, Bhadrapura Lakkappa; Sudarshan, Shivalingaiah; Dongol, Yashad; More, Sunil S

    2016-05-01

    The aqueous extract of Mangifera indica is known to possess diverse medicinal properties, which also includes anti-snake venom activities. However, its inhibitory potency and mechanism of action on multi-toxic snake venom phospholipases A2s are still unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the modulatory effect of standard aqueous bark extract of M. indica on NN-XIb-PLA2 of Indian cobra venom. The in vitro sPLA2, in situ hemolytic and in vivo edema inhibition effect were carried out as described. Also the effect of substrate and calcium concentration was carried out. M. indica extract dose dependently inhibited the GIA sPLA2 (NN-XIb-PLA2) activity with an IC50 value of 7.6 μg/ml. M. indica extract effectively inhibited the indirect hemolytic activity up to 98% at ∼40 μg/ml concentration. Further, M. indica extract (0-50 μg/ml) inhibited the edema formed in a dose dependent manner. When examined as a function of increased substrate and calcium concentration, there was no relieve of inhibitory effect of M. indica extract on the NN-XIb-PLA2. Further, the inhibition was irreversible as evident from binding studies. The in vitro inhibition is well correlated with in situ and in vivo edema inhibiting activities of M. indica. As the inhibition is independent of substrate and calcium and was irreversible, it can be concluded that M. indica extract mode of inhibition could be due to direct interaction of components present in the extract with the PLA2 enzyme. The aqueous extract of M. indica effectively inhibits svPLA2 enzymatic and its associated toxic activities, which substantiate their anti-snake venom properties. Further in-depth studies on the role and mechanism of the principal constituents present in the extract, responsible for the anti-PLA2 activity will be interesting to develop them into potent antisnake component and also as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  20. The standard aqueous stem bark extract of Mangifera indica L. inhibits toxic PLA2 – NN-XIb-PLA2 of Indian cobra venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhadrapura Lakkappa Dhananjaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aqueous extract of Mangifera indica is known to possess diverse medicinal properties, which also includes anti-snake venom activities. However, its inhibitory potency and mechanism of action on multi-toxic snake venom phospholipases A2s are still unknown. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the modulatory effect of standard aqueous bark extract of M. indica on NN-XIb-PLA2 of Indian cobra venom. The in vitro sPLA2, in situ hemolytic and in vivo edema inhibition effect were carried out as described. Also the effect of substrate and calcium concentration was carried out. M. indica extract dose dependently inhibited the GIA sPLA2 (NN-XIb-PLA2 activity with an IC50 value of 7.6 μg/ml. M. indica extract effectively inhibited the indirect hemolytic activity up to 98% at ∼40 μg/ml concentration. Further, M. indica extract (0–50 μg/ml inhibited the edema formed in a dose dependent manner. When examined as a function of increased substrate and calcium concentration, there was no relieve of inhibitory effect of M. indica extract on the NN-XIb-PLA2. Further, the inhibition was irreversible as evident from binding studies. The in vitro inhibition is well correlated with in situ and in vivo edema inhibiting activities of M. indica. As the inhibition is independent of substrate and calcium and was irreversible, it can be concluded that M. indica extract mode of inhibition could be due to direct interaction of components present in the extract with the PLA2 enzyme. The aqueous extract of M. indica effectively inhibits svPLA2 enzymatic and its associated toxic activities, which substantiate their anti-snake venom properties. Further in-depth studies on the role and mechanism of the principal constituents present in the extract, responsible for the anti-PLA2 activity will be interesting to develop them into potent antisnake component and also as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  1. Biophysically realistic filament bending dynamics in agent-based biological simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Jonathan B

    2009-01-01

    An appealing tool for study of the complex biological behaviors that can emerge from networks of simple molecular interactions is an agent-based, computational simulation that explicitly tracks small-scale local interactions--following thousands to millions of states through time. For many critical cell processes (e.g. cytokinetic furrow specification, nuclear centration, cytokinesis), the flexible nature of cytoskeletal filaments is likely to be critical. Any computer model that hopes to explain the complex emergent behaviors in these processes therefore needs to encode filament flexibility in a realistic manner. Here I present a numerically convenient and biophysically realistic method for modeling cytoskeletal filament flexibility in silico. Each cytoskeletal filament is represented by a series of rigid segments linked end-to-end in series with a variable attachment point for the translational elastic element. This connection scheme allows an empirically tuning, for a wide range of segment sizes, viscosities, and time-steps, that endows any filament species with the experimentally observed (or theoretically expected) static force deflection, relaxation time-constant, and thermal writhing motions. I additionally employ a unique pair of elastic elements--one representing the axial and the other the bending rigidity- that formulate the restoring force in terms of single time-step constraint resolution. This method is highly local -adjacent rigid segments of a filament only interact with one another through constraint forces-and is thus well-suited to simulations in which arbitrary additional forces (e.g. those representing interactions of a filament with other bodies or cross-links / entanglements between filaments) may be present. Implementation in code is straightforward; Java source code is available at www.celldynamics.org.

  2. Biophysically realistic filament bending dynamics in agent-based biological simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan B Alberts

    Full Text Available An appealing tool for study of the complex biological behaviors that can emerge from networks of simple molecular interactions is an agent-based, computational simulation that explicitly tracks small-scale local interactions--following thousands to millions of states through time. For many critical cell processes (e.g. cytokinetic furrow specification, nuclear centration, cytokinesis, the flexible nature of cytoskeletal filaments is likely to be critical. Any computer model that hopes to explain the complex emergent behaviors in these processes therefore needs to encode filament flexibility in a realistic manner. Here I present a numerically convenient and biophysically realistic method for modeling cytoskeletal filament flexibility in silico. Each cytoskeletal filament is represented by a series of rigid segments linked end-to-end in series with a variable attachment point for the translational elastic element. This connection scheme allows an empirically tuning, for a wide range of segment sizes, viscosities, and time-steps, that endows any filament species with the experimentally observed (or theoretically expected static force deflection, relaxation time-constant, and thermal writhing motions. I additionally employ a unique pair of elastic elements--one representing the axial and the other the bending rigidity- that formulate the restoring force in terms of single time-step constraint resolution. This method is highly local -adjacent rigid segments of a filament only interact with one another through constraint forces-and is thus well-suited to simulations in which arbitrary additional forces (e.g. those representing interactions of a filament with other bodies or cross-links / entanglements between filaments may be present. Implementation in code is straightforward; Java source code is available at www.celldynamics.org.

  3. Method of RPkNN-Sarsa (λ) reinforcement learning for robot path planning%基于RPkNN-Sarsa(λ)强化学习的机器人路径规划方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王军红; 江虹; 黄玉清; 伍晓利

    2013-01-01

    The method of robot path planning based on kNN-Sarsa(λ) reinforcement learning has fast convergence speed, but the algorithm is easy to fall into local optimal value and does not consider incomplete observability of environmental information. With regards to this, this paper designed a method of random perturbation kNN-Sarsa(λ) reinforcement learning algorithm. Also, it processed sensors detection data uncertainty using Bayesian theory. In addition, it used grid map to establish simulation environment model. The simulation experimental results show that the method not only has rapid convergence speed by alleviating the local optimal problem of kNN-Sarsa(λ) algorithm, but also can find a shortest path in the case of sensors detection data uncertainty.%基于kNN-Sarsa(λ)强化学习的机器人路径规划方法虽然收敛速度快,但该算法容易陷入局部最优值,且未考虑环境信息的不完全可观测性.为此,设计了一种随机扰动(random perturbation) kNN-Sarsa(λ)强化学习算法,利用Bayesian规则对传感器探测信息的不确定性进行了处理,建立了基于栅格地图的仿真环境模型.仿真实验结果表明,该方法不仅收敛性好,能有效缓解kNN-Sarsa(λ)算法易陷入局部最优的现象,且在传感器探测信息不确定的情况下仍能搜索到最优路径.

  4. Click or Strike: Realistic versus Standard Game Controls in Violent Video Games and Their Effects on Aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Melzer, André; Derks, Ingmar; Heydekorn, Jens; Steffgen, Georges

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The motion detection technology used in innovative game controlling devices like the Nintendo Wii-Remote® provides experiences of realistic and immersive game play. In the present study (N=62) it was tested whether this technology may also provoke stronger aggression-related effects than standard forms of interaction (i.e., keyboard and mouse). With the aid of a gesture recognition algorithm, a violent action role-playing game was developed to compare different modes o...

  5. A realistic evaluation: the case of protocol-based care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background 'Protocol based care' was envisioned by policy makers as a mechanism for delivering on the service improvement agenda in England. Realistic evaluation is an increasingly popular approach, but few published examples exist, particularly in implementation research. To fill this gap, within this paper we describe the application of a realistic evaluation approach to the study of protocol-based care, whilst sharing findings of relevance about standardising care through the use of protocols, guidelines, and pathways. Methods Situated between positivism and relativism, realistic evaluation is concerned with the identification of underlying causal mechanisms, how they work, and under what conditions. Fundamentally it focuses attention on finding out what works, for whom, how, and in what circumstances. Results In this research, we were interested in understanding the relationships between the type and nature of particular approaches to protocol-based care (mechanisms), within different clinical settings (context), and what impacts this resulted in (outcomes). An evidence review using the principles of realist synthesis resulted in a number of propositions, i.e., context, mechanism, and outcome threads (CMOs). These propositions were then 'tested' through multiple case studies, using multiple methods including non-participant observation, interviews, and document analysis through an iterative analysis process. The initial propositions (conjectured CMOs) only partially corresponded to the findings that emerged during analysis. From the iterative analysis process of scrutinising mechanisms, context, and outcomes we were able to draw out some theoretically generalisable features about what works, for whom, how, and what circumstances in relation to the use of standardised care approaches (refined CMOs). Conclusions As one of the first studies to apply realistic evaluation in implementation research, it was a good fit, particularly given the growing emphasis on

  6. Terahertz current oscillations assisted by optical phonon emission in GaN n+nn+ diodes: Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Íñiguez-de-la-Torre, A.; Mateos, J.; González, T.

    2010-03-01

    Under certain conditions, plasma instabilities associated with streaming motion of carriers taking place in n+nn+ diodes can lead to current oscillations. The origin of the phenomenon, known as optical phonon transit time resonance, is characterized by a frequency related to the transit time between consecutive optical phonon emissions by electrons along the active region of the diode. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, the possibility to obtaining current oscillations in GaN n+nn+ diodes is analyzed. The optimum conditions for the onset of such mechanism are investigated: applied bias, temperature, doping, and length of the active n region. Simulations show that current oscillations at frequencies in the terahertz range can be obtained at very low temperatures. Moreover, by choosing the appropriate applied voltage and length of the n region, some degree of tunability can be achieved for frequencies close to the plasma frequency of the n region of the n+nn+ diode.

  7. First principles calculations of vacancy-vacancy interactions in nickel: thermal expansion effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megchiche, E H; Amarouche, M [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique (LPCQ), Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-ouzou (Algeria); Mijoule, C, E-mail: claude.mijoule@ensiacet.f [CIRIMAT UMR CNRS/INP/UPS, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs en Arts Chimiques et Technologiques (ENSIACET), 4 allee Emile Monso, B.P 44362, Toulouse cedex 4 (France)

    2010-12-08

    The energetic properties of the divacancy defect in fcc nickel are studied by ab initio calculations based on density functional theory. The formation and binding enthalpies of the divacancy in the first (1nn), second (2nn) and third (3nn) nearest-neighbor configurations are presented. Results show that the 1nn divacancy configuration is the most stable with a formation enthalpy H{sub 2v}{sup f} of 2.71 eV and a small binding energy H{sub 2v}{sup b} of 0.03 eV. In the 2nn configuration, the monovacancy-monovacancy interaction is repulsive, and it vanishes in the 3nn configuration. The migration process of the divacancy in its stable configuration is studied. We find that the divacancy migrates in the (111) plane by successive rotational steps of 60{sup 0}. The corresponding migration enthalpy H{sub 2v}{sup m} is predicted to be 0.59 eV, about half of that found for the monovacancy. For a better comparison of our results with high temperature experimental data, we have analyzed the effects of thermal expansion. Our results show that the inclusion of thermal expansion allows us to reproduce satisfactorily the experimental predictions.

  8. Neutropenia Prediction Based on First-Cycle Blood Counts Using a FOS-3NN Classifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elize A. Shirdel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Delivery of full doses of adjuvant chemotherapy on schedule is key to optimal breast cancer outcomes. Neutropenia is a serious complication of chemotherapy and a common barrier to this goal, leading to dose reductions or delays in treatment. While past research has observed correlations between complete blood count data and neutropenic events, a reliable method of classifying breast cancer patients into low- and high-risk groups remains elusive. Patients and Methods. Thirty-five patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer under the care of a single oncologist are examined in this study. FOS-3NN stratifies patient risk based on complete blood count data after the first cycle of treatment. All classifications are independent of breast cancer subtype and clinical markers, with risk level determined by the kinetics of patient blood count response to the first cycle of treatment. Results. In an independent test set of patients unseen by FOS-3NN, 19 out of 21 patients were correctly classified (Fisher’s exact test probability P<0.00023 [2 tailed], Matthews’ correlation coefficient +0.83. Conclusions. We have developed a model that accurately predicts neutropenic events in a population treated with adjuvant chemotherapy in the first cycle of a 6-cycle treatment.

  9. Could k-NN Classifier be Useful in Tree Leaves Recognition?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horaisová Kateřina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a method for affine invariant recognition of two-dimensional binary objects based on 2D Fourier power spectrum. Such function is translation invariant and their moments of second order enable construction of affine invariant spectrum except of the rotation effect. Harmonic analysis of samples on circular paths generates Fourier coefficients whose absolute values are affine invariant descriptors. Affine invariancy is approximately saved also for large digital binary images as demonstrated in the experimental part. The proposed method is tested on artificial data set first and consequently on a large set of 2D binary digital images of tree leaves. High dimensionality of feature vectors is reduced via the kernel PCA technique with Gaussian kernel and the k-NN classifier is used for image classification. The results are summarized as k-NN classifier sensitivity after dimensionality reduction. The resulting descriptors after dimensionality reduction are able to distinguish real contours of tree leaves with acceptable classification error. The general methodology is directly applicable to any set of large binary images. All calculations were performed in the MATLAB environment

  10. The properties of nuclear matter with lattice $NN$ potential in relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Jinniu; Shen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    We study the properties of nuclear matter with lattice nucleon-nucleon ($NN$) potential in the relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (RBHF) theory. To use this potential in such a microscopic many-body theory, we firstly have to construct a one-boson-exchange potential (OBEP) based on the latest lattice $NN$ potential. Three mesons, pion, $\\sigma$ meson, and $\\omega$ meson, are considered. Their coupling constants and cut-off momenta are determined by fitting the on-shell behaviors and phase shifts of the lattice force, respectively. Therefore, we obtain two parameter sets of the OBEP potential (named as LOBEP1 and LOBEP2) with these two fitting ways. We calculate the properties of symmetric and pure neutron matter with LOBEP1 and LOBEP2. In non-relativistic Brueckner-Hartree-Fock case, the binding energies of symmetric nuclear matter are around $-3$ and $-5$ MeV at saturation densities, while it becomes $-8$ and $-12$ MeV in relativistic framework with $^1S_0,~^3S_1,$ and $^3D_1$ channels using our two paramet...

  11. Improving Shape Retrieval by Integrating AIR and Modified Mutual kNN Graph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nouman Qadeer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In computer vision, image retrieval remained a significant problem and recent resurgent of image retrieval also relies on other postprocessing methods to improve the accuracy instead of solely relying on good feature representation. Our method addressed the shape retrieval of binary images. This paper proposes a new integration scheme to best utilize feature representation along with contextual information. For feature representation we used articulation invariant representation; dynamic programming is then utilized for better shape matching followed by manifold learning based postprocessing modified mutual kNN graph to further improve the similarity score. We conducted extensive experiments on widely used MPEG-7 database of shape images by so-called bulls-eye score with and without normalization of modified mutual kNN graph which clearly indicates the importance of normalization. Finally, our method demonstrated better results compared to other methods. We also computed the computational time with another graph transduction method which clearly shows that our method is computationally very fast. Furthermore, to show consistency of postprocessing method, we also performed experiments on challenging ORL and YALE face datasets and improved baseline results.

  12. GA_MLP NN: A Hybrid Intelligent System for Diabetes Disease Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilip Kumar Choubey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a condition in which the amount of sugar in the blood is higher than normal. Classification systems have been widely used in medical domain to explore patient’s data and extract a predictive model or set of rules. The prime objective of this research work is to facilitate a better diagnosis (classification of diabetes disease. There are already several methodology which have been implemented on classification for the diabetes disease. The proposed methodology implemented work in 2 stages: (a In the first stage Genetic Algorithm (GA has been used as a feature selection on Pima Indian Diabetes Dataset. (b In the second stage, Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network (MLP NN has been used for the classification on the selected feature. GA is noted to reduce not only the cost and computation time of the diagnostic process, but the proposed approach also improved the accuracy of classification. The experimental results obtained classification accuracy (79.1304% and ROC (0.842 show that GA and MLP NN can be successfully used for the diagnosing of diabetes disease.

  13. Test of 600 and 750 MeV NN matrix on elastic scattering Glauber model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, I.

    1980-09-01

    The 600 and 750 MeV proton nucleus elastic scattering cross section and polarization calculations have been performed in the framework of the Glauber model to test the pp and pn scattering amplitudes deduced from a phase shift analysis by Bystricky, Lechanoine and Lehar. It is well known that up to now we do not possess a non-phenomenological NN scattering matrix at intermediate energies. However proton-nucleus scattering analyses are used to extract information about short range correlations1), Δ resonance2) or pion condensation presences)... etc. Most scattering calculations made at these energies have been done with phenomenological NN amplitudes having a gaussian q-dependence 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE1.gif A(q) = {kσ }/{4π }(α + i) e^{ - β ^2 q^2 /2} and 10050_2005_Article_BF01438168_TeX2GIFE2.gif C(q) = {kσ }/{4π }iq(α + i) D_e - β ^2 q^2 /2 K and σ being respectively the projectile momentum and the total pN total cross section. The parameters α, β and D are badly known and are adjusted by fitting some specific reactions as p+4He elastic scattering4). Even when these amplitudes provide good fits to the data, our understanding of the dynamics of the scattering remains obscure.

  14. Decay width of $d^*(2380)\\to NN \\pi\\pi$ processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yubing; Shen, Pengnian; Zhang, Zongye

    2016-01-01

    The decay widths of four-body double-pion decays $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^+\\pi^-$, and iso-scalar parts of $\\ds\\to pp \\pi^0\\pi^-$ and $\\ds\\to nn \\pi^+\\pi^0$ are explicitly calculated with the help of the $d^*$ wave function obtained in a chiral SU(3) quark model calculation. The effect of the dynamical structure on $\\ds$'s width is analyzed both in the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel and coupled $\\Delta\\Delta$ and $CC$ channel approximations. It is found that in the coupled-channel approximation, the obtained partial decay widths of $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^0\\pi^0$, $\\ds\\to pn \\pi^+\\pi^-$, and those of $d^*$ to the iso-scalar parts of $pp \\pi^0\\pi^-$ and $nn \\pi^+\\pi^0$ are about $7.4$MeV, $16.4$MeV, $3.5$MeV and $3.5$MeV, respectively As a consequence, the total width is about $64.5$MeV. These widths are consistent with those estimated by using the corresponding cross section data in our previous investigation and also the observed data. But in the single $\\Delta\\Delta$ channel approximation, the widths ar...

  15. Measurement of charged-particle spectra in Pb+Pb collisions at s N N = 2.76 $$ \\sqrt{s_{\\mathrm{NN}}}=2.76 $$ TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. 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F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thong, W. M.; Thun, R. P.; Tian, F.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tran, H. L.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virzi, J.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wendland, D.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yanush, S.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Charged-particle spectra obtained in Pb+Pb interactions at √sNN=2.76 and pp interactions at √sNN=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented, using data with integrated luminosities of 0.15 nb-1 and 4.2 pb-1, respectively, in a wide transverse momentum (0.5 < p T < 150 GeV) and pseudorapidity (|η| < 2) range. For Pb+Pb collisions, the spectra are presented as a function of collision centrality, which is determined by the response of the forward calorimeters located on both sides of the interaction point. The nuclear modification factors R AA and R CP are presented in detail as a function of centrality, p T and η. They show a distinct p T-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7 GeV. Above 60 GeV, R AA is consistent with a plateau at a centrality-dependent value, within the uncertainties. The value is 0.55 ± 0.01(stat.) ± 0.04(syst.) in the most central collisions. The R AA distribution is consistent with flat |η| dependence over the whole transverse momentum range in all centrality classes.

  16. Simplified realistic human head model for simulating Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Cornelia; Bomzon, Ze'ev; Salvador, Ricardo; Basser, Peter J; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields) are alternating electric fields in the intermediate frequency range (100-300 kHz) of low-intensity (1-3 V/cm). TTFields are an anti-mitotic treatment against solid tumors, which are approved for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) patients. These electric fields are induced non-invasively by transducer arrays placed directly on the patient's scalp. Cell culture experiments showed that treatment efficacy is dependent on the induced field intensity. In clinical practice, a software called NovoTalTM uses head measurements to estimate the optimal array placement to maximize the electric field delivery to the tumor. Computational studies predict an increase in the tumor's electric field strength when adapting transducer arrays to its location. Ideally, a personalized head model could be created for each patient, to calculate the electric field distribution for the specific situation. Thus, the optimal transducer layout could be inferred from field calculation rather than distance measurements. Nonetheless, creating realistic head models of patients is time-consuming and often needs user interaction, because automated image segmentation is prone to failure. This study presents a first approach to creating simplified head models consisting of convex hulls of the tissue layers. The model is able to account for anisotropic conductivity in the cortical tissues by using a tensor representation estimated from Diffusion Tensor Imaging. The induced electric field distribution is compared in the simplified and realistic head models. The average field intensities in the brain and tumor are generally slightly higher in the realistic head model, with a maximal ratio of 114% for a simplified model with reasonable layer thicknesses. Thus, the present pipeline is a fast and efficient means towards personalized head models with less complexity involved in characterizing tissue interfaces, while enabling accurate predictions of electric field distribution.

  17. Cloning,subcellular localization and expression analysis of NnFUL genes from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.)%莲 NnFUL 基因克隆、亚细胞定位及表达分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岳; 张微微; 田代科; 王金刚

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of FUL-like gene of A-class MADS-box family on floral organ develop-ment of Nelumbo nucifera,flower buds of N.nucifera ‘Da Sajin’were used as a test material and a cDNA of a FUL-like gene,being named NnFUL and 763 bp long,was successfully cloned by rT-PCr.The cDNA’s open reading frame (OrF)encodes 250 amino acids totally.The NnFUL protein is hydrophilic and its secondary struc-ture mainly consists of α-helical,irregularly curled and extended strands.The phylogenetic analysis showed that the NnFUL protein belongs to a class of FUL-like protein in AP1 ?SQUA subfamily and has a close genetic rela-tionship with FUL-like protein of Platanus ×acerifolia.The subcellular localization indicated that the gene NnFUL is located in the cell nucleus.The fluorescent quantitation real-time PCr analysis showed that NnFUL has the highest expression level in the floral organ,mainly concentrating in the sepals and petals,and also has some expression in the vegetative organs.Therefore,the gene NnFUL has a certain regulatory effect on development of both sepals and petals in lotus flowers.%为了研究 MADS-box A 类基因在莲花器官发育中的作用,以莲品种‘大洒锦’(Nelumbo nucifera ‘Da Sajin’)的花蕾为试验材料,利用 rT-PCr 方法克隆了莲 FUL-like 基因 cDNA 序列,命名为 NnFUL。NnFUL 的cDNA长度为763 bp,其开放阅读框(Open reading frame,OrF)共编码250个氨基酸。该蛋白属于亲水性蛋白,二级结构主要由α-螺旋、无规则卷曲和延伸链组成。系统进化分析表明:NnFUL 编码的蛋白与 AP1?SQUA 亚家族中的FUL-like 蛋白聚为一类,与二球悬铃木(Platanus ×acerifolia )的 FUL-like 蛋白具有较高的亲缘关系。亚细胞定位显示该基因位于细胞核中。荧光定量 real-time PCr 结果表明:NnFUL 在花器官中表达量最高,主要集中在花萼和花瓣中,同时在营养器官中也有表达;因此,NnFUL 在

  18. The role of the P sub 1 sub 1 (1710) in the NN->N SIGMA K reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sibirtsev, A A; Cassing, W; Thomas, A W

    1999-01-01

    Using the resonance model, which was successfully applied for the study of the pp->p LAMBDA K sup + reaction, we investigate NN->N SIGMA K reactions that are expected to provide cleaner information about resonance excitations and meson exchange contributions. For this purpose we demonstrate that the invariant mass distribution for the SIGMA K system, as well as the Dalitz plot for the NN->N SIGMA K reaction, provide direct information about the SIGMA K production mechanism, which can be tested in the near future by experiments at COSY.

  19. SISTEM PENENTU GERAKAN MOBILE ROBOT YANG BELAJAR SENDIRI CARA UNTUK BERGERAK MAJU DAN MENGINDARI TRABRAKAN MENGGUNAKAN NEURAL NETWORK (NN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eru Puspita

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Commonly used for driving mobile robot is by using certain pre defined algorithm. This research will try to develop driving technique using continuous self learning NN while mobile robot on go. This research only observe about how mobile robot by it self can move forward an how to avoid a collision. Program NN will try to learn how to move forward, backward, turn left, turn right or other possibility depend on or by using collision experience. The test results obtained 82% successful runs forward and approximately 90% managed to avoid a collision.

  20. Pion Interferometry of square root of (s(NN)) =130 GeV Au + Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, C; Ahammed, Z; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Bossingham, R; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón De La Barca Sánchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Conin, L; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; DeMello, M; Deng, W S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O; Greiner, D; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Gushin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Y I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, Q; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; LoCurto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Y A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Y; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Pinganaud, W; Platner, E; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schweda, K; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Stroebele, H; Struck, C; Suaide, A A; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J; Szanto De Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vanyashin, A; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N

    2001-08-20

    Two-pion correlation functions in Au+Au collisions at square root of [s(NN)] = 130 GeV have been measured by the STAR (solenoidal tracker at RHIC) detector. The source size extracted by fitting the correlations grows with event multiplicity and decreases with transverse momentum. Anomalously large sizes or emission durations, which have been suggested as signals of quark-gluon plasma formation and rehadronization, are not observed. The Hanbury Brown-Twiss parameters display a weak energy dependence over a broad range in square root of [s(NN)].

  1. Transverse energy production and charged-particle multiplicity at midrapidity in various systems from $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=7.7$ to 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Al-Jamel, A; Al-Ta'ani, H; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Aschenauer, E C; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Bai, X; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Baumgart, S; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Black, D; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bryslawskyj, J; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Castera, P; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choi, S; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Cronin, N; Crossette, N; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Danley, D; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Diss, P B; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; D'Orazio, L; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gainey, K; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, A; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Ge, H; Germain, M; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gong, X; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guo, L; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hamilton, H F; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Hasegawa, S; Haseler, T O S; Hashimoto, K; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Hayashi, S; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hori, Y; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Hotvedt, N; Huang, J; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isinhue, A; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Javani, M; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kanda, S; Kaneta, M; Kaneti, S; Kang, B H; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khandai, P K; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, G W; Kim, H J; Kim, K -B; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y -S; Kimelman, B; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kitamura, R; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kofarago, M; Komatsu, Y; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Krizek, F; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, B; Lee, D M; Lee, G H; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S; Lee, S H; Lee, S R; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lenzi, B; Lewis, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Maruyama, T; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Masumoto, S; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Midori, J; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of midrapidity charged particle multiplicity distributions, $dN_{\\rm ch}/d\\eta$, and midrapidity transverse-energy distributions, $dE_T/d\\eta$, are presented for a variety of collision systems and energies. Included are distributions for Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$, 130, 62.4, 39, 27, 19.6, 14.5, and 7.7 GeV, Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ and 62.4 GeV, Cu$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, U$+$U collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=193$ GeV, $d$$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV, and $p$$+$$p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. Centrality-dependent distributions at midrapidity are presented in terms of the number of nucleon participants, $N_{\\rm part}$, and the number of constituent quark participants, $N_{q{\\rm p}}$. For all $A$$+$$A$ collisions down to $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=7.7$ GeV, it is observed that the midrapidity data are better described by scaling with $N_{q{\\rm p}}$ than scalin...

  2. Electronic structure, stability and non-linear optical properties of aza-fullerenes C60-2nN2n(n=1–12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srinivasu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Through ab initio based density functional theory calculations, we have investigated the electronic structure, stability and non-linear optical properties of a series of nitrogen substituted fullerenes (azafullerenes with the general formula C60-2nN2n (n=1–12. For each system, we have considered different possible isomers and the minimum energy isomer is subjected to further detailed investigations. We have calculated different properties such as HOMO-LUMO gaps, vertical ionization potentials, vertical electron affinities, etc. to verify the stability of the considered fullerenes. From the Hessian calculations, it is observed that all the fullerenes are not only associated with real vibrational frequencies, but the minimum frequencies are also found to be considerably large which further confirms the stability of the considered fullerenes. We find that the presence of unperturbed C6 rings enhances the stability of the fullerene whereas, the -N-C-N- fragments are found to destabilize the structure. At lower doping concentration, the stabilization due to C6 is more predominant and as the doping concentration is increased, the destabilization due to nitrogen-nitrogen repulsion plays a more important role. Our calculated polarizability and hyperpolarizability parameters of C60 are found to be in good agreement with the earlier reported results. On nitrogen doping, considerable variation is observed in the non-linear optical coefficients, which can be helpful in designing new photonic devices.

  3. Scaling up complex interventions: insights from a realist synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Cameron D; Riley, Barbara L; Stockton, Lisa; Abramowicz, Aneta; Zummach, Dana; Wong, Geoff; Robinson, Kerry L; Best, Allan

    2016-12-19

    Preventing chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, requires complex interventions, involving multi-component and multi-level efforts that are tailored to the contexts in which they are delivered. Despite an increasing number of complex interventions in public health, many fail to be 'scaled up'. This study aimed to increase understanding of how and under what conditions complex public health interventions may be scaled up to benefit more people and populations.A realist synthesis was conducted and discussed at an in-person workshop involving practitioners responsible for scaling up activities. Realist approaches view causality through the linkages between changes in contexts (C) that activate mechanisms (M), leading to specific outcomes (O) (CMO configurations). To focus this review, three cases of complex interventions that had been successfully scaled up were included: Vibrant Communities, Youth Build USA and Pathways to Education. A search strategy of published and grey literature related to each case was developed, involving searches of relevant databases and nominations from experts. Data extracted from included documents were classified according to CMO configurations within strategic themes. Findings were compared and contrasted with guidance from diffusion theory, and interpreted with knowledge users to identify practical implications and potential directions for future research.Four core mechanisms were identified, namely awareness, commitment, confidence and trust. These mechanisms were activated within two broad scaling up strategies, those of renewing and regenerating, and documenting success. Within each strategy, specific actions to change contexts included building partnerships, conducting evaluations, engaging political support and adapting funding models. These modified contexts triggered the identified mechanisms, leading to a range of scaling up outcomes, such as commitment of new communities, changes in relevant

  4. A continuous family of realistic Susy SU(5) GUTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajc, Borut

    2016-06-01

    It is shown that the minimal renormalizable supersymmetric SU(5) is still realistic providing the supersymmetric scale is at least few tens of TeV or large R-parity violating terms are considered. In the first case the vacuum is metastable, and different consistency constraints can give a bounded allowed region in the tan β - msusy plane. In the second case the mass eigenstate electron (down quark) is a linear combination of the original electron (down quark) and Higgsino (heavy colour triplet), and the mass ratio of bino and wino is determined. Both limits lead to light gravitino dark matter.

  5. ROC Analysis and a Realistic Model of Heart Rate Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Thurner, S; Teich, M C; Thurner, Stefan; Feurstein, Markus C.; Teich, Malvin C.

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out a pilot study on a standard collection of electrocardiograms from patients who suffer from congestive heart failure, and subjects without cardiac pathology, using receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis. The scale-dependent wavelet-coefficient standard deviation superior to two commonly used measures of cardiac dysfunction when the two classes of patients cannot be completely separated. A jittered integrate-and-fire model with a fractal Gaussian-noise kernel provides a realistic simulation of heartbeat sequences for both heart-failure patients and normal subjects.

  6. Recovering the quantum formalism from physically realist axioms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffèves, Alexia; Grangier, Philippe

    2017-03-03

    We present a heuristic derivation of Born's rule and unitary transforms in Quantum Mechanics, from a simple set of axioms built upon a physical phenomenology of quantization. This approach naturally leads to the usual quantum formalism, within a new realistic conceptual framework that is discussed in details. Physically, the structure of Quantum Mechanics appears as a result of the interplay between the quantized number of "modalities" accessible to a quantum system, and the continuum of "contexts" that are required to define these modalities. Mathematically, the Hilbert space structure appears as a consequence of a specific "extra-contextuality" of modalities, closely related to the hypothesis of Gleason's theorem, and consistent with its conclusions.

  7. Centralized Cooperative Positioning and Tracking with Realistic Communications Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mensing, Christian; Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the performance of centralized cooperative positioning algorithms. Compared to traditional positioning algorithms which solely exploit ranging information from anchor nodes, cooperative positioning additionally uses measurements from peer-to-peer links between...... on the overall performance will be assessed. As we are considering a dynamic scenario, the cooperative positioning algorithms are based on extended Kalman filtering for position estimation and tracking. Simulation results for ultra-wideband based ranging information and WLAN based communications infrastructure...... show the benefits of cooperative position and tracking for realistic measurement and mobility models....

  8. Assumptions behind size-based ecosystem models are realistic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Blanchard, Julia L.; Fulton, Elizabeth A.;

    2016-01-01

    A recent publication about balanced harvesting (Froese et al., ICES Journal of Marine Science; doi:10.1093/icesjms/fsv122) contains several erroneous statements about size-spectrum models. We refute the statements by showing that the assumptions pertaining to size-spectrum models discussed...... by Froese et al. are realistic and consistent. We further show that the assumption about density-dependence being described by a stock recruitment relationship is responsible for determining whether a peak in the cohort biomass of a population occurs late or early in life. Finally, we argue...

  9. Mode-Coupling in Realistic Rotating Gravitational Collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Hod, S

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the mode-coupling phenomena in realistic rotating gravitational collapse. Physically, this phenomena is caused by the dragging of reference frames, due to the black-hole (or star's) rotation. It is shown that different modes become coupled during the rotating collapse. As a consequence, the asymptotic late-time tails are dominated by modes which, in general, have an angular distribution different from the original one. We show that a rotating Kerr black hole becomes ``bald'' slower than a spherically-symmetric Schwarzschild black hole. This paper considers gravitational, electromagnetic and neutrino fields propagating on a Kerr background.

  10. Ultra-Reliable Communications in Failure-Prone Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerardino, Guillermo Andrés Pocovi; Lauridsen, Mads; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential of different diversity and interference management techniques to achieve the required downlink SINR outage probability for ultra-reliable communications. The evaluation is performed in a realistic network deployment based on site-specific data from a European capital....... Micro and macroscopic diversity techniques are proved to be important enablers of ultra-reliable communications. Particularly, it is shown how a 4x4 MIMO scheme with three orders of macroscopic diversity can achieve the required SINR outage performance. Smaller gains are obtained from interference...

  11. Dynamic Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination for Realistic Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Klaus I.; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Barcos, Sonia;

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination (eICIC) is a key ingredient to boost the performance of co-channel Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets). eICIC encompasses two main techniques: Almost Blank Subframes (ABS), during which the macro cell remains silent to reduce the interference, and biased...... and an opportunistic approach exploiting the varying cell conditions. Moreover, an autonomous fast distributed muting algorithm is presented, which is simple, robust, and well suited for irregular network deployments. Performance results for realistic network deployments show that the traditional semi-static e...

  12. Introducing a more realistic model for opinion formation considering instability in social structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sajjad; Taghiyareh, Fattaneh

    2016-06-01

    Opinion formation is a process through which interactions of individuals and dynamism of their opinions in effect of neighbors are modeled. In this paper, in an effort to model the opinion formation more realistically, we have introduced a model that considers the role of network structure in opinion dynamics. In this model, each individual changes his opinion in a way so as to decrease its difference with the opinion of trusted neighbors while he intensifies his dissention with the untrusted ones. Considering trust/distrust relations as a signed network, we have defined a structural indicator which shows the degree of instability in social structure and is calculated based on the structural balance theory. It is also applied as feedback to the opinion formation process affecting its dynamics. Our simulation results show formation of a set of clusters containing individuals holding opinions having similar values. Also, the opinion value of each individual is far from the ones of distrusted neighbors. Since this model considers distrust and instability of relations in society, it can offer a more realistic model of opinion formation.

  13. [A new age of mass casuality education? : The InSitu project: realistic training in virtual reality environments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, D; Armbruster, W; Vogelgesang, C; Hoffmann, H; Pattar, A; Schmidt, D; Volk, T; Kubulus, D

    2016-09-01

    Chief emergency physicians are regarded as an important element in the care of the injured and sick following mass casualty accidents. Their education is very theoretical; practical content in contrast often falls short. Limitations are usually the very high costs of realistic (large-scale) exercises, poor reproducibility of the scenarios, and poor corresponding results. To substantially improve the educational level because of the complexity of mass casualty accidents, modified training concepts are required that teach the not only the theoretical but above all the practical skills considerably more intensively than at present. Modern training concepts should make it possible for the learner to realistically simulate decision processes. This article examines how interactive virtual environments are applicable for the education of emergency personnel and how they could be designed. Virtual simulation and training environments offer the possibility of simulating complex situations in an adequately realistic manner. The so-called virtual reality (VR) used in this context is an interface technology that enables free interaction in addition to a stereoscopic and spatial representation of virtual large-scale emergencies in a virtual environment. Variables in scenarios such as the weather, the number wounded, and the availability of resources, can be changed at any time. The trainees are able to practice the procedures in many virtual accident scenes and act them out repeatedly, thereby testing the different variants. With the aid of the "InSitu" project, it is possible to train in a virtual reality with realistically reproduced accident situations. These integrated, interactive training environments can depict very complex situations on a scale of 1:1. Because of the highly developed interactivity, the trainees can feel as if they are a direct part of the accident scene and therefore identify much more with the virtual world than is possible with desktop systems

  14. Constraints on string percolation model from anomalous centrality evolution data in Au-Au collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=}$ 62 and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Feofilov, Grigory; Kochebina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations observed in Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV and the onset of ridge structures are considered in the model of interacting quark-gluon strings. We assume that at the given energy of nucleus-nucleus collisions the critical energy density may be reached at the specific centrality. In a string percolation model this might be treated equivalently to a formation of a large cluster of strings characterized by the critical string density, with a size comparable to the whole area of interaction of two nuclei. This hypothesis allows to define some constraints on the string percolation model using data on transitional centralities in Au-Au collisions at these two energies. Results are extrapolated to the LHC energy where high string densities (exceeding the critical value) are confirmed for all classes of centralities in Pb-Pb collisions. Interaction between strings inside large clusters formed in nucleus-nucleus collisions is consid...

  15. Realistic simulation of the Space-borne Compton Polarimeter POLAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hualin

    2016-07-01

    POLAR is a compact wide field space-borne detector dedicated for precise measurements of the linear polarization of hard x-rays emitted by transient sources. Its energy range sensitivity is optimized for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). POLAR is developed by an international collaboration of China, Switzerland and Poland. It is planned to be launched into space in 2016 onboard the Chinese space laboratory TG2. The energy range of POLAR spans between 50 keV and 500 keV. POLAR detects gamma rays with an array of 1600 plastic scintillator bars read out by 25 muti-anode PMTs (MAPMTs). Polarization measurements use Compton scattering process and are based on detection of energy depositions in the scintillator bars. Reconstruction of the polarization degree and polarization angle of GRBs requires comparison of experimental modulation curves with realistic simulations of the full instrument response. In this paper we present a method to model and parameterize the detector response including efficiency of the light collection, contributions from crosstalk and non-uniformity of MAPMTs as well as dependency on low energy detection thresholds and noise from readout electronics. The performance of POLAR for determination of polarization is predicted with such realistic simulations and carefully cross-checked with dedicated laboratory tests.

  16. Neuronize: a tool for building realistic neuronal cell morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Juan P.; Mata, Susana; Bayona, Sofia; Pastor, Luis; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a tool, Neuronize, for building realistic three-dimensional models of neuronal cells from the morphological information extracted through computer-aided tracing applications. Neuronize consists of a set of methods designed to build 3D neural meshes that approximate the cell membrane at different resolution levels, allowing a balance to be reached between the complexity and the quality of the final model. The main contribution of the present study is the proposal of a novel approach to build a realistic and accurate 3D shape of the soma from the incomplete information stored in the digitally traced neuron, which usually consists of a 2D cell body contour. This technique is based on the deformation of an initial shape driven by the position and thickness of the first order dendrites. The addition of a set of spines along the dendrites completes the model, building a final 3D neuronal cell suitable for its visualization in a wide range of 3D environments. PMID:23761740

  17. Diffusive and dynamical radiating stars with realistic equations of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassel, Byron P.; Maharaj, Sunil D.; Goswami, Rituparno

    2017-03-01

    We model the dynamics of a spherically symmetric radiating dynamical star with three spacetime regions. The local internal atmosphere is a two-component system consisting of standard pressure-free, null radiation and an additional string fluid with energy density and nonzero pressure obeying all physically realistic energy conditions. The middle region is purely radiative which matches to a third region which is the Schwarzschild exterior. A large family of solutions to the field equations are presented for various realistic equations of state. We demonstrate that it is possible to obtain solutions via a direct integration of the second order equations resulting from the assumption of an equation of state. A comparison of our solutions with earlier well known results is undertaken and we show that all these solutions, including those of Husain, are contained in our family. We then generalise our class of solutions to higher dimensions. Finally we consider the effects of diffusive transport and transparently derive the specific equations of state for which this diffusive behaviour is possible.

  18. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  19. Modeling of Transmembrane Potential in Realistic Multicellular Structures before Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murovec, Tomo; Sweeney, Daniel C; Latouche, Eduardo; Davalos, Rafael V; Brosseau, Christian

    2016-11-15

    Many approaches for studying the transmembrane potential (TMP) induced during the treatment of biological cells with pulsed electric fields have been reported. From the simple analytical models to more complex numerical models requiring significant computational resources, a gamut of methods have been used to recapitulate multicellular environments in silico. Cells have been modeled as simple shapes in two dimensions as well as more complex geometries attempting to replicate realistic cell shapes. In this study, we describe a method for extracting realistic cell morphologies from fluorescence microscopy images to generate the piecewise continuous mesh used to develop a finite element model in two dimensions. The preelectroporation TMP induced in tightly packed cells is analyzed for two sets of pulse parameters inspired by clinical irreversible electroporation treatments. We show that high-frequency bipolar pulse trains are better, and more homogeneously raise the TMP of tightly packed cells to a simulated electroporation threshold than conventional irreversible electroporation pulse trains, at the expense of larger applied potentials. Our results demonstrate the viability of our method and emphasize the importance of considering multicellular effects in the numerical models used for studying the response of biological tissues exposed to electric fields. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Realistic thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical measures for neural synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2014-04-15

    Synchronized brain rhythms, associated with diverse cognitive functions, have been observed in electrical recordings of brain activity. Neural synchronization may be well described by using the population-averaged global potential VG in computational neuroscience. The time-averaged fluctuation of VG plays the role of a "thermodynamic" order parameter O used for describing the synchrony-asynchrony transition in neural systems. Population spike synchronization may be well visualized in the raster plot of neural spikes. The degree of neural synchronization seen in the raster plot is well measured in terms of a "statistical-mechanical" spike-based measure Ms introduced by considering the occupation and the pacing patterns of spikes. The global potential VG is also used to give a reference global cycle for the calculation of Ms. Hence, VG becomes an important collective quantity because it is associated with calculation of both O and Ms. However, it is practically difficult to directly get VG in real experiments. To overcome this difficulty, instead of VG, we employ the instantaneous population spike rate (IPSR) which can be obtained in experiments, and develop realistic thermodynamic and statistical-mechanical measures, based on IPSR, to make practical characterization of the neural synchronization in both computational and experimental neuroscience. Particularly, more accurate characterization of weak sparse spike synchronization can be achieved in terms of realistic statistical-mechanical IPSR-based measure, in comparison with the conventional measure based on VG. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Towards Modeling Realistic Mobility for Performance Evaluations in MANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, Alex; Tahir, Hassan

    Simulation modeling plays crucial role in conducting research on complex dynamic systems like mobile ad hoc networks and often the only way. Simulation has been successfully applied in MANET for more than two decades. In several recent studies, it is observed that the credibility of the simulation results in the field has decreased while the use of simulation has steadily increased. Part of this credibility crisis has been attributed to the simulation of mobility of the nodes in the system. Mobility has such a fundamental influence on the behavior and performance of mobile ad hoc networks. Accurate modeling and knowledge of mobility of the nodes in the system is not only helpful but also essential for the understanding and interpretation of the performance of the system under study. Several ideas, mostly in isolation, have been proposed in the literature to infuse realism in the mobility of nodes. In this paper, we attempt a holistic analysis of creating realistic mobility models and then demonstrate creation and analysis of realistic mobility models using a software tool we have developed. Using our software tool, desired mobility of the nodes in the system can be specified, generated, analyzed, and then the trace can be exported to be used in the performance studies of proposed algorithms or systems.

  2. Toward the classification of the realistic free fermionic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-08-01

    The realistic free fermionic models have had remarkable success in providing plausible explanations for various properties of the Standard Model which include the natural appearance of three generations, the explanation of the heavy top quark mass and the qualitative structure of the fermion mass spectrum in general, the stability of the proton and more. These intriguing achievements makes evident the need to understand the general space of these models. While the number of possibilities is large, general patterns can be extracted. In this paper the author presents a detailed discussion on the construction of the realistic free fermionic models with the aim of providing some insight into the basic structures and building blocks that enter the construction. The role of free phases in the determination of the phenomenology of the models is discussed in detail. The author discusses the connection between the free phases and mirror symmetry in (2,2) models and the corresponding symmetries in the case of (2,0) models. The importance of the free phases in determining the effective low energy phenomenology is illustrated in several examples. The classification of the models in terms of boundary condition selection rules, real world-sheet fermion pairings, exotic matter states and the hidden sector is discussed.

  3. Music therapy for palliative care: A realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Tracey; Porter, Sam

    2017-08-01

    Music therapy has experienced a rising demand as an adjunct therapy for symptom management among palliative care patients. We conducted a realist review of the literature to develop a greater understanding of how music therapy might benefit palliative care patients and the contextual mechanisms that promote or inhibit its successful implementation. We searched electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase, Medline, and PsychINFO) for literature containing information on music therapy for palliative care. In keeping with the realist approach, we examined all relevant literature to develop theories that could explain how music therapy works. A total of 51 articles were included in the review. Music therapy was found to have a therapeutic effect on the physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual suffering of palliative care patients. We also identified program mechanisms that help explain music therapy's therapeutic effects, along with facilitating contexts for implementation. Music therapy may be an effective nonpharmacological approach to managing distressing symptoms in palliative care patients. The findings also suggest that group music therapy may be a cost-efficient and effective way to support staff caring for palliative care patients. We encourage others to continue developing the evidence base in order to expand our understanding of how music therapy works, with the aim of informing and improving the provision of music therapy for palliative care patients.

  4. Generation of anatomically realistic numerical phantoms for optoacoustic breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yang; Mitsuhashi, Kenji; Appleton, Catherine M.; Oraevsky, Alexander; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Because optoacoustic tomography (OAT) can provide functional information based on hemoglobin contrast, it is a promising imaging modality for breast cancer diagnosis. Developing an effective OAT breast imaging system requires balancing multiple design constraints, which can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, computer- simulation studies are often conducted to facilitate this task. However, most existing computer-simulation studies of OAT breast imaging employ simple phantoms such as spheres or cylinders that over-simplify the complex anatomical structures in breasts, thus limiting the value of these studies in guiding real-world system design. In this work, we propose a method to generate realistic numerical breast phantoms for OAT research based on clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. The phantoms include a skin layer that defines breast-air boundary, major vessel branches that affect light absorption in the breast, and fatty tissue and fibroglandular tissue whose acoustical heterogeneity perturbs acoustic wave propagation. By assigning realistic optical and acoustic parameters to different tissue types, we establish both optic and acoustic breast phantoms, which will be exported into standard data formats for cross-platform usage.

  5. From grid cells to place cells with realistic field sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Torsten; Azizi, Amir Hossein; Cheng, Sen

    2017-01-01

    While grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) of rodents have multiple, regularly arranged firing fields, place cells in the cornu ammonis (CA) regions of the hippocampus mostly have single spatial firing fields. Since there are extensive projections from MEC to the CA regions, many models have suggested that a feedforward network can transform grid cell firing into robust place cell firing. However, these models generate place fields that are consistently too small compared to those recorded in experiments. Here, we argue that it is implausible that grid cell activity alone can be transformed into place cells with robust place fields of realistic size in a feedforward network. We propose two solutions to this problem. Firstly, weakly spatially modulated cells, which are abundant throughout EC, provide input to downstream place cells along with grid cells. This simple model reproduces many place cell characteristics as well as results from lesion studies. Secondly, the recurrent connections between place cells in the CA3 network generate robust and realistic place fields. Both mechanisms could work in parallel in the hippocampal formation and this redundancy might account for the robustness of place cell responses to a range of disruptions of the hippocampal circuitry.

  6. Radiation-Spray Coupling for Realistic Flow Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrag, Hossam; Iannetti, Anthony C.

    2011-01-01

    Three Large Eddy Simulations (LES) for a lean-direct injection (LDI) combustor are performed and compared. In addition to the cold flow simulation, the effect of radiation coupling with the multi-physics reactive flow is analyzed. The flame let progress variable approach is used as a subgrid combustion model combined with a stochastic subgrid model for spray atomization and an optically thin radiation model. For accurate chemistry modeling, a detailed Jet-A surrogate mechanism is utilized. To achieve realistic inflow, a simple recycling technique is performed at the inflow section upstream of the swirler. Good comparison is shown with the experimental data mean and root mean square profiles. The effect of combustion is found to change the shape and size of the central recirculation zone. Radiation is found to change the spray dynamics and atomization by changing the heat release distribution and the local temperature values impacting the evaporation process. The simulation with radiation modeling shows wider range of droplet size distribution by altering the evaporation rate. The current study proves the importance of radiation modeling for accurate prediction in realistic spray combustion configurations, even for low pressure systems.

  7. Validation of a realistic simulator for veterinary gastrointestinal endoscopy training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M; Pérez-Merino, Eva M; Soria-Gálvez, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the face, content, and construct validity of a new realistic composite simulator (Simuldog) used to provide training in canine gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy. The basic endoscopic procedures performed on the simulator were esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), gastric biopsy (GB), and gastric foreign body removal (FBR). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of novices (final-year veterinary students and recent graduates without endoscopic experience, n=30) versus experienced subjects (doctors in veterinary medicine who had performed more than 50 clinical upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures as a surgeon, n=15). Tasks were scored based on completion time, and specific rating scales were developed to assess performance. Internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were assessed. Face and content validity were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire. The novices needed considerably more time than the experts to perform EGD, GB, and FBR, and their performance scores were significantly lower (pendoscopy scenarios were very realistic. The experts highly valued the usefulness of Simuldog for veterinary training and as a tool for assessing endoscopic skills. Simuldog is the first validated model specifically developed to be used as a training tool for endoscopy techniques in small animals.

  8. A general realistic treatment of the disk paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazis, George; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical angular momentum is not conserved in systems involving electromagnetic fields with non-zero electromagnetic field angular momentum. Conservation is restored only if the total (mechanical and field) angular momentum is considered. Previous studies have investigated this effect, known as ‘Feynman’s Electromagnetic Paradox’ or simply ‘Disk Paradox’ in the context of idealized systems (infinite or infinitesimal solenoids and charged cylinders etc). In the present analysis we generalize previous studies by considering more realistic systems with finite components and demonstrating explicitly the conservation of the total angular momentum. This is achieved by expressing both the mechanical and the field angular momentum in terms of charges and magnetic field fluxes through various system components. Using this general expression and the closure of magnetic field lines, we demonstrate explicitly the conservation of total angular momentum in both idealized and realistic systems (finite solenoid concentric with two charged cylinders, much longer than the solenoid) taking all the relevant terms into account including the flux outside of the solenoid. This formalism has the potential to facilitate a simpler and more accurate demonstration of total angular momentum conservation in undergraduate physics electromagnetism laboratories.

  9. Time variability of α from realistic models of Oklo reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-08-01

    We reanalyze Oklo Sm149 data using realistic models of the natural nuclear reactors. Disagreements among recent Oklo determinations of the time evolution of α, the electromagnetic fine structure constant, are shown to be due to different reactor models, which led to different neutron spectra used in the calculations. We use known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Two Oklo reactors, RZ2 and RZ10, were modeled with MCNP. The resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the Sm149 effective neutron capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. We independently deduce ancient Sm149 effective cross sections and use these values to set limits on the time variation of α. Our study resolves a contradictory situation with previous Oklo α results. Our suggested 2σ bound on a possible time variation of α over 2 billion years is stringent: -0.11≤Δα/α≤0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  10. Neural Correlates of Realistic and Unrealistic Auditory Space Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Callan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Binaural recordings can simulate externalized auditory space perception over headphones. However, if the orientation of the recorder's head and the orientation of the listener's head are incongruent, the simulated auditory space is not realistic. For example, if a person lying flat on a bed listens to an environmental sound that was recorded by microphones inserted in ears of a person who was in an upright position, the sound simulates an auditory space rotated 90 degrees to the real-world horizontal axis. Our question is whether brain activation patterns are different between the unrealistic auditory space (ie, the orientation of the listener's head and the orientation of the recorder's head are incongruent and the realistic auditory space (ie, the orientations are congruent. River sounds that were binaurally recorded either in a supine position or in an upright body position were served as auditory stimuli. During fMRI experiments, participants listen to the stimuli and pressed one of two buttons indicating the direction of the water flow (horizontal/vertical. Behavioral results indicated that participants could not differentiate between the congruent and the incongruent conditions. However, neuroimaging results showed that the congruent condition activated the planum temporale significantly more than the incongruent condition.

  11. UAV based distributed ATR under realistic simulated environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohan; Gong, Shanshan; Schmid, Natalia A.; Valenti, Matthew C.

    2007-04-01

    Over the past several years, the military has grown increasingly reliant upon the use of unattended aerial vehicles (UAVs) for surveillance missions. There is an increasing trend towards fielding swarms of UAVs operating as large-scale sensor networks in the air. Such systems tend to be used primarily for the purpose of acquiring sensory data with the goal of automatic detection, identification, and tracking objects of interest. These trends have been paralleled by advances in both distributed detection, image/signal processing and data fusion techniques. Furthermore, swarmed UAV systems must operate under severe constraints on environmental conditions and sensor limitations. In this work, we investigate the effects of environmental conditions on target detection and recognition performance in a UAV network. We assume that each UAV is equipped with an optical camera, and use a realistic computer simulation to generate synthetic images. The detection algorithm relies on Haar-based features while the automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithm relies on Bessel K features. The performance of both algorithms is evaluated using simulated images that closely mimic data acquired in a UAV network under realistic environmental conditions. We design several fusion techniques and analyze both the case of a single observation and the case of multiple observations of the same target.

  12. Electron percolation in realistic models of carbon nanotube networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Louis-Philippe; Villeneuve, Jérémie; Rochefort, Alain

    2015-09-01

    The influence of penetrable and curved carbon nanotubes (CNT) on the charge percolation in three-dimensional disordered CNT networks have been studied with Monte-Carlo simulations. By considering carbon nanotubes as solid objects but where the overlap between their electron cloud can be controlled, we observed that the structural characteristics of networks containing lower aspect ratio CNT are highly sensitive to the degree of penetration between crossed nanotubes. Following our efficient strategy to displace CNT to different positions to create more realistic statistical models, we conclude that the connectivity between objects increases with the hard-core/soft-shell radii ratio. In contrast, the presence of curved CNT in the random networks leads to an increasing percolation threshold and to a decreasing electrical conductivity at saturation. The waviness of CNT decreases the effective distance between the nanotube extremities, hence reducing their connectivity and degrading their electrical properties. We present the results of our simulation in terms of thickness of the CNT network from which simple structural parameters such as the volume fraction or the carbon nanotube density can be accurately evaluated with our more realistic models.

  13. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Matthew E S; Friberg, Sara E; Gonzalez-Dorantes, Cirse A; Williams, Susan L

    2008-01-22

    Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the consequences of species loss for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evaluated the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used randomly selected assemblages from a local species pool to construct diversity gradients. It is therefore difficult, based on current evidence, to predict the functional consequences of realistic declines in biodiversity. In this study, we used tide pool microcosms to demonstrate that the effects of real-world changes in biodiversity may be very different from those of random diversity changes. Specifically, we measured the relationship between the diversity of a seaweed assemblage and its ability to use nitrogen, a key limiting nutrient in nearshore marine systems. We quantified nitrogen uptake using both experimental and model seaweed assemblages and found that natural increases in diversity resulted in enhanced rates of nitrogen use, whereas random diversity changes had no effect on nitrogen uptake. Our results suggest that understanding the real-world consequences of declining biodiversity will require addressing changes in species performance along natural diversity gradients and understanding the relationships between species' susceptibility to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning.

  14. Ultra-realistic 3-D imaging based on colour holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelkhagen, H. I.

    2013-02-01

    A review of recent progress in colour holography is provided with new applications. Colour holography recording techniques in silver-halide emulsions are discussed. Both analogue, mainly Denisyuk colour holograms, and digitally-printed colour holograms are described and their recent improvements. An alternative to silver-halide materials are the panchromatic photopolymer materials such as the DuPont and Bayer photopolymers which are covered. The light sources used to illuminate the recorded holograms are very important to obtain ultra-realistic 3-D images. In particular the new light sources based on RGB LEDs are described. They show improved image quality over today's commonly used halogen lights. Recent work in colour holography by holographers and companies in different countries around the world are included. To record and display ultra-realistic 3-D images with perfect colour rendering are highly dependent on the correct recording technique using the optimal recording laser wavelengths, the availability of improved panchromatic recording materials and combined with new display light sources.

  15. Medium energy measurements of N-N parameters. Progress report: January 1, 1990--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrose, D.; Bachman, M.; Coffey, P.; Glass, G.; Jobst, B.; McNaughton, K.H.; Nguyen, C.; Riley, P.J.

    1993-10-01

    The authors report here progress made during the three year period January 1, 1990, to December 31, 1993, for the Department of Energy Three-Year Grant No. DE-FG05-88ER40446, third year. A major part of the work has been associated with nucleon-nucleon (N-N) research carried out at the Nucleon Physics Laboratory (NPL) at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF). During this period they also completed data acquisition and analyses of a TRIUMF experiment, but they have no further plans for experimental work at TRIUMF. Other research has been and will be continued to be carried out at BNL, and involves two rare kaon decay experiments, BNL E791, now completed, and a second generation rare kaon decay experiment, E871, which has just this summer completed an engineering test run. The authors are now also members of a proposed experiment, STAR, (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) to be carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility, RHIC, at BNL. The past three years have been a time of rapid change in the focus of the experimental program. A LAMPF experiment, E1097, in which they spent a large amount of effort during the past three years, was terminated due to funding shortages after they had fabricated the detector, but before data acquisition, and consequently they increased their participation in the rare kaon experiment at BNL, E871. It now appears that there will be no LAMPF N-N program after 1993, so that the research efforts will concentrate on the BNL rare kaon decay measurement, E871, and on STAR. The authors expect that STAR, which requires the fabrication of a large colliding beam detector facility, will use an increasing amount of their research efforts during the next few years. In what follows they describe recent progress on the LAMPF and TRIUMF N-N measurements, on the BNL rare kaon decay work, and on the initial work with the STAR group.

  16. Evaluation of normalization methods for cDNA microarray data by k-NN classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Wei; Xing, Eric P; Myers, Connie; Mian, Saira; Bissell, Mina J

    2004-12-17

    Non-biological factors give rise to unwanted variations in cDNA microarray data. There are many normalization methods designed to remove such variations. However, to date there have been few published systematic evaluations of these techniques for removing variations arising from dye biases in the context of downstream, higher-order analytical tasks such as classification. Ten location normalization methods that adjust spatial- and/or intensity-dependent dye biases, and three scale methods that adjust scale differences were applied, individually and in combination, to five distinct, published, cancer biology-related cDNA microarray data sets. Leave-one-out cross-validation (LOOCV) classification error was employed as the quantitative end-point for assessing the effectiveness of a normalization method. In particular, a known classifier, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), was estimated from data normalized using a given technique, and the LOOCV error rate of the ensuing model was computed. We found that k-NN classifiers are sensitive to dye biases in the data. Using NONRM and GMEDIAN as baseline methods, our results show that single-bias-removal techniques which remove either spatial-dependent dye bias (referred later as spatial effect) or intensity-dependent dye bias (referred later as intensity effect) moderately reduce LOOCV classification errors; whereas double-bias-removal techniques which remove both spatial- and intensity effect reduce LOOCV classification errors even further. Of the 41 different strategies examined, three two-step processes, IGLOESS-SLFILTERW7, ISTSPLINE-SLLOESS and IGLOESS-SLLOESS, all of which removed intensity effect globally and spatial effect locally, appear to reduce LOOCV classification errors most consistently and effectively across all data sets. We also found that the investigated scale normalization methods do not reduce LOOCV classification error. Using LOOCV error of k-NNs as the evaluation criterion, three double

  17. Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses of Highly Realistic Training and Live Tissue Training for Navy Corpsmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-08

    Naval Health Research Center Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses of Highly Realistic Training and Live Tissue Training for Navy Corpsmen Stephanie...Highly Realistic and Live Tissue Training 1 Perceived Strengths and Weaknesses of Highly Realistic Training and Live Tissue...Highly Realistic and Live Tissue Training 2 ABSTRACT The U.S. Navy currently employs two types of trauma care training for Navy corpsmen: highly

  18. Brueckner-Hartree-Fock calculations for finite nuclei with renormalized realistic forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B. S.; Xu, F. R.; Wu, Q.; Ma, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. H.

    2017-03-01

    One can adopt two-step G -matrix approximations for the Brueckner-Hartree-Fock (BHF) calculations. The first G matrix is to soften the bare force, and the second one is to include the high-order correlations of the interaction in medium. The first G -matrix calculation for two-nucleon interaction should be done in the center-of-mass coordinate. As another alternative BHF approach, we have adopted the Vlow-k technique to soften the interaction and used the G matrix to include high-order correlations. The Vlow-k renormalization leads to high-momentum and low-momentum components