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Sample records for real life goal

  1. LDL-C reductions and goal attainment among naive statin users in the Netherlands: real life results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintjes, Edith M; Hirsch, Mark W; van der Linden, Michiel W; O'Donnell, John C; Stalenhoef, Anton F; Herings, Ron M C

    2008-08-01

    The effectiveness of statin therapy in a real life setting may differ from that in clinical trials, as physicians make non-randomised treatment decisions for patients with less uniform and possibly different characteristics. We therefore performed a study to compare the effectiveness of different statins and doses in routine clinical practice with respect to total serum cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction and goal attainment according to European guidelines on the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Naive statin users starting treatment in 2003 and 2004 with LDL-C measurements at baseline and between 30 and 365 days after start of treatment were extracted from the PHARMO database. During treatment with their initial statin dose LDL-C reduction and attainment of cholesterol goals were compared between different statins and doses. Of 2303 identified naive patients, approximately 30% were allocated to the high CVD-risk group. Average LDL-C reductions were 48%, 42%, 39%, and 32% at mean doses of 11 mg rosuvastatin, 17 mg atorvastatin, 22 mg simvastatin and 35 mg pravastatin, respectively. The proportion of patients attaining cholesterol goals was 75% for rosuvastatin, 68% for atorvastatin, 56% for simvastatin, and 42% for pravastatin. Dose comparisons showed greater LDL-C reduction and increased goal attainment for rosuvastatin 10 mg compared to other statins at most doses (adjusted p < 0.05). In a real life setting, both LDL-C reduction and the proportion of patients attaining cholesterol goals appear to be significantly increased among users of rosuvastatin compared to other statins. These results confirm and extend reported clinical trial results to a real world setting.

  2. Achieving 2003 European lipid goals with rosuvastatin and comparator statins in 6743 patients in real-life clinical practice: DISCOVERY meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, A; Binbrek, A S; Fonseca, F A H; Wilpshaar, W; Watkins, C; Strandberg, T E

    2006-06-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence to support the benefits of reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels and this has been reflected in a lowering of LDL-C goals recommended by international guidelines. Therefore, there is a growing need for effective lipid-modifying therapies to optimise the achievement of these more stringent LDL-C goals. A meta-analysis of data pooled from five studies participating in the DISCOVERY (DIrect Statin COmparison of LDL-C Values: an Evaluation of Rosuvastatin therapY) Programme was performed to compare the effect of rosuvastatin treatment with other statins in real-life clinical practice. These studies included 6743 patients with hypercholesterolaemia from different ethnicities, countries and cultural environments. The meta-analysis showed that significantly more patients receiving rosuvastatin 10 mg achieved the 2003 European LDL-C goals compared with those who received atorvastatin 10 mg or simvastatin 20 mg (p patients receiving rosuvastatin 10 mg also achieved the 2003 European total cholesterol goal compared with those on atorvastatin 10 mg (p patients to achieve lipid goals at recommended start doses. In addition, all statins studied were well tolerated and confirmed that rosuvastatin had a similar safety profile to other statins.

  3. From real life to real life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    In Action Learning programmes, it is held central to work on real business challenges (task) while learning about team and self (process); staying mindful aware of the process is referred to in this paper as ‘double awareness’, and emphasises noticing and acting on process cues while working on t...... double awareness. The concepts ‘mindful avoidance’ and ‘mindful alertness’ are introduced as essential conceptual findings. Finally the paper will explore how the overall findings can be applied back into Action Learning-methodology as enablers for improvement....

  4. Life goals and purpose in life in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinquart, Martin; Silbereisen, Rainer K; Fröhlich, Cornelia

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze associations between life goals and purpose in life in cancer patients. A sample of 153 cancer patients was assessed before the start of chemotherapy and about 9 months later. Purpose in life was measured with a German version of Crumbaugh and Maholick's purpose in life test, and the perceived importance of social, psychological, materialistic, and health-related goals was assessed with Likert scales. High importance of social, psychological, and health-related goals was related to higher purpose in life. In addition, having high levels of social goals at the first time of measurement predicted an increase in purpose of life over time. However, higher importance of material goals was associated with lower purpose in life at the second time of measurement and with a decline of purpose in life over time. There is continuity and change in the sources of purpose in life during cancer therapy, and a lack of fit between goals and changed living conditions is a risk factor for a decline in purpose in life.

  5. Some predictors of life goals in Slovenia and Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Poljšak Škraban

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Personal goals and interests play an important role in human development because they orient people's life planning, decision-making and also, therefore, their future life course. The article presents the findings of a research which explores the eventual differences between Slovenian and Croatian sample in agency-oriented and communion-oriented life goals and the analysis of significant predictors of above mentioned life goals on both samples. The research included 924 adults of both genders, aged between 21 and 70 years from Slovenia and Croatia. In the study we used the scale of Goals (Pohlman and Brunstein, 1997 and a set of questions regarding various participant's life domains and their perceived importance. The results show significant differences on agency- oriented and communion-oriented life goals between the Slovenian and Croatian sample; in both cases croatian participants reach higher results than those from slovenina sample. As significant predictors in both samples were identified (a age and importance of effective use of free time for agency-oriented goals, and (b and gender, parenthood, importance of parenthood and importance of effective use of free time for communion-oriented life goals. The differences in results are explained by respective levels of social modernisation and social welfare, given the fact the Slovenian respondents are embedded in the social environment that offers more possibilities for fullfilment of their life goals, and are closer to postmaterialism and individualism.a

  6. Life goal appraisal and marijuana use among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Leslie L; Palfai, Tibor P

    2012-07-01

    The current study was designed to examine the motivational context of marijuana use among college students using idiographic and nomothetic goal assessment approaches. One hundred and ninety-eight introductory psychology students completed a questionnaire that included measures of life goals and marijuana use behavior. Forty-three percent of students surveyed reported the use of marijuana in the past 90 days. Students rated a set of five personally salient, self-generated and five normative life goals on a series of dimensions using the personal projects methodology (Little, 1983). Goal meaning and goal efficacy ratings for each type of assessment were studied in relation to the likelihood of marijuana use and the frequency of use among current users. Logistic regression analyses showed that levels of meaning for self-generated life goals and normative academic life goals were independent predictors of whether students used marijuana in the past 90 days. Students who reported high levels of meaning were less likely to have used marijuana in the past 90 days. For students who used marijuana, higher meaning ratings related to involvement in groups/organizations and fitness were correlated with decreased frequency of use. Moreover, ratings of efficacy related to self-generated goals were associated with less frequent use among smokers. These results suggest that meaning related to life goal pursuit may be associated with students' decisions to use marijuana. Potential implications for interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Simple Pleasures, Small Annoyances, and Goal Progress in Daily Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.L. Mead (Nicole); V.M. Patrick (Vanessa); M.P. Gunadi (Manissa); W. Hofmann (Wilhelm)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDespite the explosion of research on goal pursuit, relatively little is known about the shaping of goal progress by the simple experiences that characterize everyday life. Two literatures furnish competing predictions about the relationship between pleasant daily experiences (simple

  8. Does family structure matter? Comparing the life goals and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with greater well-being, happiness and life satisfaction (Hofer & Chasiotis,. 2003; Ryan, Chirkov ... under psychological 'threat', such as unemployment or the possibility of dying, they may pursue extrinsic ..... intrinsic life goals and aspirations have a greater chance of happiness and well-being than individuals ...

  9. Life Goal Appraisal and Marijuana Use Among College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Leslie L.; Palfai, Tibor P.

    2012-01-01

    The current study was designed to examine the motivational context of marijuana use among college students using idiographic and nomothetic goal assessment approaches. One hundred and ninety-eight introductory psychology students completed a questionnaire that included measures of life goals and marijuana use behavior. Forty-three percent of students surveyed reported the use of marijuana in the past 90 days. Students rated a set of five personally salient, self-generated and five normative l...

  10. Measuring life by real people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ellen Kathrine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how information about Active House is obtained through tests done on demonstration buildings. Tests in which life in intelligent and energy-optimised homes takes centre stage, and where ratings are obtained via human behaviour and wellbeing. The article also describes...

  11. Factors Influencing Goal Attainment in Patients with Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity Following Treatment with Botulinum Toxin A in Real-Life Clinical Practice: Sub-Analyses from the Upper Limb International Spasticity (ULIS-II Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemens Fheodoroff

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this post-hoc analysis of the ULIS-II study, we investigated factors influencing person-centred goal setting and achievement following botulinum toxin-A (BoNT-A treatment in 456 adults with post-stroke upper limb spasticity (ULS. Patients with primary goals categorised as passive function had greater motor impairment (p < 0.001, contractures (soft tissue shortening [STS] (p = 0.006 and spasticity (p = 0.02 than those setting other goal types. Patients with goals categorised as active function had less motor impairment (0.0001, contracture (p < 0.0001, spasticity (p < 0.001 and shorter time since stroke (p = 0.001. Patients setting goals for pain were older (p = 0.01 with more contractures (p = 0.008. The proportion of patients achieving their primary goal was not impacted by timing of first-ever BoNT-A injection (medium-term (≤1 year vs. longer-term (>1 year post-stroke (80.0% vs. 79.2% or presence or absence of severe contractures (76.7% vs. 80.6%, although goal types differed. Earlier BoNT-A intervention was associated with greater achievement of active function goals. Severe contractures impacted negatively on goal achievement except in pain and passive function. Goal setting by patients with ULS is influenced by impairment severity, age and time since stroke. Our findings resonate with clinical experience and may assist patients and clinicians in selecting realistic, achievable goals for treatment.

  12. Goal processes in relation to goal attainment: predicting health-related quality of life in myocardial infarction patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Sandra N; Maes, Stan; Joekes, Katherine; Dusseldorp, Elise

    2006-11-01

    Goal theory suggests that both goal attainment and psychological processes concerning goal pursuit can influence a patient's (health-related) quality of life (HRQL) (e.g. Carver & Scheier, 1999). In the present longitudinal study, 46 MI patients completed questionnaires shortly after hospitalization and four months later, assessing a health, social and individual goal for the coming year, goal conflict, goal self-efficacy, goal attainment and HRQL. The results of a multiple regression analysis suggest that both goal conflict and goal self-efficacy predict goal attainment. Furthermore, goal self-efficacy appeared to be an independent predictor of physical and social HRQL. Goal attainment had a medium effect on social HRQL, but its effect was mediated by goal conflict and goal self-efficacy. A goal theory perspective seems to offer additional insights into HRQL after an MI.

  13. Real-Life Contextual Manifestations of Wisdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Ying

    2008-01-01

    Wisdom pertains to managing human affairs, and it arises in highly contextualized situations. The present study aims to investigate manifestations of wisdom in real-life contexts through semi-structured interviews with 66 individuals nominated as wise persons. All nominees were ethnic Chinese from Taiwan, an East Asian country which has…

  14. Endangered Species: Real Life in Two Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Lynette K.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of "Endangered Species: Real Life in Two Dimensions" is to create awareness about a critical environmental issue. There is a special urgency to this project because large numbers of animal species are currently endangered or on the brink of extinction. In addition to being enlightened about this important topic through research, students…

  15. Goals of stability evaluation throughout the vaccine life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Philip R

    2009-11-01

    Stability studies play a critical role in assuring product quality at all points in the vaccine life cycle. At and after licensure, stability studies on quality attributes (including potency) provide a critical link between marketed and clinically evaluated vaccine product, addressing important regulatory concerns by assuring that product quality is maintained throughout the dating period. During development, stability studies are done to assure product quality and to obtain the data needed to support licensure. Stability studies may also be performed after licensure to assure that product continues to perform as it did pre-licensure, as well as to evaluate the effect on product quality of deliberately introduced manufacturing changes. At each phase in the product life cycle, it is important to consider the goals of stability evaluation and to perform appropriate statistical analyses in order to assure and reach appropriate conclusions about product quality.

  16. Violence Exposure in Real-Life, Video Games, Television, Movies, and the Internet: Is There Desensitization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jeanne B.; Baldacci, Heidi Bechtoldt; Pasold; Tracie; Baumgardner, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    It is believed that repeated exposure to real-life and to entertainment violence may alter cognitive, affective, and behavioral processes, possibly leading to desensitization. The goal of the present study was to determine if there are relationships between real-life and media violence exposure and desensitization as reflected in related…

  17. The relationship between life goals at thirty and perceptions of goal attainment and life satisfaction at seventy for gifted men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holahan, C K

    This article examines the relationship between life goals at thirty and perceptions of goal attainment, happiness, and life satisfaction at seventy for gifted men and women. Respondents were members of the Terman Study of the Gifted. Men and women differed in life goals at age thirty, with men predominantly oriented toward occupational pursuit, and women predominantly oriented toward home and family life. Results showed a significant sex difference in feelings of goal attainment at age seventy, with men reporting greater attainment. Women with occupational goals at age thirty reported lower feelings of goal attainment at age seventy than women without such goals. For men, a positive relationship was found between satisfaction and happiness at age seventy and feelings of goal attainment. For women, these relationships varied according to life goals at age thirty. The implications of these results are discussed.

  18. Understanding Human Original Actions Directed at Real-World Goals: The Role of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnikova, Tatiana; Rosen, Bruce R.; Lord, Louis-David; West, W. Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive, original actions, which can succeed in multiple contextual situations, require understanding of what is relevant to a goal. Recognizing what is relevant may also help in predicting kinematics of observed, original actions. During action observation, comparisons between sensory input and expected action kinematics have been argued critical to accurate goal inference. Experimental studies with laboratory tasks, both in humans and nonhuman primates, demonstrated that the lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) can learn, hierarchically organize, and use goal-relevant information. To determine whether this LPFC capacity is generalizable to real-world cognition, we recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data in the human brain during comprehension of original and usual object-directed actions embedded in video-depictions of real-life behaviors. We hypothesized that LPFC will contribute to forming goal-relevant representations necessary for kinematic predictions of original actions. Additionally, resting-state fMRI was employed to examine functional connectivity between the brain regions delineated in the video fMRI experiment. According to behavioral data, original videos could be understood by identifying elements relevant to real-life goals at different levels of abstraction. Patterns of enhanced activity in four regions in the left LPFC, evoked by original, relative to usual, video scenes, were consistent with previous neuroimaging findings on representing abstract and concrete stimuli dimensions relevant to laboratory goals. In the anterior left LPFC, the activity increased selectively when representations of broad classes of objects and actions, which could achieve the perceived overall behavioral goal, were likely to bias kinematic predictions of original actions. In contrast, in the more posterior regions, the activity increased even when concrete properties of the target object were more likely to bias the kinematic prediction. Functional

  19. Real-life applications with membrane computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Gexiang; Gheorghe, Marian

    2017-01-01

    This book thoroughly investigates the underlying theoretical basis of membrane computing models, and reveals their latest applications. In addition, to date there have been no illustrative case studies or complex real-life applications that capitalize on the full potential of the sophisticated membrane systems computational apparatus; gaps that this book remedies. By studying various complex applications – including engineering optimization, power systems fault diagnosis, mobile robot controller design, and complex biological systems involving data modeling and process interactions – the book also extends the capabilities of membrane systems models with features such as formal verification techniques, evolutionary approaches, and fuzzy reasoning methods. As such, the book offers a comprehensive and up-to-date guide for all researchers, PhDs and undergraduate students in the fields of computer science, engineering and the bio-sciences who are interested in the applications of natural computing models.

  20. Online dating across the life span: Users' relationship goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menkin, Josephine A; Robles, Theodore F; Wiley, Joshua F; Gonzaga, Gian C

    2015-12-01

    Utilizing data from an eHarmony.com relationship questionnaire completed by new users (N = 5,434), this study identifies prioritized goals in new romantic relationships and whether importance of these goals differs by participants' age and gender. Overall, users valued interpersonal communication more than sex appeal. Older users rated sexual attraction as slightly less important than younger users did, but they still highly valued the goal. Women placed even greater emphasis on communication over sexual attraction compared to men. However, although men valued sexual attraction more than women at all ages, only the youngest women valued interpersonal communication more than young men. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Real-Life and RCT Participants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reyes, Carlen; Pottegård, Anton; Schwarz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    .4 %) diagnoses of myocardial infarction, 423 (3 %) and 368 (1.7 %) of erosive gastro-intestinal disease, 200 (1.4 %) and 1109 (5.2 %) of dyspepsia, and 349 (2.4 %) and 149 (0.7 %) of metabolic bone disease, all of which were exclusion criteria in FIT. Men [3818 (26.7 %) in SIDIAP and 3885 (18.3 %) in DHR......] and glucocorticoid users [1229 (8.6 %) in SIDIAP and 4716 (22.2 %) in DHR] were also excluded from the FIT trial. Overall, 3447 (35.4 %) SIDIAP and 6228 (44.5 %) (when not considering men and glucocorticoid users) DHR of incident alendronate users would have been excluded from FIT. One in two real-life users......We aimed to characterize incident users of alendronate from Denmark and Spain, and investigate their eligibility for participation in the pivotal Fracture Intervention Trial (FIT). This is an international cross-sectional study, where the data were obtained from the SIDIAP database (Sistema d...

  2. Aspects across Software Life Cycle: A Goal-Driven Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Nan; Yu, Yijun; González-Baixauli, Bruno; Ernst, Neil; Sampaio Do Prado Leite, Julio Cesar; Mylopoulos, John

    Goal modeling fits model-driven engineering (MDE) in that it captures stakeholder concerns and the interdependencies using concepts that are much less bound to the underlying implementation technology and are much closer to the problem languages. Aspect-oriented software development (AOSD) provides language constructs to facilitate the representation of multiple perceptions and to alleviate tangling and scattering concerns. Synthesis of AOSD and MDE not only manages software complexity but also improves productivity, as well as model quality and longevity. In this paper, we propose a model-driven framework for tracing aspects from requirements to implementation and testing, where goal models become engineering assets and straightforward model-to-code transformation bridges the gap between domain concepts and implementation technologies. We test our hypotheses and evaluate the framework’s applicability and usefulness with a case study of an open-source e-commerce platform written in PHP.

  3. The Census of Marine Life: goals, scope and strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Yarincik

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The Census of Marine Life aims to assess and explain the changing diversity, distribution, and abundance of marine species from the past to the present, and to project future ocean life. It assembles known historical data back to 1500 in an online Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS and has over 1000 scientists from 70 countries using advanced technologies to quantify and discover unknown life in under-explored ocean realms. Over 99% of the 6 million records now in OBIS are from the top 1000m of the water column, so the mid-waters and floor of the open ocean and the polar ice oceans are special targets. Even where the species are known, their distributions and abundance are largely speculative. This report outlines the strategies of COML projects to efficiently reveal the 95% of the biosphere beneath the waves, from microbes to whales. Open access to the OBIS data set will improve capacity to predict future impacts of climate and human activity. The baseline created by 2010 and the calibrated techniques developed will become important tools for monitoring and managing future ocean ecosystems to maintain their capacity to provide crucial services to our blue planet.

  4. Gamer Girls, Gold Farmers, and Activism "In Real Life"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Megan L.

    2016-01-01

    This essay analyzes the graphic novel "In Real Life" as an example of Cory Doctorow and Jen Wang's intention to raise young people's awareness about gender and economic disparities within the gaming industry. Broadly, "In Real Life" combats the pervasive cultural anxiety that Jane McGonigal challenges in her book "Reality…

  5. Dare to Dream: Personal Values, Life Goals, and International Students in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaili C; Zhang, Abraham

    2017-10-01

    It has been well identified and supported in the literature that values and life goals are associated with one's general well-being. However, there have been few studies on values and life goals among international students in New Zealand. This study addressed this lack of research by focusing on the life goals and personal values among international students in three tertiary institutes in New Zealand. Based on the literature review, the hypothesis of this study is that international students' intrinsic life goals are positively correlated with their spiritual values. In contrast, extrinsic goals did not have similar effects. The Aspirations Index, which was used to assess life goals, and the Schwartz' value survey, which measured the students' personal values, were both distributed to the participants. Follow-up interviews with 24 of the participants were also conducted. Findings revealed that spiritual values were positively correlated with intrinsic goals and that extrinsic goals did not have similar effects. As the research findings showed that spiritual values were positively correlated with intrinsic goals, helping international students to find meaning and purpose in life may promote their well-being, and the learning and growth of international students can be improved by incorporating spiritual values and cultural aspects in college education. The authors also argue that a holistic approach to college education for international students is needed.

  6. Mars exploration program analysis group goal one: determine if life ever arose on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehler, Tori M; Westall, Frances

    2010-11-01

    The Mars Exploration Program Analysis Group (MEPAG) maintains a standing document that articulates scientific community goals, objectives, and priorities for mission-enabled Mars science. Each of the goals articulated within the document is periodically revisited and updated. The astrobiology-related Goal One, "Determine if life ever arose on Mars," has recently undergone such revision. The finalized revision, which appears in the version of the MEPAG Goals Document posted on September 24, 2010, is presented here.

  7. Real-time decreased sensitivity to an audio-visual illusion during goal-directed reaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Tremblay

    Full Text Available In humans, sensory afferences are combined and integrated by the central nervous system (Ernst MO, Bülthoff HH (2004 Trends Cogn. Sci. 8: 162-169 and appear to provide a holistic representation of the environment. Empirical studies have repeatedly shown that vision dominates the other senses, especially for tasks with spatial demands. In contrast, it has also been observed that sound can strongly alter the perception of visual events. For example, when presented with 2 flashes and 1 beep in a very brief period of time, humans often report seeing 1 flash (i.e. fusion illusion, Andersen TS, Tiippana K, Sams M (2004 Brain Res. Cogn. Brain Res. 21: 301-308. However, it is not known how an unfolding movement modulates the contribution of vision to perception. Here, we used the audio-visual illusion to demonstrate that goal-directed movements can alter visual information processing in real-time. Specifically, the fusion illusion was linearly reduced as a function of limb velocity. These results suggest that cue combination and integration can be modulated in real-time by goal-directed behaviors; perhaps through sensory gating (Chapman CE, Beauchamp E (2006 J. Neurophysiol. 96: 1664-1675 and/or altered sensory noise (Ernst MO, Bülthoff HH (2004 Trends Cogn. Sci. 8: 162-169 during limb movements.

  8. Comparison of Offender and Non-offender Young Men to Setting Goals for Life and Attributing Meaning to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryılmaz, Ali

    2017-08-14

    The main goal of the present study is to compare male offenders and non-offenders in terms of how they attribute meaning to life and set life goals. The samples were chosen from among offenders (n = 50) and non-offenders (n = 50) who were between ages 19-26. Mixed method was used in this study. The scale of setting life goals and interview form were used to collect data. To analysis of the data, the content analysis technique and t test and were used. Findings of the present study show that offenders tend to have troubles setting life goals when compared to non-offenders. Furthermore, the results of this study could be used in rehabilitating offenders and preventing those at risk of committing criminal acts from doing so.

  9. Virtually numbed: Immersive video gaming alters real-life experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weger, Ulrich W; Loughnan, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ...). Does immersive video gaming, during which the player takes on the mantle of an avatar, prompt people to adopt the coldness and rigidity associated with robotic behavior and desensitize them to real-life experience...

  10. Goal setting in cancer rehabilitation and relation to quality of life among women with gynaecological cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Kamila A; Mogensen, Ole; Jensen, Pernille T; Hansen, Dorte G

    2015-11-01

    Rehabilitation should be integrated in the routine cancer care of women treated for gynaecological cancers. Goal setting is expected to facilitate the process through patient involvement and motivation. Our knowledge about goal setting in cancer rehabilitation is, however, sparse. This study aimed to: 1) analyse rehabilitation goals defined during hospital-based rehabilitation in patients with gynaecological cancer, with regard to number, category, changes over time, and differences between cancer diagnosis, and 2) analyse the association between health-related quality of life and goals defined for rehabilitation. Consecutively, all patients treated surgically for endometrial, ovarian, and cervical cancer were invited for hospital-based rehabilitation at Odense University Hospital, Denmark, including two sessions at the hospital one and three months following surgery and two phone calls for follow-up. Questionnaires from the EORTC were used to prepare patients and facilitate individual goal setting with definitions of up to three goals. All goals were grouped into six categories. A total of 151 (63%) patients accepted the invitation including 50 endometrial, 65 ovarian, and 36 cervical cancers patients. All patients defined goals at the first session, 76.4% defined three goals, 21.9% two, and 1.6% had one goal. Physical goals decreased over time but were the most frequent at both sessions (98% and 89%). At both sessions, the social and emotional categories were the second and third most frequent among patients with endometrial and ovarian cancer. Sexual issues were dominant among the cervical cancer patients. Regression analysis showed significant association between quality of life scores and goal setting within the social and emotional domains. Goal setting seemed feasible in all problem areas. The EORTC questionnaires were helpful during the process although expectations of the sub-scores being predictive of which areas to address were not convincing.

  11. Real life with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagnik, Deepak

    2015-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a form of diabetes mellitus that results from the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. Those affected by this disorder have a challenging life, both in terms of health and social adjustments. Various "alternative medicines" are offered to them in an effort to cure. Research has shown that good control over diabetes can be maintained through regular self-monitoring of blood glucose and frequent checking of diabetic complications. Here, I describe a female with T1DM and her journey with the disorder.

  12. Life goals and social identity in people with severe acquired brain injury: an interpretative phenomenological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachelle; Levack, William M M; Sinnott, K Anne

    2015-01-01

    While there is a growing body of literature exploring life goals in rehabilitation, little research has been undertaken that includes the voice of the end-user. This study examined the views and experiences of people with severe acquired brain injury regarding the place of "life goals" in residential rehabilitation. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to collect and analyze data from five semi-structured interviews with participants in a residential rehabilitation setting. Three inter-related themes emerged from this study. Social connectedness (being 'part of things') emerged as a life goal of central importance for all participants (Theme 1). However, in order to achieve this sense of belonging, the participants needed to tentatively balance the opportunities arising within their environmental milieu (Theme 2) with the interpersonal factors relating to their unchanged, changed and changing self-identity (Theme 3). This study suggests that social identity and social connectedness ought to be primary foci of rehabilitation rather than matters only of secondary concern. Consideration needs to be given to both the environmental contexts and the intrapersonal strategies that support people who require residential rehabilitation services to achieve social connection, and thus their life goals, following a severe acquired brain injury. Implications for Rehabilitation There is a need to better support people with severe acquired brain injury (ABI) in terms of their social relationships and social identity during the delivery of person-centered rehabilitation services. Within the clinical setting there should be regular, in depth and open dialogue in which the individuals' values and preferences are discovered. A focus on the coherence between daily activities and the person's life goals is required for people with severe ABI. Clinicians need to consider how life goals for individual people change or are re-prioritized over the life span.

  13. Towards Real-Life Facial Expression Recognition Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENTA, K.-I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Facial expressions are a set of symbols of great importance for human-to-human communication. Spontaneous in their nature, diverse and personal, facial expressions demand for real-time, complex, robust and adaptable facial expression recognition (FER systems to facilitate the human-computer interaction. The last years' research efforts in the recognition of facial expressions are preparing FER systems to step into the real-life. In order to meet the before-mentioned requirements, this article surveys the work in FER since 2008, particularly adopting the discrete states emotion model in a quest for the most valuable FER work/systems. We first present the new spontaneous facial expression databases and then organize the real-time FER solutions grouped by spontaneous and posed facial expression databases. Then automatic FERs are compared and the cross-database validation method is presented. Finally, we outline FER system open issues to meet real-life challenges.

  14. The transition from youth to adulthood and the importance of hope and life goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jan Brødslev; Hansen, Claus D.

    differences: young adults with a family of origin with low parental education have a lower score on the trait hope scale. What appears to be most important for high-hope score is feeling energetic and full of life and being admired and having a good sex life also show relatively strong associations with hope......It is widely accepted among scholars (Erikson, Levinson, Arnett, Marcia) that the transition from childhood to adulthood is a life-period in its own right and with its own developmental efforts and tasks. It is therefore obvious that hope and life goals must play an important role in this period...

  15. Swiss residents' speciality choices – impact of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abel Thomas

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical specialities chosen by doctors for their careers play an important part in the development of health-care services. This study aimed to investigate the influence of gender, personality traits, career motivation and life goal aspirations on the choice of medical speciality. Methods As part of a prospective cohort study of Swiss medical school graduates on career development, 522 fourth-year residents were asked in what speciality they wanted to qualify. They also assessed their career motivation and life goal aspirations. Data concerning personality traits such as sense of coherence, self-esteem, and gender role orientation were collected at the first assessment, four years earlier, in their final year of medical school. Data analyses were conducted by univariate and multivariate analyses of variance and covariance. Results In their fourth year of residency 439 (84.1% participants had made their speciality choice. Of these, 45 (8.6% subjects aspired to primary care, 126 (24.1% to internal medicine, 68 (13.0% to surgical specialities, 31 (5.9% to gynaecology & obstetrics (G&O, 40 (7.7% to anaesthesiology/intensive care, 44 (8.4% to paediatrics, 25 (4.8% to psychiatry and 60 (11.5% to other specialities. Female residents tended to choose G&O, paediatrics, and anaesthesiology, males more often surgical specialities; the other specialities did not show gender-relevant differences of frequency distribution. Gender had the strongest significant influence on speciality choice, followed by career motivation, personality traits, and life goals. Multivariate analyses of covariance indicated that career motivation and life goals mediated the influence of personality on career choice. Personality traits were no longer significant after controlling for career motivation and life goals as covariates. The effect of gender remained significant after controlling for personality traits, career motivation and life goals. Conclusion

  16. Goal setting in cancer rehabilitation and relation to quality of life among women with gynaecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Kamila A; Mogensen, Ole; Jensen, Pernille T

    2015-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to: 1) analyse rehabilitation goals defined during hospital-based rehabilitation in patients with gynaecological cancer, with regard to number, category, changes over time, and differences between cancer diagnosis, and 2) analyse the association between health-related quality...... months following surgery and two phone calls for follow-up. Questionnaires from the EORTC were used to prepare patients and facilitate individual goal setting with definitions of up to three goals. All goals were grouped into six categories. RESULTS: A total of 151 (63%) patients accepted the invitation...... and emotional categories were the second and third most frequent among patients with endometrial and ovarian cancer. Sexual issues were dominant among the cervical cancer patients. Regression analysis showed significant association between quality of life scores and goal setting within the social and emotional...

  17. Self-reported goal pursuit and purpose in life among people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wingyun

    2011-03-01

    Existential aspects of well-being are rarely studied in people with dementia, despite their reported importance. Self-report methods are also rarely used, despite the growing evidence for its use in mild-to-moderate dementia and the lack of concordance between self-reports and proxy reports of well-being. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship between one aspect of well-being, purpose in life, and one of its predictors, goal pursuit, while employing the self-report of individuals with dementia. Questionnaire and experimental methods were used to gauge the relationship between goal pursuit and purpose in life. The experimental portion was structured around creative drawing activities that are often used in adult day service centers. People with mild-to-moderate dementia were able to provide reliable self-report data on their well-being. A strong association between goal pursuit and purpose in life emerged, but dementia severity did not moderate this relationship. People with dementia who engage in goal-directed activity may experience a greater sense of purpose. Results from this study illuminate the experience of psychological well-being in dementia and may inform activity programming for this population.

  18. Nostalgia motivates pursuit of important goals by increasing meaning in life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sedikides, Constantine; Cheung, Wing-Yee; Wildschut, Tim

    2017-01-01

    This research focused on existential and motivational implications of the emotion of nostalgia. Nostalgia (relative to control) increased meaning in life, which, in turn, galvanised intentions to pursue one's most important goal (Experiment 1) and to pursue one's most important, but not least...

  19. Implementation Planning and Progress on Physical Activity Goals: The Mediating Role of Life-Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugas, Michelle; Gaudreau, Patrick; Carraro, Natasha

    2012-01-01

    This 4-week prospective study examined whether the use of life-management strategies mediates the relationship between implementation planning and short-term progress on physical activity goals. In particular, the strategies of elective selection, compensation, and loss-based selection were disentangled to assess their specific mediating effects.…

  20. Examining Life Goals and School Attendance Rates of Afghan Students Receiving Higher Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bek, Hafiz

    2016-01-01

    This research is a descriptive study carried out to examine the relations between life goals and school attendance levels among Afghan students receiving higher education in Turkey. In total there were 198 Afghan students that participated in the study. Among which 159 were male and 39 female. All of these students were studying in 16 Turkish…

  1. Exploration of Quality-of-Life Goals in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Lajos; Toth, Katalin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study is to investigate the applicability of structured interviews for exploration of quality-of-life goals using an established instrument. Structured interviews were performed using WHOQOL-BREF and Disabilities Module as guideline with 35 clients admitted for first rehabilitation intervention after spinal cord injury. Although…

  2. Learning about Real-Life Heroes: Forest Rangers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Susan; Fonville, Beth

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that when children show interest in television superheroes, build on that interest in the classroom by introducing them to real-life heroes in the community. Using forest rangers as an example, offers a variety of activities, books, and resources that can introduce children to forest rangers and the work they do to protect forest…

  3. Competence and Quality in Real-Life Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    What distinguishes a competent decision maker and how should the issue of decision quality be approached in a real-life context? These questions were explored in three studies. In Study 1, using a web-based questionnaire and targeting a community sample, we investigated the relationships between objective and subjective indicators of real-life decision-making success. In Study 2 and 3, targeting two different samples of professionals, we explored if the prevalent cognitively oriented definition of decision-making competence could be beneficially expanded by adding aspects of competence in terms of social skills and time-approach. The predictive power for each of these three aspects of decision-making competence was explored for different indicators of real-life decision-making success. Overall, our results suggest that research on decision-making competence would benefit by expanding the definition of competence, by including decision-related abilities in terms of social skills and time-approach. Finally, the results also indicate that individual differences in real-life decision-making success profitably can be approached and measured by different criteria. PMID:26545239

  4. Real life practice in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naderi, Nader; Mochtar, Chaidir A.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current diagnostic and treatment options of lower urinary tract symptom due to benign prostatic hyperplasia and to put data from real life practice into perspective. Recent findings The overall incidence rate of lower urinary tract symptom/benign prostatic hyperplasia

  5. Improvisation of Real-Life Scenarios through Intercultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okten, Celile Eren; Griffin, Banu Ozer

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes tasks based on real-life scenarios, which triggered reflective thinking, verbalization, and writing, leading to the creation of natural dialogues rather than artificial, dull monologues. One of the main aims of this approach is to engage students in a dynamic process of both learning about multicultural participants and…

  6. The Real Life Application of Pulleys in a Competitive Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekbiyik, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore students' application of theoretical knowledge in real-life situations using pulley systems in a competition designed for primary school students. The study was conducted with 24 primary school students who had completed year seven, and who volunteered to participate in a summer science camp. In groups, the…

  7. Children's Eyewitness Memory for Multiple Real-Life Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odegard, Timothy N.; Cooper, Crystal M.; Lampinen, James M.; Reyna, Valerie F.; Brainerd, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined the influence of prior knowledge on children's free recall, cued recall, recognition memory, and source memory judgments for a series of similar real-life events. Forty children (5-12 years old) attended 4 thematic birthday parties and were later interviewed about the events that transpired during the parties using…

  8. Real Life Lab BIPV field testing in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritzen, M.; Vroon, Z.; Rovers, R.; Geurts, C.; Blocken, B.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of PV in the Building Envelope (BIPV) is one of the four key developments necessary for large market PV penetration, together with PV efficiency improvement, price decrease and electricity storage [1]. In the course of BIPV development, Real-Life Lab demonstration projects are realized

  9. Life Goals and Well-Being: Are Extrinsic Aspirations Always Detrimental to Well-Being?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Brdar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Past research has revealed that relative importance a person places on extrinsic life goals as oposed to intrinsic ones is related to lower well-being. But sometimes it is more important why a goal is being pursued than the content of the goal. Materialistic aspirations will not decrease people's well-being if they help them to achieve basic financial security or some intrinsic goals. On the other hand, if social comparison or seeking power drives extrinsic orientation, these aspirations may be detrimental for well-being, since they do not satisfy satisfy our basic psychological needs. Research from Croatia and other, less rich countries suggest that extrinsic aspirations are not necessarily deterimental but may even contribute to well-being. This finding suggests that various factors can moderate the relationship between aspirations and well-being. Intrinsic life goals may probably be affordable only for people who are well off enough. The meaning of financial success in transitional and poor countries may not necesseraly be associated with purchase and consumption. On the contrary, it may bring opportunities and possibilities of self-expression and self-growth. Individualistic societies allow individuals to pursue their intrinsic goals while collectivistic cultures stress extrinsic ones. Although this extrinsic orientation may detract their well-being, the sense of individual well-being may not be as important to them as the survival of the group they belong to or so called social well-being.

  10. Conflicts in Everyday Life: The Influence of Competing Goals on Domestic Energy Conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneli Selvefors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A common approach for understanding people’s domestic energy behavior is to study the influence of deterministic factors, such as attitudes, norms and knowledge, on behavior. However, few studies have succeeded in fully explaining people’s behavior based on these factors alone. To further the understanding of people’s everyday energy use, a goal-oriented approach based on activity theory has been applied to discuss energy conservation from a multiple goal perspective based on the findings from an interview study with 42 informants. The findings show that the informants used energy to fulfill goals linked to basic needs or desires related to their well-being. Even though the majority of informants had an explicit goal to reduce their energy consumption, many experienced conflicts with other competing goals, which often made energy conservation undesirable or challenging. The findings suggest that actions to reduce energy use will most often not be prioritized if they cannot be integrated into people’s daily life without jeopardizing their possibilities to achieve their primary goals and satisfy their everyday needs. It is thus vital to consider people’s everyday life and the many conflicts they experience when aiming to understand why people do, or do not, prioritize energy conservation during everyday activities.

  11. How Accumulated Real Life Stress Experience and Cognitive Speed Interact on Decision-Making Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Eva; Sebold, Miriam; Kuitunen-Paul, Sören; Nebe, Stephan; Veer, Ilya M; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Smolka, Michael N; Rapp, Michael; Walter, Henrik; Heinz, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Advances in neurocomputational modeling suggest that valuation systems for goal-directed (deliberative) on one side, and habitual (automatic) decision-making on the other side may rely on distinct computational strategies for reinforcement learning, namely model-free vs. model-based learning. As a key theoretical difference, the model-based system strongly demands cognitive functions to plan actions prospectively based on an internal cognitive model of the environment, whereas valuation in the model-free system relies on rather simple learning rules from operant conditioning to retrospectively associate actions with their outcomes and is thus cognitively less demanding. Acute stress reactivity is known to impair model-based but not model-free choice behavior, with higher working memory capacity protecting the model-based system from acute stress. However, it is not clear which impact accumulated real life stress has on model-free and model-based decision systems and how this influence interacts with cognitive abilities. Methods: We used a sequential decision-making task distinguishing relative contributions of both learning strategies to choice behavior, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale questionnaire to assess accumulated real life stress, and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test to test cognitive speed in 95 healthy subjects. Results: Individuals reporting high stress exposure who had low cognitive speed showed reduced model-based but increased model-free behavioral control. In contrast, subjects exposed to accumulated real life stress with high cognitive speed displayed increased model-based performance but reduced model-free control. Conclusion: These findings suggest that accumulated real life stress exposure can enhance reliance on cognitive speed for model-based computations, which may ultimately protect the model-based system from the detrimental influences of accumulated real life stress. The combination of accumulated real life stress exposure

  12. Life Support Goals Including High Closure and Low Mass Should Be Reconsidered Using Systems Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2017-01-01

    Recycling space life support systems have been built and tested since the 1960s and have operated on the International Space Station (ISS) since the mid 2000s. The development of space life support has been guided by a general consensus focused on two important related goals, increasing system closure and reducing launch mass. High closure is achieved by recycling crew waste products such as carbon dioxide and condensed humidity. Recycling directly reduces the mass of oxygen and water for the crew that must be launched from Earth. The launch mass of life support can be further reduced by developing recycling systems with lower hardware mass and reduced power. The life support consensus has also favored using biological systems. The goal of increasing closure using biological systems suggests that food should be grown in space and that biological processors be used for air, water, and waste recycling. The goal of reducing launch mass led to use of Equivalent System Mass (ESM) in life support advocacy and technology selection. The recent consensus assumes that the recycling systems architecture developed in the 1960s and implemented on ISS will be used on all future long missions. NASA and other project organizations use the standard systems engineering process to guide hardware development. The systems process was used to develop ISS life support, but it has been less emphasized in planning future systems for the moon and Mars. Since such missions are far in the future, there has been less immediate need for systems engineering analysis to consider trade-offs, reliability, and Life Cycle Cost (LCC). Preliminary systems analysis suggests that the life support consensus concepts should be revised to reflect systems engineering requirements.

  13. Goal disturbance predicts health-related quality of life and depression 4 months after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Sandra N; Maes, Stan; van Elderen, Thérèse

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to determine whether the event of a myocardial infarction (MI) would lead to a disturbance in important higher-order goals, and whether goal disturbance could predict health-related quality of life (HRQL) and depression 4 months later, in addition to baseline scores, demographic characteristics, presence of anginal complaints (AP) or chest pain, coping strategies and social support. A total of 113 MI patients completed questionnaires shortly after hospitalization (T1) and 4 months later (T2), assessing (an impact of the event on) important higher-order goals (T1), disease-related coping strategies (T1), perceived adequacy of social support (T2), AP (T2), HRQL, and depression (T2). Two separate hierarchical regression analyses were performed with HRQL and depression at T2 as dependent variables. The results suggest that the experience of an MI has an impact on the attainment of higher-order goals. Goal disturbance is an independent predictor of both HRQL and depression after MI. A goal theory perspective can provide additional insights into HRQL outcomes after an MI.

  14. College Students' Physical Activity and Health-Related Quality of Life: An Achievement Goal Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Ping; Gu, Xiangli; Rose, Melanie

    2016-06-01

    The 2 × 2 achievement goal model, including the mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goal orientations, has recently been used to explain motivational outcomes in physical activity. This study attempted to examine the relationships among 2 × 2 achievement goal orientations, physical activity, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in college students. Participants were 325 students (130 men and 195 women; Mage = 21.4 years) enrolled in physical activity classes at a Southern university. They completed surveys validated in previous research assessing achievement goal orientations, physical activity, and HRQOL. Path analyses revealed a good fit between the model and data (root mean square error of approximation = .06; Comparative Fit Index = .99; Bentler-Bonett Nonnormed Fit Index = .98; Incremental Fit Index = .99), but the model explained small variances in the current study. Mastery-approach and performance-approach goal orientations only had low or no relationships with physical activity. Mastery-approach goal orientation and physical activity also had low positive relationships with HRQOL, but mastery-avoidance and performance-avoidance goal orientations had low negative relationships with HRQOL. The hypothesized mediational role of physical activity in the relationship between mastery-approach and performance-approach goal orientations and HRQOL was not supported in this study. Although the data fit the proposed model well, only small variance was explained by the model. The relationship between physical activity and HRQOL of the college students and other related correlates should be further studied.

  15. Trade and Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 15: Promoting "Life on Land" through mandatory and voluntary approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew, Dale

    2017-01-01

    Sustainable Development Goal 15 deals with "Life on Land." Its nine targets and three means of implementation cover a vast array of environmentally sensitive issues related to land-based renewable natural resources. This paper explores the channels through which trade can address them. Approaches are categorized as mandatory or voluntary. The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has over 40 years' experience in mandatory regulation of trade i...

  16. Aiming for a healthier life: a qualitative content analysis of rehabilitation goals in patients with rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdal, Gunnhild; Sand-Svartrud, Anne-Lene; Bø, Ingvild; Dager, Turid N; Dingsør, Anne; Eppeland, Siv G; Hagfors, Jon; Hamnes, Bente; Nielsen, Merete; Slungaard, Bente; Wigers, Sigrid H; Hagen, Kåre Birger; Dagfinrud, Hanne S; Kjeken, Ingvild

    2017-01-13

    To explore and describe rehabilitation goals of patients with rheumatic diseases during rehabilitation stays, and examine whether goal content changed from admission to discharge. Fifty-two participants were recruited from six rehabilitation centers in Norway. Goals were formulated by the participants during semi-structured goal-setting conversations with health professionals trained in motivational interviewing. An inductive qualitative content analysis was conducted to classify and quantify the expressed goals. Changes in goal content from admission to discharge were calculated as percentage differences. Goal content was explored across demographic and contextual characteristics. A total of 779 rehabilitation goals were classified into 35 categories, within nine overarching dimensions. These goals varied and covered a wide range of topics. Most common at admission were goals concerning healthy lifestyle, followed by goals concerning symptoms, managing everyday life, adaptation, disease management, social life, and knowledge. At discharge, goals about knowledge and symptoms decreased considerably, and goals about healthy lifestyle and adaptation increased. The health profession involved and patient gender influenced goal content. The rehabilitation goals of the patients with rheumatic diseases were found to be wide-ranging, with healthy lifestyle as the most prominent focus. Goal content changed between admission to, and discharge from, rehabilitation stays. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation goals set by patients with rheumatic diseases most frequently concern healthy lifestyle changes, yet span a wide range of topics. Patient goals vary by gender and are influenced by the profession of the health care worker involved in the goal-setting process. To meet the diversity of patient needs, health professionals need to be aware of their potential influence on the actual goal-setting task, which may limit the range of topics patients present when they are

  17. Clinical and economic impact of etanercept in real-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Andersen, Peter Hundevadt; Lorentzen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Real-life data on the therapeutic effectiveness and costs of etanercept are scarce. Objectives: To assess the clinical and economic impact of etanercept in patients with psoriasis in Denmark and Norway. MATERIAL & METHODS: This prospective, non-interventional study in a private dermat...... care and loss-of-productivity decreased. Maintained improved quality of life was accompanied by decreasing cost during the second 6 month period of etanercept treatment. There were no new safety signals reported.......BACKGROUND: Real-life data on the therapeutic effectiveness and costs of etanercept are scarce. Objectives: To assess the clinical and economic impact of etanercept in patients with psoriasis in Denmark and Norway. MATERIAL & METHODS: This prospective, non-interventional study in a private...... dermatologist care setting in Denmark and Norway included patients ≥18 years with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, selected for treatment with etanercept. Assessments during 1 year from etanercept initiation included Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Self-Administered Psoriasis Area and Severity Index...

  18. How doctors move from generic goals to specific communicative behavior in real practice consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Mogendorff, Karen; Ram, Paul; van der Weijden, Trudy; Elwyn, Glyn; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2013-02-01

    To understand how recommendations for communication can be brought into alignment with clinical communication routines, we explored how doctors select communicative actions during consultations. We conducted stimulated recall interviews with 15 GPs (general practitioners), asking them to comment on recordings of two consultations. The data analysis was based on the principles of grounded theory. A model describing how doctors select communicative actions during consultations was developed. This model illustrates how GPs constantly adapt their selection of communicative actions to their evaluation of the situation. These evaluations culminate in the selection of situation-specific goals. These multiple and often dynamic goals require constant revision and adaptation of communication strategies, leading to constant readjustments of the selection of communicative actions. When selecting consultation goals GPs weigh patients' needs and preferences as well as the medical situation and its consequences. GPs' selection of communicative actions during consultations is situational and goal driven. To help doctors develop communicative competence tailored to the specific situation of each consultation, holistic communication training courses, which pay attention to the selection of consultation goals and matching communication strategies besides training specific communication skills, seem preferable to current generic communication skills training. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. From Theory to Practice: Measuring end-of-life communication quality using multiple goals theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Scoy, L J; Scott, A M; Reading, J M; Chuang, C H; Chinchilli, V M; Levi, B H; Green, M J

    2017-05-01

    To describe how multiple goals theory can be used as a reliable and valid measure (i.e., coding scheme) of the quality of conversations about end-of-life issues. We analyzed conversations from 17 conversations in which 68 participants (mean age=51years) played a game that prompted discussion in response to open-ended questions about end-of-life issues. Conversations (mean duration=91min) were audio-recorded and transcribed. Communication quality was assessed by three coders who assigned numeric scores rating how well individuals accomplished task, relational, and identity goals in the conversation. The coding measure, which results in a quantifiable outcome, yielded strong reliability (intra-class correlation range=0.73-0.89 and Cronbach's alpha range=0.69-0.89 for each of the coded domains) and validity (using multilevel nonlinear modeling, we detected significant variability in scores between games for each of the coded domains, all p-values theory-based measure of end-of-life conversation quality that is superior to other methods of measuring communication quality. Our description of the coding method enables researches to adapt and apply this measure to communication interventions in other clinical contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Real-Life Stories About Addiction Struggles | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Preventing Drug Abuse and Addiction Real-Life Stories About Addiction Struggles Past Issues / Fall 2011 ... TO PLAY THE VIDEO NIHSeniorHealth Videos Offer Real-Life Stories About Addiction Struggles—and Much More Many ...

  1. Solving Real-Life Problems: Future Mobile Technology Sophistication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARHAN SHAFIQ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology and MT (Mobile Technology provides opportunity to redesign and reengineered the human routines? life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action.

  2. Father’s and their children`s life goals in the context of Self-Determination Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Wojtowicz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the similarities and differences in goals valuation in father’s and children’s life. According to the motivative Self-Determination Theory (Deci, Ryan, 2000 the aspirations were divided into two groups: external goals (i.e. finance, power, fame and internal goals (i.e. affiliation and prosocial goals. The results suggest that teens, unlike their fathers, estimate higher affiliation goals. The report also shows (in both groups relations between three categories of goals: prosocial, close relationships and self- acceptance.

  3. Accounting Theory: An Ethical Perspective of Real Life Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivneil Kumar Raj

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Decisions are made daily in businesses and individuals do encounter situations where they are faced with ethical issues. The subject is how one evaluates whether an act is ethical or unethical. This research article discusses real life ethical dilemmas that could be faced in accounting or business environment and applicability of various theories of ethics that were taught in accounting theory course in the undergraduate accounting program. The researcher employs a number of case studies highlighting the stories related to ethics that have been experienced in the past working life. Teleological and deontological theories are being used to explain how one could identify that a particular act is ethical or unethical. The work of accountants requires them to maintain high level of ethics to ensure integrity of the profession.

  4. How Accumulated Real Life Stress Experience and Cognitive Speed Interact on Decision-Making Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Friedel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rationale: Advances in neurocomputational modeling suggest that valuation systems for goal-directed (deliberative on one side, and habitual (automatic decision-making on the other side may rely on distinct computational strategies for reinforcement learning, namely model-free vs. model-based learning. As a key theoretical difference, the model-based system strongly demands cognitive functions to plan actions prospectively based on an internal cognitive model of the environment, whereas valuation in the model-free system relies on rather simple learning rules from operant conditioning to retrospectively associate actions with their outcomes and is thus cognitively less demanding. Acute stress reactivity is known to impair model-based but not model-free choice behavior, with higher working memory capacity protecting the model-based system from acute stress. However, it is not clear which impact accumulated real life stress has on model-free and model-based decision systems and how this influence interacts with cognitive abilities.Methods: We used a sequential decision-making task distinguishing relative contributions of both learning strategies to choice behavior, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale questionnaire to assess accumulated real life stress, and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test to test cognitive speed in 95 healthy subjects.Results: Individuals reporting high stress exposure who had low cognitive speed showed reduced model-based but increased model-free behavioral control. In contrast, subjects exposed to accumulated real life stress with high cognitive speed displayed increased model-based performance but reduced model-free control.Conclusion: These findings suggest that accumulated real life stress exposure can enhance reliance on cognitive speed for model-based computations, which may ultimately protect the model-based system from the detrimental influences of accumulated real life stress. The combination of accumulated real life

  5. Rehabilitation in the real-life environment of a shopping mall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Delphine; Poldma, Tiiu; Fichten, Catherine; Havel, Alice; Kehayia, Eva; Mazer, Barbara; McKinley, Patricia; Rochette, Annie; Swaine, Bonnie

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how shopping malls could be used during rehabilitation and to identify the facilitators and barriers to their use. Two focus groups, conducted with 15 rehabilitation professionals from various disciplines and working with people with disabilities of all ages were structured around two topics: (i) The usage of malls for rehabilitation and (ii) Factors that facilitate or limit rehabilitation professionals' use of the mall as an environment for clinical assessment and/or intervention. The thematic analysis revealed that shopping malls were used to achieve several rehabilitation goals targeting physical and cognitive skills, psychological health and socialization. This real-life environment is motivating and helps foster independence and normalization. Factors affecting mall use during rehabilitation included personal factors (e.g. clients' personality and level of readiness) and environmental factors (e.g. clinical context, accessibility of the mall and social attitudes of store owners). Shopping malls may be a relevant rehabilitation assessment and treatment environment that could contribute to optimizing community integration of people with disabilities. Implications for rehabilitation To ensure successful community reintegration, clients could be trained at some point during their rehabilitation, to perform activities in real-life settings, such as a shopping mall. Shopping malls appear to enable the attainment of rehabilitation goals targeting a variety of skills. This real-life environment appears to be motivating and helps foster independence and normalization. Factors felt to affect mall use during rehabilitation include personal factors (e.g. clients' personality and level of readiness) and environmental factors (e.g. clinical context, accessibility of the mall and social attitudes of store owners). The shopping mall may be an untapped resource as it appears to be a relevant rehabilitation assessment and treatment

  6. Goal pursuit and goal adjustment as predictors of disability and quality of life among individuals with a lower limb amputation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Laura; Gallagher, Pamela; Desmond, Deirdre

    2014-02-01

    (1) To identify significant changes in disability and quality of life (QOL) across 3 time points (t1: admission to rehabilitation; t2: 6wk postdischarge; t3: 6mo postdischarge) in individuals with lower limb amputation, and (2) to examine whether goal pursuit and goal adjustment at t1 were predictive of these outcomes at t3. Prospective cohort study. Inpatient rehabilitation. Consecutive sample of persons (N=64) aged ≥18 years with major lower limb amputation. Not applicable. World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) and World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF). Mean WHODAS 2.0 scores were in the 95th percentile at each time point. Scores on the WHODAS 2.0 and the physical, psychological, and social relations domains of the WHOQOL-BREF remained stable across the study period. Environmental QOL scores decreased from t1 to t2 but returned to near-baseline levels between t2 and t3. Having a greater tendency toward goal pursuit at t1 was predictive of higher physical and psychological QOL at t3, whereas having a stronger disposition toward goal adjustment at t1 predicted lower disability and higher environmental QOL at t3. High levels of disability were experienced from admission to rehabilitation up to 6 months postdischarge. QOL in the physical, psychological, and social relations domains remained stable over the study period. Stronger goal pursuit and goal adjustment tendencies on admission predicted lower disability and higher QOL 6 months postdischarge. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Generational differences in young adults' life goals, concern for others, and civic orientation, 1966-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenge, Jean M; Campbell, W Keith; Freeman, Elise C

    2012-05-01

    Three studies examined generational differences in life goals, concern for others, and civic orientation among American high school seniors (Monitoring the Future; N = 463,753, 1976-2008) and entering college students (The American Freshman; N = 8.7 million, 1966-2009). Compared to Baby Boomers (born 1946-1961) at the same age, GenX'ers (born 1962-1981) and Millennials (born after 1982) considered goals related to extrinsic values (money, image, fame) more important and those related to intrinsic values (self-acceptance, affiliation, community) less important. Concern for others (e.g., empathy for outgroups, charity donations, the importance of having a job worthwhile to society) declined slightly. Community service rose but was also increasingly required for high school graduation over the same time period. Civic orientation (e.g., interest in social problems, political participation, trust in government, taking action to help the environment and save energy) declined an average of d = -.34, with about half the decline occurring between GenX and the Millennials. Some of the largest declines appeared in taking action to help the environment. In most cases, Millennials slowed, though did not reverse, trends toward reduced community feeling begun by GenX. The results generally support the "Generation Me" view of generational differences rather than the "Generation We" or no change views.

  8. Excerpt from "IRL (In Real Life: The Bronze Documentary Project" [interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Tuszynski

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Excerpt from "IRL (In Real Life: The Bronze Documentary Project". One of the first feature-length documentary films to take on the subject of online relationships, "IRL (In Real Life" chronicles the life, death, and afterlife of an online community called The Bronze, made up of fans from the official Web site for Buffy, the Vampire Slayer.

  9. Goal disturbance in relation to anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life after Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersma, Sandra N; Maes, Stan; Joekes, Katherine

    2005-12-01

    Aim of this cross-sectional study, was to examine whether the sudden event of hospitalization for Myocardial Infarction (MI) would lead to a disturbance in the attainment of important higher order or life goals, and secondly, whether goal importance as well as goal disturbance would be related to emotional distress and health-related quality of life (HRQL) shortly (two to five weeks) after the MI. Respondents were 160 patients who were hospitalized for MI. Results indicate that patients experience goal disturbance as a result of their cardiac event. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that independently from demographics, medical characteristics and prior lifestyle, disturbance of important higher order goals was a powerful correlate of anxiety, depression as well as HRQL. Furthermore, the extent to which patients valued higher order goals in their life (goal importance) was an independent correlate of depression. Based on self-regulation theory, we suggest that emotional distress and lower levels of HRQL can be explained in terms of threat to goal attainment. Recommendations for further research and practical implications for rehabilitation programs were formulated.

  10. Emotional and Physiological Desensitization to Real-Life and Movie Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Mrug, Sylvie; Madan, Anjana; Cook, Edwin W.; Wright, Rex A.

    2014-01-01

    Youth are exposed to large amounts of violence in real life and media, which may lead to desensitization. Given evidence of curvilinear associations between exposure to violence and emotional distress, we examined linear and curvilinear associations of exposure to real-life and movie violence with PTSD symptoms, empathy, and physiological arousal, as well emotional and physiological reactivity to movie violence. College students (N=209; mean age=18.74) reported on their exposure to real-life ...

  11. Life goals and alcohol use among first-year college students: the role of motives to limit drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfai, Tibor P; Ralston, Timothy E

    2011-11-01

    The main objective of the present study was to advance our understanding of how life goals are associated with hazardous alcohol use among first-year university students. One-hundred and seventeen students rated a series of self-generated life goals on meaning and efficacy and then completed alcohol assessments. Higher goal meaning ratings were associated with less alcohol use and fewer heavy drinking episodes. Tests of indirect effects showed that the associations between goal meaning ratings and alcohol use indices were mediated by motives to limit drinking, particularly the motive to maintain self-control/standards. These results replicate and extend previous work on goal meaning and hazardous drinking among students. Findings are consistent with the view that engagement in university life goals may serve as a protective factor against hazardous drinking among first-year students due to greater concern with the impact of drinking on their ability to attain goal standards. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Venus effect in real life and in photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertamini, Marco; Lawson, Rebecca; Jones, Luke; Winters, Madeline

    2010-10-01

    The toilet of Venus is the subject of many paintings. Typically, Venus appears with a small mirror in which her face is visible. Observers tend to say that Venus is admiring herself in a mirror, even when the location of the mirror makes this impossible. We demonstrate that the Venus effect is not specific to paintings by showing that it occurs in real life (Experiment 1) and in photographs (Experiments 1-4). The original description of the effect implied that observers describe Venus as seeing in a mirror what they (the observers) see. We used different photographs to compare the responses when the person in front of the mirror could or could not see him or herself and when the image of his or her face was or was not visible to the observer. Observers tend to state that a person can see his or her own reflection when he or she appears near a mirror, whether or not his or her face is visible in the mirror. A task based on a top-down view of a room confirmed that people lack sensitivity to the role of the viewpoint (Experiment 5). We discuss these findings in relation to other evidence of difficulty in understanding what is visible in a mirror.

  13. Goals of care in advanced dementia: quality of life, dignity and comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volicer, L

    2007-01-01

    Prolongation of human lifespan is increasing the number of individuals suffering from Alzheimer's disease and other progressive dementia worldwide. There are about 5 million of these individuals in both United States and European Union and many more in other countries of the world (1). Because there is no curative treatment for these diseases, most individuals with dementia survive to an advanced stage of dementia at which time many of them require institutional care. Home care for individuals with advanced dementia and especially institutional care are very expensive and are becoming major public health problems. The cost of care for advanced dementia is often increased by the use of aggressive medical interventions that may not be in the best interest of the patient. Because advanced dementia is currently incurable, it should be considered a terminal illness, similar to terminal cancer. Therefore, palliative care may be the most appropriate strategy for management of advanced dementia (2). The goals of palliative care are maintenance of quality of life, dignity and comfort and the four articles in this special issue are addressing these goals. Enhancement of quality of life in dementia requires attention to three main domains: provision of meaningful activities, appropriate medical care, and treatment of behavioral symptoms (3). Individuals with advanced dementia may not be able to participate in many activity programs but they still may maintain some quality of life if they are provided care in a pleasant environment with constant presence of a caregiver. Simard describes a program, Namaste Care, which is specifically tailored for individuals with advanced dementia. This program requires neither major expenditure nor increased staffing and should be instituted in all facilities that care for individuals with advanced dementia. Maintaining functional status of individuals with advanced dementia is important because it improves their self esteem and facilitates

  14. Aircraft Engine Life-Consumption Monitoring for Real-Time Reliability Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A real-time life-use consumption monitor is proposed for aircraft engine systems. The life monitor will process power data available on the aircraft to calculate the...

  15. College Students' Physical Activity and Health-Related Quality of Life: An Achievement Goal Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Xiang, Ping; Gu, Xiangli; Rose, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The 2 × 2 achievement goal model, including the mastery-approach, mastery-avoidance, performance-approach, and performance-avoidance goal orientations, has recently been used to explain motivational outcomes in physical activity. This study attempted to examine the relationships among 2 × 2 achievement goal orientations, physical…

  16. Virtual Worlds: Relationship Between Real Life and Experience in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P. Anstadt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the unique applications of virtual reality in many modern contexts, Second Life (SL offers inimitable opportunities for research and exploration and experiential learning as part of a distance learning curriculum assignment. A review of current research regarding SL examined real world social influences in online interactions and what the effects on users may be. This aids students in understanding the social constructionist perceptions and worldview of those persons they may serve in social services. This suggests the importance of developing an understanding of the relationship between users’ real life (RL and their SL. Some research has begun to reveal the effectiveness of telecommunication and computer simulation with certain clients in the fields of mental health and social work, yet there is a lack of sufficient research done within the context of virtual worlds. The current study surveyed users of several educationally and health focused SIMS (simulations as to what motivates their SL and RL interactions. The data explores associations between users’ RL and their SL in several areas,potentially addressing the future role of educating social work students regarding research methodology in online virtual reality interactions. Implications for social work are discussed including engaging clients using incentives for social participation built into the SL milieu.

  17. Individual differences in mixed emotions moderate the negative consequences of goal conflict on life purpose

    OpenAIRE

    Berrios, R.; Totterdell, P.; Kellett, S.

    2017-01-01

    Pursuing two incompatible goals (goal conflict) is commonly viewed as pernicious for individual well-being. Recent research has also shown that sometimes goal conflict instigates the experience of mixed emotions (co-activation of positive and negative emotions), and in turn, mixed emotions has been linked to some beneficial outcomes, including self-control and eudaimonic well-being. In the present study we formulated mixed emotions as an individual difference, and hypothesized that individual...

  18. Exploring English Language Learners (ELL) Experiences with Scientific Language and Inquiry within a Real Life Context

    OpenAIRE

    Algee, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Exploring English Language Learners (ELL) Experiences with Scientific Language and Inquiry within a Real Life Context Lisa M. Algee English Language Learners (ELL) are often at a distinct disadvantage from receiving authentic science learning opportunites. This study explored English Language Learners (ELL) learning experiences with scientific language and inquiry within a real life context. This research was theoretically informed by socioc...

  19. [Unmarried women of the war generation: an explorative study of their goals in life and personal satisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilken, B; Kemmler, L

    1997-01-01

    Older never-married women are often confronted with negative stereotypes which find expression in terms like "spinster" or "old maid". Their life-situation, however, has rarely been a subject of empirical studies. In a research project at the University of Münster, started in 1985, some psychological and social aspects of the life-situation of never-married employed women born between 1919 and 1933 (in comparison to married women of the same age not employed) were studied by means of detailed interviews. Parts of the results concerning "life goals" and "life satisfaction" are described. The results relativize the negative stereotypes mentioned above. They indicate that in the retrospective view of their lives the never-married women had many life goals which they could not achieve, but that they do not regret this at present. They rate their life satisfaction as very high and actively pursue present goals and interests. There are only few differences between never-married and married women. The results are discussed with regard to cognitive theories of aging and to the specific historical background of the interviewees.

  20. The Role of Purposeful Work Goals in Promoting Meaning in Life and in Schoolwork during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, David Scott; Bundick, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    What type of work goals provide adolescents with the sense that schoolwork is important and that their lives are meaningful? This mixed-methods study of a diverse sample of 6th-, 9th-, and 12th-grade adolescents (N = 148) investigated the relationship between work goals, purpose, and meaning using a semistructured interview and a survey. Interview…

  1. Meaning in life and violations of beliefs and goals: reciprocal relations among individuals with congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Login S; Park, Crystal L

    2017-05-01

    In the context of highly stressful experiences, violations of beliefs and goals and meaning in life may have a reciprocal relationship over time. More violations may lead to lowered meaning, whereas higher meaning may lead to lowered violations. The present study examines this relationship among congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. A cross-lagged panel design was used. CHF patients (N = 142) reported twice, six months apart, on their meaning in life and the extent to which CHF violates their beliefs and goals. Overall, results were consistent with a reciprocal relationship, showing that greater goal violations led to negative subsequent changes in meaning, whereas greater meaning led to favorable subsequent changes in violations of beliefs and goals. Meaning in life and violations may contribute to one another, and therefore, in understanding the adjustment process, it is important to consider their interrelationship. The results are also broadly informative regarding the experience of meaning, showing that disruption of beliefs and goals may undermine meaning.

  2. The Role of Health Care Provider Goals, Plans, and Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) in Preparing for Conversations About End-of-Life Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jessica

    2016-09-01

    The Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST) is a planning tool representative of an emerging paradigm aimed at facilitating elicitation of patient end-of-life care preferences. This study assessed the impact of the POLST document on provider goals and plans for conversations about end-of-life care treatment options. A 2 (POLST: experimental, control) × 3 (topic of possible patient misunderstanding: cardiopulmonary resuscitation, medical intervention, artificially administered nutrition) experimental design was used to assess goals, plan complexity, and strategies for plan alterations by medical professionals. Findings suggested that the POLST had little impact on plan complexity or reaction time with initial plans. However, preliminary evidence suggested that the utility of the POLST surfaced with provider responses to patient misunderstanding, in which differences in conditions were identified. Significant differences in goals reported as most important in driving conversational engagement emerged. Implications for findings are discussed.

  3. Real life testing of a Hybrid PEM Fuel Cell Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkesson, Anders; Andersson, Christian; Alvfors, Per; Alaküla, Mats; Overgaard, Lars

    Fuel cells produce low quantities of local emissions, if any, and are therefore one of the most promising alternatives to internal combustion engines as the main power source in future vehicles. It is likely that urban buses will be among the first commercial applications for fuel cells in vehicles. This is due to the fact that urban buses are highly visible for the public, they contribute significantly to air pollution in urban areas, they have small limitations in weight and volume and fuelling is handled via a centralised infrastructure. Results and experiences from real life measurements of energy flows in a Scania Hybrid PEM Fuel Cell Concept Bus are presented in this paper. The tests consist of measurements during several standard duty cycles. The efficiency of the fuel cell system and of the complete vehicle are presented and discussed. The net efficiency of the fuel cell system was approximately 40% and the fuel consumption of the concept bus is between 42 and 48% lower compared to a standard Scania bus. Energy recovery by regenerative braking saves up 28% energy. Bus subsystems such as the pneumatic system for door opening, suspension and brakes, the hydraulic power steering, the 24 V grid, the water pump and the cooling fans consume approximately 7% of the energy in the fuel input or 17% of the net power output from the fuel cell system. The bus was built by a number of companies in a project partly financed by the European Commission's Joule programme. The comprehensive testing is partly financed by the Swedish programme "Den Gröna Bilen" (The Green Car). A 50 kW el fuel cell system is the power source and a high voltage battery pack works as an energy buffer and power booster. The fuel, compressed hydrogen, is stored in two high-pressure stainless steel vessels mounted on the roof of the bus. The bus has a series hybrid electric driveline with wheel hub motors with a maximum power of 100 kW. Hybrid Fuel Cell Buses have a big potential, but there are

  4. Discussing Death, Dying, and End-of-Life Goals of Care: A Communication Skills Training Module for Oncology Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Nessa; Manna, Ruth; Shen, Megan; Banerjee, Smita C; Penn, Stacey; Pehrson, Cassandra; Krueger, Carol A; Maloney, Erin K; Zaider, Talia; Bylund, Carma L

    2015-12-01

    Effective communication, particularly at the end of life, is an essential skill for oncology nurses, but few receive formal training in this area. The aim of this article is to adapt an end-of-life care communication skills training (CST) module, originally developed for oncologists, for oncology nurses and to evaluate participants' confidence in using the communication skills learned and their satisfaction with the module. The adapted end-of-life care module consisted of a 45-minute didactic, exemplary video and 90 minutes of small group interaction and experiential role play with a simulated patient. Using a five-point Likert-type scale, 247 inpatient oncology nurses completed pre-/post-workshop surveys rating their confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care with patients, as well as overall satisfaction with the module. Nurses' confidence in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life goals of care increased significantly after attending the workshop. Nurse participants indicated satisfaction with the module by agreeing or strongly agreeing to all six items assessing satisfaction 90%-98% of the time. Nurses' CST in discussing death, dying, and end-of-life care showed feasibility, acceptability, and potential benefit at improving confidence in having end-of-life care discussions.

  5. Does family structure matter? Comparing the life goals and aspirations of learners in secondary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Lee Davids

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the goals and aspirations of learners from single- and two-parent families. The study used a quantitative methodology with a cross-sectional comparative group design. The sample consisted of 853 Grade 11 learners from secondary schools in the Northern, Southern and Metro Central education districts in the Western Cape. The data were collected using the Aspirations Index and a short biographical questionnaire. The results suggest that there was a significant main effect of family structure on certain goals and aspirations of learners in secondary schools. These goals and aspirations included wealth, image, personal growth, relationships, and health. Furthermore, learners in single-parent families placed more emphasis on intrinsic goals.

  6. The Functional Role of Resignation Orientation on Goal Engagement, Self-Esteem, Life Satisfaction, and Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Kenichi; Ishimura, Ikuo; Kodama, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Several studies in Europe and North America have highlighted the importance of resignation or giving up. Research has shown that resignation is as important as goal attainment. Hence, this study examines, using path analysis, the effect of resignation orientation on goal disengagement and reengagement. Furthermore, this study attempts to clarify the implication of resignation orientation for elements of mental well-being. Questionnaires were completed by 261 Japanese college students. Results showed that proactive resignation orientation promotes reestablishment of alternative goals while negative resignation orientation encourages disengagement of the unattainable goals. The findings help explain the functional role of resignation orientation and can inform the development of treatment for resignation-related depression. PMID:26973950

  7. The functional role of resignation orientation on goal engagement, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Asano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies in Europe and North America have highlighted the importance of resignation or giving up. Research has shown that resignation is as important as goal attainment. Hence, this study examines, using path analysis, the effect of resignation orientation on goal disengagement and reengagement. Furthermore, this study attempts to clarify the implication of resignation orientation for elements of mental well-being. Questionnaires were completed by 261 Japanese college students. Results showed that proactive resignation orientation promotes reestablishment of alternative goals while negative resignation orientation encourages disengagement of the unattainable goals. The findings help explain the functional role of resignation orientation and can inform the development of treatment for resignation-related depression.

  8. Simulating real world functioning in schizophrenia using a naturalistic city environment and single-trial, goal-directed navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Zawadzki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a virtual reality platform that would serve as a functionally meaningful measure of cognition in schizophrenia that would complement standard batteries of cognitive tests during clinical trials for cognitive treatments in schizophrenia, be amenable to human neuroimaging research, yet lend itself to neurobiological comparison with rodent analogues.Method: Thirty-three patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls matched for age, sex, video gaming experience and education completed eight rapid, single-trial virtual navigation tasks within a naturalistic virtual city. Four trials tested their ability to find different targets seen during the passive viewing of a closed path that led them around different city blocks. Four subsequent trials tested their ability to return to four different starting points after viewing a path that took them several blocks away from the starting position. Results: Individuals with schizophrenia had difficulties in way-finding, measured as distance travelled to find targets previously encountered within the virtual city. They were also more likely not to notice the target during passive viewing, less likely to find novel shortcuts to targets and more likely to become lost and fail completely in finding the target. Total travel distances across all eight trials strongly correlated (negatively with neurocognitive measures and, for 49 participants who completed the Quality of Life Scale, psychosocial functioning. Conclusion: Single-trial, goal-directed navigation in a naturalistic virtual environment is a functionally meaningful measure of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

  9. Simulating real world functioning in schizophrenia using a naturalistic city environment and single-trial, goal-directed navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, John A; Girard, Todd A; Foussias, George; Rodrigues, Alicia; Siddiqui, Ishraq; Lerch, Jason P; Grady, Cheryl; Remington, Gary; Wong, Albert H C

    2013-01-01

    To develop a virtual reality platform that would serve as a functionally meaningful measure of cognition in schizophrenia and that would also complement standard batteries of cognitive tests during clinical trials for cognitive treatments in schizophrenia, be amenable to human neuroimaging research, yet lend itself to neurobiological comparison with rodent analogs. Thirty-three patients with schizophrenia and 33 healthy controls matched for age, sex, video gaming experience, and education completed eight rapid, single-trial virtual navigation tasks within a naturalistic virtual city. Four trials tested their ability to find different targets seen during the passive viewing of a closed path that led them around different city blocks. Four subsequent trials tested their ability to return to four different starting points after viewing a path that took them several blocks away from the starting position. Individuals with schizophrenia had difficulties in way-finding, measured as distance travelled to find targets previously encountered within the virtual city. They were also more likely not to notice the target during passive viewing, less likely to find novel shortcuts to targets, and more likely to become lost and fail completely in finding the target. Total travel distances across all eight trials strongly correlated (negatively) with neurocognitive measures and, for 49 participants who completed the Quality of Life Scale, psychosocial functioning. Single-trial, goal-directed navigation in a naturalistic virtual environment is a functionally meaningful measure of cognitive functioning in schizophrenia.

  10. Managing in the Virtual World: How Second Life is Rewriting the Rules of "Real Life" Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyld, David C.

    In this paper, we will explore the growth of virtual worlds - one of the most exciting and fast-growing concepts in the Web 2.0 era. We will see that while there has been significant growth across all demographic groups, online gaming in MMOGs (Massively Multiplayer Online Games) are finding particular appeal in today's youth - the so-called "digital native" generation. We then overview the today's virtual world marketplace, both in the youth and adult-oriented markets. Second Life is emerging as the most important virtual world today, due to the intense interest amongst both large organizations and individual entrepreneurs to conduct real business in the virtual environment. Due to its prominence today and its forecasted growth over the next decade, we take a look at the unscripted world of Second Life, examining the corporate presence in-world, as well as the economic, technical, legal, ethical and security issues involved for companies doing business in the virtual world. In conclusion, we present an analysis of where we stand in terms of virtual world development today and a projection of where we will be heading in the near future. Finally, we present advice to management practitioners and academicians on how to learn about virtual worlds and explore the world of opportunities in them.

  11. Revamped Curriculum at a Vermont College Focuses on Life Skills and Career Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The Vermont college has radically revamped its class structure to better prepare students for life beyond the lecture halls. The collegewide program, "Education in 3 Dimensions," centers on three main parts: life-skills workshops, an interdisciplinary core curriculum, and professional courses. Required courses make up all three…

  12. Leading Teams of Higher Education Administrators: Integrating Goal Setting, Team Role, and Team Life Cycle Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posthuma, Richard; Al-Riyami, Said

    2012-01-01

    Leaders of higher education institutions can create top management teams of academic administrators to guide and improve their organizations. This study illustrates how the leadership of top management teams can be accomplished successfully through a combination of goal setting (Doran, 1981; Locke & Latham, 1990), understanding of team roles…

  13. Reciprocal feedback between self-concept and goal pursuit in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alexander E; Vallacher, Robin R

    2017-07-21

    We hypothesized that self-knowledge and goal perseverance are mutually reinforcing because of the roles of self-knowledge in directing goal pursuit, and of goal pursuit in structuring the self-concept. To test this hypothesis, we used a daily diary design with 97 college-aged participants for 40 days to assess whether daily self-concept clarity and grit predict one another's next-day levels. Data were analyzed using multilevel cross-lagged panel modeling. Results indicated that daily self-concept clarity and grit had positive and symmetric associations with each other across time, while controlling for their respective previous values. Similar crossed results were also found when testing the model using individual daily self-concept clarity and grit items. The results are the first to indicate the existence of reinforcing feedback loops between self-concept clarity and grit, such that fluctuations in the clarity of self-knowledge are associated with fluctuations in goal resolve, and vice versa. Discussion centers on the implications of these results for the functional link between mind and action and on the study's heuristic value for subsequent research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The psychosocial transition associated with spontaneous 46,XX primary ovarian insufficiency: illness uncertainty, stigma, goal flexibility, and purpose in life as factors in emotional health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Mary; Ventura, June L; Wieners, Mary; Covington, Sharon N; Vanderhoof, Vien H; Ryan, Mary E; Koziol, Deloris E; Popat, Vaishali B; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2010-01-01

    .... Illness uncertainty, stigma, goal disengagement/re-engagement, purpose in life, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory...

  15. Exploring the relationship between physical activity, life goals and health-related quality of life among high school students: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigvartsen, Julie; Gabrielsen, Leiv Einar; Abildsnes, Eirik; Stea, Tonje H; Omfjord, Christina Sandvand; Rohde, Gudrun

    2016-08-03

    Two models were developed to increase high school students' participation in physical education (PE): "motion enjoyment" and "sport enjoyment". The first model focuses on increasing knowledge about the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle and thereby promoting a positive attitude towards physical activity, whereas the second model focuses on techniques and practices for enhancing athletic performance. The aims of the present study are to investigate and understand the similarities and differences between students selecting "motion enjoyment" vs. "sport enjoyment" and to examine the extent to which life goals and reported physical activity are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL). A total of 156 high school students (mean age, 16 years [standard deviation = 0.8], 123 girls and 33 boys) were included in this cross-sectional study. HRQOL and life goals were measured using KIDSCREEN-10 and the Adolescent Life Goal Profile Scale, respectively. Physical activity was measured using a self-reporting questionnaire intended to describe the students' leisure-time activity. Independent sample t-tests, chi-square, one-way analyses of variance and multiple regression analysis were applied. Self-reported physical activity level and HRQOL were higher among students in the "sport enjoyment" program, while the perceived importance of life goals was the same regardless of the preferred PE model. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the perceived importance of relations-oriented life goals (B = -5.61; 95 % confidence interval CI = -10.53 to -0.70; p = .026), perceived importance of generativity-oriented life goals (B = 4.14.; 95 % CI = 0.85 to 7.422; p = .014), perceived attainability of relations-oriented life goals (B = 7.28; 95 % CI = 2.49 to 12.07; p = .003), age (B = -7.29; 95 % CI = -11.38 to -3.20; p = .001) and gender, with boys as the reference group (B = -12.10; 95 % CI

  16. Exploring the relationship between physical activity, life goals and health-related quality of life among high school students: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Sigvartsen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two models were developed to increase high school students’ participation in physical education (PE: “motion enjoyment” and “sport enjoyment”. The first model focuses on increasing knowledge about the health benefits of a physically active lifestyle and thereby promoting a positive attitude towards physical activity, whereas the second model focuses on techniques and practices for enhancing athletic performance. The aims of the present study are to investigate and understand the similarities and differences between students selecting “motion enjoyment” vs. “sport enjoyment” and to examine the extent to which life goals and reported physical activity are associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL. Method A total of 156 high school students (mean age, 16 years [standard deviation = 0.8], 123 girls and 33 boys were included in this cross-sectional study. HRQOL and life goals were measured using KIDSCREEN-10 and the Adolescent Life Goal Profile Scale, respectively. Physical activity was measured using a self-reporting questionnaire intended to describe the students’ leisure-time activity. Independent sample t-tests, chi-square, one-way analyses of variance and multiple regression analysis were applied. Results Self-reported physical activity level and HRQOL were higher among students in the “sport enjoyment” program, while the perceived importance of life goals was the same regardless of the preferred PE model. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the perceived importance of relations-oriented life goals (B = −5.61; 95 % confidence interval CI = −10.53 to −0.70; p = .026, perceived importance of generativity-oriented life goals (B = 4.14.; 95 % CI = 0.85 to 7.422; p = .014, perceived attainability of relations-oriented life goals (B = 7.28; 95 % CI = 2.49 to 12.07; p = .003, age (B = −7.29; 95 % CI = −11.38 to −3.20; p

  17. Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life

    OpenAIRE

    Mileto, Camilla; Vegas López-Manzanares, Fernando; Cristini, Valentina; Diodato, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Mileto, C.; Vegas López-Manzanares, F.; Cristini, V.; Diodato, M. (2011). Learning based upon projects of architectural conservation: from university to real life. IATED. 1-8. http://hdl.handle.net/10251/50072 Senia 1 8

  18. Social Anxiety in Online and Real-Life Interaction and Their Associated Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Hsin; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety was compared between online and real-life interaction in a sample of 2,348 college students. Severity of social anxiety in both real-life and online interaction was tested for associations with depression, Internet addiction, Internet activity type (gaming versus chatting), and scores on Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS)/Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scales. The results showed that social anxiety was lower when interacting online than when interacting offline. Depression,...

  19. Patients with asthma and comorbid allergic rhinitis: is optimal quality of life achievable in real life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Braido

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Asthma trials suggest that patients reaching total disease control have an optimal Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. Moreover, rhinitis is present in almost 80% of asthmatics and impacts asthma control and patient HRQoL. We explored whether optimal HRQoL was reachable in a real-life setting, and evaluated the disease and patient related patterns associated to optimal HRQoL achievement. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Asthma and rhinitis HRQoL, illness perception, mood profiles, rhinitis symptoms and asthma control were assessed by means of validated tools in patients classified according to GINA and ARIA guidelines. Optimal HRQoL, identified by a Rhinasthma Global Summary (GS score ≤20 (score ranging from 0 to 100, where 100 represents the worst possible HRQoL, was reached by 78/209 (37.32%. With the exception of age, no associations were found between clinical and demographic characteristics and optimal HRQoL achievement. Patients reaching an optimal HRQoL differed in disease perception and mood compared to those not reaching an optimal HRQoL. Asthma control was significantly associated with optimal HRQoL (χ(2 = 49.599; p<0.001 and well-controlled and totally controlled patients significantly differed in achieving optimal HRQoL (χ(2 = 7.617; p<0.006. CONCLUSION: Approximately one third of the patients in our survey were found to have an optimal HRQoL. While unsatisfactory disease control was the primary reason why the remainder failed to attain optimal HRQoL, it is clear that illness perception and mood also played parts. Therefore, therapeutic plans should be directed not only toward achieving the best possible clinical control of asthma and comorbid rhinitis, but also to incorporating individualized elements according to patient-related characteristics.

  20. A Real-Life Case Study of Audit Interactions--Resolving Messy, Complex Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Vivien; Fearnley, Stella; Hines, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Real-life accounting and auditing problems are often complex and messy, requiring the synthesis of technical knowledge in addition to the application of generic skills. To help students acquire the necessary skills to deal with these problems effectively, educators have called for the use of case-based methods. Cases based on real situations (such…

  1. Communication patterns and satisfaction levels in three-dimensional versus real-life intimate relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Richard L; Murphy, Nora A; Ávalos, M Clementina

    2011-10-01

    The present study compared communication patterns and satisfaction levels between three-dimensional (3D) and real-life intimate relationships using a sample of 71 participants who were concurrently involved in an intimate relationship within Second Life and a separate real-life romantic relationship. Participants indicated that the quality of their communication was significantly better in their Second-Life relationship and that they experienced higher levels of satisfaction with their virtual partners. The more positive or idealized view of the 3D relationships may have been due to higher levels of focused interaction and reduced stressors in the virtual world and the greater length, and associated problems, in participant's real-life relationships. In addition, the presence of a concurrent relationship within Second Life could have negatively affected participant's judgments of their real-life relationships. These data offer the first detailed assessment of communication patterns and satisfaction levels in intimate relationships across the real and 3D virtual realms as the number of users and romantic partners in immersive virtual environments continue to grow.

  2. Registration accuracy and quality of real-life images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yen Hsu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common registration problem for the application of consumer device is to align all the acquired image sequences into a complete scene. Image alignment requires a registration algorithm that will compensate as much as possible for geometric variability among images. However, images captured views from a real scene usually produce different distortions. Some are derived from the optic characteristics of image sensors, and others are caused by the specific scenes and objects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An image registration algorithm considering the perspective projection is proposed for the application of consumer devices in this study. It exploits a multiresolution wavelet-based method to extract significant features. An analytic differential approach is then proposed to achieve fast convergence of point matching. Finally, the registration accuracy is further refined to obtain subpixel precision by a feature-based modified Levenberg-Marquardt method. Due to its feature-based and nonlinear characteristic, it converges considerably faster than most other methods. In addition, vignette compensation and color difference adjustment are also performed to further improve the quality of registration results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The performance of the proposed method is evaluated by testing the synthetic and real images acquired by a hand-held digital still camera and in comparison with two registration techniques in terms of the squared sum of intensity differences (SSD and correlation coefficient (CC. The results indicate that the proposed method is promising in registration accuracy and quality, which are statistically significantly better than other two approaches.

  3. A real-life, ecologically valid test of executive functioning : The executive secretarial task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamberts, Kirsten F.; Evans, Jonathan J.; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2010-01-01

    A major goal of neuropsychological assessment is predicting a person's level of functioning in daily life. Making predictions about everyday executive functioning based on tests is problematic because of the contrast between demands made in the test environment and demands made in everyday life

  4. The psychological context of quality of life: a psychometric analysis of a novel idiographic measure of bladder cancer patients' personal goals and concerns prior to surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganstern, Bradley Andrew; Bochner, Bernard; Dalbagni, Guido; Shabsigh, Ahmad; Rapkin, Bruce

    2011-02-15

    Over the past two decades, there has been an increasing focus on quality of life outcomes in urological diseases. Patient-reported outcomes research has relied on structured assessments that constrain interpretation of the impact of disease and treatments. In this study, we present content analysis and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Life Appraisal Profile. Our evaluation of this measure is a prelude to a prospective comparison of quality of life outcomes of reconstructive procedures after cystectomy. Fifty patients with bladder cancer were interviewed prior to surgery using the Quality of Life Appraisal Profile. Patients also completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and demographics. Analysis included content coding of personal goal statements generated by the Appraisal Profile, examination of the relationship of goal attainment to content, and association of goal-based measures with QLQ-C30 scales. Patients reported an average of 10 personal goals, reflecting motivational themes of achievement, problem solving, avoidance of problems, maintaining desired circumstances, letting go of roles and responsibilities, acceptance of undesirable situations, and attaining milestones. 503 goal statements were coded using 40 different content categories. Progress toward goal attainment was positively correlated with relationships and activities goals, but negatively correlated with health concerns. Associations among goal measures provided evidence for construct validity. Goal content also differed according to age, gender, employment, and marital status, lending further support for construct validity. QLQ-C30 functioning and symptom scales were correlated with goal content, but not with progress toward goal attainment, suggesting that patients may calibrate progress ratings relative to their specific goals. Alternately, progress may reflect a unique aspect of quality of life untapped by more standard scales. The Brief Quality of Life Appraisal Profile was associated with

  5. Bringing Reality into Calculus Classrooms: Mathematizing a Real-life Problem Simulated in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V. Shipulina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study explores how students, who had completed the AP calculus course, mathematized the optimal navigation real-life problem simulated in the Second Life Virtual Environment. The particular research interest was to investigate whether/how students’ empirical activity in VE influences the way of their mathematizing.

  6. Preparing Special Educators to Infuse Real Life Issues into the K-12 Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyda-Lorie, Sandra; Kritikos, Effie; Messerer, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Research shows that educators are not prepared to address real life issues such as substance abuse, HIV/AIDS, and bullying in the classroom. Yet, students with learning disabilities remain vulnerable to each of these pressing life issues. The purpose of the current study was to determine whether the curriculum infusion (CI) model increased the…

  7. Goal Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons for......-JRC in European Commission—Joint Research Centre—Institute for Environment and Sustainability: International Reference Life Cycle Data System (ILCD) Handbook—General Guide for Life Cycle Assessment—Detailed Guidance. Publications Office of the European Union, Luxembourg 2010).......The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons...

  8. The influence of illness-related variables, personal resources and context-related factors on real-life functioning of people with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galderisi, Silvana; Rossi, Alessandro; Rocca, Paola; Bertolino, Alessandro; Mucci, Armida; Bucci, Paola; Rucci, Paola; Gibertoni, Dino; Aguglia, Eugenio; Amore, Mario; Bellomo, Antonello; Biondi, Massimo; Brugnoli, Roberto; Dell'Osso, Liliana; De Ronchi, Diana; Di Emidio, Gabriella; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Fagiolini, Andrea; Marchesi, Carlo; Monteleone, Palmiero; Oldani, Lucio; Pinna, Federica; Roncone, Rita; Sacchetti, Emilio; Santonastaso, Paolo; Siracusano, Alberto; Vita, Antonio; Zeppegno, Patrizia; Maj, Mario

    2014-10-01

    In people suffering from schizophrenia, major areas of everyday life are impaired, including independent living, productive activities and social relationships. Enhanced understanding of factors that hinder real-life functioning is vital for treatments to translate into more positive outcomes. The goal of the present study was to identify predictors of real-life functioning in people with schizophrenia, and to assess their relative contribution. Based on previous literature and clinical experience, several factors were selected and grouped into three categories: illness-related variables, personal resources and context-related factors. Some of these variables were never investigated before in relationship with real-life functioning. In 921 patients with schizophrenia living in the community, we found that variables relevant to the disease, personal resources and social context explain 53.8% of real-life functioning variance in a structural equation model. Neurocognition exhibited the strongest, though indirect, association with real-life functioning. Positive symptoms and disorganization, as well as avolition, proved to have significant direct and indirect effects, while depression had no significant association and poor emotional expression was only indirectly and weakly related to real-life functioning. Availability of a disability pension and access to social and family incentives also showed a significant direct association with functioning. Social cognition, functional capacity, resilience, internalized stigma and engagement with mental health services served as mediators. The observed complex associations among investigated predictors, mediators and real-life functioning strongly suggest that integrated and personalized programs should be provided as standard treatment to people with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 World Psychiatric Association.

  9. Life in a landfill slum, children's health, and the Millennium Development Goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Tomoyuki, E-mail: tshibata@niu.edu [Public Health Program, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Institute of the Study for Environment, Sustainability, and Energy, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Faculty of Public Health, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi (Indonesia); Wilson, James L. [Institute of the Study for Environment, Sustainability, and Energy, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Department of Geography, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Watson, Lindsey M.; Nikitin, Ivan V. [Public Health Program, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Ansariadi; La Ane, Ruslan; Maidin, Alimin [Faculty of Public Health, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi (Indonesia)

    2015-12-01

    People living in slums can be considered left behind with regard to national successes in achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the living and working conditions of waste pickers and their children in a landfill slum located in the largest city in eastern Indonesia. A total of 113 people from the landfill slum and 1184 people from the general population participated in face-to-face interviews. Municipal solid waste (MSW) was analyzed for metals, metalloids and fecal indicator bacteria. Ambient air quality including particulate matter was measured in the landfill. Households in the landfill slum were 5.73 (p = 0.04) times more likely to be below the international poverty line (MDG 1: Poverty) and 15.6 times (p < 0.01) more likely to have no one in the household possessing a primary education (MDG 2: Universal Education), and 107 times (p < 0.01) more likely not to have improved sanitation facilities (MDG 7: Environmental Sustainability) when compared to the general population. Diarrhea is one of the leading causes of death in children under five in Indonesia. Young children living in the landfill slum were 2.87 times (p = 0.02) more likely to develop diarrhea than their general population counterparts. Other survey results and environmental measurements suggest that landfill slum children have additional adverse health effects (e.g. infections and poisoning). Poverty underlies several MDG issues that directly or indirectly affect child health. Therefore, eradicating extreme poverty will continue to be the most critical challenge for the MDGs beyond 2015. - Highlights: • Waste-pickers and the health and well-being of their children are examined • Landfill slum (LS) residents do not have a share in improving economies • LSs illustrate the interrelationship of Millennium Development Goals • LS mothers and children are exposed to toxic chemicals and pathogens • MDGs directly and indirectly addresses issues

  10. Optimizing engagement in goal pursuit with youth with physical disabilities attending life skills and transition programs: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Eric; Aulakh, Adeeta; McDougall, Carolyn; Rigby, Patty; King, Gillian

    2017-10-01

    Identify strategies youth perceive will optimize their engagement in goal pursuit in life skills and transition programs using an engagement framework involving affective, cognitive, and behavioral components. A qualitative descriptive design was used. Two semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven youth. The first was informed by a prior observation session, and the second occurred after the program ended and explored youths' perceptions of whether and how their engagement changed. Data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The analysis generated eight strategies youth considered effective. These were categorized under the three components of engagement. Affective strategies: (1) building a relationship on familiarity and reciprocity; and (2) guiding the program using youths' preferences and strengths. Cognitive strategies: (3) assisting youth to envision meaningful change; (4) utilizing youths' learning styles; and (5) promoting awareness of goal progress. Behavioral strategies: (6) ensuring youth access to a resource network; (7) providing youth multiple decision opportunities; and (8) enabling youth to showcase capabilities. Service providers together with youth are encouraged to consider the role of context and self-determination needs in order to optimize youth engagement in goal pursuit. Systematic approaches to studying engagement are necessary to learn how to maximize rehabilitation potential. Implications for Rehabilitation Service providers are encouraged to be aware of the nature of engagement strategies identified by youth. Comprehensive frameworks of engagement are essential to generate knowledge on the range of strategies service providers can use to engage clients in rehabilitation services. Strategies perceived by youth to optimize their engagement in goal pursuit in life skills and transition programs have subtle yet significant differences with strategies used in other rehabilitation settings like mental health and adult healthcare

  11. Biometric identification devices -- Laboratory testing vs. real life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.S.

    1997-05-01

    For over fifteen years Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in laboratory testing of biometric identification devices. The key concept of biometric identification devices is the ability for the system to identify some unique aspect of the individual rather than some object a person may be carrying or some password they are required to know. Tests were conducted to verify manufacturer`s performance claims, to determine strengths/weaknesses of devices, and to determine devices that meet the US Department of energy`s needs. However, during recent field installation, significantly different performance was observed than was predicted by laboratory tests. Although most people using the device believed it operated adequately, the performance observed was over an order of magnitude worse than predicted. The search for reasons behind this gap between the predicted and the actual performance has revealed many possible contributing factors. As engineers, the most valuable lesson to be learned from this experience is the value of scientists and engineers with (1) common sense, (2) knowledge of human behavior, (3) the ability to observe the real world, and (4) the capability to realize the significant differences between controlled experiments and actual installations.

  12. LOGIC SIMULATION OF LIFE SUPPORT SYSTEM COMPONENT IN REAL TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Marchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The article proposed the use of simulation methods for evaluating the effectiveness of a stepped fan engine speed control while maintaining the air flow volume in the set boundaries of the «fan-filter» system. A detailed algorithm of the program made on the basis of an Any Logic software package. Is analyzed the possibility of using the proposed method in the design of ventilation systems.The proposed method allows at the design stage to determine the maximum replacement intervals of the systems filter elements, as well as to predict the time to switch the fan motor speeds. Using of the technique allows to refuse the complex air flow systems and maximize the life of the filter elements set.Methods of logical processes modeling allows to reduce construction costs and improve energy efficiency of buildings. 

  13. Life in a landfill slum, children's health, and the Millennium Development Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Wilson, James L; Watson, Lindsey M; Nikitin, Ivan V; Ansariadi; La Ane, Ruslan; Maidin, Alimin

    2015-12-01

    People living in slums can be considered left behind with regard to national successes in achieving Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The objective of this study was to evaluate the living and working conditions of waste pickers and their children in a landfill slum located in the largest city in eastern Indonesia. A total of 113 people from the landfill slum and 1184 people from the general population participated in face-to-face interviews. Municipal solid waste (MSW) was analyzed for metals, metalloids and fecal indicator bacteria. Ambient air quality including particulate matter was measured in the landfill. Households in the landfill slum were 5.73 (p=0.04) times more likely to be below the international poverty line (MDG 1: Poverty) and 15.6 times (pcauses of death in children under five in Indonesia. Young children living in the landfill slum were 2.87 times (p=0.02) more likely to develop diarrhea than their general population counterparts. Other survey results and environmental measurements suggest that landfill slum children have additional adverse health effects (e.g. infections and poisoning). Poverty underlies several MDG issues that directly or indirectly affect child health. Therefore, eradicating extreme poverty will continue to be the most critical challenge for the MDGs beyond 2015. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Infrastructure and automobile shifts: positioning transit to reduce life-cycle environmental impacts for urban sustainability goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Mikhail; Pincetl, Stephanie; Elizabeth, Zoe; Eisenstein, William; Matute, Juan

    2013-03-01

    Public transportation systems are often part of strategies to reduce urban environmental impacts from passenger transportation, yet comprehensive energy and environmental life-cycle measures, including upfront infrastructure effects and indirect and supply chain processes, are rarely considered. Using the new bus rapid transit and light rail lines in Los Angeles, near-term and long-term life-cycle impact assessments are developed, including consideration of reduced automobile travel. Energy consumption and emissions of greenhouse gases and criteria pollutants are assessed, as well the potential for smog and respiratory impacts. Results show that life-cycle infrastructure, vehicle, and energy production components significantly increase the footprint of each mode (by 48-100% for energy and greenhouse gases, and up to 6200% for environmental impacts), and emerging technologies and renewable electricity standards will significantly reduce impacts. Life-cycle results are identified as either local (in Los Angeles) or remote, and show how the decision to build and operate a transit system in a city produces environmental impacts far outside of geopolitical boundaries. Ensuring shifts of between 20-30% of transit riders from automobiles will result in passenger transportation greenhouse gas reductions for the city, and the larger the shift, the quicker the payback, which should be considered for time-specific environmental goals.

  15. Cervical and facial infections - a real life threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, S.; Fratila, M.

    2014-03-01

    Cervicofacial infections of dental origin are a difficult and complex issue of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Recognizing in due time the situations which are likely to develop a life-threatening condition and medical surgical prompt interventions significantly reduce the rate of the complications. Between January 2009 and March 2013, at the Clinic of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Victor Babes" Timisoara, 17 patients with severe cervicofacial infections were admitted in the emergency department as they needed a complex medical surgical treatment in accordance with protocol established together with the intensive-care department. Assessing the situations, we noticed a difficult, prolonged time of the recovery process which needed a hospitalization period of around 20 days. It recorded two deceased because of cervical necrotizing fasciitis and oral floor phlegmon, the most severe forms of the cervicofacial infections. The severity of the condition of the patients with cervicofacial infections must be figured and as quickly as possible an energetic therapeutic attitude must be adopted. The experience shows a frequent resistance to antibiotics like ampicillin, penicillin and oxacillin. The patients must be guided in due time to a clinic which has an intensive care department, where the surgical treatment must be administrated together with an intensive treatment for supporting the general condition. The reduction of the vital risk of the cervicofacial infections of dental origin will be done through an attentive assessment of the general and local condition (status) of the outpatients, before the dental extraction. The absence of a treatment adapted to the situation and to the clinic development, meaningfully increases the rate of the complications and the length of the hospitalization, the lethal evolution being not excluded.

  16. Self-stigma and the "why try" effect: impact on life goals and evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrigan, Patrick W; Larson, Jonathon E; Rüsch, Nicolas

    2009-06-01

    Many individuals with mental illnesses are troubled by self-stigma and the subsequent processes that accompany this stigma: low self-esteem and self-efficacy. "Why try" is the overarching phenomenon of interest here, encompassing self-stigma, mediating processes, and their effect on goal-related behavior. In this paper, the literature that explains "why try" is reviewed, with special focus on social psychological models. Self-stigma comprises three steps: awareness of the stereotype, agreement with it, and applying it to one's self. As a result of these processes, people suffer reduced self-esteem and self-efficacy. People are dissuaded from pursuing the kind of opportunities that are fundamental to achieving life goals because of diminished self-esteem and self-efficacy. People may also avoid accessing and using evidence-based practices that help achieve these goals. The effects of self-stigma and the "why try" effect can be diminished by services that promote consumer empowerment.

  17. Emotional and Physiological Desensitization to Real-Life and Movie Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Madan, Anjana; Cook, Edwin W.; Wright, Rex A.

    2014-01-01

    Youth are exposed to large amounts of violence in real life and media, which may lead to desensitization. Given evidence of curvilinear associations between exposure to violence and emotional distress, we examined linear and curvilinear associations of exposure to real-life and movie violence with PTSD symptoms, empathy, and physiological arousal, as well emotional and physiological reactivity to movie violence. College students (N=209; mean age=18.74) reported on their exposure to real-life and televised violence, PTSD symptoms, and empathy. Then, students were randomly assigned to view a series of violent or nonviolent high-action movie scenes, providing ratings of emotional distress after each clip. Blood pressure was measured at rest and during video viewing. Results showed that with increasing exposure to real-life violence, youth reported more PTSD symptoms and greater identification with fictional characters. Cognitive and emotional empathy increased from low to medium levels of exposure to violence, but declined at higher levels. For males, exposure to higher levels of real-life violence was associated with diminishing (vs. increasing) emotional distress when viewing violent videos. Exposure to televised violence was generally unrelated to emotional functioning. However, those with medium levels of exposure to TV/movie violence experienced lower elevations of blood pressure when viewing violent videos compared to those with low exposure, and those with higher levels of exposure evidenced rapid increase in blood pressure that quickly declined over time. The results point to diminished empathy and reduced emotional reactivity to violence as key aspects of desensitization to real-life violence, and more limited evidence of physiological desensitization to movie violence among those exposed to high levels of televised violence. PMID:25326900

  18. Emotional and physiological desensitization to real-life and movie violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrug, Sylvie; Madan, Anjana; Cook, Edwin W; Wright, Rex A

    2015-05-01

    Youth are exposed to large amounts of violence in real life and media, which may lead to desensitization. Given evidence of curvilinear associations between exposure to violence and emotional distress, we examined linear and curvilinear associations of exposure to real-life and movie violence with PTSD symptoms, empathy, and physiological arousal, as well emotional and physiological reactivity to movie violence. College students (N = 209; mean age = 18.74) reported on their exposure to real-life and televised violence, PTSD symptoms, and empathy. Then, students were randomly assigned to view a series of violent or nonviolent high-action movie scenes, providing ratings of emotional distress after each clip. Blood pressure was measured at rest and during video viewing. Results showed that with increasing exposure to real-life violence, youth reported more PTSD symptoms and greater identification with fictional characters. Cognitive and emotional empathy increased from low to medium levels of exposure to violence, but declined at higher levels. For males, exposure to higher levels of real-life violence was associated with diminishing (vs. increasing) emotional distress when viewing violent videos. Exposure to televised violence was generally unrelated to emotional functioning. However, those with medium levels of exposure to TV/movie violence experienced lower elevations of blood pressure when viewing violent videos compared to those with low exposure, and those with higher levels of exposure evidenced rapid increase in blood pressure that quickly declined over time. The results point to diminished empathy and reduced emotional reactivity to violence as key aspects of desensitization to real-life violence, and more limited evidence of physiological desensitization to movie violence among those exposed to high levels of televised violence.

  19. Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation in a Real Life Patient Population with Chronic Tonal Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauptmann, Christian; Ströbel, Armin; Williams, Mark; Patel, Nitesh; Wurzer, Hannes; von Stackelberg, Tatjana; Brinkmann, Uwe; Langguth, Berthold; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Primary tinnitus has a severe negative influence on the quality of life of a significant portion of the general population. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation is designed to induce a long-lasting reduction of tinnitus symptoms. To test acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation as a treatment for chronic, tonal tinnitus under real life conditions, an outpatient study “RESET Real Life” was commissioned by ANM GmbH. Herein we present the results of this study. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized, noncontrolled multicenter clinical study with 200 chronic tinnitus patients, tinnitus questionnaire TBF-12 and Global Clinical Improvement-Impression Scale (CGI-I7) are used to study the safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation. 189 patients completed the last 12-month visit, 11 patients dropped out (8 because of nontreatment related reasons; 2 because tinnitus did not change; and 1 because tinnitus got louder). Results. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation caused a statistically and clinically significant decrease in TBF-12 scores as well as in CGI-I7 after 12 months of therapy under real life conditions. There were no persistent adverse events reported that were related to the therapy. Conclusion. The field study “RESET Real Life” provides evidence for safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in a prospective, open-label, real life setting. PMID:26568958

  20. Acoustic Coordinated Reset Neuromodulation in a Real Life Patient Population with Chronic Tonal Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Hauptmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Primary tinnitus has a severe negative influence on the quality of life of a significant portion of the general population. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation is designed to induce a long-lasting reduction of tinnitus symptoms. To test acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation as a treatment for chronic, tonal tinnitus under real life conditions, an outpatient study “RESET Real Life” was commissioned by ANM GmbH. Herein we present the results of this study. Methods. In a prospective, open-label, nonrandomized, noncontrolled multicenter clinical study with 200 chronic tinnitus patients, tinnitus questionnaire TBF-12 and Global Clinical Improvement-Impression Scale (CGI-I7 are used to study the safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation. 189 patients completed the last 12-month visit, 11 patients dropped out (8 because of nontreatment related reasons; 2 because tinnitus did not change; and 1 because tinnitus got louder. Results. Acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation caused a statistically and clinically significant decrease in TBF-12 scores as well as in CGI-I7 after 12 months of therapy under real life conditions. There were no persistent adverse events reported that were related to the therapy. Conclusion. The field study “RESET Real Life” provides evidence for safety and efficacy of acoustic coordinated reset neuromodulation in a prospective, open-label, real life setting.

  1. High correlation between performance on a virtual-reality simulator and real-life cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Smith, Phillip; Subhi, Yousif

    2017-01-01

    antitremor training, forceps training, bimanual training, capsulorhexis and phaco divide and conquer. RESULTS: Eleven surgeons were enrolled. After a designated warm-up period, the proficiency-based test on the EyeSi simulator was strongly correlated to real-life performance measured by motion......-tracking software of cataract surgical videos with a Pearson correlation coefficient of -0.70 (p = 0.017). CONCLUSION: Performance on the EyeSi simulator is significantly and highly correlated to real-life surgical performance. However, it is recommended that performance assessments are made using multiple data...

  2. Assessing the Value of Real-life Brands in Virtual Worlds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mattsson, Jan; Barnes, Stuart; Hartley, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    is that current brand offerings in Virtual Worlds do not offer consumers adequate experiential value. The results demonstrate both the validity of an axiological approach to examining brand value, and highlight significant problems in consumer perceptions of the experiential value of brands within the Virtual......Virtual Worlds are a significant new market environment for brand-building through experiential customer service interactions. Using value theory, this paper aims to assess the experiential brand value of real-life brands that have moved to the Virtual World of Second Life. A key premise...... World. A key finding is the difficulty in creating emotional brand value in Second Life which has serious implications for the sustainability of current real-life brands in Virtual Worlds. The paper rounds off with conclusions and implications for future research and practice in this very new area....

  3. Relationships among adolescents' weight perceptions, exercise goals, exercise motivation, quality of life and leisure-time exercise behaviour: a self-determination theory approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gillison, F B; Standage, M; Skevington, S M

    2006-01-01

    ... behaviour and quality of life (QoL). Results of structural equation modelling revealed that adolescents perceiving themselves to be overweight and pressurized to lose weight, endorsed extrinsic weight-related goals for exercise...

  4. Effectiveness of an online computer-tailored physical activity intervention in a real-life setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Spittaels (Heleen); I. Bourdeaudhuij, de (Ilse); J. Brug (Hans); C. Vandelanotte

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered through the Internet in a real-life setting. Healthy adults (n = 526), recruited in six worksites, between 25 and 55 years of age were randomized to one of three

  5. Opportunities for real-life respiratory research in Korea: The HIRA database and beyond

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Boven, Job F.M.; Rhee, Chin-Kook; Park, Hae-Yun; Yoo, Kwang H.; Kim, Dong-Kyu; Soriano, Joan; Ming, Simon Wan Yau; Price, David; Park, Hae Sim

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, most real-life respiratory research has been conducted using databases from Europe and North America. However, over half of the World population suffering from asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are living outside these areas, limiting generalizability of

  6. Comorbidome, pattern and impact of asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) in real-life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Job F. M.; Roman-Rodriguez, Miguel; Palmer, Josep F.; Toledo-Pons, Nuria; Cosio, Borja G.; Soriano, Joan B.

    BACKGROUND: Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) has been described and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity; however, its characteristics in daily clinical practice are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ACOS in the real-life population, its pattern of

  7. Consumer Responses to the Carbon Labelling of Food: A Real Life Experiment in a Canteen Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaargaren, G.; Koppen, van C.S.A.; Janssen, A.M.; Hendriksen, A.; Kolfschoten, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    The emerging debate on the climate impact of food is expected to result in the carbon labelling of food in the future. As yet, consumer responses to carbon labels are not well researched. A real life experiment was developed to study consumer responses to new carbon labels for food. A ‘light’ and a

  8. Treatment Strategies for Social Inhibition Based on Real-Life Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkowitz, Hal; And Others

    This paper reviews recent evidence on a new treatment procedure for dating anxieties and inhibitions based on real-life practice dating interactions. The procedure involves randomly pairing opposite-sexed partners (both of whom are volunteers for the treatment program) for a series of practice dates, each with a different partner. Data from five…

  9. Metacognition in Real Life Situations and Study Skills and Habits: Two Types of Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hilawani, Yasser A.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between metacognition in real life situations and study skills and habits was examined using a sample of college students. Results showed no significant relationship between these two variables nor was there a significant relationship between study skills and reaction time as measured on the metacognitive test. However, there was…

  10. Moral Emotions and Moral Judgments in Children's Narratives: Comparing Real-Life and Hypothetical Transgressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller-Helfenfinger, Eveline; Gasser, Luciano; Malti, Tina

    2010-01-01

    How children make meaning of their own social experiences in situations involving moral issues is central to their subsequent affective and cognitive moral learning. Our study of young children's narratives describing their interpersonal conflicts shows that the emotions and judgments constructed in the course of these real-life narratives differ…

  11. Students' Conception about the Relation of Mathematics to Real-Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Soltani Salout

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Present paper has studied the conceptions of high school students about mathematical relations to the real life in the three strands; mathematics, experimental science and humanities. Regard to this research, research methodology was survey. Consequently 780 girl high school students are chosen via multi-steps cluster sampling method randomly. Questionnaire forms are applied in four parts as research instrumentation. Data are analyzed thereby descriptive and inferential statistics for further analysis as a result of the process that is demonstrated via one-sample sign test in order to collect and analyze of students' responses regard to self-conception about mathematics in real-life. Accord to the findings and results, it seems that students believed that the generalization of mathematics to the real life is surprisingly insufficiency. These views and responses are indicated that it necessaries to modify the textbooks and curriculums in terms of mathematics development and students' needs in real-life. Also teachers have to spend the special courses for this important.

  12. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. AIM: To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA...

  13. Development of a diagnostic decision tree for obstructive pulmonary diseases based on real-life data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Esther I; In 't Veen, Johannes C C M; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; van Heijst, Ellen; Kocks, Janwillem W H; Muilwijk-Kroes, Jacqueline B; Chavannes, Niels H; van der Molen, Thys

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and explore the diagnostic accuracy of a decision tree derived from a large real-life primary care population. Data from 9297 primary care patients (45% male, mean age 53±17 years) with suspicion of an obstructive pulmonary disease was derived from an

  14. Development of a diagnostic decision tree for obstructive pulmonary diseases based on real-life data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, E.I.; Veen, J.C. In 't; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Heijst, E. van; Kocks, J.W.; Muilwijk-Kroes, J.B.; Chavannes, N.H.; Molen, T. van der

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and explore the diagnostic accuracy of a decision tree derived from a large real-life primary care population. Data from 9297 primary care patients (45% male, mean age 53+/-17 years) with suspicion of an obstructive pulmonary disease was derived from an

  15. The Impossibility of "Real-Life" Word Problems (According to Bakhtin, Lacan, Zizek and Baudrillard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerofsky, Susan

    2010-01-01

    In recent years a great deal of work on mathematical word problems has focused on efforts to bring more of "real life" into the problems themselves and students' uptake of these problems. Following on from earlier studies of the word problem as a pedagogical and literary genre, the author argues that we cannot unproblematically assume an ability…

  16. AVEC 2017 - Real-life depression, and affect recognition workshop and challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringeval, Fabien; Schuller, Bjorn; Valstar, Michel; Gratch, Jonathan; Cowie, Roddy; Scherer, Stefan; Mozgai, Sharon; Cummins, Nicholas; Schmitt, Maximilian; Pantic, Maja

    2017-01-01

    The Audio/Visual Emotion Challenge and Workshop (AVEC 2017) "Real-life depression, and affect" will be the seventh competition event aimed at comparison of multimedia processing and machine learning methods for automatic audiovisual depression and emotion analysis, with all participants competing

  17. Emotional Creativity and Real-Life Involvement in Different Types of Creative Leisure Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trnka, Radek; Zahradnik, Martin; Kuška, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional creativity in practicing creative leisure activities and in the preference of college majors remains unknown. This study aims to explore how emotional creativity measured by the Emotional Creativity Inventory (ECI; Averill, 1999) is interrelated with the real-life involvement in different types of specific creative leisure…

  18. A feasible BCI in real life : Using predicted head rotation to improve HMD imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, A.M.; Waa, J.S. van der; Hogervorst, M.A.; Cacace, A.; Stokking, H.

    2017-01-01

    While brain signals potentially provide us with valuable information about a user, it is not straightforward to derive and use this information to smooth man-machine interaction in a real life setting. We here propose to predict head rotation on the basis of brain signals in order to improve images

  19. Virtual shopping: A viable alternative to direct assessment of real life function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Kathryn E; Morris, Robin; Smith, Vanessa; Jones, Anna-Marie; Pearman, Douglas; Wykes, Til

    2016-04-01

    Real-life function is markedly impaired in schizophrenia and is an important outcome for interventions, but direct assessment is time consuming and resource intensive. Virtual reality (VR) enables assessment using simulation, akin to real life (RL), but allowing greater experimental control, reliability, and a more timely assessment. This study explores whether VR simulation predicts RL performance in supermarket shopping and how both relate to underlying cognitive abilities. Forty three people with DSM-IV schizophrenia were included in the study. Participants were required to shop for items using a self-directed search in both RL and VR. In each task, accuracy (number of correct items) and efficiency (time taken and number of aisles entered) were measured. IQ, executive function, working memory, spatial memory and social cognition were also assessed. Specific correlations were found between RL accuracy and VR accuracy, and between RL and VR efficiency measures. Multiple regression analyses indicated that VR efficiency measures contributed significant unique variance to RL efficiency outcomes, in addition to that explained by background cognitive measures, with a final model predicting 58% of variance in RL efficiency. VR functional shopping measures may enhance predictions of real life performance, over and above existing cognitive test procedures, and provide a more time-efficient method for evaluating real life outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating Real-Life Data Analysis in Teaching Descriptive Statistics: A Constructivist Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libman, Zipora

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at a process of integrating real-life data investigation in a course on descriptive statistics. Referring to constructivist perspectives, this article suggests a look at the potential of inculcating alternative teaching methods that encourage students to take a more active role in their own learning and participate in the…

  1. A Real-Life Based Evaluation Method of Deployable Vulnerable Road User Protection Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fredriksson, R.; Dahlgren, M.; Schijndel-de Nooij, M. van; Hair-Buijssen, S.H.H.M. de; Montfort, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to develop a real-life-based evaluation method, incorporating vulnerable road user (VRU) full-body loading to a vehicle with a deployable protection system in relevant test setups, and use this method to evaluate a prototype pedestrian and cyclist protection

  2. A novel dataset for real-life evaluation of facial expression recognition methodologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqi, Muhammad Hameed; Ali, Maqbool; Idris, Muhammad; Banos Legran, Oresti; Lee, Sungyoung; Choo, Hyunseung

    2016-01-01

    One limitation seen among most of the previous methods is that they were evaluated under settings that are far from real-life scenarios. The reason is that the existing facial expression recognition (FER) datasets are mostly pose-based and assume a predefined setup. The expressions in these datasets

  3. Children with Imaginary Companions Focus on Mental Characteristics When Describing Their Real-life Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paige E.; Meins, Elizabeth; Fernyhough, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Relations between having an imaginary companion (IC) and (i) descriptions of a real-life friend, (ii) theory of mind performance, and (iii) reported prosocial behaviour and behavioural difficulties were investigated in a sample of 5-year-olds (N?=?159). Children who had an IC were more likely than their peers without an IC to describe their best…

  4. Creating Machinima (3D) and Real Life Videos in an ESP Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Alpala, Carol Anne; Ortíz García, William Ricardo

    2018-01-01

    This research paper reports on the development of oral presentation skills in a 3D virtual world called "Moviestorm" machinima, in contrast with real-life videos. In this way, the implementation of both types of videos sought to promote the improvement of oral communication skills, specifically oral presentations in a foreign language,…

  5. Motion Pictures and Real-Life Violence; What the Research Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    There is evidence that violence in motion pictures viewed by children on screen or television can contribute to violence in real life, although the movies can rarely be blamed as the sole cause of anti-social conduct. Clinical reports cite instances of the effect on "susceptible" youngsters; e.g., emotionally disturbed individuals. Long-term…

  6. Connecting Social and Mathematical Thinking: The Use of "Real Life" Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatzki, Carly

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of research into an educational intervention featuring open-ended mathematical problems situated in "real life" contexts and associated pedagogies. "Money and financial mathematics" is the topic in focus, with tasks termed "financial dilemmas" being trialled by 35 teachers in 16…

  7. Applying mathematics in real-life problems: A case study of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the extent to which senior high school students could apply mathematics in real life situations by examining the relationship between their performance on “routine” mathematical calculations and that on a “shortwriting” task related to the application of mathematics.

  8. Contextualizing Performances: Comparing Performances during TOEFL iBT™ and Real-Life Academic Speaking Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Lindsay; Swain, Merrill

    2014-01-01

    In this study we compare test takers' performance on the Speaking section of the TOEFL iBT™and their performances during their real-life academic studies. Thirty international graduate students from mixed language backgrounds in two different disciplines (Sciences and Social Sciences) responded to two independent and four integrated speaking tasks…

  9. Social Media Use And Real-life Social Relationships: (A Study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study recommends that government and policy makers should set up machinery that will encourage and supervise social media network service providers to monitor the adequacy of content generated and shared on their social media networking sites. Key Words: Social Media, Real-Life Social Relationships, Social ...

  10. Real-Life Challenges in Using Augmentative and Alternative Communication by Persons with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jayanti

    2015-01-01

    Given the linguistic and cognitive demands of communication, adult Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) users with acquired communication disorders may have difficulty using AAC systems consistently and effectively in "real-life" situations. The process of recommending AAC systems and strategies is an area of exploration,…

  11. The Real-Life-Referent as a Standard for News Perspective Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbatsis, Gretchen S.

    The concept of news perspective bias necessitates the creation of an empirical standard by which to judge that bias. A study defined and tested a real life referent applicable to planned, sustained news events that have identifiable and accessible participants. The study compared the television news coverage of court ordered busing to achieve…

  12. Wandering minds and wavering goals: Examining the relation between mind wandering and grit in everyday life and the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph, Brandon C W; Wammes, Jeffrey D; Barr, Nathaniel; Smilek, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Here we examined the relation between mind wandering and the personality trait of 'grit.' Our hypothesis was that because mind wandering leads to a disruption of momentary goal completion, the tendency to mind wander might be inversely related to the completion of long-term goals that require sustained interest and effort (i.e., grittiness). In Study 1 we used online questionnaires and found that in everyday life, the propensity to mind wander was negatively correlated with individuals' self-reported grittiness. Interestingly, the relation between mind wandering and grit was strongest for unintentional bouts of mind wandering (as compared with intentional mind wandering). We extended these findings in Study 2 by (a) using a more heterogeneous sample of participants, (b) including a measure of conscientiousness, and (c) including another measure of general perseverance. In addition to replicating our findings from Study 1, in Study 2 we found that the grit measure uniquely predicted spontaneous mind wandering over and above a measure of conscientiousness and an alternative measure of general perseverance. Lastly, in Study 3 we extend the relation between mind wandering and grit to the classroom, finding that mind wandering during university lectures was also related to self-reported grittiness. Taken together, we suggest that the propensity to experience brief lapses of attention is associated with the propensity to stick-with and complete long-term goals. We also provide evidence that when predicting mind wandering and inattention, measures of grit are not redundant with existing measure of conscientiousness and general perseverance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. How goal disturbance, coping and chest pain relate to quality of life: A study among patients waiting for PTCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echteld, M A; van Elderen, T M; van der Kamp, L J

    2001-01-01

    This article describes psychological correlates of quality of life (QOL) in patients on a waiting list for percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Variables were selected based on a theoretical model describing psychological correlates of QOL in PTCA patients. This model was based on self-regulation and stress-coping theories. The variables in the model are stress appraisal, coping, coping resources, and general and disease-specific QOL variables. Respondents were 122 patients on a 3-month waiting list for a PTCA. Results indicated that PTCA patients had a poorer QOL than matched healthy controls. Using a path analysis approach to regression analysis, it appeared that goal disturbance, avoidant coping, approach coping, and chest pain were related to QOL. More specifically, chest pain and goal disturbance were only related to health-related QOL and negative affect. Both approach and avoidant coping were related to QOL variables. Results could be explained adequately using self-regulation theory. Recommendations for future research and for form and content of rehabilitation programmes were made.

  14. Explaining Health and Social Care Students' Experiences of Meaningfulness in Vocational Education: The Importance of Life Goals, Learning Support, Perceived Competence, and Autonomous Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Støen Utvaer, Britt Karin

    2014-01-01

    The experience of meaning in a learning situation is a stated goal of Knowledge Promotion Reform in Norway. This study, guided by self-determination theory, examines how pursuing intrinsic and extrinsic life goals relates to the experience of meaning in vocational education. The study also examines how learning support, perceived competence, and…

  15. The psychological context of quality of life: a psychometric analysis of a novel idiographic measure of bladder cancer patients' personal goals and concerns prior to surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabsigh Ahmad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the past two decades, there has been an increasing focus on quality of life outcomes in urological diseases. Patient-reported outcomes research has relied on structured assessments that constrain interpretation of the impact of disease and treatments. In this study, we present content analysis and psychometric evaluation of the Quality of Life Appraisal Profile. Our evaluation of this measure is a prelude to a prospective comparison of quality of life outcomes of reconstructive procedures after cystectomy. Methods Fifty patients with bladder cancer were interviewed prior to surgery using the Quality of Life Appraisal Profile. Patients also completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and demographics. Analysis included content coding of personal goal statements generated by the Appraisal Profile, examination of the relationship of goal attainment to content, and association of goal-based measures with QLQ-C30 scales. Results Patients reported an average of 10 personal goals, reflecting motivational themes of achievement, problem solving, avoidance of problems, maintaining desired circumstances, letting go of roles and responsibilities, acceptance of undesirable situations, and attaining milestones. 503 goal statements were coded using 40 different content categories. Progress toward goal attainment was positively correlated with relationships and activities goals, but negatively correlated with health concerns. Associations among goal measures provided evidence for construct validity. Goal content also differed according to age, gender, employment, and marital status, lending further support for construct validity. QLQ-C30 functioning and symptom scales were correlated with goal content, but not with progress toward goal attainment, suggesting that patients may calibrate progress ratings relative to their specific goals. Alternately, progress may reflect a unique aspect of quality of life untapped by more standard scales. Conclusions The

  16. The relationship between real life breast screening and an annual self assessment scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Hazel J.; Evans, Andrew; Gale, Alastair G.; Murphy, Alison; Reed, Jacquie

    2009-02-01

    Incidence of cancer in the UK NHS Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) is relatively low (approximately 7% per 1,000 cases screened). As such, feedback from cancers missed or interval cancers can be a relatively lengthy process (whereby a woman will not present for corroborating imaging for a further three years). Therefore in order to monitor their radiological skill, all breast screening radiologists and technologists read a self-assessed, standard set of challenging mammographic images bi-yearly. This scheme, 'PERFORMS' (Personal Performance in Mammographic Screening) has been running since near the inception of the NHSBSP in 1991. Although PERFORMS has functioned as an educational tool for film-readers on the UKBSP for decades, its relation to real life screening in past years has proven to be somewhat equivocal (Cowley & Gale, 1999). The present study investigated the relationship between performance measures in real life and their equivalent on the PERFORMS self assessment scheme namely: Miss Rate (FN), Cases Arbitrated and Returned to Routine screening and Incorrect recall (FP), Specificity (TN) and Cancer Detection (TP). Over 40 individuals from one NHS region in the UK submitted their real life data for comparison with PERFORMS results from the same time frame. Data from this initial study were taken from the year 2005-2006 and compared with the relevant PERFORMS set of cases. Results indicated a significant positive correlation between PERFORMS performance measures and performance measures for real life. These results are discussed in the light of the legitimacy of self-assessment comparative to film-reading skill (during real life clinical practice).

  17. Shelf Life of Food Products: From Open Labeling to Real-Time Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Maria G

    2018-01-12

    The labels currently used on food and beverage products only provide consumers with a rough guide to their expected shelf lives because they assume that a product only experiences a limited range of predefined handling and storage conditions. These static labels do not take into consideration conditions that might shorten a product's shelf life (such as temperature abuse), which can lead to problems associated with food safety and waste. Advances in shelf-life estimation have the potential to improve the safety, reliability, and sustainability of the food supply. Selection of appropriate kinetic models and data-analysis techniques are essential to predict shelf life, to account for variability in environmental conditions, and to allow real-time monitoring. Novel analytical tools to determine safety and quality attributes in situ coupled with modern tracking technologies and appropriate predictive tools have the potential to provide accurate estimations of the remaining shelf life of a food product in real time. This review summarizes the necessary steps to attain a transition from open labeling to real-time shelf-life measurements. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Food Science and Technology Volume 9 is March 25, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  18. Influence of menu labeling on food choices in real-life settings: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ana C; Oliveira, Renata C; Proença, Rossana P C; Curioni, Cintia C; Rodrigues, Vanessa M; Fiates, Giovanna M R

    2016-08-01

    Evidence that menu labeling influences food choices in real-life settings is lacking. Reviews usually focus on calorie counts without addressing broader issues related to healthy eating. This systematic review assessed the influence of diverse menu-labeling formats on food choices in real-life settings. Several databases were searched: Cochrane Library, Scopus, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Food Science and Technology Abstracts, Biological Abstracts, CAB Abstracts, EconLit, SciELO, and LILACS. Articles reporting experiments, quasi-experiments, and observational studies using control or preintervention groups were selected blindly by two reviewers. Data was extracted using a standard form. Analyses differentiated between foodservice types. The quality of the 38 included studies was assessed blindly by two reviewers. The results were mixed, but a partial influence of menu labeling on food choices was more frequent than an overall influence or no influence. Menu labeling was more effective in cafeterias than in restaurants. Qualitative information, such as healthy-food symbols and traffic-light labeling, was most effective in promoting healthy eating. In general, the studies were of moderate quality and did not use control groups. Calorie labeling in menus is not effective to promote healthier food choices. Further research in real-life settings with control groups should test diverse qualitative information in menu labeling. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real life? A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, N.; Ijntema, H.; Meyerbröker, K.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2015-01-01

    In virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET), patients are exposed to virtual environments that resemble feared real-life situations. The aim of the current study was to assess the extent to which VRET gains can be observed in real-life situations. We conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials

  20. Improving Caregivers' Perceptions Regarding Patient Goals of Care/End-of-Life Issues for the Multidisciplinary Critical Care Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessman, Brian T; Sona, Carrie; Schallom, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    With population aging and growth, use of critical care medicine at the end of life continues to rise, while many critical care providers are not adequately trained regarding goals of care/end-of-life (GOC/EOL) issues. A multidisciplinary intensive care unit (ICU) team intervention regarding GOC/EOL communication will enhance the clinical abilities of all critical care providers when discussing GOC/EOL issues and increase ICU staff comfort level while improving transitions for patients to a comfort care approach. This study was a preintervention/postintervention survey evaluation. This study was conducted at an academic tertiary surgical burn trauma ICU. The intervention was provided to nursing, ancillary staff, house staff, and attending physicians. An initial survey was circulated among the critical care staff for baseline expectations, satisfaction, and understanding of GOC/EOL care. A robust intervention was begun including the creation of a multidisciplinary GOC/EOL team, communication tools for providers, patient-family pamphlets, standardized EOL order sets, and formalized didactic sessions. Subsequently, the same survey was circulated and compared to baseline data. Preintervention/postintervention survey data were reviewed and statistically analyzed. Our survey response rate for preintervention/postintervention was 50.4% and 36.1%, respectively. The intervention generated heightened interest in improving family communication and provided focal direction to foster this growth. Based on the serial surveys regarding our intervention, statistically significant staff improvements were seen in "work stress" (P = .04), "EOL information" (P = .006), and "space allotment" (P = .001). Improved congruence of families and health care providers regarding decision over intensity of care was also noted. We created a novel unit-based multidisciplinary program for improved EOL/GOC approaches in the critical care setting. A similarly formatted program could be adapted by

  1. Social anxiety in online and real-life interaction and their associated factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Ju-Yu; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Wang, Peng-Wei; Chang, Yi-Hsin; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Social anxiety was compared between online and real-life interaction in a sample of 2,348 college students. Severity of social anxiety in both real-life and online interaction was tested for associations with depression, Internet addiction, Internet activity type (gaming versus chatting), and scores on Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS)/Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scales. The results showed that social anxiety was lower when interacting online than when interacting offline. Depression, Internet addiction, and high BIS and BAS scores were associated with high social anxiety. The social anxiety decreased more in online interaction among subjects with high social anxiety, depression, BIS, and BAS. This result suggests that the Internet has good potential as an alternative medium for delivering interventions for social anxiety. Further, the effect of BIS on social anxiety is decreased in online interaction. More attention should be paid for BIS when the treatment for social anxiety is delivered online.

  2. In Patients with Cirrhosis, Driving Simulator Performance is Associated With Real-life Driving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Mette Enok Munk; Thacker, Leroy R; White, Melanie B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) has been linked to higher real-life rates of automobile crashes and poor performance in driving simulation studies, but the link between driving simulator performance and real-life automobile crashes has not been clearly established. Further...... months) seen at the Virginia Commonwealth University and McGuire Veterans Administration Medical Center, from November 2008 through April 2014. All participants were given paper-pencil tests to diagnose MHE (98 had MHE, 48%), and 163 patients completed a standardized driving simulation. Data were....... The driving simulator measured crashes, run-time, road center and edge excursions, and illegal turns during navigation; before and after each driving simulation session, patients were asked to rate their overall driving skills. Drivers were classified as safe or unsafe based on crashes and violations reported...

  3. Inhomogeneous Long-Range Percolation for Real-Life Network Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Deprez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of random graphs has become very popular for real-life network modeling, such as social networks or financial networks. Inhomogeneous long-range percolation (or scale-free percolation on the lattice Zd, d ≥ 1, is a particular attractive example of a random graph model because it fulfills several stylized facts of real-life networks. For this model, various geometric properties, such as the percolation behavior, the degree distribution and graph distances, have been analyzed. In the present paper, we complement the picture of graph distances and we prove continuity of the percolation probability in the phase transition point. We also provide an illustration of the model connected to financial networks.

  4. SMART marine goals, targets and management - Is SDG 14 operational or aspirational, is 'Life Below Water' sinking or swimming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Roland; Elliott, Michael

    2017-10-15

    The United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), adopted in September 2015, are accompanied by targets which have to be met individually and collectively by the signatory states. SDG14 Life Below Water aims to lay the foundation for the integrated and sustainable management of the oceans. However, any environmental management has to be based around targets which are SMART - specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time bounded - otherwise it is not possible to determine whether management actions are successful and achieve the desired aims. The discussion here shows that many of the targets adopted for SDG14, and especially a detailed analysis of Target 1, are aspirational rather than fully quantified. In order to move towards making the targets operational, we advocate merging the language of environmental management with that used by industry for linking risks to the environment, management performance and ensuing controls. By adopting an approach which uses Key Performance Indicators ('KPIs'), Key Risk Indicators ('KRIs') and Key Control Indicators ('KCIs'), we advocate that a degree of rigour leading to defendable actions can be brought to marine management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Albanian students’ motives for preferring certain real-life situations for learning mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suela Kacerja

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a qualitative investigation of Albanian students’ motives for preferring certain real-life situations to be used in school mathematics, and possible connections of these motives to characteristics and issues within Albanian society. It is based on realistic interviews with students from Grades 8 and 9 in a school in the district of Shkodra in northern Albania. Interviews were conducted after students experienced five teaching units which dealt with mathematics embedded in real-life situations. Results are expressed in terms of contextmechanism-outcome configurations as proposed by critical realist theory. Most of the resultsare supported by those from a previous quantitative study which found that students prefer real-life situations which deal with computer games, being productive in a job, community development, and recreation, physical exercise and sport. An important mechanism uncovered in this study was the role of the mathematics that the topic introduced; degree of difficulty of the mathematics influenced the choice of preferred contexts by students. Preferences expressed by students are therefore to be considered with care.

  6. Does Playing Sports Video Games Predict Increased Involvement in Real-Life Sports Over Several Years Among Older Adolescents and Emerging Adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Paul J C; Willoughby, Teena

    2016-02-01

    Given the extreme popularity of video games among older adolescents and emerging adults, the investigation of positive outcomes of video game play during these developmental periods is crucial. An important direction for research in this area is the investigation of a link between sports video game play and involvement in real-life sports among youth. Yet, this association has not been examined in the long-term among older adolescents and emerging adults, and thus represents an exciting new area for discovery. The primary goal of the current study, therefore, was to examine the long-term association between sports video game play and involvement in real-life sports clubs among older adolescents and emerging adults. In addition, we examined whether self-esteem was an underlying mechanism of this longitudinal association. We surveyed older adolescents and emerging adults (N = 1132; 70.6 % female; M age = 19.06 years, range of 17-25 years at the first assessment) annually over 3 years about their video game play, self-esteem, and involvement in real-life sports. We found a long-term predictive effect of sports video game play on increased involvement in real-life sports over the 3 years. Furthermore, we demonstrated that self-esteem was an underlying mechanism of this long-term association. Our findings make an important contribution to an emerging body of literature on the positive outcomes of video game play, as they suggest that sports video game play may be an effective tool to promote real-life sports participation and physical activity among older adolescents and emerging adults.

  7. On-Board Real-Time Optimization Control for Turbo-Fan Engine Life Extending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiangang; Zhang, Haibo; Miao, Lizhen; Sun, Fengyong

    2017-11-01

    A real-time optimization control method is proposed to extend turbo-fan engine service life. This real-time optimization control is based on an on-board engine mode, which is devised by a MRR-LSSVR (multi-input multi-output recursive reduced least squares support vector regression method). To solve the optimization problem, a FSQP (feasible sequential quadratic programming) algorithm is utilized. The thermal mechanical fatigue is taken into account during the optimization process. Furthermore, to describe the engine life decaying, a thermal mechanical fatigue model of engine acceleration process is established. The optimization objective function not only contains the sub-item which can get fast response of the engine, but also concludes the sub-item of the total mechanical strain range which has positive relationship to engine fatigue life. Finally, the simulations of the conventional optimization control which just consider engine acceleration performance or the proposed optimization method have been conducted. The simulations demonstrate that the time of the two control methods from idle to 99.5 % of the maximum power are equal. However, the engine life using the proposed optimization method could be surprisingly increased by 36.17 % compared with that using conventional optimization control.

  8. Problem-based learning spanning real and virtual words: a case study in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Good

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing use of immersive virtual environments for educational purposes. However, much of this activity is not yet documented in the public domain, or is descriptive rather than analytical. This paper presents a case study in which university students were tasked with building an interactive learning experience using Second Life as a platform. Both problem-based learning and constructionism acted as framing pedagogies for the task, with students working in teams to design and build a learning experience which could potentially meet the needs of a real client in innovative ways which might not be possible in real life. A process account of the experience is provided, which examines how the pedagogies and contexts (real and virtual influence and enhance each other. The use of a virtual environment, combined with problem-based learning and constructionism, subtly changed the nature of the instructor–student relationship, allowed students to explore ‘problematic problems' in a motivating and relevant manner, provided students with greater ownership over their work, and allowed problems to be set which were flexible, but at the same time allowed for ease of assessment.

  9. Tower of London versus real life analogue planning in schizophrenia with disorganization and psychomotor poverty symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Kathryn E; Wykes, Til; Sigmundsson, Thordur; Landau, Sabine; Morris, Robin G

    2011-05-01

    Neuropsychological models propose qualitatively distinct planning impairments in the psychomotor poverty and disorganization syndromes in schizophrenia. It was proposed that poor plan initiation in psychomotor poverty would lead to longer initial planning times, while poor plan execution in disorganization would lead to greater inefficiency. Participants with psychomotor poverty (n = 30) and disorganization (n = 29) symptoms were contrasted with healthy controls (n = 28) to elucidate distinct planning impairments. Planning was compared in the Tower of London task versus real life analogue performance in the form of a board-game style diary planning task. The specificity of planning impairments was investigated by controlling for current IQ. The disorganization group demonstrated inefficient planning across both tasks, with poor performance on the Tower of London but not on the real life analogue task remaining after intelligence levels were taken into account. Initial planning times did not differ between groups. Previous associations between poor planning and symptoms may have been driven by poor planning with disorganization symptoms and associated lower order impairments in executive function or the semantic system. Targeting these impairments in people with disorganization symptoms may lead to a greater chance of success in promoting generalization to the real world.

  10. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Maged N Kamel; Burden, David

    2007-11-27

    This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds) in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world), and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy.

  11. Web GIS in practice V: 3-D interactive and real-time mapping in Second Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burden David

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes technologies from Daden Limited for geographically mapping and accessing live news stories/feeds, as well as other real-time, real-world data feeds (e.g., Google Earth KML feeds and GeoRSS feeds in the 3-D virtual world of Second Life, by plotting and updating the corresponding Earth location points on a globe or some other suitable form (in-world, and further linking those points to relevant information and resources. This approach enables users to visualise, interact with, and even walk or fly through, the plotted data in 3-D. Users can also do the reverse: put pins on a map in the virtual world, and then view the data points on the Web in Google Maps or Google Earth. The technologies presented thus serve as a bridge between mirror worlds like Google Earth and virtual worlds like Second Life. We explore the geo-data display potential of virtual worlds and their likely convergence with mirror worlds in the context of the future 3-D Internet or Metaverse, and reflect on the potential of such technologies and their future possibilities, e.g. their use to develop emergency/public health virtual situation rooms to effectively manage emergencies and disasters in real time. The paper also covers some of the issues associated with these technologies, namely user interface accessibility and individual privacy.

  12. Transferability of clinical skills acquired on simulator to real life clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arigbede, A O; Denloye, Obafunke O; Dosumu, Oyekunle O

    2014-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the relationship between performances of students in clinical skills laboratory and real life clinical practice and to determine the experiences and views of instructors as it relates to teaching in skills laboratory. The performances of two randomly selected sets of graduates in the operative examinations conducted in skills laboratory were compared with the performances of the same sets of graduates in the operative examinations conducted on life patients two years later using Spearman's rank test. Experiences and views of two teachers from each of the six dental schools in southern Nigeria as it relates to teaching in clinical skills laboratory were obtained using a structured questionnaire. There was an insignificant correlation between the outcomes at both examinations (p value was 0.18). Most of the respondents (62.5%) agreed that teaching in skills laboratory was tiresome and most (75.0%) strongly agreed that the number of students constitutes a serious challenge to learning. Most of the respondents regarded their role in skills laboratory as that of an expert as against that of a facilitator. There was a weak correlation between performances in skills laboratory and real life environment. Students' number appears to make teaching in skills laboratory unpleasant and teachers had a wrong perception of their role.

  13. Importance of leadership in cardiac arrest situations: from simulation to real life and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Sabnina; Tschan, Franziska; Semmer, Norbert K; Marsch, Stephan

    2013-04-18

    The 2010 American Heart Association guidelines now recommend leadership training in Advanced Cardiac Life Support courses. In this review we provide a comprehensive summary of data derived from clinical studies that investigated the importance of leadership in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Only a few, mostly observational, studies have been conducted under real-life conditions because of the high heterogeneity of the situations, difficulties in capturing the initial phase of CPR, and ethical issues. Well-controlled studies in the human simulator can fill existing gaps and provide important insights. High-fidelity video-assisted simulator studies from different research groups have shown that a prolonged process of teambuilding is associated with significant shortcomings in CPR, whereas effective leadership improves team performance. In addition, randomised controlled studies have provided evidence that medical students receiving leadership training subsequently showed improved CPR performance, which was sustained after a follow up of 4 months. In addition, leadership is influenced by gender and other factors such as emotional stress. Future studies are needed to investigate cultural differences and how findings from the simulator can be transferred to real-life situations.

  14. Mood effects on memory and executive control in a real-life situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagner, Prune; Kliegel, Matthias; Phillips, Louise H; Ihle, Andreas; Hering, Alexandra; Ballhausen, Nicola; Schnitzspahn, Katharina M

    2015-01-01

    In the laboratory, studies have shown an inconsistent pattern of whether, and how, mood may affect cognitive functions indicating both mood-related enhancement as well as decline. Surprisingly, little is known about whether there are similar effects in everyday life. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate possible mood effects on memory and executive control in a real-life situation. Mood effects were examined in the context of winning in a sports competition. Sixty-one male handball players were tested with an extensive cognitive test battery (comprising memory and executive control) both after winning a match and after training as neutral baseline. Mood differed significantly between the two testing situations, while physiological arousal and motivation were comparable. Results showed lowered performance after the win compared with training in selected cognitive measures. Specifically, short-term and episodic memory performance was poorer following a win, whereas executive control performance was unaffected by condition. Differences in memory disappeared when emotional states after the match were entered as covariates into the initial analyses. Thus, findings suggest mood-related impairments in memory, but not in executive control processes after a positive real-life event.

  15. 3D Interactions between Virtual Worlds and Real Life in an E-Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Lucke

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual worlds became an appealing and fascinating component of today's internet. In particular, the number of educational providers that see a potential for E-Learning in such new platforms increases. Unfortunately, most of the environments and processes implemented up to now do not exceed a virtual modelling of real-world scenarios. In particular, this paper shows that Second Life can be more than just another learning platform. A flexible and bidirectional link between the reality and the virtual world enables synchronous and seamless interaction between users and devices across both worlds. The primary advantages of this interconnection are a spatial extension of face-to-face and online learning scenarios and a closer relationship between virtual learners and the real world.

  16. REAL-LIFE ACTIVITIES: BOOSTING MY STUDENTS’ AWARENESS OF HONESTY IN CREATING GENRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rr. Dewi Wahyu Mustikasari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available My students was strugled to write genre without copypasting sentences or texts from the internet. On the other hand, it was a huge challange for me to teach five big writing classes. Each class consisted of 25-30 students who tended (mostly collecting unoriginal writing works. This paper discusses the real-life activities that can be used to enhance my students’ aweareness of honesty in creating genre. My students must write some genres namely recount, descriptive (optional, spoof (optional, procedure, hortatory (optional and analytical exposition (optional text. I also took some benefits of ICT to equip the learning process. Browsing and experiencing the menu of premierskills.britishcouncil.org were the real-life activities that explore their personal memories to be told as the recount text. Then they defined the feature of one of the menu of the previous website to be informed as the descriptive text. Furthermore, they wrote their personal funny experiences which were related to the Indonesian culture as the spoof text. The procedure text can be produced by exploring the daily activities in the pictures such as how to make a cup of tea/coffee, cook a sunny side-up egg, insert sim card into mobile phone, etc. Next, my students visited the tourism and public places in Salatiga, and they observed the strength and weekness of those places as the production of hortatory or analytical exposition text. The real-life activities were able to foster my students’ awareness of honesty. It was fantastic that my students were able to create the genre honestly.

  17. The psychosocial transition associated with spontaneous 46,XX primary ovarian insufficiency: illness uncertainty, stigma, goal flexibility, and purpose in life as factors in emotional health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Mary; Ventura, June L; Wieners, Mary; Covington, Sharon N; Vanderhoof, Vien H; Ryan, Mary E; Koziol, Deloris E; Popat, Vaishali B; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2010-05-01

    To examine factors associated with emotional well-being in women with spontaneous primary ovarian insufficiency. Cross-sectional and case-control study. Clinical research center, national U.S. health research facility. Women diagnosed with spontaneous 46,XX primary ovarian insufficiency (n = 100) at a mean age of 32.4 years and healthy control women of similar age (n = 60). Administration of validated self-reporting instruments. Illness uncertainty, stigma, goal disengagement/re-engagement, purpose in life, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Compared with controls, women with spontaneous primary ovarian insufficiency scored adversely on all measures of affect. Illness uncertainty and purpose in life were significant independent factors associated with anxiety (R(2) = 0.47), stigma and purpose in life were the significant independent factors associated with depression (R(2) = 0.51), and goal re-engagement and purpose in life were significantly and independently associated with positive affect (R(2) = 0.43). This evidence supports the need for prospective studies. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that clinicians could improve the emotional well-being of their patients with primary ovarian insufficiency by [1] informing them better about their condition, [2] helping them to feel less stigmatized by the disorder, and [3] assisting them in developing alternative goals with regard to family planning as well as other goals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. A Path Analysis of Basic Need Support, Self-Efficacy, Achievement Goals, Life Satisfaction and Academic Achievement Level among Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Age; Danielsen, Anne G.; Samdal, Oddrun

    2012-01-01

    Teachers' support of basic psychological needs, self-efficacy, achievement goals, life satisfaction and academic achievement level was measured in a sample of 240 secondary school students (8th and 10th grades). Correlation analysis showed significant positive relations between all of the variables, except for the relation between need support of…

  19. The effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, R C; Ghandour, M

    1984-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children. The sample consisted of 48 boys and 48 girls of Lebanese origin who were students in an elementary school in Beirut, Lebanon. After controlling for pre-experimental aggression, the subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions: human-film aggression, cartoon-film aggression, neutral film, or real-life (act of war) aggression. The results indicated that boys as a group were more aggressive than girls and exhibited more imitative aggression after viewing both violent film and real-life violence. Girls were not more violent after viewing filmed aggression but were affected by the real-life violence. Comparisons of Bandura's work within the Lebanese culture are made.

  20. Dried blood spots, valid screening for viral hepatitis and human immunodeficiency virus in real-life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mössner, Belinda K; Staugaard, Benjamin; Jensen, Janne

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To detect chronic hepatitis B (CHB), chronic hepatitis C (CHC) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in dried blood spot (DBS) and compare these samples to venous blood sampling in real-life. METHODS: We included prospective patients with known viral infections from drug treatment......, but correctly classified 95% of the anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic and past infections. Anti-HBc and anti-HBS showed low sensitivity in DBS (68% and 42%). CONCLUSION: DBS sampling, combined with an automated analysis system, is a feasible screening method to diagnose chronic viral hepatitis and HIV...

  1. An adaptation framework for turning Real-Life Events into Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærhus Therkildsen, Sacha; Cassøe Bunkenborg, Nanna; Larsen, Lasse Juel

    Many games are intended to change the players’ minds or actions. The presented design framework for persuasive board games is derived from the Syrian refugee crisis, which is used as backdrop to communicate the experience of being a refugee traveling through Europe. We applied an agile development...... method and participatory design to achieve our ambition. In conclusion we found that a framework for persuasive board games can be advanced by balancing five interrelated layers: 1) real life events (game fiction), 2) rules (formal game elements), 3) movement system (game mechanisms), 4) destiny...... (randomness), and 5) meaning (player choice) which prioritise game over story....

  2. Overvoltage protection of large power transformers:a real life study case

    OpenAIRE

    Bak, Claus Leth; Wiechowski, Wojciech Tomasz; Einarsdottir, Kristin; Andresson, Einar; Rasmussen, Jesper M.; Lykkegaard, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the results from a detailed study of the overvoltage protection of a particular 400/150 kV 400 MVA power transformer. The work presented here is based on real-life power system substation design and data and initiated by Danish TSO Energinet.dk as a consequence of a serious transformer overvoltage damage. A simulation model for the entire system consisting of overhead line, transformer, surge arrester and earth grid has been created in PSCAD/EMTDC. Main focus has been ...

  3. Projectile motion in real-life situation: Kinematics of basketball shooting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changjan, A.; Mueanploy, W.

    2015-06-01

    Basketball shooting is a basic practice for players. The path of the ball from the players to the hoop is projectile motion. For undergraduate introductory physics courses student must be taught about projectile motion. Basketball shooting can be used as a case study for learning projectile motion from real-life situation. In this research, we discuss the relationship between optimal angle, minimum initial velocity and the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball for basketball shooting problem analytically. We found that the value of optimal angle and minimum initial velocity decreases with increasing the height of the ball before the player shoots the ball.

  4. 3D Projection on Physical Objects: Design Insights from Five Real Life Cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Halskov, Kim

    2011-01-01

    3D projection on physical objects is a particular kind of Augmented Reality that augments a physical object by projecting digital content directly onto it, rather than by using a mediating device, such as a mobile phone or a head- mounted display. In this paper, we present five cases in which we...... have developed installations that employ 3D projection on physical objects. The installations have been developed in collaboration with external partners and have been put into use in real-life settings such as museums, exhibitions and interaction design laboratories. On the basis of these cases, we...

  5. Efficient and Flexible KNN Query Processing in Real-Life Road Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yang; Bui, Bin; Zhao, Jiakui

    2008-01-01

    Along with the developments of mobile services, effectively modeling road networks and efficiently indexing and querying network constrained objects has become a challenging problem. In this paper, we first introduce a road network model which captures real-life road networks better than previous...... models. Then, based on the proposed model, we propose a novel index named the RNG (Road Network Grid) index for accelerating KNN queries and continuous KNN queries over road network constrained data points. In contrast to conventional methods, speed limitations and blocking information of roads...... experimental study shows that our methods are efficient in terms of both CPU time and disk I/Os....

  6. Meaningful coping with chronic pain: Exploring the interplay between goal violation, meaningful coping strategies and life satisfaction in chronic pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezutter, Jessie; Dewitte, Laura; Thauvoye, Evalyne; Vanhooren, Siebrecht

    2017-02-01

    Trying to cope with chronic pain is a highly demanding and challenging task and pain patients often need to reformulate goals or aspirations due to their pain condition. This goal violation is often related with experienced distress and requires coping processes in order to decrease the distress and stimulate a healthy adaptation. Some scholars, however, argued that in so-called unsolvable or irreparable stressors such as chronic pain, conventional coping strategies like problem-focused coping might not be the most adaptive option. In these situations, meaningful coping strategies attempting to transform the meaning of the stressful experience would be more accurate. In this study, we aim to test if goal violation triggers meaningful coping strategies over time and whether engagement in these meaningful coping strategies result in improved life satisfaction, as an indicator of adaptation. A longitudinal three wave study in a sample of paint patients (n = 125) tests whether goal violation triggers positive reappraisal and downward comparison, two possible meaningful coping strategies. The study furthermore tests if engagement in these strategies results in a better adaptation to the pain condition, reflected in higher life satisfaction. Results partially supported our hypotheses by pointing to the benevolent role of downward comparison on life satisfaction via decreased goal violation of pain patients. Our findings however did also show that positive reappraisal predicted lower life satisfaction via increased levels of appraised goal violation which questions the role of positive reappraisal as a genuine meaningful coping strategy. Implications and limitations are discussed. © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. DCA-Based Real-Time Residual Useful Life Prediction for Critical Faulty Component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funa Zhou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Residual useful life (RUL prediction is significant for condition-based maintenance. Traditional data-driven RUL prediction method can only predict fault trend of the system rather than RUL of a specific system component. Thus it cannot tell the operator which component should be maintained. The innovation of this paper is as follows: (1 Wavelet filtering based method is developed for early detection of slowly varying fault. (2 Designated component analysis is introduced as a feature extraction tool to define the fault precursor of a specific component. (3 Exponential life prediction model is established by nonlinear fitting of the historical RUL and the fault size characterized by the statistics used. Once online detection statistics is obtained, real-time RUL of the critical component can be predicted online. Simulation shows the effectiveness of this algorithm.

  8. A retrospective analysis of real-world use of the eaTracker® My Goals website by adults from Ontario and Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieffers, Jessica R L; Haresign, Helen; Mehling, Christine; Hanning, Rhona M

    2016-09-15

    Little is known about use of goal setting and tracking tools within online programs to support nutrition and physical activity behaviour change. In 2011, Dietitians of Canada added "My Goals," a nutrition and physical activity behaviour goal setting and tracking tool to their free publicly available self-monitoring website (eaTracker® ( http://www.eaTracker.ca/ )). My Goals allows users to: a) set "ready-made" SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-related) goals (choice of n = 87 goals from n = 13 categories) or "write your own" goals, and b) track progress using the "My Goals Tracker." The purpose of this study was to characterize: a) My Goals user demographics, b) types of goals set, and c) My Goals Tracker use. Anonymous data on all goals set using the My Goals feature from December 6/2012-April 28/2014 by users ≥19y from Ontario and Alberta, Canada were obtained. This dataset contained: anonymous self-reported user demographic data, user set goals, and My Goals Tracker use data. Write your own goals were categorized by topic and specificity. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Multivariate binary logistic regression was used to determine associations between user demographics and a) goal topic areas and b) My Goals Tracker use. Overall, n = 16,511 goal statements (75.4 % ready-made; 24.6 % write your own) set by n = 8,067 adult users 19-85y (83.3 % female; mean age 41.1 ± 15.0y, mean BMI 28.8 ± 7.6kg/m(2)) were included for analysis. Overall, 33.1 % of ready-made goals were from the "Managing your Weight" category. Of write your own goal entries, 42.3 % were solely distal goals (most related to weight management); 38.6 % addressed nutrition behaviour change (16.6 % had unspecific general eating goals); 18.1 % addressed physical activity behaviour change (47.3 % had goals without information on exercise amount and type). Many write your own goals were poor quality (e.g., non-specific (e.g., missing

  9. Shifting paradigm of maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh: A real time approach to address sustainable developmental goal 3 by 2030.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in reducing maternal and neonatal morality, even though the millennium developmental goal to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality was not achieved. Sustainable Developmental Goal (SDG) 3 has already been set for a new target to reduce maternal and neonatal deaths by 2030. The country takes this timely initiative to introduce a maternal and perinatal death review system. This review will discuss the shifting paradigm of the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh and its challenges in reaching the SDG on time. This review uses existing literature on the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh, and other systems in similar settings, as well as reports, case studies, news, government letters and meeting minutes. Bangladesh introduced the maternal and perinatal death review system in 2010. Prior to this there was no such comprehensive death review system practiced in Bangladesh. The system was established within the government health system and has brought about positive effects and outcomes. Therefore, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh gradually scaled up the maternal and perinatal death review system nationwide in 2016 within the government health system. The present death review system highlighted real-time data use, using the district health information software(DHIS-2). Health mangers are able to take remedial action plans and implement strategies based on findings in DHIS-2. Therefore, effective utilization of data can play a pivotal role in the reduction of maternal and perinatal deaths in Bangladesh. Overall, the maternal and perinatal death review system provides a great opportunity to achieve the SDG 3 on time. However, the system needs continuous monitoring at different levels to ensure its quality and validity of information, as well as effective utilization of findings for planning and implementation under a measureable accountability framework.

  10. Shifting paradigm of maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh: A real time approach to address sustainable developmental goal 3 by 2030 [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Biswas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Bangladesh has made remarkable progress in reducing maternal and neonatal morality, even though the millennium developmental goal to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality was not achieved. Sustainable Developmental Goal (SDG 3 has already been set for a new target to reduce maternal and neonatal deaths by 2030. The country takes this timely initiative to introduce a maternal and perinatal death review system. This review will discuss the shifting paradigm of the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh and its challenges in reaching the SDG on time. This review uses existing literature on the maternal and perinatal death review system in Bangladesh, and other systems in similar settings, as well as reports, case studies, news, government letters and meeting minutes. Bangladesh introduced the maternal and perinatal death review system in 2010. Prior to this there was no such comprehensive death review system practiced in Bangladesh. The system was established within the government health system and has brought about positive effects and outcomes. Therefore, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare of Bangladesh gradually scaled up the maternal and perinatal death review system nationwide in 2016 within the government health system. The present death review system highlighted real-time data use, using the district health information software(DHIS-2. Health mangers are able to take remedial action plans and implement strategies based on findings in DHIS-2. Therefore, effective utilization of data can play a pivotal role in the reduction of maternal and perinatal deaths in Bangladesh. Overall, the maternal and perinatal death review system provides a great opportunity to achieve the SDG 3 on time. However, the system needs continuous monitoring at different levels to ensure its quality and validity of information, as well as effective utilization of findings for planning and implementation under a measureable

  11. Critical Care Nurses Inadequately Assess SAPS II Scores of Very Ill Patients in Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Perren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Reliable ICU severity scores have been achieved by various healthcare workers but nothing is known regarding the accuracy in real life of severity scores registered by untrained nurses. Methods. In this retrospective multicentre audit, three reviewers independently reassessed 120 SAPS II scores. Correlation and agreement of the sum-scores/variables among reviewers and between nurses and the reviewers’ gold standard were assessed globally and for tertiles. Bland and Altman (gold standard—nurses of sum scores and regression of the difference were determined. A logistic regression model identifying risk factors for erroneous assessments was calculated. Results. Correlation for sum scores among reviewers was almost perfect (mean ICC = 0.985. The mean (±SD nurse-registered SAPS II sum score was 40.3±20.2 versus 44.2±24.9 of the gold standard (32 points scores. The lowest agreement was found in high SAPS II tertiles for haemodynamics (k = 0.45–0.51. Conclusions. In real life, nurse-registered SAPS II scores of very ill patients are inaccurate. Accuracy of scores was not associated with nurses’ characteristics.

  12. Images of eyes enhance investments in a real-life public good.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Francey

    Full Text Available A key issue in cooperation research is to determine the conditions under which individuals invest in a public good. Here, we tested whether cues of being watched increase investments in an anonymous public good situation in real life. We examined whether individuals would invest more by removing experimentally placed garbage (paper and plastic bottles from bus stop benches in Geneva in the presence of images of eyes compared to controls (images of flowers. We provided separate bins for each of both types of garbage to investigate whether individuals would deposit more items into the appropriate bin in the presence of eyes. The treatment had no effect on the likelihood that individuals present at the bus stop would remove garbage. However, those individuals that engaged in garbage clearing, and were thus likely affected by the treatment, invested more time to do so in the presence of eyes. Images of eyes had a direct effect on behaviour, rather than merely enhancing attention towards a symbolic sign requesting removal of garbage. These findings show that simple images of eyes can trigger reputational effects that significantly enhance on non-monetary investments in anonymous public goods under real life conditions. We discuss our results in the light of previous findings and suggest that human social behaviour may often be shaped by relatively simple and potentially unconscious mechanisms instead of very complex cognitive capacities.

  13. Beyond Awareness and Self-Governance: Approaching Kavango Timber Users’ Real-Life Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pröpper

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Targeted illegal harvesting of hardwood in the woodland of Namibia’s Kavango region threatens forest stands. In a transforming setting, where wood is increasingly traded through value chains on a globalized market, local harvesters have complex incentives but also a crucially important position. Sustainability largely depends on their choices. Such choices are being influenced by awareness campaigns and decentralized forest management, which are being lauded and supported. Having produced an ethnographic awareness film (AF on the problem of logging and the opportunities for community forests (CF to reduce extractions while raising community income, we approach the influence of the instruments of film and community forests on forest-users’ real life choices with an economic public goods game. We compare villages that have experienced influences to a differing degree. We find more extraction in AF and no effect for CF at village level. Instead, the extractive impact of certain experimental and free riding personality types, whose strategies remain stable across the experiment, is equally distributed among villages. We discuss methodological implications and the fact that in a situation of ecological and socio-economic challenges certain players use game and real life opportunities to decouple individual choice from problem awareness and the social control-setting.

  14. Assessing diagnostic accuracy of Haemoglobin Colour Scale in real-life setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pankaj P; Desai, Shrey A; Modi, Dhiren K; Shah, Shobha P

    2014-03-01

    The study was undertaken to determine diagnostic accuracy of Haemoglobin Colour Scale (HCS) in hands of village-based community health workers (CHWs) in real-life community setting in India. Participants (501 women) were randomly selected from 8 villages belonging to a project area of SEWA-Rural, a voluntary organization located in India. After receiving a brief training, CHWs and a research assistant obtained haemoglobin readings using HCS and HemoCue (reference) respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive-values, and likelihood ratios were calculated. Bland-Altman plot was constructed. Mean haemoglobin value, using HCS and HemoCue were 11.02 g/dL (CI 10.9-11.2) and 11.07 g/dL (CI 10.9-11.2) respectively. Mean difference between haemoglobin readings was 0.95 g/dL. Sensitivity of HCS was 0.74 (CI 0.65-0.81) and 0.84 (CI 0.8-0.87) whereas specificity was 0.84 (CI:0.51-0.98) and 0.99 (CI:0.97-0.99) using haemoglobin cutoff limits of 10 g/dL and 7 g/dL respectively. CHWs can accurately diagnose severe and moderately-severe anaemia by using HCS in real-life field condition after a brief training.

  15. Which joints and why do rheumatologists scan in rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasonography? A real life experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Sibel Zehra; Pay, Salih; Inanc, Nevsun; Kamali, Sevil; Karadag, Omer; Emery, Paul; D'Agostino, Maria-Antonietta

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) has been demonstrated to improve assessment of synovitis and disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the utility and feasibility of US in RA in clinical practice in real life is not known. We aimed to investigate: i) the indications for performing US in RA in daily practice; and ii) whether the number of scanned joints varies according to the purpose. Consecutive patients who had a US scan either for diagnosis or follow-up for RA from 5 centres were recruited. The sonographers were asked to mark the joints that had a US scan and grade their findings. Descriptive analysis was applied to find out the sites and the number of joints scanned and compared according to the indications of US. Two hundred consecutive patients were recruited. The most common indication was assessing disease activity (48.5%) followed by diagnosis (45.5 %). Wrists (66%) and MCPs (63.5) were the most frequently scanned joints followed by knees (26%), PIPs (20%). The number of joints scanned by US was significantly higher when performed for diagnostic purposes as compared to assessing disease activity and guidance for injections (p=0.001). The current data highlight differences between the numbers of joints for which that the clinician feels necessary to perform US in real life. This observation may be a guide when providing recommendations regarding which joints need to be scanned according to the indication.

  16. Desiderio e scrittura in "The Real Life of Sebastian Knight" di Vladimir Nabokov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Invernizzi

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines, from a psychoanalytic standpoint, the intersection between identity and writing in the novel The Real Life of Sebastian Knight (1941 by Vladimir Nabokov. In particular, in the wake of Freud and Lacan, the following contribution will take the notions of desire, signifier, and the process of sublimation involved in artistic creation as interpretative devices. The main focus of the analysis will be the relationship between the two half-brothers of the novel, V (the narrator and Sebastian. First, I will show that Sebastian Knight holds the role of the object of desire for the characters who have established a close relationship with him and, in particular, for V. Secondly, the paper will be devoted to the analysis of the trauma experienced by the characters because of Sebastian's death, with a particular focus on the narrator's mourning through writing (the fictional biography we read in the novel; in the end, I will give evidence of the so-called signifier’s fallacy, crucial episodes in which the narrator can experience an insight into the truth of desire. Because of the not negligible question of the fictional paternity of The Real Life and the equally essential matter of V’s ‘stylistic touch’, metaliterary aspects of the novel will also be part of the following reading of the text.

  17. Real-time sample entropy predicts life-saving interventions after the Boston Marathon bombing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, Miroslav P; Naraghi, Leily; Chang, Yuchiao; Demoya, Marc; Fagenholz, Peter; Yeh, Daniel; Velmahos, George; King, David R

    2013-12-01

    Identifying patients in need of a life-saving intervention (LSI) during a mass casualty event is a priority. We hypothesized that real-time, instantaneous sample entropy (SampEn) could predict the need for LSI in the Boston Marathon bombing victims. Severely injured Boston Marathon bombing victims (n = 10) had sample entropy (SampEn) recorded upon presentation using a continuous 200-beat rolling average in real time. Treating clinicians were blinded to real-time results. The correlation between SampEn, injury severity, number, and type of LSI was examined. Victims were males (60%) with a mean age of 39.1 years. Injuries involved lower extremities (50.0%), head and neck (24.2%), or upper extremities (9.7%). Sample entropy negatively correlated with Injury Severity Score (r = -0.70; P = .023), number of injuries (r = -0.70; P = .026), and the number and need for LSI (r = -0.82; P = .004). Sample entropy was reduced under a variety of conditions. (Table see text). Sample entropy strongly correlates with injury severity and predicts LSI after blast injuries sustained in the Boston Marathon bombings. Sample entropy may be a useful triage tool after blast injury. © 2013.

  18. Life-Satisfaction, Values and Goal Achievement: The Case of Planned versus by Chance Searches on the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ferran; Gonzalez, Monica; Figuer, Cristina; Coenders, Germa

    2004-01-01

    The relation between life domains satisfaction and overall life satisfaction, values, internal/external perceived control and the option of planning or by chance searching information on the Internet has been explored in a sample of Spanish adolescents aged 12 to 16 (N=968). Age and sex differences have been examined. Results clearly confirm a…

  19. EDITORIAL Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences Wireless sensor networks: design for real-life deployment and deployment experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaura, Elena; Roedig, Utz; Brusey, James

    2010-12-01

    modalities and (iv) system solutions with high end-user added value and cost benefits. The common thread is deployment and deployment evaluation. In particular, satisfaction of application requirements, involvement of the end-user in the design and deployment process, satisfactory system performance and user acceptance are concerns addressed in many of the contributions. The contributions form a valuable set, which help to identify the priorities for research in this burgeoning area: Robust, reliable and efficient data collection in embedded wireless multi-hop networks are essential elements in creating a true deploy-and-forget user experience. Maintaining full connectivity within a WSN, in a real world environment populated by other WSNs, WiFi networks or Bluetooth devices that constitute sources of interference is a key element in any application, but more so for those that are safety-critical, such as disaster response. Awareness of the effects of wireless channel, physical position and line-of-sight on received signal strength in real-world, outdoor environments will shape the design of many outdoor applications. Thus, the quantification of such effects is valuable knowledge for designers. Sensors' failure detection, scalability and commercialization are common challenges in many long-term monitoring applications; transferable solutions are evidenced here in the context of pollutant detection and water quality. Innovative, alternative thinking is often needed to achieve the desired long-lived networks when power-hungry sensors are foreseen components; in some instances, the very problems of wireless technology, such as RF irregularity, can be transformed into advantages. The importance of an iterative design and evaluation methodology—from analysis to simulation to real-life deployment—should be well understood by all WSN developers. The value of this is highlighted in the context of a challenging WPAN video-surveillance application based on a novel Nomadic Access

  20. Use of Daclatasvir in HCV/HIV-Coinfected Patients in a Real-Life Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonora, Stefano; Puoti, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    The burden of HIV and HCV coinfection is estimated to affect 5-7 million people worldwide, with approximately 15-30% of people with HIV coinfected with HCV. The first oral direct-acting antivirals have shown to improve the response in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection, and more recently, other direct-acting antivirals that target various stages of the HCV life cycle have been developed, among them daclatasvir. The objective of this article is to examine recent clinical studies investigating the efficacy and safety of daclatasvir in comparison with other antiretroviral drugs, focusing on its efficacy in the coinfected HIV patient and real-life data. Daclatasvir is a direct-acting antiviral first-in-class HCV NS5A replication complex inhibitor, approved in June 2014 by the European Medicines Agency for use in combination with other medicinal products for the treatment of chronic HCV infection in adults, and in July 2015 by the Food and Drug Administration. Its efficacy was demonstrated in several trials, with a mean sustained virologic response 12 weeks after therapy completion above 90%. The majority of adverse events related to treatment were mild-to-moderate in severity, with no discontinuation of therapy because of an adverse event and no clinically significant interactions with most of HIV antiretrovirals. The efficacy of daclatasvir in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients was demonstrated in many studies, and confirmed by real-life data for patients with different genotypes, patients with cirrhosis, and in association with ribavirin, opening a new frontier in the treatment of these patients.

  1. Motivational Goal Bracketing: An Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    We study in an online, real-effort experiment how the bracketing of non-binding goals affects performance in a work-leisure self-control problem. We externally induce the goal bracket - daily goals or a weekly goal - and within that bracket let subjects set goals for how much they want to work over...

  2. Real-life experience using trabectedin plus pegylated liposomal doxorubicin combination to treat patients with relapsed ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Tahir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of recurrent ovarian cancer (ROC treatment is no longer just palliation, but prolonging survival. This is usually through administering a new line of chemotherapy at each relapse. A novel treatment sequencing strategy to achieve this is through the intercalation of an effective non-platinum alternative, in between platinum-based therapies. Trabectedin in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD has been fully available privately in the UK since 2009 for treating patients with ROC. A single institution's experience with the trabectedin + PLD combination, as a non-platinum/non-taxane alternative, to intercalate between platinum-based therapies is reported here. To date 6 patients have been successfully treated with trabectedin + PLD at Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, Essex. Here we describe a new, practice-changing treatment approach in a real-life case study of a heavily-treated patient with advanced ROC treated with trabectedin + PLD at fourth-line and then subsequently rechallenged at seventh-line; with treatment continuing until disease progression.

  3. MOTIVATION: Goals and Goal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Richard K.

    2005-01-01

    Goal setting has great impact on a team's performance. Goals enable a team to synchronize their efforts to achieve success. In this article, the author talks about goals and goal setting. This articles complements Domain 5--Teaching and Communication (p.14) and discusses one of the benchmarks listed therein: "Teach the goal setting process and…

  4. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  5. The Other Side of the Screen - Simultaneously maintaining social relationships in real life and on social media

    OpenAIRE

    Gruenke, Solveig Wiland

    2017-01-01

    Social media as a social concept is becoming a prominent fixture in social life and is taking on a significant increase in social relevance, both academically and in popular discourse. The academic research is often focused on either the online content itself or the macro societal implications, more than the real-life social aspect of social media. People using social media are now simultaneously producing content about their life online, whilst they are, in fact, living it. The new social fe...

  6. A Comparison of Online Social Networks and Real-Life Social Networks: A Study of Sina Microblogging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks appear to enrich our social life, which raises the question whether they remove cognitive constraints on human communication and improve human social capabilities. In this paper, we analyze the users' following and followed relationships based on the data of Sina Microblogging and reveal several structural properties of Sina Microblogging. Compared with real-life social networks, our results confirm some similar features. However, Sina Microblogging also shows its own specialties, such as hierarchical structure and degree disassortativity, which all mark a deviation from real-life social networks. The low cost of the online network forms a broader perspective, and the one-way link relationships make it easy to spread information, but the online social network does not make too much difference in the creation of strong interpersonal relationships. Finally, we describe the mechanisms for the formation of these characteristics and discuss the implications of these structural properties for the real-life social networks.

  7. Postural adjustments during spontaneous and goal-directed arm movements in the first half year of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Fits, IBM; Klip, AWJ; van Eykern, LA; Hadders-Algra, M

    1999-01-01

    We studied the development of postural control during goal-directed reaching and spontaneous arm movements in early infancy. Two groups of infants participated. The first group consisted of 10 healthy infants, who were assessed four times at the ages of 3, 4, 5 and 6 months. Each assessment

  8. Transfer effects of errorless Goal Management Training on cognitive function and quality of life in brain-injured persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertens, D.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Boelen, D.H.; Fasotti, L.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous findings had shown that the addition of errorless learning to traditional Goal Management Training (GMT) resulted in superior results when training everyday tasks in persons with executive deficits after brain injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the additional effects of an

  9. The Role of Personal Goals in Depressive Reaction to Adverse Life Events: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couyoumdjian, Alessandro; Ottaviani, Cristina; Trincas, Roberta; Spitoni, Grazia; Tenore, Katia; Mancini, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with cognitive views of depression, we aimed to investigate the mediating role of personal goals in the relationship between stressful events and distinct patterns of depressive symptoms in a nonclinical sample. Participants identified a dysphoric episode that occurred in the previous year by reporting the severity of 12 depressive symptoms and their plausible cause. A goal taxonomy was used to determine how much the event interfered with the achievement of a series of personal goals. After controlling for age and current level of depression, the patterns of symptoms differed based on the triggering events. The relationship between sadness and affective losses was partially mediated by the personal goal of lovableness, and success was a partial mediator in the association between an event of failure and symptoms of worthlessness and anhedonia. Although the cross-sectional design of the study does not allow for conclusions on the direction of effects, findings suggest the importance of motivational factors in the development of specific patterns of depressive symptoms to adverse events. Assuming a continuum from low mood to clinical depression, treatment models could benefit from a precise identification of the specific stressors that initiate depressive behaviour and the personal meaning assigned to those events. PMID:23304090

  10. A retrospective analysis of real-world use of the eaTracker® My Goals website by adults from Ontario and Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. L. Lieffers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about use of goal setting and tracking tools within online programs to support nutrition and physical activity behaviour change. In 2011, Dietitians of Canada added “My Goals,” a nutrition and physical activity behaviour goal setting and tracking tool to their free publicly available self-monitoring website (eaTracker® ( http://www.eaTracker.ca/ . My Goals allows users to: a set “ready-made” SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, Time-related goals (choice of n = 87 goals from n = 13 categories or “write your own” goals, and b track progress using the “My Goals Tracker.” The purpose of this study was to characterize: a My Goals user demographics, b types of goals set, and c My Goals Tracker use. Methods Anonymous data on all goals set using the My Goals feature from December 6/2012-April 28/2014 by users ≥19y from Ontario and Alberta, Canada were obtained. This dataset contained: anonymous self-reported user demographic data, user set goals, and My Goals Tracker use data. Write your own goals were categorized by topic and specificity. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Multivariate binary logistic regression was used to determine associations between user demographics and a goal topic areas and b My Goals Tracker use. Results Overall, n = 16,511 goal statements (75.4 % ready-made; 24.6 % write your own set by n = 8,067 adult users 19-85y (83.3 % female; mean age 41.1 ± 15.0y, mean BMI 28.8 ± 7.6kg/m2 were included for analysis. Overall, 33.1 % of ready-made goals were from the “Managing your Weight” category. Of write your own goal entries, 42.3 % were solely distal goals (most related to weight management; 38.6 % addressed nutrition behaviour change (16.6 % had unspecific general eating goals; 18.1 % addressed physical activity behaviour change (47.3 % had goals without information on exercise amount and type. Many write your own

  11. AB036. Real-life experience of COPD patients on ease and accuracy of inhaler use: the REAL survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keininger, Dorothy L.; Price, David; Viswanad, Boomi; Gasser, Matthias; Walda, Susann

    2016-01-01

    Background Many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) achieve incomplete benefit from their treatment, due to reasons including inadequate device training or incorrect inhaler technique. Dosing frequency has also been shown to impact COPD treatment compliance with inhaler overuse and underuse being the most common form of noncompliance. Between 28–68% of patients do not use their inhalers correctly, and 39–67% of health care professionals (HCPs) do not effectively train patients to correctly use their inhalers. This makes patients prone to committing inhaler use errors and may negatively impact treatment compliance. We conducted a computer-assisted telephonic survey in patients with COPD to evaluate patient-reported insights on real life aspects of inhaler use, training and check for correct use by HCP, device attributes and patient-reported compliance of inhaler or medication use. Methods Patients from 9 countries, diagnosed with mild to very severe COPD and using maintenance inhaled treatment (via Breezhaler®, Ellipta®, Genuair®, Respimat®) were included in this survey. Patient-reported data on correct inhaler use (training and check), inhalation pattern, and device attributes (ease of use and confidence of inhaling full dose), compliance and potential underuse or overuse was collected. Chi-square test was performed for testing significance and z-test was used for comparisons of proportions (significance level: alphaEllipta® =191; Genuair® = 194; Respimat® =201) with mild to very severe COPD with a mean (±SD) age 56±9.8 years, completed the survey. Approximately, 30% of all patients reported not receiving any inhaler use training. Of the 70%, who received training on inhaler use, 83% felt that the demonstration of inhaler use was very helpful, followed by videos (58%), instructions for use (51%) and leaflets (34%), irrespective of the device used. About 29% of all patients reported never being checked for correct inhaler

  12. Effect of goal attainment theory based education program on cardiovascular risks, behavioral modification, and quality of life among patients with first episode of acute myocardial infarction: Randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Moonkyoung; Song, Rhayun; Jeong, Jin-Ok

    2017-06-01

    Effect of goal-attainment-theory-based education program on cardiovascular risks, behavioral modification, and quality of life among patients with first episode of acute myocardial infarction: randomized study BACKGROUND: The behavioral modification strategies should be explored at the time of admission to lead the maximum effect of cardiovascular risk management. This randomized study aimed to elucidate the effects of a nurse-led theory-based education program in individuals with a first episode of acute myocardial infarction on cardiovascular risks, health behaviors, and quality of life over 6 months. The study involved a convenience sample of 64 patients with acute myocardial infarction who were randomly assigned to either the education group or the control group. The goal-attainment-based education program was designed to set the mutually agreed goals of risk management and the behavioral modification strategies for achieving those goals. Those in the control group received routine management only. The participants in both groups were contacted at 6-8 weeks and at 6 months after discharge to measure outcome variables. Repeated measure ANOVA was conducted using SPSSWIN (version 20.0) to determine the significance of differences in outcome variables over 6 months between the groups. Both groups showed significant positive changes in cardiovascular risks, health behaviors, and quality of life over 6 months. The 2-year risk of cardiovascular disease was significantly reduced in both study groups, but with no significant interaction effect (F=2.01, p=0.142). The performance and maintenance of health behaviors (F=3.75, p=0.029) and the mental component of quality of life (F=4.03, p=0.020) were significantly better in the education group than the control group. Applying a goal-oriented education program at an early stage of hospital management improved and maintained blood glucose, health behaviors, and mental component of the quality of life up to six months in

  13. Overvoltage Protection of Large Power Transformers - A Real-Life Study Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Einarsdottir, K. E.; Andresson, E.

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the results from a detailed study of the overvoltage protection of a particular 400/150-kV 400-MVA power transformer. The work presented here is based on a real-life power system substation design and data and initiated by Danish TSO Energinet.dk as a consequence of serious...... transformer overvoltage damage. A simulation model for the entire system consisting of overhead line, transformer, surge arrester, and earth grid has been created in PSCAD/EMTDC. The main focus has been put on the earth grid, which has been submodeled in detail in MATLAB using an electromagnetic transient...... approach based on the thin-wire program made by J. H. Richmond for NASA in 1974. The earth grid model is verified with excellent agreement compared to already published results. The overvoltage performance of the particular case is analyzed, and it shows that the transformers LIWL have probably been...

  14. Evaluation of RPL-compliant routing solutions in real-life WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahariadis Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN applications continue to expand and already cover almost all our daily activities improving from security and environmental efficiency to gaming experience. The diverse applications running on top of WSNs have led to the design of an immense number of routing protocols. Few years ago, the IETF standardized the IPv6 routing protocol for low-power and lossy networks (RPL which is based on routing metrics to build communication paths between a source and the destination node. While significant efforts have focused on the design of routing metrics that satisfy the various applications, limited work has been reported on validating their performance using real-life motes. In this paper, we focus on validating the simulation results (obtained through the JSim simulator using TelosB motes for a set of routing metrics that have been proposed in our previous articles.

  15. Real life Dosages and Costs of TNFα inhibitor therapy for RA patients in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hostenkamp, Gisela; Sørensen, Jan; Hetland, Merete Lund

    2009-01-01

    about the true long run cost. Taking the actual medication practice into account is important for the evaluation of the costs and optimal sequencing of new and existing biological treatments. Objectives: To investigate the drug cost of TNF-inhibitors in the treatment of RA using real-life data from...... of treatment. Cost estimates based on short term observational data or on instruction leaflets from manufacturers may provide wrong cost assessments of TNF-alpha therapy. It is important to take the long term cost structure into account to arrive at unbiased treatment cost estimates.......Background: When estimating the cost of biological treatment many analyses rely on cross sectional data or standard consumption patterns indicated in the manufacturers' instruction leaflet. Unless such consumption patterns truly reflect routine clinical practice they may result in wrong assumptions...

  16. Group Creativity Development by Solving Real-life Project in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Chunfang; Kolmos, Anette; Du, Xiangyun

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, problem and project based learning (PBL) has been employed by a growing number of educational institutions to foster creative engineers. Among the diverse pedagogical practices of PBL, there has been an emergence of real-life project for students. Based on literature of creativity...... creativity can be developed by the mutual function of the four dimensions under the positive facilitation of supervisors. A case study was carried out with a student satellite project in the department of electronic systems at Aalborg University in Denmark. Multiple methods including interviews...... and observation were employed in this case. The analysis of the empirical data leads to the findings that learning through reallife projects may frame the creative learning environment by facilitating motivation and skills such as collaboration, communication, group development management, and social networking...

  17. Template-matched filtering for automatic object segmentation in real-life scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos, Kenia; Hirales-Carbajal, Adán.; Díaz-Ramírez, Victor H.

    2017-08-01

    A reliable approach for object segmentation based on template-matching filters is proposed. The system employs an adaptive strategy for the generation of space-variant filters which take into account several versions of the target and local statistical properties of the input scene. Moreover, the proposed method considers the geometric modifications of the target while is moving through a video sequence. The detection accuracy of the matched filter brings the location of the target of interest. The estimated location coordinates are used to compute the support area covered by the target using watershed segmentation technique. In each frame, the filter adapts according the geometrical changes of the target in order to estimate its current support region. Experimental tests carried out in a video sequence show that the proposed system yields a very good performance for accuracy detection, and object segmentation efficiency in real-life scenes.

  18. Cyberbullying in Germany – an exploration of prevalence, overlapping with real life bullying and coping strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JULIA RIEBEL

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new phenomenon of violence among pupils has been spreading over Europe in the last few years: Cyberbullying, the repeated and intended hurting of weaker schoolmates via modern communication technologies. This study shows (based on a sample of 1987 pupils, that cyberbullying exists in Germany, although the number of incidents is still rather small. It could also be shown, that the pupils who act as cyberbullies are the same as those who bully others in real life. The same overlap was found to be true for the victims. Cyberbullying can therefore be considered a subcategory of ordinary bullying instead of being considered a whole new phenomenon. The exploration of coping strategies showed, that a common factor structure underlies physical, verbal and cyberbullying. Considering the fact that the findings of the study are based on an online questionnaire with restricted representativeness, the results should however be interpreted carefully.

  19. Real life narratives enhance learning about the 'art and science' of midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilkison, Andrea; Giddings, Lynne; Smythe, Liz

    2016-03-01

    Health professional educators have long grappled with how to teach the more elusive art of practice alongside the science (a term that encompasses the sort of professional knowledge that can be directly passed on). A competent practitioner is one who knows when, how and for whom to apply knowledge and skills, thereby making the links between theory and practice. They combine art and science in such a way that integrates knowledge with insight. This participatory hermeneutic study explored the experience of teachers and students of implementing a narrative-centred curriculum in undergraduate midwifery education. It revealed that when real life narratives were central to the learning environment, students' learning about the art of midwifery practice was enhanced as they learned about midwifery decisions, reflected on their own values and beliefs and felt an emotional connection with the narrator. Further, art and science became melded together in the context specific wisdom of practice (phronesis).

  20. Cognitive coping strategies and blood pressure responses to real-life stress in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, C A; Sherwood, A; Light, K C

    1992-01-01

    Coping style is an important feature in the understanding of the relation between real-life stress and associated blood pressure (BP) responses. In this study, 10 high- and 10 low-"self-focused-coping" (SFC) male college students were tested with ambulatory BP monitoring on two typical schooldays, one of which included an examination. It was found that the high-SFC subjects, defined as those who tend to keep to themselves and/or blame themselves in stressful situations, showed higher BP responses than the low-SFC subjects, but only on the exam day. Further, the high-SFC subjects showed higher BP during the exam but also had BP elevations that were sustained during other activities throughout the same day, including evening rest. These results are discussed in terms of the relation between psychological and physiological responding.

  1. The bidirectional relationships between online victimization and psychosocial problems in adolescents: a comparison with real-life victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, Regina; Vermulst, Ad; van Rooij, Antonius J; Scholte, Ron; van de Mheen, Dike

    2014-05-01

    Although peer victimization is of major concern and adolescents spend increasing amounts of time on the Internet, relatively little is known about the psychosocial antecedents and consequences of online victimization. The main aim of this study was to compare the psychosocial antecedents and consequences of online versus real-life victimization. More specifically, the bidirectional relationship between online and real-life victimization on the one hand and psychosocial problems (i.e., loneliness and social anxiety) on the other was examined. In addition, the moderating role of online aggression in the relationship between online victimization and subsequent psychosocial problems was studied. This prospective study, consisting of three annual measurements, was conducted among a sample of 831 adolescents (50.3 % girls) aged 11-15, of which most (80.2 %) had a Dutch ethnic background. The results indicate a unidirectional relationship whereby loneliness and social anxiety predict an increase in latter online victimization rather than the reverse. A bidirectional relationship was found for real-life victimization: loneliness (but not social anxiety) predicted an increase in latter real-life victimization, which in turn predicted an increase in subsequent social anxiety (but not loneliness). No moderating effects of online aggression were found. The findings of the present study suggest that negative online and in real life peer interactions have a differential meaning for, and impact on adolescents' well-being.

  2. Echolocation may have real-life advantages for blind people: an analysis of survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lore eThaler

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Some people can echolocate by making sonar emissions (e.g. mouth-clicks, finger snaps, feet shuffling, humming, cane tapping, etc. and listening to the returning echoes. To date there are no statistics available about how many blind people use echolocation, but anecdotal reports in the literature suggest that perhaps between 20 and 30 % of totally blind people may use it, suggesting that echolocation affords broad functional benefits. Consistent with the notion that blind individuals benefit from the use of echolocation, previous research conducted under controlled experimental conditions has shown that echolocation improves blind people’s spatial sensing ability. The current study investigated if there is also evidence for functional benefits of echolocation in real life. To address this question the current study conducted an online survey. Thirty-seven blind people participated. Linear regression analyses of survey data revealed that, while statistically controlling for participants’ gender, age, level of visual function, general health, employment status, level of education, Braille skill, and use of other mobility means, people who use echolocation have higher salary, and higher mobility in unfamiliar places, than people who do not use echolocation. The majority of our participants (34 out of 37 use the long cane, and all participants who reported to echolocate, also reported to use the long cane. This suggests that the benefit of echolocation that we found might be conditional upon the long cane being used as well. The investigation was correlational in nature, and thus cannot be used to determine causality. In addition, the sample was small (N=37, and one should be cautious when generalizing the current results to the population. The data, however, are consistent with the idea that echolocation offers real-life advantages for blind people, and that echolocation may be involved in peoples’ successful adaptation to vision loss.

  3. Unreal Goal Bots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hindriks, K.V.; Korstanje, R.; Van Riemsdijk, M.B.; Kraayenbrink, N.; De Rijk, L.; Behrens, T.; Pasman, W.

    2010-01-01

    It remains a challenge with current state of the art technology to use BDI agents to control real-time, dynamic and complex environments. We report on our effort to connect the GOAL agent programming language to the real-time game UNREAL TOURNAMENT 2004. We focus in particular on the design of a

  4. Population Aging as the Social Body in Representation and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Crampton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article uses three levels of body analysis as presented by Nancy Scheper-Hughes and Margaret Lock to compare old age as a construct in population aging discourse with research on lived experience of people aging in the United States and Ghana. I first describe how demographers construct social bodies as becoming “gray” through population statistics and how policy makers then use dependency ratios to rationalize intervention on behalf of older adults in the body-politic.  The construction of old age within this discourse is then compared with ethnographic research that suggests this construct leaves out much of the lived experience familiar to anthropologists of aging.  Rather than debunk the old age construct, however, the purpose of this article is to argue for study of population aging discourse as constituting a social body reflecting cultural constructions of nature and society.  Moreover, this representation is made real through policy and social intervention work, and with very real effect on people’s lives. As such, an anthropology of aging bodies can include the social life of old age as a social construct.

  5. Issues of Application of Machine Learning Models for Virtual and Real-Life Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The current Building Energy Performance Simulation (BEPS tools are based on first principles. For the correct use of BEPS tools, simulationists should have an in-depth understanding of building physics, numerical methods, control logics of building systems, etc. However, it takes significant time and effort to develop a first principles-based simulation model for existing buildings—mainly due to the laborious process of data gathering, uncertain inputs, model calibration, etc. Rather than resorting to an expert’s effort, a data-driven approach (so-called “inverse” approach has received growing attention for the simulation of existing buildings. This paper reports a cross-comparison of three popular machine learning models (Artificial Neural Network (ANN, Support Vector Machine (SVM, and Gaussian Process (GP for predicting a chiller’s energy consumption in a virtual and a real-life building. The predictions based on the three models are sufficiently accurate compared to the virtual and real measurements. This paper addresses the following issues for the successful development of machine learning models: reproducibility, selection of inputs, training period, outlying data obtained from the building energy management system (BEMS, and validation of the models. From the result of this comparative study, it was found that SVM has a disadvantage in computation time compared to ANN and GP. GP is the most sensitive to a training period among the three models.

  6. The real limits to marine life: a further critique of the Respiration Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibel, B. A.; Childress, J. J.

    2013-05-01

    The recently proposed "Respiration Index" (RI = log PO2/PCO2) suggests that aerobic metabolism is limited by the ratio of reactants (oxygen) to products (carbon dioxide) according to the thermodynamics of cellular respiration. Here, we demonstrate further that, because of the large standard free energy change for organic carbon oxidation (ΔG° = -686 kcal mol-1), carbon dioxide can never reach concentrations that would limit the thermodynamics of this reaction. A PCO2 to PO2 ratio of 10503 would be required to reach equilibrium (equilibrium constant, Keq = 10503), where ΔG = 0. Thus, a Respiration Index of -503 would be the real thermodynamic limit to aerobic life. Such a Respiration Index is never reached, either in the cell or in the environment. Moreover, cellular respiration and oxygen provision are kinetically controlled such that, within limits, environmental oxygen and CO2 concentrations have little to do with intracellular concentrations. The RI is fundamentally different from the aragonite saturation state, a thermodynamic index used to quantify the potential effect of CO2 on calcification rates, because of its failure to incorporate the equilibrium constant of the reaction. Not only is the RI invalid, but its use leads to incorrect and misleading predictions of the threat of changing oxygen and carbon dioxide to marine life. We provide a physiological framework that identifies oxygen thresholds and allows for synergistic effects of ocean acidification and global warming.

  7. Exploiting Knowledge Composition to Improve Real-Life Hand Prosthetic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Gauravkumar K; Nowak, Markus; Castellini, Claudio

    2017-07-01

    In myoelectric prosthesis control, one of the hottest topics nowadays is enforcing simultaneous and proportional (s/p) control over several degrees of freedom. This problem is particularly hard and the scientific community has so far failed to provide a stable and reliable s/p control, effective in daily-life activities. In order to improve the reliability of this form of control, in this paper we propose on-the-fly knowledge composition, thereby reducing the burden of matching several patterns at the same time, and simplifying the task of the system. In particular, we show that using our method it is possible to dynamically compose a model by juxtaposing subsets of previously gathered (sample, target) pairs in real-time, rather than composing a single model in the beginning and then hoping it can reliably distinguish all patterns. Fourteen intact subjects participated in an experiment, where repetitive daily-life tasks (e.g. ironing a cloth) were performed using a commercially available dexterous prosthetic hand mounted on a splint and wirelessly controlled using a machine learning method. During the experiment, the subjects performed these tasks using myocontrol with and without knowledge composition and the results demonstrate that employing knowledge composition allowed better performance, i.e. reducing the overall task completion time by 30%.

  8. The real limits to marine life: a further critique of the Respiration Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Seibel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The recently proposed "Respiration Index" (RI = log PO2/PCO2 suggests that aerobic metabolism is limited by the ratio of reactants (oxygen to products (carbon dioxide according to the thermodynamics of cellular respiration. Here, we demonstrate further that, because of the large standard free energy change for organic carbon oxidation (ΔG° = −686 kcal mol−1, carbon dioxide can never reach concentrations that would limit the thermodynamics of this reaction. A PCO2 to PO2 ratio of 10503 would be required to reach equilibrium (equilibrium constant, Keq = 10503, where ΔG = 0. Thus, a Respiration Index of −503 would be the real thermodynamic limit to aerobic life. Such a Respiration Index is never reached, either in the cell or in the environment. Moreover, cellular respiration and oxygen provision are kinetically controlled such that, within limits, environmental oxygen and CO2 concentrations have little to do with intracellular concentrations. The RI is fundamentally different from the aragonite saturation state, a thermodynamic index used to quantify the potential effect of CO2 on calcification rates, because of its failure to incorporate the equilibrium constant of the reaction. Not only is the RI invalid, but its use leads to incorrect and misleading predictions of the threat of changing oxygen and carbon dioxide to marine life. We provide a physiological framework that identifies oxygen thresholds and allows for synergistic effects of ocean acidification and global warming.

  9. Towards Understanding Life Cycle Savings of Boundedly Rational Agents : A Model with Feasibility Goals (Revision of DP 2008-14)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binswanger, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper develops a new life cycle model that aims to describe the savings and asset allocation choices of boundedly rational agents. In this model, agents make forward-looking decisions without the requirement of anticipating their actual future decisions. Instead, agents pursue two simple

  10. The impact of personal resources and their goal relevance on satisfaction with food-related life among the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, Moira; Grunert, Klaus G.; Raats, Monique M.

    2008-01-01

    with food-related life, as was expected, was predicted by income, health measures and living circumstances. However, the study also showed that perceived levels of other resources such as support of family and friends, food knowledge, storage facilities also added to the individuals' satisfaction with food...

  11. Comparing a Real-Life WSN Platform Small Network and its OPNET Modeler Model using Hypothesis Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilbert E. Pérez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To avoid the high cost and arduous effort usually associated with field analysis of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN, Modeling and Simulation (M&S is used to predict the behavior and performance of the network. However, the simulation models utilized to imitate real life networks are often used for general purpose. Therefore, they are less likely to provide accurate predictions for different real life networks. In this paper, a comparison methodology based on hypothesis testing is proposed to evaluate and compare simulation output versus real-life network measurements. Performance related parameters such as traffic generation rates and goodput rates for a small WSN are considered. To execute the comparison methodology, a "Comparison Tool", composed of MATLAB scripts is developed and used. The comparison tool demonstrates the need for model verification and the analysis of good agreements between the simulation and empirical measurements.

  12. The fragrance hand immersion study - an experimental model simulating real-life exposure for allergic contact dermatitis on the hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2003-01-01

    .p.m.), whilst during the following 2 weeks, the concentration was relatively high (approximately 250 p.p.m.), imitating real-life exposure to a household product like dishwashing liquid diluted in water and the undiluted product, respectively. Evaluation was made using a clinical scale and laser Doppler flow...... meter. 3 of 15 hand eczema patients developed eczema on the finger immersed in the fragrance-containing solution, 3 of 15 on the placebo finger and 3 of 15 on both fingers. Using this experimental exposure model simulating real-life exposure, we found no association between immersion of a finger...

  13. Does neuropsychological performance impact on real-life functional achievements in obsessive-compulsive disorder? A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Giampaolo; Cavedini, Paolo; Harvey, Philip D; Di Chiaro, Nunzia Valentina; Daccò, Silvia; Caldirola, Daniela

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the association between neuropsychological performance and real-life functioning in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). As a secondary aim, we investigated the association between neuropsychological performance and self-reported quality of life (QoL). We retrospectively selected 68 of 240 inpatients with OCD, who had been hospitalised for a 4-week psychiatric rehabilitation programme. We used clinical information recorded in the patients' electronic medical records. We considered the following variables: neuropsychological performance (verbal/visual memory, sustained attention, visual-constructive ability, and language fluency; in a sub-sample of 37 subjects, divided attention, working memory, and attentional shifting were also available); real-life functional achievements (social/vocational outcomes and independent living); subjectively reported QoL (WHOQOL-BREF); obsessive-compulsive (OC) symptoms severity (DY-BOCS). We found significant associations between poorer neuropsychological performance and poorer achievements in independent living and vocational outcomes. Among the different neuropsychological tests, we found significant associations between language fluency/executive processing and independent living, and between divided attention, attentional shifting, working memory and vocational outcome. We found no significant associations between neuropsychological performance and subjectively reported QoL. OC symptoms severity was not associated with real-life functional achievements. Our preliminary results suggest that poorer neuropsychological performance may be associated with impaired real-life functioning in subjects with OCD.

  14. Use of a FORTH-based PROLOG for real-time expert systems. 1: Spacelab life sciences experiment application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloski, William H.; Odette, Louis L.; Krever, Alfred J.; West, Allison K.

    1987-01-01

    A real-time expert system is being developed to serve as the astronaut interface for a series of Spacelab vestibular experiments. This expert system is written in a version of Prolog that is itself written in Forth. The Prolog contains a predicate that can be used to execute Forth definitions; thus, the Forth becomes an embedded real-time operating system within the Prolog programming environment. The expert system consists of a data base containing detailed operational instructions for each experiment, a rule base containing Prolog clauses used to determine the next step in an experiment sequence, and a procedure base containing Prolog goals formed from real-time routines coded in Forth. In this paper, we demonstrate and describe the techniques and considerations used to develop this real-time expert system, and we conclude that Forth-based Prolog provides a viable implementation vehicle for this and similar applications.

  15. Chronic Hepatitis C Treatment with Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents in a Real-Life Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirino-Sprung, Ruby Ann; Dehesa, Margarita; Wolpert, Enrique; Corona-Lau, Clara; García-Juarez, Ignacio; Sánchez-Ávila, José Francisco; Moctezuma-Velázquez, Carlos; Kershenobich, David

    2016-01-01

    In clinical trials, new oral direct-acting antiviral agent therapies have demonstrated a high sustained virological response rate in patients with hepatitis C virus infection. We aimed to analyze the efficacy and safety data from direct-acting antiviral agent interferon-free therapy in hepatitis C virus infection in a study performed in five different clinical settings in Mexico City; four private practice sites and one academic medical center in a real-world scenario. Eighty-one patients were treated with seven different direct-acting antiviral agent regimens, in which the end of treatment, sustained virological response at 12 weeks post-treatment, and adverse effects were evaluated. At their discretion, attending physicians selected the treatment regimens and durations. In total, 70.4% of the patients were female and the mean age was 60.7 years; 74.1% had blood transfusion as a risk factor. The most common genotype was 1b (70.4%). The fibrosis stage was F3 or F4 in 55.5% of patients; liver cirrhosis was present in 44%. The overall end of treatment response was 98.8%, and the rate of sustained virological response was 96%, independent of the regimen. Three patients did not achieve sustained virological response; they had cirrhosis and were treatment-experienced, and two had hepatocarcinoma. Non-significant adverse effects during treatment were documented. In this real-life setting in Mexico, a rate of 96% of sustained virological response to direct-acting antiviral agents was achieved in an older population of patients with advanced fibrosis. This study provides data that may be useful in guiding health professionals and authorities in the development of health policies.

  16. Process mining routinely collected electronic health records to define real-life clinical pathways during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karl; Dunwoodie, Elaine; Jones, Richard G; Newsham, Alex; Johnson, Owen; Price, Christopher P; Wolstenholme, Jane; Leal, Jose; McGinley, Patrick; Twelves, Chris; Hall, Geoff

    2017-07-01

    There is growing interest in the use of routinely collected electronic health records to enhance service delivery and facilitate clinical research. It should be possible to detect and measure patterns of care and use the data to monitor improvements but there are methodological and data quality challenges. Driven by the desire to model the impact of a patient self-test blood count monitoring service in patients on chemotherapy, we aimed to (i) establish reproducible methods of process-mining electronic health records, (ii) use the outputs derived to define and quantify patient pathways during chemotherapy, and (iii) to gather robust data which is structured to be able to inform a cost-effectiveness decision model of home monitoring of neutropenic status during chemotherapy. Electronic Health Records at a UK oncology centre were included if they had (i) a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer and received adjuvant epirubicin and cyclosphosphamide chemotherapy or (ii) colorectal cancer and received palliative oxaliplatin and infusional 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy, and (iii) were first diagnosed with cancer between January 2004 and February 2013. Software and a Markov model were developed, producing a schematic of patient pathways during chemotherapy. Significant variance from the assumed care pathway was evident from the data. Of the 535 patients with breast cancer and 420 with colorectal cancer there were 474 and 329 pathway variants respectively. Only 27 (5%) and 26 (6%) completed the planned six cycles of chemotherapy without having unplanned hospital contact. Over the six cycles, 169 (31.6%) patients with breast cancer and 190 (45.2%) patients with colorectal cancer were admitted to hospital. The pathways of patients on chemotherapy are complex. An iterative approach to addressing semantic and data quality issues enabled the effective use of routinely collected patient records to produce accurate models of the real-life experiences of chemotherapy patients and

  17. Exploring English Language Learners (ELL) experiences with scientific language and inquiry within a real life context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algee, Lisa M.

    English Language Learners (ELL) are often at a distinct disadvantage from receiving authentic science learning opportunites. This study explored English Language Learners (ELL) learning experiences with scientific language and inquiry within a real life context. This research was theoretically informed by sociocultural theory and literature on student learning and science teaching for ELL. A qualitative, case study was used to explore students' learning experiences. Data from multiple sources was collected: student interviews, science letters, an assessment in another context, field-notes, student presentations, inquiry assessment, instructional group conversations, parent interviews, parent letters, parent homework, teacher-researcher evaluation, teacher-researcher reflective journal, and student ratings of learning activities. These data sources informed the following research questions: (1) Does participation in an out-of-school contextualized inquiry science project increase ELL use of scientific language? (2) Does participation in an out-of-school contextualized inquiry science project increase ELL understanding of scientific inquiry and their motivation to learn? (3) What are parents' funds of knowledge about the local ecology and does this inform students' experiences in the science project? All data sources concerning students were analyzed for similar patterns and trends and triangulation was sought through the use of these data sources. The remaining data sources concerning the teacher-researcher were used to inform and assess whether the pedagogical and research practices were in alignment with the proposed theoretical framework. Data sources concerning parental participation accessed funds of knowledge, which informed the curriculum in order to create continuity and connections between home and school. To ensure accuracy in the researchers' interpretations of student and parent responses during interviews, member checking was employed. The findings

  18. Comorbidome, Pattern, and Impact of Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Boven, Job F M; Román-Rodríguez, Miguel; Palmer, Josep F; Toledo-Pons, Núria; Cosío, Borja G; Soriano, Joan B

    2016-04-01

    Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) has been described and acknowledged as a distinct clinical entity; however, its characteristics in daily clinical practice are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ACOS in the real-life population, its pattern of comorbidities, and its impact on hospitalization risk. Data for this retrospective cohort study were extracted from the Majorca Real-Life Investigation in COPD and Asthma cohort, including primary care, hospitalization, and pharmacy data from the Balearic Islands, Spain. Patients who had received a physician-confirmed diagnosis of both asthma and COPD were identified as having ACOS and compared with a COPD-only population. In subanalyses, more stringent diagnostic criteria (Global Initiative for Asthma-Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease) were applied. The pattern and impact of comorbidities on all-cause hospitalization were compared by multivariate logistic regression. In total, 5,093 patients with ACOS (prevalence, 5.55 per 1,000 inhabitants) were compared with 22,778 patients with COPD (30.40 per 1,000 inhabitants). Patients with ACOS were more frequently female (53.4%) than were patients with COPD (30.8%), younger (ACOS, 64.0 years; COPD, 65.8 years), and differed by nonsmoking status (ACOS, 41.4%; COPD, 22.1%) (all, P < .001). In adjusted analyses, allergic rhinitis (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.63-2.00), anxiety (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10-1.27), gastroesophageal reflux disease (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.04-1.33), and osteoporosis (OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.26) were more frequent in ACOS than COPD. In contrast, chronic kidney disease (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.66-0.95) and ischemic heart disease (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.79-0.98) were less frequent. In patients with ACOS, cardiovascular diseases showed the strongest association with hospitalization. ACOS is prevalent in the general population, and it affects to a large extent females with less smoking exposure compared with patients with

  19. Real-life memory and spatial navigation in patients with focal epilepsy: ecological validity of a virtual reality supermarket task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, P; Lahr, D; Kohsik, A; Dyck, E; Markowitsch, H J; Bien, C G; Botsch, M; Piefke, M

    2014-02-01

    Ecological assessment and training of real-life cognitive functions such as visual-spatial abilities in patients with epilepsy remain challenging. Some studies have applied virtual reality (VR) paradigms, but external validity of VR programs has not sufficiently been proven. Patients with focal epilepsy (EG, n=14) accomplished an 8-day program in a VR supermarket, which consisted of learning and buying items on a shopping list. Performance of the EG was compared with that of healthy controls (HCG, n=19). A comprehensive neuropsychological examination was administered. Real-life performance was investigated in a real supermarket. Learning in the VR supermarket was significantly impaired in the EG on different VR measures. Delayed free recall of products did not differ between the EG and the HCG. Virtual reality scores were correlated with neuropsychological measures of visual-spatial cognition, subjective estimates of memory, and performance in the real supermarket. The data indicate that our VR approach allows for the assessment of real-life visual-spatial memory and cognition in patients with focal epilepsy. The multimodal, active, and complex VR paradigm may particularly enhance visual-spatial cognitive resources. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ngVLA Key Science Goal 2: Probing the Initial Conditions for Planetary Systems and Life with Astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brett; ngVLA Science Working Group 1

    2018-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects in understanding the origin and evolution of planets and planetary systems is tracing the influence of chemistry on the physical evolution of a system from a molecular cloud to a solar system. Existing facilities have already shown the stunning degree of molecular complexity present in these systems. The unique combination of sensitivity and spatial resolution offered by the ngVLA will permit the observation of both highly complex and very low-abundance chemical species that are exquisitely sensitive to the physical conditions and evolutionary history of their sources, which are out of reach of current observatories. In turn, by understanding the chemical evolution of these complex molecules, unprecedentedly detailed astrophysical insight can be gleaned from these astrochemical observations.This poster will overview a number of key science goals in astrochemistry which will be enabled by the ngVLA, including:1) imaging of the deepest, densest regions in protoplanetary disks and unveiling the physical history through isotopic ratios2) probing the ammonia snow line in these disks, thought to be the only viable tracer of the water snowline3) observations of the molecular content of giant planet atmospheres4) detections of new, complex molecules, potentially including the simplest amino acids and sugars5) tracing the origin of chiral excess in star-forming regions

  1. The fragrance hand immersion study - an experimental model simulating real-life exposure for allergic contact dermatitis on the hands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Menné, T; Andersen, K E

    2003-01-01

    meter. 3 of 15 hand eczema patients developed eczema on the finger immersed in the fragrance-containing solution, 3 of 15 on the placebo finger and 3 of 15 on both fingers. Using this experimental exposure model simulating real-life exposure, we found no association between immersion of a finger...

  2. Exploring Marine Ecosystems with Elementary School Portuguese Children: Inquiry-Based Project Activities Focused on "Real-Life" Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, Elsa; Faria, Cláudia; Boaventura, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate how young students engage in an inquiry-based project driven by real-life contexts. Elementary school children were engaged in a small inquiry project centred on marine biodiversity and species adaptations. All activities included the exploration of an out-of-school setting as a learning context. A total…

  3. Using Real-Life Data When Teaching Statistics: Student Perceptions of this Strategy in an Introductory Statistics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, David L.; Hood, Michelle; Neumann, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Many teachers of statistics recommend using real-life data during class lessons. However, there has been little systematic study of what effect this teaching method has on student engagement and learning. The present study examined this question in a first-year university statistics course. Students (n = 38) were interviewed and their reflections…

  4. Social Cohesion as a Real-Life Phenomenon: Assessing the Explanatory Power of the Universalist and Particularist Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmaat, Jan Germen

    2011-01-01

    Unlike most studies on social cohesion, this study explores the concept as a real-life macro-level phenomenon. It assesses to what extent the conceptions of social cohesion suggested by several macro-level approaches represent coherent empirically observable forms of social cohesion. Additionally it discusses two perspectives on social…

  5. Children's Toleration of Real-Life Aggression after Exposure to Media Violence: A Replication of the Drabman and Thomas Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitor, Fred; Hirsch, Kenneth William

    1994-01-01

    Results of four mid-1970s experiments continue to be used as evidence that exposure to media violence desensitizes children to real-life aggression. This study replicated procedures from those experiments using contemporary video materials, and results confirmed original findings that children tend to tolerate more the aggressive behaviors of…

  6. Blue Tigers, Black Tapirs, & the Pied Raven of the Faroe Islands: Teaching Genetic Drift Using Real-Life Animal Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robischon, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Genetic drift is a concept of population genetics that is central to understanding evolutionary processes and aspects of conservation biology. It is frequently taught using rather abstract representations. I introduce three real-life zoological examples, based on historical and recent color morphs of tigers, tapirs, and ravens, that can complement…

  7. The effects of different types of product information on the consumer product evaluation for fresh cod in real life settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kole, A.P.W.; Altintzoglou, T.; Schelvis-Smit, A.A.M.; Luten, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of different types of product information on consumer product evaluation were examined in real life settings. Cod fillets were presented to 1440 consumers drawn from the Dutch TasteNet consumer panel for assessment in their own households. The product was presented accompanied by product

  8. Using Real-Worldness and Cultural Difference to Enhance Student Learning in a Foundation Phase Life Skills Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Mariette; Ebrahim, Hasina Banu

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to explore how real-world experience, inclusive of engagement with cultural differences, influences the quality of students' learning in a Life Skills module in pre-service Foundation Phase teacher education. The study was conducted with 147 students in their final year of the Bachelor of Education (Foundation Phase specialisation), at…

  9. The use of questionnaires in colour research in real-life settings : In search of validity and methodological pitfalls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, I.C.; van der Voordt, Theo; Vink, P.; de Boon, J

    2014-01-01

    This research discusses the validity of applying questionnaires in colour research in real life settings.
    In the literature the conclusions concerning the influences of colours on human performance and well-being are often conflicting. This can be caused by the artificial setting of the test

  10. Real-Life Management of Patients with Retinal Vein Occlusion Using I-Macula Web Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolò, Massimo; Bonetto, Monica; Rosa, Raffaella; Musetti, Donatella; Musolino, Maria; Traverso, Carlo Enrico; Giacomini, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Real-life evaluation in the management of patients affected by macular edema secondary to retinal vein occlusion. A retrospective, observational study using the I-Macula Web platform. Thirty-five patients (37 eyes; 15 females and 20 male) affected by RVO were analysed. At 12 months, there was a statistically significant improvement of best-corrected visual acuity (p = 0.0235) and central macular thickness (p < 0.0001). The mean change in visual acuity was 8.9 letters. Twenty-seven eyes underwent DEX implant (n = 62; mean: 2.29) only. Of these, 8, 4, 14, and 1 eyes underwent 1, 2, 3, and 4 DEX implants, respectively. The remaining 10 eyes were also injected with ranibizumab (n = 49; mean: 4.9). At 12 months, 12 eyes (32.5%) presented a dry macula, whereas the remaining 25 eyes (67.5%) still had macular edema. Mean interval between the first and second treatment (T1) and between the second and third treatment (T2) were 5.15 and (T2) 3.7 months, respectively. Where only DEX implants were received, T1 and T2 was 5.1 and 4.9 months, respectively. This study confirms that DEX implants and/or anti-VEGF drugs improve visual acuity and central macular thickness in patients affected by RVO.

  11. Real time capable control design with increased life expectancy for research purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epple, S.; Jung, R.; Jalba, K.; Nasui, V.

    2017-05-01

    A new, freely programmable, scalable control system for academic research purposes was developed. The intention was, to have a control unit capable of handling multiple PT1000 temperature sensors at reasonable accuracy and temperature range, as well as digital input signals and providing more powerful output signals at 230V AC than conventional control units. To take full advantage of the system, control-loops are run in real time. The whole system runs independently of a personal computer. The two on-board RS232 connectors allow to connect further units to use more sensors or actuators or to connect other laboratory equipment, as required. To allow usage for long-time experiments, systematically electronic components with low failure-in-time (FIT) rate have been chosen in order to achieve high life expectancy. This paper describes the third prototype, which now provides stable measurements, and an improvement in accuracy compared to the previous designs. A rough estimation about the expected mean time between failures is given. As test case, a thermal solar system to produce hot tap water and assist heating in a single-family house was implemented. The solar fluid pump was power-controlled and several temperatures at different points in the hydraulic system were measured and used in the control algorithms. The hardware design proved suitable to test several different control strategies and their corresponding algorithms for the thermal solar system.

  12. Real-life effectiveness of Singulair (montelukast) in 506 children with mild to moderate asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirav, Israel

    2008-04-01

    Based on the outcome of several randomized controlled trials, the orally active leukotriene receptor antagonist montelukast (Singulair, Merck) has been licensed for treatment of asthma. The drug is favored for treating childhood asthma, where a therapeutic challenge has arisen due to poor compliance with inhalation therapy. To assess the efficiency of and satisfaction with Singulair in asthmatic children under real-life conditions. Montelukast was prescribed for 6 weeks to a cohort of 506 children aged 2 to 18 years with mild to moderate persistent asthma, who were enrolled by 200 primary care pediatricians countrywide. Four clinical correlates of childhood asthma--wheeze, cough, difficulty in breathing, night awakening--were evaluated from patients' diary cards. Due to under-treatment by their physicians, almost 60% of the children were not receiving controller therapy at baseline. By the end of the study, which consisted of montelukast treatment, a significant improvement over baseline was noted in asthma symptoms and severity, as well as in treatment compliance. The participating pediatricians and parents were highly satisfied with the treatment. The results of this extensive study show that the use of montelukast as monotherapy in children presenting with persistent asthma resulted in a highly satisfactory outcome for themselves, their parents and their physicians.

  13. A real life clinical practice of neurologists in the ambulatory setting in Thailand: a pragmatic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannikar Kongbunkiat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The burden of neurological disorders is high in developing countries. Real life data from neurologists as to how they practice in Thailand are limited in literature. Practices of neurologists in a university hospital clinical setting in Thailand were studied. A prospective study was performed at the ambulatory neurology clinic, Khon Kaen University Hospital, between 1 February and 31 October 2009. The following data were recorded: numbers of patients, characteristics of patients, consultation notes, and time spent for each patient. There were three neurologists, each of whom ran one afternoon clinic, once a week. There were 6137 visits during the 9 months, with an average of 681 visits per month. The total number of patients was 2834. The three most common diseases were cerebrovascular diseases (33%, epilepsy (16%, and movement disorders (non-Parkinson’s disease, 12%. Neurologists spent an average of 6.34 minutes per patient. In conclusion, neurologists in medical schools have limited time to take care of each patient. Several strategies are needed in medical education and neurology training to improve the quality of care.

  14. Challenges in real-life diabetes translation research: early lessons from BRIDGES projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Quevedo, Isabel; Siminerio, Linda; L'Heveder, Ronan; Narayan, K M Venkat

    2012-03-01

    Efficacious interventions for prevention of diabetes and its complications exist; however, their implementation is woefully inadequate. The purpose of this project is to qualitatively assess the early lessons learnt from implementing translational research from eleven projects supported by BRIDGES, an International Diabetes Federation program. Semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted with 10 researchers, seeking their views on factors relating to success and barriers to implementation. Data were collected from June to September 2010 by a trained interviewer; information was recorded, transcribed and further analyzed with MAXQDA. Patient recruitment and retention were reported as challenges. Lack of availability of local multidisciplinary teams was highlighted as having a negative effect on the project. Grassroots and community participation were emphasized to have beneficial effects. Flexibility was recognized as a key for successful execution of the projects. Recommendations include: feedback from previous grantees, in the form of pre-submission workshops, and mentoring from experienced investigators with emphasis on the differences between traditional and translational researches. This evaluation underscores the main contingencies to be considered for successful implementation of translational research. It emphasizes the importance of having the three stakeholders: patients, providers, and health systems, acting together in a flexible environment within real life settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Neuropsychiatric adverse drug reactions in children initiated on montelukast in real-life practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benard, Brigitte; Bastien, Valérie; Vinet, Benjamin; Yang, Roger; Krajinovic, Maja; Ducharme, Francine M

    2017-08-01

    Although montelukast is generally well tolerated, postmarketing studies have reported serious neuropsychiatric adverse drug reactions (ADRs) leading to a United States Food and Drug Administration black box warning. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of neuropsychiatric ADRs leading to discontinuation of montelukast in asthmatic children.We conducted a retrospective cohort study in children aged 1-17 years initiated on montelukast. In a nested cohort study, children initiated on montelukast as monotherapy or adjunct therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) were matched to those initiated on ICS monotherapy. A non-leading parental interview served to ascertain the occurrence of any ADRs with any asthma medication, and circumstances related to, and evolution of, the event.Out of the 106 participants who initiated montelukast, most were male (58%), Caucasian (62%) with a median (interquartile range) age of 5 (3-8) years. The incidence (95% CI) of drug cessation due to neuropsychiatric ADRs was 16 (10-26)%, mostly occurring within 2 weeks. Most frequent ADRs were irritability, aggressiveness and sleep disturbances. The relative risk of neuropsychiatric ADRs associated with montelukast versus ICS was 12 (2-90).In the real-life setting, asthmatic children initiated on montelukast experienced a notable risk of neuropsychiatric ADRs leading to drug cessation, that is significantly higher than that associated with ICS. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  16. Visualizing Dealumination of a Single Zeolite Domain in a Real-Life Catalytic Cracking Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Sam; Paalanen, Pasi P; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-05

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts play a central role in the chemical conversion of crude oil fractions. Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) we investigate the chemistry of one fresh and two industrially deactivated (ECAT) FCC catalysts at the single zeolite domain level. Spectro-microscopic data at the Fe L3 , La M5 , and Al K X-ray absorption edges reveal differing levels of deposited Fe on the ECAT catalysts corresponding with an overall loss in tetrahedral Al within the zeolite domains. Using La as a localization marker, we have developed a novel methodology to map the changing Al distribution of single zeolite domains within real-life FCC catalysts. It was found that significant changes in the zeolite domain size distributions as well as the loss of Al from the zeolite framework occur. Furthermore, inter- and intraparticle heterogeneities in the dealumination process were observed, revealing the complex interplay between metal-mediated pore accessibility loss and zeolite dealumination. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  17. Neural correlates of risk perception during real-life risk communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmälzle, Ralf; Häcker, Frank; Renner, Britta; Honey, Christopher J; Schupp, Harald T

    2013-06-19

    During global health crises, such as the recent H1N1 pandemic, the mass media provide the public with timely information regarding risk. To obtain new insights into how these messages are received, we measured neural data while participants, who differed in their preexisting H1N1 risk perceptions, viewed a TV report about H1N1. Intersubject correlation (ISC) of neural time courses was used to assess how similarly the brains of viewers responded to the TV report. We found enhanced intersubject correlations among viewers with high-risk perception in the anterior cingulate, a region which classical fMRI studies associated with the appraisal of threatening information. By contrast, neural coupling in sensory-perceptual regions was similar for the high and low H1N1-risk perception groups. These results demonstrate a novel methodology for understanding how real-life health messages are processed in the human brain, with particular emphasis on the role of emotion and differences in risk perceptions.

  18. Exploring sustainability transitions in households: insights from real-life experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baedeker, Carolin; Buhl, Johannes; Greiff, Kathrin; Hasselkuß, Marco; Liedtke, Christa; Lukas, Melanie

    2016-04-01

    Societal transformation towards sustainable consumption and production, especially in urban areas, is a key challenge. The design and implementation of sustainable product service systems (PSS) might be the initial point, in which private households play a major role. The Sustainable LivingLab research infrastructure was developed as an experimental setting for investigating consumption and production patterns in private households, especially to explore socio-technical innovations which are helpful to guide sustainability transitions. The suggested presentation describes results of several real-life experiments conducted in German households, e.g. the project SusLabNRW (North-Rhine Westphalia as part of the European SusLabNWE-Project), the EnerTransRuhr project as well as the PATHWAYS project that explore patterns of action, time use, social practices and the related resource use in private households. The presentation gives an overview of the employed methods and analysed data (qualitative interviews, social network analysis, survey on household activities and inventories and a sustainability assessment (resource profiles - MIPS household analysis). Households' resource consumption was calculated in all fields of activity to analyse social practices' impact. The presentation illustrates how aggregated data can inform scenario analysis and concludes with an outlook onto transition pathways at household level and socio-technical innovations in the fields of housing, nutrition and mobility.

  19. High-Performance Local Search for Solving Real-Life Inventory Routing Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoist, Thierry; Estellon, Bertrand; Gardi, Frédéric; Jeanjean, Antoine

    In this paper, a real-life routing and scheduling problem encountered is addressed. The problem, which consists in optimizing the delivery of fluids by tank trucks on a long-term horizon, is a generalization of the vehicle routing problem with vendor managed inventory replenishment. The particularity of this problem is that the vendor monitors the customers’ inventories, deciding when and how much each inventory should be replenished by routing tank trucks. Thus, the objective of the vendor is to minimize the logistic cost of the inventory replenishment for all customers over the long run. Then, an original local-search heuristic is presented for solving the short-term planning problem. The engineering of this algorithm follows the three-layers methodology for “high-performance local search” recently introduced by some of the authors. A computational study demonstrates that our solution is both effective, efficient and robust, providing long-term savings exceeding 20 % on average, compared to solutions computed by expert planners or even a classical greedy algorithm. The resulting software is now exploited in North America by one of the French industry leaders.

  20. Goal Definition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Anders; Laurent, Alexis; Owsianiak, Mikołaj

    2017-01-01

    The goal definition is the first phase of an LCA and determines the purpose of a study in detail. This chapter teaches how to perform the six aspects of a goal definition: (1) Intended applications of the results, (2) Limitations due to methodological choices, (3) Decision context and reasons for...

  1. The effects of a life goal-setting technique in a preventive care program for frail community-dwelling older people: a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuri, Yoshimi; Takabatake, Shinichi; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Oka, Mari; Fujiwara, Taro

    2016-05-12

    Frailty among older people is associated with an increased risk of needing care. There have been many reports on preventive care programs for frail older people, but few have shown positive effects on disability prevention. Physical exercise programs for frail older people affect elements such as physical fitness and balance, but are less effective for disability outcomes and are not followed up in the longer term. We developed a life goal-setting technique (LGST). Our objective was to determine the effect of a LGST plus standard preventive care program for community-dwelling frail older people. We used a cluster nonrandomized controlled trial with seven intervention and nine matched control groups, with baseline assessment and follow-up at 3, 6, and 9 months. Participants were 176 frail older people, aged 65 years or over, living in the community in Izumi, Osaka, Japan. All participants attended regular 120 min preventive care exercise classes each week, over 3 months. They also received oral care and nutrition education. The intervention groups alone received life goal-setting support. We assessed outcomes longitudinally, comparing pre-intervention with follow-up. The primary outcome measure was health improvement according to the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare's "Kihon Checklist" for assessment of frailty and quality of life (QOL), analyzed with a two-way ANOVA and post-test comparison. Secondary outcomes included physical functions and assessment of life goals. The improvement on the Kihon Checklist for the intervention group was approximately 60 % from baseline to 9-months follow-up; the control group improved by approximately 40 %. The difference between groups was significant at 3-month (p = 0.043) and 6-month (p = 0.015) follow-ups but not at 9-month (p = 0.098) follow-up. Analysis of QOL yielded a significant time × group interaction effect (p = 0.022). The effect was significant at 3 months in the intervention

  2. Get the most from your data: a propensity score model comparison on real-life data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Ferdinand,1 Mirko Otto,2 Christel Weiss1 1Department of Biomathematics and Medical Statistics, 2Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Mannheim (UMM, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany Purpose: In the past, the propensity score has been in the middle of several discussions in terms of its abilities and limitations. With a comprehensive review and a practical example, this study examines the effect of propensity score analysis of real-life data and introduces a simple and effective clinical approach. Materials and methods: After the authors reviewed current publications, they applied their insights to the data of a nonrandomized clinical trial in bariatric surgery. This study examined weight loss in 173 patients where 127 patients received Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery and 46 patients sleeve gastrectomy. Both groups underwent analysis in terms of their covariate distribution using Mann–Whitney U and χ2 testing. Mean differences within excess weight loss in native data were examined with Student’s t-test. Three propensity score models were defined and matching was performed. Covariate distribution and mean differences in excess weight loss were checked with Mann–Whitney U and χ2 testing. Results: Native data implied a significant difference in excess weight loss. The propensity score models did not confirm this difference. All models proved that both surgical procedures were equal, due to their weight-loss induction. Covariate distribution improved after the matching procedure in terms of an equal distribution. Conclusion: It seemed that a practical clinical approach with outcome-related covariates as a propensity score base is the ideal midpoint between an equal distribution in covariates and an acceptable loss of data. Nevertheless, propensity score models designed with clinical intent seemed to be absolutely suitable for overcoming heterogeneity in covariate distribution. Keywords: nonrandomized clinical

  3. Quality of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation during real-life out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenborg, Tore; Granfeldt, Asger; Lippert, Freddy; Riddervold, Ingunn Skogstad; Folke, Fredrik

    2017-11-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can increase survival in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). However, little is known about bystander CPR quality in real-life OHCA. To describe bystander CPR quality based on automated external defibrillator (AED) CPR process data during OHCA and compare it with the European Resuscitation Council 2010 and 2015 Guidelines. We included OHCA cases from the Capital Region, Denmark, (2012-2016) where a Zoll AED was used before ambulance arrival. For cases with at least one minute of continuous data, the initial 10min of CPR data were analysed for compression rate, depth, fraction and compressions delivered for each minute of CPR. Data are presented as median [25th;75th percentile]. We included 136 cases. Bystander median compression rate was 101min(-1) [94;113], compression depth was 4.8cm [3.9;5.8] and compressions per minute were 62 [48;73]. Of all cases, the median compression rate was 100-120min(-1) in 42%, compression depth was 5-6cm in 26%, compression fraction≥60% in 51% and compressions delivered per minute exceeded 60 in 54%. In a minute-to-minute analysis, we found no evidence of deterioration in CPR quality over time. The median peri-shock pause was 27s [23;31] and the pre-shock pause was 19s [17;22]. The median CPR performed by bystanders using AEDs with audio-feedback in OHCA was within guideline recommendations without deterioration over time. Compression depth had poorer quality compared with other parameters. To improve bystander CPR quality, focus should be on proper compression depth and minimizing pauses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-life conditions of use of sodium phosphate tablets for colon cleansing before colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagège, Hervé; Laugier, René; Nahon, Stéphane; Coulom, Pierre; Isnard-Bagnis, Corinne; Albert-Marty, Annaïck

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the real-life conditions of use, efficacy, safety, and acceptability of sodium phosphate (NaP) tablets for colon cleansing in routine medical practice in France. A total of 996 patients undergoing bowel preparation were enrolled by 108 gastroenterologists in this observational, longitudinal, prospective, multicenter study. The conditions of use of NaP tablets were assessed with a composite endpoint, which included six criteria for patient compliance with the recommended administration scheme and a criterion for the absence of contraindications to NaP use. Adequate use of NaP was reported for 75.1 % of the patients. The main reasons for misuse were a smaller fluid intake than expected with a dose of 4 tablets and noncompliance with age-related contraindications. The quality of cleansing was satisfactory: the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) total score was 7 or higher in 75.4 % of the patients. Gastroscopy associated with colonoscopy in 38.9 % of the patients revealed gastric lesions, which were considered as possibly related to the use of NaP tablets in 10.3 % of them. Vomiting occurred in 9.8 % of the patients, and 0.6 % discontinued bowel preparation after an adverse event. No electrolyte disorders or renal impairment was reported, even if not systematically sought. The acceptability of the NaP tablets was high, particularly among patients who previously had undergone other methods of bowel preparation. Despite being defined according to strict criteria, adequate use of NaP tablets was observed in a high percentage of patients. The quality of colon cleansing and the safety and acceptability of NaP tablets were satisfactory and consistent with data from randomized clinical studies.

  5. Local contextual processing of abstract and meaningful real-life images in professional athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogelson, Noa; Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Acero, Rafael Martín

    2012-05-01

    We investigated the effect of abstract versus real-life meaningful images from sports on local contextual processing in two groups of professional athletes. Local context was defined as the occurrence of a short predictive series of stimuli occurring before delivery of a target event. EEG was recorded in 10 professional basketball players and 9 professional athletes of individual sports during three sessions. In each session, a different set of visual stimuli were presented: triangles facing left, up, right, or down; four images of a basketball player throwing a ball; four images of a baseball player pitching a baseball. Stimuli consisted of 15 % targets and 85 % of equal numbers of three types of standards. Recording blocks consisted of targets preceded by randomized sequences of standards and by sequences including a predictive sequence signaling the occurrence of a subsequent target event. Subjects pressed a button in response to targets. In all three sessions, reaction times and peak P3b latencies were shorter for predicted targets compared with random targets, the last most informative stimulus of the predictive sequence induced a robust P3b, and N2 amplitude was larger for random targets compared with predicted targets. P3b and N2 peak amplitudes were larger in the professional basketball group in comparison with professional athletes of individual sports, across the three sessions. The findings of this study suggest that local contextual information is processed similarly for abstract and for meaningful images and that professional basketball players seem to allocate more attentional resources in the processing of these visual stimuli.

  6. Real-Life Clinical Practice of Using the Xpert MTB/RIF Assay in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawkitinarong, Kamon; Suwanpimolkul, Gompol; Kateruttanakul, Pairaj; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Ubolyam, Sasiwimol; Sophonphan, Jiratchaya; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ruxrungtham, Kiat

    2017-05-15

    Delayed diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and drug-resistant TB are major challenges of TB control in Thailand. This study assessed the practicality of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay in a real-life setting with high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB). This prospective study was conducted at 3 large tertiary care hospitals. Patients who had suspected PTB were enrolled into the study. Expectorated sputum samples were sent for staining, mycobacterial culture, and Xpert MTB/RIF. Four hundred ninety-four patients were enrolled. From 355 cases with final diagnosis of PTB, 263 (71.8%) had definite diagnosis and 92 cases had probable diagnosis. Among TB culture-positive cases, Xpert MTB/RIF had 100% and 81% sensitivity in sputum smear-positive and smear-negative groups, respectively. The specificity was 95.7%. The sensitivity and positive predictive value of Xpert MTB/RIF in culture-negative but clinically diagnosed PTB was 37.8% and 83.8%, respectively. Centrifugation was required in 59% cases with scanty sputum. Five cases were false-positive by Xpert MTB/RIF in patients with nontuberculous mycobacteria, old PTB scar, and immune reconstitution syndrome. Discordant rifampicin susceptibility results of Xpert MTB/RIF and mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT) were confirmed by using rpoB gene sequencing, which raised the sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF in detecting rifampicin resistance to 93.8%. Xpert MTB/RIF is an effective tool in diagnosing PTB but will be more cost-effective for sputum-negative patients and in settings with high prevalence of rifampicin resistance. Early diagnosis of TB results in early treatment and implementation of strategies to limit spreading of TB. Sputum centrifugation may increase the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF.

  7. Embracing the role of real life studies in the management of rare cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available For commonly occurring cancers, as well as situations or conditions that are frequently encountered in oncological setting, plenty of prospective data are available to oncologists or medical practitioners to facilitate the decision making process. However, for rare cancers and atypical scenarios, there are limited references in the current literature. Understandably, this is attributed to the difficulty in recruiting enough patients to systematically study such rare manifestations. Under these circumstances, the importance of real life data that are collected via population-based studies, case series, and case reports is especially significant. In the current issue of AMOR, the journal features three case reports that describe distinctly uncommon oncological scenarios. In one report, Vafaii and Shao highlighted the stepwise development of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL from diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL via precursor Reed-Sternberg/Hodgkin cells, as confirmed via multiple biopsies. They suggested that cHL and DLBCL can be clonally related, even when developing metachronously in the same patient, based on the presence of a hybrid intermediate stage. Meanwhile, Xian and colleagues reported the surgical management of brachial plexus pain that is caused by Pancoast tumor. According to them, the condition closely resembles the symptoms of brachial plexus injury and thus, the underlying cause is easily misdiagnosed. Finally, Coehlo and co-workers presented a report on the prolonged disease control of esthesioneuroblastoma using a multimodality approach, combining surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy to derive an effective treatment strategy. It is noteworthy that despite an initial distant metastasis setback, the patient responded positively to palliative chemotherapy, thus proving the value of the much debated approach.In short, these case reports are an invaluable addition to existing medical literature concerning the diagnoses and

  8. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-03-13

    Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are "self-performing" and "contain a solution." The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one's aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-life situations, whereas external causality refers to environmental factors, such as experimental conditions, causing such responses. To investigate the issue, we developed a novel approach that assesses causal attribution under experimental conditions. During fMRI scanning, subjects were required to engage in virtual frustrating situations and play the role of protagonists by verbalizing social responses, which were socially adaptive or non-adaptive. After fMRI scanning, the subjects reported their causal attribution index of the psychological reaction to the experimental condition. We performed a correlation analysis between the causal attribution index and brain activity. We hypothesized that the brain region whose activation would have a positive and negative correlation with the self-reported index of the causal attributions would be regarded as neural correlates of internal and external causal attribution of social responses, respectively. We found a significant negative correlation between external causal attribution and neural responses in the right anterior temporal lobe for adaptive social behaviors. This region is involved in the integration of emotional and social information. These results suggest that, particularly in adaptive social behavior, the social demands of frustrating situations, which involve external causality, may be integrated by a neural response in the right anterior temporal lobe.

  9. Long-term Course of Alzheimer Disease in Patients Treated According to the Dutch Dementia Guideline at a Memory Clinic A "Real-Life" Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Droogsma, Erika; van Asselt, Dieneke; van Steijn, Jolanda; Diekhuis, Marjolein; Veeger, Nic; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction:There is little knowledge of the long-term course of Alzheimer disease (AD) in light of current pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions provided in a real-life setting.Methods:The Frisian Alzheimer's Disease Cohort study is a real-life study of the course of AD in patients

  10. Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real-life? : A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Ijntema, Hiske; Meyerbröker, Katharina|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/343319594; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2015-01-01

    In virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET), patients are exposed to virtual environments that resemble feared real-life situations. The aim of the current study was to assess the extent to which VRET gains can be observed in real-life situations. We conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials

  11. Is fear in your head? A comparison of instructed and real-life expressions of emotion in the face and body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Lior; Marom, Inbal; Petranker, Rotem; Aviezer, Hillel

    2017-04-01

    The majority of emotion perception studies utilize instructed and stereotypical expressions of faces or bodies. While such stimuli are highly standardized and well-recognized, their resemblance to real-life expressions of emotion remains unknown. Here we examined facial and body expressions of fear and anger during real-life situations and compared their recognition to that of instructed expressions of the same emotions. In order to examine the source of the affective signal, expressions of emotion were presented as faces alone, bodies alone, and naturally, as faces with bodies. The results demonstrated striking deviations between recognition of instructed and real-life stimuli, which differed as a function of the emotion expressed. In real-life fearful expressions of emotion, bodies were far better recognized than faces, a pattern not found with instructed expressions of emotion. Anger reactions were better recognized from the body than from the face in both real-life and instructed stimuli. However, the real-life stimuli were overall better recognized than their instructed counterparts. These results indicate that differences between instructed and real-life expressions of emotion are prevalent and raise caution against an overreliance of researchers on instructed affective stimuli. The findings also demonstrate that in real life, facial expression perception may rely heavily on information from the contextualizing body. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Targets, attitudes, and goals of psychiatrists treating patients with schizophrenia: key outcome drivers, role of quality of life, and place of long-acting antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bartolomeis A

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea de Bartolomeis,1 Andrea Fagiolini,2 Marco Vaggi,3 Claudio Vampini4 1Section of Psychiatry and Treatment Resistant Psychosis, Department of Neuroscience, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Molecular and Developmental Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy; 3Mental Health and Drug Addiction Department, Genovese, Genoa, Italy; 4Department of Mental Health, Ospedale Civile Maggiore and ULSS 20, Verona, Italy Purpose: This survey of Italian psychiatrists was conducted to better define drivers of schizophrenia treatment choice in real-life practice, particularly for use of long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics.Methods: Between October 15 and December 15, 2014, 1,000 surveys were sent to psychiatrists who treat schizophrenic patients; 709 completed questionnaires were analyzed (71% response rate.Results: The two most important factors determining therapy success were efficacy (75% of responses and tolerability (45% followed by global functioning (24% and quality of life (17%. LAI antipsychotics were most often used to facilitate regular treatment monitoring (49%, and 41% of psychiatrists thought that patients with low adherence who had failed oral therapy were well-suited for LAI antipsychotics. Only 4% of respondents saw LAI antipsychotics as appropriate for patients without other therapeutic options.Conclusion: Although efficacy and tolerability were the most common factors used to evaluate treatment success in schizophrenia, psychiatrists also consider QoL and global functioning to be important. Keywords: quality of life, long-acting injectable antipsychotics, schizophrenia, survey

  13. UNSCHOOLING AND HOW I BECAME LIBERATED: THE TEENAGE LIBERATION HANDBOOK, QUITTING SCHOOL AND GETTING A REAL LIFE AND EDUCATION 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael JODAH 

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five years ago, Grace Llewellyn, a school teacher from Colorado, published The Teenage Liberation Handbook: How to Quit School and Get A Real Life and Education. As a teenager struggling with many issues, including bullying, social isolation and poverty, I concluded that school was largely contributing to my misery — thanks to this book, I finally had the clarity and courage to leave school. This is a retrospective and narrative inquiry on my experiences growing up and the book that has helped transform my life and the lives of other unschoolers. 

  14. Aircraft Engine Life-Consumption Monitoring for Real-Time Reliability Determination Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The object of this research is to develop an in-service life-monitor system for the prediction of the remaining component and system life of aircraft engines. The...

  15. 'The real stuff': implications for nursing of assessing and measuring a terminally ill person's quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annells, M; Koch, T

    2001-11-01

    Two quality of life (QoL) assessment and measurement tools, the Client Generated Index (CGI) and the McGill Quality of Life (MQOL) questionnaires, were trialled within district nursing palliative care to test usefulness and feasibility for holistic intervention selection, individualized palliative care planning, and measurement of the quality of dying. The specific focus of this paper is to discuss the less tangible outcomes of the trial, which illuminate the partly 'hidden' value and nature of clinical nursing. These outcomes include awareness that the use of such tools may: by actual administration of the tool be, in and of itself, a therapeutic nursing action; focus on 'the real stuff from the client's perspective, that which matters most to the terminally ill client, but may not be classically considered as prompting nursing intervention; and facilitate 'the real stuff' of nursing, perhaps known but not usually articulated by nurses, and which usually does not feature on care plans nor in time allocation schedules.

  16. Vertical Jump Biomechanics Altered With Virtual Overhead Goal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Hegedus, Eric J; Taylor, Jeffrey B

    2017-04-01

    Virtual environments with real-time feedback can simulate extrinsic goals that mimic real life conditions. The purpose was to compare jump performance and biomechanics with a physical overhead goal (POG) and with a virtual overhead goal (VOG). Fourteen female subjects participated (age: 18.8 ± 1.1 years, height: 163.2 ± 8.1 cm, weight 63.0 ± 7.9 kg). Sagittal plane trunk, hip, and knee biomechanics were calculated during the landing and take-off phases of drop vertical jump with different goal conditions. Repeated-measures ANOVAs determined differences between goal conditions. Vertical jump height displacement was not different during VOG compared with POG. Greater hip extensor moment (P biomechanical testing, screening, and training conditions.

  17. AI-test - A real life expert system for electronic troubleshooting (a description and a case study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Bassat, Moshe; Ben-Arie, D.; Beniaminy, Israel; Cheifetz, Jonathan; Klinger, Mordechai

    AITEST is a real-life expert system for functional fault detection and isolation in electronic equipment. Its main features include probabilistic diagnostic assessment and effective manangement of the testing process, including gaol-oriented test evaluation and selection. Together with detailed documentation of the unit under test, AITEST essentially provides an intelligent electronic service manual that guides the user through the diagnostic process. Preliminary experience with AITEST for troubleshooting a dot matrix printer is reported. Implementation issues are also discussed.

  18. Measurement of Walking Ground Reactions in Real-Life Environments: A Systematic Review of Techniques and Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erfan Shahabpoor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring natural human gait in real-life environments is essential in many applications, including quantification of disease progression, monitoring the effects of treatment, and monitoring alteration of performance biomarkers in professional sports. Nevertheless, developing reliable and practical techniques and technologies necessary for continuous real-life monitoring of gait is still an open challenge. A systematic review of English-language articles from scientific databases including Scopus, ScienceDirect, Pubmed, IEEE Xplore, EBSCO and MEDLINE were carried out to analyse the ‘accuracy’ and ‘practicality’ of the current techniques and technologies for quantitative measurement of the tri-axial walking ground reactions outside the laboratory environment, and to highlight their strengths and shortcomings. In total, 679 relevant abstracts were identified, 54 full-text papers were included in the paper and the quantitative results of 17 papers were used for meta-analysis and comparison. Three classes of methods were reviewed: (1 methods based on measured kinematic data; (2 methods based on measured plantar pressure; and (3 methods based on direct measurement of ground reactions. It was found that all three classes of methods have competitive accuracy levels with methods based on direct measurement of the ground reactions showing highest accuracy while being least practical for long-term real-life measurement. On the other hand, methods that estimate ground reactions using measured body kinematics show highest practicality of the three classes of methods reviewed. Among the most prominent technical and technological challenges are: (1 reducing the size and price of tri-axial load-cells; (2 improving the accuracy of orientation measurement using IMUs; (3 minimizing the number and optimizing the location of required IMUs for kinematic measurement; (4 increasing the durability of pressure insole sensors, and (5 enhancing the robustness and

  19. Measurement of Walking Ground Reactions in Real-Life Environments: A Systematic Review of Techniques and Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabpoor, Erfan; Pavic, Aleksandar

    2017-09-12

    Monitoring natural human gait in real-life environments is essential in many applications, including quantification of disease progression, monitoring the effects of treatment, and monitoring alteration of performance biomarkers in professional sports. Nevertheless, developing reliable and practical techniques and technologies necessary for continuous real-life monitoring of gait is still an open challenge. A systematic review of English-language articles from scientific databases including Scopus, ScienceDirect, Pubmed, IEEE Xplore, EBSCO and MEDLINE were carried out to analyse the 'accuracy' and 'practicality' of the current techniques and technologies for quantitative measurement of the tri-axial walking ground reactions outside the laboratory environment, and to highlight their strengths and shortcomings. In total, 679 relevant abstracts were identified, 54 full-text papers were included in the paper and the quantitative results of 17 papers were used for meta-analysis and comparison. Three classes of methods were reviewed: (1) methods based on measured kinematic data; (2) methods based on measured plantar pressure; and (3) methods based on direct measurement of ground reactions. It was found that all three classes of methods have competitive accuracy levels with methods based on direct measurement of the ground reactions showing highest accuracy while being least practical for long-term real-life measurement. On the other hand, methods that estimate ground reactions using measured body kinematics show highest practicality of the three classes of methods reviewed. Among the most prominent technical and technological challenges are: (1) reducing the size and price of tri-axial load-cells; (2) improving the accuracy of orientation measurement using IMUs; (3) minimizing the number and optimizing the location of required IMUs for kinematic measurement; (4) increasing the durability of pressure insole sensors, and (5) enhancing the robustness and versatility of the

  20. Long-term treatment of ADHD with stimulants: A large observational study of real-life patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Powell, Shelagh G.; Thomsen, Per Hove; Frydenberg, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate 410 real-life patients treated with stimulants and assessed systematically over several years. Method: Naturalistic observational study. A database was compiled on the basis of a review of the medical charts of patients attending a specialized ADHD clinic. Results: The dive...... and depend on individual factors, that individual factors influence outcome, and that patients with ADHD should be individually monitored and stimulant dosages adjusted continuously. (J. of Att. Dis. 2011; 15(6) 439-451)...

  1. Schizophrenia in real life: courses, symptoms and functioning in an Italian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turola Maria

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the general belief, schizophrenia is associated with the concepts of seriousness, incurability, dangerousness: this is incorrect. In recent decades, the interest in course studies increased and different trends emerged, not necessarily chronic, with the possibility of remission. The plan of this research was to draw a picture of the schizophrenia syndrome in a specific geographic area, in the past and at present time: this allows to detect needs, weaknesses and strengths, for a better planning of future interventions. Methods The course of all cases diagnosed as schizophrenia (N = 1,759 in the period 1978–2008, was retrospectively studied in the entire population of an Italian province by observing, for a mean period of 12 years per person, age at first psychiatric consultation, number and length of admissions for both acute symptoms and residential-rehabilitation programs, number of interventions in outpatients. The cases under treatment (N = 842, were evaluated in terms of symptoms, using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and in terms of functioning, using the Personal and Social Functioning Scale. Results The disease course differs significantly between genders: males have an earlier age at first consultation (about 7 years earlier, higher admission rates, greater number of outpatient interventions and personal and social functioning significantly worse. Hospitalization resulted often unnecessary: 23.1% of cases were never hospitalized and 67.2% spent less than one week per year in hospital. A quarter of the cases meets the international criteria for remission and more than 75% are asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic; only 5.3% of cases shows severe symptoms. However, Personal and Social Functioning highlights, in about 1/3 of cases, relevant or serious problems mainly in Work and Relationships areas, whilst Aggressiveness is a serious problem only in 9%. Conclusions In this population, schizophrenia in real

  2. Management of ED under the "severe distress" criteria in the NHS: a real-life study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohee, Amar; Bretsztajn, Laure; Storey, Anne; Eardley, Ian

    2014-04-01

    The United Kingdom is unusual in that a significant proportion of patients with erectile dysfunction (ED) have their treatment fully reimbursed by the National Health Service (NHS). This may have consequences for the choice of treatment and for compliance with treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use and cost implications of phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor in an NHS setting. Basic demographics and data on ED management for patients treated from January 2000 to April 2011 were obtained from a prospectively accrued database. We reviewed drug usage and costs as well as switching between drugs. Patients were given the choice of all available therapies and were followed up annually. Switching, compliance, and costs of treating ED under the "severe distress" criteria in the NHS were reviewed for this study. Two thousand one hundred fifty-nine patients qualified for reimbursed therapy. Two hundred twenty-six patients were excluded from further analysis owing to missing data. Patients were followed up on an annual basis. The mean patient age was 60.2 years (min 23, max 90), and the mean follow-up was 50.8 months (min 1, max 127). Six hundred ninety-six were started on sildenafil, 990 on tadalafil, 163 on vardenafil, and 84 on intracavernosal alprostadil. Eighteen percent of patients initially started on the scheme and stopped medication unilaterally. Of the patients, 12.3% changed their medication during follow-up. The cost of drugs increased year by year from £257,100 in 2007 to £352,519 in 2011. Our real-life observational study shows that in our institution, dropout of therapy is unusual. We hypothesize that this reflects, in part, the reimbursement issue. We also found that switching between drugs was unusual, although there are several possible explanations for that. Although this is a successful system for the patients, the hospital, which bears the costs of medication, is finding this an increasing economic drain. © 2014 International Society

  3. Adherence and quality of life in adults and children during 3-years of SLIT treatment with Grazax-a real life study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiotseridis, Hampus; Arvidsson, Peter; Backer, Vibeke

    2018-01-01

    the possibility of home administration of allergen therapy, but adherence is more uncertain. The aim of the study was to investigate the adherence with GRAZAX in adults and children ≥ 5 years during three consecutive years of treatment. This was a non-interventional, prospective, observational, multi-center, open......Respiratory allergic disease represents a global health problem, 30% of the population suffers from allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 20% suffer from asthma. Allergy immunotherapy induce immunological tolerance and thereby modify the response to allergens and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) offers......-label study to investigate adherence, quality of life, safety and tolerability of GRAZAX in adult and pediatric patients in a real-life setting. During the 3-years study period estimation of adherence was done regularly. Quality of life as well as symptom score was also assessed. In total, 399 patients (236...

  4. Methods of modeling TCO residential real estate in the life cycles of buildings as a promising energy efficiency management tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulakov Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Building and developing an affordable housing market is a huge challenge for Russia’s national economy. Today, the housing construction industry finds itself in a situation torn by a conflict caused by the simultaneous needs to minimize the housing construction costs in order to make housing more affordable for Russians and to increase the energy efficiency of the housing projects, which is associated with additional costs for developers. To find solutions to this contradictory situation, one needs new theoretical and practical approaches and economic tools. The global economic trend of managing goods and services on the basis of the value of goods and services over the life cycle is also manifested in the construction industry in Russia. The problem of forming a new economic thinking in the housing sector predetermines the perception of the value of housing not only as the price of purchased real estate, but as the equivalent of the total cost of ownership of real estate throughout its life cycle. This approach allows to compensate the initial rise in the cost of construction resulting from the introduction of energy-efficient technologies by savings in the operational phase of the life cycle of the property. In this regard, management of the total cost of real estate ownership based on energy modeling is of high research and practical relevance.

  5. Profinteg: A Tool for Real-Life Assessment of Activities of Daily Living in Patients with Cognitive Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Anselme

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Although there are many instruments for assessing activities of daily living (IADL in brain injured patients, few instruments specifically target cognitive impairment and its impact on IADL. The present study presents the development of the Profinteg instrument, a tool for real-life assessment as well as rehabilitation of IADL in patients with cognitive impairment. This two-stage instrument covers over 90 activities. Psychometric properties of the different Profinteg measures were explored in twenty-five patients with mild to severe cognitive difficulties and twenty-five caregivers. The feasibility of the Profinteg rehabilitation procedure was explored in three patients. Excellent interrater reliability ('r' > 0.90,' ''p' < 0.01 was observed for all measures. Good sensitivity to changes in IADL disability over time was also observed ('T' = 2.37, 'p' < 0.02. Significant improvement of IADL functioning was found after rehabilitation guided by Profinteg assessment. The Profinteg instrument detects with precision the difficulties patients encounter in their real-life setting via (1 assessment of a large number of activities and (2 detailed decomposition of activities into sub-activities. The Profinteg tool also provides promising results for guidance of IADL rehabilitation in the patient's real-life environment.

  6. Rasch modelling of Mathematics and Science teachers’ preferences of real-life situations to be used in Mathematical Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Julie

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to ascertain the real-life situations that teachers, as stakeholders, would find suitable and appropriate to deal with in Mathematical Literacy (a compulsory subject for students who are not doing Mathematics at the Further Education and Training level of the South African education system, we embarked on a study known as the Relevance of School Mathematics Education (ROSME. The principle underpinning this article is that there are times when it is necessary to assess the functionality and quality of questionnaires used to ascertain affective domain issues. The study provides an analysis technique which is not affected by the sample of individuals completing a questionnaire, provided that the instrument meets particular requirements. It thus improves the rigour of measurement. Various statistics obtained in this study showed that the instrument used to determine the real-life situations which teachers prefer for Mathematical Literacy reasonably identifies this variable. However, it is cautioned that much more care needs to be exercised in construction of such instruments. The results also indicated the real-life situations which teachers most and least preferred to be included in Mathematical Literacy, providing useful information for policy-makers and textbook authors on contextual situations to be included in learning materials.

  7. A Delphi Study to Detect Deficiencies and Propose Actions in Real Life Treatment of Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo García-Layana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Spanish retina specialists were surveyed in order to propose actions to decrease deficiencies in real-life neovascular age macular degeneration treatment (nv-AMD. Methods. One hundred experts, members of the Spanish Vitreoretinal Society (SERV, were invited to complete an online survey of 52 statements about nv-AMD management with a modified Delphi methodology. Four rounds were performed using a 5-point Linkert scale. Recommendations were developed after analyzing the differences between the results and the SERV guidelines recommendations. Results. Eighty-seven specialists completed all the Delphi rounds. Once major potential deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment were identified, 15 recommendations were developed with a high level of agreement. Consensus statements to reduce the burden of the disease included the use of treat and extend regimen and to reduce the amount of diagnostic tests during the loading phase and training technical staff to perform these tests and reduce the time between relapse detection and reinjection, as well as establishing patient referral protocols to outside general ophthalmology clinics. Conclusion. The level of agreement with the final recommendations for nv-AMD treatment among Spanish retinal specialist was high indicating that some actions could be applied in order to reduce the deficiencies in real-life nv-AMD treatment.

  8. Self-disclosure through weblogs and perceptions of online and "real-life" friendships among female bloggers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Cynthia M H; Cornish, Marilyn; Erspamer, Nicole; Kampman, Lia

    2010-04-01

    The current study examined female bloggers' perceptions of online and "real-life" same-sex friendships and examined relationships between self-disclosure through blogs and perceptions of the two types of friendships. Three hundred seven female bloggers (M age = 34.56 years) completed an online survey regarding friendship satisfaction and perceptions of intimacy-promoting interaction patterns in friendships. One hundred respondents' weblogs were analyzed for self-disclosure. Self-reported self-disclosure was positively correlated with number of online friendships and satisfaction with online friendships. Although participants reported having close online friends, they perceived real-life friendships as more likely than online friendships to possess intimacy-promoting interaction patterns. These perceptions did not differ as a function of self-disclosure through blogging, although bloggers who were categorized as higher in disclosure were more satisfied with online friendships than were bloggers who were categorized as lower in disclosure. These results suggest a relationship between self-disclosure through blogging and online relationship satisfaction among women in middle adulthood but that these women perceive real-life friendships as more likely to offer interaction patterns that foster intimacy.

  9. Real life cost and quality of life associated with continuous intraduodenal levodopa infusion compared with oral treatment in Parkinson patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, C.; Beiske, A. G.; Reiertsen, O.

    2014-01-01

    Advanced-stage Parkinson's disease (PD) strongly affects quality of life (QoL). Continuous intraduodenal administration of levodopa (IDL) is efficacious, but entails high costs. This study aims to estimate these costs in routine care. 10 patients with advanced-PD who switched from oral medication...

  10. Home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin G replacement therapy under real-life conditions in children and adults with antibody deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG therapy is an alternative to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG therapy. Methods We evaluated the efficacy and safety of the SCIG Vivaglobin® (formerly known as Beriglobin® SC under real-life conditions in a post-marketing observational study in 82 patients with primary or secondary antibody deficiencies. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL was evaluated in a subset of 30 patients previously treated with IVIG (including 11 children Results The mean serum immunoglobulin G (IgG trough level during SCIG treatment (7.5 g/L was higher than during previous IVIG treatment (6.6 g/L; p Conclusion This study confirms that therapy with Vivaglobin® at home is effective, safe, well tolerated, and improves quality of life in patients with antibody deficiency.

  11. Working as simulated patient has effects on real patient life – Preliminary insights from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simmenroth-Nayda, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Persons who simulate patients during medical education understand the routines and the underlying script of medical consultations better. We aimed to explore how simulated patients (SPs integrated this new understanding into their daily life, how this work affected their private life as patients, and what we can learn from these changes for concepts of empowerment.Design, setting, and participants: A qualitative interview study. All SPs of Göttingen medical school who had been working longer than three semesters (n=14 were invited and agreed to take part in an open interview about their daily experience with real doctors. Documentary method was used to identify the main issues. Several cases were chosen according to maximum contrast and analysed by in-depth analysis to provide vivid examples of how simulations may affect the real life of the SPs as patients.Results: Our analysis revealed three main changes in the behaviour of SPs as real patients. They were more attentive, had a better understanding of the circumstances under which doctors work, and acted more self-confidently. From the selected cases it became apparent that working as a SP may lead to a constant and significant decrease of fear of hospitals and medical procedures or, in other cases, may enable the SPs to develop new abilities for giving feedback, questioning procedures, and explanations for real doctors.Conclusion: working as a simulated patient seems to be well-suited to understand own progression of diseases, to increase self-responsibility and to a confident attitude as patient.

  12. IKIGAI: Reflection on Life Goals Optimizes Performance and Happiness : Address delivered in shortened form on the occasion of accepting the appointment of Professor of Behaviour and Performance Management at the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Schippers (Michaéla)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractIn her inaugural address, Michaéla discusses the role of self-regulatory behaviors that people can employ in order to live a full-filling life. These behaviors include reflection and personal goal setting, in order to formulate a direction or purpose in life (Ikigai). In the inaugural

  13. The need for a life-cycle based aging paradigm for nanomaterials: importance of real-world test systems to identify realistic particle transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrano, Denise M.; Nowack, Bernd

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the risks of manufactured nanomaterials (MNM) has been almost exclusively focused on the pristine, as-produced materials with far fewer studies delving into more complex, real world scenarios. However, when considering a life-cycle perspective, it is clear that MNM released from commercial products during manufacturing, use and disposal are far more relevant both in terms of more realistic environmental fate and transport as well as environmental risk. The quantity in which the particles are released and their (altered) physical and chemical form should be identified and it is these metrics that should be used to assess the exposure and hazard the materials pose. The goal of this review is to (1) provide a rationale for using a life-cycle based approach when dealing with MNM transformations, (2) to elucidate the different chemical and physical forces which age and transform MNM and (3) assess the pros and cons of current analytical techniques as they pertain to the measurement of aged and transformed MNM in these complex release scenarios. Specifically, we will describe the possible transformations common MNM may undergo during the use or disposal of nano-products based on how these products will be used by the consumer by taking stock of the current nano-enabled products on the market. Understanding the impact of these transformations may help forecast the benefits and/or risks associated with the use of products containing MNM.

  14. Real-time in situ sensors and control integration for life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, G. E.; Seshan, P. K.

    1991-07-01

    The limitations of the state-of-the-art for in situ sensors are discussed and a program of adaptation and enhancement of off-the-shelf sensor technologies and of innovation and research to develop more appropriate sensor technologies for life support systems is offered. By critically assessing the state-of-the-art in multifunctional sensors and smart sensors, research and development requirements for life support systems can be defined. Consideration is given to the desirable characteristics of smart sensors for life support applications, and some preliminary concepts for hierarchical integration of in situ sensors and control elements are presented.

  15. Description of Anomalous Noise Events for Reliable Dynamic Traffic Noise Mapping in Real-Life Urban and Suburban Soundscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Alías

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic noise is one of the main pollutants in urban and suburban areas. European authorities have driven several initiatives to study, prevent and reduce the effects of exposure of population to traffic. Recent technological advances have allowed the dynamic computation of noise levels by means of Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks (WASN such as that developed within the European LIFE DYNAMAP project. Those WASN should be capable of detecting and discarding non-desired sound sources from road traffic noise, denoted as anomalous noise events (ANE, in order to generate reliable noise level maps. Due to the local, occasional and diverse nature of ANE, some works have opted to artificially build ANE databases at the cost of misrepresentation. This work presents the production and analysis of a real-life environmental audio database in two urban and suburban areas specifically conceived for anomalous noise events’ collection. A total of 9 h 8 min of labelled audio data is obtained differentiating among road traffic noise, background city noise and ANE. After delimiting their boundaries manually, the acoustic salience of the ANE samples is automatically computed as a contextual signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. The analysis of the real-life environmental database shows high diversity of ANEs in terms of occurrences, durations and SNRs, as well as confirming both the expected differences between the urban and suburban soundscapes in terms of occurrences and SNRs, and the rare nature of ANE.

  16. Real-Life Treatment Paradigms Show Adalimumab Is Cost-Effective for the Management of Ulcerative Colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candace L. Beilman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adalimumab is effective for the maintenance of remission in patients with moderate-to-severe ulcerative colitis (UC. Currently, biologic therapies are used in cases where patients fail conventional medical therapies. If biologic therapies are not available, patients often choose to remain in an unwell state rather than undergo colectomy. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in patients with UC where adalimumab was readily available compared to not available. Methods. A previously validated Markov model was used to simulate disease progression of patients with UC who are corticosteroid-dependent and/or did not respond to thiopurine therapy. Utility scores and transition probabilities between health states were determined by using data from randomized controlled trials and real-life observational studies. Costs were obtained from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative and the Alberta Health Schedule of Medical Benefits. Results. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for readily available adalimumab treatment of UC were $40,000 and $59,000 per quality-adjusted life year, compared with ongoing medical therapy in an unwell state, at 5-year and 10-year treatment time horizons, respectively. Conclusion. Considering real-life patient preferences to avoid colectomy, adalimumab is cost-effective according to a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80,000 for treatment of UC.

  17. Semi-Interactive Tracing of Persons in Real-Life Surveillance Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metternich, M.J.; Worring, M.

    2010-01-01

    To increase public safety, more and more surveillance cameras have been placed over the years. To deal with the resulting information overload many methods have been deployed, focusing either on real-time crime detection or post-incident investigation. In this paper we concentrate on post-incident

  18. Improvements in the quality of advanced life support and patient outcome after implementation of a standardized real-life post-resuscitation feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubner, Pia; Lobmeyr, Elisabeth; Wallmüller, Christian; Poppe, Michael; Datler, Philip; Keferböck, Markus; Zeiner, Sebastian; Nürnberger, Alexander; Zajicek, Andreas; Laggner, Anton; Sterz, Fritz; Sulzgruber, Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Educational aspects in the training of advanced life support (ALS) represent a key role in critical care management of patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and received special attention in guidelines of various international societies. While a positive association of feedback on ALS performance in training conditions is well established, data on the impact of a real-life post-resuscitation feedback on both ALS quality and outcome remain scarce and inconclusive. We aimed to elucidate the impact of a standardized post-resuscitation feedback on quality of ALS and improvements in patient outcome, in a real-life out-of-hospital setting. We prospectively enrolled and analyzed 2209 patients presenting with OHCA receiving resuscitation attempts by the municipal emergency medical service (EMS) of Vienna over a two-year period. A standardized post-resuscitation feedback protocol was delivered to the respective EMS-team to elucidate its impact on the quality of ALS. We observed that both chest compression rates and ratios were in accordance to recommendations of recent guidelines. While interruptions of chest compressions longer than 30s declined during the observation period (-6.5%) rates of the recommended chest compressions during defibrillator-charging periods increased (+8.9%). Since the percentage of ROSC and 30-day survival remained balanced, the frequencies of both survival until hospital discharge (+6.3%) and favorable neurological outcome (+16%) in survivors significantly increased during the observation period. Improvements in the quality of advanced life support as well the patient outcome were observed after the implementation of a standardized post-resuscitation feedback protocol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A PIC microcontroller-based system for real-life interfacing of external peripherals with a mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N. Nirmal; Chatterjee, Amitava; Rakshit, Anjan

    2010-02-01

    The present article describes the development of a peripheral interface controller (PIC) microcontroller-based system for interfacing external add-on peripherals with a real mobile robot, for real life applications. This system serves as an important building block of a complete integrated vision-based mobile robot system, integrated indigenously in our laboratory. The system is composed of the KOALA mobile robot in conjunction with a personal computer (PC) and a two-camera-based vision system where the PIC microcontroller is used to drive servo motors, in interrupt-driven mode, to control additional degrees of freedom of the vision system. The performance of the developed system is tested by checking it under the control of several user-specified commands, issued from the PC end.

  20. Carbohydrates and exercise performance in non-fasted athletes: A systematic review of studies mimicking real-life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombani Paolo C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is a consensus claiming an ergogenic effect of carbohydrates ingested in the proximity of or during a performance bout. However, in performance studies, the protocols that are used are often highly standardized (e.g. fasted subjects, constant exercise intensity with time-to-exhaustion tests, and do not necessarily reflect competitive real-life situations. Therefore, we aimed at systematically summarizing all studies with a setting mimicking the situation of a real-life competition (e.g., subjects exercising in the postprandial state and with time-trial-like performance tests such as fixed distance or fixed time tests. We performed a PubMed search by using a selection of search terms covering inclusion criteria for sport, athletes, carbohydrates, and fluids, and exclusion criteria for diseases and animals. This search yielded 16,658 articles and the abstract of 16,508 articles contained sufficient information to identify the study as non-eligible for this review. The screening of the full text of the remaining 150 articles yielded 17 articles that were included in this review. These articles described 22 carbohydrate interventions covering test durations from 26 to 241 min (mostly cycling. We observed no performance improvement with half of the carbohydrate interventions, while the other half of the interventions had significant improvement between 1% and 13% (improvement with one of five interventions lasting up to 68 min and with 10 of 17 interventions lasting between 70 and 241 min. Thus, when considering only studies with a setting mimicking real-life competition, there is a mixed general picture about the ergogenic effect of carbohydrates ingested in the proximity of or during a performance bout with an unlikely effect with bouts up to perhaps 70 min and a possible but not compelling ergogenic effect with performance durations longer than about 70 min.

  1. Carbohydrates and exercise performance in non-fasted athletes: a systematic review of studies mimicking real-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombani, Paolo C; Mannhart, Christof; Mettler, Samuel

    2013-01-28

    There is a consensus claiming an ergogenic effect of carbohydrates ingested in the proximity of or during a performance bout. However, in performance studies, the protocols that are used are often highly standardized (e.g. fasted subjects, constant exercise intensity with time-to-exhaustion tests), and do not necessarily reflect competitive real-life situations. Therefore, we aimed at systematically summarizing all studies with a setting mimicking the situation of a real-life competition (e.g., subjects exercising in the postprandial state and with time-trial-like performance tests such as fixed distance or fixed time tests). We performed a PubMed search by using a selection of search terms covering inclusion criteria for sport, athletes, carbohydrates, and fluids, and exclusion criteria for diseases and animals. This search yielded 16,658 articles and the abstract of 16,508 articles contained sufficient information to identify the study as non-eligible for this review. The screening of the full text of the remaining 150 articles yielded 17 articles that were included in this review. These articles described 22 carbohydrate interventions covering test durations from 26 to 241 min (mostly cycling). We observed no performance improvement with half of the carbohydrate interventions, while the other half of the interventions had significant improvement between 1% and 13% (improvement with one of five interventions lasting up to 68 min and with 10 of 17 interventions lasting between 70 and 241 min). Thus, when considering only studies with a setting mimicking real-life competition, there is a mixed general picture about the ergogenic effect of carbohydrates ingested in the proximity of or during a performance bout with an unlikely effect with bouts up to perhaps 70 min and a possible but not compelling ergogenic effect with performance durations longer than about 70 min.

  2. Deceleration during 'real life' motor vehicle collisions – a sensitive predictor for the risk of sustaining a cervical spine injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartwig Erich

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The predictive value of trauma impact for the severity of whiplash injuries has mainly been investigated in sled- and crash-test studies. However, very little data exist for real-life accidents. Therefore, the predictive value of the trauma impact as assessed by the change in velocity of the car due to the collision (ΔV for the resulting cervical spine injuries were investigated in 57 cases after real-life car accidents. Methods ΔV was determined for every car and clinical findings related to the cervical spine were assessed and classified according to the Quebec Task Force (QTF. Results In our study, 32 (56% subjects did not complain about symptoms and were therefore classified as QTF grade 0; 25 (44% patients complained of neck pain: 8 (14% were classified as QTF grade I, 6 (10% as QTF grade II, and 11 (19% as QTF grade IV. Only a slight correlation (r = 0.55 was found between the reported pain and ΔV. No relevant correlation was found between ΔV and the neck disability index (r = 0.46 and between ΔV and the QTF grade (r = 0.45 for any of the collision types. There was no ΔV threshold associated with acceptable sensitivity and specificity for the prognosis of a cervical spine injury. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that ΔV is not a conclusive predictor for cervical spine injury in real-life motor vehicle accidents. This is of importance for surgeons involved in medicolegal expertise jobs as well as patients who suffer from whiplash-associated disorders (WADs after motor vehicle accidents. Trial registration The study complied with applicable German law and with the principles of the Helsinki Declaration and was approved by the institutional ethics commission.

  3. Effects of Healthy Aging and Mild Cognitive Impairment on a Real-Life Decision-Making Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertl, Marie-Theres; Benke, Thomas; Zamarian, Laura; Delazer, Margarete

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of age and of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) on decision making under risk by adopting a task representing real-life health-related situations and involving complex numerical information. Moreover, we assessed the relationship of real-life decision making to other cognitive functions such as number processing, executive functions, language, memory, and attention. For this reason, we compared the performance of 19 healthy, relatively younger adults with that of 18 healthy older adults and the performance of the 18 healthy older adults with that of 17 patients with MCI. Results indicated difficulties in real-life decision making for the healthy older adults compared with the healthy, relatively younger adults. Difficulties of patients with MCI relative to the healthy older adults arose in particular in difficult items requiring processing of frequencies and fractions. Significant effects of age and of MCI in processing frequencies were also evident in a ratio number comparison task. Decision-making performance of healthy participants and of the patient group correlated significantly with number processing. There was a further significant correlation with executive functions for the healthy participants and with reading comprehension for the patients. Our results suggest that healthy older individuals and patients with MCI make less advantageous decisions when the information is complex and high demands are put on executive functions and numerical abilities. Moreover, we show that executive functions and numerical abilities are not only essential in laboratory gambling tasks but also in more realistic and ecological decision situations within the health context.

  4. Higher blood pressure control rate in a real life management program provided by the community health service center in China

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xiao-Jing; Gao, Xi-Lian; You, Gui-Ying; Jiang, Jing; Sun, Xiao-Lin; Li, Xiao; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Liang, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Qing; Zeng, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    Background Community health service center (CHSC) in China is always regarded as a good facility of primary care, which plays an important role in chronic non-communicable disease management. This study aimed to investigate the blood pressure (BP) control rate in a real life CHSC-based management program and its determinants. Methods The study enrolled 3191 patients (mean age of 70 ± 10 years, 43% males) in a hypertension management program provided by the Yulin CHSC (Chengdu, China), which h...

  5. Grating-based guided-mode resonance devices and degradation of their performance in real-life conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Bergmann, René; Kafka, Jan Robert

    2014-01-01

    of an infinite periodic structure illuminated by a plane wave. To see how grating-based components can perform in real life we take into account two critical factors: the finite size of the grating and the Gaussian shape of the light source replacing a plane wave. These factors can significantly change...... and impair the performance of filters, mirrors, sensors and other devices operating by the guided-mode resonance effect. We also show experimentally that for some kinds of gratings guided-mode resonances can vanish if the grating is illuminated by extended source, i.e. heated plate in our case, focused...

  6. Assessment of cognitive flexibility in real life using virtual reality: a comparison of healthy individuals and schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kiwan; Young Kim, In; Kim, Jae-Jin

    2012-08-01

    To date, cognitive flexibility has been measured only using neuropsychological tasks, and has not been tested using more ecologically valid task due to methodological limitations. In this study, a virtual reality task was developed to evaluate cognitive flexibility in a real life situation and performance on this task was compared between 30 healthy individuals and 30 schizophrenia patients. Compared to healthy controls, a greater number of schizophrenia patients made concrete decisions, and their decision-making times were negatively correlated with the severity of their negative symptoms. These findings indicate that virtual reality can be an ecologically valid measurement of cognitive flexibility. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Improvement in the quality of life of patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria treated with omalizumab in real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea-Baca, Itzíar; Gurpegui-Resano, María

    Evaluation of the impact on the quality of life (QOL) relating to health in patients with chronic urticaria (CSU) treated with omalizumab. Longitudinal descriptive observational study of quality of life based on18 patients with chronic urticaria ≥12 years treated with omalizumab. Changes in QOL examined at 1 month (T1), at 6 months (T6) and 12 months (T12), by: Visual Analogical Scale (UAS), specific urticaria QOL questionnaire (CU-Q2oL), general health questionnaire (SF-36) and activity of urticaria questionnaire (Score UAS7). The most disabling symptoms for patients were: pruritus (61.1%); decrease in health and physical activity (55.5%), wheals, swelling and nervousness (50%); depression and shame of marks (38.89%); side effects to drugs (33.33%); sleepiness and tiredness (27.78%); work (22.22%); "choosing clothes and pain" 16.67% and social relations (11.11%). Statistically significant differences were observed in T1, T6 and T12. In T1, UAS -4.72 (p=.001); CU-Q2oL -16.38 (p<.001); SF-36 15.44 (p=.006); UAS7 wheals -7.27 (p=.001), UAS7 pruritus -8.72 (p=.003). In T6, UAS -4.26 (p=.001); CU-Q2oL -18.94 (p<.001); SF-36 15.41 (p<.001); UAS7 wheals -7.41 (p=.001), UAS7 pruritus -7.11 (p=.001). In T12 UAS -9.61 (p=.004); CU-Q2oL -21.38 (p=.01); SF-36 17.53 (p=.04); UAS7 wheals -8.23 (p=.004), UAS7 pruritus -10.69 (p=.004). There was a very good response in T1, which was maintained in T6 and T12. Patients with chronic urticaria treated with omalizumab presented good results with a reduction of CUE activity and improvement of their QOL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W.; E. Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interac...

  9. Neural correlates of adaptive social responses to real-life frustrating situations: a functional MRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Sugiura, Motoaki; Yokoyama, Satoru; Sassa, Yuko; Horie, Kaoru; Sato, Shigeru; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2013-01-01

    Background Frustrating situations are encountered daily, and it is necessary to respond in an adaptive fashion. A psychological definition states that adaptive social behaviors are ?self-performing? and ?contain a solution.? The present study investigated the neural correlates of adaptive social responses to frustrating situations by assessing the dimension of causal attribution. Based on attribution theory, internal causality refers to one?s aptitudes that cause natural responses in real-lif...

  10. Computational Chemistry Laboratory: Calculating the Energy Content of Food Applied to a Real-Life Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbiric, Dora; Tribe, Lorena; Soriano, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory, students calculated the nutritional value of common foods to assess the energy content needed to answer an everyday life application; for example, how many kilometers can an average person run with the energy provided by 100 g (3.5 oz) of beef? The optimized geometries and the formation enthalpies of the nutritional components…

  11. Virtual World, Real Education: A Descriptive Study of Instructional Design in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Linda S.

    2011-01-01

    Virtual worlds like Second Life are emerging technologies that have gained popularity among educators. As these worlds emerged, greater focus has been placed on the design of the environments themselves rather than the design of instruction within them. Educators have begun using these environments for teaching and instructional designers are now…

  12. Six-minute walk test closely correlates to "real-life" outdoor walking capacity and quality of life in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordanstig, Joakim; Broeren, Monica; Hensäter, Marlene; Perlander, Angelica; Osterberg, Klas; Jivegård, Lennart

    2014-08-01

    We used outdoor walking distance measured during 40 minutes as "real-life" outdoor walking capacity in 49 patients with intermittent claudication (IC). The outdoor walking distance was measured by a global positioning system application for a smartphone. The relationships of self-reported maximum walking distance (SR-MWD), the MWD on a graded treadmill test, and the 6-minute maximum walk distance (6MWD) vs outdoors walking capacity were investigated. Also studied were the associations of SR-MWD, MWD, and 6MWD with health-related quality of life assessed with the disease-specific instrument the Vascular Quality of Life Questionnaire (VascuQoL). In this prospective observational cohort study, 49 IC patients underwent an outdoor walking capacity test for 40 minutes, and MWD and 6MWD were measured. SR-MWD was recorded, and all subjects completed the VascuQoL questionnaire. Associations between the different walk estimates and outdoor walking capacity and health-related quality of life were investigated by correlation analysis (Spearman ρ). Outdoor walking distance during 40 minutes was a median 2495 m (range, 1110-3300 m). SR-MWD correlated moderately and MWD correlated strongly to outdoor walking capacity (r = 0.56 and r = 0.65; P walking capacity (r = 0.78; P walked during the 6-minute walk test is closely correlated to outdoor walking capacity and health-related quality of life in IC patients. Our data support the use of 6MWD for routine clinical evaluation of walking capacity in IC patients. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lab meets real life: A laboratory assessment of spontaneous thought and its ecological validity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kuehner

    Full Text Available People's minds frequently wander towards self-generated thoughts, which are unrelated to external stimuli or demands. These phenomena, referred to as "spontaneous thought" (ST and "mind wandering" (MW, have previously been linked with both costs and benefits. Current assessments of ST and MW have predominantly been conducted in the laboratory, whereas studies on the ecological validity of such lab-related constructs and their interrelations are rare. The current study examined the stability of ST dimensions assessed in the lab and their predictive value with respect to MW, repetitive negative thought (uncontrollable rumination, RUM, and affect in daily life. Forty-three university students were assessed with the Amsterdam Resting State Questionnaire (2nd version to assess ten ST dimensions during the resting state in two laboratory sessions, which were separated by five days of electronic ambulatory assessment (AA. During AA, individuals indicated the intensity of MW and RUM, as well as of positive and negative affect in daily life ten times a day. ST dimensions measured in the lab were moderately stable across one week. Five out of ten ST lab dimensions were predicted by mental health-related symptoms or by dispositional cognitive traits. Hierarchical linear models revealed that a number of ST lab dimensions predicted cognitive and affective states in daily life. Mediation analyses showed that RUM, but not MW per se, accounted for the relationship between specific ST lab dimensions and mood in daily life. By using a simple resting state task, we could demonstrate that a number of lab dimensions of spontaneous thought are moderately stable, are predicted by mental health symptoms and cognitive traits, and show plausible associations with categories of self-generated thought and mood in daily life.

  14. Linking the microscopic view of chemistry to real-life experiences: Intertextuality in a high-school science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Kai

    2003-11-01

    Chemistry learning involves establishing conceptual relationships among macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic representations. Employing the notion of intertextuality to conceptualize these relationships, this study investigates how class members interactionally construct meanings of chemical representations by connecting them to real-life experiences and how the teachers' content knowledge shapes their ways to coconstruct intertextual links with students. Multiple sources of data were collected over 7 weeks with a participation of 25 eleventh graders, an experienced teacher, and a student teacher. An examination of classroom discourse shows that the intertextual links between the microscopic view of chemistry and students' real-life experiences could be initiated by students and instigated by the teachers. The teachers applied several discursive strategies to scaffold students building meaningful links based on their prior knowledge and experiences. Additionally, the experienced teacher with stronger content knowledge tended to present links in both dialogic and monologic discourses. Yet, the relatively limited content knowledge did not necessarily constrain the student teacher's interactions with students. The findings of this study provide a backdrop for further research to explore how chemistry is learned and taught in a class through the social constructivist lens.

  15. The Italian compassionate use of sofosbuvir in HCV patients waitlisted for liver transplantation: A national real-life experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Silvia; Donato, Maria Francesca; Mazzarelli, Chiara; Rendina, Maria; Visco-Comandini, Ubaldo; Filì, Daniela; Gianstefani, Alice; Fagiuoli, Stefano; Melazzini, Mario; Montilla, Simona; Pani, Luca; Petraglia, Sandra; Russo, Pierluigi; Trotta, Maria Paola; Carrai, Paola; Caraceni, Paolo

    2017-09-16

    This study aimed to assess the real-life clinical and virological outcomes of HCV waitlisted patients for liver transplantation (LT) who received sofosbuvir/ribavirin (SOF/R) within the Italian compassionate use program. Clinical and virological data were collected in 224 patients with decompensated cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) receiving daily SOF/R until LT or up a maximum of 48 weeks. Of 100 transplanted patients, 51 were HCV-RNA negative for >4 weeks before LT (SVR12: 88%) and 49 negative for <4 weeks or still viraemic at transplant: 34 patients continued treatment after LT (bridging therapy) (SVR12: 88%), while 15 stopped treatment (SVR12: 53%). 98 patients completed SOF/R without LT (SVR12: 73%). In patients with advanced decompensated cirrhosis (basal MELD ≥15 and/or C-P ≥B8), a marked improvement of the scores occurred in about 50% of cases and almost 20% of decompensated patients without HCC reached a condition suitable for inactivation and delisting. These real-life data indicate that in waitlisted patients: (i) bridging antiviral therapy can be an option for patients still viraemic or negative <4 weeks at LT; and (ii) clinical improvement to a condition suitable for delisting can occur even in patients with advanced decompensated cirrhosis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Reversal of Dabigatran Using Idarucizumab in a Septic Patient with Impaired Kidney Function in Real-Life Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C. Sauter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Immediate reversal of anticoagulation is essential when facing severe bleeding or emergency surgery. Although idarucizumab is approved for the reversal of dabigatran in many countries, clinical experiences are lacking, particularly in special patient-populations such as sepsis and impaired renal function. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 67-year-old male septic patient with a multilocular facial abscess and chronic kidney disease (GFR 36.5 mL/min. Thrombin time (TT and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT 15 hours after the last intake of 150 mg dabigatran were both prolonged (>120 sec, resp., 61 sec, as well as unbound dabigatran concentration (119.05 ng/mL. Before immediate emergency surgery dabigatran was antagonised using idarucizumab 2 × 2.5 g. Dabigatran concentration was not detectable 10 min after idarucizumab administration (<30 ng/mL. TT and aPTT time were normalised (16.2 sec, resp., 30.2 sec. Sepsis was controlled after surgery and kidney function remained stable. In the absence of postoperative bleeding, dabigatran was restarted 36 hours after admission. Conclusion. Idarucizumab successfully reversed the effect of dabigatran in real-life practice in a patient with sepsis and renal impairment and allowed emergency surgery with normal haemostasis. Efficacy and safety in real-life practice will nevertheless require prospective registries monitoring.

  17. A Robust Epoxy Resins @ Stearic Acid-Mg(OH)2 Micronanosheet Superhydrophobic Omnipotent Protective Coating for Real-Life Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Yifan; Guo, Zhiguang; Liu, Weimin

    2016-06-29

    Superhydrophobic coating has extremely high application value and practicability. However, some difficult problems such as weak mechanical strength, the need for expensive toxic reagents, and a complex preparation process are all hard to avoid, and these problems have impeded the superhydrophobic coating's real-life application for a long time. Here, we demonstrate one kind of omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating via a simple antideposition route and one-step superhydrophobization process. The whole preparation process is facile, and expensive toxic reagents needed. This omnipotent coating can be applied on any solid substrate with great waterproof ability, excellent mechanical stability, and chemical durability, which can be stored in a realistic environment for more than 1 month. More significantly, this superhydrophobic coating also has four protective abilities, antifouling, anticorrosion, anti-icing, and flame-retardancy, to cope with a variety of possible extreme natural environments. Therefore, this omnipotent epoxy resins @ stearic acid-Mg(OH)2 superhydrophobic coating not only satisfies real-life need but also has great application potential in many respects.

  18. Career and Technology Center Guides Students in Real-Life Careers | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Frederick County Public School students have a unique opportunity—a chance to get a real-world, hands-on experience in biomedical science and biotechnology before they even graduate from high school, thanks to the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC). Several years ago, the CTC established its biomedical sciences program with a curriculum from Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a nonprofit, nationwide developer of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in elementary, middle, and high schools.

  19. Impact of gender on COPD expression in a real-life cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Nicolas; Deslée, Gaetan; Caillaud, Denis; Brinchault, Graziella; Court-Fortune, Isabelle; Nesme-Meyer, Pascale; Surpas, Pascale; Escamilla, Roger; Perez, Thierry; Chanez, Pascal; Pinet, Christophe; Jebrak, Gilles; Paillasseur, Jean-Louis; Burgel, Pierre-Régis

    2014-02-17

    Reports regarding gender-related differences in COPD expression have provided conflicting results. In the French Initiatives BPCO real-world cohort, which contained 688 patients (146 women) when data were extracted, women were matched with men (1:3 ratio: n = 107:275) on age (5-year intervals) and FEV1 (5% predicted intervals) and comparisons were performed using univariate logistic regressions. For a given age and level of airflow obstruction, women with COPD had higher BOD scores due to more pronounced dyspnea and lower BMI, suggesting worse prognosis, and were more likely to exhibit anxiety, suggesting the need for specific assessment and care.

  20. Punishment goals of crime victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Uli

    2003-04-01

    Research on subjective punishment goals has focused on the perspective of third-party observers of criminal offenses and neglected the perspective of victims. This study investigates punishment goals among 174 adult crime victims (rape and nonsexual assault) for each participant's real criminal case. Scales measuring support for punishment goals are constructed by factor analysis of an 18-item list. Results show that 5 highly supported goals can be distinguished: retaliation, recognition of victim status, confirmation of societal values, victim security, and societal security. Analysis of relations between punishment goal scales and personal variables, situational variables, and demanded punishment severity corroborates the view that the punishment goals revealed can be classified according to the two independent dichotomies of moral versus instrumental goals, and micro versus macro goals.

  1. The correlation between pedestrian injury severity in real-life crashes and Euro NCAP pedestrian test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandroth, Johan; Rizzi, Matteo; Sternlund, Simon; Lie, Anders; Tingvall, Claes

    2011-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the correlation between Euro NCAP pedestrian rating scores and injury outcome in real-life car-to-pedestrian crashes, with special focus on long-term disability. Another aim was to determine whether brake assist (BA) systems affect the injury outcome in real-life car-to-pedestrian crashes and to estimate the combined effects in injury reduction of a high Euro NCAP ranking score and BA. In the current study, the Euro NCAP pedestrian scoring was compared with the real-life outcome in pedestrian crashes that occurred in Sweden during 2003 to 2010. The real-life crash data were obtained from the data acquisition system Swedish Traffic Accident Data Acquisition (STRADA), which combines police records and hospital admission data. The medical data consisted of International Classification of Diseases (ICD) diagnoses and Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) scoring. In all, approximately 500 pedestrians submitted to hospital were included in the study. Each car model was coded according to Euro NCAP pedestrian scores. In addition, the presence or absence of BA was coded for each car involved. Cars were grouped according to their scoring. Injury outcomes were analyzed with AIS and, at the victim level, with permanent medical impairment. This was done by translating the injury scores for each individual to the risk of serious consequences (RSC) at 1, 5, and 10 percent risk of disability level. This indicates the total risk of a medical disability for each victim, given the severity and location of injuries. The mean RSC (mRSC) was then calculated for each car group and t-tests were conducted to falsify the null hypothesis at p ≤ .05 that the mRSC within the groups was equal. The results showed a significant reduction of injury severity for cars with better pedestrian scoring, although cars with a high score could not be studied due to lack of cases. The reduction in RSC for medium-performing cars in comparison with low-performing cars

  2. Removal of Dissolved Silica using Calcinated Hydrotalcite in Real-life Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krumhansl, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Water shortages are a growing global problem. Reclamation of industrial and municipal wastewater will be necessary in order to mitigate water scarcity. However, many operational challenges, such as silica scaling, prevent large scale water reuse. Previously, our team at Sandia has demonstrated the use of selective ion exchange materials, such as calcinated hydrotalcite (HTC, (Mg 6 Al 2 (OH) 16 (CO 3 )*4H 2 O)), for the low cost removal of silica from synthetic cooling tower water. However, it is not currently know if calcinated HTC has similar capabilities in realistic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of calcinated HTC to remove silica from real cooling tower water. This was investigated under both batch and continuous conditions, and in the presence of competing ions. It was determined that calcinated HTC behaved similarly in real and synthetic cooling tower water; the HTC is highly selective for the silica even in the presence of competing cations. Therefore, the data concludes that calcinated HTC is a viable anti-scaling pretreatment for the reuse of industrial wastewaters.

  3. A real-time measurement system for long-life flood monitoring and warning applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Perez, Rafael; García-Pintado, Javier; Gómez, Antonio Skarmeta

    2012-01-01

    A flood warning system incorporates telemetered rainfall and flow/water level data measured at various locations in the catchment area. Real-time accurate data collection is required for this use, and sensor networks improve the system capabilities. However, existing sensor nodes struggle to satisfy the hydrological requirements in terms of autonomy, sensor hardware compatibility, reliability and long-range communication. We describe the design and development of a real-time measurement system for flood monitoring, and its deployment in a flash-flood prone 650 km(2) semiarid watershed in Southern Spain. A developed low-power and long-range communication device, so-called DatalogV1, provides automatic data gathering and reliable transmission. DatalogV1 incorporates self-monitoring for adapting measurement schedules for consumption management and to capture events of interest. Two tests are used to assess the success of the development. The results show an autonomous and robust monitoring system for long-term collection of water level data in many sparse locations during flood events.

  4. A Real-Time Measurement System for Long-Life Flood Monitoring and Warning Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Skarmeta Gómez

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A flood warning system incorporates telemetered rainfall and flow/water level data measured at various locations in the catchment area. Real-time accurate data collection is required for this use, and sensor networks improve the system capabilities. However, existing sensor nodes struggle to satisfy the hydrological requirements in terms of autonomy, sensor hardware compatibility, reliability and long-range communication. We describe the design and development of a real-time measurement system for flood monitoring, and its deployment in a flash-flood prone 650 km2 semiarid watershed in Southern Spain. A developed low-power and long-range communication device, so-called DatalogV1, provides automatic data gathering and reliable transmission. DatalogV1 incorporates self-monitoring for adapting measurement schedules for consumption management and to capture events of interest. Two tests are used to assess the success of the development. The results show an autonomous and robust monitoring system for long-term collection of water level data inmany sparse locations during flood events.

  5. Real-life setting in data collection. The role of nutrition knowledge whilst selecting food products for weight management purposes in a supermarket environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Anna-Maria; Lapveteläinen, Anja T; Mykkänen, Hannu M; Kantanen, Teuvo T; Rissanen, Riitta L

    2013-12-01

    The aim was to explore the role of consumers' nutrition knowledge while selecting foods for weight management and the predominating food selection factors by combining quantitative and qualitative methodology in a real-life setting during two consecutive shopping tasks given in a supermarket. Thirty-six consumers were given a list of 11 products and asked to think-aloud while selecting (i) a product they usually buy and (ii) a product they use for weight management. After the consecutive shopping tasks, the subjects were interviewed and asked to answer a nutrition knowledge questionnaire. The subjects were categorized by the difference in the energy contents of their selections and the food selection criteria. The energy contents of the selections for weight management were reduced by 10-46%. Ten subjects with the greatest difference between the energy contents of their selections had higher level in nutrition knowledge and mentioned less nutritional issues during the selections than ten subjects with the smallest such differences. Taste was an important product selection criterion by the former group, while the latter focused primarily on price. Nutrition knowledge is interrelated with personal factors and selection goals. It is not necessarily utilized consistently when selecting food products. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Empirical Platform Data Analysis to Investigate how Heat Pumps Operate in Real-Life Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Elmegaard, Brian; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2015-01-01

    Heat pumps have been widely acknowledged, by academia and industry, as highly efficient thermal energy technologies, for space heating and domestic hot water production. However, there is a lack of information about real performance in residential single family houses with active participation...... of end-users. In this paper, an analysis based on data from 242 heat pump installations in Denmark gathered over a period up to 4 years (2010 until today) is performed. COP, operating temperatures and socio-demographic data are used as basis for comparing theoretical and actual performance. Six different...... heat pump configurations are considered depending on source (ground or air) and sink (radiators, floor heating and/or combined systems). This unique study intends to point out the benefits and limitations of such technologies in terms of energy efficiency and comfort delivery, as well as investigating...

  7. Limits for survivability in frontal collisions: theory and real-life data combined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Denis P; Veyrat, Nicolas; Simms, Ciaran; Glynn, Colin

    2007-07-01

    The limits for survivability in vehicle frontal collisions are unknown. This paper proposes a new hypothesis that occupant risk in frontal collisions is due to both inertial and crushing injuries and that the limits of survivability in frontal collisions are principally due to the complete crushing of vehicles at high DeltaV's. Analysis of the NASS data for the period 1982-1991 for AIS3+ injury and fatality to belted and unbelted drivers shows that the real world distributions of risk with DeltaV are asymptotic to 1.0 over similar DeltaV ranges and over a lower speed range than that predicted from intrusion/complete car crush alone. This is consistent with the proposed hypothesis as human biomechanical loading also influences survivability. While the hypothesis is supported by the presently available limited high-speed collision data, further in-depth investigations should be undertaken to confirm the ultimate limits of survivability.

  8. Exploring and modelling impacts of third molar experience on quality of life: a real-time qualitative study using Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Kamal; Sambrook, Paul; Armfield, Jason M; Brennan, David S

    2017-10-01

    This study had two objectives: (i) to explore and model domains describing the real-time impact of third molars (TMs) on quality of life (QoL); and (ii) to assess the percentage coverage, in some generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) instruments, of the TM QoL domains identified in this study. A global cross-sectional sample of tweets containing 'wisdom tooth' over a 1-week period retrieved 3,537 tweets. After random quota sampling, classification and filtering, only 843 tweets were included in the thematic analysis. A TM QoL model was constructed based on the associations of the identified domains. Domains for the selected generic HRQoL and OHRQoL instruments were plotted against the domains identified in the study to calculate the percentage coverage for each. The QoL domains identified were pain (n = 348, 41%), mood (n = 173, 20%), anxiety and fear (n = 54, 7%), enjoying food (n = 41, 4%), coping (n = 37, 4%), daily activities (n = 34, 4%), sleep (n = 24, 2%), social life (n = 19, 2%), physical health (n = 17, 2%), ability to think (n = 9, 1%), self-care (n = 8, 1%) and sporting & recreation (n = 2, <1%). The Assessment Quality of Life instrument (AQoL-8D) covers 87% of the TM QoL domains, while the rest of the HRQoL and OHRQoL instruments cover 33-60%. This study shows how Twitter can be used to obtain real-time QoL data, which might be used to model how TMs impact on QoL. The TM QoL domains identified in the study were generally under-represented among the generic OHRQoL instruments assessed while, the HRQoL AQoL-8D covered most of the TM QoL domains. The QoL domains identified in the study might be used to develop a new OHRQoL measure for TMs. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  9. Impact of cataract surgery on vision-related life performances: the usefulness of Real-Life Vision Test for cataract surgery outcomes evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Li, X; Hou, Z; Zhang, H; Qiu, W; Wang, W

    2015-12-01

    Real-Life Vision Test (RLVT) is a newly developed performance-based measures of functional vision. This present study is designed to determine whether it could be a meaningful assessment for cataract surgery outcomes evaluation. Age-related cataract patients (56) who scheduled for bilateral cataract surgery and 44 age-matched controls were evaluated by four types of measurements: (1) demographic, medical, cognitive and depressive evaluation, and the reaction time testing; (2) clinical measures (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereopsis, and color perception); (3) the 25-item National Eye Institute's Visual Functioning Questionnaire (NEI-VFQ); (4) the RLVT. Spearman's coefficients and multiple regression analysis were conducted to investigate the relationship among RLVT, clinical measures, and self-report assessment of visual function. The results of RLVT, clinical measures, and NEI-VFQ total scores were improved significantly after cataract surgery. There were no differences between control subjects and post-surgery patients with respect to NEI-VFQ-25 total scores, self-rating depression scale scores and three tasks of RLVT. Change of RLVT was significantly associated with the change of clinical measures in the cataract group. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that change of distance, intermediate, and near visual acuity, and binocular contrast sensitivity were significant predictors of improvements of RLVT. Cataract surgery could improve real-world visual ability effectively for cataract patients. Our study highlights the potential usefulness of RLVT as an adjunct to the current outcomes evaluation system for cataract surgery. The use of RLVT combined with clinical and self-survey methods may be the comprehensive strategy to manifest the impact of cataract surgery on patients' overall vision-related quality of life.

  10. Perceived needs and health-related quality of life in people with schizophrenia and metabolic syndrome: a "real-world" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros-Ferreira, Leticia; Navarro-Pastor, José Blas; Zúñiga-Lagares, Antonio; Romaní, Rosanna; Muray, Elisenda; Obiols, Jordi E

    2016-11-21

    The complexity of schizophrenia lies in the combination of psychiatric, somatic and social needs requiring care. The aim of the study was to compare perceived needs between groups with absence/presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and to analyze the relationship between needs, health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and MetS in people with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. A "real-world" cross-sectional study was set up with a comprehensive framework including the following, needs for care (Camberwell Assessment of Need Interview [CAN]), HRQoL (Euro Qol-5D Questionnaire), sociodemographic data, lifestyle habits, psychopathology (Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale [PANSS]), global functioning (Global Assessment of Functioning Scale [GAF]), anthropometric measurements and blood test results were assessed for an outpatient sample (n = 60). The mean number of needs (given by CAN) was identified for both groups. Patients with MetS rated a higher number of needs compared to the group without this condition. Mobility problems (given by EQ-5D) were negatively associated with the number of total and unmet needs. For participants with MetS, HRQoL was related to the number of needs and unmet needs. For people with MetS, positive symptomatology score (given by PANSS) was related to the number of needs and met needs and general symptomatology was associated with total, met and unmet needs. For individuals without MetS, the global functioning score (given by GAF) was significantly inversely related with total, met and unmet needs. Needs and HRQoL, as well as general symptomatology, were related only in patients with MetS. This has implications for treatment planning at the individual and organizational levels. An analysis of both physical and mental needs could provide a starting point for the extension of facilities in the health care system in order to reach the goal of improving quality of life.

  11. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjeerd W. Boonstra

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  12. The effect of a low-speed automatic brake system estimated from real life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksson-Hellman, Irene; Lindman, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    A substantial part of all traffic accidents involving passenger cars are rear-end collisions and most of them occur at low speed. Auto Brake is a feature that has been launched in several passenger car models during the last few years. City Safety is a technology designed to help the driver mitigate, and in certain situations avoid, rear-end collisions at low speed by automatically braking the vehicle.Studies have been presented that predict promising benefits from these kinds of systems, but few attempts have been made to show the actual effect of Auto Brake. In this study, the effect of City Safety, a standard feature on the Volvo XC60 model, is calculated based on insurance claims data from cars in real traffic crashes in Sweden. The estimated claim frequency of rear-end frontal collisions measured in claims per 1,000 insured vehicle years was 23% lower for the City Safety equipped XC60 model than for other Volvo models without the system.

  13. Mapping dynamic social networks in real life using participants' own smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonstra, Tjeerd W; E Larsen, Mark; Christensen, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Interpersonal relationships are vital for our daily functioning and wellbeing. Social networks may form the primary means by which environmental influences determine individual traits. Several studies have shown the influence of social networks on decision-making, behaviors and wellbeing. Smartphones have great potential for measuring social networks in a real world setting. Here we tested the feasibility of using people's own smartphones as a data collection platform for face-to-face interactions. We developed an application for iOS and Android to collect Bluetooth data and acquired one week of data from 14 participants in our organization. The Bluetooth scanning statistics were used to quantify the time-resolved connection strength between participants and define the weights of a dynamic social network. We used network metrics to quantify changes in network topology over time and non-negative matrix factorization to identify cliques or subgroups that reoccurred during the week. The scanning rate varied considerably between smartphones running Android and iOS and egocentric networks metrics were correlated with the scanning rate. The time courses of two identified subgroups matched with two meetings that took place that week. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using participants' own smartphones to map social network, whilst identifying current limitations of using generic smartphones. The bias introduced by variations in scanning rate and missing data is an important limitation that needs to be addressed in future studies.

  14. Migration of formaldehyde and melamine from melaware and other amino resin tableware in real life service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannoni, Veruscka; Padula, Giorgio; Panico, Oronzo; Maggio, Antonino; Arena, Claudio; Milana, Maria-Rosaria

    2017-01-01

    The migration of formaldehyde and melamine monomers has been measured on 90 samples of plastic tableware in three different situations - new articles, already used articles and artificially aged articles - by using simulant, contact times and temperatures prescribed by Commission Regulation (EU) No. 10/2011. Formaldehyde was determined by ultraviolet spectroscopy analysis of the coloured complex obtained by reaction with chromotropic acid. Melamine was measured by an ultra high performance liquid chromatography method. Fourier Transformed - Infrared Analysis was applied to characterise the plastic. The results highlighted the presence of different amino resins based on formaldehyde-melamine, urea-formaldehyde or melamine-urea-formaldehyde with different migration behaviour. The migration of monomers was related to progressive degradation of the resins. Ageing studies demonstrated that the potential degradation of the resins and the consequent migration of the monomers may continue throughout the service life of the product. The specific migration limit (SML) of melamine was exceeded after ageing.

  15. Healthy food choices are happy food choices: Evidence from a real life sample using smartphone based assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Deborah R; Villinger, Karoline; König, Laura M; Ziesemer, Katrin; Schupp, Harald T; Renner, Britta

    2017-12-06

    Research suggests that "healthy" food choices such as eating fruits and vegetables have not only physical but also mental health benefits and might be a long-term investment in future well-being. This view contrasts with the belief that high-caloric foods taste better, make us happy, and alleviate a negative mood. To provide a more comprehensive assessment of food choice and well-being, we investigated in-the-moment eating happiness by assessing complete, real life dietary behaviour across eight days using smartphone-based ecological momentary assessment. Three main findings emerged: First, of 14 different main food categories, vegetables consumption contributed the largest share to eating happiness measured across eight days. Second, sweets on average provided comparable induced eating happiness to "healthy" food choices such as fruits or vegetables. Third, dinner elicited comparable eating happiness to snacking. These findings are discussed within the "food as health" and "food as well-being" perspectives on eating behaviour.

  16. Component resolved diagnosis in real life: the risk assessment of food allergy using microarray-based immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonicelli, L; Massaccesi, C; Braschi, M C; Cinti, B; Bilò, M B; Bonifazi, F

    2014-01-01

    The development of component-resolved diagnostics constitutes a potential breakthrough in food allergy testing, as detection of specific IgE (sIgE) to individual allergens may make it possible to establish the risk of a mild versus severe reaction. To compare allergists' risk assessment based on the current decision making process with that of virtual allergen-oriented risk assessment through microarray-based immunoassay. An observational, real-life study was performed on 86 adults with food allergy. The prescription of epinephrine was the surrogate marker of a severe reaction. In the same patients, the prescription of epinephrine based on the current decision making of the allergist and the independently established allergen-oriented risk assessment determined by microarray-based immunoassay were compared. Fair degree of agreement between the specialists' risk assessment and that of the microarray-based immunoassay (k index 0.372 (95% CI: 0.185- 0.559) p food allergy.

  17. High-Resolution Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging of Zeolite Aggregates within Real-Life Fluid Catalytic Cracking Particles**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50–150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. PMID:25504139

  18. Real-life efficacy of pregabalin for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain in daily clinical practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crawford, Michael E; Poulsen, Peter Bo; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to provide evidence regarding the real-life efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (NeP) in Denmark. METHODS: In this prospective, observational, noninterventional study, pregabalin (Lyrica(®)) was prescribed following usual...... was used to perform paired analyses, and a multivariate regression analysis investigated factors driving change in pain. RESULTS: A total of 86 of the 128 patients included were regarded as efficacy evaluable (those completing 3 months of pregabalin treatment). Patients (59 years) were long-time sufferers...... of peripheral NeP, and 38% of them had comorbidities. The majority had previously been treated with tricyclic antidepressants or gabapentin. The average dose of pregabalin was 81.5 mg/d at baseline and 240 mg/d after 3 months. A clinically and statistically significant improvement of 2.2 points in the average...

  19. Do children do what they say? Responses to hypothetical and real-life social problems in children with mild intellectual disabilities and behaviour problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M; Bijman, E R; Lamberix, I C W; Wijnroks, L; de Castro, B Orobio; Vermeer, A; Matthys, W

    2005-06-01

    Most research on children's social problem-solving skills is based on responses to hypothetical vignettes. Just how these responses relate to actual behaviour in real-life social situations is, however, unclear, particularly for children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID). In the present study, the spontaneous and selected responses of 56 children with MID to hypothetical situations from the Social Problem-Solving Test for children with MID (SPT-MID) were compared to their actual behaviour in comparable staged standardized real-life conflict situations. Correlations to externalizing behaviour problems were assessed using the Teacher's Report Form (TRF). The results show children with MID and accompanying externalizing behaviour problems to behave more aggressively in the staged real-life conflicts and provide more spontaneous aggressive responses to the hypothetical vignettes than children with MID and no accompanying externalizing behaviour problems; they did not, however, select more aggressive responses from the hypothetical options provided. A moderate correlation was found between the aggressiveness of the spontaneous responses in the hypothetical situations and actual behaviour in the staged real-life situations. In addition, both the spontaneous aggressive responses under hypothetical circumstances and the actual aggressive behaviour under staged real-life circumstances were related to teacher-rated aggressive behaviour in the classroom. It is concluded that the hypothetical vignettes from the SPT-MID do provide information on both the actual behaviour and knowledge of social problem-solving skills of children with MID.

  20. Budget impact of parenteral iron treatment of iron deficiency: methodological issues raised by using real-life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Elisabeth; Braunhofer, Peter; Troxler, Josef; Schneider, Heinz

    2014-12-01

    Iron deficiency is common in pregnancy, postpartum, inflammatory bowel disease, chronic kidney disease, chronic heart failure, heavy uterine bleeding, cancer and following surgery. We estimate the budget impact (BI) on the Swiss mandatory health insurance associated with substituting iron sucrose (standard) with ferric carboxymaltose (new treatment) using real-life data. Resource use was based on recent primary data (Polyquest Prescriber Analysis, Anemia Patient Record Study in Switzerland). Personnel costs were estimated using the Swiss Tarmed fee-for-service reimbursement system. Drug costs and costs of materials used were based on official tariffs (Spezialitätenliste, MiGeL). Actual IMS sales data of both products were used to verify the BI model (1 CHF ≈ 1 USD, Jan 2013). Ferric carboxymaltose was associated with cost savings of 30-44 % per patient per treatment cycle compared to iron sucrose. Costs per 200/500/1,000 mg total dosage treatment cycle were CHF 101/210/420 for ferric carboxymaltose and CHF 144/375/721 for iron sucrose. This results in cost savings of CHF 22-31 million across all indications in 2009. Savings were driven by personnel cost reductions (application time and number of applications). Sensitivity analyses confirmed these cost savings, even for the higher application costs of ferric carboxymaltose, with minimum savings of CHF 17 million per year. Treating iron deficiency involves substantial costs to the Swiss MHI which may be reduced by substituting iron sucrose with ferric carboxymaltose. The use of real-life data raises methodological questions about the fundamental compatibility of this data with the conceptual framework of BI analysis.

  1. Action versus state orientation moderates the impact of executive functioning on real-life self-control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Max; Krönke, Klaus-Martin; Venz, John; Kräplin, Anja; Bühringer, Gerhard; Smolka, Michael N; Goschke, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Self-control is commonly assumed to depend on executive functions (EFs). However, it is unclear whether real-life self-control failures result from deficient EF competencies or rather reflect insufficient conflict-induced mobilization of executive control, and whether self-control depends more critically on function-specific EF competencies or general executive functioning (GEF), that is, common competencies that underlie all EFs. Here we investigated whether failure-related action versus state orientation, a personality trait related to the conflict-induced mobilization of cognitive control, moderates the effect of general and function-specific control competencies on self-control. To this end, 240 young adults completed questionnaire measures of action-state orientation and trait self-control, reported everyday self-control failures during 7 consecutive days via smartphone-based experience sampling, and completed 9 EF tasks from which latent variables reflecting GEF as well as inhibition-, updating-, and shifting-specific competencies were derived. Structural equation models confirmed that the effect of GEF on self-control was moderated by action-state orientation: action-oriented compared with more state-oriented participants showed a stronger inverse association between GEF and everyday self-control failures. Corresponding effects of function-specific competencies on self-control were not found. These results highlight that high executive functioning may enable self-controlled behavior only if control is sufficiently mobilized when needed and suggest that self-control may depend more critically on general than function-specific control competencies. More generally, the present study demonstrates the fruitfulness of combining latent-variable models of well-controlled EF tasks with experience sampling of daily self-control and measures of individual differences in control modes to bridge the gap between laboratory research and real-life behavior. (Psyc

  2. An Anomalous Noise Events Detector for Dynamic Road Traffic Noise Mapping in Real-Life Urban and Suburban Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Claudi Socoró

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the main aspects affecting the quality of life of people living in urban and suburban areas is their continued exposure to high Road Traffic Noise (RTN levels. Until now, noise measurements in cities have been performed by professionals, recording data in certain locations to build a noise map afterwards. However, the deployment of Wireless Acoustic Sensor Networks (WASN has enabled automatic noise mapping in smart cities. In order to obtain a reliable picture of the RTN levels affecting citizens, Anomalous Noise Events (ANE unrelated to road traffic should be removed from the noise map computation. To this aim, this paper introduces an Anomalous Noise Event Detector (ANED designed to differentiate between RTN and ANE in real time within a predefined interval running on the distributed low-cost acoustic sensors of a WASN. The proposed ANED follows a two-class audio event detection and classification approach, instead of multi-class or one-class classification schemes, taking advantage of the collection of representative acoustic data in real-life environments. The experiments conducted within the DYNAMAP project, implemented on ARM-based acoustic sensors, show the feasibility of the proposal both in terms of computational cost and classification performance using standard Mel cepstral coefficients and Gaussian Mixture Models (GMM. The two-class GMM core classifier relatively improves the baseline universal GMM one-class classifier F1 measure by 18.7% and 31.8% for suburban and urban environments, respectively, within the 1-s integration interval. Nevertheless, according to the results, the classification performance of the current ANED implementation still has room for improvement.

  3. The frequency and determinants of liver stiffness measurement failure: a retrospective study of "real-life" 38,464 examinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ji

    Full Text Available To investigate the frequency and determinants of liver stiffness measurement (LSM failure by means of FibroScan in "real-life" Chinese patients.A total of 38,464 "real-life" Chinese patients in 302 military hospital of China through the whole year of 2013, including asymptomatic carrier, chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, liver cirrhosis (LC, alcoholic liver disease, autoimmune liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC and other, were enrolled, their clinical and biological parameters were retrospectively investigated. Liver fibrosis was evaluated by FibroScan detection. S probe (for children with height less than 1.20 m and M probe (for adults were used. LSM failure defined as zero valid shots (unsuccessful LSM, or the ratio of the interquartile range to the median of 10 measurements (IQR/M greater than 0.30 plus median LSM greater or equal to 7.1 kPa (unreliable LSM.LSM failure occurred in 3.34% of all examinations (1286 patients out of 38,464, among them, there were 958 cases (2.49% with unsuccessful LSM, and 328 patients (0.85% with unreliable LSM. Statistical analyses showed that LSM failure was independently associated with body mass index (BMI greater than 30 kg/m(2, female sex, age greater than 50 years, intercostal spaces (IS less than 9 mm, decompensated liver cirrhosis and HCC patients. There were no significant differences among other diseases. By changing another skilled operator, success was achieved on 301 cases out of 1286, which reduced the failure rate to 2.56%, the decrease was significant (P<0.0001.The principal reasons of LSM failure are ascites, obesity and narrow of IS. The failure rates of HCC, decompensated LC, elder or female patients are higher. These results emphasize the need for adequate operator training, technological improvements and optimal criteria for specific patient subpopulations.

  4. Sofosbuvir based treatment of chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 infections-A Scandinavian real-life study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Dalgard

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 3 infection with advanced liver disease has emerged as the most challenging to treat. We retrospectively assessed the treatment outcome of sofosbuvir (SOF based regimes for treatment of HCV genotype 3 infections in a real life setting in Scandinavia.Consecutive patients with chronic HCV genotype 3 infection were enrolled at 16 treatment centers in Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland. Patients who had received a SOF containing regimen were included. The fibrosis stage was evaluated by liver biopsy or transient liver elastography. The following treatments were given according availability and local guidelines: 1 SOF + ribavirin (RBV for 24 weeks, 2 SOF + daclatasvir (DCV +/-RBV for 12-24 weeks, 3 SOF + pegylated interferon alpha (peg-IFN-α + RBV for 12 weeks or 4 SOF/ledipasvir (LDV + RBV for 12-16 weeks. The primary endpoint was sustained virological response (SVR assessed at week 12 (SVR12 after end of treatment.We included 316 patients with a mean age of 55 years (range 24-79, 70% men, 49% treatment experienced, 58% with compensated cirrhosis and 12% with decompensated cirrhosis.In the modified intention to treat (mITT population SVR12 was achieved in 284/311 (91% patients. Among 26 treatment failures, five had non-response, 3 breakthrough and 18 relapse. Five patients were not included in the mITT population. Three patients died from reasons unrelated to treatment and two were lost to follow-up. The SVR12 rate was similar for all treatment regimens, but lower in men (p = 0.042, and in patients with decompensated liver disease (p = 0.004.We found that sofosbuvir based treatment in a real-life setting could offer SVR rates exceeding 90% in patients with HCV genotype 3 infection and advanced liver disease.

  5. How does age-related macular degeneration affect real-world visual ability and quality of life? A systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Deanna J; Hobby, Angharad E; Binns, Alison M; Crabb, David P

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To review systematically the evidence of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) affecting real-world visual ability and quality of life (QoL). To explore trends in specific topics within this body of the literature. Design Systematic review. Methods A systematic literature search was carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PsychARTICLES and Health and Psychosocial Instruments for articles published up to January 2015 for studies including people diagnosed with AMD, assessing real-world visual ability or QoL as an outcome. Two researchers screened studies for eligibility. Details of eligible studies including study design, characteristics of study population and outcomes measured were recorded in a data extraction table. All included studies underwent quality appraisal using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool 2011 Version (MMAT). Results From 5284 studies, 123 were eligible for inclusion. A range of approaches were identified, including performance-based methods, quantitative and qualitative patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). AMD negatively affects tasks including mobility, face recognition, perception of scenes, computer use, meal preparation, shopping, cleaning, watching TV, reading, driving and, in some cases, self-care. There is evidence for higher rates of depression among people with AMD than among community dwelling elderly. A number of adaptation strategies have been associated with AMD of varying duration. Much of the research fails to report the type of AMD studied (59% of included studies) or the duration of disease in participants (74%). Of those that do report type studied, the breakdown is as follows: wet AMD 20%, dry AMD 4% and both types 17%. Conclusions There are many publications highlighting the negative effects of AMD in various domains of life. Future research should focus on delivering some of this research knowledge into patient management and clinical trials and differentiating between the types of AMD. PMID

  6. MP-AzeFlu provides rapid and effective allergic rhinitis control in real life: A pan-European study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Ludger; Bachert, Claus; Stjärne, Par; Dollner, Ralph; Larsen, Petter; Haahr, Peter; Agache, Ioana; Scadding, Glenis; Price, David

    2016-09-01

    The European Union has prioritized allergic rhinitis (AR) control. Contre les Maladies Chronique pour un Vieillissement Actif Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma has endorsed the visual analog scale (VAS) as the AR control language and incorporated it into a new AR treatment algorithm. Concurrently, the Respiratory Effectiveness Group and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology are striving to improve the quality of published real-life AR research. Our aim was to assess the effectiveness of MP-AzeFlu by using a VAS in a well-designed, real-life, pan-European study. A total of 2988 patients (aged ≥ 12 years) with Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma defined moderate-to-severe AR from Germany, Sweden, Romania, United Kingdom, Denmark, and Norway were included. Patients (except from the United Kingdom) assessed symptom severity by using a VAS from 0 mm (not at all bothersome) to 100 mm (very bothersome) on days 0, 1, 3, 7, and the last visit (∼day 14) in the morning before MP-AzeFlu use. Patients' perceived level of disease control was assessed on day 3. A VAS score cutoff on day 3 for "well controlled" was determined, and the proportion of patients who achieved this response was calculated. MP-AzeFlu was associated with a mean VAS score reduction from 73.7 mm at baseline to 23.4 mm by the last visit. This reduction was significant (p Vieillissement Actif Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma, the Respiratory Effectiveness Group, and the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology objectives, supporting MP-AzeFlu as the drug of choice for the treatment of moderate-to-severe AR.

  7. The use of new aceclofenac dosage forms in patients with osteoarthrosis in real-life clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Ivanovna Alekseeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new convenient dosage form of aceclofenac (sashet bags has recently been launched on the Russian market. The powder in a single sashet bag weighs 3 g, which corresponds to 100 mg of the active ingredient per tablet. A prospective study (including evaluation of the effectiveness and safety of the sashet form of aceclofenac in real-life clinical practice was carried out in 40 outpatients with osteoarthrosis (OA of the knee and hip joints during 2 weeks. A clear pain relief by 25% vs the beginning of therapy was observed; joint stiffness decreased by 34%; joint function improved by 17%; and the total WOMAC score decreased by 18% by the end of the therapy (262.7±127.7 vs 198.5±111.6; 88.5±42.21vs 57.7±32.6; 789.9±307.2 vs 650.6±242.6 and 1087.7±369.3 vs 886.4±326.0, p<0.05, respectively, in all cases. The results of our surveillance study in real-life clinical practice have shown that sashet aceclofenac rapidly relieves pain and reduces joint stiffness, thus improving the functional condition of joints. Adverse effects related to the gastrointestinal tract were observed in only one (2.5% patient when using sashet aceclofenac. The drug in this dosage form can be recommended as an effective and safe agent, especially for patients who typically receive non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in liquid forms.

  8. ER vs. ED: a comparison of televised and real-life emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A; Roberts, Traci; Fine, Michael J; Dillman Carpentier, Francesca R; Rice, Kristen R; Barnato, Amber E

    2012-12-01

    Although accurate health-related representations of medical situations on television can be valuable, inaccurate portrayals can engender misinformation. The purpose of this study was to compare sociodemographic and medical characteristics of patients depicted on television vs. actual United States (US) Emergency Department (ED) patients. Two independently working coders analyzed all 22 programs in one complete year of the popular "emergency room" drama ER. Inter-rater reliability was excellent, and all initial coding differences were easily adjudicated. Actual health data were obtained from the National Heath and Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from the same year. Chi-squared goodness-of-fit tests were used to compare televised vs. real distribution across key sociodemographic and medical variables. Ages at the extremes of age (i.e., ≤ 4 and ≥ 45 years) were less commonly represented on television compared with reality. Characters on television vs. reality were less commonly women (31.2% vs. 52.9%, respectively), African-American (12.7% vs. 20.3%), or Hispanic (7.1% vs. 12.5%). The two most common acuity categories for television were the extreme categories "non-urgent" and "emergent," whereas the two most common categories for reality were the middle categories "semi-urgent" and "urgent." Televised visits compared with reality were most commonly due to injury (63.5% vs. 37.0%, respectively), and televised injuries were less commonly work-related (4.2% vs. 14.8%, respectively). Comparison of represented and actual characteristics of ED patients may be valuable in helping us determine what types of patient misperceptions may exist, as well as what types of interventions may be beneficial in correcting that potential misinformation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Visual function assessment in simulated real-life situations in HIV-infected subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Barteselli

    Full Text Available Visual function abnormalities are common in people living with HIV disease (PLWH without retinitis, even after improvement in immune status. Abnormalities such as reduced contrast sensitivity, altered color vision, peripheral visual field loss, and electrophysiological changes are related to a combination of retinal dysfunctions, involving inner and outer retinal structures. The standard protocol for testing vision performance in clinical practice is the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS chart. However, this method poorly correlates with activities of daily living that require patients to assess visual stimuli in multiple light/contrast conditions, and with limited time. We utilized a novel interactive computer program (Central Vision Analyzer to analyze vision performance in PLWH under a variety of light/contrast conditions that simulate stressful and real-world environments. The program tests vision in a time-dependent way that we believe better correlates with daily living activities than the non-timed ETDRS chart. We also aimed to correlate visual scores with retinal neuro-fiber layer thickness on optical coherence tomography. Here we show that visual acuity is more affected in PLWH in comparison to HIV-seronegative controls in varying contrast and luminance, especially if the nadir CD4+ T-cell count was lower than 100 cells/mm3. Visual impairment reflects the loss of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness especially of the temporal-inferior sector. In PLWH the ETDRS chart test led to better visual acuity compared to the Central Vision Analyzer equivalent test, likely because patients had indefinite time to guess the letters. This study confirms and strengthens the finding that visual function is affected in PLWH even in absence of retinitis, since we found that the HIV serostatus is the best predictor of visual loss. The Central Vision Analyzer may be useful in the diagnosis of subclinical HIV-associated visual loss in multiple

  10. ER vs. ED: A Comparison of Televised and Real-Life Emergency Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Brian A.; Roberts, Traci; Fine, Michael J.; Dillman Carpentier, Francesca R.; Rice, Kristen R.; Barnato, Amber E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although accurate health-related representations of medical situations on television can be valuable, inaccurate portrayals can engender misinformation. Objective The purpose of this study was to compare socio-demographic and medical characteristics of patients depicted on television vs. actual U.S. Emergency Department (ED) patients. Methods Two independently working coders analyzed all 22 programs in one complete year of the popular emergency room drama ER. Inter-rater reliability was excellent, and all initial coding differences were easily adjudicated. Actual health data were obtained from the National Heath and Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from the same year. We used Pearson’s chi-squared test to compare televised vs. real distribution across key socio-demographic and medical variables. Results Ages at the extremes (e.g., ≤4 and ≥45) were less commonly represented on television compared with reality. Compared with reality, characters on television were less commonly women (31.2% vs. 52.9%), African American (12.7% vs. 20.3%) or Hispanic (7.1% vs. 12.5%). The two most common acuity categories for television were the extreme categories “non-urgent” and “emergent,” whereas the two most common categories for reality were the middle categories “semi-urgent” and “urgent.” Compared with reality, televised visits were most commonly due to injury (63.5% vs. 37.0%), and televised injuries were less commonly work-related (4.2% vs. 14.8%). Conclusions Comparison of represented and actual characteristics of ED patients may be valuable in helping us determine what types of patient misperceptions may exist as well as what types of interventions may be beneficial in correcting that potential misinformation. PMID:22766407

  11. Assessment of real-world daily-living skills in early-onset schizophrenia trough the Life Skills Profile scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, O; Penadés, R; Baeza, I; De la Serna, E; Sánchez-Gistau, V; Lázaro, L; Bernardo, M; Castro-Fornieles, J

    2013-04-01

    Adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) have marked deficits in their functional outcome. However, few short and reliable instruments for assessing real-world functioning have been specifically validated in EOS. The Life Skills Profile (LSP) is a brief scale widely used in schizophrenia and considered one of the optimal instruments for assessing real-world daily living skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness and the feasibility of the LSP to assess daily living skills in EOS. The sample included 53 clinically and pharmacologically stabilized adolescent patients with EOS and 53 healthy adolescents. Content review of the scale and internal consistency analysis were conducted in the EOS group. A subgroup of 30 patients was re-assessed over a 10-day interval to establish the test-retest reliability. Measures of functional outcome were used to assess convergent validity, and measures of intelligence and symptoms were used to assess divergent validity. Discriminant validity was analyzed through logistic analysis and the receiver-operating characteristic curve. The LSP and its subscales showed high reliability, adequate internal consistency and adequate convergent and divergent validity. The LSP was also found to be a sensitive instrument for detecting differences between patients and healthy adolescents, correctly classifying 84% of the sample. The estimated area under the curve was 0.925 (95% CI 0.875-0.976). The LSP showed adequate psychometric characteristics in adolescents with EOS and appeared to be a valid, reliable and time-efficient instrument for use in clinical practice and research settings to assess real-world daily-living skills in EOS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dose uniformity of budesonide Easyhaler® under simulated real-life conditions and with low inspiration flow rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haikarainen, Jussi; Rytilä, Paula; Roos, Sirkku; Metsärinne, Sirpa; Happonen, Anita

    2017-01-01

    Budesonide Easyhaler® multidose dry powder inhaler is approved for the treatment of asthma. Objectives were to determine the delivered dose (DD) uniformity of budesonide Easyhaler® in simulated real-world conditions and with different inspiration flow rates (IFRs). Three dose delivery studies were performed using 100, 200, and 400 µg/dose strengths of budesonide. Dose uniformity was assessed during in-use periods of 4-6 months after exposure to high temperature (30°C) and humidity (60% relative humidity) and after dropping and vibration testing. The influence of various IFRs (31, 43, and 54 L/min) on the DD was also investigated. Acceptable dose uniformity was declared when mean DD were within 80-120% of expected dose; all data reported descriptively. DD was constant (range: 93-109% of expected dose) at all in-use periods and after exposure to high temperature and humidity for a duration of up to 6 months. DD post-dropping and -vibration were unaffected (range 98-105% of expected dose). Similarly, DD was constant and within 10% of expected dose across all IFRs. Results indicate that budesonide Easyhaler® delivers consistently accurate doses in various real-life conditions. Budesonide Easyhaler® can be expected to consistently deliver a uniform dose and improve asthma control regardless of high temperature and humidity or varying IFR.

  13. 'Real-life' report on the management of chronic GvHD in the Gruppo Italiano Trapianto Midollo Osseo (GITMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaccone, L; Mancini, G; Mordini, N; Gargiulo, G; De Cecco, V; Angelini, S; Arpinati, M; Baronciani, D; Bozzoli, V; Bramanti, S; Calore, E; Cavattoni, I M; Cimminiello, M; Colombo, A A; Facchini, L; Falcioni, S; Faraci, M; Fedele, R; Guidi, S; Iori, A P; Marotta, S; Micò, M C; Milone, G; Onida, F; Pastore, D; Patriarca, F; Pini, M; Raimondi, R; Rovelli, A; Santarone, S; Severino, A; Skert, C; Stanghellini, M T L; Tecchio, C; Vassallo, E; Chiarucci, M; Bruno, B; Bonifazi, F; Olivieri, A

    2018-01-01

    Several guidelines have been published about management of chronic GvHD (cGvHD), but the clinical practice still remains demanding. The Gruppo Italiano Trapianto di Midollo Osseo (GITMO) has planned a prospective observational study on cGvHD, supported by a dedicated software, including the updated recommendations. In view of this study, two surveys have been conducted, focusing the management of cGvHD and ancillary therapy in cGvHD, to address the current 'real life' situation. The two surveys were sent to all 57 GITMO centers, performing allografting in Italy; the response rate was 57% and 66% of the interviewed centers, respectively. The first survey showed a great disparity especially regarding steroid-refractory cGvHD, although extracorporeal photo-apheresis resulted as the most indicated treatment in this setting. Another challenging issue was the strategy for tapering steroid: our survey showed a great variance, and this disagreement could be a real bias in evaluating outcomes in prospective studies. As for the second survey, the results suggest that the ancillary treatments are not standardized in many centers. All responding centers reported a strong need to standardize management of cGvHD and to participate in prospective trials. Before starting observational and/or interventional studies, a detailed knowledge of current practice should be encouraged.

  14. Power requirements and environmental impact of a pedelec. A case study based on real-life applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abagnale, Carmelina, E-mail: c.abagnale@unina.it; Cardone, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.cardone@unina.it; Iodice, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.iodice@unina.it; Strano, Salvatore, E-mail: salvatore.strano@unina.it; Terzo, Mario, E-mail: m.terzo@unina.it; Vorraro, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.vorraro@unina.it

    2015-07-15

    This paper describes the methodologies to appraise the power requests and environmental analysis of an electrically assisted bicycle under real driving conditions, also containing regulations and technical-science-related aspects. For this purpose, in this study, the on-road test program of an electrically assisted bicycle was executed in the urban area of Naples on different test tracks, so a general assessment about its driving behavior under several driving conditions was performed. The power requirements in different typical riding situations were estimated by a procedure based on the experimental kinematic parameters that characterize the driving dynamics collected during the real-life applications. An environmental analysis was also performed, with a methodology that takes into account the environmental assessment of a moped by measuring the experimental moped exhaust emissions of the regulated pollutants. Starting from the results acquired during the different test samples, besides, an assessment of the electric traction offered by this pedelec on the driving comfort was evaluated for different riding situations. - Highlights: • The power requirements of a pedelec in typical riding conditions were identified. • The estimated electricity consumption for battery recharging was defined. • An environmental valuation of the tested pedelec and of a moped was performed. • Emissions that could be saved utilizing a pedelec instead of a moped were derived.

  15. Seen it in the Bulletin? Now see it in real-life!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Detector Technologies (Map: C4): Read more about the construction and physics of the new NA62 straw chambers in “Straw Detector: 1 - Vacuum: 0”.   The Synchrocyclotron (Map: B2): Read more about the newly opened synchrocyclotron (SC) in “New life for CERN's first accelerator”.   Linac 4 (Map: D4): Visit the site of CERN’s newest linear accelerator: Linac4. Read more about the accelerator in “Linac4: the final assembly stage is under way” (2013), “Testing begins on Linac4” (2012), and “Sixteen silver wires to assemble 350 kg of copper” (2010).   Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) (Map: I3): AMS is the most sensitive particle physics spectrometer ever deployed in space. Read about its launch in “AMS: From the ISS to CERN”.   COMPASS (Map: I1): COMPASS is a high-energy physics experiment at the SPS. Read more about its newest phase in ...

  16. Perversion and perverse relationships in the filmic element: the unfinished between real and fantasmatic life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Bille

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The sadomasochist lives in an undifferentiated universe: a universe which assumes a complete equivalence and confusion between roles and erotic objects, in which incest is not prohibited, nor the distinction between inside and outside, between life and death. Following childhood traumas and abuses, sexual behavior with perverse aspects and the perverse structures that derive from it both move on common ground: that of the dehumanization of the emotional and sexual context, which principally consists in “thing-ifying” the Other in order to sustain arousal. The cinema can cue us as to what occurs in perversions and perverse relationships, precisely insofar as the unconscious material that fluctuates on the silver screen provides a clear representation of the entire world that the director inhabits: a world that is revived for the spectator in a space without time, in a “non-place” that acts as a backdrop to new meanings that remain undefined, incomplete and subject to change.

  17. Verification of an emerging LCA design tool through real life performance monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eon Christine

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has demonstrated that low-emission houses often underperform, consuming more energy than predicted by their designs. Life cycle assessments (LCA have been employed to complement mandatory energy assessments, as they offer a more comprehensive evaluation of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions over the building lifespan. This research monitored ten energy efficient Australian houses and recorded data about energy use and photovoltaic generation over 1 year. The houses were assessed with a relatively new LCA tool in addition to the Australian mandatory house energy assessment Nationwide House Energy Rating Scheme (NatHERS. The objective of this study was twofold: first, to evaluate the results of the assessment tools compared to actual house energy requirements and second, to understand how design, renewable energy, and occupancy can impact the overall GHG emissions of the houses. The results show that energy use is positively related to NatHERS ratings, but some of the high performance houses perform poorly and there was significant variation in energy use between houses with the same ratings. The LCA revealed that modern houses have higher embodied energy than older houses, while solar panels are not always used to their full potential. This paper attributes some of the variations between theoretical and actual energy use to construction issues and occupant practices.

  18. Modifying social anxiety related to a real-life stressor using online Cognitive Bias Modification for interpretation☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppitt, Laura; Illingworth, Josephine L.; MacLeod, Colin; Hampshire, Adam; Dunn, Barnaby D.; Mackintosh, Bundy

    2014-01-01

    Modifying threat related biases in attention and interpretation has been shown to successfully reduce global symptoms of anxiety in high anxious and clinically anxious samples (termed Cognitive Bias Modification, CBM). However, the possibility that CBM can be used as a way to prevent anxiety associated with an upcoming real-life stressful event in vulnerable populations has yet to be systematically examined. The present study aimed to assess whether a two-week course of online CBM for interpretations (CBM-I) could reduce social evaluative fear when starting university. Sixty-nine students anxious about starting university completed five sessions of online CBM in the two weeks prior to starting university, or completed a placebo control intervention. Results indicated that CBM-I reduced social evaluative fear from baseline to day one of starting university to a greater extent than the placebo control intervention. Also, there was a greater reduction in state anxiety and a trend indicating a greater reduction in social evaluative fear in the CBM-I group at 4 weeks follow-up. Results suggest that CBM-I could be used as a preventative tool to help reduce anxiety specific to challenging life events. PMID:24317281

  19. From Affective Experience to Motivated Action: Tracking Reward-Seeking and Punishment-Avoidant Behaviour in Real-Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Wichers

    Full Text Available Many of the decisions and actions in everyday life result from implicit learning processes. Important to psychopathology are, for example, implicit reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant learning processes. It is known that when specific actions get associated with a rewarding experience, such as positive emotions, that this will increase the likelihood that an organism will engage in similar actions in the future. Similarly, when actions get associated with punishing experiences, such as negative emotions, this may reduce the likelihood that the organism will engage in similar actions in the future. This study examines whether we can observe these implicit processes prospectively in the flow of daily life. If such processes take place then we expect that current behaviour can be predicted by how similar behaviour was experienced (in terms of positive and negative affect at previous measurement moments. This was examined in a sample of 621 female individuals that had participated in an Experience Sampling data collection. Measures of affect and behaviour were collected at 10 semi-random moments of the day for 5 consecutive days. It was examined whether affective experience that was paired with certain behaviours (physical activity and social context at previous measurements modified the likelihood to show similar behaviours at next measurement moments. Analyses were performed both at the level of observations (a time scale with units of ± 90 min and at day level (a time scale with units of 24 h. As expected, we found that affect indeed moderated the extent to which previous behaviour predicted similar behaviour later in time, at both beep- and day-level. This study showed that it is feasible to track reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant behaviour prospectively in humans in the flow of daily life. This opens up a new toolbox to examine processes determining goal-oriented behaviour in relation to psychopathology in humans.

  20. From Affective Experience to Motivated Action: Tracking Reward-Seeking and Punishment-Avoidant Behaviour in Real-Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichers, Marieke; Kasanova, Zuzana; Bakker, Jindra; Thiery, Evert; Derom, Catherine; Jacobs, Nele; van Os, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Many of the decisions and actions in everyday life result from implicit learning processes. Important to psychopathology are, for example, implicit reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant learning processes. It is known that when specific actions get associated with a rewarding experience, such as positive emotions, that this will increase the likelihood that an organism will engage in similar actions in the future. Similarly, when actions get associated with punishing experiences, such as negative emotions, this may reduce the likelihood that the organism will engage in similar actions in the future. This study examines whether we can observe these implicit processes prospectively in the flow of daily life. If such processes take place then we expect that current behaviour can be predicted by how similar behaviour was experienced (in terms of positive and negative affect) at previous measurement moments. This was examined in a sample of 621 female individuals that had participated in an Experience Sampling data collection. Measures of affect and behaviour were collected at 10 semi-random moments of the day for 5 consecutive days. It was examined whether affective experience that was paired with certain behaviours (physical activity and social context) at previous measurements modified the likelihood to show similar behaviours at next measurement moments. Analyses were performed both at the level of observations (a time scale with units of ± 90 min) and at day level (a time scale with units of 24 h). As expected, we found that affect indeed moderated the extent to which previous behaviour predicted similar behaviour later in time, at both beep- and day-level. This study showed that it is feasible to track reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant behaviour prospectively in humans in the flow of daily life. This opens up a new toolbox to examine processes determining goal-oriented behaviour in relation to psychopathology in humans.

  1. Differences in change blindness to real-life scenes in adults with autism spectrum conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Chris; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2017-01-01

    People often fail to detect large changes to visual scenes following a brief interruption, an effect known as ‘change blindness’. People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have superior attention to detail and better discrimination of targets, and often notice small details that are missed by others. Together these predict people with autism should show enhanced perception of changes in simple change detection paradigms, including reduced change blindness. However, change blindness studies to date have reported mixed results in ASC, which have sometimes included no differences to controls or even enhanced change blindness. Attenuated change blindness has only been reported to date in ASC in children and adolescents, with no study reporting reduced change blindness in adults with ASC. The present study used a change blindness flicker task to investigate the detection of changes in images of everyday life in adults with ASC (n = 22) and controls (n = 22) using a simple change detection task design and full range of original scenes as stimuli. Results showed the adults with ASC had reduced change blindness compared to adult controls for changes to items of marginal interest in scenes, with no group difference for changes to items of central interest. There were no group differences in overall response latencies to correctly detect changes nor in the overall number of missed detections in the experiment. However, the ASC group showed greater missed changes for marginal interest changes of location, showing some evidence of greater change blindness as well. These findings show both reduced change blindness to marginal interest changes in ASC, based on response latencies, as well as greater change blindness to changes of location of marginal interest items, based on detection rates. The findings of reduced change blindness are consistent with clinical reports that people with ASC often notice small changes to less salient items within their environment, and are in

  2. Differences in change blindness to real-life scenes in adults with autism spectrum conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ashwin

    Full Text Available People often fail to detect large changes to visual scenes following a brief interruption, an effect known as 'change blindness'. People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC have superior attention to detail and better discrimination of targets, and often notice small details that are missed by others. Together these predict people with autism should show enhanced perception of changes in simple change detection paradigms, including reduced change blindness. However, change blindness studies to date have reported mixed results in ASC, which have sometimes included no differences to controls or even enhanced change blindness. Attenuated change blindness has only been reported to date in ASC in children and adolescents, with no study reporting reduced change blindness in adults with ASC. The present study used a change blindness flicker task to investigate the detection of changes in images of everyday life in adults with ASC (n = 22 and controls (n = 22 using a simple change detection task design and full range of original scenes as stimuli. Results showed the adults with ASC had reduced change blindness compared to adult controls for changes to items of marginal interest in scenes, with no group difference for changes to items of central interest. There were no group differences in overall response latencies to correctly detect changes nor in the overall number of missed detections in the experiment. However, the ASC group showed greater missed changes for marginal interest changes of location, showing some evidence of greater change blindness as well. These findings show both reduced change blindness to marginal interest changes in ASC, based on response latencies, as well as greater change blindness to changes of location of marginal interest items, based on detection rates. The findings of reduced change blindness are consistent with clinical reports that people with ASC often notice small changes to less salient items within their

  3. Differences in change blindness to real-life scenes in adults with autism spectrum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, Chris; Wheelwright, Sally; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2017-01-01

    People often fail to detect large changes to visual scenes following a brief interruption, an effect known as 'change blindness'. People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) have superior attention to detail and better discrimination of targets, and often notice small details that are missed by others. Together these predict people with autism should show enhanced perception of changes in simple change detection paradigms, including reduced change blindness. However, change blindness studies to date have reported mixed results in ASC, which have sometimes included no differences to controls or even enhanced change blindness. Attenuated change blindness has only been reported to date in ASC in children and adolescents, with no study reporting reduced change blindness in adults with ASC. The present study used a change blindness flicker task to investigate the detection of changes in images of everyday life in adults with ASC (n = 22) and controls (n = 22) using a simple change detection task design and full range of original scenes as stimuli. Results showed the adults with ASC had reduced change blindness compared to adult controls for changes to items of marginal interest in scenes, with no group difference for changes to items of central interest. There were no group differences in overall response latencies to correctly detect changes nor in the overall number of missed detections in the experiment. However, the ASC group showed greater missed changes for marginal interest changes of location, showing some evidence of greater change blindness as well. These findings show both reduced change blindness to marginal interest changes in ASC, based on response latencies, as well as greater change blindness to changes of location of marginal interest items, based on detection rates. The findings of reduced change blindness are consistent with clinical reports that people with ASC often notice small changes to less salient items within their environment, and are in

  4. Exploring the neural basis of real-life joint action: measuring brain activation during joint table setting with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eEgetemeir

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many everyday life situations require two or more individuals to execute actions together. Assessing brain activation during naturalistic tasks to uncover relevant processes underlying such real-life joint action situations has remained a methodological challenge. In the present study, we introduce a novel joint action paradigm that enables the assessment of brain activation during real-life joint action tasks using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS. We monitored brain activation of participants who coordinated complex actions with a partner sitting opposite them. Participants performed table-setting tasks, either alone (solo action or in cooperation with a partner (joint action, or they observed the partner performing the task (action observation. Comparing joint action and solo action revealed stronger activation (higher [oxy-Hb]-concentration during joint action in a number of areas. Among these were areas in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL that additionally showed an overlap of activation during action observation and solo action. Areas with such a close link between action observation and action execution have been associated with action simulation processes. The magnitude of activation in these IPL areas also varied according to joint action type and its respective demand on action simulation. The results validate fNIRS as an imaging technique for exploring the functional correlates of interindividual action coordination in real-life settings and suggest that coordinating actions in real-life situations requires simulating the actions of the partner.

  5. Comparison of the effects of two low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goals for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction in real-world practice: ≥ 50% reduction from baseline versus <70 mg/dL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hoon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Kyung Woo; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Lee, Sang Rok; Chae, Jei Keon; Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2015-01-01

    The present study compared the effects of two low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals for secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in real-world practice. Of 3091 consecutive patients with AMI who had baseline LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dL and underwent successful percutaneous coronary intervention, 1305 eligible patients who received discharge statin prescriptions were analyzed. Patients were categorized into 2 groups according to the values of LDL-C at 1 year in two different manners using percent reduction from baseline (≥ 50% reduction, n=428 versus 50% reduction, n=877) and fixed levels (year major cardiac events including cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention, and coronary artery bypass grafting after hospital discharge. At 2 years, major cardiac events occurred in 139 patients (10.7%). Compared with 50% LDL-C reduction from baseline, patients with ≥ 50% LDL-C reduction had a 47% risk reduction in major cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.53; 95% confidence interval, 0.36 to 0.79; P=0.002). But, compared with LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dL at 1 year, patients with LDL-C levels year had a similar risk of major cardiac events (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.68 to 1.34; P=0.793). Obtaining a ≥ 50% reduction in LDL-C was associated with better clinical outcomes after AMI in real-world practice, whereas achieving a < 70 mg/dL was not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A real-life clinical evaluation of a next-generation antimicrobial dressing on acute and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M; Metcalf, D; Parsons, D; Bowler, P

    2015-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a new, next-generation antimicrobial dressing (AQUACEL Ag+ dressing) in facilitating healing in a variety of hard-to-heal wounds that may have been compromised by infection and/or biofilm. This was an international, multi-centred, real-life, non-randomised evaluation involving patients with a wide variety of slow-, non-healing or deteriorating chronic and acute wounds. There were no strict inclusion or exclusion criteria and the clinicians were asked to use their discretion in the selection of patients. The clinicians continued to use their standard protocol of care but replaced their existing primary wound-contact dressing with the next-generation antimicrobial dressing (NGAD) for up to 4 weeks. Clinicians could extend the treatment period if this was deemed clinically appropriate. Baseline assessments included wound bed characteristics, exudate level, indicators of wound biofilm, and signs and symptoms of infection. At the final assessment, the investigators reported the wound size, wound bed characteristics, and exudate level. A total of 121 patients were recruited into the original evaluation, of which eight were excluded for incomplete data sets. Most wounds (73; 64%) were either venous leg ulcers (59; 52%) or diabetic foot ulcers (14; 12%). At baseline, the wounds of (26; 23%) patients were slowly improving, 65 were stagnant (58%) and 22 (19%) were deteriorating. Just under three-quarters (74%) of the wounds had suspected biofilm (criteria including failure of a wound to heal, lack of response to topical and systemic antimicrobial agents, or the presence of slimy substances on the wound surface). Following the evaluations, the average wound closure achieved for all wounds was 72.6%, 19 (17%) wounds healed, 47 (42%) achieved at least 90% wound closure, and 71 (63%) achieved at least 75% closure. The average treatment period was 4.1 weeks; 35 wounds were treated with the dressing for more than 4 weeks. Cost analysis indicated that

  7. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis ( p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis ( p

  8. Real-life effectiveness of spa therapy in rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases: a retrospective study of 819 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagülle, Mine; Kardeş, Sinan; Karagülle, Müfit Zeki

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the use and efficacy of spa therapy in patients with a wide spectrum of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases under real-life clinical practice circumstances. In this retrospective observational study at the Medical Ecology and Hydroclimatology Department of Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, the records of all adult patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases who were prescribed a spa therapy in various health resorts in Turkey between 2002 and 2012 were analyzed. Patients sojourned to and stayed at a health resort and followed a usual 2-week course of spa therapy. The patients were examined within a week before and after the spa therapy at the department by the physicians and outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), patient's general evaluation (VAS), physician's general evaluation (VAS), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Lequesne's Functional Index (LFI), Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Index (WOMAC), Waddell Index (WI), Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPDS), Shoulder Disability Questionnaire (SDQ), Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). In total, 819 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnoses were 536 osteoarthritis; 115 fibromyalgia; 50 lumbar disc herniation; 34 cervical disc herniation; 23 nonspecific low back pain; 22 ankylosing spondylitis; 16 rheumatoid arthritis; 9 rotator cuff tendinitis; and 14 other conditions/diseases including scoliosis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, congenital hip dislocation in adult, Behçet's disease, de Quervain tendinopathy, psoriatic arthritis, osteoporosis, fracture rehabilitation, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. Statistically significant decrease in pain scores was found in all patients except hip osteoarthritis (p = 0.063) and rheumatoid arthritis (p = 0.134) subgroups; and statistically significant improvement in function in all patients except hip osteoarthritis

  9. A Proficiency Based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training (PROSPECT) Program Enhances Operative Performance in Real Life: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maertens, H; Aggarwal, R; Moreels, N; Vermassen, F; Van Herzeele, I

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare evolution requires optimisation of surgical training to provide safe patient care. Operating room performance after completion of proficiency based training in vascular surgery has not been investigated. A randomised controlled trial evaluated the impact of a Proficiency based Stepwise Endovascular Curricular Training program (PROSPECT) on the acquisition of endovascular skills and the transferability of these skills to real life interventions. All subjects performed two endovascular interventions treating patients with symptomatic iliac and/or superficial femoral artery stenosis under supervision. Primary outcomes were technical performances (Global Rating Scale [GRS]; Examiner Checklist), operative metrics, and patient outcomes, adjusted for case difficulty and trainee experience. Secondary outcomes included knowledge and technical performance after 6 weeks and 3 months. Thirty-two general surgical trainees were randomised into three groups. Besides traditional training, the first group (n = 11) received e-learning and simulation training (PROSPECT), the second group (n = 10) only had access to e-learning, while controls (n = 11) did not receive supplementary training. Twenty-nine trainees (3 dropouts) performed 58 procedures. Trainees who completed PROSPECT showed superior technical performance (GRS 39.36 ± 2.05; Checklist 63.51 ± 3.18) in real life with significantly fewer supervisor takeovers compared with trainees receiving e-learning alone (GRS 28.42 ± 2.15; p = .001; Checklist 53.63 ± 3.34; p = .027) or traditional education (GRS 23.09 ± 2.18; p = .001; Checklist 38.72 ± 3.38; p = .001). Supervisors felt more confident in allowing PROSPECT trained physicians to perform basic (p = .006) and complex (p = .003) procedures. No differences were detected in procedural parameters (such as fluoroscopy time, DAP, procedure time, etc.) or complications. Proficiency levels were maintained up to 3 months. A structured

  10. Amlodipine/valsartan single-pill combination: a prospective, observational evaluation of the real-life safety and effectiveness in the routine treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Yuri; Dongre, Neelesh; Vigdorchik, Alexey; Sastravaha, Krisada

    2012-02-01

    As several international guidelines on hypertension have now recommended, single-pill/fixed-dose combination antihypertensive therapies may be particularly beneficial as first-line therapy in high-risk patients, in whom more rapid and pronounced blood pressure (BP) control is desired. Upon the single-pill combination of amlodipine and valsartan becoming available, the authors conducted this international, observational study to evaluate its efficacy and safety in a real-life practice setting. This prospective, open-label, postmarketing surveillance study enrolled adults with arterial hypertension (systolic BP >140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP >90 mmHg) who were prescribed antihypertensive therapy with single-pill combination amlodipine/valsartan 5/80, 5/160, or 10/160 mg once daily. Patients were observed over a 3-month period (12 weeks) with approximately monthly intervals between clinic visits. A total of 8336 patients completed all study visits and were included in the efficacy analysis. Mean age was 54.7 years and 83.4% of patients had received prior antihypertensive therapy. BP reductions were dose related. Overall, mean BP was reduced from 165.0/99.3 mmHg at baseline to 128.7/80.4 mmHg at 12 weeks (36.3/18.9 mmHg; Ppatients. Efficacy was consistent in subgroups of patients with comorbidities and regardless of whether patients were previously treated with monotherapy or combination therapy. Adverse events were reported in 5.3% of patients. The incidence of edema declined from 10.4% at baseline to 8.5% at study end. Single-pill combination amlodipine/valsartan safely and effectively reduced BP across all hypertension grades and allowed the vast majority of patients to achieve BP goals.

  11. [Real life visual and anatomic outcomes of aflibercept treatment for treatment-naive patients with exudative age-related macular degeneration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, M-V; Rougier, M-B; Delyfer, M-N; Combillet, F; Korobelnik, J-F

    2017-04-01

    Anti-VEGF therapies have revolutionized the treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The goal of this study was to evaluate the "real life" visual and anatomical outcomes of aflibercept treatment for treatment-naive patients with exudative AMD. This was a retrospective study of patients treated with aflibercept in the department of Ophthalmology at the University Hospital of Bordeaux between November 2013 and July 2015. The follow-up period varied from 3months to 2years. All patients received an induction phase with 3monthly intravitreal injections (IVT) followed by personalized monitoring. ETDRS best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), fundus examination and OCT were performed at each visit. Data were collected at day 0, 3 months, 6, 9, 12months, 18 and 24months. Forty-three eyes of forty patients, mean age 77.7years, were included, with a minimum of 3months follow-up. Twenty-five eyes were followed for 1year; 5 eyes for two years. At baseline, the mean BCVA was 55.7 letters. Patients received 7.5 injections on average the first year and 2.6 the 2nd year. The mean gain of visual acuity was +7.3 letters at 3 months, +6.2 letters at 12 months, and +6.8 letters at 2years. Anatomically, the OCT data showed a decline of all parameters. The central macular thickness decreased by 118.3μm at 3months, 136.4μm at 12months and 65.5μm at 2years. Aflibercept can achieve effective visual and anatomical outcomes with results, which approach the pivotal studies, despite the use of personalized protocols and longer monitoring intervals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Acute social stress before the planning phase improves memory performance in a complex real life-related prospective memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glienke, Katharina; Piefke, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Successful execution of intentions, but also the failure to recall are common phenomena in everyday life. The planning, retention, and realization of intentions are often framed as the scientific concept of prospective memory. The current study aimed to examine the influence of acute stress on key dimensions of complex "real life" prospective memory. To this end, we applied a prospective memory task that involved the planning, retention, and performance of intentions during a fictional holiday week. Forty healthy males participated in the study. Half of the subjects were stressed with the Socially Evaluated Cold Pressor Test (SECPT) before the planning of intentions, and the other half of the participants underwent a control procedure at the same time. Salivary cortisol was used to measure the effectiveness of the SECPT stress induction. Stressed participants did not differ from controls in planning accuracy. However, when we compared stressed participants with controls during prospective memory retrieval, we found statistically significant differences in PM across the performance phase. Participants treated with the SECPT procedure before the planning phase showed improved prospective memory retrieval over time, while performance of controls declined. Particularly, there was a significant difference between the stress and control group for the last two days of the holiday week. Interestingly, control participants showed significantly better performance for early than later learned items, which could be an indicator of a primacy effect. This differential effect of stress on performance was also found in time- and event-dependent prospective memory. Our results demonstrate for the first time, that acute stress induced before the planning phase may improve prospective memory over the time course of the performance phase in time- and event-dependent prospective memory. Our data thus indicate that prospective memory can be enhanced by acute stress. Copyright © 2016

  13. Off the fence, onto the bandwagon? A large-scale survey experiment on effect of real-life poll outcomes on subsequent vote intentions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, T.W.G.; Hakhverdian, A.; Aaldering, L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of scholarly inquiry, the debate on the existence of a bandwagon effect in politics remains undecided. This article aims to overcome the limitations of previous experimental and survey research. We test to what extent success in real-life polling outcomes of the previous weeks

  14. Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real-life? A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morina, Nexhmedin; Ijntema, Hiske; Meyerbröker, Katharina; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2015-11-01

    In virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET), patients are exposed to virtual environments that resemble feared real-life situations. The aim of the current study was to assess the extent to which VRET gains can be observed in real-life situations. We conducted a meta-analysis of clinical trials applying VRET to specific phobias and measuring treatment outcome by means of behavioral laboratory tests or recordings of behavioral activities in real-life. Data sources were searches of databases (Medline, PsycInfo, and Cochrane). We included in total 14 clinical trials on specific phobias. Results revealed that patients undergoing VRET did significantly better on behavioral assessments following treatment than before treatment, with an aggregated uncontrolled effect size of g = 1.23. Furthermore, patients undergoing VRET performed better on behavioral assessments at post-treatment than patients on wait-list (g = 1.41). Additionally, results of behavioral assessment at post-treatment and at follow-up revealed no significant differences between VRET and exposure in vivo (g = -0.09 and 0.53, respectively). Finally, behavioral measurement effect sizes were similar to those calculated from self-report measures. The findings demonstrate that VRET can produce significant behavior change in real-life situations and support its application in treating specific phobias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-Life Outcomes for Patients with Asthma Prescribed Spacers for Use with Either Extrafine- or Fine-Particle Inhaled Corticosteroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guilbert, Theresa W.; Colice, Gene; Grigg, Jonathan; van Aalderen, Wim; Martin, Richard J.; Israel, Elliot; Postma, Dirkje S.; Roche, Nicolas; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Hillyer, Elizabeth V.; Evans, Jennifer M.; Dolovich, Myrna B.; Price, David B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spacers are often used with pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) to eliminate the need for coordinating inhalation with actuation. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the real-life effectiveness of spacers prescribed for use with either extrafine-or fine-particle inhaled corticosteroids

  16. Do children do what they say? Responses to hypothetical and real-life social problems in children with mild intellectual disabilities and behaviour problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuijzen, M; Bijman, ER; Lamberix, ICW; Wijnroks, L; de Castro, BO; Vermeer, A; Matthys, W

    Background Most research on children's social problem-solving skills is based on responses to hypothetical vignettes. Just how these responses relate to actual behaviour in real-life social situations is, however, unclear, particularly for children with mild intellectual disabilities (MID). Method

  17. Talking about Real-Life Events: An Investigation into the Ability of People with Intellectual Disabilities to Make Links between Their Beliefs and Emotions within Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebblethwaite, Amy; Jahoda, Andrew; Dagnan, Dave

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study compares how people with and without intellectual disabilities talk about events, beliefs and emotions in dialogues about real-life, emotive events and in a structured task assessing understanding of cognitive mediation. Materials and Methods: A cognitive-emotive interview was used to assist 19 adults with intellectual…

  18. Son, you’re smoking on Facebook! College students’ disclosures on social networking sites as indicators of real-life risk behaviors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoof, Joris Jasper; Bekkers, Jeroen; van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.

    2014-01-01

    Health risk behavior in student populations is an issue of major concern, and students’ risk levels are difficult to determine. In this study, we explore the extent to which information disclosed publicly on Facebook provides reliable indications of five real-life health behaviors. Questionnaire

  19. Loneliness and the social monitoring system: Emotion recognition and eye gaze in a real-life conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodder, Gerine M A; Scholte, Ron H J; Goossens, Luc; Engels, Rutger C M E; Verhagen, Maaike

    2016-02-01

    Based on the belongingness regulation theory (Gardner et al., 2005, Pers. Soc. Psychol. Bull., 31, 1549), this study focuses on the relationship between loneliness and social monitoring. Specifically, we examined whether loneliness relates to performance on three emotion recognition tasks and whether lonely individuals show increased gazing towards their conversation partner's faces in a real-life conversation. Study 1 examined 170 college students (Mage = 19.26; SD = 1.21) who completed an emotion recognition task with dynamic stimuli (morph task) and a micro(-emotion) expression recognition task. Study 2 examined 130 college students (Mage = 19.33; SD = 2.00) who completed the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test and who had a conversation with an unfamiliar peer while their gaze direction was videotaped. In both studies, loneliness was measured using the UCLA Loneliness Scale version 3 (Russell, 1996, J. Pers. Assess., 66, 20). The results showed that loneliness was unrelated to emotion recognition on all emotion recognition tasks, but that it was related to increased gaze towards their conversation partner's faces. Implications for the belongingness regulation system of lonely individuals are discussed. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  20. Performance in real life of the European Network on Drug Allergy algorithm in immediate reactions to beta-lactam antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, E; Laffond, E; Muñoz-Bellido, F; Gracia, M T; Macías, E; Moreno, A; Dávila, I

    2016-12-01

    European Network on Drug Allergy (ENDA) has proposed an algorithm for diagnosing immediate beta-lactam (BL) allergy. We evaluated its performance in real life. During 1994-2014, 1779 patients with suspected immediate reactions to BL were evaluated following ENDA's short diagnostic algorithm. Five hundred and nine patients (28.6%) were diagnosed of BL hypersensitivity. Of them, 457 (25.7%) were at first evaluation [403 by skin tests (ST), 12 by positive IgE and 42 by controlled provocation tests (CPT)]. At second evaluation (SE), 52 additional patients (10.2% of allergic patients) were diagnosed, [50 (2.8%) by ST and 2 (0.1%) by CPT]. Time between reaction and study was significantly longer in patients diagnosed at SE (median 5 vs 42 months; IQR 34 vs 170; P Drug Allergy/EAACI protocol was appropriate and safe when evaluating BL immediate reactions. Re-evaluation should be performed, particularly when anaphylaxis and long interval to diagnosis are present. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Episodic future thinking improves children's prospective memory performance in a complex task setting with real life task demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer-Trendowicz, A; Schnitzspahn, K M; Reuter, L; Altgassen, M

    2017-08-31

    Research on children's prospective memory (PM) shows an increase of performance across childhood and provides first evidence that encoding strategies such as episodic future thinking (EFT; i.e., engaging in a vivid prospection of oneself performing future tasks) may improve performance. The present study aimed at testing whether the beneficial effects of EFT extend from typical lab-based tasks to more complex tasks with real life demands. Further, it was tested whether children's ability to project themselves into different perspectives (i.e., self-projection) moderates the effects of EFT encoding on PM. Overall, 56 children (mean age: M = 10.73 years) were included in this study who were randomly assigned to either an EFT or control condition. Children participated in a 'sightseeing tour' (ongoing activity) inside the lab with various socially relevant and neutral PM tasks embedded. Results showed significantly higher PM performance in the EFT compared to the control group. There was no difference between neutral and social PM tasks and no interaction between type of PM tasks with encoding condition. Further, self-projection did not moderate the effects of EFT encoding on PM. Results suggest that EFT is an effective strategy to improve children's everyday PM. These beneficial effects seem to occur independent from children's general ability to change perspectives and for different types of PM tasks.

  2. A case study on variability management in software product lines: identifying why real-life projects fail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Huysegoms

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Economies of scale can be seen as some kind of “holy grail” in state of the art literature on the development of sets of related software systems. Software product line methods are often mentioned in this context, due to the variability management aspects they propose, in order to deal with sets of related software systems. They realize the sought-after reusability. Both variability management and software product lines already have a strong presence in theoretical research, but in real-life software product line projects trying to obtain economies of scale still tend to fall short of target. The objective of this paper is to study this gap between theory and reality through a case study in order to see why such gap exists, and to find a way to bridge this gap. Through analysis of the causes of failure identified by the stakeholders in the case study, the underlying problem, which is found to be located in the requirements engineering phase, is crystallized. The identification of a framework describing the problems will provide practitioners with a better focus for future endeavors in the field of software product lines, so that economies of scale can be achieved.

  3. Risk taking and adult attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A gap between real life behavior and experimental decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Yehuda; Shalit, Reut; Aran, Adi

    2018-01-01

    Adults with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are prone to suboptimal decision making and risk taking. The aim of this study was to test performance on a theoretically-based probabilistic decision making task in well-characterized adults with and without ADHD, and examine the relation between experimental risk taking and history of real-life risk-taking behavior, defined as cigarette, alcohol, and street drug use. University students with and without ADHD completed a modified version of the Cambridge Gambling Test, in which they had to choose between alternatives varied by level of risk, and reported their history of substance use. Both groups showed similar patterns of risk taking on the experimental decision making task, suggesting that ADHD is not linked to low sensitivity to risk. Past and present substance use was more prevalent in adults with ADHD. These finding question the validity of experimental probabilistic decision making task as a valid model for ADHD-related risk-taking behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Innovation through Wearable Sensors to Collect Real-Life Data among Pediatric Patients with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kestens Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. While increasing evidence links environments to health behavior, clinicians lack information about patients’ physical activity levels and lifestyle environments. We present mobile health tools to collect and use spatio-behavioural lifestyle data for personalized physical activity plans in clinical settings. Methods. The Dyn@mo lifestyle intervention was developed at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary time among children with cardiometabolic risk factors. Mobility, physical activity, and heart rate were measured in free-living environments during seven days. Algorithms processed data to generate spatio-behavioural indicators that fed a web-based interactive mapping application for personalised counseling. Proof of concept and tools are presented using data collected among the first 37 participants recruited in 2011. Results. Valid accelerometer data was available for 5.6 (SD=1.62 days in average, heart rate data for 6.5 days, and GPS data was available for 6.1 (2.1 days. Spatio-behavioural indicators were shared between patients, parents, and practitioners to support counseling. Conclusion. Use of wearable sensors along with data treatment algorithms and visualisation tools allow to better measure and describe real-life environments, mobility, physical activity, and physiological responses. Increased specificity in lifestyle interventions opens new avenues for remote patient monitoring and intervention.

  5. Is it time for studying real-life debiasing? Evaluation of the effectiveness of an analogical intervention technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aczel, Balazs; Bago, Bence; Szollosi, Aba; Foldes, Andrei; Lukacs, Bence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to initiate the exploration of debiasing methods applicable in real-life settings for achieving lasting improvement in decision making competence regarding multiple decision biases. Here, we tested the potentials of the analogical encoding method for decision debiasing. The advantage of this method is that it can foster the transfer from learning abstract principles to improving behavioral performance. For the purpose of the study, we devised an analogical debiasing technique for 10 biases (covariation detection, insensitivity to sample size, base rate neglect, regression to the mean, outcome bias, sunk cost fallacy, framing effect, anchoring bias, overconfidence bias, planning fallacy) and assessed the susceptibility of the participants (N = 154) to these biases before and 4 weeks after the training. We also compared the effect of the analogical training to the effect of 'awareness training' and a 'no-training' control group. Results suggested improved performance of the analogical training group only on tasks where the violations of statistical principles are measured. The interpretation of these findings require further investigation, yet it is possible that analogical training may be the most effective in the case of learning abstract concepts, such as statistical principles, which are otherwise difficult to master. The study encourages a systematic research of debiasing trainings and the development of intervention assessment methods to measure the endurance of behavior change in decision debiasing.

  6. Is it time for studying real-life debiasing? Evaluation of the effectiveness of an analogical intervention technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs eAczel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to initiate the exploration of debiasing methods applicable in real-life settings for achieving lasting improvement in decision-making competence regarding multiple decision biases. Here, we tested the potentials of the analogical encoding method for decision debiasing. The advantage of this method is that it can foster the transfer from learning abstract principles to improving behavioral performance. For the purpose of the study, we devised an analogical debiasing technique for ten biases (covariation detection, insensitivity to sample size, base rate neglect, regression to the mean, outcome bias, sunk cost fallacy, framing effect, anchoring bias, overconfidence bias, planning fallacy and assessed the susceptibility of the participants (N = 154 to these biases before and four weeks after the training. We also compared the effect of the analogical training to the effect of an ‘awareness training’ and a ‘no-training’ control group. Results suggested improved performance of the analogical training group only on tasks where the violations of statistical principles are measured. The interpretation of these findings require further investigation, yet it is possible that analogical training may be the most effective in the case of learning abstract concepts, such as statistical principles, which are otherwise difficult to master. The study encourages a systematic research of debiasing trainings and the development of intervention assessment methods to measure the endurance of behavior change in decision debiasing.

  7. 'Naked-eye' detection of biologically important anions in aqueous media by colorimetric receptor and its real life applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Archana; Trivedi, Darshak R.

    2017-05-01

    A colorimetric receptor R 2-[(2-Hydroxy-naphthalen-1-ylmethylene)-hydrazonomethyl]-quinolin-8-ol has been designed and synthesized with good yield and characterized by the standard spectroscopic techniques such as FT-IR, UV-Visible, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and ESI-MS. The receptor R showed naked-eye detection and spectral change in the presence of F-, AcO- and H2PO4- over other anions. Interestingly, receptor R displaying high selective recognition towards F-, AcO- ion with a drastic color change from pale yellow to red in dry DMSO solvent and orange in mixed solvent DMSO/H2O (9:1, v/v). The behavior of receptor R towards F-, AcO- ion was investigated using UV-Vis and 1H NMR experiment. The detailed 1H NMR experiment result revealed that the receptor R is forming the hydrogen bonding between imine nitrogen and phenolic sbnd OH proton towards anions. The receptor R is able to detect sodium salts of flouride (NaF) and acetate (NaAcO) in aqueous medium and it exhibited dramatic color change from pale yellow to red. The receptor R demonstrated itself to be useful for real life application by detecting flouride and acetate ion in sea-water and commercially available product such as toothpaste, mouthwash and vinegar solution.

  8. Innovation through Wearable Sensors to Collect Real-Life Data among Pediatric Patients with Cardiometabolic Risk Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kestens; Tracie, Barnett; Marie-Ève, Mathieu; Mélanie, Henderson; Jean-Luc, Bigras; Benoit, Thierry; St-Onge, Maxime; Marie, Lambert

    2014-01-01

    Background. While increasing evidence links environments to health behavior, clinicians lack information about patients' physical activity levels and lifestyle environments. We present mobile health tools to collect and use spatio-behavioural lifestyle data for personalized physical activity plans in clinical settings. Methods. The Dyn@mo lifestyle intervention was developed at the Sainte-Justine University Hospital Center to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary time among children with cardiometabolic risk factors. Mobility, physical activity, and heart rate were measured in free-living environments during seven days. Algorithms processed data to generate spatio-behavioural indicators that fed a web-based interactive mapping application for personalised counseling. Proof of concept and tools are presented using data collected among the first 37 participants recruited in 2011. Results. Valid accelerometer data was available for 5.6 (SD = 1.62) days in average, heart rate data for 6.5 days, and GPS data was available for 6.1 (2.1) days. Spatio-behavioural indicators were shared between patients, parents, and practitioners to support counseling. Conclusion. Use of wearable sensors along with data treatment algorithms and visualisation tools allow to better measure and describe real-life environments, mobility, physical activity, and physiological responses. Increased specificity in lifestyle interventions opens new avenues for remote patient monitoring and intervention.

  9. High-resolution single-molecule fluorescence imaging of zeolite aggregates within real-life fluid catalytic cracking particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristanović, Zoran; Kerssens, Marleen M; Kubarev, Alexey V; Hendriks, Frank C; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-02-02

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) is a major process in oil refineries to produce gasoline and base chemicals from crude oil fractions. The spatial distribution and acidity of zeolite aggregates embedded within the 50-150 μm-sized FCC spheres heavily influence their catalytic performance. Single-molecule fluorescence-based imaging methods, namely nanometer accuracy by stochastic chemical reactions (NASCA) and super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) were used to study the catalytic activity of sub-micrometer zeolite ZSM-5 domains within real-life FCC catalyst particles. The formation of fluorescent product molecules taking place at Brønsted acid sites was monitored with single turnover sensitivity and high spatiotemporal resolution, providing detailed insight in dispersion and catalytic activity of zeolite ZSM-5 aggregates. The results point towards substantial differences in turnover frequencies between the zeolite aggregates, revealing significant intraparticle heterogeneities in Brønsted reactivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Assessment of physical activity and energy expenditure by GPS combined with accelerometry in real-life conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dac Minh Tuan; Lecoultre, Virgile; Sunami, Yoshiyuki; Schutz, Yves

    2013-08-01

    Physical activity (PA) and related energy expenditure (EE) is often assessed by means of a single technique. Because of inherent limitations, single techniques may not allow for an accurate assessment both PA and related EE. The aim of this study was to develop a model to accurately assess common PA types and durations and thus EE in free-living conditions, combining data from global positioning system (GPS) and 2 accelerometers. Forty-one volunteers participated in the study. First, a model was developed and adjusted to measured EE with a first group of subjects (Protocol I, n = 12) who performed 6 structured and supervised PA. Then, the model was validated over 2 experimental phases with 2 groups (n = 12 and n = 17) performing scheduled (Protocol I) and spontaneous common activities in real-life condition (Protocol II). Predicted EE was compared with actual EE as measured by portable indirect calorimetry. In protocol I, performed PA types could be recognized with little error. The duration of each PA type could be predicted with an accuracy below 1 minute. Measured and predicted EE were strongly associated (r = .97, P PA and EE in free-living situations.

  11. The Impact of Bottom-Up Parking Information Provision in a Real-Life Context: The Case of Antwerp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Tasseron

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have analyzed the possible impacts of bottom-up parking information or parking reservation systems on parking dynamics in abstract simulation environments. In this paper, we take these efforts one step further by investigating the impacts of these systems in a real-life context: the center of the city of Antwerp, Belgium. In our simulation, we assume that all on-street and off-street parking places are equipped with technology able to transmit their occupancy status to so-called smart cars, which can receive information and reserve a parking place. We employ PARKAGENT, an agent-based simulation model, to simulate the behavior of smart and regular cars. We obtain detailed data on parking demand from FEATHERS, an activity-based transport model. The simulation results show that parking information and reservation hardly impact search time but do reduce walking distance for smart cars, leading to a reduction in total parking time, that is, the sum of search time and walking time. Reductions in search time occur only in zones with high occupancy rates, while a drop in walking distance is especially observed in low occupancy areas. Societal benefits of parking information and reservation are limited, because of the low impact on search time and the possible negative health effects of reduced walking distance.

  12. Evaluation of Virological Microparticle Enzyme Immunoassay According to the ISO 15189: Real-Life Experience in a University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Sophie; Prin-Mathieu, Christine; Velay, Aurélie; Agulles, Odette; Schvoerer, Evelyne; Jeulin, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The International Standard ISO 15189 based on the ISO 9001:2008 emphasizes specific requirements for quality and ability of medical laboratories. The accreditation of medical laboratories according to ISO 15189 includes the validation of biological methods, which depends on collection of bibliographic data and experimental proofs. Moreover, these results must be compared to provider data sheets and independent scientific data. In the immunodiagnostic field, independent published data are deeply lacking. The aim of our work was to share experience of method validation for virological immune markers on the widely used Architect i2000sr. After risk analysis, intra- and inter-assay variability, and inter-sample contamination were evaluated for each method, and sensitivity was investigated for antigen detection tests. A comparison between the two Architect i2000sr available in our laboratory was also performed. All tested methods were consistent with the manufacturer data (from the data sheet). No inter-sample contamination was observed. Both devices are broadly equivalent and can be used indifferently or as a backup solution of the other. To our knowledge, those results are the first independent complete data on the reliability of the Architect i2000sr in real-life experience. These data are needed to the accreditation of our platform and potentially useful for the accreditation of other laboratories using the same equipment.

  13. Waterpipe effects on pulmonary function and cardiovascular indices: a comparison to cigarette smoking in real life situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layoun, Nelly; Saleh, Nadine; Barbour, Bernadette; Awada, Sanaa; Rachidi, Samar; Al-Hajje, Amal; Bawab, Wafaa; Waked, Mirna; Salameh, Pascale

    2014-08-01

    Smoking is known to have physiological effects on biological systems. The purpose of this study is to evaluate acute and chronic effects on pulmonary functions and cardiovascular indices of waterpipe (WP) smoking in real life circumstances. Three groups were included in the study: non-smokers (N = 42), WP smokers (N = 42) and cigarette smokers (N = 48). A questionnaire was completed for each participant, in addition to pulmonary function [forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1), 6 s (FEV6), percentage of FEV1/FEV6], and cardiovascular [diastolic blood pressure (DBP), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate (HR)] measures, taken before and after smoking. Mean values of FEV1, FEV6, FEV1/FEV6, DBP and SBP in WP and cigarette smokers were very close. However, WP smoking significantly increased HR compared to cigarette smokers (p = 0.007); duration of smoking, age at first WP and quantity of smoking affected pulmonary function and cardiovascular values. In the subgroup of WP smokers, DBP was acutely increased by a larger WP size (p = 0.011), while the FEV6 was acutely increased by a smaller WP size (p = 0.045). WP smoking affected the cardiovascular system more than cigarette smoking, while it had similar effects on pulmonary function.

  14. Story and Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Waxler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Why should we be concerned about the fate of literature as we move from a book culture to a screen culture in the digital age? Not primarily because we are losing our sense of story, but because we are losing our sense of the central importance of linguistic narrative. There is a difference. The technologies creating the digital revolution seem to devalue language and increasingly to do away with boundaries, celebrating instead speed and boundless exhilaration. The visual trumps the linguistic, the image and the screen trump the word and the book. As a result, we no longer seem to engage deeply with others or ourselves. We are beginning to move, in other words, from “a reading brain” to “a digital brain,” from a brain capable of deep reading and deep thinking to a brain increasingly addled by spectacle and surface sensation. We are losing our standing as “linguistic beings.”

  15. Towards Understanding Life Cycle Saving Of Boundedly Rational Agents : A Model With Feasibility Goals - Replaced by CentER Discussion Paper 2010-138

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binswanger, J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops a new life cycle model that aims to describe the savings and asset allocation decisions of boundedly rational agents. The paper’s main theoretical contribution is the provision of a simple, tractable and parsimonious framework within which agents make forward looking decisions in

  16. Autonomy Support and Achievement Goals as Predictors of Perceived School Performance and Life Satisfaction in the Transition between Lower and Upper Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseth, Åge; Samdal, Oddrun

    2014-01-01

    A self-determination theory perspective on motivation assumes that basic need support is a prerequisite for motivation, achievement, and well-being in several domains of life. In the present cross-sectional study, a representative sample of 2.594 Norwegian students in their final year of lower secondary education and their first year of upper…

  17. Real life safety benefits of increasing brake deceleration in car-to-pedestrian accidents: Simulation of Vacuum Emergency Braking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeppsson, Hanna; Östling, Martin; Lubbe, Nils

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study is to predict the real-life benefits, namely the number of injuries avoided rather than the reduction in impact speed, offered by a Vacuum Emergency Brake (VEB) added to a pedestrian automated emergency braking (AEB) system. We achieve this through the virtual simulation of simplified mathematical models of a system which incorporates expected future advances in technology, such as a wide sensor field of view, and reductions in the time needed for detection, classification, and brake pressure build up. The German In-Depth Accident Study database and the related Pre Crash Matrix, both released in the beginning of 2016, were used for this study and resulted in a final sample of 526 collisions between passenger car fronts and pedestrians. Weight factors were calculated for both simulation model and injury risk curves to make the data representative of Germany as a whole. The accident data was used with a hypothetical AEB system in a simulation model, and injury risk was calculated from the new impact speed using injury risk curves to generate new situations using real accidents. Adding a VEB to a car with pedestrian AEB decreased pedestrian casualties by an additional 8-22%, depending on system setting and injury level, over the AEB-only system. The overall decrease in fatalities was 80-87%, an improvement of 8%. Collision avoidance was improved by 14-28%. VEB with a maximum deceleration in the middle of the modelled performance range has an effectiveness similar to that of an "early activation" system, where the AEB is triggered as early as 2 s before collision. VEB may therefore offer a substantial increase in performance without increasing false positive rates, which earlier AEB activation does. Most collisions and injuries can be avoided when AEB is supplemented by the high performance VEB; remaining cases are characterised by high pedestrian walking speed and late visibility due to view obstructions. VEB is effective in all analysed

  18. The Selfish Goal: Unintended Consequences of Intended Goal Pursuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargh, John A; Green, Michelle; Fitzsimons, Gráinne

    2008-10-01

    Three experiments tested the hypothesis that consciously intended goal pursuits have unintended consequences for social judgment and behavior. From evolutionary theory (Dawkins 1976/2006) and empirical evidence of a nonconscious mode of goal pursuit (Bargh, 2005) we derive the hypothesis that most human goal pursuits are open-ended in nature: Once active, goals will operate on goal-relevant content in the environment, even if that content is not the intended focus of the conscious goal. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that goals to evaluate a job applicant for either a waiter or crime reporter position also shape impressions of incidental bystanders in the situation, such that the bystander is later liked or disliked not on his own merits, but on how well his behavior matches the criteria consciously applied in evaluating the job applicant. Experiment 3 finds that a goal to help a specific target person spills over to influence actions toward incidental bystanders, but only while active. Implications of these findings for goal pursuit in everyday life are discussed.

  19. Real-life feasibility and effectiveness of home-based pulmonary rehabilitation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease requiring medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coquart JB

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Jérémy B Coquart,1 Olivier Le Rouzic,2 Ghazi Racil,3 Benoit Wallaert,2 Jean-Marie Grosbois4 1CETAPS, EA 3832, UFR STAPS, University of Rouen, Normandie-Univ, Mont Saint Aignan, France; 2Department of Respiratory Diseases, University of Lille, CHRU Lille, Lille, France; 3Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, El Manar University, Tunis, Tunisia; 4FormAction Santé, Pérenchies, France Background: Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR is a key treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD but studies are still needed to identify the most pertinent criteria to personalize this intervention and improve its efficacy.Objective: This real-life retrospective study compared the effects of home-based PR on exercise tolerance, anxiety, depression, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL in COPD patients, according to their medical equipment.Methods: Exercise tolerance, anxiety, depression, and HRQoL were evaluated in 109 patients equipped with long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT, 84 patients with noninvasive ventilation (NIV, 25 patients with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP, and 80 patients with no equipment (NE, before, just after, and 6 and 12 months after PR.Results: At baseline, the body mass index in the CPAP and NIV groups was higher (p<0.05 than in the other two groups, and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second was lower in the LTOT and NIV groups (p<0.001. All parameters improved after PR in the four groups (p<0.05, but for exercise tolerance, only the 6-minute stepper test showed maintained improvement after 6 and 12 months, whereas the 10 times sit-to-stand and timed up-and-go tests were only improved just after PR. At every time point, exercise tolerance was lower in the LTOT group (p<0.05, with a similar trend in the NIV group.Conclusion: Despite differences in the medical equipment to treat COPD, home-based PR showed comparable feasibility, safety, and efficacy in all equipment-based groups. Medical equipment should

  20. 'Radiooncology 2007: High quality of life, the ultimate goal'. Abstracts; 'Radioonkologie 2007: Zielgerichtet auf ein Leben mit Qualitaet'. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    The 13th annual congress of Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie e.V. discussed clinical radiotherapy, medical physics and radiation biology, as well as an extensive programme of working groups on radiology in medical technology, care, and office. The focus was on new equipment (from image-supported to image-guided radiotherapy) and new approaches of targeted tumour therapy. Aspects of life quality are coming to the fore and will get even more important in the future. (orig.)

  1. A next-generation antimicrobial wound dressing: a real-life clinical evaluation in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, D; Parsons, D; Bowler, P

    2016-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a new, next-generation antimicrobial dressing (NGAD; AQUACEL Ag+ EXTRA dressing) in managing wound exudate, infection and biofilm, and facilitating progression toward healing. Clinicians from the UK and Ireland selected stalled or deteriorating wounds that were considered to be compromised by infection and/or biofilm. Only the primary dressing was replaced by the NGAD, for up to 4 weeks or as deemed clinically appropriate; otherwise, standard protocols of care were used. Evaluation forms captured the baseline and final assessment characteristics of wound status, exudate levels, skin health, wound bed appearance, signs of infection and biofilm, and wound dimensions. In all, 29 wounds were suitable for inclusion in the final analysis. Following the NGAD evaluation, wound statuses were shifted from stagnant/deteriorating to mainly improved, exudate levels were shifted from moderate/high to moderate/low, and skin health was improved in 20 wounds (69%). Wound bed tissue types were shifted from largely suspected biofilm/sloughy tissue (76%) to largely granulation tissue (53%). All signs of clinical infection were reduced in average frequency, with biofilm suspicion falling from 76% to 45% of the cases. The median management period with the NGAD was 4.5 weeks, after which 26 wounds (90%) became smaller in size and 10 wounds (34%) completely healed. This real-life clinical evaluation of the NGAD suggests that its successful management of exudate, infection and biofilm is generally accompanied by notable improvements in wound health and size, and in some cases, complete healing. The authors are all employed by ConvaTec Ltd. but have no other conflict of interest to declare. Dressings were provided to the clinicians free of charge.

  2. Real-life experience with liver iron concentration R2 MRI measurement in patients with hemoglobinopathies: baseline data from LICNET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrano, Angela; Calvaruso, Giuseppina; Tesé, Lorenzo; Gioia, Francesco; Cassarà, Filippo; Campisi, Saveria; Butera, Franco; Commendatore, Valeria; Rizzo, Michele; Santoro, Vincenzo; Cigna, Valeria; Quota, Alessandra; Bagnato, Sabrina; Argento, Crocetta; Fidone, Carmelo; Schembari, Dario; Gerardi, Calogera; Barbiera, Filippo; Bellisssima, Giuseppe; Giugno, Giovanni; Polizzi, Gesualdo; Rosso, Rosamaria; Abbate, Giovanna; Caruso, Vincenzo; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Gamberini, Maria Rita; Giorgi, Benedetta; Putti, Maria Caterina; Filosa, Aldo; De Ritis, Maria Rosaria; Oliva, Esther; Arcadi, Nicola; Fustaneo, Maria; Mistretta, Laura; Di Maggio, Rosario; Sacco, Massimiliano; Veronica, Di Salvo; Giangreco, Antonino; Maggio, Aurelio

    2016-10-01

    Real-life data on the use of R2 MRI for the assessment of liver iron concentration (LIC) remain limited. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis on 363 patients (mean age 35.6 yr, 44.1% men) with hemoglobinopathies (204 β-thalassemia major [TM], 102 β-thalassemia intermedia [TI], and 57 sickle cell disease [SCD]) that were evaluated with R2 MRI as part of LICNET, an MRI network of 13 Italian treatment centers. The mean LIC was 7.8 mg/g (median: 4.0), with high LIC (>7 mg/g) noted in both transfused (TM, TI 37%; SCD 38%) and non-transfused (TI 20%) patients. Ferritin levels correlated with LIC in both transfused (TM, TI, SCD) and non-transfused (TI) patients (P < 0.001), although lower values predicted high LIC in non-transfused patients (1900 vs. 650 ng/mL in TM vs. non-transfused TI). A correlation between LIC and ALT levels was only noted in HCV-negative patients (rs = 0.316, P < 0.001). The proportion of patients with high LIC was significantly different between iron chelators used (P = 0.023), with the lowest proportion in deferasirox (30%) and highest in deferiprone (53%)-treated patients. High LIC values persist in subgroups of patients with hemoglobinopathy, warranting closer monitoring and management optimization, even for non-transfused patients with relatively low ferritin levels. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Overweight and obesity as risk factors for impaired lung function in patients with asthma: A real-life experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Schiavetti, Irene; Bellezza Fontana, Rossana; Sorbello, Valentina; Ricciardolo, Fabio L M

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have outlined a possible relationship between an increased body mass index (BMI) and asthma. The aim of the study was to investigate in patients with asthma, enrolled in a real-life setting, a possible relationship between BMI and asthma parameters, including lung function markers (i.e., forced vital capacity [FVC], forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], FEV1/FVC ratio, and forced expiratory flow at 25-75%), fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), asthma control level, Asthma Control Test (ACT), comorbid allergy, and allergic rhinitis (AR). The study included 286 patients with asthma. All subjects were evaluated performing clinical examination, spirometry, FeNO measurement, and ACT questionnaire. Ninety-six (33.6%) patients were overweight and 45 (14.1%) patients were obese. Lung function was significantly impaired in overweight and obese asthmatic patients in comparison with normal-weight ones. Increased BMI did not affect FeNO values and asthma control level. Overweight patients had double the risk (odds ratio [OR], 1.89) and obese patients had triple the risk (OR, 3.17) of having pathological FEV1 in comparison with normal-weight patients. Both in overweight (OR, 2.415) and obese patients (OR, 2.126), the risk to have pathological FEV1/FVC was about two times higher than in normal-weight patients. In overweight and obese asthmatic patients the probability of allergy was, respectively, 3.5 times (OR, 0.285) and 4.5 times (OR, 0.224) lower compared with normal-weight asthmatic patients. The risk of suffering from AR was three times lower in overweight (OR, 0.331) patients and six times lower in obese (OR, 0.163) patients. The present study suggests that BMI assessment should be routinely considered in asthmatic patients to reveal bronchial obstruction, also, in controlled asthma.

  4. Laboratory alcohol self-administration experiments do not increase subsequent real-life drinking in young adult social drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Seipt, Christian; Spreer, Maik; Blümke, Toni; Markovic, Alexandra; Jünger, Elisabeth; Plawecki, Martin H; Zimmermann, Ulrich S

    2015-06-01

    While the utility of experimental free-access alcohol self-administration paradigms is well established, little data exist addressing the question of whether study participation influences subsequent natural alcohol consumption. We here present drinking reports of young adults before and after participation in intravenous alcohol self-administration studies. Timeline Follow-back drinking reports for the 6 weeks immediately preceding the first, and the 6 weeks after the last experimental alcohol challenge were examined from subjects completing 1 of 2 similar alcohol self-administration paradigms. In study 1, 18 social drinkers (9 females, mean age 24.1 years) participated in 3 alcohol self-infusion sessions up to a maximum blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of 160 mg%. Study 2 involved 60 participants (30 females, mean age 18.3 years) of the Dresden Longitudinal Study on Alcohol Use in Young Adults (D-LAYA), who participated in 2 sessions of alcohol self-infusion up to a maximum BAC of 120 mg%, and a nonexposed age-matched control group of 42 (28 females, mean age 18.4 years) subjects. In study 1, participants reported (3.7%) fewer heavy drinking days as well as a decrease of 2.5 drinks per drinking day after study participation compared to prestudy levels (p alcohol-exposed participants reported 7.1% and non-alcohol-exposed controls 6.5% fewer drinking days at poststudy measurement (p alcohol self-administration experiments does not increase subsequent real-life drinking of young adults. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Testing the ecological validity of the Trier Social Stress Test: Association with real-life exam stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Gina-Isabelle; Zänkert, Sandra; Urschler, David F; Hiltl, Tanja J; Kudielka, Brigitte M; Pruessner, Jens C; Wüst, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is the most widely used laboratory stress protocol in psychoneuroendocrinology. Despite its popularity, surprisingly few attempts have been made to explore the ecological validity of the TSST. In the present study, 31 young healthy subjects (24 females) were exposed to the TSST about 4 weeks before completing an oral exam on a separate day. Salivary cortisol levels increased significantly in response to both stimuli (TSST: F(2.21, 66.33)=5.73, p=0.004; oral exam: F(1.98, 59.28)=4.38, p=0.017) with similar mean response curves and significant correlations between cortisol increases and areas under the response curves (increase: r=0.67; AUC: r=0.56; both p≤0.01). Correspondingly, changes in positive and negative affect did also show significant correlations between conditions (increase: positive affect: r=0.36; negative affect: r=0.50; both: p≤0.05; AUC: positive affect: r=0.81; negative affect: r=0.70; both p≤0.01) while mean time course dynamics were significantly different (positive affect: F(2.55, 76.60)=10.15, p=0.001; negative affect: F(1.56, 46.82)=23.32, p=0.001), indicating that the oral exam had a more pronounced impact on affect than the TSST. Our findings provide new evidence for the view that cortisol as well as subjective stress responses to the TSST are indeed significantly associated with acute stress responses in real life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Real-life outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor α in the ambulatory treatment of ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baki, Enayatullah; Zwickel, Philipp; Zawierucha, Anna; Ehehalt, Robert; Gotthardt, Daniel; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Gauss, Annika

    2015-03-21

    To evaluate the outcome of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy in outpatients with ulcerative colitis at a tertiary referral center. All patients with a confirmed diagnosis of ulcerative colitis undergoing therapy with infliximab and/or adalimumab at the outpatient clinic for inflammatory bowel diseases at the University Hospital Heidelberg between January 2011 and February 2014 were retrospectively enrolled. Patients with a follow-up period of less than 6 mo from start of anti-TNFα therapy were excluded. Medical records of all eligible individuals were carefully reviewed. Steroid-free clinical remission of a duration of at least 3 mo, colectomy rate, duration of anti-TNFα therapy, need for anti-TNFα dose escalation, and the occurrence of adverse events were evaluated as the main outcome parameters. Seventy-two patients were included (35 treated with infliximab, 17 with adalimumab, 20 with both consecutively). Median follow-up was 27 mo (range: 6-87 mo). Steroid-free clinical remission was achieved by 22.2% of the patients (median duration: 21 mo until end of follow-up; range: 3-66 mo). Patients attaining steroid-free clinical remission displayed lower hemoglobin and albumin blood levels at the start of treatment than those who did not achieve remission. The overall colectomy rate was 20.8%. Nearly 50% of the patients underwent anti-TNFα dose escalation during the follow-up period. For both the infliximab and the adalimumab treated patients, non-response to anti-TNFα therapy was the major reason for treatment discontinuation. 18.2% of the infliximab-treated patients and 13.5% of the adalimumab-treated patients had to discontinue their therapy due to adverse events. Real-life remission rates of ulcerative colitis under anti-TNFα are overall low, but some patients have a clear long-term benefit.

  7. Using the real-life vision test to assess the functional vision of age-related cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, W; Li, X; Ao, M; Zhang, H; Hou, Z; Si, S; Wang, W

    2012-11-01

    (1) To describe and validate a newly developed, timed performance-based measures of functional vision-the real-life vision test (RLVT). (2) To determine how RLVT relates to clinical measures and self-report assessment of visual function and the complex interactions among visual impairment, psychosocial status, and demographic factors. A total of 64 patients with age-related cataract and 45 age-matched controls were evaluated by four types of measurements: (1) demographic, medical, cognitive, and depressive evaluation and the reaction time (RT) testing; (2) clinical measures (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, stereopsis, and the color perception); (3) the 25-item National Eye Institute's Visual Functioning Questionnaire; and (4) the RLVT. Spearman's coefficients, partial correlation, and multiple regression analysis were conducted to determine the relationship among RLVT, clinical measures, and self-report assessment of visual function while controlling for confounders. Control subjects performed RLVT significantly better than the cataract patients. RLVT correlated well with both clinical and self-report assessments of visual function. All subscales of RLVT remained highly associated with most of the clinical measures, even after adjusting for age, years of education, depression, cognitive status, and the RT. Distance, intermediate and near visual acuity, and binocular contrast sensitivity were significant predictors of the RLVT performances. Given the strong relationship among RLVT, clinical measures, and the self-report assessments, our results highlight the potential usefulness of RLVT for assessing the functional vision of cataract patients. RLVT may provide information not obtainable from clinical measures or surveys and therefore it is essential to be incorporated into future ophthalmological practice.

  8. Does a 20-week aerobic exercise training programme increase our capabilities to buffer real-life stressors? A randomized, controlled trial using ambulatory assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haaren, Birte; Ottenbacher, Joerg; Muenz, Julia; Neumann, Rainer; Boes, Klaus; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich

    2016-02-01

    The cross-stressor adaptation hypothesis suggests that regular exercise leads to adaptations in the stress response systems that induce decreased physiological responses to psychological stressors. Even though an exercise intervention to buffer the detrimental effects of psychological stressors on health might be of utmost importance, empirical evidence is mixed. This may be explained by the use of cross-sectional designs and non-personally relevant stressors. Using a randomized controlled trial, we hypothesized that a 20-week aerobic exercise training does reduce physiological stress responses to psychological real-life stressors in sedentary students. Sixty-one students were randomized to either a control group or an exercise training group. The academic examination period (end of the semester) served as a real-life stressor. We used ambulatory assessment methods to assess physiological stress reactivity of the autonomic nervous system (heart rate variability: LF/HF, RMSSD), physical activity and perceived stress during 2 days of everyday life and multilevel models for data analyses. Aerobic capacity (VO2max) was assessed pre- and post-intervention via cardiopulmonary exercise testing to analyze the effectiveness of the intervention. During real-life stressors, the exercise training group showed significantly reduced LF/HF (β = -0.15, t = -2.59, p = .01) and increased RMSSD (β = 0.15, t = 2.34, p = .02) compared to the control group. Using a randomized controlled trial and a real-life stressor, we could show that exercise appears to be a useful preventive strategy to buffer the effects of stress on the autonomic nervous system, which might result into detrimental health outcomes.

  9. Different way, same goal

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso & Fabio Capello

    2012-01-01

    Radio-oncologists and radiotherapists represented a large proportion of the doctors and clinicians who attended the ICTR-PHE 2012 conference. With them were also biologists and doctors of nuclear medicine. They presented the state of the art of their research that touches on the genetics and biology of tumours as well as on futuristic drugs that selectively target malignant cells. The future of cancer treatment seems to lie in the personalised approach.   When the members of the life sciences community took over from the physicists, the focus remained basically the same. Just another sign of the fact that the different communities are leading the same battle and have the same goal. However, the methodologies and issues can be very different. The example of hadrontherapy illustrates the situation well: while for physicists this is a relatively well-established concept, medical doctors consider that the amount of patient data available is still very small. Several clinical trials are in progress ...

  10. Time-Frequency Feature Representation Using Multi-Resolution Texture Analysis and Acoustic Activity Detector for Real-Life Speech Emotion Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Ching Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The classification of emotional speech is mostly considered in speech-related research on human-computer interaction (HCI. In this paper, the purpose is to present a novel feature extraction based on multi-resolutions texture image information (MRTII. The MRTII feature set is derived from multi-resolution texture analysis for characterization and classification of different emotions in a speech signal. The motivation is that we have to consider emotions have different intensity values in different frequency bands. In terms of human visual perceptual, the texture property on multi-resolution of emotional speech spectrogram should be a good feature set for emotion classification in speech. Furthermore, the multi-resolution analysis on texture can give a clearer discrimination between each emotion than uniform-resolution analysis on texture. In order to provide high accuracy of emotional discrimination especially in real-life, an acoustic activity detection (AAD algorithm must be applied into the MRTII-based feature extraction. Considering the presence of many blended emotions in real life, in this paper make use of two corpora of naturally-occurring dialogs recorded in real-life call centers. Compared with the traditional Mel-scale Frequency Cepstral Coefficients (MFCC and the state-of-the-art features, the MRTII features also can improve the correct classification rates of proposed systems among different language databases. Experimental results show that the proposed MRTII-based feature information inspired by human visual perception of the spectrogram image can provide significant classification for real-life emotional recognition in speech.

  11. Optimal screening mammography reading volumes; evidence from real life in the East Midlands region of the NHS Breast Screening Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornford, E., E-mail: eleanor.cornford@nuh.nhs.u [Nottingham Breast Institute, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Reed, J.; Murphy, A. [East Midlands QA Reference centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Bennett, R. [Cancer Screening Evaluation Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Evans, A. [Centre for Oncology and Molecular Medicine, University of Dundee (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-15

    Aim: To assess real-life reader performance as a function of both volume of mammograms read and reading experience in a multicentre cohort. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven film readers from the East Midlands Breast Screening Programme had 3 years of consecutive screen reading results available for comparison. Markers of screening performance as the first film reader [cancer detection rates, small cancer detection rates, recall rates, positive predictive value of recall (PPV), and missed cancers] were compared with both volume of films read and years of film reading experience. For reading volume, readers were categorized according to film reading volume over the 3 year period: <15,000 (i.e., on average less than the recommended 5000/year); 15-<20,000; 20-<25,000; and {>=}25,000. For years of experience, readers were categorized into the following groups: <5 years, 5-<10 years, 10-<15 years, and 15-<20 years. Results: There was no evidence to suggest a relationship between years of film reading experience and film-reading performance. For reading volume, there was a significant difference in the distribution of cancer-detection rate between the four groups (p = 0.01); however, there was no difference in small cancer-detection rates, missed cancers or PPV. The median cancer detection rate in the high-volume group ({>=}25,000 mammograms/3 years) was significantly lower than the other groups combined (6.9 per 1000 women screened versus 7.9 per 1000 women screened). The lowest median recall rate was also in the high-volume group, whilst those readers not meeting the NHSBSP minimum requirement had the highest median recall rate; however, there was borderline evidence to suggest a difference in the distribution of recall rates between the four groups. Conclusion: The data from the East Midlands do not provide any evidence for reducing the threshold volume of 5000 cases /year. However, there appears to be an upper limit above which reader performance deteriorates in

  12. Menu-engineering in restaurants - adapting portion sizes on plates to enhance vegetable consumption: a real-life experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Machiel J; Huitink, Marlijn; Dijkstra, S Coosje; Maaskant, Anna J; Heijnen, Joris

    2017-12-25

    The aim of this research was to investigate whether increased portion sizes of vegetables and decreased portion sizes of meat on main dishes increased the amount of vegetables consumed in a real-life restaurant setting without affecting customer satisfaction. The participants were unaware of the experiment. A cross-over design was used in which three restaurants were randomly assigned to a sequence of an intervention and control condition. In the intervention period, the vegetable portion sizes on the plates of main dishes were doubled (150 g of vegetables instead of 75 g) and the portion sizes of meat on the plates were reduced by an average of 12.5%. In the control period, the portion sizes of the main dishes were maintained as usual. In total, 1006 observations and questionnaires were included. Vegetable consumption from plates was significantly higher during the intervention period (M = 115.5 g) than during the control period (M = 61.7 g). Similarly, total vegetable consumption (including side dishes) was significantly higher during the intervention period (M = 178.0 g) than during the control period (M = 137.0 g). Conversely, meat consumption was significantly lower during the intervention period (M = 183.1 g) than during the control period (M = 211.1 g). Satisfaction with the restaurant visit did not differ between the intervention period (M = 1.27) and control period (M = 1.35). Satisfaction with the main dish was significantly lower during the intervention period (M = 1.25) than during the control period (M = 1.38), although in both cases, the scores indicated that participants remained (very) satisfied with their main dish. This study showed that increasing vegetable portions in combination with decreasing meat portions (unknowingly to the consumer) increased the amount of vegetables consumed and decreased the amount of meat consumed. Furthermore, despite the changes in portion sizes, participants remained satisfied

  13. 5C.06: HYPERTENSION AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS: A SHOT ON NORTHERN ITALY POPULATION IN REAL LIFE SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destro, M; Dognini, G P; Pozzi, A; Cagnoni, F; Galimberti, V C; Cavalleri, C; Besozzi, A

    2015-06-01

    Hypertension (HT) represents the most important cardiovascular (CV) risk factor and blood pressure (BP) measurements are generally performed in medical settings, while data deriving from real life are generally poor. This work was conducted during public events out of medical setting (i.e. world hypertension day) in order to assess the prevalence of HT and evaluate other CV risk factors. Each participating subject, after signing an informed consent, was asked to fulfil a questionnaire investigating his/her comorbidities, CV risk factors and ongoing therapies. BP measurement was performed according to the ESH/ESC guidelines. A brief counselling was then offered and brochures dealing with HT prevention provided. Between May 2011 and May 2014, 1540 subjects were evaluated (mean age = 58y, median = 60y, range = 12-102y, M = 696, F = 845, M/F = 0.82). Among them, 890 (58%) declared themselves «normotensive» (mean age = 52y, median = 53y, range = 12-86, M = 408, F = 482) and 650 (42%) «hypertensive» (mean age = 65y, median = 66, range: = 22-102, M = 287, F = 363). BP measurement resulted  140/90mmHg was observed in 403 subjects(=26%), 242 of them belonging to the «hypertensive» group (=non target pts) and 161 to those previously declaring «normotensive». CV risk factors were analysed, the most represented being dyslipidaemia (N = 441), smoke(N = 216), Type 2 Diabetes(N = 121), Coronary artery disease(N = 110), cerebrovascular disease(N = 44). All these risk factors were significantly more expressed in «hypertensive» pts. Number of CV risk factors was 0, 1, 2, 3, > 4 respectively for 500, 522, 312, 150, and 55 subjects. Thirty-five % of «hypertensive» pts had no other CV risk factor, but a significantly higher number of CV risk factors emerged respect to «normotensives». Despite the possible bias, our data provide a picture of the status of pts out of medical

  14. A real-life study of the use, effectiveness and tolerability of rosiglitazone in France: the AVANCE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, S; Aubert, J P; Fontbonne, A; Guillausseau, P J; Nachit, F; Bouée, S; Detournay, B

    2012-10-01

    The study aimed to determine the effectiveness and tolerability of rosiglitazone, and its profile in terms of treatment adherence, treated patients and prescribing recommendations under everyday conditions of care. This was a "real-life" observational longitudinal study including patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) starting treatment with rosiglitazone and followed for up to 2 years. A questionnaire was completed at the time of inclusion and during routine consultations at around 6, 12, 18 and 24 months following inclusion. Information was collected on sociodemographics, clinical history, treatments, co-morbidities, laboratory data and compliance with treatment. There were three primary outcome measures: treatment response (defined as an HbA1c ≤ 8.0% or a decrease in HbA1c ≥ 0.7%); switch to insulin (as considered necessary by the physician); and occurrence of adverse events requiring a change or discontinuation of treatment. The evaluation included 670 patients (61.1%) treated with rosiglitazone/metformin as fixed-dose combination tablets and 427 (38.9%) with standard rosiglitazone tablets. Rates of HbA1c response, defined as an HbA1c less than or equal to 8.0% or a decrease in HbA1c greater than or equal to 0.7%, ranged from 80.6% to 92.1% depending on the follow-up time. The percentage of patients with an HbA1c less than 7% was 18.4% before rosiglitazone was prescribed, and ranged from 48.2% to 57.8% depending on the follow-up period. Sixty-two patients (6.1%, 95% CI: 4.6-7.6%) switched to insulin therapy during the follow-up period. Spontaneously reported adverse events leading to a change or discontinuation of treatment were seen in 45 patients (4.4%, 95% CI: 3.2-5.6%). Rosiglitazone showed sustained efficacy, with around 90% of patients defined as responders to the treatment in terms of reduction in HbA1c, and was relatively well tolerated. The adverse-event profile was consistent with the known effects of rosiglitazone, and no signs of

  15. Acute hepatitis C in persons infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV: The "Real-life Setting" proves the concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obermeier M

    2011-05-01

    HIV infected patients affects mainly MSM who acquire HCV sexually. Patients had a short duration of HIV infection and a stable immunological situation. In this real-life setting from urban regions in northern Germany, treatment rates appear to be high and effective.

  16. Qualitative research building real-life interventions: user-involving development of a mindfulness-based lifestyle change support program for overweight citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, N V; Brændgaard, P; Hjørnholm, C; la Cour, S

    2014-10-01

    This study is an experiment of putting social sciences to work in developing a support intervention for healthy lifestyle changes that would be attractive and manageable in real-life settings. Starting with a hypothesis that a class of intervention methods based on an unconventional 'low-tension' strategy may offer an effective support of stable, long-term changes well integrated in everyday life, difficult to maintain with conventional dieting and self-control approaches, this study focuses on designing and optimizing an intervention model combining several low-tension methods: mindfulness, small steps and group support. In three consecutive 'action research' cycles, the intervention was run in practice with groups of 20 overweight or obese citizens. Qualitative data, mainly in the form of recorded group sessions and individual interviews with group participants and group leaders, were systematically collected and analyzed, using a framework of social psychological theory to focus on difficulties, resources and meanings connected with habits and everyday life. This information was recycled into the design process for the next version of the intervention. We describe the user-involving development processes toward a more attractive and manageable intervention model. The model now exists as a well-articulated package whose effectiveness is being tested in a randomized controlled trial study. Social science can be put to work in systematically integrating real-life experience in a development process. It answers a very different kind of question than clinical trials-filling another place in an overall research program to create useful knowledge of what helps-in complex, everyday, real life.

  17. Prospective analysis of the use of OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) in the treatment of chronic migraine; real-life data in 254 patients from Hull, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Modar; Zafar, Hassan W; Quarshie, Victoria; Ahmed, Fayyaz

    2014-09-01

    Chronic migraine affects 2% of the population. It results in substantial disability and reduced quality of life. Medications used for prophylaxis in episodic migraine may also work in chronic migraine. The efficacy and safety of OnabotulinumtoxinA (BOTOX) in adults with chronic migraine was confirmed in the PREEMPT programme. However, there are few real-life data of its use. 254 adults with chronic migraine were injected with OnabotulinumtoxinA BOTOX as per PREEMPT Protocol between July 2010 and May 2013, their headache data were collected using the Hull headache diary and analysed to look for headache, migraine days decrements, crystal clear days increment in the month post treatment, we looked at the 50% responder rate as well. Our prospective analysis shows that OnabotulinumtoxinA, significantly, reduced the number of headache and migraine days, and increased the number of headache free days. OnabotulinumtoxinA Botox also improved patients' quality of life. We believe that these results represent the largest post-marketing cohort of patients treated with OnabotulinumtoxinA in the real-life clinical setting. OnabotulinumtoxinA is a valuable addition to current treatment options in patients with chronic migraine. Our results support findings of PREEMPT study in a large cohort of patients, we believe, is representative of the patients seen in an average tertiary headache centre. While it can be used as a first line prophylaxis its cost may restrict its use to more refractory patients who failed three oral preventive treatments.

  18. Comparing Three Models of Achievement Goals: Goal Orientations, Goal Standards, and Goal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, Corwin; Tropiano, Katie L.

    2016-01-01

    Achievement goal theory (Dweck, 1986) initially characterized mastery goals and performance goals as opposites in a good-bad dualism of student motivation. A later revision (Harackiewicz, Barron, & Elliot, 1998) contended that both goals can provide benefits and be pursued together. Perhaps both frameworks are correct: Their contrasting views…

  19. Social cues to joint actions: the role of shared goals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCIA MARIA eSACHELI

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, we do not just move independently from how others move. Rather, the way we move conveys information about our cognitive and affective attitudes towards our conspecifics. However, the implicit social substrate of our movements is not easy to capture and isolate given the complexity of human interactive behaviors. In this perspective article we discuss the crucial conditions for exploring the impact of interpersonal cognitive/emotional dimensions on the motor behavior of individuals interacting in realistic contexts. We argue that testing interactions requires one to build up naturalistic and yet controlled scenarios where participants reciprocally adapt their movements in order to achieve an overarching shared goal. We suggest that a shared goal is what singles out real interactions from situations where two or more individuals contingently but independently act next to each other, and that interpersonal socio-emotional dimensions might fail to affect co-agents’ behaviors if real interactions are not at place. We report the results of a novel joint-grasping task suitable for exploring how individual sub-goals (i.e. correctly grasping an object relate to, and depend from, the representation of shared goals.

  20. Patients' understanding of treatment goals and disease course and their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life: a preliminary study among advanced breast cancer outpatients before receiving palliative treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Cem; Babacan, Taner; Sever, Ali R; Altundag, Kadri

    2016-08-01

    The aims of this study were to explore advanced breast cancer patients' knowledge of treatment intent and expectation of illness course and to evaluate their relationship with optimism, hope, and quality of life (QoL). Patients with advanced breast cancer (n = 55) who were treated in the ambulatory clinic of the University of Hacettepe were included in the study. They completed Life Orientation Scale, The Hope Scale, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life questionnaires. The data regarding the knowledge of illness progression and the perceptions of therapy intent were assessed using self-administered open-ended questionnaires that were answered by the patients. The data revealed that 58.2 % of the patients had an inaccurate perception of treatment intent, believing the aim of treatment was cure, whereas only 38.2 % of the patients had a realistic expectation that their disease may remain stable or may progress over a year. In addition, the awareness of disease progression and perception of goals of treatment was significantly related to hope and optimism scores but not to QoL. A large proportion of patients diagnosed with advanced breast cancer believed that their treatment was "curative", and they would improve within a year. Findings of our study suggest that patients with inaccurate perception of treatment intent and unrealistic expectation of prognosis have higher hope and optimism scores than those who do not, but there were no significant differences in terms of global health status.

  1. Real Thinking with Virtual Hats: A Role-Playing Activity for Pre-Service Teachers in "Second Life"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Sue; Masters, Yvonne

    2012-01-01

    Role-plays in a virtual world hold tremendous potential for higher education because they allow synchronous, immersive participation by students located across the globe. They also have the added advantage of allowing students to adopt roles and carry out tasks that are not possible in the real world. In this article, a project that involved…

  2. Advances in inline quantification of co-eluting proteins in chromatography: Process-data-based model calibration and application towards real-life separation issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brestrich, Nina; Sanden, Adrian; Kraft, Axel; McCann, Karl; Bertolini, Joseph; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Pooling decisions in preparative liquid chromatography for protein purification are usually based on univariate UV absorption measurements that are not able to differentiate between product and co-eluting contaminants. This can result in inconsistent pool purities or yields, if there is a batch-to-batch variability of the feedstock. To overcome this analytical bottleneck, a tool for selective inline quantification of co-eluting model proteins using mid-UV absorption spectra and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLS) was presented in a previous study and applied for real-time pooling decisions. In this paper, a process-data-based method for the PLS model calibration will be introduced that allows the application of the tool towards chromatography steps of real-life processes. The process-data-based calibration method uses recorded inline mid-UV absorption spectra that are correlated with offline fraction analytics to calibrate PLS models. In order to generate average spectra from the inline data, a Visual Basic for Application macro was successfully developed. The process-data-based model calibration was established using a ternary model protein system. Afterwards, it was successfully demonstrated in two case studies that the calibration method is applicable towards real-life separation issues. The calibrated PLS models allowed a successful quantification of the co-eluting species in a cation-exchange-based aggregate and fraction removal during the purification of monoclonal antibodies and of co-eluting serum proteins in an anion-exchange-based purification of Cohn supernatant I. Consequently, the presented process-data-based PLS model calibration in combination with the tool for selective inline quantification has a great potential for the monitoring of future chromatography steps and may contribute to manage batch-to-batch variability by real-time pooling decisions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C.; Lobbezoo, Dorien J.A.; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M. Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J.W.; van de Wouw, Agnès J.; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A.; Peer, Petronella G.M.; Voogd, Adri C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. Methods. We included all patients with stage I–III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005–2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Results. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37–1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. PMID:26099745

  4. Real-Life Use and Effectiveness of Adjuvant Trastuzumab in Early Breast Cancer Patients: A Study of the Southeast Netherlands Breast Cancer Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferina, Shanly C; Lobbezoo, Dorien J A; de Boer, Maaike; Dercksen, M Wouter; van den Berkmortel, Franchette; van Kampen, Roel J W; van de Wouw, Agnès J; de Vries, Bart; Joore, Manuela A; Peer, Petronella G M; Voogd, Adri C; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G

    2015-08-01

    The impact of drug prescriptions in real life as opposed to strict clinical trial prescription is only rarely assessed, although it is well recognized that incorrect use may harm patients and may have a significant impact on health care resources. We investigated the use and effectiveness of adjuvant trastuzumab in daily practice compared with the effectiveness in clinical trials. We included all patients with stage I-III invasive breast cancer, irrespective of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status, diagnosed in five hospitals in the southeast of The Netherlands in 2005-2007. We aimed to assess the actual use of adjuvant trastuzumab in early HER2-positive breast and its efficacy in daily practice. Of 2,684 patients included, 476 (17.7%) had a HER2-positive tumor. Of these, 251 (52.7%) patients had an indication for trastuzumab treatment of which 196 (78.1%) patients actually received it. Of the 225 patients without an indication, 34 (15.1%) received trastuzumab. Five-year disease-free survival was 80.7% for (n = 230) patients treated with versus 68.2% for (n = 246) patients not treated with trastuzumab (p = .0023), and 5-year overall survival rates were 90.7% and 77.4%, respectively (p = .0002). The hazard ratio for disease recurrence was 0.63 (95% confidence interval, 0.37-1.06) for trastuzumab when adjusting for potential confounders. This study shows that in real life, patients treated with trastuzumab in early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer had a 5-year disease-free and overall survival comparable to prior randomized trials. For informative decision making, real-life data are of additional value, providing insight on outcome of patients considered ineligible for treatment. ©AlphaMed Press.

  5. Development and validation of a generic finite element vehicle buck model for the analysis of driver rib fractures in real life nearside oblique frontal crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraeus, Johan; Lindquist, Mats

    2016-10-01

    Frontal crashes still account for approximately half of all fatalities in passenger cars, despite several decades of crash-related research. For serious injuries in this crash mode, several authors have listed the thorax as the most important. Computer simulation provides an effective tool to study crashes and evaluate injury mechanisms, and using stochastic input data, whole populations of crashes can be studied. The aim of this study was to develop a generic buck model and to validate this model on a population of real-life frontal crashes in terms of the risk of rib fracture. The study was conducted in four phases. In the first phase, real-life validation data were derived by analyzing NASS/CDS data to find the relationship between injury risk and crash parameters. In addition, available statistical distributions for the parameters were collected. In the second phase, a generic parameterized finite element (FE) model of a vehicle interior was developed based on laser scans from the A2MAC1 database. In the third phase, model parameters that could not be found in the literature were estimated using reverse engineering based on NCAP tests. Finally, in the fourth phase, the stochastic FE model was used to simulate a population of real-life crashes, and the result was compared to the validation data from phase one. The stochastic FE simulation model overestimates the risk of rib fracture, more for young occupants and less for senior occupants. However, if the effect of underestimation of rib fractures in the NASS/CDS material is accounted for using statistical simulations, the risk of rib fracture based on the stochastic FE model matches the risk based on the NASS/CDS data for senior occupants. The current version of the stochastic model can be used to evaluate new safety measures using a population of frontal crashes for senior occupants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Symptoms and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease treated with aclidinium in a real-life setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Olejnicka, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive disease with symptoms that can have a major impact on patients' physical health. The aim of this study was to evaluate quality of life (QoL), symptom severity and dyspnoea in COPD patients treated with aclidinium up to 24...

  7. Goals and Psychological Accounting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander Karl; Nafziger, Julia

    We model how people formulate and evaluate goals to overcome self-control problems. People often attempt to regulate their behavior by evaluating goal-related outcomes separately (in narrow psychological accounts) rather than jointly (in a broad account). To explain this evidence, our theory...... of endogenous narrow or broad psychological accounts combines insights from the literatures on goals and mental accounting with models of expectations-based reference-dependent preferences. By formulating goals the individual creates expectations that induce reference points for task outcomes. These goal......-induced reference points make substandard performance psychologically painful and motivate the individual to stick to his goals. How strong the commitment to goals is depends on the type of psychological account. We provide conditions when it is optimal to evaluate goals in narrow accounts. The key intuition...

  8. Direct-acting antiviral agents in the treatment of chronic Hepatitis C - "Real-life" experience from an academic centre and two specialized clinical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Manuel Jonathan; Härter, Georg; Backhus, Johanna; Zizer, Eugen; Seufferlein, Thomas; Ludwig, Leopold; Dikopoulos, Nektarios

    2017-11-07

    The introduction of the new direct antiviral agents has revolutionized the therapy of chronic hepatitis C. Today we are able to cure the vast majority of our patients with an 8- to 12-week therapy course of an antiviral combination therapy with an excellent safety profile. Real-life data are very important to further develop our experience with the new therapeutics and help us to improve the care of our patients in our everyday clinical practice.In our study, we present the retrospective analysis of a representative German cohort of 344 patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with the new direct antiviral agents. The patients were recruited in an academic center of southern Germany (University Clinic of Ulm, Clinic of Internal Medicine I) and in 2 highly specialized clinical practices in the city center and the near region of Ulm. Within this in-detail characterized study cohort, we analyzed the efficacy and safety of antiviral therapy under real-life conditions.In 322 patients, we could document SVR12 data and found an excellent overall SVR12 rate of 97.8 % across all genotypes. In more detail, we could show comparable SVR12 results of 99 % and 99.2 % in patients with the hepatitis C virus subtypes 1a and 1b of and an excellent SVR12 rate of 93.1 % in genotype 3 patients without liver cirrhosis. Nevertheless, SVR12 rates tend to be lower in patients with the presence of liver cirrhosis, especially in genotype 3 patients with the lowest SVR12 rate in the whole study group of only 80 %. In general, there were no major safety issues except of 1 patient treated with a protease-inhibitor-based regimen who developed a generalized skin reaction and needed hospitalization and premature end of antiviral therapy.In summary, our analysis of this well characterized representative cohort of 344 patients adds more information in the field of real-life experience with the new antiviral therapeutics and could therefore contribute to improve the care of our patients

  9. Get a taste of your goals: promoting motive-goal congruence through affect-focus goal fantasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Job, Veronika; Brandstätter, Veronika

    2009-10-01

    Studies show that motive-goal congruence is an important predictor of well-being (Baumann, Kaschel, & Kuhl, 2005; Brunstein, Schultheiss, & Grässmann, 1998). However, little is known about the factors that promote congruence between implicit motives and goals. Relying on McClelland's (1985) concept of implicit motives and the theory of fantasy realization (Oettingen, 1999), we postulated that goal fantasies focusing on motive-specific affective incentives promote motive-congruent goal setting. This hypothesis was tested in 3 experimental studies. In Study 1 (n=46) and Study 2 (n=48), participants were asked to select goals in a hypothetical scenario. In Study 3 (n=179), they rated their commitment to personal goals for their actual life situation. The results of all 3 studies supported our hypothesis that participants who focus on motive-specific affective incentives in their goal fantasies set their goals in line with their corresponding implicit motive dispositions.

  10. Recent trends in robot-assisted therapy environments to improve real-life functional performance after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Michelle J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Upper and lower limb robotic tools for neuro-rehabilitation are effective in reducing motor impairment but they are limited in their ability to improve real world function. There is a need to improve functional outcomes after robot-assisted therapy. Improvements in the effectiveness of these environments may be achieved by incorporating into their design and control strategies important elements key to inducing motor learning and cerebral plasticity such as mass-practice, feedback, task-engagement, and complex problem solving. This special issue presents nine articles. Novel strategies covered in this issue encourage more natural movements through the use of virtual reality and real objects and faster motor learning through the use of error feedback to guide acquisition of natural movements that are salient to real activities. In addition, several articles describe novel systems and techniques that use of custom and commercial games combined with new low-cost robot systems and a humanoid robot to embody the " supervisory presence" of the therapy as possible solutions to exercise compliance in under-supervised environments such as the home.

  11. The Relation Between Goals and Autobiographical Memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Kim Berg; Rasmussen, Anne Scharling; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The present study examines involuntary (spontaneously retrieved) versus voluntary (deliberately retrieved) autobiographical memories in relation to earlier registered goals measured by the Personal Concern Inventory (Cox & Klinger, 2000). We found that the important and not yet planned goals...... facilitate recall of goal congruent autobiographical memories which supports the idea of autobiographical memory facilitating goal attainment. Further, no differences between involuntary and voluntary memories with regard to frequency or characteristics of goal related content were found. Yet memories...... related to goals were rated as more central to the person's identity, life story and expectations for the future than non-goal related memories, irrespective of mode of recall. Interestingly, depression and PTSD symptoms correlated positively with the proportion of goal related memories, thereby...

  12. The indirect costs of palliative care in end-stage cancer: A real-life longitudinal register- and questionnaire-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haltia, Olli; Färkkilä, Niilo; Roine, Risto Paavo; Sintonen, Harri; Taari, Kimmo; Hänninen, Juha; Lehto, Juho Tuomas; Saarto, Tiina

    2018-02-01

    Palliative care needs are increasing as more people are dying from incurable diseases. Healthcare costs have been reported to be highest during the last year of life, but studies on the actual costs of palliative care are scarce. To explore the resource use and costs of palliative care among end-stage breast, colorectal and prostate cancer patients after termination of life-prolonging oncological treatments, that is, during the palliative care period. A real-life longitudinal register- and questionnaire-based study of cancer patients' resource use and costs. In total, 70 patients in palliative care with no ongoing oncological treatments were recruited from the Helsinki University Hospital or from the local hospice. Healthcare costs, productivity costs and informal care costs were included. The mean duration of the palliative care period was 179 days. The healthcare cost accounted for 55%, informal care for 27% and productivity costs for 18% of the total costs. The last 2 weeks of life contributed to 37% of the healthcare cost. The costs of the palliative care period were higher in patients living alone, which was mostly caused by inpatient care ( p = 0.018). The 45% share of indirect costs is substantial in end-of-life care. The healthcare costs increase towards death, which is especially true of patients living alone. This highlights the significant role of caregivers. More attention should be paid to home care and caregiver support to reduce inpatient care needs and control the costs of end-of-life care.

  13. Real Learning in a Virtual World: A Case Study of the School of Information Studies' Learning Centre in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Lyn; Pymm, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Following a review of the online delivery of distance education programs within the School of Information Studies (SIS) program at Charles Sturt University, a team of academics worked with an external consultant to design a purpose built SIS Learning Centre in Second Life (SL), a 3D virtual world environment in which people (via their avatars) may…

  14. From Affective Experience to Motivated Action : Tracking Reward-Seeking and Punishment-Avoidant Behaviour in Real-Life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichers, Marieke; Kasanova, Zuzana; Bakker, Jindra; Thiery, Evert; Derom, Catherine; Jacobs, Nele; van Os, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Many of the decisions and actions in everyday life result from implicit learning processes. Important to psychopathology are, for example, implicit reward-seeking and punishment-avoidant learning processes. It is known that when specific actions get associated with a rewarding experience, such as

  15. Long-term Course of Alzheimer Disease in Patients Treated According to the Dutch Dementia Guideline at a Memory Clinic: A "Real-Life" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droogsma, Erika; van Asselt, Dieneke; van Steijn, Jolanda; Diekhuis, Marjolein; Veeger, Nic; De Deyn, Peter P

    2016-01-01

    There is little knowledge of the long-term course of Alzheimer disease (AD) in light of current pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions provided in a "real-life" setting. The Frisian Alzheimer's Disease Cohort study is a "real-life" study of the course of AD in patients (n=576) treated with pharmacological (ie, cholinesterase inhibitors) and nonpharmacological (ie, case management, respite care) interventions. Disease course was described by changes in cognition (Mini Mental State Examination, clock-drawing test) and number of types of professional care applying a repeated-measures analysis using a marginal model (population-based average model). In addition, behavioral and psychological symptoms, and proportions of nursing home admissions and deaths were investigated. During 3.5 years, the average Mini Mental State Examination decreased from 22.24 to 18.91, the clock-drawing test score increased from 3.38 to 4.05, the number of types of professional care increased from 0.85 to 2.64, and the patients with behavioral and psychological symptoms increased from 29.0% to 70.2%. The proportion of patients admitted to a nursing home was 40.8% and 41.0% died. Cognition and behaviour of AD patients deteriorated accompanied with an increase in care-dependency during 3.5 years. Nevertheless, compared with the precholinesterase inhibitor era, current pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions appear to slow cognitive decline, which emphasizes that they seem to have a favorable effect.

  16. Grading of proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenosis by Doppler/duplex ultrasound (DUS) and computed tomographic angiography (CTA): correlation and interrater reliability in real-life practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matz, Oliver; Nikoubashman, Omid; Rajkumar, Parajuli; Keuler, Andreas; Wiesmann, Martin; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2017-03-01

    Doppler/duplex ultrasound (DUS) and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) are frequently applied methods to assess the degree of proximal internal carotid artery (ICA) stenoses in patients with acute ischemic stroke. This study evaluated the agreement and interrater reliability (IR) of both methods using a revised DUS grading system as well as different criteria (ECST/NASCET) under real-life conditions. CTA and DUS data of 281 proximal ICA stenoses [143 patients; 65.7 % male; age (mean (years) ± SD, range) 72.2 ± 11.1, 40-99] were retrospectively analyzed. For both methods, two independent raters estimated the degree of stenosis according to NASCET and ECST criteria. DUS raters applied revised German DUS criteria. For agreement and IR assessment, the linear weighted Kappa statistic was used. Correlation between DUS and CTA was substantial irrespective of the applied classification [weighted Kappa: 0.77 (NASCET)/0.79 (ECST)]. IR for DUS was almost perfect (weighted Kappa: 0.94) and better than for CTA [weighted Kappa: 0.78 (NASCET)/0.78 (ECST)]. In a real-life setting, CTA and DUS assessments of the degree of proximal ICA stenoses agreed substantially irrespective of the criteria applied (ECST/NASCET). For DUS, IR was better than for CTA.

  17. A sensitive, selective and rapid determination of lead(II) ions in real-life samples using an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-graphite reinforced carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamsawahini, Kunashegaran; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Ahamad, Rahmalan; Yusoff, Abdull Rahim Mohd

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a sensitive and cost-effective electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ErGO) on graphite reinforced carbon (GRC) was developed for the detection of lead (Pb(II)) ions present in the real-life samples. A film of graphene oxide (GO) was drop-casted on GRC and their electrochemical properties were investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), amperometry and square wave voltammetry (SWV). Factors influencing the detection of Pb(II) ions, such as grades of GRC, constant applied cathodic potential (CACP), concentration of hydrochloric acid and drop-casting drying time were optimised. GO is irreversibly reduced in the range of -0.7 V to -1.6 V vs Ag/AgCl (3 M) in acidic condition. The results showed that the reduction behaviour of GO contributed to the high sensitivity of Pb(II) ions detection even at nanomolar level. The ErGO-GRC showed the detection limit of 0.5 nM and linear range of 3-15 nM in HCl (1 M). The developed electrode has potential to be a good candidate for the determination of Pb(II) ions in different aqueous system. The proposed method gives a good recovery rate of Pb(II) ions in real-life water samples such as tap water and river water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Improved real-life adherence of 6-monthly denosumab injections due to positive feedback based on rapid 6-month BMD increase and good safety profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, J D; Farahmand, P

    2014-05-01

    Almost 50 % of osteoporosis (OP) patients discontinue bisphosphonate (BP) therapy within 1-2 years after the start of their treatment. Denosumab's longer dosing interval with its administration every 6 months (Q6M) as a subcutaneous (sc) injection might result in a better real-life treatment adherence and persistence than weekly or monthly oral BP treatment regimen. The objectives of this open, investigator-initiated, prospective, observational, single-center study were to evaluate adherence with denosumab 60 mg sc every 6 months (Q6M) (Prolia(®)) injections in osteoporotic patients in a routine clinical care setting and to describe whether positive feedback to OP patients based on measured bone mineral density (BMD) increases and good safety profile have an impact on patients' real-life adherence. Results indicate that the rarity of adverse events and reduced dosage frequency together with the consistency of rapid and highly significant increases in BMD already after 6 months of denosumab therapy used as a positive reinforcement during doctor-patient interactions had a significant, positive impact on osteoporotic patient's adherence to continue with the 6-monthly sc denosumab injections.

  19. A single tri-axial accelerometer-based real-time personal life log system capable of activity classification and exercise information generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myong-Woo; Khan, Adil Mehmood; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Cho, Young-Sun; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2010-01-01

    Recording a personal life log (PLL) of daily activities is an emerging technology for u-lifecare and e-health services. In this paper, we present an accelerometer-based personal life log system capable of human activity classification and exercise information generation. In our system, we use a tri-axial accelerometer and a real-time activity recognition scheme in which a set of augmented features of accelerometer signals, processed with Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA), is classified by our hierarchical artificial neural network classifier: in the lower level of the classifier, a state of an activity is recognized based on the statistical and spectral features; in the upper level, an activity is recognized with a set of augmented features including autoregressive (AR) coefficients, signal magnitude area (SMA), and tilt angles (TA). Upon the recognition of each activity, we further estimate exercise information such as energy expenditure based on Metabolic Equivalents (METS), step count, walking distance, walking speed, activity duration, etc. Our PLL system functions in real-time and all information generated from our system is archived in a daily-log database. By testing our system on seven different daily activities, we have obtained an average accuracy of 84.8% in activity recognition and generated their relative exercise information.

  20. Quality of life improvement after a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy in patients with house dust mite and grass pollen induced allergic rhinitis: results from real-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakova, Silviya Mihaylova; Staevska, Maria Toncheva; Novakova, Plamena Ivanova; Yoncheva, Manuela Dimitrova; Bratoycheva, Maria Stoykova; Musurlieva, Nina Mihaylova; Tzekov, Valeri Dimitrov; Nicolov, Dimitar Georgiev

    2017-09-29

    Along with its high prevalence, the burden of allergic rhinitis rests upon the serious impact on quality of life of patients. Allergic rhinitis is associated with impairments in daily activities, work and school performance, and practical problems. Patients suffer from sleep disorders and emotional problems. Тhe advantages of sublingual immunotherapy on quality of life have only recently begun to emerge. The objective of this prospective real-life study was to evaluate the effect of a three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy with house dust mite (HDM) and grass pollen extracts on quality of life in adults with allergic rhinitis. A total number of 191 adult patients [105 (54,979%) men; mean age 27.3 years (SD-6.14)] with moderate to severe allergic rhinitis and clinically relevant sensitization to house dust mites or grass pollen were prospectively evaluated in the course of management of their disease. Health-related quality of life was assessed by Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire at baseline and after three-year course of sublingual immunotherapy. The mean overall Qol score assessed at baseline and at the end of the third year of treatment decreased significantly in patients treated with HDM extract (from 2.95 to 0.76) as well as with Grass pollen extract (from 2.83 to 1.22) (р life provided evidence that a three-year course of SLIT with HDM extract as well as with grass pollen extract significantly increased QoL in patients with allergic rhinitis.

  1. Goal Management Training Combined With External Cuing as a Means to Improve Emotional Regulation, Psychological Functioning, and Quality of Life in Patients With Acquired Brain Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornås, Sveinung; Løvstad, Marianne; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Schanke, Anne-Kristine; Stubberud, Jan

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether goal management training (GMT) expanded to include external cuing and an emotional regulation module is associated with improved emotional regulation, psychological functioning, and quality of life (QOL) after chronic acquired brain injury (ABI). Randomized controlled trial with blinded outcome assessment at baseline, posttraining, and 6-month follow-up. Outpatient. Persons with ABI and executive dysfunction (N=70; 64% traumatic brain injury; 52% men; mean age ± SD, 43±13y; mean time since injury ± SD, 8.1±9.4y). Eight sessions of GMT in groups, including a new module addressing emotional regulation, and external cuing. A psychoeducative control condition (Brain Health Workshop) was matched on amount of training, therapist contact, and homework. Emotional regulation was assessed with the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Trust Regulation of Emotions Questionnaire, the Emotional Control subscale and the Emotion Regulation factor (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version), and the Positive and Negative Affect subscales from the Dysexecutive Questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures included psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25) and QOL (Quality of Life After Brain Injury Scale). Findings indicated beneficial effects of GMT on emotional regulation skills in everyday life and in QOL 6 months posttreatment. No intervention effects on measures of psychological distress were registered. GMT is a promising intervention for improving emotional regulation after ABI, even in the chronic phase. More research using objective measures of emotional regulation is needed to investigate the efficacy of this type of training. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Goal Attainment and Goal Adjustment of Older Adults During Person-Directed Cancer Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Newman, Robin M; Kaufman, Peter A; Bruce, Martha L; Stearns, Diane M; Lansigan, Frederick; Chamberlin, Mary; Bartels, Stephen J; Whipple, Jessica; Hegel, Mark T

    In this pilot study of a home-based occupational therapy intervention intended to reduce disability and improve quality of life, our objective was to identify rates of goal attainment and patterns of goal adjustment of participants. Thirty older adults with cancer were randomized to the intervention arm, and 24 participants identified goals and completed the six-session intervention. An exploratory content analysis of qualitative and quantitative session data was performed. Participants set 63 6-wk goals and attained 62% of them. Most of the goals addressed walking (28%), sedentary leisure (24%), exercising (16%), or instrumental activities of daily living (14%). When 6-wk goals were not attained (n = 24), there were 10 instances of goal disengagement and 14 instances of goal reengagement. Although most participants were able to meet their goals, many also changed their goals and priorities after reflection and attempts to resume or initiate meaningful activities.

  3. Occupational Therapy Intervention Improves Glycemic Control and Quality of Life Among Young Adults With Diabetes: the Resilient, Empowered, Active Living With Diabetes (REAL Diabetes) Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatak, Elizabeth A; Carandang, Kristine; Vigen, Cheryl L P; Blanchard, Jeanine; Diaz, Jesus; Concha-Chavez, Alyssa; Sequeira, Paola A; Wood, Jamie R; Whittemore, Robin; Spruijt-Metz, Donna; Peters, Anne L

    2018-01-19

    To assess the efficacy of a manualized occupational therapy (OT) intervention (Resilient, Empowered, Active Living with Diabetes [REAL Diabetes]) to improve glycemic control and psychosocial well-being among ethnically diverse young adults with low socioeconomic status (SES) who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Eighty-one young adults (age 22.6 ± 3.5 years; hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] = 10.8%/95 mmol/mol ± 1.9%/20.8 mmol/mol) were randomly assigned to the REAL Diabetes intervention group (IG) or an attention control group (CG) over 6 months. IG participants received biweekly sessions guided by a manual composed of seven content modules; CG participants received standardized educational materials and biweekly phone calls. Blinded assessors collected data at baseline and 6 months. The primary outcome was HbA1c; secondary outcomes included diabetes self-care, diabetes-related quality of life (QOL), diabetes distress, depressive symptoms, and life satisfaction. Change scores were analyzed using Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that IG participants showed significant improvement in HbA1c (-0.57%/6.2 mmol/mol vs. +0.36%/3.9 mmol/mol, P = 0.01), diabetes-related QOL (+0.7 vs. +0.15, P = 0.04), and habit strength for checking blood glucose (+3.9 vs. +1.7, P = 0.05) as compared with CG participants. There was no statistically significant effect modification by sex, ethnicity, diabetes type, recruitment site, or SES. No study-related serious adverse events were reported. The REAL Diabetes intervention improved blood glucose control and diabetes-related QOL among a typically hard-to-reach population, thus providing evidence that a structured OT intervention may be beneficial in improving both clinical and psychosocial outcomes among individuals with diabetes. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  4. Practical experiences with an extended screening strategy for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in real-life samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtens, Ingrid; Laurensse, Emile; Molenaar, Bonnie; Zaaijer, Stephanie; Gaballo, Heidi; Boleij, Peter; Bak, Arno; Kok, Esther

    2013-09-25

    Nowadays most animal feed products imported into Europe have a GMO (genetically modified organism) label. This means that they contain European Union (EU)-authorized GMOs. For enforcement of these labeling requirements, it is necessary, with the rising number of EU-authorized GMOs, to perform an increasing number of analyses. In addition to this, it is necessary to test products for the potential presence of EU-unauthorized GMOs. Analysis for EU-authorized and -unauthorized GMOs in animal feed has thus become laborious and expensive. Initial screening steps may reduce the number of GMO identification methods that need to be applied, but with the increasing diversity also screening with GMO elements has become more complex. For the present study, the application of an informative detailed 24-element screening and subsequent identification strategy was applied in 50 animal feed samples. Almost all feed samples were labeled as containing GMO-derived materials. The main goal of the study was therefore to investigate if a detailed screening strategy would reduce the number of subsequent identification analyses. An additional goal was to test the samples in this way for the potential presence of EU-unauthorized GMOs. Finally, to test the robustness of the approach, eight of the samples were tested in a concise interlaboratory study. No significant differences were found between the results of the two laboratories.

  5. [Insanity, life crises and longing for a "real life". On the discussion of deviant behavior and mental disorders in psychiatry of the 19th and 20th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanis-Seyfried, Uta

    On insanity, life crises and the longing for a "right life". A contribution to the discussion on the deviant behavior and mental disorders in the psychiatry of the 19th and 20th centuries using the example of patient stories. History of psychiatry, understood as social and cultural history, provides the framework for this micro-historical article. Using the example of three patients treated in Wuerttemberg or Baden psychiatric asylums between 1875 and 1912, the article focuses on the critical analysis of types of asylums, their practices of admissions, therapies and power relations between patients and staff. Ways of thinking and acting, subjective experiences and emotions are exemplified by patient records, personal testimonials and contemporary publications again by patients and staff. The article examines options of patients to influence the institutional daily asylum routine against the background of its complexity and dynamics. Borders, manipulations, malingering and querulous paranoia are at stake here. Furthermore, the article reflects various forms of social interaction with the power regulating therapeutic and disciplinary aspects against the backdrop of the "canons of rules" of the asylum as well as the contemporary political and legal framework.

  6. The U.K. Pushes the Boundaries of Bionics: Researchers and Engineers Are Making Great Strides Toward Advanced Prosthetics' Ultimate Goal-Mimicking the Functionality of a Real Limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Using state-of-the-art technology, athletes at the Paralympic Games achieve great feats of physical prowess, but for most people using assistive and rehabilitative technologies (ART), even simple tasks can present huge challenges. Many do not make full use of the technology available to them because it is unreliable, uncomfortable, and nonintuitive, so researchers are pushing the envelope to create practical solutions that function like real limbs.

  7. Quantitative analysis of wellbeing and personal goals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Jorien

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present data on 407 homeless adults who have just entered the Dutch social relief system. We examined their personal goals of homeless adults and the association between their perceived goal related self-efficacy and their quality of life. Based on a hierarchical regression analysis

  8. Shared goals and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Olle

    2015-01-01

    In 'Joint Action and Development', Stephen Butterfill argues that if several agents' actions are driven by what he calls a "shared goal" -- a certain pattern of goal-relations and expectations -- then these actions constitute a joint action. This kind of joint action is sufficiently cognitively...... a counterexample, I show that the pattern of goal-relations and expectations specified by Butterfill cannot play this role. I then provide an appropriately conceptually and cognitively undemanding amendment with which the account can be saved....

  9. The good lies: Altruistic goals modulate processing of deception in the anterior insula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lijun; Hu, Yang; Dynowski, Dennis; Li, Jian; Weber, Bernd

    2017-04-22

    When it comes to lies, the beneficiaries of one's dishonesty play an important role in the decision-making process. Altruistic lies that are made with the intention of benefiting others are a specific type of lies and very common in real life. While it has been shown that altruistic goals influence (dis)honest behaviors, the neural substrates of this effect is still unknown. To reveal how the brain integrates altruistic goals into (dis)honest decisions, this study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine the neural activity of participants in a real incentivized context while they were making (dis)honest decisions. We manipulated the beneficiaries of individuals' decisions (self vs. a charity) and whether the choices of higher payoffs involved deception or not. While finding that participants lied more often to benefit charities than for themselves, we observed that the altruistic goal of benefiting a charity, compared with the self-serving goal, reduced the activity in the anterior insula (AI) when lying to achieve higher payoffs. Furthermore, the degree of altruistic goal-induced reduction of AI activity was positively correlated with the degree of altruistic goal-induced reduction of honesty concerns. These results suggest that the AI serves as a neural hub in modulating the effect of altruistic goals on deception, which shed light on the underlying neural mechanism of altruistic lies. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Unconflicted goal striving: goal ambivalence as a mediator between goal self-concordance and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koletzko, Svenja H; Herrmann, Marcel; Brandstätter, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This research introduces low goal ambivalence as a relevant correlate of goal self-concordance. In three studies, we tested the hypothesis that university freshmen's ambivalence toward the goal of completing their degree mediates the effect of goal self-concordance on subjective well-being. In Studies 1 and 2, differences in goal ambivalence accounted for effects of goal self-concordance on concurrent life satisfaction and affect at the end of the freshman year. Study 3 evidenced a longitudinal mediation effect of goal ambivalence on 1-year post-entry increases in life and study satisfaction, which were explained through perceptions of goal progress at the end of the freshman year. Decomposing self-concordance into autonomous and controlled motivation revealed non-redundant parallel effects for both subcomponents. These results point to ambivalence as a significant experience in goal pursuit and suggest that it represents an additional explanatory variable in the self-concordance model of goal striving and longitudinal well-being. © 2014 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  11. Real analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DiBenedetto, Emmanuele

    2016-01-01

    The second edition of this classic textbook presents a rigorous and self-contained introduction to real analysis with the goal of providing a solid foundation for future coursework and research in applied mathematics. Written in a clear and concise style, it covers all of the necessary subjects as well as those often absent from standard introductory texts. Each chapter features a “Problems and Complements” section that includes additional material that briefly expands on certain topics within the chapter and numerous exercises for practicing the key concepts. The first eight chapters explore all of the basic topics for training in real analysis, beginning with a review of countable sets before moving on to detailed discussions of measure theory, Lebesgue integration, Banach spaces, functional analysis, and weakly differentiable functions. More topical applications are discussed in the remaining chapters, such as maximal functions, functions of bounded mean oscillation, rearrangements, potential theory, a...

  12. Development of a Real-Time Environmental Monitoring System, Life Cycle Assessment Systems, and Pollution Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Walter M.

    2003-01-01

    Pollution prevention (P2) opportunities and Greening the Government (GtG) activities, including the development of the Real-Time Environmental Monitoring System (RTEMS), are currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The RTEMS project entails the ongoing development of a monitoring system which includes sensors, instruments, computer hardware and software, plus a data telemetry system.Professor Kocher has been directing the RTEMS project for more than 3 years, and the implementation of the prototype system at GRC will be a major portion of his summer effort. This prototype will provide mulitmedia environmental monitoring and control capabilities, although water quality and air emissions will be the immediate issues addressed this summer. Applications beyond those currently identified for environmental purposes will also be explored.

  13. ["What I don't Appreciate in Real Life": Online Role Playing Game Addiction of an Adolescent--Case Study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Marie; Traxl, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The present article aims to provide an insight into the life story of a computer-game addicted adolescent. Here, the relationship between the symptom game addiction, the family as a reference framework, the game's characteristics, as well as the subjective emotional state of the adolescent are of particular interest. An emphasis is also laid on the psychodynamically approached question of the impact of infantile and current relationship experiences (both within a family environment as well as with peers) on personal development. Last, still within a psychodynamic framework, we hope to provide a better understanding of the role of online computer-game addiction in the process of experiences potentially dominated by conflicts.

  14. Product Life Cycle - Quality Management Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alting, Leo; Majstorovic, Vidosav D.

    2004-01-01

    The strategic goal of our country is European and world integration. Within this context the management of sustainable development considered from the aspect of product’s life cycle and its quality management represents a real challenge for researchers, economy and educational system. The aim...

  15. Use of a Virtual-Technological Sailing Program to Prepare Children With Disabilities for a Real Sailing Course: Effects on Balance and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Irene; Iacovelli, Chiara; Iuvone, Laura; Imbimbo, Isabella; Cruciani, Arianna; Pecchioli, Cristiano; Manozzi, Francesco Maria; Padua, Luca

    2016-07-01

    Sailing might produce a positive effect on a patient's general health and become an integrated part of rehabilitation. Our hypothesis was that a specific technological rehabilitation program might be used to prepare a group of disabled subjects for sailing. Seventeen patients (age range: 9-20) with impairments in motor coordination and balance and 15 healthy subjects participated in the study. The study was divided into the virtual-technological sailing phase, theory-practice phase, and sports phase. Proprioceptive platforms were used to evaluate balance, and the Child Health Questionnaire-PF50 was used to evaluate quality of life. Trunk displacement and the center of pressure velocity improved significantly after the virtual-technological sailing program. As regards quality of life, the physical and psychosocial score significantly improved at the end of the program. A technological rehabilitation training improved balance in disabled subjects and may be used to prepare them for a real sailing course. Sailing improves the quality of life of disabled subjects and could be used in the rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Motivational Goal Bracketing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafziger, Julia; Koch, Alexander

    It is a puzzle why people often evaluate consequences of choices separately (narrow bracketing) rather than jointly (broad bracketing). We study the hypothesis that a present-biased individual, who faces two tasks, may bracket his goals narrowly for motivational reasons. Goals motivate because th...

  17. Accepted legal applications of actuarial testing and delinquency interventions: examples of savings in real-life situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagar, Robert John; Zagar, Agata Karolina; Bartikowski, Boris; Busch, Kenneth G; Stark, Randall

    2009-02-01

    Violent crime, especially by youth, is an increasing and costly problem. Zagar and colleagues have described five empirical studies in which youths' and adults' risks were identified and used to predict commission of homicide. The samples were more representative of the most violent modern urban delinquents than samples in previous research from smaller cities. From Zagar and colleagues' results, it is clear that the use of actuarial personality and probation-parole tests to identify at-risk individuals and target treatments to their needs would allow organizations to reduce loss of life and improve quality of life and economic and social well-being. The current article first provides a brief review of the situations in which the courts already accept the use of actuarial personality and probation-parole tests. Following that are several representations of the costs and benefits of broader application of testing and treatment in schools, universities, and workplaces. Finally, a specific proposal for generalized screening is proposed in a city of 3 million, with estimates of lives saved and costs reduced.

  18. Translation of a tailored nutrition and resistance exercise intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting: adaptation process and pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Ellen Ji; Leerlooijer, Joanne N; Steijns, Jan M; Tieland, Michael; de Groot, Lisette Cpgm; Haveman-Nies, Annemien

    2017-01-18

    Combining increased dietary protein intake and resistance exercise training for elderly people is a promising strategy to prevent or counteract the loss of muscle mass and decrease the risk of disabilities. Using findings from controlled interventions in a real-life setting requires adaptations to the intervention and working procedures of healthcare professionals (HCPs). The aim of this study is to adapt an efficacious intervention for elderly people to a real-life setting (phase one) and test the feasibility and potential impact of this prototype intervention in practice in a pilot study (phase two). The Intervention Mapping approach was used to guide the adaptation in phase one. Qualitative data were collected from the original researchers, target group, and HCPs, and information was used to decide whether and how specified intervention elements needed to be adapted. In phase two, a one-group pre-test post-test pilot study was conducted (n = 25 community-dwelling elderly), to elicit further improvements to the prototype intervention. The evaluation included participant questionnaires and measurements at baseline (T0) and follow-up (T1), registration forms, interviews, and focus group discussions (T1). Qualitative data for both phases were analysed using an inductive approach. Outcome measures included physical functioning, strength, body composition, and dietary intake. Change in outcomes was assessed using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. The most important adaptations to the original intervention were the design of HCP training and extending the original protein supplementation with a broader nutrition programme aimed at increasing protein intake, facilitated by a dietician. Although the prototype intervention was appreciated by participants and professionals, and perceived applicable for implementation, the pilot study process evaluation resulted in further adaptations, mostly concerning recruitment, training session guidance, and the nutrition programme

  19. Real-life clinical outcomes with everolimus eluting platinum chromium stent with an abluminal biodegradable polymer in patients from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Giovanna; Lagerqvist, Bo; Olivecrona, Göran; Varenhorst, Christoph; Danielewicz, Mikael; Hambraeus, Kristina; Lindholm, Daniel; Råmunddal, Truls; Witt, Nils; James, Stefan

    2017-11-15

    No previous studies have evaluated the performance of the Synergy stent in a large real-life population. To describe the initial real-life experience with a novel everolimus eluting platinum chromium stent with abluminal biodegradable polymer (SYNERGY) in unselected patients from a nationwide registry. All implanted Synergy stents were compared with other new generation drug eluting stents (n-DES) with >1,000 implantations in Sweden between March 2013 and October 2015. Restenosis, definite stent thrombosis (ST), myocardial infarction (MI) and death rates were assessed using propensity score and Cox regression analyses. A total of 7,886 of Synergy stents and 64,429 other n-DES (BioMatrix, N = 1,953; Orsiro, N = 4,946; Promus Element Plus, N= 2,543; Promus Premier, N= 20,414; Xience Xpedition, N= 7,971, Resolute/Resolute Integrity, N = 19,021; Ultimaster, N = 1,156; Resolute Onyx, N = 6,425) were implanted in 42,357 procedures. Restenosis and stent thrombosis occurred in 642 and 314 cases, respectively, in the overall population at 1 year. The cumulative rate of restenosis (1.1% vs. 1.0%, adjusted HR: 1.24 95% CI: 0.88-1.75; P = 0.21) and ST (0.4% vs. 0.5%, adjusted HR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.63-1.50; P = 0.17) up to 1 year was low in both the Synergy group and the other n-DES group. Death occurred in 5.2% versus 4.5% (adjusted HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.96-1.36; P = 0.11) and MI in 3.2% versus 3.5%, (adjusted HR: 1.11; 95% CI: 0.93-1.33; P = 0.24) up to 1 year. In a large real-life population the Synergy stent appears to be safe and effective with a low rate of restenosis and ST comparable with other n-DES. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Relationship of Pretreatment Rorschach Factors to Symptoms, Quality of Life, and Real-Life Functioning in a 3-Year Follow-Up of Traumatized Refugee Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opaas, Marianne; Hartmann, Ellen; Wentzel-Larsen, Tore; Varvin, Sverre

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Response to mental health treatment varies highly among refugee patients. Research has not established which factors relate to differences in outcome. This study is a follow-up of Opaas and Hartmann's (2013) Rorschach Inkblot Method (RIM; Exner, 2003) pretreatment study of traumatized refugees, where 2 RIM principal components, Trauma Response and Reality Testing, were found descriptive of participants’ trauma-related personality functioning. This study's aims were to examine relationships of the RIM components with measures of anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress, quality of life (QOL), employment, and exile language skills throughout 3 years. We found that impaired Reality Testing was related to more mental health symptoms and poorer QOL; furthermore, individuals with adequate Reality Testing improved in posttraumatic stress symptoms the first year and retained their improvement. Individuals with impaired Reality Testing deteriorated the first year and improved only slightly the next 2 years. The results of this study imply that traumatized refugee patients with impaired Reality Testing might need specific treatment approaches. Research follow-up periods should be long enough to detect changes. The reality testing impairment revealed by the RIM, mainly perceptual in quality, might not be easily detected by diagnostic interviews and self-report. PMID:26528822

  1. Head impact velocities in FIS World Cup snowboarders and freestyle skiers: Do real-life impacts exceed helmet testing standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstrup, Sophie E; Mok, Kam-Ming; McIntosh, Andrew S; Bahr, Roald; Krosshaug, Tron

    2018-01-01

    Prior to the 2013-2014 season, the International Ski Federation (FIS) increased the helmet testing speed from a minimum requirement of 5.4 to 6.8 m/s for alpine downhill, super-G and giant slalom and for freestyle ski cross, but not for the other freestyle disciplines or snowboarding. Whether this increased testing speed reflects impact velocities in real head injury situations on snow is unclear. We therefore investigated the injury mechanisms and gross head impact biomechanics in four real head injury situations among World Cup (WC) snowboard and freestyle athletes and compared these with helmet homologation laboratory test requirements. The helmets in the four cases complied with at least European Standards (EN) 1077 (Class B) or American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F2040. We analysed four head injury videos from the FIS Injury Surveillance System throughout eight WC seasons (2006-2014) in detail. We used motion analysis software to digitize the helmet's trajectory and estimated the head's kinematics in two dimensions, including directly preimpact and postimpact. All four impacts were to the occiput. In the four cases, the normal-to-slope preimpact velocity ranged from 7.0(±SD 0.2) m/s to 10.5±0.5 m/s and the normal-to-slope velocity change ranged from 8.4±0.6 m/s to 11.7±0.7 m/s. The sagittal plane helmet angular velocity estimates indicated a large change in angular velocity (25.0±2.9 rad/s to 49.1±0.3 rad/s). The estimated normal-to-slope preimpact velocity was higher than the current strictest helmet testing rule of 6.8 m/s in all four cases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. “Learning from real life and not books”: A gamified approach to Business English task design in transatlantic telecollaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sevilla-Pavón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with task design in the context of a telecollaboration project which was carried out in a Business English course among students from Spain and the United States. The goal was to provide students with opportunities to develop linguistic, intercultural and digital competences by interacting and collaborating online with native speakers of the target language. A task-based approach was adopted and enriched by gamification, the different tasks being designed with a view towards engaging students intrinsically in the learning process. This was achieved by means of the adoption of gamification strategies and techniques such as the use of points, performance graphs, quests, avatars, a reward system, peer assessment and the use of social media. Via technological immersion, students from both sides of the Atlantic Ocean were required to work together online to complete different tasks while exchanging peer feedback and assessment. The paper analyses and discusses participants’ views and perceptions about the gamified telecollaboration exchange. The quantitative and qualitative data were gathered by means of a pre- and a post-treatment questionnaires. Results indicate that students found this way of learning beneficial in terms of the development of different skills and competences (namely linguistic, digital and intercultural and motivation.

  3. Patient and caregiver goals for dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Lee A; Palimaru, Alina; Corona, Maria G; Cagigas, Xavier E; Ramirez, Karina D; Zhao, Tracy; Hays, Ron D; Wenger, Neil S; Reuben, David B

    2017-03-01

    Most health outcome measures for chronic diseases do not incorporate specific health goals of patients and caregivers. To elicit patient-centered goals for dementia care, we conducted a qualitative study using focus groups of people with early-stage dementia and dementia caregivers. We conducted 5 focus groups with 43 participants (7 with early-stage dementia and 36 caregivers); 15 participants were Spanish-speaking. Verbatim transcriptions were independently analyzed line-by-line by two coders using both deductive and inductive approaches. Coded texts were grouped into domains and developed into a goal inventory for dementia care. Participants identified 41 goals for dementia care within five domains (medical care, physical quality of life, social and emotional quality of life, access to services and supports, and caregiver support). Caregiver goals included ensuring the safety of the person with dementia and managing caregiving stress. Participants with early-stage dementia identified engaging in meaningful activity (e.g., work, family functions) and not being a burden on family near the end of life as important goals. Participants articulated the need to readdress goals as the disease progressed and reported challenges in goal-setting when goals differed between the person with dementia and the caregiver (e.g., patient safety vs. living independently at home). While goals were similar among English- and Spanish-speaking participants, Spanish-speaking participants emphasized the need to improve community education about dementia. Patient- and caregiver-identified goals for care are different than commonly measured health outcomes for dementia. Future work should incorporate patient-centered goals into clinical settings and assess their usefulness for dementia care.

  4. Real-life efficacy of pregabalin for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain in daily clinical practice in Denmark: the NEP-TUNE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford ME

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Michael E Crawford,1 Peter Bo Poulsen,2 Berit Schiøttz-Christensen,3 Andreas Habicht,4 Mette Strand,2 Flemming W Bach5 1Copenhagen City Pain Clinic, Copenhagen K, 2Pfizer Denmark ApS, Ballerup, 3Spine Center Southern Denmark, Lillebælt Hospital, Middelfart, 4Signifikans ApS, Vedbæk, 5Department of Neurology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark Objective: The aim of this study was to provide evidence regarding the real-life efficacy of pregabalin in the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (NeP in Denmark. Methods: In this prospective, observational, noninterventional study, pregabalin (Lyrica® was prescribed following usual clinical practice. Compared with baseline, the primary study end points after 3 months of observation were changes in 1 the average level of pain during the past week, 2 the worst level of pain during the past week, and 3 the least level of pain during the past week. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to perform paired analyses, and a multivariate regression analysis investigated factors driving change in pain. Results: A total of 86 of the 128 patients included were regarded as efficacy evaluable (those completing 3 months of pregabalin treatment. Patients (59 years were long-time sufferers of peripheral NeP, and 38% of them had comorbidities. The majority had previously been treated with tricyclic antidepressants or gabapentin. The average dose of pregabalin was 81.5 mg/d at baseline and 240 mg/d after 3 months. A clinically and statistically significant improvement of 2.2 points in the average level of pain intensity was found after 3 months. The higher the pain intensity at baseline, the higher was the reduction of the pain score. Positive results were also found for pain-related sleep interference, patients’ global impression of change, quality of life, and work and productivity impairment. Twenty-one patients reported 28 adverse events. Conclusion: This real-life study indicates that for some

  5. [Three Essential Shared Capabilities for Young Psychiatrists: Brain, Real-world, and Life-course Principles toward Values-based Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    The discipline of psychiatry promotes well-being and recovery based on a comprehensive understanding of the patient from the perspectives of the brain, real-world, and life-course. Pursuant to efforts toward addressing social issues at a regional and national level, it is assumed that the psychiatrist can assist individuals based on an understanding of these three perspectives. This tripartite relationship goes beyond the history of extreme reductionism in neuroscience and the aftermath resulting from the anti-psychiatry movement to provide a foundation for the development of psychiatry and a theoretical groundwork for such basic psychiatric issues as what role pharmacotherapy plays in psychiatric treatment, just why the lives of people living in the community are thought to be important to an individual's well-being, and just what constitutes recovery. Humans have come to possess highly developed brain and mental functions as a result of the adaptation to the social environment that takes place as part of the evolutionary process. While mental functions are thus dictated in large part by evolution of the brain, they also consist of important features that are not attributable to reductionist models of the brain. That is, human mental functioning forms a foundation for metacognition and sophisticated language functions, and through interactions with others and society, one's mental functioning allows for further brain transformation and development (self-regulation of mental functions). Humans develop their own brain and mental functions through mutual exchanges with others, and their dealings with other people and society form their individual modes of living in the real-world. The human brain and mental functions have evolved in such a way as to provide for a better mode of living. Accordingly, for the individual, the makeup of his or her mode of living in the real-world is the source of the well-being that serves to support that individual's values. The

  6. Real-life evidence in evaluating effectiveness of treatment in Haemophilia A with a recombinant FVIII concentrate: a non-interventional study in emerging countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouider, E; Rauchensteiner, S; Andreeva, T; Al Zoebie, A; Mehadzic, S; Nefyodova, L; Brunn, M; Tueckmantel, C; Meddeb, B

    2015-05-01

    Some progress has been made regarding availability of recombinant factor VIII concentrates and prophylaxis for haemophilia A in emerging countries, where plasma-derived concentrates were used in the vast majority. Clinical studies to document their introduction and effectiveness are so far not widely available in literature. This non-interventional study evaluates the real-life effectiveness and safety of prophylactic and on-demand treatment with recombinant factor VIII formulated with sucrose (rFVIII-FS) for bleed control and preservation of joints in emerging countries from Eastern Europe, North Africa and Middle East area. One hundred and eighty-six patients from 11 countries were enrolled, mean ± SD age 12.8 ± 12.7 years. At enrolment, majority (79.6%) had severe haemophilia A (emerging countries and adds to the established safety profile of rFVIII-FS. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Long-term prognosis in an ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction population treated with routine primary percutaneous coronary intervention: from clinical trial to real-life experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune; Galatius, Soren; Mogelvang, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We sought to describe the long-term prognosis after routine primary percutaneous coronary intervention (pPCI) in a contemporary consecutive population of patients with presumed ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, compare it with similar results from the landmark DANAMI-2 trial...... trial reached the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke (P=0.68), whereas the all-cause mortality was 13.0% and 13.7%, respectively (P=0.65). Patients admitted during off hours had the same risk of reaching the combined end point of death, reinfarction, or stroke compared with patients......). Furthermore, the long-term prognosis was the same regardless of whether the pPCI was performed during off hours or office hours. Thus, pPCI including transportation of patients from noninvasive centers can be applied successfully in a real-life population....

  8. 1C.03: GENDER DIFFERENCES IN OFFICE AND HOME BLOOD PRESSURE CONTROL IN UNCOMPLICATED HYPERTENSIVES, WHO OBTAINED STANDARDIZED ALGORITHMIC TREATMENT IN LONGITUDINAL REAL-LIFE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosova, K; Rudenko, I U

    2015-06-01

    To compare both target office (home (home BP monitoring (HBPM) in men and women office and home BP (table). Maximal FDC dose (10/10 mg) prescription obtained 48,7% men vs 33,9% women (p 0,05). By 6 M, target office BP was attained in 145(73,6%) men vs 206(88,4%) women, normal home BP - in 110(55,8%) vs 179(76,8%), both target office and normal home BP - in 104(52,8%) vs 169(72,5%, all p  0,05).(Figure is included in full-text article.) : Standardized algorithmic treatment based on FDC in real life setting provided lower rates of office and home BP control in men compared to women. Sex differences did not affect the incidence of masked uncontrolled and white-coat hypertension.

  9. Sofosbuvir plus simeprevir for the treatment of HCV genotype 4 patients with advanced fibrosis or compensated cirrhosis is highly efficacious in real life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, S B; Baak, L C; Kuiken, S D; van der Sluys Veer, A; Lettinga, K D; van der Meer, J T M; Depla, A C T M; Tuynman, H; van Nieuwkerk, C M J; Schinkel, C J; Kwa, D; Reesink, H W; van der Valk, M

    2016-12-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and liver-related death. Recently, multiple regimens of different direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) have been registered. Although treatment with sofosbuvir (SOF) and simeprevir (SMV) is registered for the treatment of genotype 4 patients in some countries, data on efficacy of this combination are lacking. We aimed to assess the efficacy of SOF and SMV with or without RBV during 12 weeks in a real-life cohort of genotype 4 HCV patients. A retrospective multicentre observational study was conducted in 4 hospitals in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, including patients with advanced liver fibrosis or liver cirrhosis treated with SOF plus SMV with or without RBV during 12 weeks for a genotype 4 chronic HCV infection from 1 January 2015 to 1 August 2015. Sustained viral response (SVR) was established at week 12 after end of treatment. A total of 53 patients with genotype 4 HCV infection, treatment naïve and experienced, were included. SVR was achieved in 49 of 53 patients (92%). The four failures all had a virological relapse and did not receive ribavirin. Three were nonresponder to earlier interferon-based treatment, and one was treatment naive. In this real-life cohort of patients with HCV genotype 4 infection and advanced liver fibrosis/cirrhosis, we show that treatment with SOF and SMV is effective. The addition of RBV could be considered in treatment-experienced patients as recommended in guidelines. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Viral Hepatitis Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Long-term stability of morphine, codeine, and 6-acetylmorphine in real-life whole blood samples, stored at -20°C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høiseth, Gudrun; Fjeld, Bente; Burns, Margrete Larsen; Strand, Dag Helge; Vindenes, Vigdis

    2014-06-01

    Stability of drugs during storage is important in forensic toxicology. For the analytes detected after intake of heroin (6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), morphine and codeine), long-time stability in real life whole blood samples are studied in only a small number of cases. Whole blood post mortem (n=37) and whole blood samples from living persons (n=22) containing morphine and codeine as well as 6-AM in blood or urine were selected. All cases represented intake of heroin. All samples contained fluoride and were initially analysed and stored in normal conditions (-20°C) for 4-9 years. All samples were then reanalysed using the same analytical methods and the results were compared. For samples from living persons, the median change in concentration was -3.7% for morphine and -5.3% for codeine. For post mortem samples, the median change in concentration was -12% for morphine and -11% for codeine. Both for samples from living persons and post mortem samples, the decrease in the concentrations from the original analysis to reanalysis were statistically significant for morphine and codeine. Regarding 6-AM, all living samples were negative at reanalysis. For post mortem samples, four cases still tested positive for 6-AM at reanalysis with a median change in the concentrations of -81%. There was no significant change in the morphine to codeine concentration ratios neither for living nor post mortem samples. This study showed that in real life whole blood samples, the concentrations of morphine and codeine are relatively stable during long-term storage at -20°C. 6-AM on the other hand, shows a considerable decrease in concentrations that is important to consider when interpreting results from reanalyses of forensic cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of Optomap ultrawide-field imaging versus slit-lamp biomicroscopy for assessment of diabetic retinopathy in a real-life clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purbrick RMJ

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Robert M J Purbrick, Shahrnaz Izadi, Ankur Gupta, N Victor Chong Oxford Eye Hospital, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, UK Purpose: We aimed to assess the agreement between clinical assessment of diabetic retinopathy and Optomap ultrawide-field imaging (UWFI in a real-life clinic setting. Methods: Structured examination findings, from diabetic patients attending routine medical retina clinics in July 2011, were retrospectively compared with the grade obtained from Optomap UWFI images, graded independently by two ophthalmologists, taken at the same visit. Results: A total of 84 eyes (42 patients were examined, and 74 eyes (37 patients were suitable for analysis. The hospital Eye Service slit-lamp biomicroscopy grades for retinopathy were: no diabetic retinopathy in zero eyes; background retinopathy in 21 eyes; preproliferative retinopathy in 34 eyes; and proliferative retinopathy in 19 eyes. For retinopathy, the agreement between the Optomap UWFI and clinical grading was moderate for both graders (κ=0.57 and κ=0.63, and there was almost perfect agreement between the two graders (κ=0.92. The clinical grades for the presence of photocoagulation scars were: no photocoagulation scars in 46 eyes and photocoagulation scars visible in 28 eyes, indicating substantial agreement between the Optomap UWFI and clinical grading for both graders (κ=0.73 and κ=0.64. There were two instances where proliferative retinopathy was documented clinically but graded as preproliferative by both graders of Optomap UWFI. These were investigated, and neither patient required treatment, ie, the difference in retinopathy grade would not have affected the patient outcomes. Conclusion: This study demonstrated moderate agreement between Optomap UWFI and hospital slit-lamp biomicroscopy grading of patients’ retinopathy in a real-life medical retina clinic setting. The authors believe that Optomap UWFI is, not only a very useful adjunct to clinical examination in terms of

  12. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio W. Zuardi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg, and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg. The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline, 80 (pre-test, 153 (speech, and 216 (post-speech. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  13. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio W; Rodrigues, Natália P; Silva, Angélica L; Bernardo, Sandra A; Hallak, Jaime E C; Guimarães, Francisco S; Crippa, José A S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD) in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg), and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg). The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS) where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes) after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline), 80 (pre-test), 153 (speech), and 216 (post-speech). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  14. Setting goals in psychotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliussen, Jakob; Wagoner, Brady

    2013-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the ethical dilemmas of setting goals in therapy. The main questions that it aims to answer are: who is to set the goals for therapy and who is to decide when they have been reached? The study is based on four semi-­‐structured, phenomenological interviews...... with psychologists, which were analyzed using the framework of the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), with minor changes to the procedure of categorization. Using Harré’s (2002, 2012) Positioning Theory, it is shown that determining goals and deciding if they have been reached are processes...... that are based on asymmetric collaboration between the therapist and the client. Determining goals and deciding when they are reached are not “sterile” procedures, as both the client and the therapist might have different agendas when working therapeutically. The psychologists that participated in this study...

  15. Rapid Gist Perception of Meaningful Real-Life Scenes: Exploring Individual and Gender Differences in Multiple Categorization Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Vanmarcke

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In everyday life, we are generally able to dynamically understand and adapt to socially (irelevant encounters, and to make appropriate decisions about these. All of this requires an impressive ability to directly filter and obtain the most informative aspects of a complex visual scene. Such rapid gist perception can be assessed in multiple ways. In the ultrafast categorization paradigm developed by Simon Thorpe et al. (1996, participants get a clear categorization task in advance and succeed at detecting the target object of interest (animal almost perfectly (even with 20 ms exposures. Since this pioneering work, follow-up studies consistently reported population-level reaction time differences on different categorization tasks, indicating a superordinate advantage (animal versus dog and effects of perceptual similarity (animals versus vehicles and object category size (natural versus animal versus dog. In this study, we replicated and extended these separate findings by using a systematic collection of different categorization tasks (varying in presentation time, task demands, and stimuli and focusing on individual differences in terms of e.g., gender and intelligence. In addition to replicating the main findings from the literature, we find subtle, yet consistent gender differences (women faster than men.

  16. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.” Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc. Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page. Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark. Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create. Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  17. Citizen Goals Online

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Vrabie

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to give to public institution Web designers a better understanding of the citizens’ objectives when accessing a Web page. Understanding citizen online goals is critical because it gets to the heart of what the public institution website should or could “do.”Approach: The challenge for e-marketers is that for most agencies/institutions, there are likely to be multiple goals that represent the “reason why” citizens could come to the website. For example, a national theatre website might be very effective for people who have already been there, they know effectively what place is the best, who are the actors, etc.Research limitations: The nature of a public institution activity almost dictates the different types of goals that consumers have when visiting the site. It is clear that a citizen has a different goal when accessing a theatre Web page or when he’s accessing a municipality Web page. This is the biggest impediment for drawing a good conceptual model for a public institution Web page.Practical implications: there are likely to be many other goals that could lead people to visit the site, like receiving customer service or leaving a remark.Value: Since citizen online goals represent the starting point for Web design efforts (for public institutions, this article has attempted to highlight the nature and types of goals that e-marketers might consider when planning what their website should do in order to create.Findings: The goal a site visitor has when arriving at a website tends to be very action oriented. If the visitor has never visited the site before, the goal may simply be to evaluate the website and figure out what the site is and if it will help him. On the other hand, if the visitor has reached the site as the result of a directed search or is a repeat visitor, the user goal is likely to be specific and functional. If important citizen goals are not supported by the website, the public

  18. Moving from laboratory to real life conditions: Influence on the assessment of variability and stability of gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Paola; Storm, Fabio; Buckley, Chris; Bisi, Maria Cristina; Stagni, Rita; Mazzà, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The availability of wearable sensors allows shifting gait analysis from the traditional laboratory settings, to daily life conditions. However, limited knowledge is available about whether alterations associated to different testing environment (e.g. indoor or outdoor) and walking protocols (e.g. free or controlled), result from actual differences in the motor behaviour of the tested subjects or from the sensitivity to these changes of the indexes adopted for the assessment. In this context, it was hypothesized that testing environment and walking protocols would not modify motor control stability in the gait of young healthy adults, who have a mature and structured gait pattern, but rather the variability of their motor pattern. To test this hypothesis, data from trunk and shank inertial sensors were collected from 19 young healthy participants during four walking tasks in different environments (indoor and outdoor) and in both controlled (i.e. following a predefined straight path) and free conditions. Results confirmed what hypothesized: variability indexes (Standard deviation, Coefficient of variation and Poincaré plots) were significantly influenced by both environment and walking conditions. Stability indexes (Harmonic ratio, Short term Lyapunov exponents, Recurrence quantification analysis and Sample entropy), on the contrary, did not highlight any change in the motor control. In conclusion, this study highlighted an influence of environment and testing condition on the assessment of specific characteristics of gait (i.e. variability and stability). In particular, for young healthy adults, both environment and testing conditions affect gait variability indexes, whereas neither affect gait stability indexes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Sildenafil improves erectile hardness in Chinese men with erectile dysfunction: a real-life study analyzed on age stratification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Xu, Ben; Liu, Defeng; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Jichuan; Deng, Chunhua; Jin, Jie; Jiang, Hui

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of sildenafil for the improvement of penile erection hardness in erectile dysfunction (ED) patients and to determine the relationship between this improvement in erection hardness and social and psychological functioning. From 2007 to 2008, a total of 4507 men diagnosed with ED were enrolled from 46 centers in China; 4039 of these patients were treated with sildenafil and asked to complete the Erectile Function domain of the International Index of Erectile Function, Erection Hardness Score, and Quality of Erection Questionnaire. The patients were divided into 5 groups on the basis of their age (group A: 20-30 years; group B: 31-40 years; group C: 41-50 years; group D: 51-60 years; and group E: >60 years). A total of 3837 (95.0%) patients completed the entire study. After sildenafil treatment, the vast majority (96.3%) of the men were able to achieve grade 3-4 erection hardness. Patients with a better baseline erection hardness were more able to achieve grade 4 hardness after treatment (P <.001). Comparisons of the Erection Hardness Score improvement before and after treatment between the age-categorized groups also showed that the erection hardness improvement was much greater in men older than 50 years. Sildenafil can help the vast majority of Chinese ED patients achieve grade 3-4 erection hardness. Grade 4 hardness can improve the patients' sexual life to a greater extent than grade 3 hardness. A marked improvement in erection hardness can be achieved in patients older than 50 years. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 'Doctor' or 'darling'? Decoding the communication partner from ECoG of the anterior temporal lobe during non-experimental, real-life social interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eDerix

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Human brain processes underlying real-life social interaction in everyday situations have been difficult to study and have, until now, remained largely unknown. Here, we investigated whether electrocorticography (ECoG recorded for pre-neurosurgical diagnostics during the daily hospital life of epilepsy patients could provide a way to elucidate the neural correlates of non-experimental social interaction. We identified time periods in which patients were involved in conversations with either their respective life partners (Condition 1; C1 or attending physicians (Condition 2; C2. These two conditions can be expected to differentially involve subfunctions of social interaction which have been associated with activity in the anterior temporal lobe (ATL, including the temporal poles (TP. Therefore, we specifically focused on ECoG recordings from this brain region and investigated spectral power modulations in the alpha (8-12 Hz and theta (3-5 Hz frequency ranges, which have been previously assumed to play an important role in the processing of social interaction. We hypothesized that brain activity in this region might be sensitive to differences in the two interaction situations and tested whether these differences can be detected by single-trial decoding. Condition-specific effects in both theta and alpha bands were observed: the left and right TP exclusively showed increased power in C1 compared to C2, whereas more posterior parts of the ATL exhibited similar (C1 > C2 and also contrary (C2 > C1 effects. Single-trial decoding accuracies for classification of these effects were highly above chance. Our findings demonstrate that it is possible to study the neural correlates of human social interaction in non-experimental conditions. Decoding the identity of the communication partner and adjusting the speech output accordingly may be useful in the emerging field of brain- machine interfacing for restoration of expressive speech.

  1. Effects of Goal Setting When Goal Difficulty Is Held Constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossett, Dennis L.; And Others

    Goal-setting has been accepted as an effective motivational tool. Whether goals should be participatively set or assigned was examined by holding goal difficulty constant in an investigation based on previous results which suggested that participants in goal-setting set more difficult goals than those for whom goals are assigned. Results suggest…

  2. Self-regulation of health behavior: social psychological approaches to goal setting and goal striving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Traci; de Ridder, Denise; Fujita, Kentaro

    2013-05-01

    The goal of this article is to review and highlight the relevance of social psychological research on self-regulation for health-related theory and practice. We first review research on goal setting, or determining which goals to pursue and the criteria to determine whether one has succeeded. We discuss when and why people adopt goals, what properties of goals increase the likelihood of their attainment, and why people abandon goals. We then review research on goal striving, which includes the planning and execution of actions that lead to goal attainment, and the processes that people use to shield their goals from being disrupted by other competing goals, temptations, or distractions. We describe four types of strategies that people use when pursuing goals. We find that self-regulation entails the operation of a number of psychological mechanisms, and that there is no single solution that will help all people in all situations. We recommend a number of strategies that can help people to more effectively set and attain health-related goals. We conclude that enhancing health behavior requires a nuanced understanding and sensitivity to the varied, dynamic psychological processes involved in self-regulation, and that health is a prototypical and central domain in which to examine the relevance of these theoretical models for real behavior. We discuss the implications of this research for theory and practice in health-related domains. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Personel and life coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    2017-01-01

    Personal coaching and life-coaching psychology is for assisting individuals clarify values, visions and meaning of life, through a systematic process in which the coach facilitates improvement of satisfying and fruitful life experiences and achievement of personal life goals....

  4. Rehabilitation of executive functioning in patients with frontal lobe brain damage with Goal Management Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian eLevine

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Executive functioning deficits due to brain disease affecting frontal lobe functions cause significant real-life disability, yet solid evidence in support of executive functioning interventions is lacking. Goal Management Training (GMT, an executive functioning intervention that draws upon theories concerning goal processing and sustained attention, has received empirical support in studies of patients with traumatic brain injury, normal aging, and case studies. GMT promotes a mindful approach to complex real-life tasks that pose problems for patients with executive functioning deficits, with a main goal of periodically stopping ongoing behavior to monitor and adjust goals. In this controlled trial, an expanded version of GMT was compared to an alternative intervention, Brain Health Workshop (BHW that was matched to GMT on non-specific characteristics that can affect intervention outcome. Participants included 19 individuals in the chronic phase of recovery from brain disease (predominantly stroke affecting frontal lobe function. Outcome data indicated specific effects of GMT on the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART as well as the Tower Test, a visuospatial problem solving measure that reflected far transfer of training effects. There were no significant effects on self-report questionnaires, likely owing to the complexity of these measures in this heterogeneous patient sample. Overall, these data support the efficacy of GMT in the rehabilitation of executive functioning deficits.

  5. EUREKA study – the evaluation of real-life use of a biophotonic system in chronic wound management: an interim analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanelli M

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Marco Romanelli,1 Alberto Piaggesi,2 Giovanni Scapagnini,3 Valentina Dini,1 Agata Janowska,1 Elisabetta Iacopi,2 Carlotta Scarpa,4 Stéphane Fauverghe,5 Franco Bassetto4 1Wound Healing Research Unit, Division of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, 2Diabetic Foot Section, Department of Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, 3Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Molise, Campobasso, 4Clinic of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Padova University-Hospital, Padova, Italy; 5KLOX Technologies Inc., Laval, QC, Canada Objective: Interest has grown regarding photobiomodulation (PBM with low-level light therapy, which has been shown to positively affect the stages of the wound healing process. In a real-life context clinical setting, the objective of the EUREKA study was to investigate efficacy, safety, and quality of life associated with the use of a BioPhotonic gel (LumiHeal™ in the treatment of chronic wounds such as venous leg ulcers (VLUs, diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs, and pressure ulcers (PUs. This BioPhotonic gel represents a new, first-in-class emission spectrum of light, including fluorescence, to induce PBM and modulate healing.Design: The multicenter, prospective, interventional, uncontrolled, open-label study enrolled 100 patients in 12 wound centers in Italy. We performed an early interim analysis based on the first 33 subjects (13 VLU, 17 DFU, 3 PU in seven centers who completed the study.Main results: Seventeen patients (52% achieved total wound closure (full re-epithelialization for 2 weeks during the study period. Two patients (6% were considered “almost closed” (decrease of the wound area of more than 90% at study end and three others (9% were considered “ready for skin grafting”. No related serious adverse events were observed, and the compliance was excellent. After the treatment, the average time to “pain-free” was 11.9 days in the VLU group. Quality of life was

  6. Insulin analogues dosing and costs - comparing real-life daily doses of insulin detemir and insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Marie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The uncertainties regarding dose similarities between basal long-acting insulin analogues remain. Recent real-world studies indicate dose similarities between insulin detemir and insulin glargine, but further studies are still warranted. The aim of this study was to compare real-life daily doses of insulin detemir and insulin glargine in type 2 diabetes patients when administered once daily. Methods We analysed 536 patient cases from general practice (63% and endocrinological outpatient clinics (37%. A self-administered questionnaire completed by the treating physician was used to obtain data on patient characteristics (gender, age, weight, height, latest HbA1c-value, daily doses, administration of and number of years treated with insulin detemir and insulin glargine, concomitant insulin use and use of non-insulin anti-diabetic medication. Both bivariate analyses and multivariate regression analyses were applied to examine whether there were differences in the daily doses of insulin detemir and insulin glargine. Results There was no significant difference in the mean daily doses of insulin detemir (0.414 U/kg and insulin glargine (0.416 U/kg (p = 0.4341. In multivariate regression analyses, age and BMI had a significant influence on daily insulin dose with the dose increasing 0.003 U/kg (p = 0.0375 and 0.008 U/kg (p = 0.0003 with every 1 increment in age and BMI, respectively. Conclusions Dose similarities between insulin detemir and insulin glargine were seen in type 2 diabetes patients when administered once daily. Thus, the use of insulin detemir and insulin glargine is not associated with different medical costs if the price and treating algorithm are similar.

  7. Materialistic Values and Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasser, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Materialism comprises a set of values and goals focused on wealth, possessions, image, and status. These aims are a fundamental aspect of the human value/goal system, standing in relative conflict with aims concerning the well-being of others, as well as one's own personal and spiritual growth. Substantial evidence shows that people who place a relatively high priority on materialistic values/goals consume more products and incur more debt, have lower-quality interpersonal relationships, act in more ecologically destructive ways, have adverse work and educational motivation, and report lower personal and physical well-being. Experimentally activating materialistic aims causes similar outcomes. Given these ills, researchers have investigated means of decreasing people's materialism. Successful interventions encourage intrinsic/self-transcendent values/goals, increase felt personal security, and/or block materialistic messages from the environment. These interventions would likely be more effective if policies were also adopted that diminished contemporary culture's focus on consumption, profit, and economic growth.

  8. Perception of future goals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottsen, Christina L.; Berntsen, Dorthe

    The current study: a cross-cultural comparison between the Middle East and Scandinavia. Two societies that offer a unique opportunity to examine gender and cultural differences in perception of personal goals. Previous studies show that imagined future events are affected by memories of personal...

  9. Long-acting muscarinic antagonist use in adults with asthma: real-life prescribing and outcomes of add-on therapy with tiotropium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, David; Kaplan, Alan; Jones, Rupert; Freeman, Daryl; Burden, Anne; Gould, Shuna; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Ali, Muzammil; King, Christine; Thomas, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials indicate that addition of a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) such as tiotropium may improve asthma control and reduce exacerbation risk in patients with poorly controlled asthma, but broader clinical studies are needed to investigate the effectiveness of LAMA in real-life asthma care. Medical records of adults with asthma (aged ≥18 years) prescribed tiotropium were obtained from the UK Optimum Patient Care Research Database for the period 2001-2013. Patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded, but no other clinical exclusions were applied. Two primary outcomes were compared in the year before (baseline) and the year after (outcome) addition of tiotropium: exacerbations (asthma-related hospital emergency department attendance or inpatient admission, or acute oral corticosteroid course) and acute respiratory events (exacerbation or antibiotic prescription with lower respiratory consultation). Secondary outcomes included lung function test results and short-acting β2 agonist usage. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for variables measured on the interval scale, the marginal homogeneity test for categorized variables, and the paired t-test for lung function indices. Of the 2,042 study patients, 83% were prescribed an inhaled corticosteroid and 68% a long-acting β2 agonist during the baseline year; 67% were prescribed both. Comparing baseline and outcome years, the percentage of patients having at least one exacerbation decreased from 37% to 27% (P<0.001) and the percentage having at least one acute respiratory event decreased from 58% to 47% (P<0.001). There were no significant changes in lung function, and usage of short-acting β2 agonists (in salbutamol/albuterol equivalents) increased from a median (interquartile range) of 274 (110, 548) to 329 (110, 603) μg/day (P=0.01). In this real-life asthma population, addition of LAMA therapy was associated with significant decreases in the

  10. Stopping Onabotulinum Treatment after the First Two Cycles Might Not Be Justified: Results of a Real-life Monocentric Prospective Study in Chronic Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Sarchielli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionOnabotulinum toxin A (OnabotA cyclic treatment is approved for the prophylactic treatment of chronic migraine (CM, a highly disabling disorder. Although treatment response varies among patients, current guidelines suggest to stop treatment after cycle 2 if no response is achieved. This prospective study aimed to define, in real-life setting, the evolution of the response to OnabotA over five cycles of treatment among patients non-responding to cycle 1. The results of this study might help in decision-making, in particular whether prosecuting OnabotA further or not, when facing a patient not responding to cycle 1.MethodsPatients failing to respond at cycle 1 were recruited to complete five cycles. Key outcomes were: (i a ≥50% reduction in headache days, (ii a ≥50% reduction in total cumulative hours of headache on headache days and (iii a ≥5-point improvement in Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6 scores.ResultsOverall, 56 patients were included. Mean age was 45.7 years (female 83.9%. Severe (≥60 HIT-6 score was reported at baseline by 95.8% of patients. Responders (headache days reduction of more than 50% progressively increased cycle after cycle, doubling from cycle 2 to cycle 5 (from 27 to 48%. In addition, patients regressed from CM to episodic migraine moving on with each cycle, with 78% of them reaching less than nine migraine days/month after cycle 5. The headache days per month decreased significantly from cycle 1 to cycle 5 (overall from 23.3 ± 5.7 to 9.2 ± 3.6; p < 0.001. During 12 months (5 cycles, migraine days per month progressively abated (from 18.5 to 8.7; p < 0.001, days with symptomatic medications intake/month consistently decreased (from 17.4 to 8.1; p < 0.001, and mean HIT-6 score lowered (from 72.4 ± 5.7 to 50.2 ± 4.3; p < 0.001.ConclusionThe positive effect of OnabotA treatment spreads over the course of the treatment and might also manifest late in treatment course

  11. Real-life effectiveness and safety of salbutamol Steri-Neb™ vs. Ventolin Nebules® for exacerbations in patients with COPD: Historical cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B Price

    Full Text Available Ventolin Nebules® (reference product; GlaxoSmithKline was the first licensed nebulizer solution containing the rapid-onset, short-acting β2-agonist salbutamol. Salbutamol Steri-Neb™ (comparator; Teva Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has the same chemical composition as the reference product. This study evaluated whether the effectiveness of the comparator is non-inferior to the reference product alongside concomitant medications during real-life clinical management of COPD exacerbations. Safety in terms of adverse events (AEs was also examined.This matched (1:1 historical cohort study evaluated data from 2 UK primary care databases on patients prescribed the salbutamol comparator or reference. The study included a 1-year baseline period, starting 1 year before the index prescription date, and 1-year outcome period. Cohorts were matched for baseline COPD respiratory medications. The primary outcome was analysis of non-inferiority for the comparator versus reference product for the rate of moderate and severe COPD exacerbations. Non-inferiority was satisfied if the 95% confidence interval (CI upper limit for mean differences in proportions between treatments was <15%. Secondary outcomes were examined through rate ratios (RR of severe exacerbations and AEs.After matching, 1191 patients were included in each cohort. Adjusted upper 95% CI for the difference in proportion of patients experiencing moderate or severe exacerbations between comparator and reference groups was 0.032 (3.2%, demonstrating non-inferiority. No significant differences were observed in rates of moderate and severe exacerbations (RR: 1.00; 95% CI: 0.91, 1.10, severe exacerbations (RR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.49, 1.17, or AEs (RR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.78, 1.22 after adjusting for baseline confounders. No significant differences across cohorts were observed for rates of any AE or death.This matched cohort study of real-life management of COPD patients supports the salbutamol comparator as non

  12. Cirrhotic patients with portal hypertension-related bleeding and an indication for early-TIPS: a large multicentre audit with real-life results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabut, Dominique; Pauwels, Arnaud; Carbonell, Nicolas; Remy, Andre Jean; Nahon, Pierre; Causse, Xavier; Cervoni, Jean-Paul; Cadranel, Jean-François; Archambeaud, Isabelle; Bramli, Slim; Ehrhard, Florent; Ah-Soune, Philippe; Rostain, Florian; Pariente, Alexandre; Vergniol, Julien; Dupuychaffray, Jean-Pierre; Pelletier, Anne-Laure; Skinazi, Florence; Guillygomarc'h, Anne; Vitte, René-Louis; Henrion, Jean; Combet, Stéphanie; Rudler, Marika; Bureau, Christophe

    2017-09-13

    The Baveno VI consensus meeting concluded that an early TIPS must be considered in high-risk cirrhotic patients presenting with variceal bleeding (VB) (Child B + active bleeding at endoscopy or Child C10-13 patients). Whether this therapeutic approach is feasible in a real-life setting remains unclear. To determine (1) the proportion of patients eligible for early-TIPS among cirrhotic patients with VB, (2) the proportion of these patients who underwent early-TIPS placement and the main reasons for discarding TIPS, and (3) the outcomes of patients who experienced early-TIPS placement in a large, national, prospective, multicentre audit including academic and non-academic centres. All French centres recruiting gastrointestinal bleeding were invited to participate. All consecutive patients with cirrhosis and PHT-related bleeding were included. 964 patients were included (58 centres: 26 academic, 32 non-academic; patient characteristics: male sex, 77%; age, 59.6 ± 12.1 years; aetiologies of cirrhosis (alcoholic,viral/other, 67%/15%/18%); source of bleeding (EV/GV/other, 80/11/9%); active bleeding at endoscopy 34%; Child A 21%/B 44%/C 35%. Overall, 35% of the patients were eligible for early-TIPS, but only 6.8%, displaying less severe cirrhosis underwent early-TIPS placement. The main reason for discarding TIPS was a lack of availability. The actuarial probability of survival at one year was significantly increased in early-TIPS patients (85.7±0.07% vs 58.9±0.03%, p=0.04). The severity of liver disease was the only parameter independently associated with improved one-year survival. In this real-life study, one-third of the cirrhotic patients admitted for VB fulfilled the criteria for early-TIPS placement, whereas only 7% had access to TIPS. TIPS was restricted to patients displaying less severe cirrhosis. The severity of liver disease was the only parameter that influenced survival. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. From speech to thought: the neuronal basis of cognitive units in non-experimental, real-life communication investigated using ECoG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derix, Johanna; Iljina, Olga; Weiske, Johanna; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Aertsen, Ad; Ball, Tonio

    2014-01-01

    Exchange of thoughts by means of expressive speech is fundamental to human communication. However, the neuronal basis of real-life communication in general, and of verbal exchange of ideas in particular, has rarely been studied until now. Here, our aim was to establish an approach for exploring the neuronal processes related to cognitive "idea" units (IUs) in conditions of non-experimental speech production. We investigated whether such units corresponding to single, coherent chunks of speech with syntactically-defined borders, are useful to unravel the neuronal mechanisms underlying real-world human cognition. To this aim, we employed simultaneous electrocorticography (ECoG) and video recordings obtained in pre-neurosurgical diagnostics of epilepsy patients. We transcribed non-experimental, daily hospital conversations, identified IUs in transcriptions of the patients' speech, classified the obtained IUs according to a previously-proposed taxonomy focusing on memory content, and investigated the underlying neuronal activity. In each of our three subjects, we were able to collect a large number of IUs which could be assigned to different functional IU subclasses with a high inter-rater agreement. Robust IU-onset-related changes in spectral magnitude could be observed in high gamma frequencies (70-150 Hz) on the inferior lateral convexity and in the superior temporal cortex regardless of the IU content. A comparison of the topography of these responses with mouth motor and speech areas identified by electrocortical stimulation showed that IUs might be of use for extraoperative mapping of eloquent cortex (average sensitivity: 44.4%, average specificity: 91.1%). High gamma responses specific to memory-related IU subclasses were observed in the inferior parietal and prefrontal regions. IU-based analysis of ECoG recordings during non-experimental communication thus elicits topographically- and functionally-specific effects. We conclude that segmentation of spontaneous

  14. The Interaction between Childhood Bullying and the FKBP5 Gene on Psychotic-Like Experiences and Stress Reactivity in Real Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Cristóbal-Narváez

    Full Text Available The present study employed Experience Sampling Methodology to examine whether the interaction between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability (i is associated with the expression of psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect, and (ii moderates psychotic-like, paranoid, and affective reactivity to different forms of momentary stress (situational and social in daily life.A total of 206 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for bullying with the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse and were prompted randomly eight times daily for one week to complete assessments of their current experiences, affect, and stress appraisals. Participants were genotyped for three FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs (rs3800373, rs9296158, and rs1360780 that have been linked to hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity. Multilevel analyses were conducted to examine the effect of the interaction between childhood bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype derived from these three SNPs.The interaction between bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype was associated with positive, but not negative, psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect. The bullying x FKBP5 interaction also moderated the association of a social stress appraisal (specifically, being alone because people do not want to be with you with psychotic-like experiences and negative affect in daily life. Simple slopes analyses indicated that, in all cases, the associations were significantly increased by exposure to bullying in participants with the risk haplotype, but not for those with the non-risk haplotype.The present study provides the first evidence of the interplay between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability in the real-world expression of psychosis proneness and social stress reactivity. The findings underscore the importance of investigating how gene-environment interactions are involved in mechanistic pathways to the extended psychosis phenotype and lend further

  15. The Interaction between Childhood Bullying and the FKBP5 Gene on Psychotic-Like Experiences and Stress Reactivity in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristóbal-Narváez, Paula; Sheinbaum, Tamara; Rosa, Araceli; Ballespí, Sergi; de Castro-Catala, Marta; Peña, Elionora; Kwapil, Thomas R; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2016-01-01

    The present study employed Experience Sampling Methodology to examine whether the interaction between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability (i) is associated with the expression of psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect, and (ii) moderates psychotic-like, paranoid, and affective reactivity to different forms of momentary stress (situational and social) in daily life. A total of 206 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for bullying with the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse and were prompted randomly eight times daily for one week to complete assessments of their current experiences, affect, and stress appraisals. Participants were genotyped for three FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs3800373, rs9296158, and rs1360780) that have been linked to hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity. Multilevel analyses were conducted to examine the effect of the interaction between childhood bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype derived from these three SNPs. The interaction between bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype was associated with positive, but not negative, psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect. The bullying x FKBP5 interaction also moderated the association of a social stress appraisal (specifically, being alone because people do not want to be with you) with psychotic-like experiences and negative affect in daily life. Simple slopes analyses indicated that, in all cases, the associations were significantly increased by exposure to bullying in participants with the risk haplotype, but not for those with the non-risk haplotype. The present study provides the first evidence of the interplay between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability in the real-world expression of psychosis proneness and social stress reactivity. The findings underscore the importance of investigating how gene-environment interactions are involved in mechanistic pathways to the extended psychosis phenotype and lend further support to the

  16. The Interaction between Childhood Bullying and the FKBP5 Gene on Psychotic-Like Experiences and Stress Reactivity in Real Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Araceli; Ballespí, Sergi; de Castro-Catala, Marta; Peña, Elionora; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2016-01-01

    Aim The present study employed Experience Sampling Methodology to examine whether the interaction between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability (i) is associated with the expression of psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect, and (ii) moderates psychotic-like, paranoid, and affective reactivity to different forms of momentary stress (situational and social) in daily life. Methods A total of 206 nonclinical young adults were interviewed for bullying with the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse and were prompted randomly eight times daily for one week to complete assessments of their current experiences, affect, and stress appraisals. Participants were genotyped for three FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs3800373, rs9296158, and rs1360780) that have been linked to hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis reactivity. Multilevel analyses were conducted to examine the effect of the interaction between childhood bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype derived from these three SNPs. Results The interaction between bullying and the FKBP5 haplotype was associated with positive, but not negative, psychotic-like experiences, paranoia, and negative affect. The bullying x FKBP5 interaction also moderated the association of a social stress appraisal (specifically, being alone because people do not want to be with you) with psychotic-like experiences and negative affect in daily life. Simple slopes analyses indicated that, in all cases, the associations were significantly increased by exposure to bullying in participants with the risk haplotype, but not for those with the non-risk haplotype. Discussion The present study provides the first evidence of the interplay between childhood bullying and FKBP5 variability in the real-world expression of psychosis proneness and social stress reactivity. The findings underscore the importance of investigating how gene-environment interactions are involved in mechanistic pathways to the extended psychosis phenotype

  17. The Role of Goal Attainment Expectancies in Achievement Goal Pursuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senko, Corwin; Hulleman, Chris S.

    2013-01-01

    The current studies introduce the goal attainment expectancy construct to achievement goal theory. Three studies, 2 in college classrooms and the other using a novel math task in the laboratory, converged on the same finding. For mastery-approach goals and performance-approach goals alike, the harder the goal appeared to attain, the less likely…

  18. In-vehicle and site-based observations of vehicles and cyclists : a small-scale ND study in The Netherlands. PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe PROLOGUE, Deliverable D3.4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoph, M. Nes, N. van Pauwelussen, J. Mansvelders, R. Horst, A.R.A. van der & Hoedemaeker, M.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the project PROLOGUE (PROmoting real Life Observations for Gaining Understanding of road user behaviour in Europe) is to explore the feasibility and usefulness of a large-scale European naturalistic driving observation study. The work described in this deliverable focused on

  19. Who reports it best? A comparison between parent-report, self-report, and the real life social behaviors of adults with Williams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Marisa H; Mello, Maria P; Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2014-12-01

    Given the reliance on self-report in studies of adults with intellectual disabilities, this study examined individual vs. parental reports concerning the social approach behaviors of adults with Williams syndrome (WS) across a hypothetical and a live behavioral setting. Individuals with WS (N = 30) were asked whether they would approach strangers in two hypothetical, laboratory tasks (yes/no questionnaire vs. judging facial stimuli of individuals with different emotional expressions). Similarly, their parents also responded to a rating scale of their child's social approach behavior toward strangers displaying various emotions. Then, in a community setting, behavioral coders recorded actual social approaches of individuals with WS toward strangers. Although self-report ratings were consistent across measures, these measures did not correspond to the individuals' actual behaviors during the community observations. Conversely, parental reports did not correspond to their child's self-report measures, but parents did more accurately predict their child's real-life social approach behaviors. Implications are discussed for both research and practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Using life cycle assessment and techno-economic analysis in a real options framework to inform the design of algal biofuel production facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jordan D; Hise, Adam M; Characklis, Greg W; Gerlach, Robin; Viamajala, Sridhar; Gardner, Robert D

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the use of "real options analysis" (ROA) to quantify the value of greater product flexibility at algal biofuel production facilities. A deterministic optimization framework is integrated with a combined life cycle assessment/techno-economic analysis model and subjected to an ensemble of 30-year commodity price trajectories. Profits are maximized for two competing plant configurations: 1) one that sells lipid-extracted algae as animal feed only; and 2) one that can sell lipid-extracted algae as feed or use it to recover nutrients and energy, due to an up-front investment in anaerobic digestion/combined heat and power. Results show that added investment in plant flexibility does not result in an improvement in net present value, because current feed meal prices discourage use of lipid-extracted algae for nutrient and energy recovery. However, this study demonstrates that ROA provides many useful insights regarding plant design that cannot be captured via traditional techno-economic modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.