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Sample records for readiness treatment engagement

  1. ARE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT IMPORTANT IN ACHIEVING INDIVIDUAL READINESS FOR CHANGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wustari L.H. Mangundjaya

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGlobalization is everywhere, in this regard, every organization should change according to the needs and requirement of the environment. In addition, in today’s economy, it’s critical to have effective, and efficient organization. Failure to effectively engage employees can result in wasted resources, unboptimal organizational performance, and deteriorating employee morale. On the other hand, successfully engaging and committing employee can result in higher levels or organizational performance as well as higher levels of job satisfaction, both of which are much needed in today’s environment.The question arises whether organizational commitment, and employee engagement are related to individual readiness for change. The objective of this research is to identify the relationship andimpact between organizational commitments, employee engagement to individual readiness to change. This study done in four financial companies, that consist of three private owned banks and one government owned financial company (N= 502, with quantitative methods and correlation survey. The results showed that both organizational commitment and employee engagement are positively relatd and have contributed toindividual readiness to change. The results also show that the correlation of organizational commitment is stronger than employee engagement to individual readiness to change.Keywords: organizational commitment, employee engagement, individual readiness to change.

  2. Measuring organisational readiness for patient engagement (MORE): an international online Delphi consensus study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, L.J.; Durand, M.A.; Lloyd, A.; Elwyn, G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Widespread implementation of patient engagement by organisations and clinical teams is not a reality yet. The aim of this study is to develop a measure of organisational readiness for patient engagement designed to monitor and facilitate a healthcare organisation's willingness and

  3. Ready for Change? The Role of Physician and Staff Engagement, Burnout, and Workplace Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chen, Po-Han

    We examined factors associated with change readiness among 343 primary care physicians and 590 nonphysician staff undergoing "Lean"-based process improvements. Baseline levels of engagement were associated with greater readiness for change across all measured domains. Job-related burnout correlated with greater need for change, but lower self-efficacy and perceived support, whereas a personal sense of accomplishment was associated with higher efficacy to implement changes. At a department level, teamwork, participation in decision making, and change history were associated with higher engagement and lower burnout among physicians and staff; conversely, a busy or stressful department correlated with lower engagement and higher burnout.

  4. Readiness of communities to engage with childhood obesity prevention initiatives in disadvantaged areas of Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyril, Sheila; Polonsky, Michael; Green, Julie; Agho, Kingsley; Renzaho, Andre

    2016-07-15

    Objective Disadvantaged communities bear a disproportionate burden of childhood obesity and show low participation in childhood obesity prevention initiatives. This study aims to examine the level of readiness of disadvantaged communities to engage with childhood obesity prevention initiatives.Methods Using the community readiness model, 95 semi-structured interviews were conducted among communities in four disadvantaged areas of Victoria, Australia. Community readiness analysis and paired t-tests were performed to assess the readiness levels of disadvantaged communities to engage with childhood obesity prevention initiatives.Results The results showed that disadvantaged communities demonstrated low levels of readiness (readiness score=4/9, 44%) to engage with the existing childhood obesity prevention initiatives, lacked knowledge of childhood obesity and its prevention, and reported facing challenges in initiating and sustaining participation in obesity prevention initiatives.Conclusion This study highlights the need to improve community readiness by addressing low obesity-related literacy levels among disadvantaged communities and by facilitating the capacity-building of bicultural workers to deliver obesity prevention messages to these communities. Integrating these needs into existing Australian health policy and practice is of paramount importance for reducing obesity-related disparities currently prevailing in Australia.What is known about the topic? Childhood obesity prevalence is plateauing in developed countries including Australia; however, obesity-related inequalities continue to exist in Australia especially among communities living in disadvantaged areas, which experience poor engagement in childhood obesity prevention initiatives. Studies in the USA have found that assessing disadvantaged communities' readiness to participate in health programs is a critical initial step in reducing the disproportionate obesity burden among these communities. However

  5. The Brand's PREACH Model: Predicting Readiness to Engage African American Churches in Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Dorine J; Alston, Reginald J

    2017-09-01

    Despite many attempts to reduce health disparities, health professionals face obstacles in improving poor health outcomes within the African American (AA) community. To promote change for improved health measures, it is important to implement culturally tailored programming through a trusted institution, such as the AA church. While churches have the potential to play an important role in positively impacting health among AAs, it is unclear what attributes are necessary to predict success or failure for health promotion within these institutions. The purpose of this study was to create a model, the Brand's PREACH ( Predicting Readiness to Engage African American Churches in Health) Model, to predict the readiness of AA churches to engage in health promotion programming. Thirty-six semistructured key informant interviews were conducted with 12 pastors, 12 health leaders, and 12 congregants to gain information on the relationship between church infrastructure (physical structure, personnel, funding, and social/cultural support), readiness, and health promotion programming. The findings revealed that church infrastructure has an association with and will predict the readiness of a church to engage in health promotion programming. The ability to identify readiness early on will be useful for developing, implementing, and evaluating faith-based interventions, in partnership with churches, which is a key factor for sustainable and effective programs.

  6. The Effects of Engagement in an Internship on Readiness for School Leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Gaudreau, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    In the national endeavor to reform education, there is no question of the importance of preparing quality principals. A preparatory internship provides opportunity to learn and practice school-based leadership. This research provided evidence leading to a better understanding of how engagement during an internship relates to the readiness for school leadership. In addition, evidence was gathered on how the conditions of the internship affect the level of engagement. The population in this...

  7. Are Students Ready for College? What Student Engagement Data Say

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Martha; Kuh, George D.

    2006-01-01

    How realistic are high school students' educational aspirations? Reviewing the findings of the High School Survey of Student Engagement, Ms. McCarthy and Mr. Kuh note a troubling mismatch between the academic habits of many high school students and what will be expected of them in college. (Contains 1 figure and 19 endnotes.)

  8. Measuring organisational readiness for patient engagement (MORE): an international online Delphi consensus study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oostendorp, Linda J M; Durand, Marie-Anne; Lloyd, Amy; Elwyn, Glyn

    2015-02-14

    Widespread implementation of patient engagement by organisations and clinical teams is not a reality yet. The aim of this study is to develop a measure of organisational readiness for patient engagement designed to monitor and facilitate a healthcare organisation's willingness and ability to effectively implement patient engagement in healthcare. The development of the MORE (Measuring Organisational Readiness for patient Engagement) scale was guided by Weiner's theory of organisational readiness for change. Weiner postulates that an organisation's readiness is determined by both the willingness and ability to implement the change (i.e. in this context: patient engagement). A first version of the scale was developed based on a literature search and evaluation of pre-existing tools. We invited multi-disciplinary stakeholders to participate in a two-round online Delphi survey. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of each proposed item, and to comment on the proposed domains and items. Second round participants received feedback from the first round and were asked to re-rate the importance of the revised, new and unchanged items, and to provide comments. The first version of the scale contained 51 items divided into three domains: (1) Respondents' characteristics; (2) the organisation's willingness to implement patient engagement; and (3) the organisation's ability to implement patient engagement. 131 respondents from 16 countries (health care managers, policy makers, clinicians, patients and patient representatives, researchers, and other stakeholders) completed the first survey, and 72 of them also completed the second survey. During the Delphi process, 34 items were reworded, 8 new items were added, 5 items were removed, and 18 were combined. The scale's instructions were revised. The final version of MORE totalled 38 items; 5 on stakeholders, 13 on an organisation's willingness to implement, and 20 on an organisation's ability to implement patient

  9. ARE ORGANIZATIONAL COMMITMENT AND EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT IMPORTANT IN ACHIEVING INDIVIDUAL READINESS FOR CHANGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wustari L.H. Mangundjaya,

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractGlobalization is everywhere, in this regard, every organization shouldchange according to the needs and requirement of the environment, inaddition, in today’s economy, it’s critical to have effective, and efficientorganization.  Failure to effectively engage employees can result in wastedresources, suboptimal organizational performance, and deterioratingemployee morale. On the other hand, successfully engaging and committingemployee can result in higher levels or organizational performance as wellas higher levels of job satisfaction, both of which are much needed intoday’s environment.The question arises whether organizationalcommitment, and employee engagement are related to individual readinessfor change. The objective of this research is to identify the relationship andimpact between organizational commitments, employee engagement toindividual readiness to change.  This study done in four financial companies,that consist of three private owned banks and one government ownedfinancial company(N= 502, with quantitative methods and correlation

  10. A randomized trial examining the effects of parent engagement on early language and literacy: the Getting Ready intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M; Knoche, Lisa L; Kupzyk, Kevin A; Edwards, Carolyn Pope; Marvin, Christine A

    2011-06-01

    Language and literacy skills established during early childhood are critical for later school success. Parental engagement with children has been linked to a number of adaptive characteristics in preschoolers including language and literacy development, and family-school collaboration is an important contributor to school readiness. This study reports the results of a randomized trial of a parent engagement intervention designed to facilitate school readiness among disadvantaged preschool children, with a particular focus on language and literacy development. Participants included 217 children, 211 parents, and 29 Head Start teachers in 21 schools. Statistically significant differences in favor of the treatment group were observed between treatment and control participants in the rate of change over 2 academic years on teacher reports of children's language use (d=1.11), reading (d=1.25), and writing skills (d=0.93). Significant intervention effects on children's direct measures of expressive language were identified for a subgroup of cases where there were concerns about a child's development upon entry into preschool. Additionally, other child and family moderators revealed specific variables that influenced the treatment's effects. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Adherence and Readiness to Antiretroviral Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Södergård, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy places extraordinarily high demands on adherence, since non-adherence affects both individuals and society due to the spread of resistant viral strains. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the prevalence of adherence in Swedish HIV-infected patients, changes in adherence over time, and factors associated with adherence, including patients’ readiness to adhere. Further, to investigate the collaboration between nurses, doctors and pharmacists after the introduction...

  12. Effectiveness of the Treatment Readiness and Induction Program for increasing adolescent motivation for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becan, Jennifer E; Knight, Danica K; Crawley, Rachel D; Joe, George W; Flynn, Patrick M

    2015-03-01

    Success in substance abuse treatment is improved by problem recognition, desire to seek help, and readiness to engage in treatment, all of which are important aspects of motivation. Interventions that facilitate these at treatment induction for adolescents are especially needed. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of TRIP (Treatment Readiness and Induction Program) in promoting treatment motivation. Data represent 519 adolescents from 6 residential programs who completed assessments at treatment intake (time 1) and 35 days after admission (time 2). The design consisted of a comparison sample (n=281) that had enrolled in treatment prior to implementation of TRIP (standard operating practice) and a sample of clients that had entered treatment after TRIP began and received standard operating practice enhanced by TRIP (n=238). Repeated measures ANCOVAs were conducted using each time 2 motivation scale as a dependent measure. Motivation scales were conceptualized as representing sequential stages of change. LISREL was used to test a structural model involving TRIP participation, gender, drug use severity, juvenile justice involvement, age, race-ethnicity, prior treatment, and urgency as predictors of the stages of treatment motivation. Compared to standard practice, adolescents receiving TRIP demonstrated greater gains in problem recognition, even after controlling for the other variables in the model. The model fit was adequate, with TRIP directly affecting problem recognition and indirectly affecting later stages of change (desire for help and treatment readiness). Future studies should examine which specific components of TRIP affect change in motivation.

  13. Effectiveness of the Treatment Readiness and Induction Program for Increasing Adolescent Motivation for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becan, Jennifer E.; Knight, Danica K.; Crawley, Rachel D.; Joe, George W.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Success in substance abuse treatment is improved by problem recognition, desire to seek help, and readiness to engage in treatment, all of which are important aspects of motivation. Interventions that facilitate these at treatment induction for adolescents are especially needed. The purpose of this study is to assess the effectiveness of TRIP (Treatment Readiness and Induction Program) in promoting treatment motivation. Data represent 519 adolescents from 6 residential programs who completed assessments at treatment intake (Time 1) and 35 days after admission (Time 2). The design consisted of a comparison sample (n = 281) that had enrolled in treatment prior to implementation of TRIP (standard operating practice) and a sample of clients that had entered treatment after TRIP began and received standard operating practice enhanced by TRIP (n = 238). Repeated measures ANCOVAs were conducted using each Time 2 motivation scale as a dependent measure. Motivation scales were conceptualized as representing sequential stages of change. LISREL was used to test a structural model involving TRIP participation, gender, drug use severity, juvenile justice involvement, age, race-ethnicity, prior treatment, and urgency as predictors of the stages of treatment motivation. Compared to standard practice, adolescents receiving TRIP demonstrated greater gains in problem recognition, even after controlling for the other variables in the model. The model fit was adequate, with TRIP directly affecting problem recognition and indirectly affecting later stages of change (desire for help and treatment readiness). Future studies should examine which specific components of TRIP affect change in motivation. PMID:25456094

  14. Organizational Readiness for Change and Opinions toward Treatment Innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Fuller, Bret E.; Rieckmann, Traci; Nunes, Edward V.; Miller, Michael; Arfken, Cynthia; Edmundson, Eldon; McCarty, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Program administrators and staff in treatment programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) completed surveys to characterize participating programs and practitioners. A two-level random effects regression model assessed the influence of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) and organizational attributes on opinions toward the use of four evidence-based practices (manualized treatments, medication, integrated mental health services, and motivati...

  15. The readiness of addiction treatment agencies for health care reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molfenter Todd

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA aims to provide affordable health insurance and expanded health care coverage for some 32 million Americans. The PPACA makes provisions for using technology, evidence-based treatments, and integrated, patient-centered care to modernize the delivery of health care services. These changes are designed to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and cost-savings within the health care system. To gauge the addiction treatment field’s readiness for health reform, the authors developed a Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI survey for addiction treatment agencies. Addiction treatment administrators and providers from around the United States completed the survey located on the http://www.niatx.net website. Respondents self-assessed their agencies based on 13 conditions pertinent to health reform readiness, and received a confidential score and instant feedback. On a scale of “Needs to Begin,” “Early Stages,” “On the Way,” and “Advanced,” the mean scores for respondents (n = 276 ranked in the Early Stages of health reform preparation for 11 of 13 conditions. Of greater concern was that organizations with budgets of  $5 million to have information technology (patient records, patient health technology, and administrative information technology, evidence-based treatments, quality management systems, a continuum of care, or a board of directors informed about PPACA. The findings of the HRRI indicate that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, have much to do to prepare for a future environment that has greater expectations for information technology use, a credentialed workforce, accountability for patient care, and an integrated continuum of care.

  16. The readiness of addiction treatment agencies for health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Capoccia, Victor A; Boyle, Michael G; Sherbeck, Carol K

    2012-05-02

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) aims to provide affordable health insurance and expanded health care coverage for some 32 million Americans. The PPACA makes provisions for using technology, evidence-based treatments, and integrated, patient-centered care to modernize the delivery of health care services. These changes are designed to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and cost-savings within the health care system.To gauge the addiction treatment field's readiness for health reform, the authors developed a Health Reform Readiness Index (HRRI) survey for addiction treatment agencies. Addiction treatment administrators and providers from around the United States completed the survey located on the http://www.niatx.net website. Respondents self-assessed their agencies based on 13 conditions pertinent to health reform readiness, and received a confidential score and instant feedback.On a scale of "Needs to Begin," "Early Stages," "On the Way," and "Advanced," the mean scores for respondents (n = 276) ranked in the Early Stages of health reform preparation for 11 of 13 conditions. Of greater concern was that organizations with budgets of  $5 million to have information technology (patient records, patient health technology, and administrative information technology), evidence-based treatments, quality management systems, a continuum of care, or a board of directors informed about PPACA.The findings of the HRRI indicate that the addiction field, and in particular smaller organizations, have much to do to prepare for a future environment that has greater expectations for information technology use, a credentialed workforce, accountability for patient care, and an integrated continuum of care.

  17. Implementation of Cognitive-Behavioral Substance Abuse Treatment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Treatment Engagement and Abstinence at Treatment Exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hetta Gouse

    Full Text Available This study documented the treatment cascade for engagement in care and abstinence at treatment exit as well as examined correlates of these outcomes for the first certified Matrix Model® substance abuse treatment site in Sub-Saharan Africa.This retrospective chart review conducted at a resource-limited community clinic in Cape Town, South Africa, assessed treatment readiness and substance use severity at treatment entry as correlates of the number of sessions attended and biologically confirmed abstinence at treatment exit among 986 clients who initiated treatment from 2009-2014. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of treatment outcomes were examined using logistic regression, modeling treatment completion and abstinence at treatment exit separately.Of the 2,233 clients who completed screening, approximately 44% (n = 986 initiated treatment. Among those who initiated treatment, 45% completed at least four group sessions, 30% completed early recovery skills training (i.e., at least eight group sessions, and 13% completed the full 16-week program. Approximately half (54% of clients who provided a urine sample had negative urine toxicology results for any substance at treatment exit. Higher motivation at treatment entry was independently associated with greater odds of treatment completion and negative urine toxicology results at treatment exit.Findings provide initial support for the successful implementation the Matrix Model in a resource-limited setting. Motivational enhancement interventions could support treatment initiation, promote sustained engagement in treatment, and achieve better treatment outcomes.

  18. Researcher readiness for participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation research: a conceptual framework of core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Christopher M; Young, Tiffany L; Powell, Byron J; Rohweder, Catherine; Enga, Zoe K; Scott, Jennifer E; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-03-24

    Participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation (CEDI) research is challenging for a variety of reasons. Currently, there is not specific guidance or a tool available for researchers to assess their readiness to conduct CEDI research. We propose a conceptual framework that identifies detailed competencies for researchers participating in CEDI and maps these competencies to domains. The framework is a necessary step toward developing a CEDI research readiness survey that measures a researcher's attitudes, willingness, and self-reported ability for acquiring the knowledge and performing the behaviors necessary for effective community engagement. The conceptual framework for CEDI competencies was developed by a team of eight faculty and staff affiliated with a university's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The authors developed CEDI competencies by identifying the attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors necessary for carrying out commonly accepted CE principles. After collectively developing an initial list of competencies, team members individually mapped each competency to a single domain that provided the best fit. Following the individual mapping, the group held two sessions in which the sorting preferences were shared and discrepancies were discussed until consensus was reached. During this discussion, modifications to wording of competencies and domains were made as needed. The team then engaged five community stakeholders to review and modify the competencies and domains. The CEDI framework consists of 40 competencies organized into nine domains: perceived value of CE in D&I research, introspection and openness, knowledge of community characteristics, appreciation for stakeholder's experience with and attitudes toward research, preparing the partnership for collaborative decision-making, collaborative planning for the research design and goals, communication effectiveness, equitable distribution of resources and credit, and

  19. Organizational Readiness for Change and Opinions toward Treatment Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bret E.; Rieckmann, Traci; Nunes, Edward V.; Miller, Michael; Arfken, Cynthia; Edmundson, Eldon; McCarty, Dennis

    2007-01-01

    Program administrators and staff in treatment programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) completed surveys to characterize participating programs and practitioners. A two-level random effects regression model assessed the influence of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) and organizational attributes on opinions toward the use of four evidence-based practices (manualized treatments, medication, integrated mental health services, and motivational incentives) and practices with less empirical support (confrontation and noncompliance discharge). The ORC Scales suggested greater support for evidence-based practices in programs where staff perceived more program need for improvement, better Internet access, higher levels of peer influence, more opportunities for professional growth, a stronger sense of organizational mission and more organizational stress. Support for confrontation and noncompliance discharge, in contrast, was strong when staff saw less opportunity for professional growth, weaker peer influence, less Internet access, and perceived less organizational stress. The analysis provides evidence of the ORC’s utility in assessing agency strengths and needs during the implementation of evidence-based practices. PMID:17434708

  20. Organizational Readiness for Change and opinions toward treatment innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Bret E; Rieckmann, Traci; Nunes, Edward V; Miller, Michael; Arfken, Cynthia; Edmundson, Eldon; McCarty, Dennis

    2007-09-01

    Program administrators and staff in treatment programs participating in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network completed surveys to characterize participating programs and practitioners. A two-level random-effects regression model assessed the influence of Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) and organizational attributes on opinions toward the use of four evidence-based practices (manualized treatments, medication, integrated mental health services, and motivational incentives) and practices with less empirical support (confrontation and noncompliance discharge). The ORC scales suggested greater support for evidence-based practices in programs where staff perceived more program need for improvement, better Internet access, higher levels of peer influence, more opportunities for professional growth, a stronger sense of organizational mission, and more organizational stress. Support for confrontation and noncompliance discharge, in contrast, was strong when staff saw less opportunity for professional growth, weaker peer influence, less Internet access, and perceived less organizational stress. The analysis provides evidence of the ORC's utility in assessing agency strengths and needs during the implementation of evidence-based practices.

  1. What Makes Offenders with an Intellectual Disability Ready to Engage with Psychological Therapy? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckon, Susan E.; Smith, Ian C.; Daiches, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Although there are established links between measures of readiness for psychological therapy in offenders and subsequent reduction in recidivism rates there has been a lack of theoretical research considering this process within the intellectual disability (ID) offender population. Grounded theory methodology was used to explore the process by…

  2. Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS): a proof of concept and evaluation feasibility study of staff training to improve service engagement by people with personality difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, M; Jinks, M; McMurran, M

    2015-09-01

    One third of people diagnosed with PD do not complete treatment and non-completion is associated with poorer clinical outcomes. Equipping staff to be better able to engage this client group is important, and web-based, self-directed learning is a potentially cost-effective way to train staff. This study examined the implementation of a web-based training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) in three types of service. Completion rates were 94.4% in community health services; 92.3% in prison offender health services; and 46.5% in probation services. Staff found the content of REMS acceptable and useful. This study demonstrated that staff in NHS and criminal justice settings can complete REMS, but staff in probation services are challenged by time pressures and limited computer access. Staff at probation sites were less familiar with PD issues compared with the NHS staff. A web-based staff training programme called Readiness Enhancement Management Strategies (REMS) was developed to promote the engagement of people with personality difficulties in treatment. This 'proof of concept' study examined the REMS implementation process, its acceptability and the feasibility of using service data for future evaluation. Staff in six services working with people diagnosed with personality disorder or undiagnosed people with personality difficulties were eligible to participate: two community health services, two prison offender health services and two probation services. Of 92 eligible staff, 74 were available to undertake REMS. These staff completed knowledge and acceptability surveys and rated service user engagement with treatment. The proportion of treatment sessions attended by service users was collected for a 30-week period. REMS completion rates were community - 94.4%, prison - 92.3% and probation - 46.5%. Three quarters of participants rated REMS as 7 out of 10 or higher. All teams were able to provide service data for the study period

  3. On the improvement of the control force readiness of students engaged arm sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voronkov A.V.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to identify the most informative tests and test exercises to assess force readiness athletes. Material : the study involved 23 students of mass sports categories. Ascertaining experiment involved testing athletes force readiness, analysis of their competitive activity and determination of strength and reliability of correlation tests with the results of the competition. There were 19 trials and two anthropometric measurements. Results : it was found that traditional tests to determine the strength abilities athletes enough authentic. A significant positive correlation with the results of competitive activity indicators carpal dynamometry (in two different weight classes, and on both hands in the categories of more than 85 kg. And pull-ups on the maximum number of times. A high degree of correlation between the results of competitive activity and holding a dumbbell on a special bench capture below. This exercise is effective for assessing the level of preparedness of special strength in the weight category up to 80 kg and 85 kg. Conclusions : the most informative tests and benchmarks to determine the exercise of power readiness 1-2 athletes in sports categories arm sport.

  4. Policy and Technology Readiness: Engaging the User and Developer Community to Develop a Research Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Jarrod; Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; West, Curtis L.; Kielman, Joseph

    2015-05-16

    A key challenge for research roadmapping in the crisis response and management domain is articulation of a shared vision that describes what the future can and should include. Visioning allows for far-reaching stakeholder engagement that can properly align research with stakeholders needs. Engagement includes feedback from researchers, policy makers, general public, and end-users on technical and non-technical factors. This work articulates a process and framework for the construction and maintenance of a stakeholder-centric research vision and roadmap in the emergency management domain. This novel roadmapping process integrates three pieces: analysis of the research and technology landscape, visioning, and stakeholder engagement. Our structured engagement process elicits research foci for the roadmap based on relevance to stakeholder mission, identifies collaborators, and builds consensus around the roadmap priorities. We find that the vision process and vision storyboard helps SMEs conceptualize and discuss a technology's strengths, weaknesses, and alignment with needs

  5. Problem Internet Overuse Behaviors in College Students: Readiness-to-Change and Receptivity to Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Jennifer E; Li, Wen; Snyder, Susan M; Howard, Matthew O

    2016-01-01

    This mixed methods study explores college students' readiness-to-change and receptivity to treatment for problem Internet overuse behaviors. Focus groups were conducted with 27 college students who self-identified as Internet over-users, and had experienced biopsychosocial problems related to Internet overuse. Participants completed standardized questionnaires assessing their Internet use and sociodemographic forms. Focus groups explored readiness to change problem Internet overuse behaviors and receptivity to treatment. Similar to college students with other addictive behaviors, students with problem Internet overuse fall along a continuum vis-à-vis readiness-to-change their behaviors. Over half of the participants were receptive to treatment for their problem Internet overuse behaviors.

  6. Treatment engagement of individuals experiencing mental illness: review and update.

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    Dixon, Lisa B; Holoshitz, Yael; Nossel, Ilana

    2016-02-01

    Individuals living with serious mental illness are often difficult to engage in ongoing treatment, with high dropout rates. Poor engagement may lead to worse clinical outcomes, with symptom relapse and rehospitalization. Numerous variables may affect level of treatment engagement, including therapeutic alliance, accessibility of care, and a client's trust that the treatment will address his/her own unique goals. As such, we have found that the concept of recovery-oriented care, which prioritizes autonomy, empowerment and respect for the person receiving services, is a helpful framework in which to view tools and techniques to enhance treatment engagement. Specifically, person-centered care, including shared decision making, is a treatment approach that focuses on an individual's unique goals and life circumstances. Use of person-centered care in mental health treatment models has promising outcomes for engagement. Particular populations of people have historically been difficult to engage, such as young adults experiencing a first episode of psychosis, individuals with coexisting psychotic and substance use disorders, and those who are homeless. We review these populations and outline how various evidence-based, recovery-oriented treatment techniques have been shown to enhance engagement. Our review then turns to emerging treatment strategies that may improve engagement. We focus on use of electronics and Internet, involvement of peer providers in mental health treatment, and incorporation of the Cultural Formulation Interview to provide culturally competent, person-centered care. Treatment engagement is complex and multifaceted, but optimizing recovery-oriented skills and attitudes is essential in delivery of services to those with serious mental illness.

  7. Sex offender treatment: consumer satisfaction and engagement in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jill S; Prescott, David S; D'Amora, David A

    2010-06-01

    Convicted sex offenders attending an outpatient treatment program in Connecticut were surveyed about their experiences in therapy, their perceived importance of treatment content, their satisfaction with the help they receive, and their engagement in therapeutic services. There were strong correlations between perceived importance of content items and satisfaction with services. A robust correlation was also found between engagement and satisfaction. Clients rated accountability and victim empathy as the most important components of treatment. Other popular content areas were thinking errors, relapse prevention concepts, uncovering motivations to offend, and controlling deviant arousal. Most sex offenders valued the peer support and confrontation offered by group therapy. Though reduced recidivism is clearly the crucial measure of treatment success, clients who are engaged in the treatment process and develop healthy interpersonal skills by participating in therapy may be less likely to engage in abusive behavior. Implications for practitioners are discussed.

  8. The Role of Readiness to Change in Response to Treatment of Adolescent Depression

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    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; Small, David M.; Murakami, Jessica L.; High, Robin R.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of readiness to change on treatment outcome was examined among 332 adolescents (46% male, 74% Caucasian), ages 12 through 17 years (M = 14.6, SD = 1.5), with major depressive disorder who were participating in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). TADS is a randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of…

  9. Readiness for Change and Treatment Outcome among Individuals with Alcohol Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewes, Robert L.; Janikowski, Timothy P.

    1998-01-01

    Uses the Addiction Severity Index and Stage of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale to evaluate individuals with primary alcohol-abuse problems involved in treatment programs. Results indicate that participants showed significant improvement in problems related to alcohol use. No significant differences were found between participants…

  10. The Role of Readiness to Change in Response to Treatment of Adolescent Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Cara C.; Simons, Anne D.; Silva, Susan G.; Rohde, Paul; Small, David M.; Murakami, Jessica L.; High, Robin R.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of readiness to change on treatment outcome was examined among 332 adolescents (46% male, 74% Caucasian), ages 12 through 17 years (M = 14.6, SD = 1.5), with major depressive disorder who were participating in the Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study (TADS). TADS is a randomized clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of…

  11. Readiness in HIV Treatment Adherence: A Matter of Confidence. An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain, Helene; Delmas, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is recognized as the essence of a successful HIV combination therapy. Optimal adherence implies a readiness to begin the treatment on the part of the patient. A better understanding of the "readiness phenomenon" will become an asset for optimizing HIV treatment. However, few studies have focused on understanding the process underlying the choice to adhere. The aim of this study is to understand the readiness process that leads to adhering to the HIV treatment, from both patient and professional perspectives. Twenty-seven in-depth interviews, with a qualitative exploratory design, were the source of our data. Participants were recruited in two hospitals in Paris. Throughout the data-collection process, analysed data were supplied to all participants and the research team, thus allowing for shared constructions. Four themes, interrelated with a constitutive pattern, emerged from the data we collected. Being ready to begin and adhere to treatment is a matter of confidence in oneself, as well as in relatives, in the treatment and in the health professional team. These themes are not constant and unvarying; instead, they constitute a picture moving across time and life events. Results of this study show that adherence that goes beyond "complying with" the medical instructions, but depends on how much of an active role the patient plays in the choice to adhere.

  12. Predictive Properties of the Gesell School Readiness Screening Test within Samples from Two Treatment Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Madhabi

    The predictive properties of the Gesell School Readiness Screening Test (GSRT) were examined, taking into account the stated purposes of the test and the context of test use. Two samples were used: (1) a control sample of 55 students (21 males and 34 females) whose GSRT scores were not used for placement or tracking; and (2) a treatment sample of…

  13. Barriers to treatment engagement for depression among Latinas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Susan; Whittemore, Robin

    2013-06-01

    In spite of successful treatment options for depression, the majority of Americans with severe depression do not receive treatment. Latinos are even less likely to engage in treatment than non-Hispanic Whites. The purpose of this study is to explore barriers to treatment engagement and, more specifically, how childhood adversity and gender-based violence (GBV) contribute to a lack of perceived support for treatment engagement. Experiences of GBV and childhood adversity can call into question deeply held family, cultural, and religious values, and affect the perceived quality of the therapeutic relationship and attitudes about depression treatment. A qualitative descriptive methodology was used to understand the experiences of a sample of 12 Latinas who were part of a diabetes prevention study (n = 67) and had been referred for treatment because of elevated symptoms of depression. Results indicate that the often-cited barriers to mental health care (i.e., language barriers, economic considerations, and lack of illness recognition) did not serve as deterrents for Latinas in this study. Participants recognized that they were depressed and agreed with the assessment of depression. However, none of the women followed up on the recommendation to seek care. What has emerged from this study is how cultural values, such as familismo and marianismo, and the lack of responsiveness from family and religious leaders in the context of exposure to GBV and childhood adversity created significant barriers to treatment engagement. This study highlights the need for nurses to screen for these exposures and to engage in shared decision making about treatment.

  14. Service engagement: psychopathology, recovery style and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Simone; Poloni, Nicola; Aletti, Francesca; Bonalumi, Cristiano; Callegari, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate how recovery style, a set of strategies used by patients to interact with services and therapists, and the severity of psychotic symptoms affect the quality/continuity of taking charge of each patient. 156 psychotic patients at different stages of illness were enrolled. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and integration/sealing-Over Scale, Recovery Style Questionnaire and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were administered. Patients were distinguished into four groups according to the type of treatment received: clinical package, hospital package, day-care package, and residential package. A positive correlation between the cost of psychiatric performance and psychopathological severity (measured with PANSS scores) was identified. No association emerged between ISOS/RSQ total scores and costs. The sanitary expenditure appears to be linked to positive psychotic symptoms while lower performances are given for the treatment of patients with predominant negative symptoms. Recovery style itself has not a direct influence on the quantity/quality of psychiatric services.

  15. Service Engagement: Psychopathology, Recovery Style and Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Vender

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to evaluate how recovery style, a set of strategies used by patients to interact with services and therapists, and the severity of psychotic symptoms affect the quality/continuity of taking charge of each patient. 156 psychotic patients at different stages of illness were enrolled. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected and integration/sealing-Over Scale, Recovery Style Questionnaire and Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale were administered. Patients were distinguished into four groups according to the type of treatment received: clinical package, hospital package, day-care package, and residential package. A positive correlation between the cost of psychiatric performance and psychopathological severity (measured with PANSS scores was identified. No association emerged between ISOS/RSQ total scores and costs. The sanitary expenditure appears to be linked to positive psychotic symptoms while lower performances are given for the treatment of patients with predominant negative symptoms. Recovery style itself has not a direct influence on the quantity/quality of psychiatric services.

  16. I-RREACH: an engagement and assessment tool for improving implementation readiness of researchers, organizations and communities in complex interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maar, Marion; Yeates, Karen; Barron, Marcia; Hua, Diane; Liu, Peter; Moy Lum-Kwong, Margaret; Perkins, Nancy; Sleeth, Jessica; Tobe, Joshua; Wabano, Mary Jo; Williamson, Pamela; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2015-05-04

    Non-communicable chronic diseases are the leading causes of mortality globally, and nearly 80% of these deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). In high-income countries (HICs), inequitable distribution of resources affects poorer and otherwise disadvantaged groups including Aboriginal peoples. Cardiovascular mortality in high-income countries has recently begun to fall; however, these improvements are not realized among citizens in LMICs or those subgroups in high-income countries who are disadvantaged in the social determinants of health including Aboriginal people. It is critical to develop multi-faceted, affordable and realistic health interventions in collaboration with groups who experience health inequalities. Based on community-based participatory research (CBPR), we aimed to develop implementation tools to guide complex interventions to ensure that health gains can be realized in low-resource environments. We developed the I-RREACH (Intervention and Research Readiness Engagement and Assessment of Community Health Care) tool to guide implementation of interventions in low-resource environments. We employed CBPR and a consensus methodology to (1) develop the theoretical basis of the tool and (2) to identify key implementation factor domains; then, we (3) collected participant evaluation data to validate the tool during implementation. The I-RREACH tool was successfully developed using a community-based consensus method and is rooted in participatory principles, equalizing the importance of the knowledge and perspectives of researchers and community stakeholders while encouraging respectful dialogue. The I-RREACH tool consists of three phases: fact finding, stakeholder dialogue and community member/patient dialogue. The evaluation for our first implementation of I-RREACH by participants was overwhelmingly positive, with 95% or more of participants indicating comfort with and support for the process and the dialogue it creates. The I

  17. Engagement Models for Adolescents in DATOS-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broome, Kirk M.; Joe, George W.; Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2001-01-01

    Examined relationships between patient background, treatment readiness, and therapeutic engagement in national sample of adolescents admitted to 20 treatment programs representing 3 modalities (residential, outpatient drug free, and short-term inpatient). Found that patients with higher treatment readiness at intake subsequently became more…

  18. Sensation seeking, coping with stress, and readiness to engage in therapy: does ego development influence the psychosocial functioning of substance-abusing mothers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daryn H; McMahon, Thomas J; Luthar, Suniya L; Suchman, Nancy E

    2012-04-01

    Ego development, the capacity to derive coherent, nuanced meaning from one's life experiences, often has significant impact on psychosocial adjustment during adulthood. Research with nonclinical populations has indicated links between higher ego development and healthy emotional coping and interpersonal relationships. Emerging research with substance-abusing mothers suggests that higher levels of ego development are associated with improved parenting but also with increased rates of psychopathology. Less is known about how ego development is related to other psychosocial factors important for substance-abusing mothers' functioning and capacity to parent, including the proclivity to engage in risky behaviors, adaptive coping behaviors, and readiness to engage in psychotherapy. The present study examines these links. Participants included 182 methadonemaintained women who expressed interest in a randomized clinical trial testing the efficacy of a relational parenting intervention for substance-abusing mothers (Luthar, Suchman, & Altomare, 2007). Data were analyzed using a series of MANCOVAs and ANCOVAs controlling for maternal IQ and depression. Mothers with higher levels of ego development reported more adaptive coping techniques and greater readiness to engage in psychotherapy but also reported a heightened desire for strong sensations. Findings are discussed in light of mothers' psychological processes and parenting capacities. The significance of findings for developing parenting interventions for substance-abusing mothers is also discussed.

  19. The Treatment Engagement Rating scale (TER) for forensic outpatient treatment : Description, psychometric properties, and norms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drieschner, Klaus Heinrich; Boomsma, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The Treatment Engagement Rating scale (TER) is a Dutch therapist rating instrument for treatment engagement (TE) of forensic outpatients. It yields scores for nine components of TE, which are aggregated in a total score. Following an analysis of the concept of TE, the TER is described, and various p

  20. Readiness to adopt a performance measurement system for substance abuse treatment: Findings from the Service Quality Measures initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Myers

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. A performance measurement system – the Service Quality Measures (SQM initiative – has been developed to monitor the quality of South Africa (SA’s substance abuse treatment services. Identifying factors associated with readiness to adopt this system may inform strategies to facilitate its robust implementation. Objective. To examine factors associated with readiness to adopt a performance measurement system among SA substance abuse treatment providers. Methods. We surveyed 81 treatment providers from 13 treatment sites in the Western Cape, SA. The survey examined awareness, resources, organisational climate, leadership support and readiness to adopt the SQM system. Regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with readiness to adopt this system. Results. Readiness to adopt the SQM initiative was high (M=5.64, standard deviation 1.63. In bivariate analyses, caseload size (F=3.73 (degrees of freedom (df=3.70, p=0.015, awareness (r=0.78, p<0.0001, leadership support (r=0.70, p<0.0001, resources (r=0.65, p<0.0001, openness to change (r=0.372, p=0.001, and external pressure to change were associated with readiness to adopt the SQM. In multivariate analyses, only awareness of the SQM initiative (B=0.34, standard error (SE 0.08, t=4.4, p<0.0001 and leadership support (B=0.45, SE 0.11, t=4.0, p<0.0001 were significantly associated with readiness to adopt this system. Conclusion. While treatment providers report high levels of readiness to adopt the SQM system, findings show that the likelihood of adoption can be further increased through improved provider awareness and enhanced leadership support for this health innovation.

  1. Men, masculinity, and engagement with treatment as prevention in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikovore, Jeremiah; Gillespie, Natasha; McGrath, Nuala; Orne-Gliemann, Joanna; Zuma, Thembelihle

    2016-01-01

    Men's poorer engagement with healthcare generally and HIV care specifically, compared to women, is well-described. Within the HIV public health domain, interest is growing in universal test and treat (UTT) strategies. UTT strategies refer to the expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in order to reduce onward transmission and incidence of HIV in a population, through a "treatment as prevention" (TasP). This paper focuses on how masculinity influences engagement with HIV care in the context of an on-going TasP trial. Data were collected in January-November 2013 using 20 in-depth interviews, 10 of them repeated thrice, and 4 focus group discussions, each repeated four times. Analysis combined inductive and deductive approaches for coding and the review and consolidation of emerging themes. The accounts detailed men's unwillingness to engage with HIV testing and care, seemingly tied to their pursuit of valued masculinity constructs such as having strength and control, being sexually competent, and earning income. Articulated through fears regarding getting an HIV-positive diagnosis, observations that men preferred traditional medicine and that primary health centres were not welcoming to men, descriptions that men used lay measures to ascertain HIV status, and insinuations by men that they were removed from HIV risk, the indisposition to HIV care contrasted markedly with an apparent readiness to test among women. Gendered tensions thus emerged which were amplified in the context where valued masculinity representations were constantly threatened. Amid the tensions, men struggled with disclosing their HIV status, and used various strategies to avoid or postpone disclosing, or disclose indirectly, while women's ability to access care readily, use condoms, or communicate about HIV appeared similarly curtailed. UTT and TasP promotion should heed and incorporate into policy and health service delivery models the intrapersonal tensions, and the conflict, and poor and

  2. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior. Results: Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers. PMID:20390058

  3. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-03-24

    Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior. Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers.

  4. Treatment engagement in adolescents with severe psychiatric problems: a latent class analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedelof, A J M; Bongers, Ilja L; van Nieuwenhuizen, Chijs

    2013-08-01

    Motivation is considered a pivotal factor in treatment, but a better understanding of this topic is needed. Drieschner et al. (Clin Psychol Rev 23:1115-1137, 2004) proposed to distinguish treatment motivation and treatment engagement. This study aimed to discover whether it is possible to identify classes of adolescents with severe psychiatric problems having comparable profiles of treatment engagement. To this end, professionals filled out the Treatment Engagement Rating Scale 5 times for 49 adolescents (mean age 18.3 years; SD = 1.6) during the first year of case management treatment. Using a longitudinal latent class analysis, the number of profiles of treatment engagement was investigated and described. Results identified three profiles: high (19 clients, 39%), medium (20 clients, 41%) and low (10 clients, 20%). Adolescents with a high engagement profile were at first equally, and later on more engaged in treatment than clients with a medium engagement profile. Adolescents with a low engagement profile made the least effort to engage, except after 30 weeks. Adolescents with a low engagement profile were often substance-dependent males with the lowest scores on the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale after a year. Only adolescents with a high engagement profile improved on global functioning. In conclusion, it is possible to identify different treatment engagement profiles by asking one question about level of global treatment engagement. Frequent assessment of engagement of the individual client as well as including a behavioural component into assessment and treatment may help to improve case management treatment for adolescents with medium and low engagement profiles.

  5. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Stecker

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracy Stecker1,2, John Fortney3,4, Francis Hamilton1,2, Cathy D Sherbourne5, Icek Ajzen61Psychiatric Research Center, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, NH, USA; 2VA Health Services Research and Development, White River Junction Veterans Administration, White River Junction, VT, USA; 3VA Health Services Research and Development (HR S&D, Center for Mental Health and Outcomes Research, Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System, North Little Rock, AR, USA; 4Division of Health Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA; 5RAND, Santa Monica, CA, USA; 6Department of Psychology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USAObjectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq.Methods: Participants were one hundred and fifty Operation Iraqi Freedom National Guard soldiers who screened positive for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder or alcohol abuse disorder on the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI. Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing beliefs about mental health treatment and treatment-seeking behavior.Results: Beliefs related to symptom reduction and work were significantly related to mental health treatment-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Interventions developed to engage veterans into care must be directed toward cognitive factors that motivate treatment seeking in addition to traditionally targeted structural barriers.Keywords: treatment

  6. Sterilization of ready-to-cook Bibimbap by combined treatment with gamma irradiation for space food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae-Nam; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Sung, Nak-Yun; Han, In-Jun; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2012-08-01

    Bibimbap, Korean traditional cooked rice mixed with various kinds of vegetables, together with mushrooms and a ground meat, and seasoned with red pepper paste, was developed as a ready-to-cook food by combined treatment with irradiation for the use in space. By gamma irradiation of 25 kGy, the total aerobic bacteria of Bibimbap that was initial by 6.3 log CFU/g decreased to below detection limit, but its sensory qualities were drastically decreased. To enhance the sensory quality, the effects of antioxidant in Bibimbap were evaluated. A treatment with 0.1% of vitamin C, vacuum packaging and gamma-irradiated at 25 kGy and -70 °C showed higher sensory scores than only the irradiation process. This result indicates that the radiation technology may be useful to produce a variety of space foods with high quality of taste and flavor, when combined with other methods.

  7. Antimicrobial Treatments to Preserve Packaged Ready-to-Eat Table Grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ready-to-eat table grapes are a product with severe shelf life problems. Mass loss, colour changes, accelerated softening and mould proliferation can greatly influence quality decay of berries. Hence, the effects of different dipping treatments on the quality of packaged ready-to-eat table grapes have been successfully assessed. Various antimicrobial compounds (trans-2-hexenal, potassium sorbate, eugenol, cinnamon bark oil and ethanol were used at different concentrations for dipping grape berries prior to packaging. All the samples were packaged in biaxially oriented polypropylene and stored at (4±1 °C. During the storage period, headspace gas composition, spoilage microorganisms, appearance of visible moulds and sensory quality were monitored. The composition of the headspace gas was typical of a non-climacteric fruit, thus demonstrating that the antimicrobial compounds did not affect product respiration rate. For the entire storage period, the bacterial counts did not grow significantly. On the contrary, mould proliferation on the product surface affected sensory properties until provoking product unacceptability. Relevant differences were found between the dipped and undipped samples. In particular, 50 % ethanol or 20 % ethanol combined with potassium sorbate (3 % seemed to be very effective in preventing mould proliferation, thus promoting an increase in shelf life by about 100 %.

  8. A Descriptive Model of Patient Readiness, Motivators, and Hepatitis C Treatment Uptake among Australian Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Lorraine; Carruthers, Susan; Thompson, Sandra; Cheng, Wendy; Jones, Jocelyn; Simpson, Paul; Richards, Alun; Thein, Hla-Hla; Haber, Paul; Lloyd, Andrew; Butler, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus infection (HCV) has a significant global health burden with an estimated 2%–3% of the world's population infected, and more than 350,000 dying annually from HCV-related conditions including liver failure and liver cancer. Prisons potentially offer a relatively stable environment in which to commence treatment as they usually provide good access to health care providers, and are organised around routine and structure. Uptake of treatment of HCV, however, remains low in the community and in prisons. In this study, we explored factors affecting treatment uptake inside prisons and hypothesised that prisoners have unique issues influencing HCV treatment uptake as a consequence of their incarceration which are not experienced in other populations. Method and Findings We undertook a qualitative study exploring prisoners' accounts of why they refused, deferred, delayed or discontinued HCV treatment in prison. Between 2010 and 2013, 116 Australian inmates were interviewed from prisons in New South Wales, Queensland, and Western Australia. Prisoners experienced many factors similar to those which influence treatment uptake of those living with HCV infection in the community. Incarceration, however, provides different circumstances of how these factors are experienced which need to be better understood if the number of prisoners receiving treatment is to be increased. We developed a descriptive model of patient readiness and motivators for HCV treatment inside prisons and discussed how we can improve treatment uptake among prisoners. Conclusion This study identified a broad and unique range of challenges to treatment of HCV in prison. Some of these are likely to be diminished by improving treatment options and improved models of health care delivery. Other barriers relate to inmate understanding of their illness and stigmatisation by other inmates and custodial staff and generally appear less amenable to change although there is potential for

  9. High levels of psychosocial readiness for ART in an African population at the onset of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Brent; Mbonye, Martin; Coutinho, Aartin; Amuron, Barbara; Nkabala, Robert; Jaffar, Shabbar; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2009-12-01

    Adherence at the earliest stages of treatment is likely to be influenced by prior illness trajectories and future expectations, best captured (and addressed) before treatment begins. We examined the influence of illness trajectories and treatment expectations on psychosocial readiness to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Jinja, Uganda. In-depth interviews were conducted between October 2005 and April 2006 with 41 members of an AIDS support organisation on their first day of treatment. Transcribed texts were translated, coded and analysed thematically using NVIVO-7 software. Results indicated that acute fear of death and progressive withdrawal from social, economic and sexual roles narrowed focus on survival, while efficacy-enhancing experiences with septrin prophylaxis and trust in counsellors reinforced belief in HIV diagnosis and importance of adherence. Most enjoyed supportive home environments after disclosing their serostatus. Lack of money for food and transport was anticipated as the main barriers to future adherence, particularly among women. Integrating strong counselling support with ART provision helped channel the power of shared illness experience into positive motivation to adhere at the onset of treatment.

  10. Prediction of treatment outcome in a clinical sample of problem drinkers: self-efficacy, alcohol expectancies, and readiness to change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demmel, Ralf

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive processes related to client motivation are important mediators of alcoholism treatment outcome. The present study aimed to expand previous research on client motivation and treatment outcome by establishing the predictive utility of self-efficacy, alcohol expectancies, and readiness to change in a sample of alcohol-dependent inpatients (N = 83. Treatment outcome was assessed three months following discharge. According to self-reported alcohol use, 22 clients were classified as abstainers and 41 clients as relapsers. Twenty participants were lost to follow-up. Readiness to change and anticipated reinforcement from alcohol predicted abstinence at follow-up. Client motivation was unrelated to both frequency and quantity of alcohol use. In accordance with social learning theory, self-efficacy was inversely correlated with alcohol expectancies. The results of the present study suggest that once abstinence has been violated factors other than pretreatment motivation determine drinking behavior.

  11. Integrating Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Eating Disorders: Tailoring Interventions to Patient Readiness for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Josie; Dunn, Erin C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the integration of Motivational Interviewing (MI) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the treatment of eating disorders. Although CBT is regarded as the treatment of choice in this population, it nevertheless has limitations: some patients fail to engage, drop out from treatment prematurely, or simply do not improve.…

  12. Engagement in mental health treatment among veterans returning from Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Stecker, Tracy; Fortney, John; Hamilton, Francis; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Ajzen, Icek

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Many veterans return from combat experiencing a variety of mental health concerns. Previous research has documented a stigma associated with seeking treatment that interferes with the decision to seek treatment. This study, conceptualized using the theory of planned behavior, assessed beliefs about mental health treatment in order to understand mental health treatment seeking behavior among a group of returning National Guard soldiers who served in the war in Iraq. Methods: Partic...

  13. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röd, Sara Katrine Solhøj; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank

    Sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products are susceptible to growth of the foodborne pathogenic bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may be applicable for surface decontamination in sealed bags thus avoiding recontamination. Plasmas (Fig. 1), created in neutral...

  14. Motivation and treatment engagement intervention trial (MotivaTe-IT: the effects of motivation feedback to clinicians on treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochems Eline C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment disengagement and non-completion poses a major problem for the successful treatment of patients with severe mental illness. Motivation for treatment has long been proposed as a major determinant of treatment engagement, but exact mechanisms remain unclear. This current study serves three purposes: 1 to determine whether a feedback intervention based on the patients’ motivation for treatment is effective at improving treatment engagement (TE of severe mentally ill patients in outpatient psychiatric treatment, 2 to gather insight into motivational processes and possible mechanisms regarding treatment motivation (TM and TE in this patient population and 3 to determine which of three theories of motivation is most plausible for the dynamics of TM and TE in this population. Methods/design The Motivation and Treatment Engagement Intervention Trial (MotivaTe-IT is a multi-center cluster randomized trial investigating the effectiveness of feedback generated by clinicians regarding their patients’ treatment motivation upon the patients’ TE. The primary outcome is the patients’ TE. Secondary outcomes are TM, psychosocial functioning and quality of life. Patients whose clinicians generate monthly motivation feedback (additional to treatment as usual will be compared to patients who receive treatment as usual. An estimated 350 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, with psychotic disorders and/or severe personality disorders will be recruited from outpatient community mental health care. The randomization will be performed by a computerized randomization program, with an allocation ratio of 1:1 (team vs. team or clinician vs. clinician and patients, but not clinicians, will be blind to treatment allocation at baseline assessment. Due to the nature of the trial, follow-up assessment can not be blinded. Discussion The current study can provide important insights regarding motivational processes and the way in which motivation

  15. Motivation and treatment engagement intervention trial (MotivaTe-IT): the effects of motivation feedback to clinicians on treatment engagement in patients with severe mental illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Treatment disengagement and non-completion poses a major problem for the successful treatment of patients with severe mental illness. Motivation for treatment has long been proposed as a major determinant of treatment engagement, but exact mechanisms remain unclear. This current study serves three purposes: 1) to determine whether a feedback intervention based on the patients’ motivation for treatment is effective at improving treatment engagement (TE) of severe mentally ill patients in outpatient psychiatric treatment, 2) to gather insight into motivational processes and possible mechanisms regarding treatment motivation (TM) and TE in this patient population and 3) to determine which of three theories of motivation is most plausible for the dynamics of TM and TE in this population. Methods/design The Motivation and Treatment Engagement Intervention Trial (MotivaTe-IT) is a multi-center cluster randomized trial investigating the effectiveness of feedback generated by clinicians regarding their patients’ treatment motivation upon the patients’ TE. The primary outcome is the patients’ TE. Secondary outcomes are TM, psychosocial functioning and quality of life. Patients whose clinicians generate monthly motivation feedback (additional to treatment as usual) will be compared to patients who receive treatment as usual. An estimated 350 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, with psychotic disorders and/or severe personality disorders will be recruited from outpatient community mental health care. The randomization will be performed by a computerized randomization program, with an allocation ratio of 1:1 (team vs. team or clinician vs. clinician) and patients, but not clinicians, will be blind to treatment allocation at baseline assessment. Due to the nature of the trial, follow-up assessment can not be blinded. Discussion The current study can provide important insights regarding motivational processes and the way in which motivation influences the treatment

  16. "Sometimes What They Think is Helpful is Not Really Helpful": Understanding Engagement in the Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Miriam; Manuel, Jennifer I; Gandy-Guedes, Megan E; McCray, Shenee; Negatu, Dina

    2016-11-01

    This exploratory study recruited a purposive sample of twelve clinical staff from a Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) team in central Virginia to understand the perceptions and experiences related to assertive engagement. The researchers coded the transcribed data initially as twenty-three sub-themes and further refined the data into four overarching themes: characteristics of assertive engagement, PACT engagement strategies and engagement strategies for difficult to engage clients. Further analysis emphasized that PACT team members emphasized the importance of the therapeutic relationship for engagement, which proves challenging for hard-to-engage clients.

  17. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat: Inactivation of Listeria innocua and changes in product quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rød, Sara Katrine; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma for decontamination of a sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product (bresaola) inoculated with Listeria innocua was investigated. Inoculated samples were treated at 15.5, 31, and 62 W for 2–60 s inside sealed linear-low-density-polyethylene bags...... the sensory threshold level. Surface colour changes included loss of redness of ∼40% and 70% after 1 and 14 days of storage, respectively, regardless of plasma treatment. The results indicate that plasma may be applicable in surface decontamination of pre-packed RTE food products. However, oxidation may...

  18. Italian survey of organizational functioning and readiness for change: a cross-cultural transfer of treatment assessment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazzo, Lorenzo; De Angeli, Monica; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Simpson, D Dwayne; Flynn, Patrick M

    2006-01-01

    To better understand why some drug abuse treatment programs are more effective than others, USA research about organizational functioning and its role in the provision of treatment services was extended through a study of a delivery system in another country. The Texas Christian University (TCU) organizational functioning and readiness for change instrument (ORC) was translated into Italian and administered to 405 treatment program directors and staff from both public and private sectors in the Veneto Region of Northern Italy. Results indicated that the psychometric properties of the ORC in the USA and Italy are consistent. Some general differences in staff attributes were found between USA and Italian programs, but organizational climates were remarkably similar.

  19. Stigma and adolescents with psychosis in the Middle East: implications for engaging in mental health treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearing, Robin E; Brewer, Kathryne B; Schwalbe, Craig S J; MacKenzie, Michael J; Ibrahim, Rawan W

    2013-01-01

    Stigma is a fundamental barrier to individuals seeking out mental health treatment in the Middle East. The impact of stigma may be amplified if the engagement in and utilization of mental health services for psychosis further stigmatizes individuals and their families. One hundred four Jordanians (N = 104) participated in an experimental vignette survey examining stigma perceptions and social exclusion related to adolescents with psychosis, with the vignettes varying in sex of the youth and whether their family had sought mental health services. The results found that seeking treatment did not add to perceived stigma, and both the male and female adolescents receiving mental health treatment were viewed as significantly more likely to be helped than those not in treatment (p mental health treatment did not further stigmatize these Arab youth with psychosis. In addition, seeking out and engaging adolescents and their family in mental health treatment were positively perceived and may help to improve the youth's prognosis and outcomes.

  20. Trajectories of Symptom Reduction and Engagement during Treatment for Childhood Behavior Disorders: Differences across Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Kolko, David J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined trajectories of symptom reduction and family engagement during the modular treatment phase of a clinical trial for early-onset disruptive behavior disorders that was applied either in community settings or a clinic. Participants (N = 139) were 6-11 year-old children with diagnoses of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD)…

  1. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  2. Primary Care Screening of Depression and Treatment Engagement in a University Health Center: A Retrospective Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michael C.; Ciotoli, Carlo; Chung, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This retrospective study analyzed a primary care depression screening initiative in a large urban university health center. Depression detection, treatment status, and engagement data are presented. Participants: Participants were 3,713 graduate and undergraduate students who presented consecutively for primary care services between…

  3. Estrutura fatorial da Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES em dependentes de álcool tratados ambulatorialmente Factor structure of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES in alcohol dependent outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neliana Buzi Figlie

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo foi o de investigar a confiabilidade e a estrutura fatorial da Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES, versão 8,¹ instrumento com 19 itens que mensura a prontidão para a mudança em dependentes de álcool. MÉTODOS: Uma análise fatorial confirmatória da SOCRATES foi realizada em uma amostra de 326 dependentes de álcool, tratados ambulatorialmente, tendo como base a estrutura fatorial demonstrada por Miller & Tonigan² e Maisto et al.³ O questionário foi traduzido e adaptado culturalmente para o idioma português, sendo posteriormente submetido ao procedimento da retradução para o idioma inglês. Durante esse procedimento, foram realizadas algumas modificações, visando a simplificar alguns itens que apresentaram formato complexo. RESULTADOS: As análises estatísticas mostraram a existência de dois fatores correlacionados que melhor exploraram o modelo, sendo este achado similar ao estudo de Maisto et al.³ CONCLUSÕES: Foi constatada menor evidência para o modelo de três fatores. Esses resultados são comparados com estudos prévios e as discrepâncias são discutidas neste artigo.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and factor structure of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES, version 8,¹ a 19-item self-reported instrument developed to measure readiness to change in alcohol-dependent alcoholics. METHODS: A Confirmatory Factor analysis of the SOCRATES was performed based on the factor structures previously demonstrated by Miller & Tonigan² and Maisto et al.³ in a sample with 326 alcohol-dependent outpatients. The questionnaire was translated into Portuguese, cross-culturally adapted and back-translated into English. During this process SOCRATES underwent some modifications to simplify some complex question formats. RESULTS: The analysis showed that two correlated factors provided the best fit for the

  4. Brief Strategic Family Therapy: Engaging Drug Using/Problem Behavior Adolescents and their Families into Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szapocznik, José; Zarate, Monica; Duff, Johnathan; Muir, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of family-based interventions for improving outcomes for adolescent behavior problems such as substance use, engaging and retaining whole families in treatment is one of the greatest challenges therapists confront. This article illustrates how the Brief Strategic Family Therapy® (BSFT®) model, a family-based, empirically validated intervention designed to treat children and adolescents’ problem behaviors, can be used to increase engagement, improve retention, and bring about positive outcomes for families. Research evidence for efficacy and effectiveness is also presented. PMID:23731415

  5. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat: inactivation of Listeria innocua and changes in product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rød, Sara Katrine; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank; Knøchel, Susanne

    2012-05-01

    The application of cold atmospheric pressure plasma for decontamination of a sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat product (bresaola) inoculated with Listeria innocua was investigated. Inoculated samples were treated at 15.5, 31, and 62 W for 2-60 s inside sealed linear-low-density-polyethylene bags containing 30% oxygen and 70% argon. Treatments resulted in a reduction of L. innocua ranging from 0.8 ± 0.4 to 1.6 ± 0.5 log cfu/g with no significant effects of time and intensity while multiple treatments at 15.5 and 62 W of 20 s with a 10 min interval increased reduction of L. innocua with increasing number of treatments. Concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) increased with power, treatments and storage time and were significantly higher than those of control samples after 1 and 14 days of storage at 5 °C. However, the levels were low (from 0.1 to 0.4 mg/kg) and beneath the sensory threshold level. Surface colour changes included loss of redness of ∼40% and 70% after 1 and 14 days of storage, respectively, regardless of plasma treatment. The results indicate that plasma may be applicable in surface decontamination of pre-packed RTE food products. However, oxidation may constitute an issue in some products.

  6. Job Burnout, Work Engagement and Self-reported Treatment for Health Conditions in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Leon T; Pienaar, Jaco; Rothmann, Sebastiaan

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the study being reported here was to investigate the relationship of job burnout and work engagement with self-reported received treatment for health conditions (cardiovascular condition, high cholesterol, depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome), while controlling for age, gender, smoking and alcohol use. The sample comprised 7895 employees from a broad range of economic sectors in the South African working population. A cross-sectional survey design was used for the study. Structural equation modelling methods were implemented with a weighted least squares approach. The results showed that job burnout had a positive relationship with self-reported received treatment for depression, diabetes, hypertension and irritable bowel syndrome. Work engagement did not have any significant negative or positive relationships with the treatment for these health conditions. The results of this study make stakeholders aware of the relationship between job burnout, work engagement and self-reported treatment for health conditions. Evidence for increased reporting of treatment for ill-health conditions due to burnout was found. Therefore, attempts should be made to manage job burnout to prevent ill-health outcomes.

  7. Is Stem Cell Therapy Ready for Prime Time in Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkey, Christopher J; Hommes, Daniel W

    2017-02-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and mesenchymal stromal cell therapy have been proposed for patients with refractory Crohn's disease (CD) and fistulizing CD, respectively. Will these highly advanced techniques be available only for select patients, at specialized centers, or is further clinical development justified, with the aim of offering widespread, more definitive therapeutic options for often very difficult to treat disease? Patients with CD who are eligible for HSCT have typically been failed by most approved therapies, have undergone multiple surgeries, and have coped with years of disease activity and poor quality of life. The objective of HSCT is to immediately shut down the immune response and allow the transplanted stem cells to develop into self-tolerant lymphocytes. For patients with fistulizing CD, mesenchymal stromal cell therapy deposits MSCs locally, into fistulizing tracts, to down-regulate the local immune response and induce wound healing. Recent trials have produced promising results for HSCT and mesenchymal stromal cell therapy as alternatives to systemic therapies and antibiotics for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases, but are these immunotherapies ready for prime time?

  8. Simple Myofunctional Therapy Using Ready-made 
Mouthpiece Device before and after Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, Aoi; Otsuka, Takero; Kawata, Toshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    The present report describes myofunctional therapy using a ready-made training device, the T4A, in patients with permanent dentition and its effect on the prevention of relapse. The buccinator mechanism maintains the inner pressure of the tongue muscle equivalent to the outer pressure of the perioral soft tissues, such as the orbicular muscles, including the cephalopharyngeus and buccinator muscles. Training is performed so that patients learn to place their tongue and lips in the appropriate resting positions. The shape of the T4A and tongue guard supports the tongue from the bottom, allowing formation of the correct resting tongue position. However, the use of T4A for a long period of time may cause the teeth movement; therefore, caution is required. Use of the T4A is effective for the correction of oral habits, myofunctional therapy and for teaching the correct resting tongue position during the daytime and for the correction of oral habits, teaching correct resting tongue position during sleep.

  9. The influence of partner drug use and relationship power on treatment engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehman, Kara S; Iguchi, Martin Y; Zeller, Michelle; Morral, Andrew R

    2003-05-01

    Substance-using intimate partners negatively influence individuals' substance abuse treatment engagement and drug use, but little else is known about effects of intimate relationships on treatment. We examine how relationship dynamics (power, control, dependence, insecurity and decision-making power) influence treatment engagement, and whether this differs by gender and partner drug use. Sixty-four heroin users (42 men, 22 women) receiving methadone detoxification treatment in Los Angeles were interviewed at treatment entry and submitted daily diaries of drug use throughout the 21-day treatment. Total number of reported heroin-free days in the first eight treatment days was the dependent variable. Bivariate analyses revealed, that compared to men, women were more likely to have substance-using partners, reported greater power over a partner and greater household decision-making power in their relationships. Multivariate analysis indicated that individuals whose partners had more control over them reported fewer days abstinent. Among individuals with heroin-using partners, greater household decision-making power was associated with more days abstinent, but there was no association for individuals with non-using partners. Relationship power dynamics may be important influences on the treatment process, and some dimensions of power may interact with partner drug use status.

  10. Improving engagement in mental health treatment for home meal recipients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirey JA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jo Anne Sirey, Alexandra Greenfield, Alyssa DePasquale, Nathalie Weiss, Patricia Marino, George S Alexopoulos, Martha L Bruce Department of Psychiatry, Weill Cornell Medical College, White Plains, NY, USA Background: Staff who provide support services to older adults are in a unique position to detect depression and offer a referral for mental health treatment. Yet integrating mental health screening and recommendations into aging services requires staff learn new skills to integrate mental health and overcome client barriers to accepting mental health referrals. This paper describes client rates of depression and a novel engagement intervention (Open Door for homebound older adults who are eligible for home delivered meals and screened for depression by in-home aging service programs. Methods: Homebound older adults receiving meal service who endorsed depressive symptoms were interviewed to assess depression severity and rates of suicidal ideation. Open Door is a brief psychosocial intervention to improve engagement in mental health treatment by collaboratively addressing the individual level barriers to care. The intervention targets stigma, misconceptions about depression, and fears about treatment, and is designed to fit within the roles and responsibilities of aging service staff. Results: Among 137 meal recipients who had symptoms when screened for depression as part of routine home meal service assessments, half (51% had Major Depressive Disorder and 13% met criteria for minor depression on the SCID. Suicidal ideation was reported by 29% of the sample, with the highest rates of suicidal ideation (47% among the subgroup of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. Conclusion: Individuals who endorse depressive symptoms during screening are likely to have clinically significant depression and need mental health treatment. The Open Door intervention offers a strategy to overcome barriers to mental health treatment engagement and to improve

  11. The psychometric properties of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of active duty military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Damon; Francis, Joseph P; Tafrate, Raymond Chip

    2005-11-01

    The increasing prominence of the construct of readiness to change in the field of substance abuse treatment has led to the development of instruments designed to assess the construct. We examined the psychometric properties of one such instrument, the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES), in a sample of treatment-seeking, active duty, U.S. military service members diagnosed with alcohol and/or drug dependence. A principal components analysis of the items was consistent with the tridimensional structure of the SOCRATES found among treatment-seeking civilians but resulted in a 14-item scale, as opposed to the 19-item version found for civilians. Normative data, in the form of means and decile rankings for the SOCRATES subscales, for substance-dependent military patients are provided to complement those available for civilian patients. Future research should examine the concurrent and predictive validity of the scale.

  12. Community engagement and pediatric disaster readiness in a large urban disaster resource hospital network: the case of "The Great California ShakeOut".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasuriya, Darshi; Iverson, Ellen; Burke, Rita V; Upperman, Jeffrey S

    2012-06-01

    We examined the response of 11 Los Angeles County (LAC) hospitals designated as Disaster Resource Centers (DRCs) to a statewide, earthquake preparedness drill, LAC's most comprehensive earthquake disaster drill to date. Semistructured interviews were conducted with the coordinators of 11 of the 14 LAC DRCs within 3 weeks of the drill. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis was supported by analytical software (Atlas.ti). Except for one pediatric specialty DRC, most DRCs did little to fully test their institutions' capacity to manage pediatric patients. Few DRCs included children as mock victims. Little or no attention was focused on pediatric triage and other pediatric clinical, psychosocial, and resource issues. Respondents maintained that community readiness is hampered by compartmentalizing the preparedness planning, training, and drilling. Without a mandate to coordinate with other agencies, few DRCs reported coordination with other community entities. Those that did were in smaller submunicipalities within LAC. Community coordination is critical to effective response to disasters, yet disaster preparedness planning and drills are most often uncoordinated and compartmentalized. Drills and training need to be transdisciplinary and coordinated with other community entities likely to play a role in pediatric disaster management.

  13. Supporting Mothers’ Engagement in a Community-Based Methadone Treatment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Letourneau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Unmanaged maternal opioid addiction poses health and social risks to both mothers and children in their care. Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT is a targeted public health service to which nurses and other allied health professionals may refer these high risk families for support. Mothers participating in MMT to manage their addiction and their service providers were interviewed to identify resources to maximize mothers’ engagement in treatment and enhance mothers’ parenting capacity. Twelve mothers and six service providers were recruited from an outpatient Atlantic Canadian methadone treatment program. Two major barriers to engagement in MMT were identified by both mothers and service providers including (1 the lack of available and consistent childcare while mothers attended outpatient programs and (2 challenges with transportation to the treatment facility. All participants noted the potential benefits of adding supportive resources for the children of mothers involved in MMT and for mothers to learn how to communicate more effectively with their children and rebuild damaged mother-child relationships. The public health benefits of integrating parent-child ancillary supports into MMT for mothers are discussed.

  14. College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapa, Marisa; Galvan-De Leon, Vanessa; Solis, Judith; Mundy, Marie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    During the 79th Texas Legislature, the bill "Advancement of College Readiness in Curriculum" was passed (THECB). As a response to this, high schools and colleges have combined forming an early college high school. The result of this union was a program that condensed the time it took to complete both the high school diploma and up to two…

  15. Is cannabis treatment for anxiety, mood, and related disorders ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turna, Jasmine; Patterson, Beth; Van Ameringen, Michael

    2017-06-21

    Anxiety and related disorders are the most common mental conditions affecting the North American population. Despite their established efficacy, first-line antidepressant treatments are associated with significant side effects, leading many afflicted individuals to seek alternative treatments. Cannabis is commonly viewed as a natural alternative for a variety of medical and mental health conditions. Currently, anxiety ranks among the top five medical symptoms for which North Americans report using medical marijuana. However, upon careful review of the extant treatment literature, the anxiolytic effects of cannabis in clinical populations are surprisingly not well-documented. The effects of cannabis on anxiety and mood symptoms have been examined in healthy populations and in several small studies of synthetic cannabinoid agents but there are currently no studies which have examined the effects of the cannabis plant on anxiety and related disorders. In light of the rapidly shifting landscape regarding the legalization of cannabis for medical and recreational purposes, it is important to highlight the significant disconnect between the scientific literature, public opinion, and related policies. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the current cannabis treatment literature, and to identify the potential for cannabis to be used as a therapeutic intervention for anxiety, mood, and related disorders. Searches of five electronic databases were conducted (PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, and Google Scholar), with the most recent in February 2017. The effects of cannabis on healthy populations and clinical psychiatric samples will be discussed, focusing primarily on anxiety and mood disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Latino Family Participation in Youth Mental Health Services: Treatment Retention, Engagement, and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapke, Theresa L; Gerdes, Alyson C

    2016-12-01

    Although researchers have identified a multitude of factors that contribute to family participation in mental health services, few studies have examined them specifically for Latino youth and their families in the U.S., a population that continues to experience significant disparities related to the availability, accessibility, and quality of mental health services. Latino youth and their families are at greater risk of dropping out of treatment prematurely and demonstrating poor treatment engagement, both of which have subsequent negative effects on treatment response outcomes. In order to help to guide efforts to improve the accessibility and quality of mental health services for Latino youth and their families, the current paper integrates modern conceptualization of family participation in youth mental health services and provides a summary of contextual factors within an ecological framework (Bronfenbrenner in The ecology of human development: experiments by nature and design, Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1979). The current review aims to integrate empirical research on the impact of various contextual factors across multiple levels (i.e., culture, community, mental health system, family, parent/caregiver, and child/adolescent) on Latino family participation in youth mental health services, including treatment retention, engagement, and response. Clinical implications will be discussed, and an integrated, conceptual model will be presented. Not only does this model help to demonstrate the way in which existing literature is conceptually linked, but it also helps to highlight factors and underlying processes that health care providers, administrators, and policy makers must consider in working to improve mental health services for Latino youth and their families living in the U.S.

  17. Who gets the most out of cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders? The role of treatment dose and patient engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Daniel; Golinelli, Daniela; Rose, Raphael D; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Stein, Murray B; Sullivan, Greer; Bystritksy, Alexander; Sherbourne, Cathy; Craske, Michelle G

    2013-08-01

    The present study explored treatment dose and patient engagement as predictors of treatment outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders. Measures of high versus low treatment dose and high versus low patient engagement in CBT were compared as predictors of 12- and 18-month outcomes for patients being treated for anxiety disorders with CBT (with or without concurrent pharmacotherapy) in primary care settings as part of a randomized controlled effectiveness trial of the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) intervention. Measures of dose (attendance, exposure completion) and engagement in CBT (homework adherence, commitment) were collected throughout treatment, and blinded follow-up phone assessments of outcome measures (12-item Brief Symptom Inventory, Patient Health Questionnaire 8, Sheehan Disability Scale) were completed at 12 and 18 months. Propensity score weighting controlled for baseline differences in demographics and symptom severity between patients with high and low dose and engagement. These analyses included the 439 patients who selected CBT as treatment modality. Completing exposures, having high attendance, and being more adherent to completing homework predicted better outcomes across all measures at 12 and 18 months, and high CBT commitment predicted better outcomes on all measures at 18 months. This study found that higher treatment dose and patient engagement in CBT for anxiety disorders were stable and robust predictors of greater reductions in anxiety symptoms, depression symptoms, and functional disability. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. The role of the Internet in cancer patients' engagement with complementary and alternative treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broom, Alex; Tovey, Philip

    2008-04-01

    This article draws on a study of 80 National Health Service cancer patients and their experiences of using the Internet within disease and treatment processes. It focuses on the role the Internet plays in the context of potential or actual engagement with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The results depart from previous conceptualizations of the Internet as a major source of CAM knowledge, and second, as a major pathway to patient CAM usage. Moreover, the results highlight significant anxiety as patients attempt to process vast amounts of complex biomedical diagnostic and prognostic information online. For patients attempting to embrace alternative therapeutic models of cancer care, exposure to prognostic data may pose considerable risks to individual well-being and engagement with healing practices. On the basis of these results we problematize social theorizations of the Internet as contributing to such things as: the democratization of knowledge; the deprofessionalization of medicine; and patient empowerment. We emphasize, instead, the potential role of the Internet in reinforcing biomedicine's paradigmatic dominance in cancer care.

  19. Use, perceptions, and acceptability of a ready-to-use supplementary food among adult HIV patients initiating antiretroviral treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mette Frahm; Tesfaye, Markos; Kæstel, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    Ready-to-use supplementary foods (RUSF) are used increasingly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) programs, but little is known about how it is used and viewed by patients. We used qualitative methods to explore the use, perceptions, and acceptability of RUSF among adult HIV patients in Jimma, ...

  20. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma treatment of ready-to-eat meat: Inactivation of Listeria innocua and changes in product quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Röd, Sara Katrine; Hansen, Flemming; Leipold, Frank;

    Sliced ready-to-eat (RTE) meat products are susceptible to growth of the foodborne pathogenic bacterium, Listeria monocytogenes. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) may be applicable for surface decontamination in sealed bags thus avoiding recontamination. Plasmas (Fig. 1), created in neutral...

  1. Between-client and within-client engagement and outcome in a residential wilderness treatment group: An actor partner interdependence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Harold L Lee; Kivlighan, Dennis M; Russell, Keith C

    2016-12-01

    We examine aspects of engagement (MacKenzie, 1983) as predictors of longitudinal change in Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 scores (Lambert, Kahler, Harmon, Burlingame, & Shimokawa, 2011) for 68, 18-24-year-old male residents in a 10-bed, open enrollment 90-day residential, substance use treatment program. Engagement was partitioned into within-member, between-member, within-other members, and between-other members' effects. Within-member engagement represented how a group member's score for a week deviated from that member's average engagement score (across all weeks), whereas between-member engagement was the member's average engagement score. Similarly, within-other member engagement represented how the other group members' scores for a week deviated from the other group members' average engagement score (across all weeks), whereas between-other member engagement was the other group members' average engagement score. A 2-level hierarchical linear model showed the interaction of between-member engagement and between-other member engagement was related to decreasing OQ-45 scores. When other group members generally saw the group as more engaged, higher group member average engagement ratings were related to improvement. There was a significant interaction between within-member engagement and between-member engagement in predicting OQ-45 scores. When clients generally saw the group as more engaged, weeks with relatively more member engagement, compared with other weeks, were associated with improvement in OQ-45 scores. However, when clients generally saw the group as less engaged, weeks with relatively more group member engagement, compared with other weeks, were associated with greater deterioration in OQ scores. We recommend tracking week-to-week changes in member and other member engagement to identify group members who are not getting optimal program benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Change readiness research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høstgaard, Anna Marie Balling

    2006-01-01

    The Change readiness research method (CRR) has become a wellknown method in Denmark to identify issues needed to be discussed on a hospital ward before implementation of a new IT-system and to start a dialogue. A precondition for a constructive dialogue, however, is a high degree of participation......; the management of the ward must be engaged/actively involved in the project, as they are key figures when it comes to motivating the other ward employees. The aim of this study is not to prove a causal relationship between the degree to which the “Instructions for use” are followed and the degree...... the degree of participation. In a modified way, these themes can probably be used as a tool in other studies of human – machine interactions....

  3. REDD+: Ready to engage private investors?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhantumbo, Isilda

    2011-11-15

    The prospect of gaining carbon credits by acquiring land to implement REDD+ has caught the eye of the private sector. In many countries, including Papua New Guinea and Republic of Congo, there are reports of a carbon rush. In Mozambique, private investors have expressed an interest in acquiring more than 22 per cent of the country's land — an area that is larger than the 16 per cent of protected areas and that covers 42 per cent of forests — for REDD+. But Mozambique, like many developing countries, is still in the early stages of preparing a REDD+ strategy. Stakeholder consultations are ongoing and the country's REDD+ Working Group is still assessing social, technical and institutional capacities available to deliver REDD+ in a way that helps reduce emissions while also serving environment and social development needs. Encouraging private sector involvement before the country has the right policies and institutions in place to safeguard local environments and people risks undermining the potential of REDD+ for sustainable development.

  4. Ready, set...go!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandre, Melanie

    2010-06-16

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) Discuss organizational readiness for changes in an ergonomics program or intervention; (2) Assessing organizational readiness; (3) Benefits and challenges of change; and (4) Case studies of ergonomic programs that were 'not ready' and 'ready'.

  5. Suicidal Individuals and Mental Health Treatment: A Novel Approach to Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Dana

    2016-07-01

    To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a novel, manualized problem-solving and comprehensive contact intervention (PS-CCI) aimed at improving treatment engagement of suicidal individuals. The PS-CCI was administered to 44 individuals with mood disorders presenting to the ER with suicidal ideation and/or behavior. The PS-CCI has two components: (1) a problem-solving interview administered upon admission to the emergency room (ER), and (2) follow-up contact post-discharge from the ER. The average age of participants was 33.45 years (SD = ±12.30). The PS-CCI was completed by 75 % of patients. No subject (0 %) withdrew during the 3-month follow-up period; however, 27.2 % were unable to be reached for follow-up assessment. We have concluded that the intervention has a good feasibility because of high acceptability and adherence and further testing of its efficacy seems feasible.

  6. Cognitive rehabilitation therapies for Alzheimer's disease: a review of methods to improve treatment engagement and self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jimmy; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2013-03-01

    Cognitive rehabilitation therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are becoming more readily available to the geriatric population in an attempt to curb the insidious decline in cognitive and functional performance. However, people with AD may have difficulty adhering to these cognitive treatments due to denial of memory deficits, compromised brain systems, cognitive incapacity for self-awareness, general difficulty following through on daily tasks, lack of motivation, hopelessness, and apathy, all of which may be either due to the illness or be secondary to depression. Cognitive rehabilitation training exercises are also labor intensive and, unfortunately, serve as a repeated reminder about the memory impairments and attendant functional consequences. In order for cognitive rehabilitation methods to be effective, patients must be adequately engaged and motivated to not only begin a rehabilitation program but also to remain involved in the intervention until a therapeutic dosage can be attained. We review approaches to cognitive rehabilitation in AD, neuropsychological as well as psychological obstacles to effective treatment in this population, and methods that target adherence to treatment and may therefore be applicable to cognitive rehabilitation therapies for AD. The goal is to stimulate discussion among researchers and clinicians alike on how treatment effects may be mediated by engagement in treatment, and what can be done to enhance patient adherence for cognitive rehabilitation therapies in order to obtain greater cognitive and functional benefits from the treatment itself.

  7. Transfer Readiness Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Skillman, Thelma; And Others

    The California Community Colleges (CCC) has implemented a prototype model for determining student transfer readiness as a primary means of assessing community college transfer effectiveness. This report provides definitions of transfer readiness and guidelines for colleges participating in the CCC transfer readiness study. First, a memorandum from…

  8. What Is "Career Ready"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Career and Technical Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    All too often, the terms "career ready" and "college ready" are used interchangeably, and discussions around career readiness are limited to traditional academic skills that allow students to successfully enroll in postsecondary education. While there is no debate that a rigorous level of academic proficiency, especially in math and literacy, is…

  9. Irradiated ready-to-eat spinach leaves: How information influences awareness towards irradiation treatment and consumer's purchase intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finten, G.; Garrido, J. I.; Agüero, M. V.; Jagus, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to clarify and supply further information on food irradiation acceptance, with particular focus on Argentina and irradiated ready-to-eat (RTE) spinach leaves through an open web-online survey. Results showed that half of respondents did not know food irradiation, but the other half demonstrated uncertainty despite they declared they had knowledge about it; thus, confirming little awareness towards this technology. Respondents who believed in the misleading myth about food irradiation represented 39%, while roughly the same number was doubtful. On the other hand, after supplying informative material, respondents were positively influenced and an increase in acceptance by 90% was found. Finally, 42% of respondents were willing to consume/purchase irradiated RTE spinach leaves, and 35% remained doubtful. Respondents who did not exclude to accept irradiated spinach could be considered potential consumers if intensive campaigns about the benefits of food irradiation were carried out by reliable actors. If the Argentinean RTE market grew, following the world consumption trend towards these products, irradiated spinach leaves could be successfully introduced by making better efforts to inform consumers about food irradiation.

  10. Patient engagement programs for recognition and initial treatment of depression in primary care: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Richard L; Franks, Peter; Feldman, Mitchell D; Tancredi, Daniel J; Slee, Christina A; Epstein, Ronald M; Duberstein, Paul R; Bell, Robert A; Jackson-Triche, Maga; Paterniti, Debora A; Cipri, Camille; Iosif, Ana-Maria; Olson, Sarah; Kelly-Reif, Steven; Hudnut, Andrew; Dvorak, Simon; Turner, Charles; Jerant, Anthony

    2013-11-06

    Encouraging primary care patients to address depression symptoms and care with clinicians could improve outcomes but may also result in unnecessary treatment. To determine whether a depression engagement video (DEV) or a tailored interactive multimedia computer program (IMCP) improves initial depression care compared with a control without increasing unnecessary antidepressant prescribing. Randomized clinical trial comparing DEV, IMCP, and control among 925 adult patients treated by 135 primary care clinicians (603 patients with depression and 322 patients without depression, defined by Patient Health Questionnaire-9 [PHQ-9] score) conducted from June 2010 through March 2012 at 7 primary care clinical sites in California. DEV targeted to sex and income, an IMCP tailored to individual patient characteristics, and a sleep hygiene video (control). Among depressed patients, superiority assessment of the composite measure of patient-reported antidepressant drug recommendation, mental health referral, or both (primary outcome); depression at 12-week follow-up, measured by the PHQ-8 (secondary outcome). Among nondepressed patients, noninferiority assessment of clinician- and patient-reported antidepressant drug recommendation (primary outcomes) with a noninferiority margin of 3.5%. Analyses were cluster adjusted. Of the 925 eligible patients, 867 were included in the primary analysis (depressed, 559; nondepressed, 308). Among depressed patients, rates of achieving the primary outcome were 17.5% for DEV, 26% for IMCP, and 16.3% for control (DEV vs control, 1.1 [95% CI, -6.7 to 8.9], P = .79; IMCP vs control, 9.9 [95% CI, 1.6 to 18.2], P = .02). There were no effects on PHQ-8 measured depression score at the 12-week follow-up: DEV vs control, -0.2 (95% CI, -1.2 to 0.8); IMCP vs control,  0.9 (95% CI, -0.1 to 1.9). Among nondepressed patients, clinician-reported antidepressant prescribing in the DEV and IMCP groups was noninferior to control (mean percentage point

  11. Distribution, identification, and quantification of residues after treatment of ready-to-eat salami with 36Cl-labeled or nonlabeled chlorine dioxide gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine dioxide gas actively eliminates a variety of food-borne pathogens and rot organisms, including Listeria monocytogenes on food and food preparation surfaces. However the disposition and fate of chlorine dioxide gas on ready-to-eat meat products has not been previously described. When ready-t...

  12. The Role of Transport Use in Adolescent Wilderness Treatment: Its Relationship to Readiness to Change and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Anita R.; Bettmann, Joanna E.; Norton, Christine L.; Comart, Casey

    2015-01-01

    Background: Considering the sensitive ethical issues related to involuntary treatment of adolescents, research investigating youth transport practices and treatment outcomes is clearly needed. Youth transport is common practice in many private pay programs, including wilderness therapy programs. Objective: This study of 350 adolescents in…

  13. Ready for What? Constructing Meanings of Readiness for Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    This book examines the issue of school readiness, focusing on children's readiness for entrance into kindergarten and promotion to first grade. Chapter 1 reviews the literature on school readiness, exploring trends in policy related to readiness and readiness as a child-centered characteristic. Chapter 2 examines various theoretical frameworks for…

  14. The influence of cultural variables on treatment retention and engagement in a sample of Mexican American adolescent males with substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow-Sánchez, Jason J; Meyers, Kimberly; Corrales, Carolina; Ortiz-Jensen, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Adolescent substance abuse is a serious public health concern, and in response to this problem, a number of effective treatment approaches have been developed. Despite this, retaining and engaging adolescents in treatment are 2 major challenges continuously faced by practitioners and clinical researchers. Low retention and engagement rates are especially salient for ethnic minority adolescents because they are at high risk for underutilization of substance abuse treatment compared to their White peers. Latino adolescents, in particular, are part of the fastest growing ethnic minority group in the United States and experience high rates of substance use disorders. Heretofore, the empirical examination of cultural factors that influence treatment retention and engagement has been lacking in the literature. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of the cultural variables ethnic identity, familism, and acculturation on the retention and engagement of Latino adolescents participating in substance abuse treatment. This study used data collected from a sample of Latino adolescent males (N = 96), predominantly of Mexican descent, and largely recruited from the juvenile justice system. Analysis was conducted using generalized regression models for count variables. Results indicated that higher levels of exploration, a subfactor of ethnic identity, and familism were predictive of attendance and engagement. In contrast, higher levels of Anglo orientation, a subfactor of acculturation, were predictive of lower treatment attendance and engagement. Clinical implications for the variables of ethnic identity, acculturation, and familism as well as suggestions for future research are discussed.

  15. Factor structure of a Korean-language version of the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) in a clinical sample of clients with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Young-Min; Cho, Sung-Min; Shin, Sung-Man

    2010-12-01

    The Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES) is an instrument used to measure the level of motivation in regards to changing drinking and other addictive behaviors. While some initial factor analysis studies on the SOCRATES described a three-factor orthogonal structure of the scale, some other studies found a two-factor correlated structure. Therefore, the primary objective of the present study was to test the validity of the Korean language version of the instrument using a Korean population. The study examined the factor structure of the Korean version of the SOCRATES with clinical samples consisting of 219 inpatients and 271 outpatients with alcohol dependency. An exploratory factor analysis with an alpha factoring method revealed a three-factor correlated structure (i.e., Taking Steps, Recognition, and Ambivalence). The factorial structure of the SOCRATES Korean version corresponded almost exactly to that of its original French version as well as the German version. Moreover, confirmatory factor analyses showed that a three-factor correlated structure provided the best fit for the data.

  16. The health encounter as a treatable moment for homeless substance-using adults: the role of homelessness, health seeking behavior, readiness for behavior change and motivation for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Pollini, Robin A; Ford, Daniel E; Bigelow, George

    2008-09-01

    Substance-using homeless persons frequent emergency departments and hospitals often. However, little is known about how homelessness affects when they seek care and their motivation for substance abuse treatment (SAT). We surveyed homeless (N=266) and non-homeless (N=104) substance-using adults sequentially admitted to an urban hospital medicine service, comparing demographics, readiness for change (URICA), and motivating reasons for SAT. Homeless respondents were more likely to be younger, uninsured, have hepatitis B/C, and homeless respondents were in an action stage. They also had similar motivating reasons for wanting SAT, although being homeless was an additional motivator for the majority of homeless respondents. Almost half reported that being homeless caused them to delay seeking health care; paradoxically those citing physical health as a SAT motivator were 3.4 times more likely to have delayed care. While acutely ill homeless persons were at least as motivated for SAT, these data suggest the challenge is getting them to care in a timely manner and tailoring interventions during the care episode to avail of this motivation.

  17. Practice Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents With Reactive Attachment Disorder and Disinhibited Social Engagement Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeanah, Charles H; Chesher, Tessa; Boris, Neil W

    2016-11-01

    This Practice Parameter is a revision of a previous Parameter addressing reactive attachment disorder that was published in 2005. It reviews the current status of reactive attachment disorder (RAD) and disinhibited social engagement disorder (DESD) with regard to assessment and treatment. Attachment is a central component of social and emotional development in early childhood, and disordered attachment is defined by specific patterns of abnormal social behavior in the context of "insufficient care" or social neglect. Assessment requires direct observation of the child in the context of his or her relationships with primary caregivers. Treatment requires establishing an attachment relationship for the child when none exists and ameliorating disturbed social relatedness with non-caregivers when evident.

  18. Prison-based rehabilitation: Predictors of offender treatment participation and treatment completion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.; Kunst, M.; Dirkzwager, A.J.E.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine to what extent risk factors and treatment readiness were related to engagement (i.e., participation and completion) in prison-based rehabilitation programs. The sample consisted of the total 6-month inflow of male detainees in the Netherlands who were

  19. College Readiness for All?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, American education has enthusiastically adopted the mantra of "college readiness for all." What's not to like about that? Frederick Hess says that although he considers college readiness an admirable goal, he has serious reservations about advocates, funders, and policymakers imposing this norm across all schools. His…

  20. Preschool Children's School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekdogan, Serpil; Akgül, Esra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine preschool teachers' perspectives about children's school readiness. Qualitative and quantitative research methods were used in the study as a mixed method research. Data, in the quantitative aspects of the research, were collected through the use of "School Readiness Form" developed by Boz (2004)…

  1. Readiness for Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a comparative analysis between workers in healthcare with high and low degree of readiness for living technology such as robotics. To explore the differences among workers’ readiness for robotics in healthcare, statistical analysis was conducted in the data set obtained from 200...

  2. E-Health Readiness Assessment Framework in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. Methods: The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. Results: The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). Conclusion: The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well. PMID:23304661

  3. E-health readiness assessment framework in iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai-Rad, M; Vaezi, R; Nattagh, F

    2012-01-01

    Concept of e-readiness is used in many areas such as e-business, e-commerce, e-government, and e-banking. In terms of healthcare, e-readiness is a rather new concept, and is propounded under the title of E-healthcare. E-health readiness refers to the readiness of communities and healthcare institutions for the expected changes brought by programs related to Information and Communications Technology (lCT). The present research is conducted aiming at designing E-health Readiness Assessment Framework (EHRAF) in Iran. The e-health readiness assessment framework was designed based on reviewing literature on e-readiness assessment models and opinions of ICT and health experts. In the next step, Delphi method was used to develop and test the designed framework. Three questionnaires developed to test and modify the model while determining weights of the indices; afterward they were either sent to experts through email or delivered to them in face. The designed framework approved with 4 dimensions, 11 constituents and 58 indices. Technical readiness had the highest importance coefficient (0.256099), and the other dimensions were of the next levels of coefficient importance: core readiness (0.25520), social communication readiness (0.244658), and engagement readiness (0.244039). The framework presents the movement route and investment priorities in e-health in Iran. The proposed framework is a good instrument for measuring the e-readiness in health centers in Iran, and for identifying strengths and weaknesses of these centers to access ICT and its implementation for more effectiveness and for analyzing digital divide between them, as well.

  4. The biomechanical effect of shoulder remplissage combined with Bankart repair for the treatment of engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argintar, Evan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Wang, Lawrence; Tibone, James E; Lee, Thay Q

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical effects of the remplissage repair combined with Bankart repair for engaging Hill-Sachs lesions on range of motion (ROM), translation, and glenohumeral kinematics. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested using a custom shoulder testing system. ROM, kinematics, and anterior-posterior (AP) and superior-inferior glenohumeral translations were quantified at 0° and 60° glenohumeral abduction. Six conditions were tested: intact, Bankart lesion, Bankart with 40 % Hill-Sachs lesion, Bankart repair, Bankart repair with remplissage, and remplissage repair alone. Humeral external rotation (ER) and total range of motion increased significantly after the creation of the Bankart lesion at both 0° and 60° abduction. The Bankart repair restored ER to intact values at 0° and 60° abduction, and the addition of the remplissage repair did not significantly alter range of motion from the Bankart repair alone. AP translation increased following the creation of the Bankart and Hill-Sachs lesions and was restored with the Bankart repair; the remplissage did not alter translation from the Bankart repair alone. At maximum ER at 60° abduction, the apex of the humeral head shifted posteriorly and inferiorly with remplissage repair. The addition of the remplissage procedure combined with Bankart repair for treatment of large Hill-Sachs lesions had no statistically significant effect on ROM or translation, but altered the kinematics of the glenohumeral joint. Thus, by addressing the humeral bone defect following an anterior shoulder dislocation, the remplissage technique with concurrent Bankart repair may be a relatively minimally invasive option for converting engaging Hill-Sachs lesions to non-engaging and promoting shoulder stability, though further biomechanical and clinical studies are warranted.

  5. Ready for takeoff? A critical review of armodafinil and modafinil for the treatment of sleepiness associated with jet lag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, David E

    2010-01-01

    Jet lag syndrome (JLS) is a clinical syndrome of disrupted nocturnal sleep and daytime neurocognitive impairment which occurs in the context of rapid transmeridian travel. Many strategies for treatment of JLS exist, and include hypnotics to enhance nocturnal sleep, chronotherapeutic approaches (eg, light therapy, melatonin, or gradual schedule shifting), and alerting agents to counter daytime sleepiness. Safety concerns have prompted renewed interest in managing JLS-associated excessive daytime sleepiness (JLSAEDS). Off-label use of the newer alerting agents modafinil and armodafinil is increasing for this indication, often at the specific request of patients. In order to better evaluate the potential risks and benefits of these medications for the management of JLSAEDS, clinicians must be aware of what is known - and still not known. In this article, the pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of modafinil and armodafinil are reviewed, along with evidence for their efficacy in treating sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea and shift work sleep disorder. Clinical trial data for use of alerting agents in the management of JLSAEDS are limited to one three-day trial involving armodafinil, dosed in the morning to treat JLSAEDS in the setting of eastbound transmeridian travel. This study showed improvement in objective measures of daytime sleepiness at doses of 50 and 150 mg per day. However, global impression of clinical severity of symptom scores only improved on day 1 for those patients receiving 150 mg, and were otherwise not superior to placebo. Consideration for the use of modafinil or armodafinil for the treatment of sleepiness associated with JLS involves careful integration of patient-reported goals, a review of medical contraindications, and an awareness of rare adverse events. More research is needed in order to identify those who are most likely to benefit from this intervention and better define the risk-benefit ratio for this indication.

  6. Antimicrobial effects of essential oils, nisin, and irradiation treatments against Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat carrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndoti-Nembe, Aude; Vu, Khanh Dang; Doucet, Nicolas; Lacroix, Monique

    2015-04-01

    The study aimed at using essential oil (EO) alone or combined EO with nisin and low dose γ-irradiation to evaluate their antibacterial effect against Listeria monocytogenes during storage of carrots at 4 °C. Minicarrots were inoculated with L. monocytogenes at a final concentration of approximately 7 log CFU/g. Inoculated samples were coated by nisin at final concentration of 10(3) International Unit (IU)/mL or individual mountain savory EO or carvacrol at final concentration of 0.35%, w/w) or nisin plus EO. The samples were then irradiated at 0, 0.5, and 1.0 kGy. The treated samples were kept at 4 °C and microbial analysis of samples were conducted at days 1, 3, 6, and 9. The results showed that coating carrots by carvacrol plus nisin or mountain savory plus nisin and then irradiating coated carrots at 1 kGy could reduce L. monocytogenes by more than 3 log at day 1 and reduced it to undetectable level from day 6. Thus, the combined treatments using nisin plus carvacrol or nisin plus mountain savory and irradiation at 1.0 kGy could be used as an effective method for controlling L. monocytogenes in minicarrots.

  7. Employee assistance program services for alcohol and other drug problems: implications for increased identification and engagement in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jodi M; Sacco, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen million U.S. workers meet the diagnostic criteria for substance dependence, costing millions in lost productivity. Prior research suggests that employees who follow through with their Employee Assistance Program's (EAP) recommendations are more likely to participate and remain engaged in alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment programs. This study identified rates of lifetime EAP service use for AOD problems and compared adults who reported using EAP services for AOD problems with those who used services other than EAP. Researchers analyzed a subset of participants from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions who reported having received help for an AOD problem (NESARC, 2001-2002). Statistical analyses tested for differences in sociodemographic variables, lifetime mental health and substance abuse disorders, and health disability between EAP services users and users of other types of services. Among adults who sought services for AOD problems (n= 2,272), 7.58% (n= 166) reported using EAP services for these problems at some point during their lives. Major depressive disorder (lifetime), a drug use disorder (lifetime), and Black race/ethnicity were associated with a greater likelihood that someone would seek EAP services for help with their AOD problem. Results provide a foundation for researchers to understand who uses EAP services for AOD problems. Health and mental health professionals should increase their knowledge of EAP services to improve continuity of care for employees with AOD problems. EAPs are in a unique position to reach out to vulnerable employees in the workplace and engage them in treatment. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Therapeutic Engagement as a Predictor of Retention in Adolescent Therapeutic Community Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Sami; Gunter, Whitney D.

    2014-01-01

    The adolescent drug problem places a huge toll on society and a heavy burden on the criminal justice system. Research regarding the benefits of therapeutic community (TC) treatment for adolescents has shown it to be effective. Despite the ability of therapeutic communities to lower drug relapse and reduce criminality, a great deal remains unknown…

  9. A family outreach intervention for engaging young out-of-treatment drug users: pre- versus post-treatment comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santis, Rodrigo; Hidalgo, Carmen Gloria; Jaramillo, Andrea; Hayden, Viviana; Armijo, Ivan; Lasagna, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Only a small fraction of drug users worldwide enter treatment each year. We evaluated the efficacy of a systemic family outreach intervention (SFOI) for young, untreated drug users, using a quasi-experimental design in which the experimental group (EG) received SFOI and the control group (CG) received traditional outreach work (OW). Both pre- and post-treatment, we administered the Addiction Severity Index-6 (ASI-6), the Family Environment Scale (FES), and tests of parental practices and risky behavior. Post-treatment, there was a fivefold improvement on the ASI-6 and a significant worsening on the conflict sub-scale of the FES in the EG as compared with the CG. SFOI was more efficacious than OW in reducing drug use in the drug user's home environment. The increased conflict in the EG might be explained by parents' increased awareness of abnormal behaviors and implementation of strategies to protect their children.

  10. Análise da prontidão para o tratamento em alcoolistas em um centro de tratamento Analysis of the readiness for the treatment in alcoholics in a treatment center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo L. O. de Resende

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desta pesquisa foi verificar a prontidão para o tratamento em alcoolistas participantes de uma intervenção terapêutica, seguindo o Modelo Minnesota. Participaram desta pesquisa 25 alcoolistas, de grau moderado e grave, com idade entre 23 a 60 anos, de ambos os sexos. Foram aplicadas as escalas SADD e SOCRATES na primeira entrevista, no início do tratamento. Três entrevistas adicionais realizadas no meio, no final e um mês após o tratamento, avaliaram a prontidão para o tratamento por meio da escala SOCRATES. Os resultados mostraram que, embora tenha havido 64% de adesão, não houve diminuição da ambivalência dos alcoolistas. Houve correlação significativa entre os fatores da escala SOCRATES. Esta pesquisa aponta para a necessidade de se utilizar técnicas motivacionais para a diminuição da ambivalência, visando o aumento na adesão e prevenção de recaída.The aim of this research was to verify the readiness for the treatment in alcoholics who were taking part of a therapeutical intervention, following the Minnesota Model. A sample of 25 moderate and severe level alcoholists took part on this research. They ranged from 23 to 60 years of age, both male and female. The scale SADD and SOCRATES were applied during the first interview, in the beginning of the treatment. Three additional interviews were performed in the middle, at the end and one month after the treatment, to appraise the readiness for the treatment through SOCRATES scale. The results showed that, although there had been 64% of adhesion to treatment, there was not reduction of ambivalence of the alcoholics. There has been significant correlation between the SOCRATES scale factors. This research points to the need of using motivating techniques to reduce the ambivalence, in order to increase the adhesion and to prevent relapse.

  11. A systematic review of the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational readiness to change and the process of innovation adoption in substance misuse treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Peter; Hegarty, Josephine; Barry, Joe; Dyer, Kyle R; Horgan, Aine

    2017-09-01

    Translating innovation, such as contemporary research evidence, into policy and practice is a challenge, not just in substance misuse treatment programs, but across all spheres of healthcare. Organizational readiness to change (ORC) has been described as a fundamental concept, and an important determinant of the process of innovation adoption. The aim of this review was to describe the relationship between staff perceptions of ORC and the process of innovation adoption: exposure, adoption, implementation and integration into practice, in substance misuse treatment programs. This systematic review was conducted in accordance with PRISMA guidelines and fourteen papers were identified as being eligible for inclusion. This review was designed to include all constructs of ORC, but only one tool was used in all of the included papers. Despite this, the heterogeneity of studies in this review made a direct comparison of ORC related variables challenging. None of the included papers clearly related to one stage of the process of innovation adoption, and all of the included papers related to the early stages of the process. Only one paper attempted to measure the sustained integration of an innovation into practice. Overall, the papers were assessed as being low in terms of evidential hierarchy and the quality of the papers was assessed as being on average fair. ORC measurements provide us with a measure of organizational functioning which can be important in terms of predicting how successfully new innovations are adopted. Motivation for change was high in programs where staff identified more program deficits and these staff could also identify more specific needs, but were less likely to have exposure to new innovations. Better program resources and specific staff attributes, increase the likely hood of successful innovation adoption. A good organizational climate is potentially the strongest predictor for the adoption of new practices. It may be beneficial to measure ORC

  12. A 10% ready-to-use intravenous human immunoglobulin offers potential economic advantages over a lyophilized product in the treatment of primary immunodeficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, C. G. M.

    2007-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) replacement therapy is the standard of care for patients with primary humoral immunodeficiencies. This study evaluated differences in infusion time between a 10% IVIg ready-to-use solution and a 6% IVIg lyophilized product and addressed potential cost implications.

  13. Measuring readiness for sustainable transformation: an application of integral theory in the suburbs of Bangkok

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Panthasen, T.; Santisan, A.; Lambregts, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a pilot study into the readiness of a local community to engage in an environmental transformation process. It uses elements of Sufficiency Economy and Integral Theory to explore to what extent a suburban Bangkok community is ready to adopt biological wastewater tr

  14. Assessing barriers to care and readiness for cognitive behavioral therapy in early acute care PTSD interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wagner, Amy W; Russo, Joan; Love, Jeff; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions are efficacious in reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but are challenging to implement in acute care and other non-specialty mental health settings. This investigation identified barriers impacting CBT delivery through a content analysis of interventionist chart notes from an acute care PTSD prevention trial. Only 8.5% of all intervention patients were able to complete CBT. Lack of engagement, clinical and logistical barriers had the greatest impact on CBT entry. Treatment preferences and stigma only prevented entry when more primary barriers resolved. Patients with prior diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence were able to enter CBT after six months of sobriety. Based on the first trial, we developed a CBT readiness assessment tool. We implemented and evaluated the tool in a second early intervention trial. Lack of engagement emerged again as the primary impediment to CBT entry. Patients who were willing to enter CBT treatment but demonstrated high rates of past trauma or diagnosis of PTSD were also the least likely to engage in any PTSD treatment one month post-discharge. Findings support the need for additional investigations into engagement and alternative delivery strategies, including those which dismantle traditional office-based, multi-session CBT into stepped, deliverable components.

  15. Use, perceptions, and acceptability of a ready-to-use supplementary food among adult HIV patients initiating antiretroviral treatment: a qualitative study in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olsen MF

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mette Frahm Olsen,1 Markos Tesfaye,2 Pernille Kæstel,1 Henrik Friis,1 Lotte Holm3 1Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark; 2Department of Psychiatry, College of Public Health and Medical Sciences, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia; 3Department of Food and Resource Economics, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark Objectives: Ready-to-use supplementary foods (RUSF are used increasingly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV programs, but little is known about how it is used and viewed by patients. We used qualitative methods to explore the use, perceptions, and acceptability of RUSF among adult HIV patients in Jimma, Ethiopia. Methods: The study obtained data from direct observations and 24 in-depth interviews with HIV patients receiving RUSF. Results: Participants were generally very motivated to take RUSF and viewed it as beneficial. RUSF was described as a means to fill a nutritional gap, to “rebuild the body,” and protect it from harmful effects of antiretroviral treatment (ART. Many experienced nausea and vomiting when starting the supplement. This caused some to stop supplementation, but the majority adapted to RUSF. The supplement was eaten separately from meal situations and only had a little influence on household food practices. RUSF was described as food with “medicinal qualities,” which meant that many social and religious conventions related to food did not apply to it. The main concerns about RUSF related to the risk of HIV disclosure and its social consequences. Conclusion: HIV patients view RUSF in a context of competing livelihood needs. RUSF intake was motivated by a strong wish to get well, while the risk of HIV disclosure caused concerns. Despite the motivation for improving health, the preservation of social networks was prioritized, and nondisclosure was often a necessary strategy. Food sharing and religious

  16. The Readiness Ruler as a measure of readiness to change poly-drug use in drug abusers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesse Morten

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Readiness to change is a crucial issue in the treatment of substance use disorders. Experiences with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT has shown that continuous drug and alcohol use with all its consequences characterize most MMT programs. In a prospective study of drug abusers seeking opiate agonist maintenance treatment in the City of Copenhagen, subjects were administered the Addiction Severity Index, and the Readiness Ruler for each of 11 different licit and illicit drugs by research technicians. Data was collected upon admission to the program and at a 18 month follow-up. Subjects who indicated they wanted to quit or cut down upon admission, reported less drug use at 18 month follow-up, after controlling for severity of drug problems at intake. Subjects who expressed readiness to change their drug use upon admission decreased their drug use. It is concluded that the Readiness Ruler measures a construct related to actual readiness, supporting its use in the clinical context.

  17. Creating an innovative tool to measure Magnet® readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan; Toney, Sharlene; Wilson, Martha; Barrett, Lynda; Kamke, Brooke

    2012-11-01

    Magnet designation has become a highly sought-after credential for hospitals across the United States and internationally who want to distinguish themselves for clinical excellence and employee engagement. This article chronicles how Emory Healthcare, the largest, comprehensive academic healthcare system in Georgia, developed the Magnet Readiness Index™ to assess the status of nursing compared with the standards prior to submission of an application.

  18. Peranan Komitmen Organisasi dan Employee Engagement terhadap Kesiapan Karyawan untuk Berubah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Zulkarnain

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study had two objectives, the first was to find out the role of organizational commitment and employee engagement to readiness for change. Second was to find out the determinants of readiness for change based on aspects of organizational commitment (i.e., identification, involvement, and loyalty and dimensions of employee engagement (i.e., organization, leadership, team member, job and individual. Self-administered questionnaires were used to measure the three variables. There were 206 plantation employees involved in this study. The result showed that organizational commitment and employee engagement contributed to employee readiness for change. This study also found two aspects of organizational commitment and two dimensions of employee engagement contributing to employee readiness for change. This study could be the guidelines for the policy makers in implementing policies of better human resources. Keywords: organizational commitment, employee engagement, readiness for change, plantation employees, human resource

  19. Factors influencing healthy lifestyle changes: a qualitative look at low-income families engaged in treatment for overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason-Wilkerson, Rochelle; Goldberg, Shauna; Albright, Karen; Allison, Mandy; Haemer, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Childhood obesity disproportionately affects low-income minority populations, yet there is a paucity of literature about effective interventions in this population. This study sought to understand the experience of low-income majority Hispanic families engaged in obesity treatment. We conducted six focus groups (2=English, 4=Spanish) with families who completed a community-based, family-oriented obesity treatment program, using standard qualitative focus group interview methods. Transcripts were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content. Two coders using the software program ATLAS.ti (v.7.0; Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin, Germany) coded each transcript independently; reflexive team analysis with three study team members was used to reach a consensus. Participants (n=37) indicated high program satisfaction. Parents reported buying less junk/fast food, increased consumption of fruits and vegetables, preparing and eating more meals as a family, and increasing their families' physical activity (PA). Four barrier and facilitator themes emerged. Barrier themes were time and financial cost, parent's lack of time and energy, influence of family members, and challenges regarding physical environment. Facilitator themes were skill building around healthy eating and parenting, family involvement, and long-term health concerns. Unanticipated findings, parents reported, were that changes resulted in children sleeping better, feeling happier, and less irritability. Despite low-income families experiencing barriers to lifestyle changes to manage obesity, they made positive dietary changes and increased PA by learning specific skills and including the whole family in those changes. Additionally, some unexpected benefits were noted, including improved sleep, less irritability, and children appearing happier. Future studies should consider using these parent-identified outcomes as secondary measures of program effectiveness.

  20. Situating Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Matthias

    can participate in the world. We experience a new participatory culture on the go. These developments offer new possibilities for civic engagement in participatory land use planning: to engage people where they are. This dissertation coins the notion of situated engagement, which seeks to ’situate......’ civic engagement activities in those spatial contexts that are at stake in land use planning. This approach enables engagement activities to be better integrated with people’s everyday lived experiences through connecting to the places that are personally meaningful and relevant to them. A ’research...... through design’ approach is applied across four participatory design experiments to explore how to design for situated engagement in land use planning. A notion of a situated engagement infrastructure made up of mobile, stationary, ubiquitous, and remote systems frames the design experiments suggesting...

  1. Capture ready study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchener, A.

    2007-07-15

    There are a large number of ways in which the capture of carbon as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can be integrated into fossil fuel power stations, most being applicable for both gas and coal feedstocks. To add to the choice of technology is the question of whether an existing plant should be retrofitted for capture, or whether it is more attractive to build totally new. This miscellany of choices adds considerably to the commercial risk of investing in a large power station. An intermediate stage between the non-capture and full capture state would be advantageous in helping to determine the best way forward and hence reduce those risks. In recent years the term 'carbon capture ready' or 'capture ready' has been coined to describe such an intermediate stage plant and is now widely used. However a detailed and all-encompassing definition of this term has never been published. All fossil fuel consuming plant produce a carbon dioxide gas byproduct. There is a possibility of scrubbing it with an appropriate CO{sub 2} solvent. Hence it could be said that all fossil fuel plant is in a condition for removal of its CO{sub 2} effluent and therefore already in a 'capture ready' state. Evidently, the practical reality of solvent scrubbing could cost more than the rewards offered by such as the ETS (European Trading Scheme). In which case, it can be said that although the possibility exists of capturing CO{sub 2}, it is not a commercially viable option and therefore the plant could not be described as ready for CO{sub 2} capture. The boundary between a capture ready and a non-capture ready condition using this definition cannot be determined in an objective and therefore universally acceptable way and criteria must be found which are less onerous and less potentially contentious to assess. 16 refs., 2 annexes.

  2. Trainee Readiness For Diversity Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunhyung Chung

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Although trainee readiness is critical for diversity training effectiveness, extant research has not paid attention to the relationship between trainee readiness for diversity training and diversity training outcomes. This study identifies motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training and proposes a theoretical framework of how individual characteristics (perceived discrimination, demographic attributes, and previous diversity-related experience and organizational characteristics (diversity climate and demographic dissimilarity influence motivational, behavioral, and cognitive trainee readiness for diversity training.

  3. Ready, set, go . . . well maybe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandre, Melanie M; Bartolome, Terri-Lynn C

    2011-02-28

    The agenda for this presentation is: (1) understand organizational readiness for changes; (2) review benefits and challenges of change; (3) share case studies of ergonomic programs that were 'not ready' and some that were 'ready'; and (4) provide some ideas for facilitating change.

  4. GIS Readiness Survey 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Lise; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2014-01-01

    The GIS Readiness Survey 2014 is a follow-up to the corresponding survey that was carried out among public institutions in Denmark in 2009. The present survey thus provides an updated image of status and challenges in relation to the use of spatial information, the construction of the com- mon...

  5. Estolides - Ready for commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estolides have shown great promise as a bio-based lubricant and are ready for commercialization. Estolides are nontoxic and biodegradable. Testing has shown estolides have increased oxidative stability over vegetable oil based lubricants and have a relatively low pour point, allowing them to be use...

  6. Online Readiness Rijscholen 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weltevreden, J.W.J.; Boels, D.H.H.

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van rijscholen in 2013 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 115 rijscholen deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de Hogeschool van Amsterdam.

  7. Examining College Writing Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncheon, Julia C.; Tierney, William G.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing postsecondary access depends in large part on enhancing underrepresented students' writing ability, or college writing readiness. However, what exactly constitutes college-level writing is not clear-cut, complicating efforts to improve secondary preparation. This article examines recent efforts to define postsecondary writing,…

  8. Libraries at the Ready

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celano, Donna C.; Neuman, Susan B.

    2016-01-01

    Because English language learners enter kindergarten at a distinct disadvantage, Celano and Neuman examine the role public libraries can play in rallying around these young children to better prepare them for school. The authors document a new program called Every Child Ready to Read, which recently launched in 4,000 public libraries across the…

  9. Severe personality disorder, treatment engagement and the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012: what you need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Leon

    2016-07-03

    Empirical research has demonstrated a link between legal coercion and treatment engagement following conviction among those with severe personality disorder. Legal coercive pressures were often applied by the Indeterminate Sentence for Public Protection (IPP), until it was replaced by the Extended Determinate Sentence by the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012. In this paper, it is proposed that use of the new determinate sentence will lessen motivation for treatment engagement. One effect of treatment refusal may be greater reliance by the Secretary of State for Justice on his jurisdiction to transfer prisoners due for release to secure hospital transfers under the Mental Health Act 1983. Not only will this risk posturing undermine the principal aim of the Offender Personality Disorder Implementation Pathway to improve treatment engagement among the target group, it will also have negative implications for medical practitioners working in secure forensic hospitals. To demonstrate what is at stake, the paper briefly recapitulates empirical findings familiar to readers of the journal, before drawing on original unpublished data.

  10. Options for a Joint Medical Readiness System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, influenza (in season), and Tetanus -Diphtheria  No temporary or permanent deployment-limiting conditions  Medical...readiness and deployability for the unit or individuals.  Installation Commanders or Military Treatment Facility Commanders at Joint Bases can...service personnel that present themselves in any medical treatment facility. The key benefit is DoD will make one system modification for each policy

  11. Distribution, Identification, and Quantification of Residues after Treatment of Ready-To-Eat Salami with (36)Cl-Labeled or Nonlabeled Chlorine Dioxide Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David J; Giddings, J Michael; Herges, Grant R; Ernst, William

    2016-11-09

    When ready-to-eat salami was treated in a closed system with (36)Cl-labeled ClO2 (5.5 mg/100 g of salami), essentially all radioactivity was deposited onto the salami. Administered (36)ClO2 was converted to (36)Cl-chloride ion (>97%), trace levels of chlorate (<2%), and detectable levels of chlorite. In residue studies conducted with nonlabeled ClO2, sodium perchlorate residues (LOQ, 4 ng/g) were not formed when reactions were protected from light. Sodium chlorate residues were present in control (39.2 ± 4.8 ng/g) and chlorine dioxide treated (128 ± 31.2 ng/g) salami. If sanitation occurred under conditions of illumination, detectable levels (3.7 ± 1.5 ng/g) of perchlorate were formed along with greater quantities of sodium chlorate (183.6 ± 75.4 ng/g). Collectively, these data suggest that ClO2 is chemically reduced by salami and that slow-release formulations might be appropriate for applications involving the sanitation of ready-to-eat meat products.

  12. What role can gender-transformative programming for men play in increasing men's HIV testing and engagement in HIV care and treatment in South Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Colvin, Chris; Peacock, Dean; Dworkin, Shari L

    2016-11-01

    Men are less likely than women to test for HIV and engage in HIV care and treatment. We conducted in-depth interviews with men participating in One Man Can (OMC) - a rights-based gender equality and health programme intervention conducted in rural Limpopo and Eastern Cape, South Africa - to explore masculinity-related barriers to HIV testing/care/treatment and how participation in OMC impacted on these. Men who participated in OMC reported an increased capability to overcome masculinity-related barriers to testing/care/treatment. They also reported increased ability to express vulnerability and discuss HIV openly with others, which led to greater willingness to be tested for HIV and receive HIV care and treatment for those who were living with HIV. Interventions that challenge masculine norms and promote gender equality (i.e. gender-transformative interventions) represent a promising new approach to address men's barriers to testing, care and treatment.

  13. Moral Treatment of the Insane: Provisions for Lifelong Learning, Cultural Engagement, and Creativity in Nineteenth-Century Asylums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maureen; Hamilton, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in the role of lifelong learning and cultural engagement for change is not new. This article looks at a most unusual precedent and a neglected area in the historiography of adult education--the use of cultural education provision in asylums in the nineteenth century to promote cure and restoration of the "insane" to…

  14. Moral Treatment of the Insane: Provisions for Lifelong Learning, Cultural Engagement, and Creativity in Nineteenth-Century Asylums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Maureen; Hamilton, Robert

    2010-01-01

    The current interest in the role of lifelong learning and cultural engagement for change is not new. This article looks at a most unusual precedent and a neglected area in the historiography of adult education--the use of cultural education provision in asylums in the nineteenth century to promote cure and restoration of the "insane" to…

  15. Using Positive Behavior Support Procedures in Head Start Classrooms to Improve School Readiness: A Group Training and Behavioral Coaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Edward G.; Walker, Hill; Severson, Herbert; Golly, Annemieke; Seeley, John R.; Small, Jason W.

    2009-01-01

    Social-emotional competence is an important determinant of school readiness. School readiness, in turn, sets the stage for school success. There is clear longitudinal evidence that school success, attachment and bonding to the schooling process, and full engagement of schooling can, in combination, operate as a protective factor against a host of…

  16. The relationship between baseline Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment subscale scores and implementation of hepatitis prevention services in substance use disorders treatment clinics: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn Hildi J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment (ORCA is a measure of organizational readiness for implementing practice change in healthcare settings that is organized based on the core elements and sub-elements of the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS framework. General support for the reliability and factor structure of the ORCA has been reported. However, no published study has examined the utility of the ORCA in a clinical setting. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between baseline ORCA scores and implementation of hepatitis prevention services in substance use disorders (SUD clinics. Methods Nine clinic teams from Veterans Health Administration SUD clinics across the United States participated in a six-month training program to promote evidence-based practices for hepatitis prevention. A representative from each team completed the ORCA evidence and context subscales at baseline. Results Eight of nine clinics reported implementation of at least one new hepatitis prevention practice after completing the six-month training program. Clinic teams were categorized by level of implementation-high (n = 4 versus low (n = 5-based on how many hepatitis prevention practices were integrated into their clinics after completing the training program. High implementation teams had significantly higher scores on the patient experience and leadership culture subscales of the ORCA compared to low implementation teams. While not reaching significance in this small sample, high implementation clinics also had higher scores on the research, clinical experience, staff culture, leadership behavior, and measurement subscales as compared to low implementation clinics. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that the ORCA was able to measure differences in organizational factors at baseline between clinics that reported high and low implementation of practice

  17. The Readiness Ruler as a measure of readiness to change poly-drug use in drug abusers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Readiness to change is a crucial issue in the treatment of substance use disorders. Experiences with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has shown that continuous drug and alcohol use with all its consequences characterize most MMT programs. In a prospective study of drug abusers seeking opiate...... agonist maintenance treatment in the City of Copenhagen, subjects were administered the Addiction Severity Index, and the Readiness Ruler for each of 11 different licit and illicit drugs by research technicians. Data was collected upon admission to the program and at a 18 month follow-up. Subjects who...... indicated they wanted to quit or cut down upon admission, reported less drug use at 18 month follow-up, after controlling for severity of drug problems at intake. Subjects who expressed readiness to change their drug use upon admission decreased their drug use. It is concluded that the Readiness Ruler...

  18. Career Readiness: Has Its Time Finally Come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE) released a "What Is Career Ready?" definition. As the career-readiness definition explains, there is much overlap between "college readiness" and "career readiness," but academic preparedness for college alone is not enough to be truly career-ready.…

  19. The association between substance use and sub-optimal HIV treatment engagement among HIV-infected female sex workers in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Kathryn E; Lungu, Thandie; Mmodzi, Pearson; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Chadwick, Katy; Powers, Kimberly A; Pence, Brian W; Go, Vivian F; Hoffman, Irving F; Miller, William C

    2017-02-01

    Female sex workers (FSW) have a high prevalence of substance use and HIV, but the impact of substance use on HIV treatment engagement is not well established. We evaluated the association between alcohol and marijuana use and sub-optimal HIV treatment engagement outcomes among HIV-infected FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi. We enroled FSW using venue-based recruitment into a cross-sectional evaluation assessing substance use and HIV treatment engagement. Seropositive FSW, identified through HIV rapid testing, received rapid CD4 count and viral load testing. We used Poisson regression with robust variance estimates to ascertain associations of alcohol and marijuana use with sub-optimal HIV treatment outcomes: (1) lack of ART use among previously diagnosed, ART-eligible FSW and (2) viral nonsuppression among FSW on ART. Of previously diagnosed, ART-eligible FSW (n = 96), 29% were not using ART. Patterns of hazardous drinking were identified in 30%, harmful drinking in 10%, and alcohol dependence in 12%. ART-eligible FSW with harmful drinking or alcohol dependency were 1.9 (95% CI: 1.0, 3.8) times as likely to not use ART compared to FSW without harmful or dependent drinking. Among those on ART, 14% were virally nonsuppressed. The prevalence ratio for viral nonsuppression was 2.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 6.5) for harmful drinkers and alcohol-dependent FSW. Over 30% of ART-eligible FSW reported using marijuana. Marijuana-using FSW were 1.9 (95% CI: 0.8, 4.6) times as likely to not use ART compared to FSW who were not using marijuana. Given the high prevalence of alcohol use and its association with lack of ART use, ART uptake and alcohol reduction strategies should be tailored for alcohol-using FSW in Malawi.

  20. "Ready to Acquire"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yetton, Philip; Henningsson, Stefan; Bjørn-Andersen, Niels

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the experiences of Danisco (a global food ingredients company) as it followed a growth-by-acquisition business strategy, focusing on how a new CIO built the IT resources to ensure the IT organization was "ready to acquire." We illustrate how these IT capabilities expedited...... the IT integration following two acquisitions, one of which involved Danisco expanding the scale of its business and the other extending the scope. Based on insights gained from Danisco, we provide lessons for CIOs to realize business benefits when managing post-acquisition IT integration....

  1. Ready or Not? Criteria for Marriage Readiness among Emerging Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jason S.; Badger, Sarah; Willoughby, Brian J.; Nelson, Larry J.; Madsen, Stephanie D.; Barry, Carolyn McNamara

    2009-01-01

    This study examined emerging adults' criteria for marriage readiness and explored how these criteria are associated with their current attitudes and behaviors. This article establishes the psychometric value of the Criteria for Marriage Readiness Questionnaire and reports on a study of 788 emerging adults recruited from five college sites across…

  2. Lean Six Sigma Analysis of Shipboard Audit Readiness on a U.S. Navy Destroyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    reconcile with budget reports 3. be audited in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards (CFOs Act, 1990) To date, the DOD is the... reporting entity solicits an independent auditor for an audit-readiness examination. Once completed, the entity creates additional CAPs to remediate...audit-readiness state. 5. Audit. The reporting entity engages the auditor for a financial audit. Upon completion, the auditor issues the audit

  3. Assessing Online Readiness of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doe, Raymond; Castillo, Matthew S.; Musyoka, Millicent M.

    2017-01-01

    The rise of distance education has created a need to understand students' readiness for online learning and to predict their success. Several survey instruments have been developed to assess this construct of online readiness. However, a review of the extant literature shows that these instruments have varying limitations in capturing all of the…

  4. Engaging Employers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

  5. Organizational Readiness for Change in Correctional and Community Substance Abuse Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Wayne E. K.; Greener, Jack M.; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant needs exist for increased and better substance abuse treatment services in our nation's prisons. The TCU Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) survey has been widely used in community-based treatment programs and evidence is accumulating for relationships between readiness for change and implementation of new clinical practices.…

  6. Organizational Readiness for Change in Correctional and Community Substance Abuse Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Wayne E. K.; Greener, Jack M.; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Significant needs exist for increased and better substance abuse treatment services in our nation's prisons. The TCU Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) survey has been widely used in community-based treatment programs and evidence is accumulating for relationships between readiness for change and implementation of new clinical practices.…

  7. Get ready for physics

    CERN Document Server

    Adelson, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Get Ready for Physics helps science students quickly prepare for their introductory physics course, either algebra-based or calculus-based. It provides useful tools for future success in the course. The booklet gives students tips on recognizing their individual learning styles and helps them maximize their study time. It helps them review the basic mathematics they will need for the course, including ratios, proportions, and graphs. It gives them a bird's-eye preview of the major concepts and physical models so they start the course with a broad perspective of the key physical ideas and the knowledge of important terms that give students most trouble. The booklet concludes with a strong chapter on solving physics problems, replete with practice problems and examples, and with insights into answering conceptual and estimation type questions.

  8. G+ COMMUNITY: MEASURING TEACHERS’ READINESS AND ACCEPTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Faisal Farish Ishak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore teachers’ acceptance and readiness in using the cloud-based community as a platform for professional collaboration related to their teaching and learning. Familiarity with certain social networking platforms has made the preferable collaboration among teachers only limited to using Facebook, WhatsApp or Telegram. However, with time and space constraints in schools, some of the sharing sessions could not be done effectively most of the time. The study focuses on teachers’ acceptance and readiness of having their community in the cloud when they were introduced to the platform during a Continuous Professional Development (CPD course. A total number of 61 teachers used Google Community named as ‘Contemporary Children’s Literature (CCL 2016’ as a platform for their Professional Learning Community (PLC during the course. Descriptive analysis was done using Google Sheets and the findings show that these teachers are receptive towards Google Community in terms of its engagement level, usefulness as well as ease of use. The introduction to Google Community has created a new pathway for their collaboration especially for teaching and learning purposes. In a nutshell, their acceptance towards the cloud-based community indicates that, given the right training channel, teachers are positive and opened to utilising and integrating the cloud-based technology in their current teaching practice.

  9. Engaging Faculty in Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Glynis A.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers endorse the integration of community engagement (CE) into higher education as a way to improve the relevance of education, address community needs, and forge university-community partnerships (Zlotkowski, 1996). CE can help create stronger ties between universities and their communities and provide students with experiential learning…

  10. A Review and Treatment Selection Model for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Who Engage in Inappropriate Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tonya N; Machalicek, Wendy; Scalzo, Rachel; Kobylecky, Alicia; Campbell, Vincent; Pinkelman, Sarah; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2016-12-01

    Some individuals with developmental disabilities develop inappropriate sexual behaviors such as public masturbation, disrobing, and touching others in an unwanted sexual manner. Such acts are problematic given the taboo nature of the behaviors and the potential for significant negative consequences, such as restricted community access, injury, and legal ramifications. Therefore, it is necessary to equip caregivers and practitioners with effective treatment options. The purpose of this paper is to review studies that have evaluated behavioral treatments to reduce inappropriate sexual behavior in persons with developmental disabilities. The strengths and weaknesses of each treatment are reviewed, and a model for treatment selection is provided.

  11. More Engagement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    At the end of 2008, the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office issued "The UK and China: A Framework for Engagement." It is the first such document Britain has issued on its China policy. It was designed to set out a way of thinking about China more widely. Peter Wilson, Political Counselor at the British Embassy in Beijing, recently talked with Beijing Review about the significance of the document for bilateral relations between China and Britain.

  12. Engaging complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gys M. Loubser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I discuss studies in complexity and its epistemological implications for systematic and practical theology. I argue that engagement with complexity does not necessarily assurea non-reductionist approach. However, if complexity is engaged transversally, it becomes possible to transcend reductionist approaches. Moreover, systematic and practical the ologians can draw on complexity in developing new ways of understanding and, therefore, new ways of describing the focus, epistemic scope and heuristic structures of systematic and practical theology. Firstly, Edgar Morin draws a distinction between restricted and general complexity based on the epistemology drawn upon in studies in complexity. Moving away from foundationalist approaches to epistemology, Morin argues for a paradigm of systems. Secondly,I discuss Kees van Kooten Niekerk�s distinction between epistemology, methodology andontology in studies in complexity and offer an example of a theological argument that drawson complexity. Thirdly, I argue for the importance of transversality in engaging complexity by drawing on the work of Wentzel van Huyssteen and Paul Cilliers. In conclusion, I argue that theologians have to be conscious of the epistemic foundations of each study in complexity, and these studies illuminate the heart of Reformed theology.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Therefore, this article has both intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary implications. When theologians engage studies incomplexity, the epistemological roots of these studies need to be considered seeing thatresearchers in complexity draw on different epistemologies. Drawing on transversality wouldenhance such considerations. Furthermore, Edgar Morin�s and Paul Cilliers� approach tocomplexity will inform practical and theoretical considerations in church polity and unity.

  13. Therapeutic assessment promotes treatment readiness but does not affect symptom change in patients with personality disorders: Findings from a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Saeger, H.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Finn, S.E.; Smith, J.D.; Verheul, R.; van Busschbach, J.J.; Feenstra, D.J.; Dine, J.; Horn, E.K.

    2014-01-01

    The field of clinical personality assessment is lacking in published empirical evidence regarding its treatment and clinical utility. This article reports on a randomized controlled clinical trial (N = 74) allocating patients awaiting treatment in a specialized clinic for personality disorders to

  14. Public Engagement with Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent review and a contribution for the 20 years anniversary edition of the scientific journal Public Understanding of Science, reflections are made about the last twenty years of achievements and failures in the theory, practice and policy of Public Engagement with Science (PES......). The ‘deficit theory’ which still today characterize many scientific activities that address citizen can be criticized for ‘one-way communication’, ‘sanctity of expertise’, and treatment of the publics as ‘homogeneous’. When arguing for the need for public engagement with science it is question about...... not problematising ‘the public’, taking values seriously and instead educating ‘the experts’, and recognising both the ‘legitimacy of wider concerns’ and the ‘democratic imperative’. Public Engagement with Science as strategy is building upon a normative commitment to the idea of democratic science policy...

  15. Relative efficacy of cash versus vouchers in engaging opioid substitution treatment clients in survey-based research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topp, Libby; Islam, M Mofizul; Day, Carolyn Ann

    2013-04-01

    Concerns that cash payments to people who inject drugs (PWID) to reimburse research participation will facilitate illicit drug purchases have led some ethical authorities to mandate department store/supermarket vouchers as research reimbursement. To examine the relative efficacy of the two forms of reimbursement in engaging PWID in research, clients of two public opioid substitution therapy clinics were invited to participate in a 20-30 min, anonymous and confidential interview about alcohol consumption on two separate occasions, 4 months apart. Under the crossover design, at Time 1, clients of Clinic 1 were offered $A20 cash as reimbursement, while clients of Clinic 2 were offered an $A20 voucher; at Time 2, the form of reimbursement was reversed. Using clinic records to determine the denominator (number of clients dosed), we found that compared with clients offered a voucher, a significantly higher proportion of clients who were offered cash participated in the survey (58% (139/241) vs 74% (186/252); χ(2)=14.27; p=0.0002). At first participation, respondents most commonly reported planning to purchase food/drinks/groceries (68%), cigarettes (21%) and transport/fuel (11%) with their payments, with those reimbursed in cash more likely to report planning to fund transport/fuel (19% vs 1%; ppayment. Results demonstrate that modest cash payments enhanced recruitment of this group, an important consideration given the challenges of delineating the parameters of a population defined by illegal activity, seemingly without promoting excessive additional drug use.

  16. Women's experiences of factors affecting treatment engagement and adherence in internet delivered Behavioural Activation for Postnatal Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. O'Mahen

    2015-03-01

    Discussion: Open access, self-help internet interventions are acceptable to women with postnatal depression, but it is critical to provide tailoring and support to help overcome barriers and improve treatment adherence.

  17. The Pediatrician's Role in Optimizing School Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    School readiness includes not only the early academic skills of children but also their physical health, language skills, social and emotional development, motivation to learn, creativity, and general knowledge. Families and communities play a critical role in ensuring children's growth in all of these areas and thus their readiness for school. Schools must be prepared to teach all children when they reach the age of school entry, regardless of their degree of readiness. Research on early brain development emphasizes the effects of early experiences, relationships, and emotions on creating and reinforcing the neural connections that are the basis for learning. Pediatricians, by the nature of their relationships with families and children, may significantly influence school readiness. Pediatricians have a primary role in ensuring children's physical health through the provision of preventive care, treatment of illness, screening for sensory deficits, and monitoring nutrition and growth. They can promote and monitor the social-emotional development of children by providing anticipatory guidance on development and behavior, by encouraging positive parenting practices, by modeling reciprocal and respectful communication with adults and children, by identifying and addressing psychosocial risk factors, and by providing community-based resources and referrals when warranted. Cognitive and language skills are fostered through timely identification of developmental problems and appropriate referrals for services, including early intervention and special education services; guidance regarding safe and stimulating early education and child care programs; and promotion of early literacy by encouraging language-rich activities such as reading together, telling stories, and playing games. Pediatricians are also well positioned to advocate not only for children's access to health care but also for high-quality early childhood education and evidence-based family supports such as

  18. LHCf: ready to go

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    Reinstalled in the tunnel at the end of 2014, the two detectors of the LHCf experiment are now ready for operation. The first data should be taken in May.   LHCf’s Arm1 detector. The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment measures neutral particles emitted at nearly zero degrees from the proton beam direction. Because these "very forward" particles carry a large fraction of the collision energy, they are important for understanding the development of atmospheric air-shower phenomena produced by high-energy cosmic rays. To measure these particles, two detectors, Arm1 and Arm2, sit along the LHC beamline, at 140 metres either side of the ATLAS collision point. In July 2010, after a 9-month operation, the LHCf collaboration removed the two detectors from the tunnel to avoid severe radiation damage. The Arm2 detector was reinstalled in the tunnel for data-taking with proton–lead collisions in 2013, while Arm1 was being upgraded to be a radiation-ha...

  19. Physical therapy 2.0: leveraging social media to engage patients in rehabilitation and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Emily; Werstine, Robert J; Rasmussen-Pennington, Diane M; Fitzsimmons, Deborah; Petrella, Robert J

    2015-03-01

    Care for chronic conditions and noncommunicable diseases is dominating health systems around the globe. For physical therapists, this strain presents a substantial opportunity for engaging patients in health promotion and disease management in the years to come. Examples of social media being used to engage consumers in the business landscape are pervasive, and research reports suggest that patients are ready for social media to be incorporated into the way health care systems deliver care. We propose that leveraging the power and utility of existing technologies, such as social media, could innovate the way physical therapists engage patients in rehabilitation and health promotion practices, thus contributing to the evolution of the profession: Physical Therapy 2.0. To continue to be relevant in the community, physical therapist practice must respond to patients' needs and expectations. Incorporating social media into how physical therapists are both designing and delivering care holds potential for enhancing patient engagement in prescribed health behaviors and improving treatment outcomes. This conceptual article presents the perspective that physical therapists can utilize social media to enhance care delivery and treatment outcomes. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  20. [In the consultation room, ready knowledge is more important than knowledge that must be looked up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rossum, H J M

    2006-02-25

    Ready knowledge rules the consultation room--there is no time to look things up. The doctor attempts to find the diagnosis on the basis of a network of ready knowledge. The quality of this knowledge network determines the quality of the resultant diagnosis and of the subsequent treatment. The doctor must continually test and maintain his or her knowledge network.

  1. StormReady in a Box: Enhancing NOAA's Presence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, N. S.; Franks, C.

    2015-12-01

    The National Weather Service StormReady Supporter program exists to give schools, companies, TV stations, and other facilities the opportunity to earn recognition for their weather preparedness and awareness. Requirements to earn StormReady Supporter status include having a facility warning point, use of NOAA Weather Radios, and weather hazard Emergency Operation Plans. Despite the increasing importance of weather preparedness in schools, only 1.2% of Minnesota schools are deemed StormReady by the National Weather Service. It was determined that the major impedance for schools becoming StormReady Supporters is the lack of time for administrators to engage in anything "extra" beyond their listed duties. As part of a 2015 Hollings Scholar project, the StormReady in a Box concept was developed to remedy this, by empowering teachers and students to take charge and complete the StormReady Supporter application for their school. StormReady in a Box is a project developed for Junior High School students to learn about weather preparedness and to help their school acquire StormReady status. The project was designed to be relevant to the Minnesota State Education Standards in Science, be simple for teachers to do with their students, and most importantly, to be enjoyable for Junior High School age students to do. The project was also designed to enhance critical thinking skills and logical reasoning abilities, as they relate to the StormReady Supporter application. This presentation will present the overall rationale for the undertaking of this project, the creation of, and the logical next steps for the StormReady in a Box project.

  2. Factors of children's school readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM; Raven, Raven, & Court, 1999, language competence using the Lestvice splošnega govornegarazvoja–LJ (LSGR–LJ, Scales of General Language Development; Marjanovič Umek, Kranjc, Fekonja in Bajc, 2004, and school readiness with the Preizkus pripravljenosti za šolo (PPŠ, Test of School Readiness; Toličič, 1986. The results indicate that children's intellectual ability and language competence have a high predictive value for the school readiness — they explained 51% of the variance in children's scores on the PPŠ. Preschool enrollment has a positive effect on school readiness for children whose parents have a low level of education, but not for those whose parents are highly educated.

  3. Engaging Students via Social Media: Is It Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Rania B.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores for the first time the moderating effect of students' readiness for cocreation on the student social media engagement and perceived value relationship. Ping's and Cadogan et al.'s procedures for assessing the structural model with interaction terms were followed. Results based on a sample of 353 university students…

  4. Engaging Students via Social Media: Is It Worth the Effort?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Rania B.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores for the first time the moderating effect of students' readiness for cocreation on the student social media engagement and perceived value relationship. Ping's and Cadogan et al.'s procedures for assessing the structural model with interaction terms were followed. Results based on a sample of 353 university students…

  5. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Knowledge Workers' Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Ricardo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rapid pace of change for knowledge workers competing globally necessitates ongoing continuous learning. Increasingly, knowledge workers will need to be ready--willing and able--to engage in self-directed learning. This makes it important to understand what factors in the work environment might be related to the self-directed learning…

  6. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Knowledge Workers' Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparicio, Ricardo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rapid pace of change for knowledge workers competing globally necessitates ongoing continuous learning. Increasingly, knowledge workers will need to be ready--willing and able--to engage in self-directed learning. This makes it important to understand what factors in the work environment might be related to the self-directed learning…

  7. Efficacy of the Getting Ready Intervention and the Role of Parental Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Knoche, Lisa L.; Edwards, Carolyn P.; Kupzyk, Kevin A.; Clarke, Brandy L.; Moorman Kim, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: This study reports the results of a randomized trial of a parent engagement intervention (the Getting Ready intervention) on directly observed learning-related social behaviors of children from low-income families in the context of parent-child interactions. The study explored the moderating effect of parental depression on…

  8. 75 FR 13515 - Office of Innovation and Improvement (OII); Overview Information; Ready-to-Learn Television...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... a media- rich curriculum that exposes them to educational content, and engages them in learning... teachers can use a media-rich curriculum to prepare low-income children for school success: Results of a... readiness, are interactive, and use multiple innovative technologies and digital media platforms. Background...

  9. Approaches to Learning and School Readiness in Head Start: Applications to Preschool Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Andres S.; White, Lisa J.; Greenfield, Daryl B.

    2017-01-01

    Approaches to learning are a set of domain-general skills that encompass curiosity, persistence, planning, and engagement in group learning. These skills play a key role in preschoolers' learning and predict school readiness in math and language. Preschool science is a critical domain for early education and facilitates learning across domains.…

  10. Efficacy of the Getting Ready Intervention and the Role of Parental Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Knoche, Lisa L.; Edwards, Carolyn P.; Kupzyk, Kevin A.; Clarke, Brandy L.; Moorman Kim, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: This study reports the results of a randomized trial of a parent engagement intervention (the Getting Ready intervention) on directly observed learning-related social behaviors of children from low-income families in the context of parent-child interactions. The study explored the moderating effect of parental depression on…

  11. Student Identity Development in Higher Education: Implications for Graduate Attributes and Work-Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeannie; Brooker, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: As universities in many countries engage more directly with industry, the learning emphasis has moved from the student experience to the work-readiness of the graduate. This focus on the student as potential worker is expressed through graduate attributes: particular sets of employability skills developed by institutions and embedded…

  12. ESTIMATION OF SPORTS-TECHNICAL READINESS OF STUDENTS OF METHODICAL BRANCH «FOOTBALL» MSUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamonin Andrey Valentinovich

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Increase of sports-technical skill in sports occurs on the basis of last achievements of the theory and physical training and sports practice. Development of football isn't possible without search and introduction in training process of optimum pedagogical models of perfection of physical and technical readiness of football players. Such pedagogical models should be applied, as in groups of initial preparation, so at the subsequent grade levels, including in student's football. Modern training process (pedagogical model, should be under construction on objective indicators of physical, technical and special readiness (so-called feedback. However, the estimation of sports-technical readiness at sports schools on football is reduced only to testing of speed, jumps, juggling, dribbling and a shoot for goal. The same criteria are applied and in student's football. Unfortunately, the given control exercises not in a condition to the full to reflect level of physical and technical readiness of the football player. For more objective estimation of special readiness it is necessary to use the test tasks revealing a level of development of coordination abilities of game structure game and competitive activity (game in football. It will allow trainers to have fuller picture of readiness of the football player, in respect of its professional (football skills. As a result coach have possibility to trace level of a condition of the various parties of sports readiness (physical, technical and coordination student's youth engaged in football at each stage of long-term preparation.

  13. SaludABLEOmaha: improving readiness to address obesity through healthy lifestyle in a Midwestern Latino community, 2011-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Robbins, Regina; Steenson, Sharalyn; Stewart, Catherine; Fisher, Christopher; Huang, Terry T-K

    2015-02-12

    A community's readiness for change is a precursor to the effective application of evidence-based practices for health promotion. Research is lacking regarding potential strategies to improve readiness to address obesity-related health issues in underserved communities. This case study describes SaludABLEOmaha, an initiative to increase readiness of residents in a Midwestern Latino community to address obesity and adopt healthy lifestyles. SaludABLEOmaha emphasized 2 core approaches, youth activism and collaboration among public and private institutions, which we applied to planning and implementing tactics in support of 3 interconnected strategies: 1) social marketing and social media, 2) service learning in schools (ie, curricula that integrate hands-on community service with instruction and reflection), and 3) community and business engagement. Following the Community Readiness Model protocol (http://triethniccenter.colostate.edu/communityReadiness.htm), structured interviews were conducted with community leaders and analyzed before and 2.5 years after launch of the program. The community increased in readiness from stage 3 of the Community Readiness Model, "vague awareness," at baseline to stage 5, "preparation," at follow-up. SaludABLEOmaha improved community readiness (eg, community knowledge, community climate), which probably contributed to the observed increase in readiness to address obesity through healthy lifestyle. Community mobilization approaches such as youth activism integrated with social marketing and social media tactics can improve community responsiveness to obesity prevention and diminish health disparities.

  14. SaludABLEOmaha: Improving Readiness to Address Obesity Through Healthy Lifestyle in a Midwestern Latino Community, 2011–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frerichs, Leah; Brittin, Jeri; Robbins, Regina; Steenson, Sharalyn; Stewart, Catherine; Fisher, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background A community’s readiness for change is a precursor to the effective application of evidence-based practices for health promotion. Research is lacking regarding potential strategies to improve readiness to address obesity-related health issues in underserved communities. Community Context This case study describes SaludABLEOmaha, an initiative to increase readiness of residents in a Midwestern Latino community to address obesity and adopt healthy lifestyles. Methods SaludABLEOmaha emphasized 2 core approaches, youth activism and collaboration among public and private institutions, which we applied to planning and implementing tactics in support of 3 interconnected strategies: 1) social marketing and social media, 2) service learning in schools (ie, curricula that integrate hands-on community service with instruction and reflection), and 3) community and business engagement. Following the Community Readiness Model protocol (http://triethniccenter.colostate.edu/communityReadiness.htm), structured interviews were conducted with community leaders and analyzed before and 2.5 years after launch of the program. Outcome The community increased in readiness from stage 3 of the Community Readiness Model, “vague awareness,” at baseline to stage 5, “preparation,” at follow-up. Interpretation SaludABLEOmaha improved community readiness (eg, community knowledge, community climate), which probably contributed to the observed increase in readiness to address obesity through healthy lifestyle. Community mobilization approaches such as youth activism integrated with social marketing and social media tactics can improve community responsiveness to obesity prevention and diminish health disparities. PMID:25674679

  15. Treatment moderators and effectiveness of Engagement and Counseling for Latinos intervention on worry reduction in a low-income primary care sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Carmela; Li, Xinliang; Wang, Ye; Canino, Glorisa; Alegría, Margarita

    2016-11-01

    We conducted a secondary analysis of randomized controlled trial data to determine if the Engagement and Counseling for Latinos (ECLA) intervention, a brief, evidence-based, and culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral intervention specifically designed for and effective at treating depression, also reduced co-occurring worry symptoms. We also explored whether delivery modality (telephone, face-to-face) and sociodemographic patient characteristics moderated treatment effectiveness. Between May 2011 and September 2012, low-income Latino primary care patients (N = 257) with depression from Boston and San Juan were randomized to usual care (n = 86), face-to-face ECLA (n = 84), or telephone ECLA (n = 87) and completed a psychosocial assessment at baseline and 4 months after randomization. We used intention-to-treat analyses with linear regression models with change in worry (4 months from randomization) as the primary outcome and treatment condition as the primary predictor. Patients in ECLA experienced significant reductions in worry at 4 months from randomization than those in usual care (PSWQΔ = -3.28, p hold promise for increasing the uptake of mental health care among employed low-income Latinos. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. An analysis of the relationship between staff qualification and export readiness of pharmaceutical companies: the case of iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Export and the readiness to export constitute the first step of international marketing, which are affected by both internal and external factors of firms. One of the most important internal factors is the presence of skilled personnel. The purpose of this study was to define the relationship between staff qualification and encouragment with the readiness level of Iranian pharmacuetical firms for engagement in export marketing. The research was based on a single case study on a basket of seven leading domestic firms. For the bias reduction, questionnaires as well as interviews with managers were used. The performance of the studied factor was lower than the desired level for export readiness and there was much scope for improvement in staff qualifications to achieve such readiness. The results of this research enable small and medium-sized pharmaceutical companies to evaluate their staff qualification levels needed for export readiness and to detect their shortcomings in order to improve them.

  17. Getting your home ready - after the hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 000432.htm Getting your home ready - after the hospital To use the sharing features on this page, ... home ready after you have been in the hospital often requires much preparation. Set up your home ...

  18. Implementation plan for WRAP Module 1 operational readiness review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irons, L.G.

    1994-11-04

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP 1) will be used to receive, sample, treat, and ship contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU), low-level waste (LLW), and low-level mixed waste (LLMW) to storage and disposal sites both on the Hanford site and off-site. The primary mission of WRAP 1 is to characterize and certify CH waste in 55-gallon and 85-gallon drums; and its secondary function is to certify CH waste standard waste boxes (SWB) and boxes of similar size for disposal. The WRAP 1 will provide the capability for examination (including x-ray, visual, and contents sampling), limited treatment, repackaging, and certification of CH suspect-TRU waste in 55-gallon drums retrieved from storage, as well as newly generated CH LLW and CH TRU waste drums. The WRAP 1 will also provide examination (X-ray and visual only) and certification of CH LLW and CH TRU waste in small boxes. The decision to perform an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was made in accordance with WHC-CM-5-34, Solid Waste Disposal Operations Administration, Section 1.4, Operational Readiness Activities. The ORR will ensure plant and equipment readiness, management and personnel readiness, and management programs readiness for the initial startup of the facility. This implementation plan is provided for defining the conduct of the WHC ORR.

  19. Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Donna E.

    2006-01-01

    "Safe, Healthy and Ready to Succeed: Arizona School Readiness Key Performance Indicators" presents a set of baseline measurements that gauge how well a statewide system of school readiness supports is addressing issues that affect Arizona children's readiness for school. The Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the system, rather…

  20. Ready to crown

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McReynolds, David

    2017-04-01

    When multiple teeth or localised segments of the mouth require crowns, the restorative interventions involved can be psychologically and physically demanding for the operator, patient and dental technician alike.1,2 It is important that all parties involved in restorations of this nature hold a shared understanding of the expected outcome of treatment, with a realistic, common end goal in mind right from the very beginning. Such clarity of thought and communication is key to avoiding biological, mechanical and aesthetic failures in the planning and execution of advanced restorative treatments. Biomechanically stable and aesthetically pleasing provisional restorations are an essential aspect of treatment, which allow teeth to be prepared and provisionalised over multiple appointments within the comfort zone of the operator and patient.3

  1. Solar Ready: An Overview of Implementation Practices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, A.; Guidice, L.; Lisell, L.; Doris, L.; Busche, S.

    2012-01-01

    This report explores three mechanisms for encouraging solar ready building design and construction: solar ready legislation, certification programs for solar ready design and construction, and stakeholder education. These methods are not mutually exclusive, and all, if implemented well, could contribute to more solar ready construction. Solar ready itself does not reduce energy use or create clean energy. Nevertheless, solar ready building practices are needed to reach the full potential of solar deployment. Without forethought on incorporating solar into design, buildings may be incompatible with solar due to roof structure or excessive shading. In these cases, retrofitting the roof or removing shading elements is cost prohibitive. Furthermore, higher up-front costs due to structural adaptations and production losses caused by less than optimal roof orientation, roof equipment, or shading will lengthen payback periods, making solar more expensive. With millions of new buildings constructed each year in the United States, solar ready can remove installation barriers and increase the potential for widespread solar adoption. There are many approaches to promoting solar ready, including solar ready legislation, certification programs, and education of stakeholders. Federal, state, and local governments have the potential to implement programs that encourage solar ready and in turn reduce barriers to solar deployment. With the guidance in this document and the examples of jurisdictions and organizations already working to promote solar ready building practices, federal, state, and local governments can guide the market toward solar ready implementation.

  2. Reading Fluency and College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy V.; Chang, Shu-Ching; Edmondson, Elizabeth; Nageldinger, James; Nigh, Jennifer; Remark, Linda; Kenney, Kristen Srsen; Walsh-Moorman, Elizabeth; Yildirim, Kasim; Nichols, William Dee; Paige, David D.; Rupley, William H.

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards suggest that an appropriate goal for secondary education is college and career readiness. Previous research has identified reading fluency as a critical component for proficient reading. One component of fluency is word recognition accuracy and automaticity. The present study attempted to determine the word…

  3. Blood Lead and Reading Readiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the University of Maryland School of Nursing, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, and Department of Health, Providence, Rhode Island, evaluated the relationship between reading readiness test scores for children attending public kindergarten in Providence, RI, and state health department records of blood lead levels (BLLs.

  4. Workplace Readiness for Communicating Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Clive

    1996-01-01

    Proposes a model for communicating change about diversity using a workplace-readiness approach. Discusses ways organizational change agents can assess the company's current interpersonal and social dynamics, use appropriate influence strategies, and create effective messages that will appeal to employees and help to achieve the desired acceptance…

  5. Onderzoek Online Readiness Modezaken 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boels, D.H.H.; Weltevreden, J.W.J.

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van modezaken in 2012 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 124 (voornamelijk zelfstandige) modezaken deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de Hoges

  6. Onderzoek Online Readiness Sportzaken 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weltevreden, J.W.J.; Boels, D.H.H.

    2013-01-01

    In dit onderzoek is de online readiness van sportzaken in 2013 in kaart gebracht. In totaal hebben 112 (voornamelijk zelfstandige) sportzaken deelgenomen aan het onderzoek. Het onderzoek is uitgevoerd door het lectoraat Online Ondernemen samen met studenten van de minor Marketing Tomorrow van de Hog

  7. PIC Reading Readiness Test Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, N. J.

    This rating form concerns the measurement of basic skills in connection with assessing reading readiness. Motor skills, ability to adjust to learning situations, familiarity with the alphabet, and general knowledge are assessed. See TM 001 111 for details of the Regional PIC program in which it is used. (DLG)

  8. Template-Engaged In Situ Synthesis of Carbon-Doped Monoclinic Mesoporous BiVO4: Photocatalytic Treatment of Rhodamine B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Mingming; Gan, Lihua; Liu, Mingxian; Tripathi, Pranav K.; Liu, Yafei; Hu, Zhonghua

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, carbon-doped monoclinic scheelite mesoporous bismuth vanadate was synthesized through template-engaged in situ method. The bismuth nitrate pentahydrate and ammonia metavanadate were used as bismuth and vanadium precursors, respectively, glucose as carbon source, and mesoporous SiO2 aerogel as a hard template. Carbon-doped monoclinic mesoporous BiVO4 were obtained by heat treatment of BiVO4/glucose/template to carbonize glucose and form monoclinic crystal, followed by etching with NaOH solution to remove the SiO2 template. The samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption and desorption, UV-visible spectroscopy, Energy dispersive spectrometry, Raman spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscopy. It was found that the sample with a carbon content of 0.5 wt.% possesses a specific surface area of 10.2 m2/g and has mesoporous structure with the most probable pore size of 13.9 nm. The band gap of carbon-doped monoclinic mesoporous BiVO4 was estimated to be 2.33 eV, indicating the superior photocatalytic activity under visible light. The photocatalytic efficiency of carbon-doped monoclinic mesoporous BiVO4 for the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light (λ > 400 nm) in 120 min reaches 98.7%, Besides, the carbon-doped monoclinic mesoporous BiVO4 photocatalyst still showed high stability: 85% for Rhodamine B degradation after ten recycles.

  9. Psychologists' Perspectives on Therapy Termination and the Use of Therapy Engagement/Retention Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmacott, Robin; Hunsley, John

    2016-08-25

    Practicing psychologists (n = 269) were surveyed regarding their perspectives on client reasons for termination at different points in therapy and their use of strategies to engage and retain clients in therapy. Psychologists estimated that one-third of their caseload unilaterally terminated (M = 13% before the third therapy session; M = 20% after the third session). They viewed lack of readiness for change/insufficient motivation as the most important barrier to early treatment engagement, and symptom improvement as the most important reason for clients' unilateral decisions to end therapy after the third session. Most psychologists reported occasional use of the majority of engagement and retention strategies. Although some strategies were used by most psychologists (e.g., building the early working alliance), fewer than 25% of psychologists reported the frequent use of time-limited treatment, appointment reminders or case management procedures. As the implementation of these strategies in clinical practice has the potential to greatly influence client retention rates, future research should examine psychologists' perspectives on and barriers to using these strategies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effect of locally made Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (Mushpro Health Drink Powder – MHDP for Treatment of Malnutrition on Children Aged 6 to 72 Months in Tribal area of Amravati District of Maharashtra, India: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod R. Wasnik,

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Background: Severe acute malnutrition (SAM in children is a significant public health problem in India with associated increased morbidity and mortality. The current WHO recommendations on management of SAM are based on facility based treatment. Given the large number of children with SAM in India and the involved costs to the care-provider as well as the care-seeker, incorporation of alternative strategies like home based management of uncomplicated SAM is important.Aim & Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a locally made ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF Mushpro Health Drink Powder in decreasing malnutrition in Tribal area. Methods/Study Design: Open-labeled Randomized Controlled trial Eligibility criteria for participants: Children aged 6—72 months but not requiring hospitalization for severe malnutrition (SAM and Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM were considered eligible for study. Children less than 6 months were excluded as several of them were receiving breast milk. Also children having other diseases incriminated as a cause of severe malnutrition, including cerebral palsy, chromosomal malformation, known metabolic diseases, malignancies, congenital heart disorders, hemolytic anaemia, known malabsorption syndrome, or hepatic disorder were excluded. Study Setting: Anganwadi centers’ run by ICDS program in tribal areas of Amravati District of Maharashtra. Interventions: Children with Severe acute malnutrition (SAM and moderate acute malnutrition (MAM in 26 Intervention Anganwadi centre received RUTF (MHDP 3 gm/kg/per day (SAM & 2 gm/kg/day MAM two times a day from October to December 2011. Children in the 27 Noninterventional Anganwadi centers’ did not receive Mushpro supplementation. For both the groups the supplementations as per ICDS protocol were given & both arms included continuation of family diets. Main outcome measures: Mean Weight gain and Mean Height gain. Results / Findings: The Mean weight gain at 2

  11. E-Learning Readiness in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Schreurs

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Many organizations failed in adopting e-learning. A primary reason for this failure is the lack of assessment of organizational readiness for e-learning. To reduce failure risk, organizations should assess their readiness for adopting e-learning to identify some weak points which have to be improved by taking some improvement actions. In the literature we can find a variety of e-learning readiness and measurement models. We developed a model to measure the readiness of organizations for e-learning. We have applied it on KBC bank to measure the readiness of KBC-ICT department for e-learning.

  12. "It gives me a sense of belonging": providing integrated health care and treatment to people with HCV engaged in a psycho-educational support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolhouse, Susan; Cooper, Emily; Pickard, Angela

    2013-11-01

    Injection drug use (IDU) increases the risk of contracting hepatitis C virus (HCV) yet very few people living with HCV access effective, and potentially curative, treatments. The East Toronto Hepatitis C Program (ETHCP) was developed in 2006 and provides health care, treatment and support to people living with HCV who have complex mental health, physical health and psychosocial needs. The program is anchored in a 16-18 week psychosocial support group located within one of the 3 participating community-based health clinics. The objective of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals engaged in the ETHCP psycho-educational group. This phenomenological qualitative study consisted of semi-structured in-depth interviews with twenty randomly selected program participants. The three dominant themes that emerged from the analysis were program structure, group cohesion and group as agent for change. The ETHCP "one-stop shopping" model provided a stable foundation allowing for the development of group cohesion. Group cohesion was marked by the formation of intense relationships creating a safe and non-judgmental environment where participants could self-reflect, make social connections and feel cared for and accepted. Three types of relationships characterized group cohesion: relationship to self, relationships with individual group members and relationship to group as a whole. Within the nurturing group environment, participants could challenge themselves and others, ultimately enabling change. The results of our qualitative study suggest that it is the formation of strong group cohesion that facilitated participants' behavioural change, regardless of their level of substance use. The structure of the group provided stability and was characterized by consistent weekly meetings, knowledge exchange and the provision of multiple services in one location. The support from peers and staff allowed participants to develop personal goals. Participants began to see

  13. Strategies to Build Readiness in Community Mobilization Efforts for Implementation in a Multi-Year Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiya, Nazmim; House, L Duane; Desmarais, Jeffrey; Fletcher, Erica; Conlin, Maeve; Perez-McAdoo, Sarah; Waggett, Jessica; Tendulkar, Shalini A

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes an assessment of community readiness to implement a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative, Youth First, and presents strategies used to enhance this readiness as informed by the assessment. Twenty-five community stakeholder interviews were conducted to assess four domains of readiness: (1) attitudes, perception, and knowledge of teen pregnancy; (2) perceived level of readiness; (3) resources, existing and current efforts; and (4) leadership. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed to identify key themes. Stakeholders acknowledged teen pregnancy as an issue but lacked contextual information. They also perceived the community as ready to address the issue and recognized some organizations already championing efforts. However, many key players were not involved, and ongoing data collection to assess teen pregnancy and prevention efforts was limited. Though many stakeholders were ready to engage in teen pregnancy prevention efforts, they required additional information and training to appropriately address the issue. In response to the assessment findings, several strategies were applied to address readiness and build Youth First partners' capacity to implement the community-wide initiative. Thus, to successfully implement community-wide prevention efforts, it is valuable to assess the level of community readiness to address health issues. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear explosives testing readiness evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valk, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This readiness evaluation considers hole selection and characterization, verification, containment issues, nuclear explosive safety studies, test authorities, event operations planning, canister-rack preparation, site preparation, diagnostic equipment setup, device assembly facilities and processes, device delivery and insertion, emplacement, stemming, control room activities, readiness briefing, arming and firing, test execution, emergency response and reentry, and post event analysis to include device diagnostics, nuclear chemistry, and containment. This survey concludes that the LLNL program and its supporting contractors could execute an event within six months of notification, and a second event within the following six months, given the NET group`s evaluation and the following three restraints: (1) FY94 (and subsequent year) funding is essentially constant with FY93, (2) Preliminary work for the initial event is completed to the historical sic months status, (3) Critical personnel, currently working in dual use technologies, would be recallable as needed.

  15. GRENADA. Renewables Readiness Assessment 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    Grenada, like many Caribbean islands, is dependent on costly oil imports for its energy needs, including the generation of electricity. The transition to renewable energy could potentially support price reductions and improve the overall competitiveness of key sectors of the economy, particularly tourism. This report provides facts and analysis to support the country's discussion on ways to move forward with the renewable energy agenda. IRENA is ready to provide support in the implementation of the actions identified in this report.

  16. Factors of children's school readiness

    OpenAIRE

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek; Urška Fekonja; Katja Bajc

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of preschool on children's school readiness in connection with their intellectual abilities, language competence, and parents' education. The sample included 219 children who were 68 to 83 months old and were attending the first year of primary school. Children were differentiated by whether or not they had attended preschool before starting school. Children's intellectual ability was determined using Raven's Coloured Progress...

  17. Fuel Price Effects on Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    31 B. Measuring the Response to Changes in Fuel Prices across Budget Years: Long- term Price Elasticity ...Changes in Fuel Prices across Budget Years: Long-term Price Elasticity In order to determine the responsiveness of inter-year OPTEMPO to inter-year... elasticity of OPTEMPO (our readiness measure) with respect to price . 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 33 1. Army Analysis In order to avoid overlooking

  18. Knowledge Management Readiness In Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanazi Sultan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To generate a comprehensive model of Knowledge Management Readiness In Organizationsintending greater value to its practical applicability. This study was based on both secondary and primary data grounded on the deductive paradigm of social research. Survey with 13 professionals in the current business setting was conducted to justify the research findings. The key criterion of KM Readiness In Organizations i.e. its dependency on human acts was ignored in many traditional KM models although literary works paid substantial value to the aspect. Applicability of conventional KM models in the current context was also limited. The study lacked consideration to the influence of organizational characteristics on KM practices based on organizational readiness. The number of respondents was also limited for a wide research such as this. As this study was mainly guided by the contemporary beliefs and attributes of organizational management the developed model is likely to find its worthy applicability in practical experiences. Due emphasis was provided to ethical soundness throughout the paper confirming its originality and value in terms that anti-plagiarism strictness was taken into context and self-infliction of information was avoided entirely.

  19. Bad Versus Good, What Matters More on the Treatment Floor? Relationships of Positive and Negative Events With Nurses' Burnout and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert R; Sliter, Michael; Mohr, Cynthia D; Sears, Lindsay E; Deese, Marylin Nicole; Wright, Robert R; Cadiz, David; Jacobs, Laurie

    2015-12-01

    Many investigators have reported the stressful aspects of nursing; fewer have focused on nurses' positive work experiences. For this study, we developed a 2 × 2 typology of positive and negative events related to the tasks of nursing work and the social and organizational context of that work: successes, supports, constraints, and conflicts. We hypothesized that positive events would predict engagement, negative events would predict burnout, and negative events would be more strongly related to both burnout and engagement. In secondary analyses of data from 310 acute care nurses who completed survey measures of workplace events at one time point and burnout and engagement measures approximately eight months later, regression results indicated that both positive and negative work events contributed to engagement, whereas only negative events were related to burnout. The results of dominance analyses established that constraints and conflicts more strongly predicted burnout than did supports and successes. Additionally, consistent with a "bad is stronger than good" perspective, the strongest predictor of engagement was lower constraints, although successes, supports, and conflicts also predicted engagement.

  20. T-cell receptor/CD28 engagement when combined with prostaglandin E2 treatment leads to potent activation of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumais, Nancy; Paré, Marie-Eve; Mercier, Simon; Bounou, Salim; Marriot, Susan J; Barbeau, Benoit; Tremblay, Michel J

    2003-10-01

    Infection with human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is characterized by long latency periods, indicating that viral gene expression is under tight control. There is presently little information available regarding the nature of extracellular stimuli that can transactivate the regulatory elements of HTLV-1 (i.e., long terminal repeat [LTR]). To gain insight into the biological importance of externally induced activation pathways in virus gene expression, primary and established T cells were transfected with HTLV-1-based reporter gene vectors and then were treated with agents that cross-linked the T-cell receptor (TCR) or the costimulatory CD28 molecule with prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We demonstrated that a potent induction of HTLV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity was seen only when the three agents were used in combination. Interestingly, similar observations were made when using C91/PL, a cell line that carries integrated HTLV-1 proviral DNA. This TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-mediated increase in virus transcription was dependent on protein kinase A activation and induction of the cAMP response element binding protein. Experiments with a mutated reporter construct further revealed the importance of the Tax-responsive elements in the HTLV-1 LTR in the observed up regulation of virus gene expression when TCR/CD28 engagement was combined with PGE(2) treatment. The protein tyrosine kinases p56(lck) and the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 were all found to be involved in TCR-CD28-PGE(2)-directed increase in HTLV-1 LTR activity. This study presents new information on the possible mechanisms underlying reactivation of this retrovirus.

  1. E-Government Readiness Assessment Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Omari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a general framework model for E-Government Readiness Assessment. There are six necessary key factors to implement any E-government initiative worldwide. These factors represent the basic components to be assessed before launching the "e-initiative" to guarantee the right implementation in the right direction. The organization building blocks need to be assessed are: Organizational Readiness, Governance and leadership Readiness, Customer Readiness, Competency Readiness, Technology Readiness and Legal Readiness[1]. In the Organizational readiness, bureaucratic nature of E-Governments, business process, long process delay and need for re-engineering will be discussed. In the Governance and Leadership Readiness, the importance of leadership and governance for the e-initiative, the importance of procedures, service level agreement, the way public officials perform, commitment and accountability for public jobs, all will be shown. In the Customer readiness, the main public concerns regarding accessibility, trust and security will be highlighted. In the Competency readiness, the lack of qualified personnel in the public sector and the different alternatives to overcome this issue will be discussed. In the Technology readiness, too many issues worth to be considered, such as hardware, software, communication, current technology, legacy systems, sharing applications and data and setting secure infrastructure to exchange services. The last factor is the Legal readiness where the adoption of the Jordanian Temporary law No 85 in the year 2001 "Electronic Transaction Law" ETL paved the road towards the big shift for e-initiative and privacy. Some of these will be discussed in detail. The need for this detail arises from the fact that all government activities are governed by law. For this reason, it is important to start from this key factor

  2. What factors affect patient access and engagement with clubfoot treatment in low- and middle-income countries? Meta-synthesis of existing qualitative studies using a social ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Sarah; Lavy, Christopher; Gooberman-Hill, Rachael

    2016-05-01

    To conduct a systematic synthesis of previous research to identify factors that affect treatment-seeking for clubfoot and community-level interventions to improve engagement in low- and middle-income counties. A search of five databases was conducted, and articles screened using six criteria. Quality was appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme checklist. Eleven studies were identified for inclusion. Analysis was informed by a social ecological model, which specifies five inter-related factors that may affect treatment-seeking: intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community or socio-cultural factors and public policy. Intrapersonal barriers experienced were a lack of income and additional responsibilities. At the interpersonal level, support from fathers, the extended family and wider community affected on treatment-seeking. Institutional or organisational factors included long distances to treatment centres, insufficient information about treatments and challenges following treatment. Guardians' beliefs about the causes of clubfoot shaped behaviour. At the level of public policy, two-tiered healthcare systems made it difficult for some groups to access timely care. Interventions to address these challenges included counselling sessions, outreach clinics, brace recycling and a range of education programmes. This study identifies factors that affect access and engagement with clubfoot treatment across diverse settings and strategies to address them. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    15-001098 Copy Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks Sarah K...other national challenges. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks...noted that the ability of the Military Health System to provide operational healthcare is measured by the readiness of its medical personnel and

  4. Context Matters: Support for Leader Developmental Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E; Reichard, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    Leader developers need to consider support for leader developmental readiness by examining organizational culture, job design and rewards, social support, and availability and structure of leader development programming.

  5. Learning through Play for School Readiness: A Training Program for Parents and Other Caregivers of Preschool Children. Learning Games To Strengthen Children's School Readiness Skills. [Videotape with Facilitator's Manual].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jerome; Singer, Dorothy

    This video-based program trains parents and other child caregivers to engage 3- to 5-year-olds in simple, motivating learning games to strengthen cognitive, social, and motor school-readiness skills. The training materials consist of a manual for training facilitators and a training video demonstrating how to play each learning game with preschool…

  6. Ready or Not...? Teen Sexuality and the Troubling Discourse of Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I explore how talk about being "ready" or "not ready" for sex shapes teen and adult understandings of sexuality. I argue that this "discourse of readiness" poses serious threats to teens' identity development, sexual decision making, and educators efforts to help them through these processes. To illustrate, I draw from my…

  7. Librarian readiness for research partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazure, Emily S; Alpi, Kristine M

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated health sciences librarians' knowledge and skill-based readiness to partner on sponsored research involving human participants. The authors developed and deployed, at two time points, a web-based survey on nine indicators of research activities with response choices reflecting the transtheoretical model of stages of behavior change. Librarians with research experience or membership in the Medical Library Association Research Section reported higher levels of having completed indicators. Our results suggest that creating awareness in precontemplation responders could encourage skill development. Mentoring and continuing education could support librarians who are contemplating or preparing to perform indicator activities.

  8. The Gap between Influence and Efficacy: College Readiness Training, Urban School Counselors, and the Promotion of Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitz-Romer, Mandy

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study presents 11 urban school counselors' perceptions of their graduate education in school counseling in relation to their engagement in college readiness counseling with low-income, 1st-generation college-bound students. Findings from 2 rounds of interviews suggest that intentional strategies to integrate postsecondary…

  9. Experiences of parents regarding a school-readiness intervention for pre-school children facilitated by Community Health Nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Prinsloo

    2015-01-01

    When CHN students engage with communities through service learning, a school-readiness intervention may serve as a powerful tool to provide parents with the support that is needed to empower them with the skills to contribute towards their children’s early childhood development. It may improve the parent–child relationship which is critical in the development of children.

  10. HIV testing experiences and their implications for patient engagement with HIV care and treatment on the eve of 'test and treat'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wringe, Alison; Moshabela, Mosa; Nyamukapa, Constance

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In view of expanding ‘test and treat’ initiatives, we sought to elicit how the experience of HIV testing influenced subsequent engagement in HIV care among people diagnosed with HIV. Methods: As part of a multisite qualitative study, we conducted in-depth interviews in Uganda, South Af...

  11. Measures of readiness for cognitive behavioural therapy in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Joshua; Charlesworth, Georgina; Scior, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a promising treatment for mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities but some may not be suited or ready. This review critically evaluates the quality and utility of measures of CBT readiness in people with intellectual disabilities. Twelve studies of six measures based on three aspects of CBT readiness were identified through systematic review. Across measures, measurement quality was largely poor or un-assessed. Only one study evaluated measurement change over the course of CBT. Not all participants with intellectual disabilities could 'pass' readiness measures and performance may be affected by levels of language and cognitive functioning. There was some evidence that CBT readiness is trainable with brief interventions. Before using readiness measures in a clinical context, further work is needed to extend initial evidence on recognising cognitive mediation as a CBT readiness ability. Given the lack of consensus as to the definition of CBT readiness and the heterogeneity of CBT interventions, future research could also focus on developing readiness measures using a bottom up approach, developing measures within the context of CBT interventions themselves, before further refining and establishing their psychometric properties. This paper is the first to systematically review measures of skills thought necessary to be ready for cognitive behavioural therapy in intellectual disabilities. The findings suggest that while readiness skills may be trainable with brief interventions, the available measures of these skills have not been fully evaluated for quality. Levels of functioning on these measures have yet to be established relative to those without intellectual disabilities and critically, there is very little evidence as to whether these skills are important in cognitive behavioural therapy process and outcome. We suggest that future research could focus on those constructs where there is preliminary

  12. Engagement in Training as a Mechanism to Understanding Fidelity of Implementation of the Responsive Classroom Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanless, Shannon B; Rimm-Kaufman, Sara E; Abry, Tashia; Larsen, Ross A; Patton, Christine L

    2015-11-01

    Fidelity of implementation of classroom interventions varies greatly, a reality that is concerning because higher fidelity of implementation relates to greater effectiveness of the intervention. We analyzed 126 fourth and fifth grade teachers from the treatment group of a randomized controlled trial of the Responsive Classroom® (RC) approach. Prior to training in the intervention, we assessed factors that had the potential to represent a teacher's readiness to implement with fidelity. These included teachers' observed emotional support, teacher-rated use of intervention practices, teacher-rated self-efficacy, teacher-rated collective responsibility, education level, and years of experience, and they were not directly related to observed fidelity of implementation 2 years later. Further analyses indicated, however, that RC trainers' ratings of teachers' engagement in the initial weeklong RC training mediated the relation between initial observed emotional support and later observed fidelity of implementation. We discuss these findings as a way to advance understanding of teachers' readiness to implement new interventions with fidelity.

  13. The impact of advanced pharmacy practice experiences on students' readiness for self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Donna; Haines, Stuart T; Plaza, Cecilia M; Sturpe, Deborah A; Williams, Greg; Rodriguez de Bittner, Magaly A; Roffman, David S

    2009-07-10

    To evaluate the impact of advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs) on doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students' readiness for self-directed learning. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) was administered to students prior to and after completing their APPEs. SDLRS is a validated instrument that determines the relative degree to which students have the attitudes and motivation to engage in self-directed learning. Seventy-seven (64%) students completed the SDLRS prior to starting their APPEs and 80 (67%) students completed the instrument after completing their APPEs. Forty-six (38%) students completed both. Prior to starting their APPEs, 74% of students scored greater than 150 on the SDLRS, indicating a high level of readiness for self-directed learning. No significant difference was found between the mean scores of students who took the SDLRS both prior to (159 +/- 20) and after completing their APPEs (159 +/- 24; p > 0.05). Students at our institution appear to be ready for self-directed learning but APPEs had a minimal impact on their readiness for self-directed learning.

  14. Engaging Your Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers love to see the spark of engagement when students eagerly engage in learning. But when teachers work with English language learners in the earliest stages of language acquisition, they're often unsure how to foster challenge and engagement with students who know such sparse English. Hill shares six key do's and don'ts for classroom…

  15. International Engagement Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    INTERNATIONAL ENGAGEMENT STRATEGY STATEMENT OF PURPOSE The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T... International Engagement Strategy is intended to establish clear goals and objectives to guide S&T’s international cooperative research, development... International Engagement Strategy, the 2015 White House National Security Strategy, the 2014 Quadrennial Homeland Security Review, and the DHS Fiscal

  16. Engaging Scholarship with Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Guillermina Gina

    2014-01-01

    A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

  17. Improving Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The…

  18. Kindergarten Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Readiness Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltero-Ruiz, Erlinda E.

    2013-01-01

    Children need to be ready to enter kindergarten, or they may begin to fall further and further behind. The achievement gap may start prior to children entering kindergarten due to their lack of early learning opportunities. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions of kindergarten teachers regarding which readiness skills preschool…

  19. From Readiness to Action: How Motivation Works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruglanski Arie W.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a new theoretical construct labeled motivational readiness. It is defined as the inclination, whether or not ultimately implemented, to satisfy a desire. A general model of readiness is described which builds on the work of prior theories, including animal learning models and personality approaches, and which aims to integrate a variety of research findings across different domains of motivational research. Components of this model include the Want state (that is, an individual’s currently active desire, and the Expectancy of being able to satisfy that Want. We maintain that the Want concept is the critical ingredient in motivational readiness: without it, readiness cannot exist. In contrast, some motivational readiness can exist without Expectancy. We also discuss the role of incentive in motivational readiness. Incentive is presently conceived of in terms of a Match between a Want and a Perceived Situational Affordance. Whereas in classic models incentive was portrayed as a first order determinant of motivational readiness, here we describe it as a second order factor which affects readiness by influencing Want, Expectancy, or both. The new model’s relation to its theoretical predecessors, and its implications for future research, also are discussed.

  20. Designing for user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Geisler, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    Designing for User Engagement on the Web: 10 Basic Principles is concerned with making user experience engaging. The cascade of social web applications we are now familiar with - blogs, consumer reviews, wikis, and social networking - are all engaging experiences. But engagement is an increasingly common goal in business and productivity environments as well. This book provides a foundation for all those seeking to design engaging user experiences rich in communication and interaction. Combining a handbook on basic principles with case studies, it provides readers with a ric

  1. Utility shopping: are consumers ready?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrados, A. [Public Interest Advocacy Centre, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    This report provides an overview of public readiness to deal with deregulation of the electric power industry , based on an analysis of public reaction to the deregulation of the transportation, telecommunications and natural gas industries which already have taken place. The report also examines the reasons why residential consumers have reason to be wary of deregulation. These include the likelihood of slow development of the intended competition, the consequent limits on consumer choices, the possibility of increased prices, decreased quality of service and erosion of social values such as affordability and accessibility. The report concludes with a number of recommendations aimed at ensuring the existence of workable competition for residential consumers, that reliable and meaningful information is available as competition in deregulated markets gets underway, that independent sources of information are widely available, and that basic consumer protection against deceptive and borderline marketing practices, a regulatory oversight mechanism and public reporting mechanisms are in place before competition begins. 33 refs.

  2. Maintenance-Ready Web Application Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion IVAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper tackles the subject of developing maintenance-ready web applications. Maintenance is presented as a core stage in a web application’s lifecycle. The concept of maintenance-ready is defined in the context of web application development. Web application maintenance tasks types are enunciated and suitable task types are identified for further analysis. The research hypothesis is formulated based on a direct link between tackling maintenance in the development stage and reducing overall maintenance costs. A live maintenance-ready web application is presented and maintenance related aspects are highlighted. The web application’s features, that render it maintenance-ready, are emphasize. The cost of designing and building the web-application to be maintenance-ready are disclosed. The savings in maintenance development effort facilitated by maintenance ready features are also disclosed. Maintenance data is collected from 40 projects implemented by a web development company. Homogeneity and diversity of collected data is evaluated. A data sample is presented and the size and comprehensive nature of the entire dataset is depicted. Research hypothesis are validated and conclusions are formulated on the topic of developing maintenance-ready web applications. The limits of the research process which represented the basis for the current paper are enunciated. Future research topics are submitted for debate.

  3. Psychological readiness of pregnant women to parenthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galjautdinova S. I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the results of a study of psychological readiness of pregnant women to parenthood are presented. Psychological readiness is defined as a structure consisting of three components: the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral, which is consistent with the single theory of psychological processes L. M. Vekkera. It was found that the main component that determines the high level of psychological readiness for motherhood is a cognitive component. The content of the cognitive component includes an understanding of the child as a value. Some results of the research of value orientations of pregnant women in the structure of psychological readiness for parenthood. To identify the value system of pregnant women, the method of “Value Orientations” by M. Rokich was applied. The analysis of empirical data was performed using factor analysis and U criterion of Mann-Whitney. Respondents were distributed into two age groups: first group of 21-25 years (56 persons, second group of 26-30 years (44 persons. All women are nulliparous. The younger age group of pregnant women is characterized by values that are directed at the outside world. Emotional component dominates in the structure of psychological readiness for motherhood. Values of women in the second group are aimed at children. Cognitive and behavioral components dominate in the structure of their psychological readiness for motherhood. Knowledge of the structure of psychological readiness of women to parenthood will help to diagnose disorders of maternal behavior, to design methods of its correction and prevention.

  4. Work readiness of graduate health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Arlene; Yong, Mellissa; Pang, Lisa; Fullarton, Christie; Costa, Beth; Dunning, A M Trisha

    2013-02-01

    The current exploratory study investigated work readiness among graduate health professionals. A critical incident technique was used to elicit perceptions regarding: strategies and skills that constitute work readiness among health professionals and the work readiness factors that help or hinder health graduates' transition and integration into the workplace. Fifteen medical graduates, 26 nursing graduates and five organisational representatives from a regional hospital in Victoria, Australia participated. Data were collected via qualitative interviews. Participants discussed a total of 92 critical incidents; 52 related to helping and 40 to hindering work readiness factors that impacted graduates' transition and integration experiences. A follow-up thematic analysis indentified four critical work readiness factors: social intelligence, organisational acumen, work competence and personal characteristics. While graduates and organisational representatives considered each factor important, some differences between the groups emerged. Organisational representative's perceived social intelligence and clinical skills critical graduate competencies, yet graduates were unprepared in these areas. The identified work readiness factors were consistent with past research and warrant further investigation of work readiness among a larger group of graduate health professionals in a range of contexts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A theory of organizational readiness for change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiner Bryan J

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Change management experts have emphasized the importance of establishing organizational readiness for change and recommended various strategies for creating it. Although the advice seems reasonable, the scientific basis for it is limited. Unlike individual readiness for change, organizational readiness for change has not been subject to extensive theoretical development or empirical study. In this article, I conceptually define organizational readiness for change and develop a theory of its determinants and outcomes. I focus on the organizational level of analysis because many promising approaches to improving healthcare delivery entail collective behavior change in the form of systems redesign--that is, multiple, simultaneous changes in staffing, work flow, decision making, communication, and reward systems. Discussion Organizational readiness for change is a multi-level, multi-faceted construct. As an organization-level construct, readiness for change refers to organizational members' shared resolve to implement a change (change commitment and shared belief in their collective capability to do so (change efficacy. Organizational readiness for change varies as a function of how much organizational members value the change and how favorably they appraise three key determinants of implementation capability: task demands, resource availability, and situational factors. When organizational readiness for change is high, organizational members are more likely to initiate change, exert greater effort, exhibit greater persistence, and display more cooperative behavior. The result is more effective implementation. Summary The theory described in this article treats organizational readiness as a shared psychological state in which organizational members feel committed to implementing an organizational change and confident in their collective abilities to do so. This way of thinking about organizational readiness is best suited for

  6. Prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system: Relationships with treatment retention and outcome among cocaine users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiluk, Brian D.; Serafini, Kelly; Malin-Mayor, Bo; Babuscio, Theresa A.; Nich, Charla; Carroll, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives A substantial portion of individuals entering treatment for substance use have been referred by the criminal justice system, yet there are conflicting reports regarding treatment engagement and outcome differences compared to those not referred. This study examined baseline characteristic and treatment outcome differences among cocaine-dependent individuals participating in cocaine treatment randomized trials. Methods This secondary analysis pooled samples across five completed randomized controlled trials, resulting in 434 participants. Of these, 67 (15%) were prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system. Results This subsample of criminal justice prompted (CJP) individuals did not differ from those not prompted by the criminal justice system in terms of gender, race/ethnicity, marital status, or age. However, the CJP group reported more years of regular cocaine use, more severe employment and legal problems, as well as less readiness to change prior to treatment. Treatment outcomes did not differ significantly from those without a criminal justice prompt, and on some measures the outcomes for CJP group were better (e.g., percentage of days cocaine abstinent, number of therapy sessions attended). Discussion and Conclusions These findings suggest that being prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system may not lead to poorer treatment engagement or substance use outcomes for individuals participating in randomized controlled treatment trials. Scientific Significance Despite some baseline indicators of poorer treatment prognosis, individuals who have been prompted to treatment by the criminal justice system have similar treatment outcomes as those presenting to treatment voluntarily. PMID:25809378

  7. The Player Engagement Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Engagement is an essential element of the player experience, and the concept is described in various ways in the literature. To gain a more detailed comprehension of this multifaceted concept, and in order to better understand what aspects can be used to evaluate engaging game play and to design...... engaging user experiences, this study investigates one dimension of player engagement by empirically identifying the components associated with the desire to continue playing. Based on a description of the characteristics of player engagement, a series of surveys were developed to discover the components......, categories and triggers involved in this process. By applying grounded theory to the analysis of the responses, a process-oriented player engagement framework was developed and four main components consisting of objectives, activities, accomplishments and affects as well as the corresponding categories...

  8. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    understanding of science to those of public engagement with science and technology (PEST), and the histories, or genealogies, of such models. Data from two qualitative studies-a case study of one of the United Kingdom'ssix Beacons for Public Engagement and a study of contract research staff-are used...... backgrounds, suggesting that multiple and overlapping meanings around PEST are derived from particular histories that have been brought together, through the rubric of public engagement, in assemblages such as the Beacons....

  9. The development of an online decision support tool for organizational readiness for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sobia; Timmings, Caitlyn; Moore, Julia E; Marquez, Christine; Pyka, Kasha; Gheihman, Galina; Straus, Sharon E

    2014-05-10

    Much importance has been placed on assessing readiness for change as one of the earliest steps of implementation, but measuring it can be a complex and daunting task. Organizations and individuals struggle with how to reliably and accurately measure readiness for change. Several measures have been developed to help organizations assess readiness, but these are often underused due to the difficulty of selecting the right measure. In response to this challenge, we will develop and test a prototype of a decision support tool that is designed to guide individuals interested in implementation in the selection of an appropriate readiness assessment measure for their setting. A multi-phase approach will be used to develop the decision support tool. First, we will identify key measures for assessing organizational readiness for change from a recently completed systematic review. Included measures will be those developed for healthcare settings (e.g., acute care, public health, mental health) and that have been deemed valid and reliable. Second, study investigators and field experts will engage in a mapping exercise to categorize individual items of included measures according to key readiness constructs from an existing framework. Third, a stakeholder panel will be recruited and consulted to determine the feasibility and relevance of the selected measures using a modified Delphi process. Fourth, findings from the mapping exercise and stakeholder consultation will inform the development of a decision support tool that will guide users in appropriately selecting change readiness measures. Fifth, the tool will undergo usability testing. Our proposed decision support tool will address current challenges in the field of organizational change readiness by aiding individuals in selecting a valid and reliable assessment measure that is relevant to user needs and practice settings. We anticipate that implementers and researchers who use our tool will be more likely to conduct

  10. Barriers and facilitators to patient and public engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions: protocol of a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Hanlon, Peter; O'Donnell, Catherine A; Garcia, Sonia; Glanville, Julie; Mair, Frances S

    2016-09-02

    Patients and the public are beginning to use digital health tools to assist in managing chronic illness, support independent living and self-care, and remain connected to health and care providers. However, engaging with and enrolling in digital health interventions, such as telehealth systems, mobile health applications, patient portals and personal health records, in order to use them varies considerably. Many factors affect people's ability to engage with and sign up to digital health platforms. The primary aim is to identify the barriers and facilitators patients and the public experience to engagement and recruitment to digital health interventions. The secondary aim is to identify engagement and enrolment strategies, leading if possible to a taxonomy of such approaches, and a conceptual framework of digital health engagement and recruitment processes. A systematic review of qualitative studies will be conducted by searching six databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and the ACM Digital Library for papers published between 2000 and 2015. Titles and abstracts along with full-text papers will be screened by two independent reviewers against predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A data extraction form will be used to provide details of the included studies. Quality assessment will be conducted using the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist. Any disagreements will be resolved through discussion with an independent third reviewer. Analysis will be guided by framework synthesis and informed by normalization process theory and burden of treatment theory, to aid conceptualisation of digital health engagement and recruitment processes. This systematic review of qualitative studies will explore factors affecting engagement and enrolment in digital health interventions. It will advance our understanding of readiness for digital health by examining the complex factors that affect patients' and the public's ability to

  11. Global e-Readiness - For What? Readiness for e-Banking (JITD)

    OpenAIRE

    Maugis, V.; Choucri, Nazli; Madnick, Stuart; Siegel, Michael; Gillett, Sharon; Haghseta, Farnaz; Zhu, Harry; Best, Mike

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid diffusion of the Internet worldwide, there has been considerable interest in the e-potentials of developing countries giving rise to a 1st generation of e-Readiness studies. Moreover, e-Readiness means different things to different people, in different contexts, and for different purposes. Despite strong merits, this first generation of e-Readiness studies assumed a fixed, one-size-fits-all set of requirements, regardless of the characteristics of individual countries, the inve...

  12. Health service providers in Somalia: their readiness to provide malaria case-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moonen Bruno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have highlighted the inadequacies of the public health sector in sub-Saharan African countries in providing appropriate malaria case management. The readiness of the public health sector to provide malaria case-management in Somalia, a country where there has been no functioning central government for almost two decades, was investigated. Methods Three districts were purposively sampled in each of the two self-declared states of Puntland and Somaliland and the south-central region of Somalia, in April-November 2007. A survey and mapping of all public and private health service providers was undertaken. Information was recorded on services provided, types of anti-malarial drugs used and stock, numbers and qualifications of staff, sources of financial support and presence of malaria diagnostic services, new treatment guidelines and job aides for malaria case-management. All settlements were mapped and a semi-quantitative approach was used to estimate their population size. Distances from settlements to public health services were computed. Results There were 45 public health facilities, 227 public health professionals, and 194 private pharmacies for approximately 0.6 million people in the three districts. The median distance to public health facilities was 6 km. 62.3% of public health facilities prescribed the nationally recommended anti-malarial drug and 37.7% prescribed chloroquine as first-line therapy. 66.7% of public facilities did not have in stock the recommended first-line malaria therapy. Diagnosis of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT or microscopy was performed routinely in over 90% of the recommended public facilities but only 50% of these had RDT in stock at the time of survey. National treatment guidelines were available in 31.3% of public health facilities recommended by the national strategy. Only 8.8% of the private pharmacies prescribed artesunate plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, while 53

  13. Anti-GITR Antibody Treatment Increases TCR Repertoire Diversity of Regulatory but not Effector T Cells Engaged in the Immune Response Against B16 Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scirka, Bozena; Szurek, Edyta; Pietrzak, Maciej; Rempala, Grzegorz; Kisielow, Pawel; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Miazek, Arkadiusz

    2017-06-21

    Crosslinking of glucocorticoid-induced TNF family-related receptor (GITR) with agonist antibodies restores cancer immunity by enhancing effector T cell (Teff) responses while interfering with intra-tumor regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and/or accumulation. However, how anti-GITR antibody infusion changes T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire of Teffs and Tregs engaged in anti-tumor immune response is unclear. Here, we used a transgenic mouse model (TCRmini) where T cells express naturally generated but limited TCR repertoire to trace the fate of individual T cells recognizing B16 melanoma in tumor-bearing mice, treated or non-treated with an anti-GITR monoclonal antibody DTA-1. Analysis of TCRs of CD4(+) T cells from these mice revealed that the TCR repertoire of dominant tumor-reactive Teff clones remained rather similar in treated and non-treated mice. In contrast, both tumor-associated and peripheral TCR repertoire of Tregs, which were mostly distinct from that of Teffs, underwent DTA-1 mediated remodeling characterized by depletion of dominant clones and an emergence of more diverse, low-frequency clones bearing increased numbers of TCRs shared with Teffs. We conclude that the DTA-1 infusion eliminates activated Tregs engaged in the initial maintenance of tolerogenic niche for tumor growth, but over time, it favors tumor replenishment by Tregs expressing an array of TCRs able to compete with Teffs for recognition of the same tumor antigens which may prevent its complete eradication.

  14. Factors preceding CRM readiness in small- and medium-sized tourism enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Vallabh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Customer relationship management (CRM is important to organisations striving for competitive advantage through building relationships with their customers.Research purpose: This study identified the factors preceding CRM and assessed selected South African small- and medium-sized tourism enterprises’ (SMTEs readiness for CRM.Motivation: CRM is likely to enhance SMTEs’ competitiveness. However, successful adoption and implementation of CRM is unlikely unless the organisation is ready for it.Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research approach and survey questionnaire yielded primary data from 332 respondent organisations selected by systematic sampling. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify the latent factors preceding CRM readiness. Organisational CRM readiness was assessed based on CRM maturity in terms of data collection, use and sharing throughout the organisation.Main findings: Respondent-organisations performed well on the four factors preceding CRM readiness − business strategy, customer strategy, touch points and competencies, skills and technology and also on data collections and use, but not on data sharing.Practical/Managerial implications: CRM practice is believed to assist organisations in tailoring products and services to customers’ needs, providing customer satisfaction, enhancing customer retention and ultimately improving the organisation’s competitiveness and profitability. CRM might fail if SMTEs do not have CRM-enabling conditions in place and a CRM readiness audit should therefore be performed.Contribution: The study contributes to a largely under-researched area concerning CRM in SMTEs by providing an improved understanding of the factors that will enable SMTEs to engage in CRM activities.

  15. Service Availability and Readiness Assessment of Maternal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    availability and the readiness of maternal, newborn and child health facilities to provide basic health care interventions for ... tetanus, syphilis, HIV, malaria, anemia and ... child mortality and morbidity in Madagascar, the .... Data analysis.

  16. From Readiness to Action: How Motivation Works

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arie W. Kruglanski; Marina Chernikova; Noa Schori-Eyal

    2014-01-01

    .... A general model of readiness is described which builds on the work of prior theories, including animal learning models and personality approaches, and which aims to integrate a variety of research...

  17. Social Interpretations of Readiness for Kindergarten.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Data from this ethnographic study of kindergartens in three communities suggest that teachers, parents, and the school as an institution interacted to develop a social interpretation of school readiness. This interpretation framed children's kindergarten experience in each community. (BC)

  18. Readiness for banking technologies in developing countries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    banking, internet banking and automated teller machine (ATM) banking to ... businesses in developing countries are building unique ways to market products ... characteristics such as technology readiness, it is therefore important for banks in.

  19. Improving Operational Readiness through Total Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-21

    DTIC AD-A236 611 EL CT F NAVAL WAR COLL GE C Newport, R. I. IMPROVING OPERATIONAL READINESS THROUGH TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT by Herb Westphal Defense...IMPROVING OPERATIONAL READINESS THROUGH TOTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT (TQM) A Case Study: The Defense Mapping Agency Combat Support Center (DMACSC) initiated a...of the Defense Mapping Agency Combat Support Center’s (DMACSC) Total Quality Management (TQM) improvement methodology. This allows the reader to

  20. Readiness Reporting for an Adaptive Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 167 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...stability operations, for example, are unlikely to be decimated by an enemy, and short of that it is difficult if not impossible to gauge how well a...Office, June 2011e. 18 ARC, 2010. 19 ARC, 2011. 20 John T. Dewey , Defense Readiness Reporting System: A Better Way to Measure Readiness? USAWC

  1. Combat ready clamp medic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovmassian, Robert V; Kragh, John F; Dubick, Michael A; Baer, David G; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2012-01-01

    Junctional hemorrhage control device use on the battlefield might be lifesaving, but little experience is reported. The purpose of the present case report is to detail prehospital use of the Combat Ready Clamp (called the CRoC by its users, Combat Medical Systems, Fayetteville, NC; Instructions for Use, 2010) in casualty care in order to increase awareness of junctional hemorrhage control. The CRoC was used to control difficult inguinal bleeding on the battlefield for an Afghani man with a hindquarter traumatic amputation. The device promptly controlled exsanguination from a critical injury when placed during rotary-wing casualty evacuation. The flight medic applied the device in 90 seconds. The device performed well without complications to control bleeding. The CRoC, a new junctional hemorrhage control device, was used as indicated on the battlefield with mechanical and physiologic success and without device problems. By controlling difficult inguinal bleeding resulting from battlefield trauma, the device facilitated casualty stabilization and delivery to a surgical facility. The device facilitated the ability of a new flight medic to focus his expertise on a critically injured battlefield casualty with demonstrable success. 2012.

  2. Information Assurance and Forensic Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangalos, Georgios; Katos, Vasilios

    Egalitarianism and justice are amongst the core attributes of a democratic regime and should be also secured in an e-democratic setting. As such, the rise of computer related offenses pose a threat to the fundamental aspects of e-democracy and e-governance. Digital forensics are a key component for protecting and enabling the underlying (e-)democratic values and therefore forensic readiness should be considered in an e-democratic setting. This position paper commences from the observation that the density of compliance and potential litigation activities is monotonically increasing in modern organizations, as rules, legislative regulations and policies are being constantly added to the corporate environment. Forensic practices seem to be departing from the niche of law enforcement and are becoming a business function and infrastructural component, posing new challenges to the security professionals. Having no a priori knowledge on whether a security related event or corporate policy violation will lead to litigation, we advocate that computer forensics need to be applied to all investigatory, monitoring and auditing activities. This would result into an inflation of the responsibilities of the Information Security Officer. After exploring some commonalities and differences between IS audit and computer forensics, we present a list of strategic challenges the organization and, in effect, the IS security and audit practitioner will face.

  3. Engaging Faculty across the Community Engagement Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorski, Irena; Mehta, Khanjan

    2016-01-01

    There currently exists an incompatibility between the demands of university administrators for increased community engagement and the realities facing faculty who want to integrate it into their academic coursework, research, and professional service. This article provides insight on the complex challenges preventing faculty from becoming involved…

  4. Engagement Means Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  5. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, debate on women in academic science has been extended to academics' engagement with industry. We suggest that women tend to engage less in industry collaboration than their male colleagues of similar status. We argue that differences are mitigated by the presence of other women and by s...

  6. Community Engagement? Let's Dance!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Paul

    2008-01-01

    School districts across the nation are reaching out to their communities in hopes of creating support for their programs. Toward that end, this article provides a rationale for and an overview of the elements of effective community engagement. The author outlines the need and analyzes the shift toward new approaches in community engagement. Next,…

  7. Defining Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelson, Rick D.; Flick, Arend

    2011-01-01

    Few terms in the lexicon of higher education today are invoked more frequently, and in more varied ways, than "engagement". The phrase "student engagement" has come to refer to how "involved" or "interested" students appear to be in their learning and how "connected" they are to their classes, their institutions, and each other. As measured by…

  8. Civic Learning and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Martha; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2013-01-01

    For decades, the US education system has failed to adequately combat a decline of civic engagement and awareness, resulting in what many are now calling a "civics recession." The good news is that there is growing awareness, at all levels, that we need new and concerted efforts to make civic learning and engagement a core component of every…

  9. On making engagement tangible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den Egon L.; Spink, A.J.; Grieco, F.; Krips, O.E.; Loijens, L.W.S.; Noldus, L.P.J.J.; Zimmerman, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this article the complexity of the construct engagement and three theories on this topic are discussed. Csikszentmihalyi's theory of flow is taken as starting point for the measurement of engagement. The measurement of each of its eight aspects is discussed, including its pros and cons. Regrettab

  10. Engagement Means Everyone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  11. Participation-engagement: a philosophically based heuristic for prioritizing clinical interventions in the treatment of comorbid, complex, and chronic psychiatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Golan; Davidson, Larry

    2009-01-01

    We propose Participation-Engagement (PAR-EN) as a philosophically based heuristic for prioritizing interventions in comorbid, complex, and chronic psychiatric conditions. Drawing from 1) the sociologist Talcott Parsons, 2) the continental-philosophical tradition, and 3) our own previous work (Davidson & Shahar, 2009; Shahar, 2004, 2006), we argue that participation in personally meaningful life goals represents a hallmark of mental health. Symptoms and vulnerabilities that impede such participation should therefore be targeted vigorously, whereas others which do not pose such imminent threats should assume a secondary focus, if at all. Winnicott's (1987) notion of the spontaneous gesture, the importance of daily activities as reflecting patients' participation, and the dialectics of interpersonal relatedness and self-definition, are introduced as guidelines for implementing PAR-EN. Implications for clinical assessment and the therapeutic relationship are discussed.

  12. Readiness for self-directed learning: validation of a new scale with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Graham D; Ginns, Paul

    2009-10-01

    Students in higher education are expected to make decisions about the depth and breadth of their study, and so self-direct their learning. Students vary in their willingness or readiness to engage in self-directed learning (SDL). This study examines the factorial validity of a new instrument, the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS) to measure readiness for SDL in medical students. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted to determine the factor structure of the SDLRS for a sample of 232 first-year students in a hybrid problem-based learning (PBL) medical programme. Estimates of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) were obtained for extracted factors that were compared with the three-factor structure obtained in a previous study of nursing students. Four factors 'Critical self-evaluation', 'Learning self-efficacy', 'Self-determination' and 'Effective organization for learning' all showed suitable levels of reliability. A revised 38 item SDLRS is a valid measure of medical students' readiness to direct their own learning in a hybrid PBL programme.

  13. Pathways to School Readiness: Executive Functioning Predicts Academic and Social-Emotional Aspects of School Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Trisha D.; Hund, Alycia M.; Hesson-McInnis, Matthew S.; Roman, Zachary J.

    2017-01-01

    The current study specified the extent to which hot and cool aspects of executive functioning predicted academic and social-emotional indicators of school readiness. It was unique in focusing on positive aspects of social-emotional readiness, rather than problem behaviors. One hundred four 3-5-year-old children completed tasks measuring executive…

  14. The ABCs of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Seth A.; Nuland, Leila Richey; Parsons, Allison Ward

    2014-01-01

    Student engagement is an important consideration for teachers and administrators because it is explicitly associated with achievement. What the authors call the ABC's of engagement they outline as: Affective engagement, Behavioral engagement, and Cognitive engagement. They also present "Three Things Every Teacher Needs to Know about…

  15. Closing the RN engagement gap: which drivers of engagement matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Reynaldo R; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2011-06-01

    This study focused on the relationship between RNs' perceptions of drivers of engagement and their workplace engagement. In multiple studies, mostly not in healthcare, researchers found that employees engaged in their work are in the minority. This phenomenon is referred to as the engagement gap. Drivers of engagement and levels of nurse engagement were measured among 510 RNs from a large urban academic university center. The greatest difference between engaged and not-engaged nurses was in the manager action index; the smallest difference was in the salary and benefits index. The passion-for-nursing index was the only significant driver related to RN levels of engagement when controlling for all the other drivers. Nurse managers play a critical role in promoting employee engagement. The nurses' passion for nursing is an important dimension of engagement. Salary and benefits were not primary drivers in employee engagement. Copyright © 2011 Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  16. Older Consumers' Readiness for e-Health in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Michelle; Waterworth, Susan; Aung, Htein

    2016-01-01

    The increase in numbers of older people in the population and their incidence of long term conditions means their readiness for e-health is imperative. This cross sectional survey set in primary health care in New Zealand sought to understand how older people are accessing health information. A convenience sample (n = 263) found one third had been on-line and this was more likely to be those with poorer health. Free telephone services and receiving health information in person were preferred, with little use of email or text messaging found. Information found on-line was considered useful to understand their health conditions, treatment options and for decision-making.

  17. The Effects of Prescribed, Sequential Programs of Reading and Mathematics on the Readiness of Middle Class Kindergarten Children and on Their Subsequent Achievement in Reading and Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Jean Napier

    The effects of a prescribed, sequential program of reading and mathematics readiness activities were investigated in an experimental study of 229 middle-class kindergarten children. Eight of 16 kindergarten classes received the experimental treatment for six months; the other eight served as a control group. Readiness tests were given before and…

  18. Measuring user engagement

    CERN Document Server

    Lalmas, Mounia; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2014-01-01

    User engagement refers to the quality of the user experience that emphasizes the positive aspects of interacting with an online application and, in particular, the desire to use that application longer and repeatedly. User engagement is a key concept in the design of online applications (whether for desktop, tablet or mobile), motivated by the observation that successful applications are not just used, but are engaged with. Users invest time, attention, and emotion in their use of technology, and seek to satisfy pragmatic and hedonic needs. Measurement is critical for evaluating whether online

  19. Service engagement in first episode psychosis: clinical and premorbid correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macbeth, Angus; Gumley, Andrew; Schwannauer, Matthias; Fisher, Rebecca

    2013-05-01

    Engagement can be understood as a multifactorial process, incorporating acceptance of treatment, therapeutic rapport, and collaboration in a shared goal of clinical and functional recovery. Difficulties in engagement with clinical services represent a risk factor for treatment discontinuation in first episode psychosis. The current study explored the associations between engagement, clinical, and preonset variables. We report the cross-sectional data on a Scottish sample with first episode psychosis, characterized in terms of psychotic symptoms, premorbid adjustment, duration of untreated psychosis, and clinician-rated engagement. Poorer clinician-rated engagement was associated with greater positive and negative symptoms, greater general psychopathology, and poorer premorbid social adjustment. In a regression analysis, only severity of negative symptoms predicted engagement. The study highlights the role of negative symptoms and impairments in social functioning as factors associated with poorer engagement with clinical services. The value of detailed assessment of social and premorbid functioning is highlighted.

  20. Achieving Provider Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Geva; Pappas, Yannis; Car, Josip; Majeed, Azeem; Harris, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The literature on integrated care is limited with respect to practical learning and experience. Although some attention has been paid to organizational processes and structures, not enough is paid to people, relationships, and the importance of these in bringing about integration. Little is known, for example, about provider engagement in the organizational change process, how to obtain and maintain it, and how it is demonstrated in the delivery of integrated care. Based on qualitative data from the evaluation of a large-scale integrated care initiative in London, United Kingdom, we explored the role of provider engagement in effective integration of services. Using thematic analysis, we identified an evolving engagement narrative with three distinct phases: enthusiasm, antipathy, and ambivalence, and argue that health care managers need to be aware of the impact of professional engagement to succeed in advancing the integrated care agenda. PMID:25212855

  1. A Media-Rich Curriculum for Improving Early Literacy Outcomes of Low-Income Children: Evaluation Results for the "Ready to Learn" Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penuel, William R.; Bates, Lauren; Townsend, Eve; Gallagher, Lawrence P.; Pasnik, Shelley; Llorente, Carlin

    2010-01-01

    Described here is a study on the efficacy of a digital media-rich curriculum based on the idea that children can learn best from "media synergy", that is, when children have opportunities to learn skills by engaging in repeated practice with them in many different formats and media (Neuman, 1995). The study is part of the "Ready to…

  2. The Development of Reading Skills in Kindergarten Influence of Parental Beliefs about School Readiness, Family Activities, and Children's Attitudes to School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Children's early home learning experiences are important influences on children's adjustment and achievement in the early years of school. This study explores the relationships between parental beliefs about school readiness, family engagement in home learning activities, on children's attitudes to school as reported by parents, and children's…

  3. Medarbejderinvolvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasle, Peter; Thoft, Eva

    2000-01-01

    En vurdering af betingelserne for at udvikle medarbejder involvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering.......En vurdering af betingelserne for at udvikle medarbejder involvering og engagement i arbejdspladsvurdering....

  4. Does engagement with exposure yield better outcomes? Components of presence as a predictor of treatment response for virtual reality exposure therapy for social phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Mehta, Natasha; Tone, Erin B; Anderson, Page L

    2011-08-01

    Virtual reality exposure (VRE) has been shown to be effective for treating a variety of anxiety disorders, including social phobia. Presence, or the level of connection an individual feels with the virtual environment, is widely discussed as a critical construct both for the experience of anxiety within a virtual environment and for a successful response to VRE. Two published studies show that whereas generalized presence relates to fear ratings during VRE, it does not relate to treatment response. However, presence has been conceptualized as multidimensional, with three primary factors (spatial presence, involvement, and realness). These factors can be linked to other research on the facilitation of fear during exposure, inhibitors of treatment response (e.g., distraction), and more recent theoretical discussions of the mechanisms of exposure therapy, such as Bouton's description of expectancy violation. As such, one or more of these components of presence may be more strongly associated with the experience of fear during VRE and treatment response than the overarching construct. The current study (N=41) evaluated relations between three theorized components of presence, fear ratings during VRE, and treatment response for VRE for social phobia. Results suggest that total presence and realness subscale scores were related to in-session peak fear ratings. However, only scores on the involvement subscale significantly predicted treatment response. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Assessment of organizational readiness for health promotion policy implementation: test of a theoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütten, A; Röger, U; Abu-Omar, K; Frahsa, A

    2009-09-01

    Models explaining the engagement of organizations in different policy sectors in health promotion policy implementation often utilize retrospective data. The current study attempted to model determinants of organizational readiness (goals, resources, obligation, opportunities) in supporting health policy implementation prospectively. Twenty qualitative interviews with representatives of organizations from different policy sectors, levels of government and organizational legal entities were conducted at the beginning of a project for the promotion of physical activity among women in difficult life situations. Organizational support in developing, implementing and disseminating the project was documented over 36 months. Results indicated that in most organizations, determinants were not favorable for health promotion policy action for physical activity among women in difficult life situations. Six organizations did not report any favorable determinant, and two organizations reported four. The other 12 organizations reported positive results for some of the determinants. Project work received support from 6 out of the 20 organizations. A case study of three organizations indicated that engagement or disengagement of organizations in health promotion policy actions might be partly explained by the theoretical model. The prospective assessment of organizational readiness in implementing health promotion policy is highly relevant for health promotion. Considering the proposed theoretical framework may aid in advancing our understanding of factors that are related to organizational engagement in health promotion actions.

  6. Patient Readiness to Exercise After Cardiac Surgery: Development of the Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheawwan, Pataraporn; Chaiyawat, Waraporn; Aungsuroch, Yupin; Wu, Yow-Wu Bill

    2016-01-01

    Readiness to change plays a significant role in patient adherence to an exercise regimen; thus, accurate assessment of readiness to change is necessary to direct interventions. To date, an accurate scale for measuring readiness to exercise after cardiac surgery is not available. The purpose of this study was to develop the Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire for use among Thai cardiac surgery patients and to evaluate its psychometric properties. The Readiness to Change Exercise Questionnaire was developed based on the Transtheoretical Model, a comprehensive literature review, and input from experts and cardiac surgery patients. Participants were 533 patients who had undergone cardiac surgery within the previous 3 months. The study was conducted in 7 hospitals in 4 geographical regions of Thailand. Confirmatory factor analysis showed satisfactory goodness of fit for the 13-item scale. The analysis supported a 4-factor structure corresponding to 4 readiness stages: precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, and action. Cronbach's α coefficients were .68 for precontemplation, .75 for contemplation, .72 for preparation, and .75 for action. The scale was found to be a valid and reliable instrument for the determination of patient readiness to exercise after cardiac surgery. However, further testing of the scale is needed to confirm its concurrent and predictive validity.

  7. Organizational readiness in specialty mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Alison B; Cohen, Amy N; Young, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    Implementing quality improvement efforts in clinics is challenging. Assessment of organizational "readiness" for change can set the stage for implementation by providing information regarding existing strengths and deficiencies, thereby increasing the chance of a successful improvement effort. This paper discusses organizational assessment in specialty mental health, in preparation for improving care for individuals with schizophrenia. To assess organizational readiness for change in specialty mental health in order to facilitate locally tailored implementation strategies. EQUIP-2 is a site-level controlled trial at nine VA medical centers (four intervention, five control). Providers at all sites completed an organizational readiness for change (ORC) measure, and key stakeholders at the intervention sites completed a semi-structured interview at baseline. At the four intervention sites, 16 administrators and 43 clinical staff completed the ORC, and 38 key stakeholders were interviewed. The readiness domains of training needs, communication, and change were the domains with lower mean scores (i.e., potential deficiencies) ranging from a low of 23.8 to a high of 36.2 on a scale of 10-50, while staff attributes of growth and adaptability had higher mean scores (i.e., potential strengths) ranging from a low of 35.4 to a high of 41.1. Semi-structured interviews revealed that staff perceptions and experiences of change and decision-making are affected by larger structural factors such as change mandates from VA headquarters. Motivation for change, organizational climate, staff perceptions and beliefs, and prior experience with change efforts contribute to readiness for change in specialty mental health. Sites with less readiness for change may require more flexibility in the implementation of a quality improvement intervention. We suggest that uptake of evidence-based practices can be enhanced by tailoring implementation efforts to the strengths and deficiencies of the

  8. Design Considerations for mHealth Programs Targeting Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit: Results of a Sequential Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffner, Jaimee; Hohl, Sarah; Klasnja, Predrag; Catz, Sheryl L

    2017-01-01

    . Results generally did not vary by stage of change for quitting smoking (precontemplation vs contemplation). The least popular feature was the ability to share progress via social media. Relevant to future marketing or distribution considerations, smokers were price-sensitive and valued empirically validated programs. Program source, expert recommendations, and user ratings were also important considerations. Conclusions Smokers who are not yet ready to quit represent an important target group for intervention. Study findings suggest that many of these individuals are receptive to using mHealth tools to reduce or quit smoking, despite not having made a commitment to quit yet. The preferences for specific mHealth intervention features, functionality, and content outlined in this paper can aid addiction treatment experts, design specialists, and software developers interested in creating engaging interventions for smokers who want to quit in the future but are not yet committed to this important health goal. PMID:28283465

  9. Design Considerations for mHealth Programs Targeting Smokers Not Yet Ready to Quit: Results of a Sequential Mixed-Methods Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Jennifer B; Heffner, Jaimee; Hohl, Sarah; Klasnja, Predrag; Catz, Sheryl L

    2017-03-10

    change for quitting smoking (precontemplation vs contemplation). The least popular feature was the ability to share progress via social media. Relevant to future marketing or distribution considerations, smokers were price-sensitive and valued empirically validated programs. Program source, expert recommendations, and user ratings were also important considerations. Smokers who are not yet ready to quit represent an important target group for intervention. Study findings suggest that many of these individuals are receptive to using mHealth tools to reduce or quit smoking, despite not having made a commitment to quit yet. The preferences for specific mHealth intervention features, functionality, and content outlined in this paper can aid addiction treatment experts, design specialists, and software developers interested in creating engaging interventions for smokers who want to quit in the future but are not yet committed to this important health goal.

  10. Development of a Faith-Based Mental Health Literacy Program to Improve Treatment Engagement Among Caribbean Latinos in the Northeastern United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Susan; Cordero, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Depression is one of the leading causes of years lived with disability (YLDs) worldwide. Although depression can be successfully treated, 75% of Americans do not receive care. Treatment rates among Latinos immigrants are significantly lower than non-immigrant Latinos and non-Hispanic Whites. Known factors for mental health-care disparities such as poverty, insurance coverage, language barriers, and access to specialty mental health services in Latino neighborhoods do not fully explain the differences in treatment rates. Significant, but poorly understood factors influencing depression treatment among Latinos in the United States are lack of culturally congruent care, low mental health literacy, and stigma. Even though churches are a major source of health information, social and spiritual support for Latinos, the conceptualization of culturally congruent care rarely addresses religious beliefs. Therefore, one strategy to reduce disparities in depression treatment is to partner with churches to address faith-based stigma. Community-based participatory research is recognized as a methodology particularly well suited for creating successful culturally targeted interventions. The purpose of this article is to describe the process of creating a faith-based mental health literacy intervention in the Caribbean Latino community using the principles of community-based participatory research. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. The Calculus Concept Readiness (CCR) Instrument: Assessing Student Readiness for Calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Marilyn; West, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Calculus Concept Readiness (CCR) instrument is based on the broad body of mathematics education research that has revealed major understandings, representational abilities, and reasoning abilities students need to construct in precalculus level courses to be successful in calculus. The CCR is a 25-item multiple-choice instrument, and the CCR taxonomy articulates what the CCR assesses. The methodology used to develop and validate the CCR is described and illustrated. Results from administering the CCR as a readiness examination in calculus are provided along with data to guide others in using the CCR as a readiness examination for beginning calculus.

  12. High-oleic ready-to-use therapeutic food maintains docosahexaenoic acid status in severe malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) is the preferred treatment for uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition. It contains large amounts of linoleic acid and little a-linolenic acid, which may reduce the availability of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to the recovering child...

  13. Balancing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenna, J Thomas; Akomo, Peter; Bahwere, Paluku;

    2015-01-01

    Ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTFs) are a key component of a life-saving treatment for young children who present with uncomplicated severe acute malnutrition in resource limited settings. Increasing recognition of the role of balanced dietary omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (P...

  14. Acceptability of locally produced ready-to-use therapeutic foods in Ethiopia, Ghana, Pakistan and India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful treatment of severe acute malnutrition has been achieved with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), but only 15% of children with severe acute malnutrition receive RUTF. The objective of this study was to determine whether new formulations of RUTF produced using locally available ingredie...

  15. Abuso e dependência de maconha: comparação entre sexos e preparação para mudanças comportamentais entre usuários que iniciam a busca por tratamento Cannabis abuse and dependency: differences between men and women and readiness to behavior change among users seeking treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fernandes

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Descrever o perfil sociodemográfico de usuários de maconha que iniciam tratamento e comparar os sexos dos indivíduos em relação aos estágios de prontidão para mudança e uso associado de outras drogas. MÉTODO: Estudo transversal descritivo, com amostra não probabilística de indivíduos que ligaram para um teleatendimento especializado em dependência química. RESULTADOS: A amostra se constituiu de 72% de indivíduos do sexo masculino na faixa etária de 12 a 25 anos. Um percentual de 85,5% fazia uso associado de outras drogas. O estágio motivacional predominante foi de ação (56%, sem diferenças entre sexos (p = 0,4. Os homens mais frequentemente procuraram auxílio para o tratamento do uso de maconha. CONCLUSÕES: Com base nesses dados, foi possível delinear o perfil dos usuários de maconha para auxiliar no direcionamento de informações e atendimento adequado.OBJECTIVES: To describe the social and demographic profile of cannabis users seeking treatment and to compare differences between sex in relation to readiness to behavior change and in relation to associated use of marijuana and other drugs. METHOD: A cross-sectional, descriptive study including a nonprobability sample of individuals who called a chemical dependency hotline. RESULTS: The sample comprised 72% male individuals aged between 12 and 25 years. The sample was composed by 85.5% used other drugs in association with cannabis. The action stage was the most frequent stage of readiness to behavior change observed, in 56% of the callers, with no differences between sex (p = 0.4. Men more frequently sought treatment for the use of cannabis. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings allowed delineating a profile of cannabis users, so as to better guide the provision of adequate information and treatment services.

  16. Should India Use Commercially Produced Ready To Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF For Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    radha holla

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Globally, nearly 20 million children under five suffer from Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM, a condition which contributes to one million child deaths annually. In India 48% of children under five years of age are stunted and 43 percent are underweight; almost 8 million suffer from SAM. Malnutrition is not a new problem in India, nor is SAM. Several hospitals and non-government organizations are engaged in community-based management of malnutrition using locally produced/procured and locally processed foods along with intensive nutrition education. These programs enable parents to meet the nutritional requirements of their children with foods that are available at low cost. The Supreme Court of India has also directed the government to universalize the Integrated Child Development Scheme and provide one hot cooked meal to children under six years of age to supplement their nutrition. The blame for the increasing number of severely malnourish children can be laid at the door of policies that have destroyed poor people’s access to food. Nonetheless, there is urgent need to ensure that these children do not die; that they recover and maintain a healthy nutritional status. The current thinking – that a centrally produced and processed Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF should supplant the locally prepared indigenous foods in treatment of SAM – ignores the multiple causes of malnutrition and destroys the diversity of potential solutions based on locally available foods. This position paper has been drafted by Dr. Vandana Prasad, Radha Holla and Dr. Arun Gupta, members of the Working Group for Children Under Six – a joint effort of Jan Swasthya Abhiyan (People’s Health Movement – India and the Right to Food Campaign which been advocating for the last three years with the Indian government for decentralized and community-based strategies to combat and prevent malnutrition in children.

  17. The effect of engaging unpaid informal providers on case detection and treatment initiation rates for TB and HIV in rural Malawi (Triage Plus): A cluster randomised health system intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, George; Faragher, Brian; Sanudi, Lifah; Namakhoma, Ireen; Banda, Hastings; Malmborg, Rasmus; Thomson, Rachael; Squire, S Bertel

    2017-01-01

    The poor face barriers in accessing services for tuberculosis (TB) and Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) disease. A cluster randomised trial was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of engaging unpaid informal providers (IPs) to promote access in a rural district. The intervention consisted of training unpaid IPs in TB and HIV disease recognition, sputum specimen collection, appropriate referrals, and raising community awareness. In total, six clusters were defined in the study areas. Through a pair-matched cluster randomization process, three clusters (average cluster population = 200,714) were allocated to receive the intervention in the Early arm. Eleven months later the intervention was rolled out to the remaining three clusters (average cluster population = 209,564)-the Delayed arm. Treatment initiation rates for TB and Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures included testing rates for TB and HIV. We report the results of the comparisons between the Early and Delayed arms over the 23 month trial period. Data were obtained from patient registers. Poisson regression models with robust standard errors were used to express the effectiveness of the intervention as incidence rate ratios (IRR). The Early and Delayed clusters were well matched in terms of baseline monthly mean counts and incidence rate ratios for TB and ART treatment initiation. However there were fewer testing and treatment initiation facilities in the Early clusters (TB treatment n = 2, TB testing n = 7, ART initiation n = 3, HIV testing n = 20) than in the Delayed clusters (TB treatment n = 4, TB testing n = 9, ART initiation n = 6, HIV testing n = 18). Overall there were more HIV testing and treatment centres than TB testing and treatment centres. The IRR was 1.18 (95% CI: 0.903-1.533; p = 0.112) for TB treatment initiation and 1.347 (CI:1.00-1.694; p = 0.049) for ART initiation in the first 12 months and the IRR were 0.552 (95% CI:0

  18. Management assessment of tank waste remediation system contractor readiness to proceed with phase 1B privatization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honeyman, J.O.

    1998-01-09

    This Management Assessment of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Contractor Readiness to Proceed With Phase 1B Privatization documents the processes used to determine readiness to proceed with tank waste treatment technologies from private industry, now known as TWRS privatization. An overall systems approach was applied to develop action plans to support the retrieval and disposal mission of the TWRS Project. The systems and infrastructure required to support the mission are known. Required systems are either in place or plans have been developed to ensure they exist when needed. Since October 1996 a robust system engineering approach to establishing integrated Technical Baselines, work breakdown structures, tank farms organizational structure and configurations, work scope, and costs has become part of the culture within the TWRS Project. An analysis of the programmatic, management, and technical activities necessary to declare readiness to proceed with execution of the mission demonstrates that the system, personnel, and hardware will be on-line and ready to support the private contractors. The systems approach included defining the retrieval and disposal mission requirements and evaluating the readiness of the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) team to support initiation of waste processing by the private contractors in June 2002 and to receive immobilized waste shortly thereafter. The Phase 1 feed delivery requirements from the private contractor Requests for Proposal were reviewed. Transfer piping routes were mapped, existing systems were evaluated, and upgrade requirements were defined.

  19. Assessing Community Readiness to Reduce Childhood Diarrheal Disease and Improve Food Security in Dioro, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borresen, Erica C; Stone, Cordelia; Boré, Abdoulaye; Cissoko, Alima; Maiga, Ababacar; Koita, Ousmane A; Ryan, Elizabeth P

    2016-06-08

    Diarrhea and malnutrition represent leading causes of death for children in Mali. Understanding a community's needs and ideas are critical to ensure the success of prevention and treatment interventions for diarrheal disease, as well as to improve food security to help reduce malnutrition. The objective of this study was to incorporate the Community Readiness Model (CRM) for the issues of childhood diarrheal disease and food security in Mali to measure baseline community readiness prior to any program implementation. Thirteen key respondents residing in Dioro, Mali were selected based on varied social roles and demographics and completed two questionnaires on these public health issues. The overall readiness score to reduce childhood diarrheal disease was 5.75 ± 1.0 standard deviation (preparation stage). The overall readiness score to improve food security was 5.5 ± 0.5 standard deviation (preparation stage). The preparation stage indicates that at least some of the community have basic knowledge regarding these issues, and want to act locally to reduce childhood diarrhea and improve food security and nutrition. Proposed activities to increase community readiness on these issues are provided and are broad enough to allow opportunities to implement community- and culturally-specific activities by the Dioro community.

  20. Assessing Community Readiness to Reduce Childhood Diarrheal Disease and Improve Food Security in Dioro, Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica C. Borresen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea and malnutrition represent leading causes of death for children in Mali. Understanding a community’s needs and ideas are critical to ensure the success of prevention and treatment interventions for diarrheal disease, as well as to improve food security to help reduce malnutrition. The objective of this study was to incorporate the Community Readiness Model (CRM for the issues of childhood diarrheal disease and food security in Mali to measure baseline community readiness prior to any program implementation. Thirteen key respondents residing in Dioro, Mali were selected based on varied social roles and demographics and completed two questionnaires on these public health issues. The overall readiness score to reduce childhood diarrheal disease was 5.75 ± 1.0 standard deviation (preparation stage. The overall readiness score to improve food security was 5.5 ± 0.5 standard deviation (preparation stage. The preparation stage indicates that at least some of the community have basic knowledge regarding these issues, and want to act locally to reduce childhood diarrhea and improve food security and nutrition. Proposed activities to increase community readiness on these issues are provided and are broad enough to allow opportunities to implement community- and culturally-specific activities by the Dioro community.

  1. CRIMSON [CRisis plan IMpact: Subjective and Objective coercion and eNgagement] Protocol: A randomised controlled trial of joint crisis plans to reduce compulsory treatment of people with psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson Claire

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of compulsory treatment under the Mental Health Act (MHA has continued to rise in the UK and in other countries. The Joint Crisis Plan (JCP is a statement of service users' wishes for treatment in the event of a future mental health crisis. It is developed with the clinical team and an independent facilitator. A recent pilot RCT showed a reduction in the use of the MHA amongst service users with a JCP. The JCP is the only intervention that has been shown to reduce compulsory treatment in this way. The CRIMSON trial aims to determine if JCPs, compared with treatment as usual, are effective in reducing the use of the MHA in a range of treatment settings across the UK. Methods/Design This is a 3 centre, individual-level, single-blind, randomised controlled trial of the JCP compared with treatment as usual for people with a history of relapsing psychotic illness in Birmingham, London and Lancashire/Manchester. 540 service users will be recruited across the three sites. Eligible service users will be adults with a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder (including bipolar disorder, treated in the community under the Care Programme Approach with at least one admission to a psychiatric inpatient ward in the previous two years. Current inpatients and those subject to a community treatment order will be excluded to avoid any potential perceived pressure to participate. Research assessments will be conducted at baseline and 18 months. Following the baseline assessment, eligible service users will be randomly allocated to either develop a Joint Crisis Plan or continue with treatment as usual. Outcome will be assessed at 18 months with assessors blind to treatment allocation. The primary outcome is the proportion of service users treated or otherwise detained under an order of the Mental Health Act (MHA during the follow-up period, compared across randomisation groups. Secondary outcomes include overall costs, service user engagement

  2. Recreation Embedded State Tuning for Optimal Readiness and Effectiveness (RESTORE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alan T.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III

    2005-01-01

    Physiological self-regulation training is a behavioral medicine intervention that has demonstrated capability to improve psychophysiological coping responses to stressful experiences and to foster optimal behavioral and cognitive performance. Once developed, these psychophysiological skills require regular practice for maintenance. A concomitant benefit of these physiologically monitored practice sessions is the opportunity to track crew psychophysiological responses to the challenges of the practice task in order to detect shifts in adaptability that may foretell performance degradation. Long-duration missions will include crew recreation periods that will afford physiological self-regulation training opportunities. However, to promote adherence to the regimen, the practice experience that occupies their recreation time must be perceived by the crew as engaging and entertaining throughout repeated reinforcement sessions on long-duration missions. NASA biocybernetic technologies and publications have developed a closed-loop concept that involves adjusting or modulating (cybernetic, for governing) a person's task environment based upon a comparison of that person's physiological responses (bio-) with a training or performance criterion. This approach affords the opportunity to deliver physiological self-regulation training in an entertaining and motivating fashion and can also be employed to create a conditioned association between effective performance state and task execution behaviors, while enabling tracking of individuals psychophysiological status over time in the context of an interactive task challenge. This paper describes the aerospace spin-off technologies in this training application area as well as the current spin-back application of the technologies to long-duration missions - the Recreation Embedded State Tuning for Optimal Readiness and Effectiveness (RESTORE) concept. The RESTORE technology is designed to provide a physiological self

  3. The Predictive Validity of the Phelps Kindergarten Readiness Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustyniak, Kristine M.; Cook-Cottone, Catherine P.; Calabrese, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This study assesses the predictive validity of the Phelps Kindergarten Readiness Scale (PKRS) for later academic achievement and explores the utility of a domain-specific measure of kindergarten readiness. Kindergarten readiness scores were significantly correlated with both math and language arts achievement as measured by New York State…

  4. Uses and Abuses of Developmental Screening and School Readiness Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisels, Samuel J.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes the uses and abuses of the Gesell School Readiness Screening Tests and similar tests. First, discusses developmental screening and readiness tests, then focuses on the Gesell tests, specifically addressing their validity and questioning their current uses. Discusses implications of using readiness tests for assigning children to…

  5. What Are the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks? Information Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are the minimum ACT® college readiness assessment scores required for students to have a high probability of success in credit-bearing college courses--English Composition, social sciences courses, College Algebra, or Biology. This report identifies the College Readiness Benchmarks on the ACT Compass scale…

  6. 75 FR 28594 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-21

    ... Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education... new awards for FY 2010 for the Ready-to-Learn Television Program. We have extended the deadline for...'' with the date ``June 22, 2010.'' FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The Ready-to-Learn Television...

  7. 75 FR 18170 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education... new awards for FY 2010 for the Ready-to-Learn Television Program. There is an error in one of the... INFORMATION CONTACT: The Ready-to-Learn Television Program, U.S. Department of Education, 400 ]...

  8. 75 FR 16763 - Ready-to-Learn Television Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... Ready-to-Learn Television Program AGENCY: Office of Innovation and Improvement, Department of Education... new awards for FY 2010 for the Ready-to-Learn Television Program. There is an error in one of the... INFORMATION CONTACT: The Ready-to-Learn Television Program, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland...

  9. School Readiness among Children with Varying Histories of Language Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Laura M.; Bowles, Ryan P.; Pence Turnbull, Khara L.; Skibbe, Lori E.

    2009-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that (a) persistent language difficulties during childhood would predict lower school readiness and (b) language difficulties present just prior to school entry would predict lower school readiness beyond any effects of persistence. The study involved examining indicators of school readiness collected at…

  10. Diagnostics of children's school readiness in scientific studies abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarenko V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the problem of children's school readiness as it is represented in contemporary studies of foreign scholars. It displays a variety of approaches to estimation of school readiness as well as the ways of measuring the levels of child development as relating to school readiness, namely those of them which are in common practice in education.

  11. Michigan School Readiness Program: Implementation Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    In operation since 1988, the Michigan School Readiness Program (MSRP) provides high-quality preschool programs for children who may be at risk of becoming educationally disadvantaged and who may have needs for special assistance. This manual provides guidelines for implementing all aspects of the program, including applying for funding, recruiting…

  12. Assistant Principals: Their Readiness as Instructional Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searby, Linda; Browne-Ferrigno, Tricia; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2017-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study investigating the capacity of assistant principals to be instructional leaders. Analyses of survey responses yielded four interesting findings: (a) years of experience as a teacher and age had no significance on assistant principals' perceived readiness as an instructional leader; (b) those completing…

  13. Career Readiness: Are We There Yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    ACT is committed to working with career and technical educators in order to prepare students to meet the standards of the high-performance workplace. In short, prepare them to be career- and job-ready. This commitment is a reflection of ACT's mission: "helping people achieve education and workplace success." After devoting more than two decades of…

  14. Modelling an Institutional Mobile Learning Readiness Analyser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireri, Bonface Ngari; Omwenga, Elijah I.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the affordability, ease of use and availability of mobile devices, many people in Africa and developing countries have acquired at least a mobile device. The penetration of mobile devices places many learning institution in a position to adopt mobile learning, however there are few tools for measuring mobile learning readiness for an…

  15. Getting Ready for the Human Phenome Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oetting, William S; Robinson, Peter N; Greenblatt, Marc S

    2013-01-01

    A forum of the Human Variome Project (HVP) was held as a satellite to the 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Human Genetics in San Francisco, California. The theme of this meeting was "Getting Ready for the Human Phenome Project". Understanding the genetic contribution to both rare si...

  16. Digital forensic readiness in a cloud environment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sibiya, G

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available of hosted data that belongs to multi-tenants. In this paper we present a forensic readiness model that makes use of a Forensic Service hosted in the cloud. The model is aimed at minimizing costs associated with conducting a digital forensic investigation...

  17. Functional criteria for assessing pointe-readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Megan; Liederbach, Marijeanne; Sandow, Emily

    2010-01-01

    The most popular criterion cited in the dance literature for advancement to pointe work is attainment of the chronological age of 12 years. However, dancers at this age vary greatly in terms of musculoskeletal maturity and motor skill development. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether objective, functional tests could be used in conjunction with dance teacher expertise to determine pointe-readiness. It was hypothesized that dynamic tests of motor control can better indicate pointe-readiness than chronological age alone or in combination with static musculoskeletal measurements. Thirty-seven pre-pointe students from two professional ballet schools were tested for muscular strength, ankle joint range of motion, single leg standing balance, dynamic alignment, and turning skill. In addition, the participating students' ballet teachers independently graded each student on her readiness to begin dancing en pointe. Performance on three functional tests (the Airplane test, Sauté test, and Topple test) was closely associated with teacher subjective rating for pointe-readiness. It is concluded that these tests may be more useful for gauging acquisition of the skills required for safe and successful performance than the traditionally accepted indicators of chronological age, years of dance training, and ankle joint range of motion.

  18. Automating Your Ready-Reference File.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Joy; Sottong, Stephen P.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the automation of the ready reference card file at the California State University, Long Beach library. Topics discusses include the use of dBase III Plus software; keyword fields for multiple access points; the source field and other fields; a menu-driven interface; and file creation and maintenance. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  19. Development toward School Readiness: A Holistic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Alan Kibbe

    2015-01-01

    A systemic analysis of early childhood development factors explains the variance in school readiness among representative U.S. 5-year-olds. The underlying theory incorporates a set of causally interactive endogenous variables that are hypothesized to be driven by the effects of three exogenous variables: parental education, immigrant status and…

  20. IFRS READINESS IN LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS CURRICULA

    OpenAIRE

    Myrna R. Berríos

    2012-01-01

    Multinational companies doing business in Latin America, and elsewhere in the world, must comply with individual countries’ financial reporting and financial market rules and local legislation when disclosing financial information. This research assesses international financial reporting standards (IFRS) readiness in the finance, accounting, and taxation curricula in Latin American universities.

  1. Ready Reference Collections: Thoughts on Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Maria Isabel

    2008-01-01

    What is a ready reference collection? A stack of reference books selected according to personal interests? Each institution is unique in its needs and so are the collections that each library carries. The curricula and programs determine the collection development policies and the student population justifies the needs for their implementation. Is…

  2. Cornerstones: Literacy Units Ready for Teachers, Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasko, Jennifer; Donahue, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Every day, teachers face the time-consuming task of adapting materials from curricula that do not meet their students' needs or match their learning styles. This article discusses ready-made literacy units specifically designed for teachers of deaf and hard of hearing students. The units were part of the Cornerstones Project, an activity of the…

  3. Ready, Set, Respect! GLSEN's Elementary School Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN), 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Ready, Set, Respect!" provides a set of tools to help elementary school educators ensure that all students feel safe and respected and develop respectful attitudes and behaviors. It is not a program to be followed but instead is designed to help educators prepare themselves for teaching about and modeling respect. The toolkit responds to…

  4. Engaging With Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondebjerg, Ib

    to engage us with reality. Engaging with Reality investigates some of the major global themes as they are reflected in documentaries from the USA, UK and Denmark. Engaging with Reality is a contribution to comparative, transnational studies of documentary in contemporary media culture. By comparing...... documentaries in three different countries dealing with the same global themes, the book contributes to a broader and deeper understanding of our global media culture. The book deals with documentaries as part of a new form of cosmopolitan narratives, as part of new, global forms of social imagination......Documentaries play an important role in the increasingly global media culture that has been developing over the last few decades. Despite its many different forms and genres, all documentaries claim a special relation to the way things are in the world, and they each attempt in their own way...

  5. The rules of engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects on the “dialogic turn,” focusing on one analytical framework for understanding the wide range of processes that fall under the rubric of engagement. The notion of power-in-interaction is explored using a case study of informal dialogue, the Dana Centre, London. Using...... this framework I argue that we can understand public engagement events as hallmarked by conflict, but that this conflict emerges not in differing assessments of the value of different forms of knowledge but around the very form of a dialogue event; similarly, I suggest that the content of talk indicates...... that imposed hierarchies are continually re-negotiated. In concluding I reflect on some implications of using power in the analysis of engagement....

  6. Engagement, Exploration, Empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Virginia Ginny

    2015-01-01

    Engagement, exploration, and empowerment are significant practice strategies used by occupational therapy practitioners as a means of getting to know what matters to clients and how to facilitate their participation in everyday life. Applied to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) as an organization, professional engagement, exploration of new service contexts, and empowerment of members to take an active role in shaping the profession's future are examined. This address, given at the 2015 AOTA Annual Convention & Expo, looks to the future in terms of engaging greater numbers of members; participating in Vision 2025, a strategic planning initiative that will be unveiled at the 2016 AOTA Annual Conference & Expo; and empowering members to achieve excellence in occupational therapy.

  7. Civic Engagement and Associationalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Damon Timothy; Barraket, Jo; Lewis, Jenny;

    2012-01-01

    that individuals are involved with (associational scope). Does it matter in terms of civic engagement, for example, whether one is a member of a quilting-circle or trade union? Does it matter whether association ‘membership’ is simply an annual payment or a major commitment of time and energy? In this article, we...... use a large survey to explore these questions empirically by focusing on the membership patterns and civic engagement practices of 4,001 citizens drawn from eight suburbs across Greater Melbourne, Australia. Our findings indicate that, while associational intensity is positively related to civic...... engagement, associational scope (the number of group memberships per person), is a more influential determinant of the level of civic and political participation. The results also suggest that while all forms of associationalism are important in terms of fostering greater levels of civic activity, not all...

  8. Engaging with users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisberg, Vibeke; Bang, Anne Louise

    to change the education of future designers. This is an emerging field at a number of design schools across the world, among these Design School Kolding in Denmark. In this paper we discuss ways in which we as design educators can teach fashion and textile students ways to engage with users during...... the creative process. To a large degree it is not common to engage direct with users in fashion and textile design. However, we see an increasing interest in this subject among the design students and also in recent research within fashion and textiles. We therefore argue that there is a need for participatory...... with the biggest sense organ – our skin. Thus, the aim of our research is to develop new dialogue tools for teaching fashion and textile students in order to stimulate new ways of thinking and engaging with users. By developing and employing participatory design methods in the field of fashion and textiles, we...

  9. An Evaluation of the Italian Version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale in Obese Adult Inpatients Engaged in a 1-Month-Weight-Loss Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarini, Martina; Manzoni, Gian Mauro; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2015-11-01

    Addiction is a compulsive need for and use of a specific substance leading to a habit, tolerance, and psychophysiological symptoms. Excessive food consumption is similar to that of substance addiction. Some individuals who have trouble losing weight display addictive eating symptoms. To investigate food addiction in a sample of obese adults referred to hospital for a 1-month-weight-loss treatment. The Italian version of the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS-16) was used as a screening tool in 88 obese inpatients. The construct validity of the YFAS-16 was assessed by testing its correlations with measures of binge eating (Binge Eating Scale), impulsiveness (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), and emotional dysregulation (Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale). 34.1% of our sample was diagnosed with YFAS food addiction. Such diagnosis was also supported by strong associations between FA and psychological and behavioral features, typically descriptive of classic addiction. Patients who endorsed the YFAS-16 criteria for food addiction (FA) had significantly higher binge eating levels, greater emotional dysregulation, and nonacceptance of negative feelings; they lacked goal-oriented behavior, had little impulse control, had difficulty in emotion recognition, and attentional impulsivity; and they were unable to concentrate and lacked inhibitory control behavior, unlike participants who did not meet the FA criteria. Further research is needed to support the reliability of the YFAS-16. This measure has the potential to be applied in epidemiological research, estimating the prevalence of FA within the Italian population and to assess new treatments' efficacy for obese patients with food addiction symptoms seeking weight-loss treatments.

  10. Science, Public Engagement with

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, Alan

    2015-01-01

    regarding their definition in institutional practice. Science and technology studies scholars have been especially active in challenging prevailing policy assumptions in this area and in considering how science–public relations might be reinterpreted and reconstructed. This article presents some of the key......‘Public engagement with science’ evokes a series of long-standing issues concerning the relationship between members of the public (or citizens) and matters of technical expertise. However, each of the terms ‘public,’ ‘engagement,’ and ‘science’ is open to question, and to empirical investigation...

  11. Constituting Public Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article uses data from two U.K. studies in order to explore the meanings attached to public engagement. It focuses on two issues of importance to contemporary discussions of science communication: the degree to which there has been a smooth transition, in practice, from models of public unde...... backgrounds, suggesting that multiple and overlapping meanings around PEST are derived from particular histories that have been brought together, through the rubric of public engagement, in assemblages such as the Beacons. © 2013 SAGE Publications....

  12. Personality Traits as Predictors towards Readiness to Change among Female Drug Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S.W. Shahrazad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Understanding the personality traits among women who are involved in drug addiction is a crucial issue prior to starting any intervention programs. It may provide an indication of their readiness to receive treatment and change this addictive behavior. This study was conducted to examine the predictive relationship between personality traits and readiness to change among women drug addicts in Malaysia. Approach: The study employed survey research involving the administration of two standardized psychological tests which were the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short Version (EPQ-RS and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES. A total of 109 female drug addicts who were undergoing drug treatment in a female rehabilitation center in Malaysia participated in this study. Data were analyzed using Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis. Results: The current study shows that there were significant correlations between the traits of extraversion, neuroticism and psychoticism with all the three stages of readiness to change. The study also demonstrated that high extraversion and neuroticism traits significantly predicted the recognition subscale. Conclusion: Being high on neuroticism and low in psychoticism traits significantly predicted the respondents to be ambivalence about changing their addictive behaviors. Likewise, being high on extraversion and neuroticism as well as low on psychoticism significantly predicted the taking steps subscale.

  13. Physician Orders for Life Sustaining Treatment in US Nursing Homes: A Case Study of CRNP Engagement in the Care Planning Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, Gerald A; Thimons, David G; Angelelli, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes changes in Physician Orders for Life Saving Treatment (POLST) status among long-stay residents of a US nursing home who had a certified registered nurse practitioner (CRNP) adopt the practice of participating in nursing home staff care plan meetings. The CRNP attended a nonrandomized sample of 60 care plan meetings, each featuring a review of POLST preferences with residents and/or family members. Days since original POLST completion, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, number of hospitalizations since index admission, and other sociodemographic characteristics including religion and payer source were among the data elements extracted via chart review for the sample as well as for a nonequivalent control group of 115 residents also under the care of the medical provider group practice at the nursing home. Twenty-three percent (n = 14) of the 60 care conferences attended by the CRNP resulted in a change in POLST status after consultations with the resident and/or family. In all cases, POLST changes involved restated preferences from a higher level of intervention to a lower level of intervention. Fifty-nine percent of the CRNP-attended conferences resulted in the issuance of new medical provider orders. CRNP participation in care conferences may represent a best practice opportunity to revisit goals of care with individuals and their family members in the context of broader interprofessional treatment planning.

  14. Ready-made allogeneic ABO-specific serum eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harritshøj, Lene Holm; Nielsen, Connie; Ullum, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    , registered and stored at -30°C in the blood bank. Upon request, frozen ABO-identical serum drops in lots of 14 bottles could be provided immediately. Safety and efficacy were evaluated in 34 patients with severe ocular surface disease refractory to conventional medical therapy. Patients were treated six...... serum treatment. CONCLUSION: Ready-made ABO-identical allogeneic serum eye drops were straightforwardly produced, quality-assured and registered as a safe standard blood product for the treatment of certain cases of severe dry eye disease. Therapeutic efficacy was comparable to previous reports......PURPOSE: To overcome problems and delays of the preparation of autologous serum eye drops, a production line of ABO-specific allogeneic serum eye drops from male blood donors was set up in a blood bank. Feasibility, clinical routine, safety and efficacy were evaluated in a cohort of patients...

  15. The Impact of Organizational Stress and Burnout on Client Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices that impact client engagement (Broome, Flynn, Knight, & Simpson, 2007). The current study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the U.S. Work environment measures...

  16. The immediate eff ect of the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act on stigma, discrimination, and engagement on HIV prevention and treatment services in men who have sex with men in Nigeria: analysis of prospective data from the TRUST cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sheree R; Nowak, Rebecca G; Orazulike, Ifeanyi; Keshinro, Babajide; Ake, Julie; Kennedy, Sara; Njoku, Ogbonnaya; Blattner, William A; Charurat, Manhattan E; Baral, Stefan D

    2015-07-01

    In January, 2014, the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act was signed into law in Nigeria, further criminalising same-sex sexual relationships. We aimed to assess the immediate effect of this prohibition act on stigma, discrimination, and engagement in HIV prevention and treatment services in men who have sex with men (MSM) in Nigeria. The TRUST cohort study uses respondent-driven sampling to assess the feasibility and effectiveness of engagement of MSM in HIV prevention and treatment services at a clinical site located with a community-based organisation trusted by the MSM community. TRUST is a prospective implementation research cohort of MSM (≥16 years) in Abuja, Nigeria. We compared HIV clinical outcomes and stigma, including fear and avoidance of health care, across baseline and quarterly visits before and after implementation of the the Same-Sex Marriage Prohibition Act. Outcomes assessed were measures of stigma and discrimination, loss to follow-up, antiretroviral therapy status, and viral load. We compared outcomes before and after the legislation with χ2 statistics, and estimated incident stigma-related events and loss to follow-up with Poisson regression. Between March 19, 2013, and Aug 7, 2014, 707 MSM participated in baseline study procedures, contributing to 756 before legislation (prelaw) and 420 after legislation (postlaw) visits. Reported history of fear of seeking health care was significantly higher in postlaw visits than in prelaw visits (n=161 [38%] vs n=187 [25%]; p<0・0001), as was avoidance of health care (n=118 [28%] vs n=151 [20%]; p=0・001). In incidence analyses, of 192 MSM with follow-up data and no history of an event at baseline, reported fear of seeking health care was higher in the postlaw than the prelaw period (n=144; incidence rate ratio 2・57, 95% CI 1・29–5・10; p=0・007); loss to follow-up and incident healthcare avoidance were similar across periods. Of the 161 (89%) of 181 HIV-infected MSM with HIV viral loads

  17. Analytics for Customer Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Block, Frank; Eisenbeiss, Maik; Hardie, Bruce G. S.; Lemmens, Aurelie; Saffert, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the state of the art of models for customer engagement and the problems that are inherent to calibrating and implementing these models. The authors first provide an overview of the data available for customer analytics and discuss recent developments. Next, the authors di

  18. Parental Engagement with Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Joanna; Harbinson, Terence

    2010-01-01

    A programme of parental engagement with school science is described, in which parents and their children take part in scientific debate and practical science lessons. Three sessions, in biology, chemistry and physics, of this ongoing programme are described, through which parents have been able to support their children by learning science with…

  19. The rules of engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects on the “dialogic turn,” focusing on one analytical framework for understanding the wide range of processes that fall under the rubric of engagement. The notion of power-in-interaction is explored using a case study of informal dialogue, the Dana Centre, London. Using...

  20. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  1. Analytics for Customer Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Block, Frank; Eisenbeiss, Maik; Hardie, Bruce G. S.; Lemmens, Aurelie; Saffert, Peter

    In this article, we discuss the state of the art of models for customer engagement and the problems that are inherent to calibrating and implementing these models. The authors first provide an overview of the data available for customer analytics and discuss recent developments. Next, the authors

  2. The Engagement Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tartari, Valentina; Salter, Ammon

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the debate about the marginality of women in academic science has been extended to academics’ engagement with industry and their commercial efforts. Analyzing multi-source data for a large sample of UK physical and engineering scientists and employing a matching technique, this s...

  3. Mars Public Engagement Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Mars public engagement goal to understand and protect our home planet, explore the Universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers. Teacher workshops, robotics education, Mars student imaging and analysis programs, MARS Student Imaging Project (MSIP), Russian student participation, MARS museum visualization alliance, and commercialization concepts are all addressed in this project.

  4. Mellem engagement og afmagt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenkiel, Annegrethe; Nielsen, Birger Steen; Schmidt, Camilla;

    Bogen præsenterer resultaterne fra udviklings- og forskningsprojektet "BUPL-tillidsrepræsentanten. Nye udfordringer - nye svar". Den giver et fyldigt indblik i tillidsrepræsentanternes arbejde, deres engagement, vanskeligheder og forhåbninger. På baggrund af et større værkstedsarbejde fremlægges...

  5. Employer Engagement in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Anthony; Dawkins, James

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this paper is employer engagement in education as it supports the learning and progression of young people through activities including work experience, job shadowing, workplace visits, career talks, mock interviews, CV workshops, business mentoring, enterprise competitions and the provision of learning resources. Interest has grown…

  6. Community engagement. Streets ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Mark

    2004-05-13

    A survey of NHS staff by the Commission for Health Improvement highlighted top-performing PCTs on community engagement. Numbers attending public meetings can be boosted by targeting transport and using existing networks. A number of PCTs have helped community links by moving staff out of NHS locations.

  7. Unges politiske engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieberkind, Jonas; Hansen, Niels-Henrik Møller

    2015-01-01

    I denne artikel undersøges danske unges politiske engagement. Vi vil se på, hvilke tilgange og forudsætninger danske unge har til politik, om deres politiske engagement kommer til udtryk på nye og anderledes måder, og hvorvidt deres politiske deltagelse er i konflikt med andre aktiviteter, der også...... kræver opmærksomhed og engagement. Vi vil argumentere for, at de unges syn på politik i disse år ændrer karakter, og at deres politiske deltagelse er viklet ind i og udfordret af et generelt og stigende krav fra de unge selv og omverdenen om at kunne navigere mellem stadigt flere interessesfærer: ’sig...... selv’, det sociale liv, jobs, uddannelse, karriere og fællesskabets generelle interesser (Illeris et al. 2009). Politisk deltagelse og engagement er i dette lys ikke et konkret og forudsigeligt anliggende, sådan som vi har for vane at diskutere det. For de unge fremstår det snarere som en diffus og...

  8. Music Researchers' Musical Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollner, Clemens; Ginsborg, Jane; Williamon, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness of the importance of reflexivity across various disciplines, which encourages researchers to scrutinize their research perspectives. In order to contextualize and reflect upon research in music, this study explores the musical background, current level of musical engagement and the listening habits of music…

  9. Reachable set modeling and engagement analysis of exoatmospheric interceptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chai Hua; Liang Yangang; Chen Lei; Tang Guojin

    2014-01-01

    A novel reachable set (RS) model is developed within a framework of exoatmospheric interceptor engagement analysis. The boost phase steering scheme and trajectory distortion mech-anism of the interceptor are firstly explored. A mathematical model of the distorted RS is then for-mulated through a dimension–reduction analysis. By treating the outer boundary of the RS on sphere surface as a spherical convex hull, two relevant theorems are proposed and the RS envelope is depicted by the computational geometry theory. Based on RS model, the algorithms of intercept window analysis and launch parameters determination are proposed, and numerical simulations are carried out for interceptors with different energy or launch points. Results show that the proposed method can avoid intensive on-line computation and provide an accurate and effective approach for interceptor engagement analysis. The suggested RS model also serves as a ready reference to other related problems such as interceptor effectiveness evaluation and platform disposition.

  10. Reachable set modeling and engagement analysis of exoatmospheric interceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Hua

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel reachable set (RS model is developed within a framework of exoatmospheric interceptor engagement analysis. The boost phase steering scheme and trajectory distortion mechanism of the interceptor are firstly explored. A mathematical model of the distorted RS is then formulated through a dimension–reduction analysis. By treating the outer boundary of the RS on sphere surface as a spherical convex hull, two relevant theorems are proposed and the RS envelope is depicted by the computational geometry theory. Based on RS model, the algorithms of intercept window analysis and launch parameters determination are proposed, and numerical simulations are carried out for interceptors with different energy or launch points. Results show that the proposed method can avoid intensive on-line computation and provide an accurate and effective approach for interceptor engagement analysis. The suggested RS model also serves as a ready reference to other related problems such as interceptor effectiveness evaluation and platform disposition.

  11. Why do patients engage in medical tourism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runnels, V.; Carrera, Percivil Melendez

    2012-01-01

    Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients¿ unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is accesse

  12. Why do patients engage in medical tourism?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Runnels, V.; Carrera, Percivil Melendez

    2012-01-01

    Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients¿ unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is

  13. Exploring the clinical information system implementation readiness activities to support nursing in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piscotty, Ronald J; Tzeng, Huey-Ming

    2011-11-01

    The implementation of clinical information systems can have a profound impact on nurses and their productivity. Poorly implemented systems can lead to unintended consequences that may have a negative impact on clinical processes and patient outcomes. Executives must have adequate knowledge to address nurses' concerns related to implementation. This study explored the clinical information system implementation readiness activities adopted by chief nurse executivesin hospital settings. A descriptive qualitative design was used, including interviews with six chief nurse executives, held from December 2003 through March 2004. The constant comparative method was used to analyze the interviews to extract readiness activity themes and compare these to the literature. The synthesized themes showed that the executives were knowledgeable about and engaged in several key areas, but not all, of the implementation readiness process. The majority of responses were classified into the thematic areas of champion support, staff preparation for change, training, organizational alignment, planning, and vendor support. The theme of a lack of vendor support was not identified in previous studies but was clear in the responses of the chief nurse executives interviewed.

  14. Readiness for interprofessional learning: a cross-faculty comparison between architecture and occupational therapy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Helen; Hitch, Danielle; Watchorn, Valerie; Ang, Susan; Stagnitti, Karen

    2013-09-01

    Health and wellbeing includes a need for built environments to accommodate and be inclusive of the broadest range of people and a corresponding need to ensure graduates are ready to engage in this field of interprofessional and inter-industry practise. All too often, interprofessional education in higher education is neglected with a tendency towards educational silos, particularly at a cross-faculty level. This paper reports on an initiative that embedded universal design practice education into the curricula of first year architecture and third year occupational therapy students and evaluated the impact on students' readiness for interprofessional learning. The Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) was given to students at the beginning and end of the semester during which students participated in a variety of online and face-to-face curriculum initiatives. Results showed that at the beginning of semester, occupational therapy students were significantly more positive about interprofessional learning than their architecture counterparts. Post-results showed that this trend continued but that occupational therapy students became less positive on some items after the interprofessional learning experience. This study provides insights into the interprofessional learning experiences of a group of students who have not previously been studied within the available literature.

  15. Implementing a Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, David [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); German, Alea [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Building cost-effective, high-performance homes that provide superior comfort, health, and durability is the goal of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) program. Building America research and other innovative programs throughout the country have addressed many of the technical challenges of building to the ZERH standard. The cost-effectiveness of measure packages that result in 30% source energy savings compared to a code-compliant home have been demonstrated. However, additional challenges remain, particularly with respect to convincing production builders of the strong business case for ZERH. The Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) team believes that the keys to successfully engaging builders and developers in the California market are to help them leverage development agreement requirements, code compliance requirements, incentives, and competitive market advantages of ZERH certification, and navigate through this process. A primary objective of this project was to gain a highly visible foothold for residential buildings that are built to the DOE ZERH specification that can be used to encourage participation by other California builders. This report briefly describes two single-family homes that were ZERH certified and focuses on the experience of working with developer Mutual Housing on a 62-unit multifamily community at the Spring Lake subdivision in Woodland, California. The Spring Lake project is expected to be the first ZERH-certified multifamily project in the country. This report discusses the challenges encountered, lessons learned, and how obstacles were overcome.

  16. Health disparities and gaps in school readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet

    2005-01-01

    The author documents pervasive racial disparities in the health of American children and analyzes how and how much those disparities contribute to racial gaps in school readiness. She explores a broad sample of health problems common to U.S. children, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, asthma, and lead poisoning, as well as maternal health problems and health-related behaviors that affect children's behavioral and cognitive readiness for school. If a health problem is to affect the readiness gap, it must affect many children, it must be linked to academic performance or behavior problems, and it must show a racial disparity either in its prevalence or in its effects. The author focuses not only on the black-white gap in health status but also on the poor-nonpoor gap because black children tend to be poorer than white children. The health conditions Currie considers seriously impair cognitive skills and behavior in individual children. But most explain little of the overall racial gap in school readiness. Still, the cumulative effect of health differentials summed over all conditions is significant. Currie's rough calculation is that racial differences in health conditions and in maternal health and behaviors together may account for as much as a quarter of the racial gap in school readiness. Currie scrutinizes several policy steps to lessen racial and socioeconomic disparities in children's health and to begin to close the readiness gap. Increasing poor children's eligibility for Medicaid and state child health insurance is unlikely to be effective because most poor children are already eligible for public insurance. The problem is that many are not enrolled. Even increasing enrollment may not work: socioeconomic disparities in health persist in Canada and the United Kingdom despite universal public health insurance. The author finds more promise in strengthening early childhood programs with a built-in health component, like Head Start; family

  17. Do individual females differ intrinsically in their propensity to engage in extra-pair copulations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Forstmeier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While many studies have investigated the occurrence of extra-pair paternity in wild populations of birds, we still know surprisingly little about whether individual females differ intrinsically in their principal readiness to copulate, and to what extent this readiness is affected by male attractiveness. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: To address this question I used captive zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata as a model system. I first measured female readiness to copulate when courted by a male for the first time in life. Second, I conducted choice-chamber experiments to assess the mating preferences of individual females prior to pair formation. I then paired females socially with a non-desired mate and once they had formed a stable pair bond, I observed the inclination of these females to engage in extra-pair copulations with various males. Females showing a high readiness to copulate when courted by a male for the first time in life were much more likely to engage in extra-pair copulations later in life than others. Male attractiveness, as measured in choice tests, was a useful predictor of whether females engaged in extra-pair copulations with these males, but, surprisingly, the attractiveness of a female's social partner had no effect on her fidelity. However, it remained unclear what made some males more attractive than others. Contrary to a widespread but rarely tested hypothesis, females did not preferentially copulate with males having a redder beak or singing at a higher rate. Rather it seemed that song rate was a confounding factor in choice-chamber experiments: song attracted the female's attention but did not increase the male's attractiveness as a copulation partner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Intrinsic variation in female readiness to copulate as well as variation in the attractiveness of the extra-pair male but not the social partner decided the outcome of extra-pair encounters.

  18. Readiness plan, Hanford 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, S.J.

    1994-11-08

    The 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) is designed for the collection, treatment, and eventual disposal of liquid waste from the 300 Area Process Sewer (PS) system. The PS currently discharges water to the 300 Area Process Trenches. Facilities supported total 54 buildings, including site laboratories, inactive buildings, and support facilities. Effluent discharges to the process sewer from within these facilities include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems, heat exchangers, floor drains, sinks, and process equipment. The wastewaters go through treatment processes that include iron coprecipitation, ion exchange and ultraviolet oxidation. The iron coprecipitation process is designed to remove general heavy metals. A series of gravity filters then complete the clarification process by removing suspended solids. Following the iron coprecipitation process is the ion exchange process, where a specific resin is utilized for the removal of mercury. The final main unit operation is the ultraviolet destruction process, which uses high power ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide to destroy organic molecules. The objective of this readiness plan is to provide the method by which line management will prepare for a Readiness Assessment (RA) of the TEDF. The self-assessment and RA will assess safety, health, environmental compliance and management readiness of the TEDF. This assessment will provide assurances to both WHC and DOE that the facility is ready to start-up and begin operation.

  19. Financing and current capacity for REDD+ readiness and monitoring, measurement, reporting and verification in the Congo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, Danae; Gaugris, Jérôme; Mollicone, Danilo; Scriven, Joel; Corblin, Alexis; Ndikumagenge, Cleto; Aquino, André; Crete, Philippe; Sanz-Sanchez, Maria-José

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first critical analysis of the financing and current capacity for REDD+ readiness in the Congo Basin, with a particular focus on the REDD+ component of national forest monitoring and measurement, reporting and verification (M&MRV). We focus on three areas of analysis: (i) general financing for REDD+ readiness especially M&MRV; (ii) capacity and information for REDD+ implementation and M&MRV; (iii) prospects and challenges for REDD+ and M&MRV readiness in terms of financing and capacity. For the first area of analysis, a REDD+ and M&MRV readiness financing database was created based on the information from the REDD+ voluntary database and Internet searches. For the second area of analysis, a qualitative approach to data collection was adopted (semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders, surveys and observations). All 10 countries were visited between 2010 and 2012. We find that: (i) a significant amount of REDD+ financing flows into the Congo Basin (±US$550 million or almost half of the REDD+ financing for the African continent); (ii) across countries, there is an important disequilibrium in terms of REDD+ and M&MRV readiness financing, political engagement, comprehension and capacity, which also appears to be a key barrier to countries receiving equal resources; (iii) most financing appears to go to smaller scale (subnational) REDD+ projects; (iv) four distinct country groups in terms of REDD+ readiness and M&MRV status are identified; and (v) the Congo Basin has a distinct opportunity to have a specific REDD+ financing window for large-scale and more targeted national REDD+ programmes through a specific fund for the region. PMID:23878337

  20. Financing and current capacity for REDD+ readiness and monitoring, measurement, reporting and verification in the Congo Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatis, Danae; Gaugris, Jérôme; Mollicone, Danilo; Scriven, Joel; Corblin, Alexis; Ndikumagenge, Cleto; Aquino, André; Crete, Philippe; Sanz-Sanchez, Maria-José

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides the first critical analysis of the financing and current capacity for REDD+ readiness in the Congo Basin, with a particular focus on the REDD+ component of national forest monitoring and measurement, reporting and verification (M&MRV). We focus on three areas of analysis: (i) general financing for REDD+ readiness especially M&MRV; (ii) capacity and information for REDD+ implementation and M&MRV; (iii) prospects and challenges for REDD+ and M&MRV readiness in terms of financing and capacity. For the first area of analysis, a REDD+ and M&MRV readiness financing database was created based on the information from the REDD+ voluntary database and Internet searches. For the second area of analysis, a qualitative approach to data collection was adopted (semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders, surveys and observations). All 10 countries were visited between 2010 and 2012. We find that: (i) a significant amount of REDD+ financing flows into the Congo Basin (±US$550 million or almost half of the REDD+ financing for the African continent); (ii) across countries, there is an important disequilibrium in terms of REDD+ and M&MRV readiness financing, political engagement, comprehension and capacity, which also appears to be a key barrier to countries receiving equal resources; (iii) most financing appears to go to smaller scale (subnational) REDD+ projects; (iv) four distinct country groups in terms of REDD+ readiness and M&MRV status are identified; and (v) the Congo Basin has a distinct opportunity to have a specific REDD+ financing window for large-scale and more targeted national REDD+ programmes through a specific fund for the region.

  1. Cyberspace Forensics Readiness and Security Awareness Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadil Al-Mahrouqi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of reaching a high level of security in wire- less and wired communication networks is continuously proving difficult to achieve. The speed at which both keepers and violators of secure networks are evolving is relatively close. Nowadays, network infrastructures contain a large number of event logs captured by Firewalls and Domain Controllers (DCs. However, these logs are increasingly becoming an obstacle for network administrators in analyzing networks for malicious activities. Forensic investigators mission to detect malicious activities and reconstruct incident scenarios is extremely complex considering the number, as well as the quality of these event logs. This paper presents the building blocks for a model for automated network readiness and awareness. The idea for this model is to utilize the current network security outputs to construct forensically comprehensive evidence. The proposed model covers the three vital phases of the cybercrime management chain, which are: 1 Forensics Readiness, 2 Active Forensics, and 3 Forensics Awareness.

  2. Treatment of moderate acute malnutrition with ready-to-use supplementary food results in higher overall recovery rates compared with a corn-soya blend in children in southern Ethiopia: an operations research trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakochuk, Crystal; van den Briel, Tina; Stephens, Derek; Zlotkin, Stanley

    2012-10-01

    Moderate and severe acute malnutrition affects 13% of children food (RUSF) and the more conventional ration of corn-soya blend (CSB) in Ethiopia. A total of 1125 children aged 6-60 mo with moderate acute malnutrition received 16 wk of CSB or RUSF. Children were randomly assigned to receive one or the other food. The daily rations were purposely based on the conventional treatment rations distributed at the time of the study in Ethiopia: 300 g CSB and 32 g vegetable oil in the control group (1413 kcal) and 92 g RUSF in the intervention group (500 kcal). The higher ration size of CSB was provided because of expected food sharing. The HR for children in the CSB group was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.73, 0.99), which indicated that they had 15% lower recovery (P = 0.039). Recovery rates of children at the end of the 16-wk treatment period trended higher in the RUSF group (73%) than in the CSB group (67%) (P = 0.056). In comparison with CSB, the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition with RUSF resulted in higher recovery rates in children, despite the large ration size and higher energy content of the conventional CSB ration.

  3. Career Engagement: Bridging Career Counseling and Employee Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neault, Roberta A.; Pickerell, Deirdre A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present a model of career engagement that helps bridge the gap between career counselors' focus on supporting individuals to find meaningful work and employers' desire for an engaged, productive, and committed workforce. They briefly review highlights of the employee engagement literature, introduce the Career…

  4. The Engaged Campus: Toward a Comprehensive Approach to Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furco, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Although civic purposes are implicit in the mission statements of higher education institutions, American colleges and universities have not always embraced public engagement initiatives. This paper explores how the recent emergence of the engaged campus movement has helped move public engagement initiatives from the margins to the mainstream by…

  5. Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    effects of polyphasic & M.J. Colligan (Eds.), New York, and ultrashort sleep schedules. In: Why Spectrum, pp. 553-580. we nap, Evolution, Chronobiology...and Naitoh, P., Kelly, T., & Babkoff, H. (1993) Functions of Polyphasic and Ultrashort Sleep inertia, best time not to wake up? Sleep , C. Stampi Editor...UNCLASSIFIED Defense Technical Information Center Compilation Part Notice ADP010467 TITLE: Sleep Inertia and On-Call Readiness DISTRIBUTION: Approved

  6. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M.; Novotny, Paul J.; Patten, Christi A.; Rausch, Sarah M.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A.; Yang, Ping

    2010-01-01

    Summary Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the mailed survey an average of 6 years after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Survey measures included the stage of change for physical activity and a set of single item QOL and symptom scales. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported they currently engaged in regular physical activity (a total of 30 min or more per day, at least 5 days per week). Kruskal–Wallis tests revealed that those who reported engaging in regular physical activity reported a better overall QOL, better QOL on all five domains of QOL functioning (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual), and fewer symptoms compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity level may have important QOL and symptom management benefits for long-term lung cancer survivors. PMID:18243406

  7. Motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life in long-term lung cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew M; Novotny, Paul J; Patten, Christi A; Rausch, Sarah M; Garces, Yolanda I; Jatoi, Aminah; Sloan, Jeff A; Yang, Ping

    2008-07-01

    Little is known about the relationship between motivational readiness for physical activity and quality of life (QOL) in long-term lung cancer survivors. Long-term survivors are considered those who are living 5 years or more following a cancer diagnosis. This project examined the relationship between a self-report measure of motivational readiness for physical activity and QOL in a sample of 272 long-term lung cancer survivors. Participants (54% male, average age 70 years old) completed the mailed survey an average of 6 years after being diagnosed with lung cancer. Survey measures included the stage of change for physical activity and a set of single item QOL and symptom scales. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported they currently engaged in regular physical activity (a total of 30 min or more per day, at least 5 days per week). Kruskal-Wallis tests revealed that those who reported engaging in regular physical activity reported a better overall QOL, better QOL on all five domains of QOL functioning (mental, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual), and fewer symptoms compared to those with a sedentary lifestyle. Physical activity level may have important QOL and symptom management benefits for long-term lung cancer survivors.

  8. Institutional social engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prijić-Samaržija Snježana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available I am referring to social engagement as a value-based choice to actively intervene in social reality in order to modify existing collective identities and social practices with the goal of realizing the public good. The very term ‘engagement’, necessarily involves the starting awareness of a social deficit or flaw and presupposes a critical attitude towards social reality. In this article, I will attempt to provide arguments in favour of the thesis about the possibility (and, later, necessity of institutional engagement, critical action and even institutional protest, basing this view on the thesis that institutions are fundamentally collective or social agents whose actions must be guided by ethical and epistemic virtues.

  9. Transnationalism and Civic Engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman

    communities the concept of qabiil (kinship allegiance) as a central organizational factor dominates western scholarship. Instead this book favors taking both western and non-western approaches into consideration in order to achieve deeper and richer understanding of the transnational global Diaspora condition....... In order to surmount the dichotomy of essentialist versus no-essentialist frames, the epistemological approach instrumentalized in this work follows an emancipatory method critically engaging both approaches. Furthermore the book proposes a theoretical framework analytically connecting western and non...... or modern, i.e. symbolizing modernity, urbanization and individualism). Finally this book empirically examines how a host country’s mobilizing, political and structural opportunities or lack of them influence transnational Diasporas’ civic engagement that often include the application of combined formal...

  10. Assessing students' readiness towards e-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Nasrudin Md; Yusoff, Siti Hawa Mohd; Latif, Shahida Abd

    2014-07-01

    The usage of e-Learning methodology has become a new attraction for potential students as shown by some higher learning institutions in Malaysia. As such, Universiti Selangor (Unisel) should be ready to embark on e-Learning teaching and learning in the near future. The purpose of the study is to gauge the readiness of Unisel's students in e-Learning environment. A sample of 110 students was chosen to participate in this study which was conducted in January 2013. This sample consisted of students from various levels of study that are foundation, diploma and degree program. Using a structured questionnaire, respondents were assessed on their basic Internet skills, access to technology required for e-Learning and their attitude towards characteristics of successful e-Learning student based on study habits, abilities, motivation and time management behaviour. The result showed that respondents did have access to technology that are required for e-Learning environment, and respondents were knowledgeable regarding the basic Internet skills. The finding also showed that respondents' attitude did meet all characteristics of successful e-Learning student. Further analysis showed that there is no significant relationshipeither among gender, level of study or faculty with those characteristics. As a conclusion, the study shows that current Unisel's students are ready to participate in e-Learning environment if the institution decided to embark on e-Learning methodology.

  11. NGNP Infrastructure Readiness Assessment: Consolidation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian K Castle

    2011-02-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project supports the development, demonstration, and deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). The NGNP project is being reviewed by the Nuclear Energy Advisory Council (NEAC) to provide input to the DOE, who will make a recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, whether or not to continue with Phase 2 of the NGNP project. The NEAC review will be based on, in part, the infrastructure readiness assessment, which is an assessment of industry's current ability to provide specified components for the FOAK NGNP, meet quality assurance requirements, transport components, have the necessary workforce in place, and have the necessary construction capabilities. AREVA and Westinghouse were contracted to perform independent assessments of industry's capabilities because of their experience with nuclear supply chains, which is a result of their experiences with the EPR and AP-1000 reactors. Both vendors produced infrastructure readiness assessment reports that identified key components and categorized these components into three groups based on their ability to be deployed in the FOAK plant. The NGNP project has several programs that are developing key components and capabilities. For these components, the NGNP project have provided input to properly assess the infrastructure readiness for these components.

  12. Frafald og engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christian Helms; Pedersen, Lene Tanggaard; Nielsen, Klaus;

    Denne rapport beskriver de første resultater fra den kvalitative del af et forskningsprojekt om frafald og fastholdelse i dansk erhvervsuddannelse finansieret af Det Strategiske Forskningsråd i perioden 2009-2012. Resultaterne bygger på de første elevinterview gennemført i efteråret 2009 og fokus...... fokuserer eksplicit på elevernes oplevelse af eget engagement eller mangel på samme på erhvervsskolernes grundforløb....

  13. Implementation of the TsunamiReady Supporter Program in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores Hots, V. E.; Vanacore, E. A.; Gonzalez Ruiz, W.; Gomez, G.

    2016-12-01

    The Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) manages the PR Tsunami Program (NTHMP), including the TsunamiReady Supporter Program. Through this program the PRSN helps private organizations, businesses, facilities or local government entities to willingly engage in tsunami planning and preparedness that meet some requirements established by the National Weather Service. TsunamiReady Supporter organizations are better prepared to respond to a tsunami emergency, developing a response plan (using a template that PRSN developed and provides), and reinforcing their communication systems including NOAA radio, RSS, and loud speakers to receive and disseminate the alerts issued by the NWS and the Tsunami Warning Centers (TWC). The planning and the communication systems added to the training that PRSN provides to the staff and employees, are intend to help visitors and employees evacuate the tsunami hazard zone to the nearest assembly point minimizing loss of life. Potential TsunamiReady Supporters include, but are not limited to, businesses, schools, churches, hospitals, malls, utilities, museums, beaches, and harbors. However, the traditional targets for such programs are primarily tourism sites and hotels where people unaware of the tsunami hazard may be present. In 2016 the Tsunami Ready Program guided four businesses to achieve the TsunamiReady Supporter recognition. Two facilities were hotels near or inside the evacuation zone. The other facilities were the first and only health center and supermarket to be recognized in the United States and US territories. Based on the experience of preparing the health center and supermarket sites, here we present two case studies of how the TsunamiReady Supporter Program can be applied to non-traditional facilities as well as how the application of this program to such facilities can improve tsunami hazard mitigation. Currently, we are working on expanding the application of this program to non-traditional facilities by working with a

  14. Preparing for success: Readiness models for rural telehealth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennett P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Readiness is an integral and preliminary step in the successful implementation of telehealth services into existing health systems within rural communities. Methods and Materials: This paper details and critiques published international peer-reviewed studies that have focused on assessing telehealth readiness for rural and remote health. Background specific to readiness and change theories is provided, followed by a critique of identified telehealth readiness models, including a commentary on their readiness assessment tools. Results: Four current readiness models resulted from the search process. The four models varied across settings, such as rural outpatient practices, hospice programs, rural communities, as well as government agencies, national associations, and organizations. All models provided frameworks for readiness tools. Two specifically provided a mechanism by which communities could be categorized by their level of telehealth readiness. Discussion: Common themes across models included: an appreciation of practice context, strong leadership, and a perceived need to improve practice. Broad dissemination of these telehealth readiness models and tools is necessary to promote awareness and assessment of readiness. This will significantly aid organizations to facilitate the implementation of telehealth.

  15. Different Perspectives of Clinicians and Patients with Severe Mental Illness on Motivation for Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochems, Eline C; van Dam, Arno; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Scheffer, Sylvia C M; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; Mulder, Niels L

    2016-09-01

    The present study assessed motivation for engaging in treatment as rated by clinicians (n = 57) and patients with severe mental illness (SMI, n = 294) using measures based on three different motivation theories. Questionnaires were derived from self-determination theory, the transtheoretical model and the integral model of treatment motivation. It was investigated to which extent clinicians of patients with SMI were able to estimate their patient's perspective on motivation for engaging in treatment, to which extent they agreed on the patient's motivation and which factors were associated with estimation and agreement on treatment motivation. It was found that clinicians were poorly to moderately capable of estimating their patient's type of motivation and readiness for change. Further, agreement on the level of motivation between patients and clinicians was moderate. These findings were consistent across diagnostic groups (psychotic and personality disorders). A higher quality therapeutic relationship was generally associated with higher clinician-rated motivation. The patient's ethnicity and socially desirable responding were factors that differentiated between scales of different motivation theories. It is concluded that patients with SMI and their clinicians have different perceptions on the patient's motivation for engaging in psychiatric treatment, regardless of the theoretical framework that is used to measure motivation. The findings imply that a negotiated approach is needed where both perceptions of clinicians and patients on motivation for treatment are considered to ensure effective mental health interventions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Work engagement: drivers and effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakhuys Roozeboom, M.; Schelvis, R.

    2014-01-01

    The concept of work engagement fits into the tradition of positive psychology, a recent paradigm shift in psychology which focuses on mental health rather than mental illness. This article gives an introduction to the concept of work engagement. Different definitions and viewpoints of the work engag

  17. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...

  18. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  19. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  20. Organizational readiness for change: Preceptor perceptions regarding early immersion of student pharmacists in health-system practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kimberly A; Wolcott, Michael D; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E; D'Ostroph, Amanda; Shea, Christopher M; Pinelli, Nicole R

    To examine preceptors' perceptions regarding readiness for change pre- and post-implementation of a pilot early immersion program engaging student pharmacists in direct patient care. Student pharmacists enrolled in the second professional year of a Doctor of Pharmacy degree program completed a four-week health-system introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) which was modified to include direct patient care roles in operational (drug preparation and dispensing) and clinical (comprehensive medication management) pharmacy environments. Pharmacy preceptors with direct oversight for program implementation completed a pre/post Organizational Readiness for Implementing Change (ORIC) survey and a 50-min interview or focus group post-experience. The ORIC survey evaluates two dimensions of organizational readiness for change - change commitment and change efficacy. Additional items assessed included implementation needs, support, and perceived value of the change. ORIC survey constructs were compared before and after the experience. Interviews and focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed, and evaluated by constant comparative analysis. A mixed methods approach was used to triangulate findings and develop greater understanding of the ORIC survey results. Twenty pharmacy preceptors (37 ± 8 years of age, 60% female, 65% clinical pharmacist position, 70% prior preceptor experience) participated in the study. There were no significant changes in pre/post survey constructs, except for a decline in the perception of organizational change commitment (p change (p changes for student pharmacist engagement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Career readiness, developmental work personality and age of onset in young adult central nervous system survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David; Wagner, Stacia; Wong, Alex W K; O'Sullivan, Deidre

    2013-04-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to undertake foundational research in the area of career readiness, work personality and age of onset with young adult central nervous system (CNS) survivors. Participants for this study consisted of 43 individuals whose age range from 18 to 30 (M = 21.64, SD = 3.46), an average age of brain tumor onset of 9.50 years (SD = 4.73) and average years off of treatment of 7.25 years (SD = 5.80). Packets were distributed to survivors who were participating in a psychosocial cancer treatment program. Participants completed multiple career instruments and a demographic form. Differences between groups and among the variables were examined and size effect sizes were analyzed. Young adult CNS survivors had significantly lower levels of work personality and career readiness when compared to young adult non-cancer survivors with CNS cancer with those between the ages of 6 and 12 reported significantly lower levels when compared to individuals diagnosed before age 6 and after the age of 13. Young adult CNS survivors at an increased risk for having lower levels of work personality and career readiness then a norm group comparison. Age of onset (between 6 and 12) may be at significant risk factor for developing poor or dysfunctional work and career behaviors. • Young adults with central nervous system (CNS) cancer are at particular risk for experiencing difficulties related to career and employment. • Work personality and career readiness are two constructs that have been found to be related to one's ability to meet the demands of work. • Young adult CNS cancer survivors have lower levels of work personality and career readiness. • Individuals diagnosed between the ages of 6 and 12 may be at particular risk and may need specific vocational rehabilitation interventions. • The results of this study point to the need for comprehensive career and vocational services for young adult CNS cancer survivors.

  2. Students individual engagement in GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene Møller; Christiansen, Frederik V; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course...... in planning and management. The analysis shows that both the theoretical perspectives and the custom and didactical contract are important to understand students' engagement in GIS. However, it is the personal desiderata that are the key to understanding the students' different engagement. Further, a temporal...... dimension and contextual awareness are important in understanding students' engagement in a broader perspective....

  3. Relationship quality and student engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Jennifer

    The purpose of this study was to examine the qualities of support, relatedness, and negative interaction within parent-child and teacher-student relationships and their association with cognitive, psychological, and behavioral engagement. Additionally, this study explored the contributions of cognitive and psychological engagement on behavioral engagement. The role of gender, grade, and ethnicity on relationship quality and engagement was also considered. Participants (n=311) were students in grades three through five from a suburban school district in southeastern Michigan. Perceptions of teacher-student relationship quality varied by grade level. In general, younger students reported greater teacher support and relatedness in comparison to older students. Conversely, older students perceived greater conflict within the teacher-student relationship. Student engagement also varied by grade level, with younger students reporting greater engagement than older students. Ethnicity also contributed to variance in student engagement, with African American students reporting significantly more engagement than Caucasian or Multiracial students. Teacher-student relationship quality was a significant predictor of student engagement, even after controlling for student characteristics and parent-child relationship variables. Results of path analysis revealed that cognitive and psychological engagement contributed significantly to behavioral engagement.

  4. A Model of Feeding Readiness for Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Pickler, Rita H

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of bottle feeding readiness in preterm infants, which hypothesizes relationships between bottle feeding readiness, experience, and outcomes. The synactive theory of development provided the conceptual foundation for the model. The model, which is currently being tested, is designed to establish bottle feeding readiness criteria that will help nurses decide when to offer a bottle to a preterm infant The model may also provide a useful framework for deter...

  5. E-Readiness Assessment at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Fariba Salek Ranjbarzadesh; Mohammad Hossein Biglu; Susan Hassanzadeh; Naser Safaei; Parviz saleh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: E-readiness assessment is the evaluation of one’s ability to accept and use information technologies and their relevant applications. E-readiness assessment helps us identify and study the strengths and weaknesses and consequently find solutions and formulate strategies to improve e-readiness which is considered as a guarantee for the implementation of knowledge development programs. This study aimed to assess ereadiness at Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Methods: The cur...

  6. Between engagement and information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Brynskov, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the initial findings from a dual case study, describing two interactive urban installations and reflecting on their design and use. The two installations are Climate on the Wall, an interactive media facade, and CO2nfession/CO2mmitment, a video installation with user......-generated content. Both were designed to contribute to the effort of making people in the city aware of the municipal goal of becoming CO2 neutral by the year 2030. They were designed as part of a larger exhibition to engage individual citizens in a concrete way towards the somewhat more abstract end: CO2...

  7. Engaging the Community

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs-Mata, Inga M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available physically remote but also socio-culturally difficult to penetrate. Project teams are therefore able to set out into the remote villages of Thondoni, Bileni, Tshiavha, Mbahela and Mushite and engage with community elders and members in one-on-one interviews...Venda culture in the form of crafts and traditional dances. In so doing, they are overcoming socio- economic challenges by promoting a socio-cultural belief system and providing sustainable livelihoods for a community. As LiveDiverse team member, Dr Marius...

  8. Geophysicists' views about public engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besley, J. C.; Dudo, A.; Yuan, S.

    2016-12-01

    The proposed talk would present the results of 2016 survey of American Geophysical Union members (n = 2040) about public engagement. This survey took place as part of a broader, NSF funded, study of engagement views across eight different U.S.-based scientific societies. The presentation would include data about geophysicists' past engagement behavior and willingness to engage alongside data about engagement attitudes, perceived norms (i.e. beliefs about whether peers engage and value engagement), and perceived efficacy (i.e., scientists' beliefs about their own communication skills and the impact of engagement). The presentation would also include results that describe scientists' overall goals for engagement (e.g., increasing support for specific policy positions, changing citizen behavior, etc.), as well as their communication-specific objectives (e.g., increasing knowledge, increase excitement, etc.). All of the results would be put in the context of equivalent results from scientists from seven other societies across a variety of fields, including chemistry, biology, and the social sciences. Three themes that would be emphasized in the presentation include (1) the fact that there are substantial commonalities in engagement views across scientific fields, (2) the important role that perceived engagement skill (efficacy) appears to play in predicting engagement willingness, and (3) a lack of evidence that scientists are thinking about engagement in strategic ways. Strategic engagement, in this regard, would involve setting clear goals and then choosing activities that the social science of science communication suggests might allow one to achieve those goals. The presentation would conclude with thoughts about what might be done to improve the effectiveness of science communication training.

  9. Brain readiness and the nature of language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eBouchard

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To identify the neural components that make a brain ready for language, it is important to have well defined linguistic phenotypes, to know precisely what language is. There are two central features to language: the capacity to form signs (words, and the capacity to combine them into complex structures. We must determine how the human brain enables these capacities.A sign is a link between a perceptual form and a conceptual meaning. Acoustic elements and content elements, are already brain-internal in non-human animals, but as categorical systems linked with brain-external elements. Being indexically tied to objects of the world, they cannot freely link to form signs. A crucial property of a language-ready brain is the capacity to process perceptual forms and contents offline, detached from any brain-external phenomena, so their representations may be linked into signs. These brain systems appear to have pleiotropic effects on a variety of phenotypic traits and not to be specifically designed for language.Syntax combines signs, so the combination of two signs operates simultaneously on their meaning and form. The operation combining the meanings long antedates its function in language: the primitive mode of predication operative in representing some information about an object. The combination of the forms is enabled by the capacity of the brain to segment vocal and visual information into discrete elements. Discrete temporal units have order and juxtaposition, and vocal units have intonation, length, and stress. These are primitive combinatorial processes. So the prior properties of the physical and conceptual elements of the sign introduce combinatoriality into the linguistic system, and from these primitive combinatorial systems derive concatenation in phonology and combination in morphosyntax.Given the nature of language, a key feature to our understanding of the language-ready brain is to be found in the mechanisms in human brains that

  10. LHCb commissioning and readiness for first data

    CERN Document Server

    Voss, Helge

    2009-01-01

    LHCb has been installed by spring 2008, followed by intensive testing and commissioning of the system in order to be ready for first data taking. Despite the horizontal geometry of the LHCb detector it was possible to collect over one million useful cosmic events that allowed a first time alignment of the sub-detectors. Moreover events from beam dumps during the LHC synchronisation tests provided very useful data for further time and spacial alignment of the detector. Here we present an overview of our commissioning activities, the current status and an outlook on the startup in 2009.

  11. Schools’ readiness and capacity to improve matter

    OpenAIRE

    Oterkiil, Constance; Ertesvåg, Sigrun K.

    2012-01-01

    The literature reveals that up to half of all evidence-based programmes introduced in schools will fail to reach their expected outcomes due to poor implementation. Addressing the reasons why school change works in some schools and not in others is therefore important. It is argued in this article that if a school’s readiness and capacity for improvement is identified, it may predict the outcome of a future change initiative when adequate support is provided. Drawing on the Burke-Litwin model...

  12. Readiness for surgery after axillary block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z J; Stens-Pedersen, H L; Lippert, F K

    1997-01-01

    We have assessed prospectively the time to readiness for surgery following axillary block (sum of block performance and latency times) in 80 patients. The brachial plexus was identified using a nerve stimulator, and anaesthetized with 45 mL of mepivacaine 1% with adrenaline 5 micrograms mL-1....... In group 1 (single injection) the whole volume of mepivacaine was injected after locating only one of the plexus nerves. In group 2 (multiple injections) at least three plexus nerves were located, and the volume of mepivacaine was divided between them. Sensory block was assessed by a blinded observer every...

  13. Alliance College-Ready Public Schools: Alice M. Baxter College-Ready High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    EDUCAUSE, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The largest charter organization in Los Angeles serving more than 11,000 low-income students aims to prove it is possible to educate students at high levels across an entire system of schools. Alliance College-Ready Public Schools developed the PACE blended learning model, launched at the new Baxter High School, to more effectively prepare its…

  14. Social-Emotional School Readiness: How Do We Ensure Children Are Ready to Learn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sarah A. O.; Herberle, Amy E.; Carter, Alice S.

    2012-01-01

    This article begins with a review of research providing evidence that social-emotional competence is a key component of school readiness and that the foundations for social-emotional competence are laid down in the earliest years. We go on to review effective practices and specific interventions that have been found to strengthen children's…

  15. Here They Come: Ready or Not! Report of the School Readiness Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Janice Lowen

    Discussed are recommendations of California's 1987 School Readiness Task Force for the education of children 4 through 6 years of age. Recommendations call for: (1) provision of an appropriate, integrated, experiential curriculum; (2) reduction of class size; (3) provision of programs that meet the special needs of culturally and linguistically…

  16. Constructing productive engagement: pre-engagement tools for emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Kulve, Haico; Rip, Arie

    2011-12-01

    Engagement with stakeholders and civil society is increasingly important for new scientific and technological developments. Preparation of such engagements sets the stage for engagement activities and thus contributes to their outcomes. Preparation is a demanding task, particularly if the facilitating agent aims for timely engagement related to emerging technologies. Requirements for such preparation include understanding of the emerging science & technology and its dynamics. Multi-level analysis and socio-technical scenarios are two complementary tools for constructing productive engagement. Examination of the emergence of nanotechnologies in the food packaging sector demonstrates how these tools work. In light of recent policy demands for responsible innovation, but also more generally, the role of organizers of engagement activities is one that deserves reflection insofar as it can extend beyond that of preparation and facilitation.

  17. Engaged to Learn Ways of Engaging ESL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Tomlinson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I am going to argue that our most important role as language teachers is to provide potentially engaging materials for our learners and then to make use of them in optimally engaging ways. If we do not engage our learners most of the time no amount of exposure, teaching, practice or use of the language will help them to achieve sufficient language acquisition and development.

  18. Team Work Engagement: Considering Team Dynamics for Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia L. Costa; Ana Passos; Bakker, Arnold B.

    2012-01-01

    Although teams are an important structure of organizations, most studies on work engagement focus almost exclusively the individual-level. The main goals of this paper are to argue that the construct of work engagement can be conceptualized at the team level and to discuss theoretically some of its possible emergence processes. A conceptual model that explains under which conditions team work engagement is more likely to emerge is developed. This model is developed based on the literature on ...

  19. The rules of engagement: physician engagement strategies in intergroup contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindler, Sara A; Larson, Bridget K; Wu, Frances M; Gbemudu, Josette N; Carluzzo, Kathleen L; Struthers, Ashley; Van Citters, Aricca D; Shortell, Stephen M; Nelson, Eugene C; Fisher, Elliott S

    2014-01-01

    Recognition of the importance and difficulty of engaging physicians in organisational change has sparked an explosion of literature. The social identity approach, by considering engagement in terms of underlying group identifications and intergroup dynamics, may provide a framework for choosing among the plethora of proposed engagement techniques. This paper seeks to address this issue. The authors examined how four disparate organisations engaged physicians in change. Qualitative methods included interviews (109 managers and physicians), observation, and document review. Beyond a universal focus on relationship-building, sites differed radically in their preferred strategies. Each emphasised or downplayed professional and/or organisational identity as befit the existing level of inter-group closeness between physicians and managers: an independent practice association sought to enhance members' identity as independent physicians; a hospital, engaging community physicians suspicious of integration, stressed collaboration among separate, equal partners; a developing integrated-delivery system promoted alignment among diverse groups by balancing "systemness" with subgroup uniqueness; a medical group established a strong common identity among employed physicians, but practised pragmatic co-operation with its affiliates. The authors cannot confirm the accuracy of managers perceptions of the inter-group context or the efficacy of particular strategies. Nonetheless, the findings suggested the fruitfulness of social identity thinking in approaching physician engagement. Attention to inter-group dynamics may help organisations engage physicians more effectively. This study illuminates and explains variation in the way different organisations engage physicians, and offers a theoretical basis for selecting engagement strategies.

  20. Medical sociology and technology: critical engagements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Monica J; Morrison, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    In this selective review of the literature on medical sociology's engagement with technology, we outline the concurrent developments of the American Sociological Association section on medicine and advances in medical treatment. We then describe theoretical and epistemological issues with scholars' treatment of technology in medicine. Using symbolic interactionist concepts, as well as work from the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies, we review and synthesize critical connections in and across sociology's intellectual relationship with medical technology. Next, we discuss key findings in these literatures, noting a shift from a focus on the effects of technology on practice to a reconfiguration of human bodies. We also look toward the future, focusing on connections between technoscientific identities and embodied health movements. Finally, we call for greater engagement by medical sociologists in studying medical technology and the process of policy-making--two areas central to debates in health economics and public policy.

  1. Getting ready for inspection of investigational site at short notice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Talele

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available India is becoming an attractive destination for drug development and clinical research. This is evidenced by the three fold increment in clinical trial applications in last four years to the office of Drugs Controller General of India (DCGI. This upward trend is collaborative efforts of all stake holders and the quality of Indian data. Therefore to sustain this trend, it is important that stake holders such as Regulators, Sponsor, CRO, Monitor, Investigators and trial subjects required maintaining high standards of data and conduct of clinical trials. Indian regulations and the role of DCGI in quality check for Indian clinical trials is always a topic of discussion in various forums. A recent move by DCGI for conducting random inspections of investigational sites and companies at short notice, checking their compliance in accordance with the guidelines, and taking action against non-complier is welcomed. This will certainly increase over quality of the clinical trials. Quality of clinical trial conduct is measured on essential documents for their appropriateness and its correctness. It is observed that the stakeholders engaged in multitasking often overlook the requirements or appropriateness of the document due to their focused approach on a specific activity which is on priority. This can lead to serious quality problem and issues. Understanding of the process and documents reviewed by auditor is important to maintain such high quality. The proper planning and time management working on essential documents can minimize the quality issues, and we can be always ready for any type of inspection, announced or unannounced, or "short notice".

  2. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on Physical and Chemical Properties of Ready-to-eat Bologna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayca Gedikoglu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Quality and safety of ready-to-eat meat products can be altered by antimicrobial agents such as lactates, diacetates and citrates. This project evaluated the effect of Ional (1.5, 2.5, 3.5%, Ional LC (1.5, 2.5, 3.5% and Optiform SD4 (2.5% compared to a control on selected physical and chemical characteristics of ready-to-eat vacuum-packaged bologna slices stored less than 4°C for up to 112 days of retail display. Water activity (aw, expressible moisture (WHC, pH, fat and moisture content, cooking yield, texture profile analysis, puncture test, Hunter color values were evaluated. Addition of antimicrobials decreased pH. Product with Optiform SD4 (2.5% had the highest cooking yield. Bologna formulated with Optiform SD4 (2.5% had the highest springiness and hardness values after control and the highest puncture value. Water activity was not significantly different (p>0.05 between treatments. Furthermore, day of display had no significant effect on aw. L and a values were not significantly different between treatments, except for Ional LC (3.5% compared to the control. Overall, treatments with Ional (1.5%, (2.5% and Optiform SD4 (2.5% were most effective for preserving the quality of the bologna (s. Also, the highest levels of antimicrobial agents had a detrimental effect on the quality of ready-to-eat bolognas.

  3. 101 ready-to-use Excel formulas

    CERN Document Server

    Alexander, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mr. Spreadsheet has done it again with 101 easy-to-apply Excel formulas 101 Ready-to-Use Excel Formulas is filled with the most commonly-used, real-world Excel formulas that can be repurposed and put into action, saving you time and increasing your productivity. Each segment of this book outlines a common business or analysis problem that needs to be solved and provides the actual Excel formulas to solve the problem-along with detailed explanation of how the formulas work. Written in a user-friendly style that relies on a tips and tricks approach, the book details how to perform everyday Excel tasks with confidence. 101 Ready-to-Use Excel Formulas is sure to become your well-thumbed reference to solve your workplace problems. The recipes in the book are structured to first present the problem, then provide the formula solution, and finally show how it works so that it can be customized to fit your needs. The companion website to the book allows readers to easily test the formulas and provides visual confirmat...

  4. The SC gets ready for visitors

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Hall 300, which houses the Synchrocyclotron (SC), CERN’s first accelerator, is getting ready to host a brand-new exhibition. The site will be one of the stops on the new visit itineraries that will be inaugurated for the 2013 CERN Open Day.   The Synchrocyclotron through the years. Just as it did in the late 1950s, when the accelerator was first installed, the gigantic red structure of the Synchrocyclotron's magnet occupies a large part of the 300-square-metre hall. “We have completed the first phase of the project that will give the SC a new lease of life,” says Marco Silari, the project leader and a member of CERN’s Radiation Protection Group. “We have removed all the equipment that was not an integral part of the accelerator. The hall is now ready for the civil-engineering work that will precede the installation of the exhibition.” The SC was witness to a big part of the history of CERN. The accelerator produced ...

  5. Decoupling, re-engaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2013-01-01

    in the project is contingent upon many factors, is likely to vary over time and should not be taken for granted. Previous studies have identified the relationship between trust and project outcomes and suggested trust-building strategies but have largely ignored the dynamic quality of trust relations through...... the life of a major project and the complex demands of managing those fluctuations. We investigate evolving trust relationships in a longitudinal case analysis of a large integrated hospital system implementation for the Faroe Islands. Trust relationships suffered various breakdowns, but the project...... was able to recover and eventually meet its goals. Based on concepts from Giddens’ later work on modernity, we develop two approaches for managing dynamic trust relationships in implementation projects: decoupling and re-engaging....

  6. Engaging with mobile methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2014-01-01

    This chapter showcases how mobile methods are more than calibrated techniques awaiting application by tourism researchers, but productive in the enactment of the mobile (Law and Urry, 2004). Drawing upon recent findings deriving from a PhD course on mobility and mobile methods it reveals...... the conceptual ambiguousness of the term ‘mobile methods’. In order to explore this ambiguousness the chapter provides a number of examples deriving from tourism research, to explore how mobile methods are always entangled in ideologies, predispositions, conventions and practice-realities. Accordingly......, the engagements with methods are acknowledged to be always political and contextual, reminding us to avoid essentialist discussions regarding research methods. Finally, the chapter draws on recent fieldwork to extend developments in mobilities-oriented tourism research, by employing auto-ethnography to call...

  7. Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchet, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science is awarded annually. Through the Prize, Europlanet aims to recognise achievements in engaging European citizens with planetary science and to raise the profile of outreach within the scientific community. It is awarded to individuals or groups who have developed innovative practices in planetary science communication and whose efforts have significantly contributed to a wider public engagement with planetary science.

  8. Student Engagement In Inclusive Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    There is general agreement that to thrive and learn at their best, students must be engaged. However, schools face a particular challenge to provide a suitable and engaging learning environment for SEN (special educational needs) students who are educated in general education classes. Using data......-students as for other students. This highlights the need for better inclusion initiatives aimed at strengthening engagement of SEN-students in regular classrooms....

  9. Engaging patients through your website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Kimberlee; Ornes, Lynne L; Paulson, Pat

    2014-01-01

    Legislation requires the healthcare industry to directly engage patients through technology. This paper proposes a model that can be used to review hospital websites for features that engage patients in their healthcare. The model describes four levels of patient engagement in website design. The sample consisted of 130 hospital websites from hospitals listed on 2010 and 2011 Most Wired Hospitals. Hospital websites were analyzed for features that encouraged patient interaction with their healthcare according to the levels in the model. Of the four levels identified in the model, websites ranged from "informing" to "collaborative" in website design. There was great variation of features offered on hospital websites with few being engaging and interactive.

  10. Students individual engagement in GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene Møller; Christiansen, Frederik V; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course...... in planning and management. The analysis shows that both the theoretical perspectives and the custom and didactical contract are important to understand students' engagement in GIS. However, it is the personal desiderata that are the key to understanding the students' different engagement. Further, a temporal...

  11. Engagement of Students Teaching Assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Brandt, Charlotte J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports from five years experiences of engaging young student teaching assistants into the continuously development of a course by involving them in research on pedagogical as well as other themes from the course. The purpose of the paper is to pave the road for a more engaged and inte......This paper reports from five years experiences of engaging young student teaching assistants into the continuously development of a course by involving them in research on pedagogical as well as other themes from the course. The purpose of the paper is to pave the road for a more engaged...

  12. Employee Engagement: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivated and engaged employees tend to contribute more in terms of organizational productivity and support in maintaining a higher commitment level leading to the higher customer satisfaction. Employees Engagement permeates across the employee-customer boundary, where revenue, corporate goodwill, brand image are also at stake. This paper makes an attempt to study the different dimensions of employee engagement with the help of review of literature. This can be used to provide an overview and references on some of the conceptual and practical work undertaken in the area of the employee engagement practices.

  13. Students’ individual engagement in GIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene Møller; Christiansen, Frederik V; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course...... in planning and management. The analysis shows that both the theoretical perspectives and the custom and didactical contract are important to understand students’ engagement in GIS. However, it is the personal desiderata that are the key to understanding the students’ different engagement. Further, a temporal...

  14. Self-Directed Learning Readiness at General Motors Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Michael A.

    Although self-directed learning (SDL) has been promoted by businesses as being needed by managers, traditional business schools have not promoted this type of learning. In addition, some adult learners are not ready for SDL, and some subjects (such as accounting) are not suitable for SDL. The concept of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) can…

  15. 47 CFR 15.118 - Cable ready consumer electronics equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. 15... Unintentional Radiators § 15.118 Cable ready consumer electronics equipment. (a) All consumer electronics TV... provisions of this section. Consumer electronics TV receiving equipment that includes features intended...

  16. Emotional Intelligence as a Determinant of Readiness for Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzdar, Muhammad Ayub; Ali, Akhtar; Tariq, Riaz Ul Haq

    2016-01-01

    Students' performance in online learning environments is associated with their readiness to adopt a digital learning approach. Traditional concept of readiness for online learning is connected with students' competencies of using technology for learning purposes. We in this research, however, investigated psychometric aspects of students'…

  17. ELL School Readiness and Pre-Kindergarten Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The increased utilization of non-parental pre-kindergarten care has spurred interest by both researchers and policy makers as to what types of care might be effective at boosting school readiness. Under-developed in the research has been an assessment of the influence of pre-kindergarten care on school readiness for English Language Learners…

  18. Implementation readiness for user-driven innovation in business networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Jacobsen, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we further develop the concept of implementation readiness of user driven innovation in business networks by focusing on how implementation readiness activities are in fact needed not only at the early stages of such network collaboration, but continuously throughout the process of ...

  19. School Readiness Research in Latin America: Findings and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Katherine; Rolla, Andrea; Romero-Contreras, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Educational results in Latin America (LA) are well below those of developed countries. One factor that influences how well children do at school is school readiness. In this article, we review studies conducted in LA on the readiness skills of preschool children. We begin by discussing contextual factors that affect what is expected of children…

  20. Teachers' Readiness to Implement Digital Curriculum in Kuwaiti Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awidi, Hamed; Aldhafeeri, Fayiz

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: The goal of this study was to investigate how Kuwaiti teachers perceive their own readiness to implement digital curriculum in public schools, and the factors that affect Kuwaiti teachers' readiness to implement digital curriculum from their perspectives. Background: In order to shift from the traditional instructional materials to…

  1. Inattention and Impulsivity: Differential Impact on School Readiness Capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasser, Tyler; Bierman, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Despite the conceptual link between self-regulation skills and school readiness capacities, questions remain regarding how distinct but related facets of self-regulation (i.e., attention regulation, behavior regulation) differentially impact the development of school readiness capacities during early childhood. Additionally, little is known about…

  2. School Readiness Research in Latin America: Findings and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Katherine; Rolla, Andrea; Romero-Contreras, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Educational results in Latin America (LA) are well below those of developed countries. One factor that influences how well children do at school is school readiness. In this article, we review studies conducted in LA on the readiness skills of preschool children. We begin by discussing contextual factors that affect what is expected of children…

  3. Rice University: Innovation to Increase Student College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    "College readiness" means that a student can enter a college classroom without remediation and successfully complete entry-level college requirements (Conley, 2012). In order for students to be considered college ready, they must acquire skills, content knowledge, and behaviors before leaving high school. Research on high-school performance…

  4. Students' Readiness for E-Learning Application in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Atousa; Rahbania, Zahra; Attaran, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the readiness of art students in applying e-learning. This study adopted a survey research design. From three public Iranian Universities (Alzahra, Tarbiat Modares, and Tehran), 347 students were selected by multistage cluster sampling and via Morgan Table. Their readiness for E-learning…

  5. Readiness, Instruction, and Learning to be a Kindergartner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Describes the effects of one community's concept of readiness for school on children in a kindergarten class. Of particular interest was the effect on children's understanding of their roles as students. The concept of readiness provided the framework for instructional activities and helped parents understand their children's roles as students.…

  6. The Answer Is Readiness--Now What Is the Question?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Although readiness is often posed as the answer in early childhood education, there is typically confusion about exactly what question this complex term responds to. In this article, I explore common uses of the term readiness, examine their theoretical and empirical problems, and suggest a more synthetic conception that merges attention to the…

  7. Predictive Validity of the Gesell School Readiness Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, M. Elizabeth; Shepard, Lorrie A.

    In response to the fact that technical standards for screening and placement tests must be more rigorous than those for readiness tests, the predictive validity of the Gesell School Readiness Tests (GSRT) was examined. The purpose of the GSRT, a commonly used screening instrument, is the assessment of children's developmental behaviors to aid in…

  8. A Complete Definition of College and Career Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, David T.

    2012-01-01

    In many circles, efforts are under way to develop definitions of college readiness, career readiness, or both. This brief contains a definition that is the culmination of 18 years of study and research on this topic. This definition, then, is based on both empirical evidence gathered via multiple research studies and on-the-ground interactions…

  9. Readiness towards Entrepreneurship Education: Students and Malaysian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Norasmah; Hashim, Norashidah; Wahid, Hariyaty Ab

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to observe the readiness of students and the internal environment of Malaysian public universities in the implementation of entrepreneurship education. Design/methodology/approach: The authors employed a quantitative approach and the main instrument used to gauge the entrepreneurship readiness among students…

  10. Computer-Based Assessment of School Readiness and Early Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csapó, Beno; Molnár, Gyöngyvér; Nagy, József

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the potential of using online tests for the assessment of school readiness and for monitoring early reasoning. Four tests of a face-to-face-administered school readiness test battery (speech sound discrimination, relational reasoning, counting and basic numeracy, and deductive reasoning) and a paper-and-pencil inductive…

  11. Student Online Readiness Assessment Tools: A Systematic Review Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Alem

    2014-01-01

    Although there are tools to assess student's readiness in an "online learning context," little is known about the "psychometric" properties of the tools used or not. A systematic review of 5107 published and unpublished papers identified in a literature search on student online readiness assessment tools between 1990 and…

  12. E-Learning Readiness in Public Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouma, Gordon O.; Awuor, Fredrick M.; Kyambo, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    As e-learning becomes useful to learning institutions worldwide, an assessment of e-learning readiness is essential for the successful implementation of e-learning as a platform for learning. Success in e-learning can be achieved by understanding the level of readiness of e-learning environments. To facilitate schools in Kenya to implement…

  13. Cross-Cultural Communities of Practice for College Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Jack

    2014-01-01

    College readiness is a social construct requiring both student and adult preparedness. This paper used a case study methodology to explore how teaching in an early college program might promote adult college readiness in the instructors. A community of practice, enhanced by a co-teaching model, in two separate high school settings under one early…

  14. Evaluation of broiler performance when fed roundup ready wheat event mon 71800, control, and commercial wheat varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, C.A.; Hartnell, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated the nutritional value of broiler diets containing approximately 40% wheat grain from Roundup Ready wheat (MON 71800), its similar nontransgenic control (MON 71900), or reference commercial wheat varieties. The feeding trial lasted 40 d, and each treatment consisted of 10 replicates of

  15. Ready-to-use foods for management of moderate acute malnutrition: Considerations for scaling up production and use in programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready-to-use foods are one of the available strategies for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), but challenges remain in the use of these products in programs at scale. This paper focuses on two challenges: the need for cheaper formulations using locally available ingredients that are...

  16. The Effects of a Social Skills Training Package on Social Engagement of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Generalized Recess Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, Keith C.; Ford, W. Blake; Battaglia, Allison A.; McHugh, Melissa B.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides a preliminary evaluation of the effects of the Superheroes Social Skills program, a practice-ready, multimedia social skills program, on social engagements of elementary-age children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four children with ASD between the ages of 8 and 10 with current placements in inclusive public…

  17. Measuring Teacher Engagement: Development of the Engaged Teachers Scale (ETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Robert M.; Yerdelen, Sündüs; Durksen, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to create and validate a brief multidimensional scale of teacher engagement--the Engaged Teachers Scale (ETS)--that reflects the particular characteristics of teachers' work in classrooms and schools. We collected data from three separate samples of teachers (total N = 810), and followed five steps in developing and…

  18. PERARES: Public Engagement with Research and Research Engagement with Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhaus, Norbert; Mulder, Henk A.J.

    2014-01-01

    PERARES is a four-year project funded by the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme which started in 2010. The acronym stands for "Public Engagement with Research and Research Engagement with Society”. The project brings together Science Shops, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) and Univer

  19. Analyzing International Readiness of Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hamidizadeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internationalization has different connotations for different social sciences and its social, economic and cultural impacts have been examined by a number of studies. While firms’ internationalization processes have been understood as being dynamic, the concept of international readiness has rarely been the main focus of research efforts, which until a decade ago, focused principally on explaining sequences of entry modes and choices of markets. The emergence of the study of international entrepreneurship has enhanced the role of readiness. This study reviews the concept of international readiness by experimental and theoretical studies. Axioms in this research are based on content analysis. The framework incorporates measures to evaluate SMEs’ international readiness. The paper concludes with a research agenda as a guide for future work on considering the readiness as a critical phase before the internationalization process.

  20. Students’ Readiness for E-learning Application in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atousa Rasouli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research was to investigate the readiness of art students in applying e-learning. This study adopted a survey research design. From three public Iranian Universities (Alzahra, Tarbiat Modares, and Tehran, 347 students were selected by multistage cluster sampling and via Morgan Table. Their readiness for E-learning application was assessed by a self-developed questionnaire. Data analysis was done by indexes of descriptive statistics and one sample t-test. Analysis of results found a significant relationship between the readiness of undergraduate students, graduate students, and post-graduate students to apply E-learning, but there was no significant relationship between students’ readiness and gender, university, and subject. Results revealed that Art students were in a moderate level of readiness for applying E-learning.

  1. Determining Dimensionality of Exercise Readiness Using Exploratory Factor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohacker, Kelley; Zakrajsek, Rebecca A

    2016-06-01

    Assessment of "exercise readiness" is a central component to the flexible non-linear periodization (FNLP) method of organizing training workloads, but the underlying factor structure of this construct has not been empirically determined. The purpose of this study was to assess construct dimensionality of exercise readiness using exploratory factor analysis. The result of which serve as initial steps of developing a brief measure of exercise readiness. Participants consisted of students recruited from undergraduate Kinesiology courses at a racially diverse, southern University. Independent, anonymous online survey data were collected across three stages: 1) generation of item pool (n = 290), 2) assessment of face validity and refinement of item pool (n = 168), and 3) exploratory factor analysis (n = 684). A principal axis factor analysis was conducted with 41 items using oblique rotation (promax). Four statistically significant factors, as determined through parallel analysis, explained 61.5% of the variance in exercise readiness. Factor 1 contained items that represented vitality (e.g., lively, revived). Factor 2 items related to physical fatigue (e.g. tired, drained). Factors 3 and 4 were descriptive of, discomfort (e.g. pain, sick) and health (i.e. healthy, fit), respectively. This inductive approach indicates that exercise readiness is comprised of four dimensions: vitality, physical fatigue, discomfort, and health. This finding supports readiness assessment techniques currently recommended for practitioners according to the FNLP model. These results serve as a theoretical foundation upon which to further develop and refine a brief survey instrument to measure exercise readiness. Key pointsAssessment of exercise readiness is a key component in implementing an exercise program based on flexible nonlinear periodization, but the dimensionality of this concept has not been empirically determined.Based on a series of surveys and a robust exploratory factor analysis

  2. Sociale Media: Get ready to get real

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Frans van den Reep

    2011-01-01

    1e alinea column: Fake verkoopt niet. Wat kun je doen als je als brand/organisatie echt een langdurige verbintenis aan wilt gaan met je klanten? Vraag je dan vooral af waarom je die verbintenis wilt en ‘what is in it for me and them’. Als het om customer engagement gaat dan is de motivatie en de in

  3. Sociale Media: Get ready to get real

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reep, Frans van der

    2011-01-01

    1e alinea column: Fake verkoopt niet. Wat kun je doen als je als brand/organisatie echt een langdurige verbintenis aan wilt gaan met je klanten? Vraag je dan vooral af waarom je die verbintenis wilt en ‘what is in it for me and them’. Als het om customer engagement gaat dan is de motivatie en de in

  4. Acceptance Testing--Course Readiness Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczka, Eugene; Singer, Frank

    For several semesters, the teaching staff of the administrative statistics course at The University of Massachusetts have engaged in "acceptance testing"--the screening of incoming students for some very basic skills with an open book, unlimited time, repeatable test. Test results demonstrated that successful completion of prerequisite…

  5. Sociale Media: Get ready to get real

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    drs. Frans van den Reep

    2011-01-01

    1e alinea column: Fake verkoopt niet. Wat kun je doen als je als brand/organisatie echt een langdurige verbintenis aan wilt gaan met je klanten? Vraag je dan vooral af waarom je die verbintenis wilt en ‘what is in it for me and them’. Als het om customer engagement gaat dan is de motivatie en de

  6. Are They Ready to Teach? Student Teachers' Readiness for the Job with Reference to Teacher Competence Frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Zulaikha; Valcke, Martin; De Wever, Bram

    2017-01-01

    This is the first report in a series of studies concerning student teachers' readiness-for-the-job, defined by a framework of 11 international teacher competences (ITCs). Attaining readiness-for-the-job is connected to four characteristics of teacher education, namely; (1) employing the ITCs in day-to-day teaching in initial teacher education, (2)…

  7. Beyond and within public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cañada, Jose A.; Tupasela, Aaro Mikael; Snell, Karoliina

    2015-01-01

    Social studies on biobanking have traditionally focused on public engagement, that is, engagement with donors, patients and the general public as an important factor of sustainability. In this article, we claim that, in order to fully understand the way biobanks work, it is necessary to pay atten...

  8. Who Engages with Moral Beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

  9. Students Individual Engagement in GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Lene Møller; Christiansen, Frederik; Rump, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    This paper develops two sets of concepts to theorize why students engage differently in Geographical Information Systems (GIS). These theoretical concepts are used as an analytical lens to explore empirical data on the experiences and engagement of students enrolled in an undergraduate GIS course in planning and management. The analysis shows that…

  10. Who Engages with Moral Beauty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diessner, Rhett; Iyer, Ravi; Smith, Meghan M.; Haidt, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Aristotle considered moral beauty to be the "telos" of the human virtues. Displays of moral beauty have been shown to elicit the moral emotion of elevation and cause a desire to become a better person and to engage in prosocial behavior. Study 1 ("N" = 5380) shows engagement with moral beauty is related to several psychological…

  11. Student Engagement In Inclusive Classrooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rangvid, Beatrice Schindler

    from a large scale student panel survey, I document substantial differences in engagement between students with and without special needs in regular classes. I then show that concerning academic achievement, well-being and motivation, engagement appears to be at least as important a determinant for SEN...

  12. Student Engagement and Study Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Liam; Kanuka, Heather

    2012-01-01

    In this study the authors assessed student engagement during a short-term study-abroad program using the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). Data were collected from a group of Canadian undergraduates spending six weeks in Mexico. Their program included a 10-day bus tour, three half-credit courses, and accommodations with local families.…

  13. Student Engagement: Rhetoric and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Paula; Corbin, Lillian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in higher education literature and policy on the concepts of student engagement and disengagement. While most academic writings recognise the significance of student engagement, they have tended to concentrate on it in relation to academic activities. Increasingly, universities are "cascading" down the need…

  14. Student Engagement through Digital Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Liz; Meriwether, Jason L.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter suggests strategies and tools for student affairs professionals to leverage digital data to measure student engagement and learning outcomes, and refine programs that enhance institutional reputation and improve student persistence. The construct of student engagement is traced from its theoretical origins to recent research…

  15. Student Engagement: Buzzword of Fuzzword?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Johanna

    2014-01-01

    Global interest in the value of student engagement in higher education has led researchers to question whether the use of the term is clear and consistent. This article investigates the construction of the term "student engagement" at three US universities through an analysis of qualitative data. Whereas a shared understanding of the…

  16. Group conflict and faculty engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    engagement has been argued to lead to more satisfied, more productive and healthier staff. In this study, based on a sample consisting of 489 members of multicultural university departments, we set out to investigate the relationship between trust, conflict and academic staff engagement. More specifically we...

  17. E-READINESS OF ROMANIAN SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIN MARTIN

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It is undeniable the importance of SMEs in economic growth since they play their proper role in the emerging digital economy. But also have to consider the electronic preparation of these, their ability to absorb knowledge and to profit from their use, the e-accessibility and value aded goods/services through ICT. Analysis capacity of SMEs to participate in the digital economy is essential in defining the level of digital divide and the critical determinants, allowing overcoming the inhibitors adoption factors of ICT by SMEs. E-readiness allows measuring the ability of SMEs to participate in digital economy, develop new channels of communication and to achieve sustainable economic development.

  18. Technology readiness level six and autonomous mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodt, Barry A.; Camden, Rick S.

    2004-09-01

    During FY03, the U.S. Army Research Laboratory undertook a series of experiments designed to assess the maturity of autonomous mobility technology for the Future Combat Systems Armed Robotic Vehicle concept. The experiments assessed the technology against a level 6 standard in the technology readiness level (TRL) maturation schedule identified by a 1999 Government Accounting Office report. During the course of experimentation, 646 missions were conducted over a total distance of ~560 km and time of ~100 hr. Autonomous operation represented 96% and 88% of total distance and time, respectively. To satisfy the TRL 6 "relevant environment" standard, several experimental factors were varied over the three-site test as part of a formal, statistical, experimental design. This paper reports the specific findings pertaining to relevant-environment questions that were posed for the study and lends additional support to the Lead System Integrator decision that TRL 6 has been attained for the autonomous navigation system.

  19. Modeling ready biodegradability of fragrance materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceriani, Lidia; Papa, Ester; Kovarich, Simona; Boethling, Robert; Gramatica, Paola

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, quantitative structure activity relationships were developed for predicting ready biodegradability of approximately 200 heterogeneous fragrance materials. Two classification methods, classification and regression tree (CART) and k-nearest neighbors (kNN), were applied to perform the modeling. The models were validated with multiple external prediction sets, and the structural applicability domain was verified by the leverage approach. The best models had good sensitivity (internal ≥80%; external ≥68%), specificity (internal ≥80%; external 73%), and overall accuracy (≥75%). Results from the comparison with BIOWIN global models, based on group contribution method, show that specific models developed in the present study perform better in prediction than BIOWIN6, in particular for the correct classification of not readily biodegradable fragrance materials. © 2015 SETAC.

  20. A hawk is ready for flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This Broad-Winged Hawk is ready for flight from its perch on a utility pole at Kennedy Space Center. This hawk's habitat is chiefly deciduous woodland, ranging from southern Canada south throughout the eastern United States, including a small area of Central Florida. It winters in tropical South America. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a haven and habitat for more than 331 species of birds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are also a habitat for 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  1. The predictive validity of the survey of readiness for alcoholics anonymous participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingree, Jeffrey B; Simpson, Alpha; Thompson, Martie; McCrady, Barbara; Tonigan, J Scott

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive validity of the Survey of Readiness for Alcoholics Anonymous Participation (SYRAAP), which is a 15-item, self-administered instrument. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined whether responses to the SYRAAP within 1 week of entering substance-use treatment (T1) were associated with posttreatment Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) participation at 3-month (T2) and 6-month (T3) follow-up assessments. The T1 assessment was completed by 268 respondents; the T2 and T3 assessments were completed by 232 (86%) and 217 (81%) respondents, respectively. Results revealed that responses to the SYRAAP at T1 predicted AA participation at T2 and T3. The findings indicate the SYRAAP is a valid measure for assessing readiness for participating in AA. Future research in relation to the SYRAAP and limitations of the current study are discussed.

  2. Military Readiness: DODs Readiness Rebuilding Efforts May Be at Risk without a Comprehensive Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Congressional Committees September 2016 GAO-16-841 United States Government Accountability Office United States Government Accountability ...Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 included a provision that GAO review DOD’s efforts to rebuild military readiness. This report (1) describes the...Report accompanying a bill for the National Defense Authorization Act for 2016 included a provision for GAO to submit a report to the congressional

  3. Vaccination attitudes and mobile readiness: A survey of expectant and new mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Katherine M; Ducharme, Robin; Westeinde, Jacqueline; Wilson, Sarah E; Deeks, Shelley L; Pascali, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2015-01-01

    Sub-optimal vaccination coverage and recent outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases serve as a reminder that vaccine hesitancy remains a concern. ImmunizeCA, a new smartphone app to help track immunizations, may address several reasons for not vaccinating. We conducted a study to describe demographic variables, attitudes, beliefs and information sources regarding pediatric vaccination in a sample of childbearing women who were willing to download an immunization app. We also sought to measure their current mobile usage behaviors and determine if there is an association between participant demographics, attitudes, beliefs and information sources regarding pediatric vaccination and mobile usage. We recruited participants using a combination of passive and active methods at a tertiary care hospital in Ottawa, Canada. We used surveys to collect demographic information, examine attitudes, behavior, and information sources regarding immunization and self-reported mobile phone usage. A total of 54 women participated. The majority had positive attitudes toward vaccination (96%) and intended to vaccinate their children (98%). Participants were interested in information on pediatric vaccination (94%), and found information from public health the most reliable and accessible (78%). Participants also trusted immunization information from their doctor or nurse and public health (83%) more than other sources. There was variability in participant use of mobile apps for other purposes. The median participant mobile readiness score was 3.2. We found no significant associations between participant age, behavior and attitudes regarding vaccination and mobile readiness scores. This is the first evaluation of mobile readiness for a smartphone app to track immunizations. Our findings suggest that there exists an opportunity to provide reliable information on vaccination through mobile devices to better inform the public, however predictors of individual engagement with these

  4. An epistemology of engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heyns

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the viewpoint of representationalist epistemology it is assumed that objects can be represented in the mind or in language by rebuilding images of these objects from foundational ideas. In this article I examine the resistance to this depiction in an ongoing debate between Rorty and Taylor. Taylor argues that we should overcome the disengagement in what he sees as representationalism’s dualism of two mutually exclusive assumptions. The first assumption is the solipsist notion that our ideas can be formed without reference to the world outside the mind. According to the second tenet, however, it is paradoxically also assumed that these inner ideas are representations of the world. Because Rorty mainly targets the element of foundationalism in representationalism, he seems to argue that all we are able to know are our perspectives. I argue (in line with Taylor’s line of thought that this view implies that Rorty leans towards solipsism and thus remains under the spell of representationalism. Taylor, on the other hand, partially accepts the strong grip of perspectives on our knowing but simultaneously devises the concept of “preunderstanding” to get beyond perspectivism. I argue that Taylor’s thinking may still leave us with a mild foundationalism. However, the holism he assumes, can be used in a re-formed way to bring us a step closer to overcoming the representationalist dualism, and to steer us in the direction of an epistemology of engagement.

  5. Research staff and public engagement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Sarah Rachael

    2013-01-01

    Public engagement plays an important role in the contemporary UK academy, and is promoted through initiatives such as Beacons of Public Engagement and research grant 'Pathways to Impact'. Relatively little is known, however, about academic experiences of such engagement activities. This study...... focuses on one staff group, contract researchers, to explore the perceived challenges and opportunities of public engagement. Qualitative and quantitative data-from a web-based survey and three focus groups-are used to show that, while engagement activities are often seen as rewarding, the challenges...... involved in participating in them are profound. While researchers report practical needs, such as for logistical support or communication training, key barriers relate to the conditions of contract research more generally, and specifically to job insecurity, transiency, and lack of autonomy. © 2013...

  6. Disease prediction models and operational readiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney D Corley

    Full Text Available The objective of this manuscript is to present a systematic review of biosurveillance models that operate on select agents and can forecast the occurrence of a disease event. We define a disease event to be a biological event with focus on the One Health paradigm. These events are characterized by evidence of infection and or disease condition. We reviewed models that attempted to predict a disease event, not merely its transmission dynamics and we considered models involving pathogens of concern as determined by the US National Select Agent Registry (as of June 2011. We searched commercial and government databases and harvested Google search results for eligible models, using terms and phrases provided by public health analysts relating to biosurveillance, remote sensing, risk assessments, spatial epidemiology, and ecological niche modeling. After removal of duplications and extraneous material, a core collection of 6,524 items was established, and these publications along with their abstracts are presented in a semantic wiki at http://BioCat.pnnl.gov. As a result, we systematically reviewed 44 papers, and the results are presented in this analysis. We identified 44 models, classified as one or more of the following: event prediction (4, spatial (26, ecological niche (28, diagnostic or clinical (6, spread or response (9, and reviews (3. The model parameters (e.g., etiology, climatic, spatial, cultural and data sources (e.g., remote sensing, non-governmental organizations, expert opinion, epidemiological were recorded and reviewed. A component of this review is the identification of verification and validation (V&V methods applied to each model, if any V&V method was reported. All models were classified as either having undergone Some Verification or Validation method, or No Verification or Validation. We close by outlining an initial set of operational readiness level guidelines for disease prediction models based upon established Technology

  7. Diagnostic digital cytopathology: Are we ready yet?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarret C House

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cytology literature relating to diagnostic accuracy using whole slide imaging is scarce. We studied the diagnostic concordance between glass and digital slides among diagnosticians with different profiles to assess the readiness of adopting digital cytology in routine practice. Materials and Methods: This cohort consisted of 22 de-identified previously screened and diagnosed cases, including non-gynecological and gynecological slides using standard preparations. Glass slides were digitalized using Aperio ScanScope XT (×20 and ×40. Cytopathologists with (3 and without (3 digital experience, cytotechnologists (4 and senior pathology residents (2 diagnosed the digital slides independently first and recorded the results. Glass slides were read and recorded separately 1-3 days later. Accuracy of diagnosis, time to diagnosis and diagnostician′s profile were analyzed. Results: Among 22 case pairs and four study groups, correct diagnosis (93% vs. 86% was established using glass versus digital slides. Both methods more (>95% accurately diagnosed positive cases than negatives. Cytopathologists with no digital experience were the most accurate in digital diagnosis, even the senior members. Cytotechnologists had the fastest diagnosis time (3 min/digital vs. 1.7 min/glass, but not the best accuracy. Digital time was 1.5 min longer than glass-slide time/per case for cytopathologists and cytotechnologists. Senior pathology residents were slower and less accurate with both methods. Cytopathologists with digital experience ranked 2 nd fastest in time, yet last in accuracy for digital slides. Conclusions: There was good overall diagnostic agreement between the digital whole-slide images and glass slides. Although glass slide diagnosis was more accurate and faster, the results of technologists and pathologists with no digital cytology experience suggest that solid diagnostic ability is a strong indicator for readiness of digital adoption.

  8. Hospitals’ Readiness to Implement Clinical Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farbod Ebadi Fardazar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Quality of health services is one of the most important factors for delivery of these services. Regarding the importance and vital role of quality in the health sector, a concept known as “Clinical Governance” (CG has been introduced into the health area which aims to enhance quality of health services. Thus, this study aimed to assess private and public hospitals’ readiness to implement CG in Iran. Methods This descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out in 2012. Four hundred thirty participants including doctors, nurses, diagnostic departments personnel, and support staff were chosen randomly from four hospitals (equally divided into private and public hospitals. Clinical Governance Climate Questionnaire (CGCQ was used for data collection. Finally, data were entered into the SPSS 18 and were analyzed using statistical methods. Results Among the CG dimensions, “organizational learning” and “planned and integrated quality improvement program” scored the highest and the lowest respectively for both types of hospitals. Hospitals demonstrated the worst condition with regard to the latter dimension. Furthermore, both types of hospitals had positive picture regarding “training and development opportunities”. Private hospitals scored better than public ones in all dimensions but there was only a significant difference in “proactive risk management” dimension between both types of hospitals (P< 0.05. Conclusion Hospitals’ readiness for CG implementation was “average or weak”. In order to implement CG successfully, it is essential to have a quality-centered culture, a culture specified by less paperwork, more selfsufficiency, and flexibility in hospitals’ affairs as well as centring on shared vision and goals with an emphasis on continuous improvement and innovation.

  9. Preventing falls in residential construction: Effectiveness of engaging partners for a national social marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macario, Everly; Hannon, Sandra Wills; Baker, Robin; Branche, Christine M; Trahan, Christina

    2015-08-01

    Falls are the leading cause of fatalities in construction. The Safety Pays, Falls Cost campaign aims to prevent falls in residential construction. A critical component of our social marketing approach was to involve 70 partners in reaching target audiences. We assessed partner engagement April 2012-August 2013 through: (1) baseline partnership quality interviews (eight partners); (2) pre-/post-partner "market" readiness in-depth interviews (three partners); (3) a pre-/post- (29/31 partners) online partner engagement survey; and (4) standardized metrics to measure partner activity. We found a high level of interest and engagement that increased with the addition of prompting to action through regular communication and new resources from organizers and formation of local partnerships that were able to tailor their activities to their own communities or regions. It is feasible to leverage government-labor-management partnerships that enjoy trust among target audiences to widely disseminate campaign materials and messages. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Recommendations for NEAMS Engagement with the NRC: Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring a new generation of analytic tools to the nuclear engineering community in order to facilitate students, faculty, industry and laboratory researchers in investigating advanced reactor and fuel cycle designs. Although primarily targeting at advance nuclear technologies, it is anticipated that these new capabilities will also become interesting and useful to the nuclear regulator Consequently, the NEAMS program needs to engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission as the software is being developed to ensure that they are familiar with and ready to respond to this novel approach when the need arises. Through discussions between key NEAMS and NRC staff members, we tentatively recommend annual briefings to the Division of Systems Analysis in the NRC's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. However the NEAC subcommittee review of the NEAMS program may yield recommendations that would need to be considered before finalizing this plan.

  11. E-learning Readiness and Absorptive Capacity in the Manufacturing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Hattinger

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The manufacturing industry constantly strive to develop the competencies of their expert production engineers in order to achieve and maintain a competitive advantage. Research shows that the absorptive capacity of a firm is central in order to reach such a goal. The absorptive capacity is the firm´s ability to recognize the value of new external information, assimilate it, and apply it to commercial ends, and thereby exploit the conditions for innovation. In this paper the concept of absorptive capacity is used as a lens for analyzing managerial rationales for engaging in technology enhanced competence development projects. Through interviews with key informants in 15 manufacturing firms we study the capabilities and readiness that organizations need for participation in e-learning initiatives. We present a framework of readiness for technology enhanced competence development comprised of the following interrelated constructs; awareness, e-learning maturity, dynamic capability and co-creativity. Results show a broad variation of levels within the constructs among the firms. Notable is the low level of e-learning maturity and dynamic capability. We argue that e-learning maturity is dependent on all four constructs.

  12. Promoting academic and social-emotional school readiness: the head start REDI program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierman, Karen L; Domitrovich, Celene E; Nix, Robert L; Gest, Scott D; Welsh, Janet A; Greenberg, Mark T; Blair, Clancy; Nelson, Keith E; Gill, Sukhdeep

    2008-01-01

    Forty-four Head Start classrooms were randomly assigned to enriched intervention (Head Start REDI-Research-based, Developmentally Informed) or "usual practice" conditions. The intervention involved brief lessons, "hands-on" extension activities, and specific teaching strategies linked empirically with the promotion of: (a) social-emotional competencies and (b) language development and emergent literacy skills. Take-home materials were provided to parents to enhance skill development at home. Multimethod assessments of three hundred and fifty-six 4-year-old children tracked their progress over the course of the 1-year program. Results revealed significant differences favoring children in the enriched intervention classrooms on measures of vocabulary, emergent literacy, emotional understanding, social problem solving, social behavior, and learning engagement. Implications are discussed for developmental models of school readiness and for early educational programs and policies.

  13. Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Ready Mix Concrete Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkar, V. M.; Duggar, A. R.; Kumar, A.; Bonde, P. P.; Girwalkar, R. S.; Gade, S. B.

    2013-11-01

    India, being a developing nation is experiencing major growth in its infrastructural sector. Concrete is the major component in construction. The requirement of good quality of concrete in large quantities can be fulfilled by ready mix concrete batching and mixing plants. The paper presents a technique of applying the value engineering tool life cycle cost analysis to a ready mix concrete plant. This will help an investor or an organization to take investment decisions regarding a ready mix concrete facility. No economic alternatives are compared in this study. A cost breakdown structure is prepared for the ready mix concrete plant. A market survey has been conducted to collect realistic costs for the ready mix concrete facility. The study establishes the cash flow for the ready mix concrete facility helpful in investment and capital generation related decisions. Transit mixers form an important component of the facility and are included in the calculations. A fleet size for transit mixers has been assumed for this purpose. The life cycle cost has been calculated for the system of the ready mix concrete plant and transit mixers.

  14. Organisational readiness for introducing a performance management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ochurub

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The successful introduction of performance management systems to the public service requires careful measurement of readiness for change.Research purpose: This study investigated the extent to which employees were ready for change as an indication of whether their organisation was ready to introduce a performance management system (PMS.Motivation for the study: Introducing system changes in organisations depends on positive employee preconditions. There is some debate over whether organisations can facilitate these preconditions. This research investigates change readiness linked to the introduction of a PMS in a public sector organisation. The results add to the growing literature on levels of change readiness.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a quantitative, questionnairebased design. Because the organisation was large, the researchers used stratified sampling to select a sample from each population stratum. The sample size was 460, which constituted 26% of the total population. They used a South African change readiness questionnaire to elicit employee perceptions and opinions.Main findings: The researchers found that the organisation was not ready to introduce a PMS. The study identified various challenges and key factors that were negatively affecting the introduction of a PMS.Practical/managerial implications: The intention to develop and introduce performance management systems is generally to change the attitudes, values and approaches of managers and employees to the new strategies, processes and plans to improve productivity and performance. However, pre-existing conditions and attitudes could have an effect. It is essential to ensure that organisations are ready to introduce performance management systems and to provide sound change leadership to drive the process effectively. This study contributes to the body of knowledge about the challenges and factors organisations should consider when they

  15. Educating for Civic Engagement: Public Achievement as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Bernadette Christine

    readiness work is completed prior to implementation, and civic skills and behaviors are part of institutional and student assessment processes. Additional research is suggested to develop an assessment tool to measure an organization's readiness to implement civic engagement programs and educational assessments to measure the cognitive and affective acquisition of civic skills and behaviors.

  16. Does readiness to change predict in-session motivational language? Correspondence between two conceptualizations of client motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Moyers, Theresa B

    2011-07-01

    Client language reflecting motivation for changing substance use (i.e. change talk) has been shown to predict outcomes in motivational interviewing. While previous work has shown that change talk may be elicited by clinician behaviors, little is known about intrapersonal factors that may elicit change talk, including clients' baseline motivation for change. The present study tested whether in-session change talk differs between clients based on their readiness for change. First-session audio recordings from Project MATCH, a large multi-site clinical trial of alcohol treatments. Project MATCH out-patients (n = 69) and aftercare patients (n = 48) receiving motivational enhancement therapy (MET). Client language from first-session MET was coded using the Sequential Code for Observing Process Exchanges. Readiness and stages of change were assessed using both categorical and dimensional variables derived from the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment and the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale, administered prior to first treatment sessions. Stage of change scales followed some of the expected correspondence with change talk, although the associations were generally small in magnitude and inconsistent across measures and treatment arms. Higher overall readiness did not predict more overall change talk, contemplation had mixed associations with preparatory change talk, and preparation/action did not predict commitment language. Motivational language used in initial sessions by people receiving counselling for excessive alcohol consumption does not appear to be associated with readiness to change as construed by the Transtheoretical Model. © 2011 The Authors, Addiction © 2011 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: a scoping review and domain analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano R. Lotrecchiano

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper identifies a gap in the team science literature that considers intrapersonal indicators of collaboration as motivations and threats to participating in collaborative knowledge producing teams (KPTs. Through a scoping review process, over 150 resources were consulted to organize 6 domains of motivation and threat to collaboration in KPTs: Resource Acquisition, Advancing Science, Building Relationships, Knowledge Transfer, Recognition and Reward, and Maintenance of Beliefs. Findings show how domains vary in their presentation of depth and diversity of motivation and threat indicators as well as their relationship with each other within and across domains. The findings of 51 indicators resulting from the review provide a psychosocial framework for which to establish a hierarchy of collaborative reasoning for individual engagement in KPTs thus allowing for further research into the mechanism of collaborative engagement. The indicators serve as a preliminary step in establishing a protocol for testing of the psychometric properties of intrapersonal measures of collaboration readiness.

  18. ATHLETES ENGAGEMENT MODEL: A GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Martins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation from a diversity of theoretical perspectives displays that one of the best predictors of children’s continuing involvement in sports is the development of positive feelings for sport involvement (e.g. Martins, Rosado, Ferreira & Biscaia, 2014. In sport, the concept of engagement reflects the energy in action, the connection between the person and the activity, and it is considered as a form of active involvement between the individual and the task (Russell, Ainley, & Frydenberg, 2005. In sport, the concept of athletes’ engagement reflects a relatively stable and long lasting experience that is generically characterized through positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in the act of practicing the given activity (Lonsdale, Hodge, & Raedeke, 2007. Therefore, the analysis of experiences related to engagement is important in order to understand sport participation, and how its different levels can condition the social involvement. In addition, these studies failed to examine potentially important gender differences in engagement among athletes. Therefore, the study of athletes by evaluating their engagement levels comparing genders, can contribute towards shedding light on decisive aspects pertaining to its social involvement within ethical dimensions as well as personal and social responsibility, on which research is still lacking. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gender on engagement in a sport scenario among youth athletes.

  19. Development of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) Metrics and Risk Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.; Anderson, K. K.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Lansing, Carina

    2012-10-01

    This is an internal project milestone report to document the CCSI Element 7 team's progress on developing Technology Readiness Level (TRL) metrics and risk measures. In this report, we provide a brief overview of the current technology readiness assessment research, document the development of technology readiness levels (TRLs) specific to carbon capture technologies, describe the risk measures and uncertainty quantification approaches used in our research, and conclude by discussing the next steps that the CCSI Task 7 team aims to accomplish.

  20. Operational readiness: an integral part of the facility planning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, LeeAnne; Howe, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Large capital building projects benefit from an operational readiness strategy prior to new facility occupancy. St. Joseph's Healthcare used a structured approach for their readiness planning that included individual work plan meetings, tools for ensuring integration across programs and services and process improvement support to ensure a smooth transition. Over 1100 staff were oriented using a Train-the-Trainer model. Significant effort was required to co-ordinate the customized training, which involved "staffing up" to ensure sufficient resources for backfill. Operational readiness planning places additional demands on managers, requiring support and assistance from dedicated resources both prior to occupancy and several months post-move.

  1. The Challenges of Community Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormick, Craig

    2010-12-01

    Lyons and Whelan provide a useful list of recommendations as to how community engagement on nanotechnology could be improved, which very few people working in community engagement could disagree with. However, as the conclusions of any study are dependent on the data obtained, if more data had been obtained and analysed then different conclusions might have been reached. Addressing the key issues in the paper and providing more data, also allows an opportunity to expand on current issues relating to community engagement on nanotechnology and the challenges it provides for practitioners.

  2. Stakeholder Engagement Through Social Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Etter, Michael; Castello, Itziar

    The introduction of new information and communication technologies such social media platforms in organizations results in a new emerging logic of stakeholder engagement around sustainable development issues. We investigate how middle managers of a pharmaceutical corporation navigate between two...... competing logics of stakeholder engagement: the current (influence logic) and the new logic underlying social media (logic of community). With a longitudinal study of 26 months we observe how engagements failed since managers were not able to integrate certain symbolic and substantive elements of the new...... introduced by social media....

  3. The Condition of College & Career Readiness 2013: Students from Low-Income Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACT, Inc., 2014

    2014-01-01

    ACT has been measuring college readiness trends for several years. "The Condition of College & Career Readiness" is ACT's annual report on the progress of the graduating class relative to college readiness. This year, 54.3% of the graduating class took the ACT® college readiness assessment. This report is designed to help inform the…

  4. Assessment of the Florida College and Career Readiness Initiative: Year 2 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokher, Christine; Jacobson, Lou

    2014-01-01

    The Florida College and Career Readiness Initiative is a statewide policy that mandates college placement testing of 11th-graders who meet high school graduation criteria but are unlikely to meet college readiness criteria. Students who score below college-ready on the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT) are required to take math and…

  5. E-Learning Readiness in Medicine: Turkish Family Medicine (FM) Physicians Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlakkiliç, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    This research investigates e-learning readiness level of family medicine physicians (FM) in Turkey. The study measures the level of e-learning readiness of Turkish FM physicians by an online e-learning readiness survey. According to results five areas are ready at Turkish FM physicians but need a few improvements:…

  6. Copernicus POD Service: Ready for Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, H.; Fernández, J.; Escobar, D.; Féménias, P.; Flohrer, C.; Otten, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Copernicus POD Service is part of the Copernicus PDGS Ground Segment of the Sentinel missions. A GMV-led consortium is operating the Copernicus POD Service being in charge of generating precise orbital products and auxiliary data files for their use as part of the processing chains of the respective Sentinel PDGS. The Sentinel-1, -2 & -3 missions have different but very demanding requirements in terms of orbital accuracy and timeliness. Orbital products in Near Real Time (latency: 30 min), Short Time Critical (1.5 days) and Non-time Critical (20-30 days) are required. The accuracy requirements are very challenging, targeting 5 cm in 3D for Sentinel-1 and 2-3 cm in radial direction for Sentinel-3. Sentinel-3A carries, in addition to a GPS receiver a laser retro reflector and a DORIS receiver. On the one hand, the three different techniques GPS, SLR and DORIS make POD more complex but, on the other hand, it is very helpful to have independent techniques available for validation of the orbit results. The successful POD processing for Sentinel-1A is a good preparation for Sentinel-3A due to the similar demanding orbit accuracy requirements. The Copernicus POD Service is ready for Sentinel-3A and the service will process GPS and SLR data routinely and has the capacity to process DORIS in NTC and reprocessing campaigns. The three independent orbit determination techniques on Sentinel-3 offer big potential for scientific exploitation. Carrying all three techniques together makes the satellite, e.g., very useful for combining all the techniques on observation level as it could only be done for Jason-2 until now. The Sentinel POD Quality Working Group strongly supporting the CPOD Service delivers additional orbit solutions to validate the CPOD results independently. The recommendations from this body guarantee that the CPOD Service is updated following state-of-the-art algorithms, models and conventions. The QWG also focuses on the scientific exploitation of the

  7. First experience with a ready-for-use rheohemapheresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, T; Rink, S; Brunner, R; Borberg, H

    2001-04-01

    Rheohemapheresis is increasingly being used for the improvement of microcirculation in numerous diseases. The method is based on the constant-flow separation of plasma by a cell separator and the secondary filtration of plasma through a hollow-fiber membrane. A new CE-marked system has recently been launched for an improved continuous flow blood separator (dideco Excel Pro) that contains a connection kit between the cell separator and a secondary filter and software which includes differential filtration as a standard protocol. The new system was used in our center using ethylenevinylalcohol secondary filters (Evaflux LA4 or LA5). 99 procedures were completed in 47 patients. A median of 2.7 (1.6-4.2) 1 of plasma were processed via the secondary filter in 109 (41-218) min. The values in peripheral blood before and after the treatment were total protein 6.7 (5.8-8.9)/ 5.3 (4.4-6.7) g/dl, fibrinogen 215 (118-480)/110 (37-275) mg/dl and cholesterol 200 (134-254)/92 (69 149) mg/dl. A median platelet loss of 30% in the peripheral blood of the patients was observed partly by platelet content of the separated plasma of 30 g/l after 500 ml of treatment and 10 g/l after 2,500 ml. Major side effects in the patients were not observed. The new differential filtration system already fulfills the demands of a ready-to-use CE-marked rheohemapheresis system but improvements in the details of the treatment protocol are still required and under way.

  8. Phage inactivation of foodborne Shigella on ready-to-eat spiced chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Ran; Bao, Hongduo

    2013-01-01

    Shigellosis, also called bacillary dysentery, is an infectious disease caused by Shigella species, including Shigella flexneri, Shigella dysenteriae, Shigella sonnei, and Shigella boydii. Infection with S. flexneri can result in epidemics, and Shigella-contaminated food is often the source of infection, such as ready-to-eat spiced chicken and duck. Therefore, we investigated the ability of Shigella phages to inhibit pathogenic Shigella spp. in ready-to-eat spiced chicken. Food samples were inoculated with individual species (1 × 10(4) cfu/g) or a mixture (S. flexneri 2a, S. dysenteriae, and S. sonnei) to a total concentration of 3 × 10(4) cfu/g. Single phages or a phage cocktail were added thereafter (1 × 10(8) pfu/g or 3 × 10(8) pfu/g), respectively, and samples were incubated at 4°C for 72 h. In general, the application of more phages (3 × 10(8) pfu/g) was the most effective treatment. Phages could reduce bacterial counts by up to 2 log(10)/g after 48 h incubation when treated with the cocktail, and after 72 h the host could not be detected. Similarly, the host in spiced chicken treated with single phage was also sharply reduced after 72 h incubation. The results suggest that an obligately virulent phage cocktail, such as S. flexneri, S. dysenteriae, and S. sonnei phages, can effectively reduce potential contamination of Shigella spp. in ready-to-eat chicken products.

  9. A Readiness Ruler for Assessing Motivation to Change in People with Eating Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Hilaire, Annie; Axelrod, Kaitlyn; Geller, Josie; Mazanek Antunes, Juliana; Steiger, Howard

    2017-09-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Eating Disorder Readiness Ruler a simple self-report instrument designed to enable rapid assessment of readiness to change problematic eating behaviours in people with clinical eating disorders. We administered the ED-RR, the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire and a measure of autonomous and controlled motivation for change to 206 individuals receiving outpatient treatment for an eating disorder. A principal axis factoring analysis of the ED-RR yielded a significant two-factor solution (explaining 59% of variance)-one factor pertaining to restriction and body image preoccupation (four items), the other to binge-eating and vomiting symptoms (two items). The ED-RR showed good internal consistency (alpha coefficients for the two factors being .77 and .84 respectively). Furthermore, individuals reporting higher readiness showed higher scores on independent measures of autonomous motivation and greater symptom reductions over time. Results suggest that the ED-RR is a psychometrically sound tool with potential clinical utility. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  10. Marketing engagement through visual content

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marius Manic

    2015-01-01

      Engaging visual is a must in the modern marketing world. Wide access to mass communication devices, with extended visuals enhancements, made visual content an important point of interest for any publisher, on all media channels...

  11. Engagement Assessment Using EEG Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederic; Zhang, Guangfan; Wang, Wei; Pepe, Aaron; Xu, Roger; Schnell, Thomas; Anderson, Nick; Heitkamp, Dean

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present methods to analyze and improve an EEG-based engagement assessment approach, consisting of data preprocessing, feature extraction and engagement state classification. During data preprocessing, spikes, baseline drift and saturation caused by recording devices in EEG signals are identified and eliminated, and a wavelet based method is utilized to remove ocular and muscular artifacts in the EEG recordings. In feature extraction, power spectrum densities with 1 Hz bin are calculated as features, and these features are analyzed using the Fisher score and the one way ANOVA method. In the classification step, a committee classifier is trained based on the extracted features to assess engagement status. Finally, experiment results showed that there exist significant differences in the extracted features among different subjects, and we have implemented a feature normalization procedure to mitigate the differences and significantly improved the engagement assessment performance.

  12. Safety evaluation of sous vide-processed ready meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, H; Rosnes, J T; Brendehaug, J; Kleiberg, G H

    2002-01-01

    To assess survival, growth and toxin production of spore-forming bacteria in sous vide products exposed to a relatively high heat treatment. During a three-year period, 2,168 sous vide-processed, commercially available ready-made meals with a shelf life of 3-5 weeks were examined. The products were stored at 4 degrees C for the first 1/3 and at 7 degrees C for the remaining 2/3 of their shelf life period. Three-fourths of the samples had less than 10 bacteria per gram the day after production, and none had more than 1,000. Similar numbers were found at the end of the shelf life when stored as described above. At abuse temperature (20 degrees C), the number of bacteria increased to 10(6)-10(7) cfu g(-1) 7 d after production. A total of 350 isolates of Bacillus spp. were collected, but no Clostridium strains were detected. Only 11 of the 113 tested strains were able to grow at 7 degrees C in broth, and none of the psychrotrophic strains were able to produce substantial amounts of toxins causing food poisoning. The health risk of these products is small as long as the temperature during storage is low. For microbial testing of the end products, traditional plating will suffice.

  13. Pancreatic cancer: Are "liquid biopsies" ready for prime-time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Alexandra R; Valle, Juan W; McNamara, Mairead G

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is a disease that carries a poor prognosis. Accurate tissue diagnosis is required. Tumours contain a high content of stromal tissue and therefore biopsies may be inconclusive. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) have been investigated as a potential "liquid biopsy" in several malignancies and have proven to be of prognostic value in breast, prostate and colorectal cancers. They have been detected in patients with localised and metastatic pancreatic cancer with sensitivities ranging from 38%-100% using a variety of platforms. Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) has also been detected in pancreas cancer with a sensitivity ranging from 26%-100% in studies across different platforms and using different genetic markers. However, there is no clear consensus on which platform is the most effective for detection, nor which genetic markers are the most useful to use. Potential roles of liquid biopsies include diagnosis, screening, guiding therapies and prognosis. The presence of CTCs or ctDNA has been shown to be of prognostic value both at diagnosis and after treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. However, more prospective studies are required before this promising technology is ready for adoption into routine clinical practice.

  14. Understanding motivation for substance use treatment: the role of social pressure during the transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Ilana; Peterson-Badali, Michele; Henderson, Joanna

    2011-06-01

    Research has shown that social pressure is related to treatment motivation and plays an important role in treatment engagement in adults with problematic substance use. Despite the shifts in autonomy and decision-making in emerging adulthood, the factors affecting treatment motivation (e.g., readiness to comply with treatment) during this period have been largely ignored. In this cross sectional study, 134 youth (83 males and 51 females) presenting to an outpatient substance abuse program completed questionnaires regarding substance use history, mental health, social pressure to reduce use and enter treatment, and treatment motivation. Age was positively related to identification of internal reasons for seeking treatment and negatively related to external coercive social pressures as a motivator for treatment. Peer pressure accounted for significant variance in Identified (e.g., personal choice and commitment to the program) and Introjected (e.g., guilt about continued substance use) treatment motivation. Family pressure was related only to External treatment motivation when peer pressure was considered in the regression model. These results highlight the importance of emerging adult peers as motivators of youths' treatment seeking. Limitations, directions for future research and treatment implications are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. bacteriological quality of some ready to eat vegetables as retailed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Some ready to eat leafy vegetables on sale at Sabon-gari market, Zaria were analysed for their bacterial flora and counts. ... particularly washing. The importance of washing ... biochemical tests that included coagulase, motility, indole, oxidase ...

  16. Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED Ready Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric First Aid/CPR/AED READY REFERENCE CHECKING AN INJURED OR ILL CHILD OR INFANT APPEARS TO ... 55 POUNDS NO BREATHING TIP: When available, use pediatric settings or pads when caring for children and ...

  17. A quantification of discharge readiness after outpatient anaesthesia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    ability to tolerate oral fluids, to void and walk unassisted.1 ... and, 3) time to discharge readiness according to nursing assessments. ... Department of Anaesthesia, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, University of British Columbia ...

  18. Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Tech...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — According to findings reported in Readiness for Meaningful Use of Health Information Technology and Patient Centered Medical Home Recognition Survey Results,...

  19. ACHIEVING BUSINESS EXCELLENCE BY OPTIMIZING CORPORATE FORENSIC READINESS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gojko Grubor; Ivan Barac; Natasa Simeunovic; Nenad Ristic

    2017-01-01

    ... incident digital forensic investigation (CCIDFI) by using adopted mathematic model of the greed MCDM - multi-criteria decision-making method and the Expert Choice software tool for multi-criteria optimization of the CCIDFI readiness...

  20. The Role of Passion and Purpose in Leader Developmental Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronk, Kendall Cotton; McLean, Derrick C

    2016-01-01

    The founder of TOMS Shoes, Blake Mycoskie, and the late Apple cofounder and CEO, Steve Jobs, model the role of passion and purpose in leader developmental readiness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  1. Employee Engagement in Hotel X & Y

    OpenAIRE

    Leppänen, Saara

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studies employee engagement in Hotel X and Y. For small businesses the engagement of employees is very important as this way businesses are able to reduce costs, ensure the professionalism of employees and obtain loyal customers. The research studies the current level of engagement and gives recommendations for further increasing the engagement. The theoretical framework introduces the concept employee engagement through Kahn 1990’s Employee Engagement Model and Maslow’s Hierarchy...

  2. Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safaa M. Raghab; Ahmed M. Abd El Meguid; Hala A. Hegazi

    2013-01-01

    .... This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Borg El Arab landfill in Alexandria using an aerobic treatment process which was applied...

  3. Readiness for behaviour change in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: implications for multidisciplinary care models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Karen E; Haller, Deborah L; Sargeant, Carol; Levenson, James L; Puri, Puneet; Sanyal, Arun J

    2015-03-01

    Weight management is a cornerstone of treatment for overweight/obese persons with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This exploratory study sought to: (i) evaluate readiness to change weight-related behaviours; (ii) assess psychosocial characteristics that may interfere with weight loss; and (iii) evaluate how baseline psychosocial features associate with 6-month change in weight in persons with NAFLD receiving standard medical care. The purpose of this investigation was to develop hypotheses regarding relationships between psychosocial factors and weight for use in future fully powered studies and clinical interventions Fifty-eight overweight/obese participants with NAFLD completed baseline measures of personality, psychiatric symptoms and readiness for behaviour change and were followed up for 6 months in standard care. One-third of participants (31.0%) were not interested in making weight-related behaviour changes; 58.6% were considering making a change, and 10.4% of individuals were actively working on or preparing to change. Six-month change in weight was non-significant and was not associated with baseline readiness for change. Depression, low conscientiousness and high neuroticism were associated with higher weight at 6-month follow-up with small to large effect sizes. Although participants received nutritional education and guidance, very few individuals presented in the active stage of change. Although readiness for change did not predict subsequent change in weight, personality factors and psychiatric symptoms were associated with weight outcomes. Integrated multidisciplinary approaches that address psychiatric needs and provide behavioural support for weight loss may help patients with NAFLD implement sustained lifestyle changes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Technological readiness and propensity of young people to online purchases

    OpenAIRE

    Eduardo Botti Abbade

    2014-01-01

    New technologies are constantly changing patterns of consumer behavior. Investigations about consu-mer acceptance and readiness to adopt new technologies are vital to the development of a better understanding of their behavior. This study aimed to analyze the relation between the dimensions of readiness for the adoption of technology and propensity to perform online purchases of undergraduate college students. It was surveyed 224 college students and the instrument of data collection comprise...

  5. DoD Current State for Software Technology Readiness Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    DoD Current State for Software Technology Readiness Assessments Systems & Software Technology Conference April 2010 Cynthia Dion-Schwarz, Ph.D...DoD Current State for Software Technology Readiness Assessments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Presented at the 22nd Systems and Software Technology Conference (SSTC), 26-29 April

  6. Improving Software Guidance for Technology Readiness Assessments (TRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    Systems & Software Technology Conference Improving Software Guidance for Technology Readiness Assessments (TRA) 29 April 2010 Mike Nicol...APR 2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Improving Software Guidance for Technology Readiness...Presented at the 22nd Systems and Software Technology Conference (SSTC), 26-29 April 2010, Salt Lake City, UT. 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  7. UNIVERSITY TEACHERS’ READINESS TO APPLY THE MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina O. Kotlyarova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to investigate the readiness of the university teachers to apply the modern educational technologies. Methods. The methods include theoretical: analysis of existing modern educational technologies, the concept «readiness» and its components, abstraction of signs and kinds of modern educational technologies based on the scientific literature and in the Federal State Educational Standards (FSES; empirical: questionnaires and testing methods for detecting levels of university teachers’ skills and readiness to use modern educational technology. Results. The main features of modern educational technologies are identified and justified that are to comply with modern methodology of the theory and practice of education study and the latest FSES requirements; the level of science, manufacturing, and modern rules of human relations. The components of readiness of university teachers to use modern educational technology are structured. The linguistic component is included along with the cognitive, psychological, operational, connotative components; its necessity is proved. The average level of readiness for the use of modern educational technology by university teachers is identified. Scientific novelty. The author specifies the features of the modern educational technology. The most significant components of higher-education teaching personnel readiness to use technological innovations are identified. As a whole, these results form the indicative framework for the development and measurement of readiness of the university teachers to use the modern educational technology. The development of the readiness of the university teachers to apply the modern educational technologies is proved to be an issue of current interest. Practical significance. The research findings can be used as the basis of techniques and methods designing for its further development and measurement of the training, retraining and advanced training of

  8. Determinants of paramedic response readiness for CBRNE threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Garry; Jones, Alison; Smith, George; Nelson, Jenny; Agho, Kingsley; Taylor, Melanie; Raphael, Beverley

    2010-06-01

    Paramedics play a pivotal role in the response to major emergencies. Recent evidence indicates that their confidence and willingness to respond to chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, and explosives-related (CBRNE) incidents differs from that relating to their "routine" emergency work. To further investigate the factors underpinning their readiness to respond to CBRNE incidents, paramedics in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, were asked to complete a validated online survey instrument. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine associated factors determining readiness. The sample of 663 respondents was weighted to reflect the NSW paramedic population as a whole. The univariate analysis indicated that gender, length of service, deployment concern, perceived personal resilience, CBRNE training, and incident experience were significantly associated with perceived CBRNE response readiness. In the initial multivariate analysis, significantly higher response readiness was associated with male gender, university education, and greater length of service (10-15 years). In the final multivariate model, the combined effect of training/incident experience negated the significant effects observed in the initial model and, importantly, showed that those with recent training reported higher readiness, irrespective of incident experience. Those with lower concern regarding CBRNE deployment and those with higher personal resilience were significantly more likely to report higher readiness (Adjusted Relative Risk [ARR] = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.84-0.99; ARR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.11-1.72, respectively). These findings will assist emergency medical planners in recognizing occupational and dispositional factors associated with enhanced CBRNE readiness and highlight the important role of training in redressing potential readiness differences associated with these factors.

  9. Higher education and civic engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egerton, Muriel

    2002-12-01

    This paper focuses on the relationship between social engagement, particularly civic engagement, and education. It is well known that more highly educated people are more likely to engage in voluntary work in formalized settings. It has been difficult to disentangle the effect of higher education from that of family origin and occupational socialization. This paper examines the effects of tertiary education on the social and civic engagement of young people, using the British Household Panel Study. The social and civic activity of young people is observed in their late teens, before entering the labour market or tertiary education, and compared with that of the same young people in their early 20s, after completing tertiary education courses or gaining labour market experience. It was found that the social and civic engagement of young people who would enter higher education was higher in their late teens than that of their peers who did not enter. However, higher education had a small additional effect on civic engagement, for both young and mature students. The children of professionals were the social grouping most likely to be involved in civic activities. The relationship of higher education, professional occupations and family socialization is discussed.

  10. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with remplissage technique for the treatment of anterior shoulder instability with engaging Hill-Sachs lesion: a report of 49 cases with a minimum 2-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Ming; Lu, Yi; Zhang, Jin; Shen, Jie-Wei; Jiang, Chun-Yan

    2011-08-01

    Engaging Hill-Sachs lesions are known to be a risk factor for recurrence dislocation after arthroscopic repair in patients with anterior shoulder instability. For a large engaging Hill-Sachs lesion, arthroscopic remplissage is a solution. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with the Hill-Sachs remplissage technique can achieve good results without significant impairment of shoulder function. Case Series; Level of evidence, 4. Forty-nine consecutive patients who underwent arthroscopic Bankart repair and Hill-Sachs remplissage for anterior shoulder instability were followed up for a mean duration of 29.0 months (range, 24-35 months). There were 42 males and 7 females with a mean age of 28.4 years (range, 16.7-54.7 years). All patients had diagnosed traumatic unidirectional anterior shoulder instability with a bony lesion of glenoid and an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Physical examination, radiographs, and magnetic resonance imaging were performed during postoperative follow-up. The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, Constant score, and Rowe score were used to evaluate shoulder function. The active forward elevation increased a mean of 8.0° (range, -10° to 80°) postoperatively. However, the patients lost 1.9° (range, -40° to 30°) of external rotation to the side. Significant improvement was detected with regard to the ASES score (84.7 vs 96.0, P lesion was shown by magnetic resonance imaging. Arthroscopic Bankart repair combined with Hill-Sachs remplissage can restore shoulder stability without significant impairment of shoulder function in patients with engaging Hill-Sachs lesions.

  11. Measuring the strategic readiness of intangible assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert S; Norton, David P

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the value of intangible assets such as company culture, knowledge management systems, and employees' skills is the holy grail of accounting. Executives know that these intangibles, being hard to imitate, are powerful sources of sustainable competitive advantage. If managers could measure them, they could manage the company's competitive position more easily and accurately. In one sense, the challenge is impossible. Intangible assets are unlike financial and physical resources in that their value depends on how well they serve the organizations that own them. But while this prevents an independent valuation of intangible assets, it also points to an altogether different approach for assessing their worth. In this article, the creators of the Balanced Scorecard draw on its tools and framework--in particular, a tool called the strategy map--to present a step-by-step way to determine "strategic readiness," which refers to the alignment of an organization's human, information, and organization capital with its strategy. In the method the authors describe, the firm identifies the processes most critical to creating and delivering its value proposition and determines the human, information, and organization capital the processes require. Some managers shy away from measuring intangible assets because they seem so subjective. But by using the systematic approaches set out in this article, companies can now measure what they want, rather than wanting only what they can currently measure.

  12. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Gue eJo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP, which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with twenty mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  13. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  14. Roadmap for an EArth Defense Initiative (READI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, J. D.; Hussain, A.; Soni, A.; Johnson-Freese, J.; Faull, J.; Schmidt, N.; Wilson, T.; Thangavelu, M.

    2015-12-01

    During the 2015 Space Studies Program of the International Space University, a team of thirty-four participants from seventeen countries carried out a team project on the subject of planetary defense against near-Earth object impacts. The READI Project presents the components of a complete architecture representing practical future strategies and methods for protecting our planet and life as we know it. The findings and recommendations of the project are as follows: for detection and tracking, add infrared instruments in space and radar in Earth's southern hemisphere, as well as dedicated ground telescopes and a program for spectroscopic and other characterization of asteroids and comets; for deflection, develop and space-qualify kinetic and nuclear interceptors, as well as long-range laser ablators; for education and outreach, develop programs aimed at the cohort of children aged 6-15 and their parents; and for evacuation and recovery, provide distributed shelters and increased emergency planning. The project recognizes that the enactment of any deflection strategy would require significant international collaboration; thus, we recommend the formation of a Mitigation Action Group (MAG) in addition to the existing organizations IAWN and SMPAG. The MAG should be chartered to recommend deflection strategies to the UN Security Council in the event of an imminent NEO impact and, upon approval, to lead international deflection action.

  15. The readiness potential reflects intentional binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Han-Gue; Wittmann, Marc; Hinterberger, Thilo; Schmidt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    When a voluntary action is causally linked with a sensory outcome, the action and its consequent effect are perceived as being closer together in time. This effect is called intentional binding. Although many experiments were conducted on this phenomenon, the underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. While intentional binding is specific to voluntary action, we presumed that preconscious brain activity (the readiness potential, RP), which occurs before an action is made, might play an important role in this binding effect. In this study, the brain dynamics were recorded with electroencephalography (EEG) and analyzed in single-trials in order to estimate whether intentional binding is correlated with the early neural processes. Moreover, we were interested in different behavioral performance between meditators and non-meditators since meditators are expected to be able to keep attention more consistently on a task. Thus, we performed the intentional binding paradigm with 20 mindfulness meditators and compared them to matched controls. Although, we did not observe a group effect on either behavioral data or EEG recordings, we found that self-initiated movements following ongoing negative deflections of slow cortical potentials (SCPs) result in a stronger binding effect compared to positive potentials, especially regarding the perceived time of the consequent effect. Our results provide the first direct evidence that the early neural activity within the range of SCPs affects perceived time of a sensory outcome that is caused by intentional action.

  16. Technology Readiness of Early Career Nurse Trainees: Utilization of the Technology Readiness Index (TRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlum, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Health Information Technology (HIT) adoption by clinicians, including nurses, will lead to reduction in healthcare costs and clinical errors and improve health outcomes. Understanding the importance of technology adoption, the current study utilized the Technology Readiness Index to explore technology perceptions of nursing students. Our analysis identifies factors that may influence perceptions of technology, including decreased optimism for students with clinical experience and increased discomfort of US born students. Our study provides insight to inform training programs to further meet the increasing demands of skilled nursing staff.

  17. Determining Dimensionality of Exercise Readiness Using Exploratory Factor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelley Strohacker, Rebecca A. Zakrajsek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of “exercise readiness” is a central component to the flexible non-linear periodization (FNLP method of organizing training workloads, but the underlying factor structure of this construct has not been empirically determined. The purpose of this study was to assess construct dimensionality of exercise readiness using exploratory factor analysis. The result of which serve as initial steps of developing a brief measure of exercise readiness. Participants consisted of students recruited from undergraduate Kinesiology courses at a racially diverse, southern University. Independent, anonymous online survey data were collected across three stages: 1 generation of item pool (n = 290, 2 assessment of face validity and refinement of item pool (n = 168, and 3 exploratory factor analysis (n = 684. A principal axis factor analysis was conducted with 41 items using oblique rotation (promax. Four statistically significant factors, as determined through parallel analysis, explained 61.5% of the variance in exercise readiness. Factor 1 contained items that represented vitality (e.g., lively, revived. Factor 2 items related to physical fatigue (e.g. tired, drained. Factors 3 and 4 were descriptive of, discomfort (e.g. pain, sick and health (i.e. healthy, fit, respectively. This inductive approach indicates that exercise readiness is comprised of four dimensions: vitality, physical fatigue, discomfort, and health. This finding supports readiness assessment techniques currently recommended for practitioners according to the FNLP model. These results serve as a theoretical foundation upon which to further develop and refine a brief survey instrument to measure exercise readiness.

  18. Why do patients engage in medical tourism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnels, Vivien; Carrera, P M

    2012-12-01

    Medical tourism is commonly perceived and popularly depicted as an economic issue, both at the system and individual levels. The decision to engage in medical tourism, however, is more complex, driven by patients' unmet need, the nature of services sought and the manner by which treatment is accessed. In order to beneficially employ the opportunities medical tourism offers, and address and contain possible threats and harms, an informed decision is crucial. This paper aims to enhance the current knowledge on medical tourism by isolating the focal content of the decisions that patients make. Based on the existing literature, it proposes a sequential decision-making process in opting for or against medical care abroad, and engaging in medical tourism, including considerations of the required treatments, location of treatment, and quality and safety issues attendant to seeking care. Accordingly, it comments on the imperative of access to health information and the current regulatory environment which impact on this increasingly popular and complex form of accessing and providing medical care. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Community engagement in diverse populations for Alzheimer disease prevention trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Heather R; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Gwyther, Lisa P; Edmonds, Henry L; Plassman, Brenda L; Germain, Cassandra M; McCart, Michelle; Hayden, Kathleen M; Pieper, Carl; Roses, Allen D

    2014-01-01

    The recruitment of asymptomatic volunteers has been identified as a critical factor that is delaying the development and validation of preventive therapies for Alzheimer disease (AD). Typical recruitment strategies involve the use of convenience samples or soliciting participation of older adults with a family history of AD from clinics and outreach efforts. However, high-risk groups, such as ethnic/racial minorities, are traditionally less likely to be recruited for AD prevention studies, thus limiting the ability to generalize findings for a significant proportion of the aging population. A community-engagement approach was used to create a registry of 2311 research-ready, healthy adult volunteers who reflect the ethnically diverse local community. Furthermore, the registry's actual commitment to research was examined, through demonstrated participation rates in a clinical study. The approach had varying levels of success in establishing a large, diverse pool of individuals who are interested in participating in pharmacological prevention trials and meet the criteria for primary prevention research trials designed to delay the onset of AD. Our efforts suggest that entry criteria for the clinical trials need to be carefully considered to be inclusive of African Americans, and that sustained effort is needed to engage African Americans in pharmacological prevention approaches.

  20. Modeling and simulation technology readiness levels.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clay, Robert L.; Shneider, Max S.; Marburger, S. J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of an effort to establish a framework for assigning and communicating technology readiness levels (TRLs) for the modeling and simulation (ModSim) capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories. This effort was undertaken as a special assignment for the Weapon Simulation and Computing (WSC) program office led by Art Hale, and lasted from January to September 2006. This report summarizes the results, conclusions, and recommendations, and is intended to help guide the program office in their decisions about the future direction of this work. The work was broken out into several distinct phases, starting with establishing the scope and definition of the assignment. These are characterized in a set of key assertions provided in the body of this report. Fundamentally, the assignment involved establishing an intellectual framework for TRL assignments to Sandia's modeling and simulation capabilities, including the development and testing of a process to conduct the assignments. To that end, we proposed a methodology for both assigning and understanding the TRLs, and outlined some of the restrictions that need to be placed on this process and the expected use of the result. One of the first assumptions we overturned was the notion of a ''static'' TRL--rather we concluded that problem context was essential in any TRL assignment, and that leads to dynamic results (i.e., a ModSim tool's readiness level depends on how it is used, and by whom). While we leveraged the classic TRL results from NASA, DoD, and Sandia's NW program, we came up with a substantially revised version of the TRL definitions, maintaining consistency with the classic level definitions and the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) approach. In fact, we substantially leveraged the foundation the PCMM team provided, and augmented that as needed. Given the modeling and simulation TRL definitions and our proposed assignment methodology, we