WorldWideScience

Sample records for reactors considerations generales

  1. General considerations for neutron capture therapy at a reactor facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binney, S.E.

    2001-01-01

    In addition to neutron beam intensity and quality, there are also a number of other significant criteria related to a nuclear reactor that contribute to a successful neutron capture therapy (NCT) facility. These criteria are classified into four main categories: Nuclear design factors, facility management and operations factors, facility resources, and non-technical factors. Important factors to consider are given for each of these categories. In addition to an adequate neutron beam intensity and quality, key requirements for a successful neutron capture therapy facility include necessary finances to construct or convert a facility for NCT, a capable medical staff to perform the NCT, and the administrative support for the facility. The absence of any one of these four factors seriously jeopardizes the overall probability of success of the facility. Thus nuclear reactor facility management considering becoming involved in neutron capture therapy, should it be proven clinically successful, should take all these factors into consideration. (author)

  2. General considerations in fuel management for thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyror, J.G.; Fayers, F.J.

    1971-07-01

    By fuel management we mean the strategy for fuelling and refuelling a reactor together with any associated absorber movements. It incorporates (a) decisions made about the timing of fuel loading operations; (b) choice of enrichments to be loaded; (c) selection of sites at which reloading occurs; (d) programming of control rods and any other reactivity control facilities such as soluble or burnable poisons; and (e) evaluation of the resulting fuel element performance consequences. The topic of fuel management is thus a vast and vital one. It embraces most of the various aspects of core performance and determines many of a reactor's design characteristics. In this paper we review what to us appear to be some of the important issues in this important field

  3. General views about specimen irradiations in reactors; Considerations generales sur'les irradiations d'echantillons dans les reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, M [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    Specimen irradiation of fissile or non-fissile materials, carried out under circumstances becoming more and more severe and in reactor of increasing flux bas led to an evolution of irradiation rigs. A survey of the problems arising from irradiating under these various circumstances leads to conclude that it is possible to devise one capsule type suitable to every particular case, and that in a wide temperature range. Consequently, once the various irradiation-parameters known, a general method of calculation can be followed so as to determine the various sizes of the parts constituting the capsule. These theoretical calculations might sometimes be corrected through benefits gained from previous irradiations. Similarly, practical experimentation might allow to foresee more handy assembling of the capsule, specimen loading-and unloading being easier at the same time. (author) [French] L'irradiation d'echantillons, fissiles ou non fissiles, dans des conditions imposees de plus en plus strictes et dans des reacteurs a flux de plus en plus eleve, a eu pour consequence une evolution dans la conception des dispositifs d'irradiation. Lorsqu'on examine les problemes souleves par ces differentes irradiations, on en conclut qu'il est possible de concevoir un type de capsule capable de donner satisfaction dans chaque cas particulier, et ce, dans une tres large gamme de temperature. Par consequent, les differents parametres de l'irradiation etant connus, une methode generale de calcul peut etre suivie pour determiner les differentes cotes des pieces constitutives de la capsule. Ces calculs theoriques devront quelquefois etre corriges grace aux enseignements tires d'irradiations precedentes. De meme, l'experience acquise permettra d'envisager un montage plus aise de la capsule, tout en facilitant l'enfournement et le defournement des echantillons.

  4. Reactor and /or accelerator: general remarks on strategic considerations in sourcing/producing radiopharmaceuticals and radiotracer for the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarea, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The most important sources of radionuclides in the world are particle accelerators and nuclear reactors. Since the late 1940's many radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals have been innovated and conceived, designed, produced and applied in important industrial and clinical/ biomedical settings. For example in the health area, reactor-produced radionuclides have become indispensable for diagnostic imaging involving, in its most recent and advanced development, radioimmunoscintigraphy, which exploits the exquisite ligand-specificity of monoclonal antibodies, reagents which in turn are the products of advances in biotechnology. Thus far, one of the most indispensable radiopharmaceuticals has been 99m Tc, which is usually obtained as a daughter decay product of 99 Mo. In January 1991, some questions about the stability of the worldwide commercial supply of 99 Mo became highlighted when the major commercial world producer of 99 Mo, Nordion International, shut down its facilities temporarily in Canada due to contamination in its main reactor building (see for instance relevant newsbrief in J. Nuclear Medicine (1991): 'Industry agrees to join DOE study of domestic moly-99 production'). With the above background, my remarks will attempt to open discussions on strategic considerations relevant to questions of 'self reliance' in radiotracers/radiopharmaceutical production in the Philippines. For instance, the relevant question of sourcing local radionuclide needs from a fully functioning multipurpose cyclotron facility within the country that will then supply the needs of the local industrial, biomedical (including research) and health sectors; and possibly, eventually acquiring the capability to export to nearby countries longer-lived radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals

  5. TRIGA reactor health physics considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.G.

    1970-01-01

    The factors influencing the complexity of a TRIGA health physics program are discussed in details in order to serve as a basis for later consideration of various specific aspects of a typical TRIGA health physics program. The health physics program must be able to provide adequate assistance, control, and safety for individuals ranging from the inexperienced student to the experienced postgraduate researcher. Some of the major aspects discussed are: effluent release and control; reactor area air monitoring; area monitoring; adjacent facilities monitoring; portable instrumentation, personnel monitoring. TRIGA reactors have not been associated with many significant occurrences in the area of health physics, although some operational occurrences have had health physics implications. One specific occurrence at OSU is described involving the detection of non-fission-product radioactive particulates by the continuous air monitor on the reactor top. The studies of this particular situation indicate that most of the particulate activity is coming from the rotating rack and exhausting to the reactor top through the rotating rack loading tube

  6. Orthognathic surgery: general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khechoyan, David Y

    2013-08-01

    a patient's appearance and occlusal function can be improved significantly, impacting the patient's sense of self and well-being. Successful outcomes in modern orthognathic surgery rely on close collaboration between the surgeon and the orthodontist across all stages of treatment, from preoperative planning to finalization of occlusion. Virtual computer planning promotes a more accurate analysis of dentofacial deformity and preoperative planning. It is also an invaluable aid in providing comprehensive patient education. In this article, the author describes the general surgical principles that underlie orthognathic surgery, highlighting the sequence of treatment, preoperative analysis of dentofacial deformity, surgical execution of the treatment plan, and possible complications.

  7. Blastogenetic associations: General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Associations of anomalies, with VACTERL as the prototype, have been the source of much debate, including questions about the validity and definition of this category. Evidence is presented for a teratologic basis for associations involving interactions between disruptive events and specific vulnerabilities. Because the embryo is organized in time and space, differences in the timing, location, and severity of exposures will create variable sequelae for any specific vulnerability, creating associations. The blastogenetic stage of development involves distinct properties that affect the nature of associations arising during this time, including relatively undifferentiated developmental fields and causally nonspecific malformations. With this, single anomalies can be part of the spectrum of findings that comprise a specific association. A specific defect defines a subset of disturbances, biasing frequencies of other defects. Processes are basic, integrated, and general, so disruptions are often lethal, and can have multiple effects, accounting for high incidences of multiple anomalies, and overlaps between associations. Blastogenetic disturbances also do not affect the late "fine tuning" of minor anomalies, although pathogenetic sequences can occur. This model suggests that certain combinations of congenital anomalies can arise from causally nonspecific teratogenetic fields determined by timing, location, and vulnerabilities, rather than polytopic developmental fields. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. General B factory design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zisman, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the general considerations that go into the design of an asymmetric B factory collider. Justification is given for the typical parameters of such a facility, and the physics and technology challenges that arise from these parameter choices are discussed. Cost and schedule issues for a B factory are discussed briefly. A summary of existing proposals is presented, noting their similarities and differences

  9. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Beroux, P.

    2012-01-01

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  10. Magnet design considerations for Tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.; Chen, W.; Thomas, R.

    1976-01-01

    Design problems for superconducting ohmic heating and toroidal field coils for large Tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The necessity for making these coils superconducting is explained, together with the functions of these coils in a Tokamak reactor. Major problem areas include materials related aspects and mechanical design and cryogenic considerations. Projections and comparisons are made based on existing superconducting magnet technology. The mechanical design of large-scale coils, which can contain the severe electromagnetic loading and stress generated in the winding, are emphasized. Additional major tasks include the development of high current conductors for pulsed applications to be used in fabricating the ohmic heating coils. It is important to note, however, that no insurmountable technical barriers are expected in the course of developing superconducting coils for Tokamak fusion reactors. (Auth.)

  11. Reactor design considerations for inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The most challenging reactor design consideration is protection of the cavity wall from the various energy forms as released by the pellet and as affected by the reaction-chamber phenomena. These phenomena depend on both the design and the yield of the pellet, as well as on ambient conditions in the chamber at the time of the pellet microexplosion. The effects on pellet energy-release mechanisms of various reaction chamber atmosphere options are summarized

  12. Environmental considerations for alternative fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Young, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Comparisons of alternative fusion reactor blanket/coolant systems suggest that environmental considerations will enter strongly into selection of design and materials. Liquid blankets and coolants tend to maximize transport of radioactive corrosion products. Liquid lithium interacts strongly with tritium, minimizing permeation and escape of gaseous tritium in accidents. However, liquid lithium coolants tend to create large tritium inventories and have a large fire potential compared to flibe and solid blankets. Helium coolants minimize radiation transport, but do not have ability to bind the tritium in case of accidental releases. (auth)

  13. [General considerations on psychiatric interconsultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinacci, J A

    1975-03-01

    This paper attempts to follow the evolution of some general ideas on Psychiatric Interconsulting. It is the result of six years' work at Ramos Mejía Hospital, Buenos Aires. Progressive transformations were imposed by daily practice on our team's theoretical and technical conceptions. We started with an individualistic-phenomenical approach, and we were forced to switch to a dynamical-situational one. The general working model we use at present is briefly summarized, emphasizing the important role played by Psychiatric Interconsulting in the change of the medical cultural patterns prevailing at present in our milieu. Two main factors for the role of privilege played by the Interconsulting team are set forth: one is conceptual, the other is pragmatic. From a conceptual standpoint, the theoretical basis of Psychiatric Interconsulting is much broader than those of other specialities, like clinical practice or surgery, for it includes, besides Biology, the Psychological and Socio-Historical determinants of the disturbance the diseases man suffers. From a pragmatic standpoint, the boundaries of human and physical fields within which Psychiatric Interconsulting is operating, go beyond the scope of daily medical practice. Their place could be located in between formal traditional wefts, relating to institutional structures as well as to specific medical practice. Professionals working at Interconsulting are usually required at general wards, at consulting offices, at emergency wards, in corridors, or even at the bar. They are interested not only in specific medical problems; they encompass the whole range of personal and institutional framework, and consider the whole situation in a comprehensive approach. Knowledge acquired in this widened professional field, together with actual experience in dealing with people in distress, are the main sources for theoretical conceptualization of new activities, as well as for building pragmatic tools to modify the official medical

  14. 20 CFR 332.2 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... a female employee be considered to lack remuneration with respect to a day solely because of the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false General considerations. 332.2 Section 332.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT...

  15. Optical design considerations for laser fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Maniscalco, J.A.

    1977-09-01

    The plan for the development of commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power plants is discussed, emphasizing the utilization of the unique features of laser fusion to arrive at conceptual designs for reactors and optical systems which minimize the need for advanced materials and techniques requiring expensive test facilities. A conceptual design for a liquid lithium fall reactor is described which successfully deals with the hostile x-ray and neutron environment and promises to last the 30 year plant lifetime. Schemes for protecting the final focusing optics are described which are both compatible with this reactor system and show promise of surviving a full year in order to minimize costly downtime. Damage mechanisms and protection techniques are discussed, and a recommendation is made for a high f-number metal mirror final focusing system

  16. Design considerations for epithermal pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    Simplified design criteria were developed for scoping analyses of epithermal pulse reactors for use in LMFBR safety testing. By using these criteria, materials and designs were investigated to determine performance limits of moderately sized reactor cores. Several designs are suggested for further study. These are a gas-cooled core fueled with a heterogeneous mixture of Fe-UO 2 cermet and BeO-UO 2 ceramic fuels, and a heavy-water-cooled core fueled with an Fe-UO 2 cermet

  17. Considerations on nuclear reactor passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated some passive safety systems present in electronuclear reactors (control bars, safety injection system accumulators, reactor cooling after stoppage, hydrogen recombination systems), this report recalls the main characteristics of passive safety systems, and discusses the main issues associated with the assessment of new passive systems (notably to face a sustained loss of electric supply systems or of cold water source) and research axis to be developed in this respect. More precisely, the report comments the classification of safety passive systems as it is proposed by the IAEA, outlines and comments specific aspects of these systems regarding their operation and performance. The next part discusses the safety approach, the control of performance of safety passive systems, issues related to their reliability, and the expected contribution of R and D (for example: understanding of physical phenomena which have an influence of these systems, capacities of simulation of these phenomena, needs of experimentations to validate simulation codes)

  18. Neutron personnel dosimetry considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, T.P.; Easterly, C.E.

    1979-07-01

    The increasing development of fusion reactor technology warrants an evaluation of personnel neutron dosimetry systems to aid in the concurrent development of a radiation protection program. For this reason, current state of knowledge neutron dosimeters have been reviewed with emphasis placed on practical utilization and the problems inherent in each type of dosimetry system. Evaluations of salient parameters such as energy response, latent image instability, and minimum detectable dose equivalent are presented for nuclear emulsion films, track etch techniques, albedo and other thermoluminescent dosimetry techniques, electrical conductivity damage effects, lyoluminescence, thermocurrent, and thermally stimulated exoelectron emission. Brief summaries of dosimetry regulatory requirements and intercomparison study results help to establish compliance and recent trends, respectively. Spectrum modeling data generated by the Neutron Physics Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Princeton Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Facility have been analyzed by both International Commission on Radiological Protection fluence to dose conversion factors and an adjoint technique of radiation dosimetry, in an attempt to determine the applicability of current neutron dosimetry systems to deuterium and tritium fusion reactor leakage spectra. Based on the modeling data, a wide range of neutron energies will probably be present in the leakage spectra of the TFTR facility, and no appreciable risk of somatic injury to occupationally exposed workers is expected. The relative dose contributions due to high energy and thermal neutrons indicate that neutron dosimetry will probably not be a serious limitation in the development of fusion power

  19. Some safety considerations in laser-controlled thermonuclear reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.; Breton, D.; Chan, C.K.; Levy, S.I.; Sehnert, M.; Ullman, A.Z.

    1978-07-01

    A major objective of this study was to identify potential safety questions for laser controlled thermonuclear reactors. From the safety viewpoint, it does not appear that the actual laser controlled thermonuclear reactor conceptual designs present hazards very different than those of magnetically confined fusion reactors. Some aspects seem beneficial, such as small lithium inventories, and the absence of cryogenic devices, while other aspects are new, for example the explosion of pressure vessels and laser hazards themselves. Major aspects considered in this report include: (a) general safety considerations, (b) tritium inventories, (c) system behavior during loss of flow accidents, and (d) safety considerations of laser related penetrations

  20. Safety considerations for research reactors in extended shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    According to the IAEA Research Reactor Database, in the last 20 years, 367 research reactors have been shut down. Of these, 109 have undergone decommissioning and the rest are in extended shutdown with no clear definition about their future. Still other research reactors are infrequently operated with no meaningful utilization programme. These two situations present concerns related to safety such as loss of corporate memory, personnel qualification, maintenance of components and systems and preparation and maintenance of documentation. There are many reasons to shut down a reactor; these may include: - the need to carry out modifications in the reactor systems; - the need for refurbishment to extend the lifetime of the reactor; - the need to repair reactor structures, systems, or components; - the need to remedy technical problems; - regulatory or public concerns; - local conflicts or wars; - political convenience; - the lack of resources. While any one of these reasons may lead to shutdown of a reactor, each will present unique problems to the reactor management. The large variations from one research reactor to the next also will contribute to the uniqueness of the problems. Any option that the reactor management adopts will affect the future of the facility. Options may include dealing with the cause of the shutdown and returning to normal operation, extending the shutdown period waiting a future decision, or decommissioning. Such options are carefully and properly analysed to ensure that the solution selected is the best in terms of reactor type and size, period of shutdown and legal, economic and social considerations. This publication provides information in support of the IAEA safety standards for research reactors

  1. Nuclear Safeguards Considerations For The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillip Casey Durst; David Beddingfield; Brian Boyer; Robert Bean; Michael Collins; Michael Ehinger; David Hanks; David L. Moses; Lee Refalo

    2009-10-01

    High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been considered since the 1940s, and have been constructed and demonstrated in the United Kingdom (Dragon), United States (Peach Bottom and Fort Saint Vrain), Japan (HTTR), Germany (AVR and THTR-300), and have been the subject of conceptual studies in Russia (VGM). The attraction to these reactors is that they can use a variety of reactor fuels, including abundant thorium, which upon reprocessing of the spent fuel can produce fissile U-233. Hence, they could extend the stocks of available uranium, provided the fuel is reprocessed. Another attractive attribute is that HTRs typically operate at a much higher temperature than conventional light water reactors (LWRs), because of the use of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide coated (TRISO) fuel particles embedded in ceramic graphite. Rather than simply discharge most of the unused heat from the working fluid in the power plant to the environment, engineers have been designing reactors for 40 years to recover this heat and make it available for district heating or chemical conversion plants. Demonstrating high-temperature nuclear energy conversion was the purpose behind Fort Saint Vrain in the United States, THTR-300 in Germany, HTTR in Japan, and HTR-10 and HTR-PM, being built in China. This resulted in nuclear reactors at least 30% or more thermodynamically efficient than conventional LWRs, especially if the waste heat can be effectively utilized in chemical processing plants. A modern variant of high temperature reactors is the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Originally developed in the United States and Germany, it is now being redesigned and marketed by the Republic of South Africa and China. The team examined historical high temperature and high temperature gas reactors (HTR and HTGR) and reviewed safeguards considerations for this reactor. The following is a preliminary report on this topic prepared under the ASA-100 Advanced Safeguards Project in support of the NNSA Next

  2. Proliferation resistance considerations for remote small modular reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlock, J., E-mail: whitlockj@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Sprinkle, J., E-mail: j.sprinkle@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Remotely located Small Modular Reactors at the low end of energy production (on the order of 10 MWe, referenced here as Very Small Modular Reactors or VSMRs) present unique proliferation resistance advantages and challenges. Addressing these challenges in the most efficient manner may not only be desirable, but necessary, for development of this technology. Incorporation of safeguards considerations early in the design process (Safeguards by Design) along with safety, security, economics and other key drivers, is of importance. Operational Transparency may become an essential aspect of the safeguards approach for such systems. (author)

  3. Considerations concerning the reliability of reactor safety equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, J.; Guyot, Ch.

    1967-01-01

    A review is made of the circumstances which favor a good collection of maintenance data at the C.E.A. The large amount of data to be treated has made necessary the use of a computer for analyzing automatically the results collected. Here, only particular aspects of the reliability from the point of view of the electronics used for nuclear reactor control will be dealt with: sale and unsafe failures; probability of survival (in the case of reactor safety); availability. The general diagrams of the safety assemblies which have been drawn up for two types of reactor (power reactor and low power experimental reactor) are given. Results are presented of reliability analysis which could be applied to the use of functional modular elements, developed industrially in France. Improvement of this reliability appears to be fairly limited by an increase in the redundancy; on the other hand it is shown how it may be very markedly improved by the use of automatic tests with different frequencies for detecting unsafe failures rates of measurements for the sub-assemblies and for the logic sub-assemblies. Finally examples are given to show the incidence of the complexity and of the use of different technologies in reactor safety equipment on the reliability. (authors) [fr

  4. General aspects of siting and safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutgers, E.

    1980-01-01

    The siting process from site selection to the different stages of review by the regulatory body is described. Special attention is payed to the role and responsibilities of the licensing authority. Next, the basic considerations involved in the siting process are reviewed. They include system planning, engineering, safety, environmental impact (including land use) and economics. Case studies illustrating different aspects of the siting process (e.g. site selection) are presented. (orig.)

  5. Triggering and data acquisition general considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Joel N.

    2003-01-01

    We provide a general introduction to trigger and data acquisition systems in High Energy Physics. We emphasize the new possibilities and new approaches that have been made possible by developments in computer technology and networking

  6. Considerations for a general flexible detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulos, F.

    1975-01-01

    Starting from a set of desirable features, a general shape of the detector is chosen. To decide on the size and magnitude of the solenoidal magnetic field 4 cases are compared. A good compromise is chosen and illustrated

  7. A generalized perturbation program for CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-31

    A generalized perturbation program has been developed for the purpose of estimating zonal power variation of a CANDU reactor upon refueling operation. The forward and adjoint calculation modules of RFSP code were used to construct the generalized perturbation program. The numerical algorithm for the generalized adjoint flux calculation was verified by comparing the zone power estimates upon refueling with those of forward calculation. It was, however, noticed that the truncation error from the iteration process of the generalized adjoint flux is not negligible. 2 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  8. A generalized perturbation program for CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Won Sik [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A generalized perturbation program has been developed for the purpose of estimating zonal power variation of a CANDU reactor upon refueling operation. The forward and adjoint calculation modules of RFSP code were used to construct the generalized perturbation program. The numerical algorithm for the generalized adjoint flux calculation was verified by comparing the zone power estimates upon refueling with those of forward calculation. It was, however, noticed that the truncation error from the iteration process of the generalized adjoint flux is not negligible. 2 refs., 1 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  9. Consideration of severe accidents in design of advanced WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorov, V.G.; Rogov, M.F.; Podshibyakin, A.K.; Fil, N.S.; Volkov, B.E.; Semishkin, V.P.

    1998-01-01

    Severe accident related requirements formulated in General Regulations for Nuclear Power Plant Safety (OPB-88), in Nuclear Safety Regulations for Nuclear Power Stations' Reactor Plants (PBYa RU AS-89) and in other NPP nuclear and radiation guides of the Russian Gosatomnadzor are analyzed. In accordance with these guides analyses of beyond design basis accidents should be performed in the reactor plant design. Categorization of beyond design basis accidents leading to severe accidents should be made on occurrence probability and severity of consequences. Engineered features and measures intended for severe accident management should be provided in reactor plant design. Requirements for severe accident analyses and for development of measures for severe accident management are determined. Design philosophy and proposed engineered measures for mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are demonstrated using examples of large, WWER-1000 (V-392), and medium size WWER-640 (V-407) reactor plant designs. Mitigation of severe accidents and decrease of radiation releases are supposed to be conducted on basis of consistent realization of the defense in depth concept relating to application of a system of barriers on the path of spreading of ionizing radiation and radioactive materials to the environment and a set of engineered measures protecting these barriers and retaining their effectiveness. Status of fulfilled by OKB Gidropress and other Russian organizations experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena supporting design decisions and severe accident management procedures is described. Status of the works on retention of core melt inside the WWER-640 reactor vessel is also characterized

  10. [Management of eyelid tumors: general considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasudry, J

    2011-12-01

    Despite the fact that the majority of eyelid tumors are benign, proper management in daily practice requires detection of the malignant ones. Several clinical criteria are usually proposed to support or reject a hypothesis of malignancy; however, most are of limited reliability. In any case of doubt, outpatient biopsy is recommended, so as to establish the correct diagnosis and formulate the most appropriate treatment plan. In all facial malignancies, the first (and absolutely mandatory) consideration is control of the cancer. Then, restoration of eyelid function can be addressed, in the following order: protection of the globe by complete dynamic eyelid closure and opening, visual function (and prevention of possible deprivation amblyopia) by insuring a clear visual axis, correction of the tear film, efficient lachrymal drainage, and only then the role of the eyelids in facial expression and esthetics. For most malignant eyelid tumors, the best assurance of complete excision is obtained by extemporaneous examination of the resection margins by frozen section (by Mohs' micrographic surgery techniques, or a variation thereof). Currently, advancement and transposition flaps, possibly in combination with tarso-conjunctival or skin grafts, are the most utilised techniques. Despite the lack of histological verification, new treatment modalities, including topical chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy and cryotherapy, may provide interesting treatment options, particularly in collaboration with the dermatologist. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Safety considerations in the fast reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, A.R.; Burton, W.R.; Taylor, H.A.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel cycle safety problems for fast reactors, as compared with thermal reactors, are enhanced by the higher fissile content and heat rating of the fuel. Additionally recycling leads to the build up of substantial isotopes which contribute to the alpha and neutron hazards. The plutonium arisings in a nuclear power reactor programme extending into the next century are discussed. A requirement is to be able to return the product plutonium to a reactor about 9 months after the end of irradiation and it is anticipated that progress will be made slowly towards this fuel cycle, having regard to the necessity for maintaining safe and reliable operations. Consideration of the steps in the fuel cycle has indicated that it will be best to store the irradiated fuel on the reactor sites while I131 decays and decay heat falls before transporting and a suitable transport flask is being developed. Reprocessing development work is aimed at the key area of fuel breakdown, the inter-relation of the fuel characteristics on the dissolution of the plutonium and a solvent extract cycle leading to a product suitable for a co-located fabrication plant. Because of the high activity of recycled fuel it is considered that fabrication must move to a fully remote operation as is already the case for reprocessing, and a gel precipitation process producing a vibro compacted fuel is under development for this purpose. The waste streams from the processing plants must be minimised, processed for recovery of plutonium where applicable and then conditioned so that the final products released from the processing cycle are acceptable for ultimate disposal. The safety aspects reviewed cover protection of operators, containment of radioactive materials, criticality and regulation of discharges to the environment

  12. Thermal-hydraulic considerations for particle bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benenati, R.; Araj, K. J.; Horn, F.

    In the design of particle bed reactor (PBR) cores, consideration must be given to the gas coolant channels and their configuration. Neutronics analysis provides the relative volume fractions of the component materials, but these must be arranged in such a manner as to allow proper cooling of all components by the gas flow at relatively low pressure drops. The thermal hydraulic aspects of this problem are addressed. A description of the computer model used in the analysis of the steady state condition is also included. Blowdown tests on hot particle bed fuel elements were carried out and are described.

  13. Nuclear safeguards considerations for pebble bed reactors (PBRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports by the Department of Energy National Laboratories have discussed safeguards considerations for low enriched uranium (LEU)-fueled pebble bed reactors (PBRs) and the need for bulk accountancy of the plutonium in “used fuel.” These reports fail to account for the degree of plutonium dilution in the graphitized-carbon pebbles that is sufficient to meet the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) “provisional” guidelines for termination of safeguards on “measured discards.” The thrust of this finding is not to terminate safeguards but to limit the need for specific accountancy of plutonium in stored used fuel. While the residual uranium in the used fuel is not sufficiently diluted to meet the IAEA provisional guidelines for termination of safeguards, the estimated quantities of the uranium minor isotopes 232 U and 236 U in the used fuel at the target burnup of ∼90 Gigawatt-days per metric ton (GWD/MT) exceed standard specification limits for reprocessed uranium and will require extensive blending with either natural uranium or uranium enrichment tails to dilute the 236 U content to fall within specification. Hence, the PBR used fuel is less desirable for commercial reprocessing and reuse than that from light water reactors. Also the PBR specific activity of a reprocessed uranium isotopic mixture and its A 2 values for effective dose limits if released in a dispersible form during a transportation accident are more limiting than the equivalent values for light-water-reactor used fuel at 55 GWD/MT without accounting for the presence of the principal carry-over fission product (technetium, 99 Tc) and plutonium contamination. Thus, the potentially recoverable uranium from PBR used fuel carries reactivity penalties and radiological penalties likely greater than those for reprocessed uranium from light water reactors. These factors impact the economics of reprocessing, but a more significant consideration is that reprocessing technologies for

  14. Challenges and Considerations for Innovative Small and Medium Sized Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.

    2008-01-01

    timing factors. Because many innovative SMRs are not water cooled, licensing approaches focussed on current light water reactors may need adjustments toward a technology-neutral approach. And most of the innovative SMR concepts rely broadly on passive safety systems, the reliability of which needs to be proven to enable risk-informed qualification and licensing. In addition, many potential applications of SMRs, such as district heat, potable water or hydrogen production, may require them to be located close to customers or a chemical plant. Based on the outputs of IAEA activities for innovative SMRs, it is possible to identify common approaches that could help the potential vendors to meet the expectations of many users and the international community. The paper will provide details on such considerations, with a link to various subject areas and categories of stake holders.(author)

  15. Considerations for tritium protection at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to indicate the general direction of current fusion reactor concepts regarding tritium, and to indicate some options in tritium control strategies. Certain strategies, in addition to providing reduced potential health hazard, afford the potential for engineering alternatives for in-plant tritium control systems. The overall coupling of containment cleanup systems and health protection must continue to develop with increased knowledge of the health effects of different tritium species and the consequent systems options available subsequent to this understanding

  16. Survey of considerations involved in introducing CANDU reactors into the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Bohn, E.M.; Chang, Y.I.; van Erp, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The important issues that must be considered in a decision to utilize CANDU reactors in the U.S. are identified in this report. Economic considerations, including both power costs and fuel utilization, are discussed for the near and longer term. Safety and licensing considerations are reviewed for CANDU-PHW reactors in general. The important issues, now and in the future, associated with power generation costs are the capital costs of CANDUs and the factors that impact capital cost comparisons. Fuel utilization advantages for the CANDU depend upon assumptions regarding fuel recycle at present, but the primary issue in the longer term is the utilization of the thorium cycle in the CANDU. Certain safety features of the CANDU are identified as intrinsic to the concept and these features must be examined more fully regarding licensability in the U.S

  17. Consideration of important technical issues for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thadani, A.C.; Perch, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Early in the design and review process of the Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWR), the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in recognition of the importance of defense-in-depth focused its attention on lessons learned from the operating experience, research and other studies as well as addressing the challenges from severe accidents. The Commission issued the Policy Statement on Safety Goals for the Operations of Nuclear Power Plants on August 4, 1986. This policy statement focused on the risks to the public from nuclear power plant operations with the objective of establishing goals that broadly define an acceptable level of radiological risk that might be imposed on the public as a result of nuclear power plant operation. The Commission recognizes the importance of mitigating the consequences of a core-melt accident and continues to emphasize features such as containment and siting in less populated areas as integral parts of the defense-in-depth concept associated with its accident prevention and mitigation philosophy. In its Severe Accident Policy statement, the Commission expressed its expectation that vendors engage in designing new standard plants should address severe accidents during the design stage to take full advantage of insights gained by providing design features to further reduce the likelihood of severe accidents from occurring and, in the unlikely occurrence of a severe accident, mitigating their consequences. Incorporating insights and design features during the design phase can be cost effective when compared to modifications to existing plants. The staff has used this guidance to apply defense-in-depth philosophy in focusing attention on severe accident considerations. This paper discusses some of the key prevention and mitigation issues the NRC has focused its efforts, including emerging technologies being applied to new reactor designs

  18. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  19. 16 CFR 1012.1 - General policy considerations; scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Policy, sets forth requirements for advance public notice, public attendance, and recordkeeping for... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General policy considerations; scope. 1012.1 Section 1012.1 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION GENERAL MEETINGS POLICY-MEETINGS...

  20. General considerations for SSC scintillator calorimeters (For the scintillator general subgroup)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodulman, L.

    1989-01-01

    The Scintillator Calorimetry group divided into three subgroups: a conventional uranium and plate design ala ZEUS, fiber design, and a group on general considerations. The considerations of the third group are reported here on geometrical and technical issues. 1 fig

  1. Siting considerations for radioactivity in reactor effluents during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, J.M.; Strom, P.O.

    1975-01-01

    In selecting a proper site for a nuclear power station, the consideration of radioactivity released in effluents can be handled in a straightforward manner using the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission's proposed Appendix I to 10 CFR 50, which gives numerical guidelines for design objectives for meeting the criterion ''as low as practicable'' for radioactive material in light-water-cooled nuclear power reactor effluents. By relating the release of radioactive material, the site meteorological conditions, and site boundary distance through appropriate dose models, the suitability of a given site can be determined. ''Rules of thumb'' for comparing anticipated releases to design objectives can be constructed for rapid assessment using the maximum permissible concentration values of 10 CFR 20 as dose factors. These rules of thumb tend to underpredict the allowed releases except in the case of radiocesium in liquids. For gaseous releases, these rules of thumb can be made up in convenient nomogram form for a quick assessment of allowed releases based on local site meteorological conditions. (U.S.)

  2. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  3. ALARA radiation considerations for the AP600 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, F.L. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The radiation design of the AP600 reactor plant is based on an average annual occupational radiation exposure (ORE) of 100 man-rem. As a design goal we have established a lower value of 70 man-rem per year. And, with our current design process, we expect to achieve annual exposures which are well below this goal. To accomplish our goal we have established a process that provides criteria, guidelines and customer involvement to achieve the desired result. The criteria and guidelines provide the shield designer, as well as the systems and plant layout designers with information that will lead to an integrated plant design that minimizes personnel exposure and yet is not burdened with complicated shielding or unnecessary component access limitations. Customer involvement is provided in the form of utility input, design reviews and information exchange. Cooperative programs with utilities in the development of specific systems or processes also provides for an ALARA design. The results are features which include ALARA radiation considerations as an integral part of the plant design and a lower plant ORE. It is anticipated that a further reduction in plant personnel exposures will result through good radiological practices by the plant operators. The information in place to support and direct the plant designers includes the Utility Requirements Document (URD), Federal Regulations, ALARA guidelines, radiation design information and radiation and shielding design criteria. This information, along with the utility input, design reviews and information feedback, will contribute to the reduction of plant radiation exposure levels such that they will be less than the stated goals.

  4. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of 233 U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490 0 C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year)

  5. Nuclear energy center site survey reactor plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to make a nuclear energy center site survey (NECSS). Background information for the NECSS report was developed in a series of tasks which include: socioeconomic inpacts; environmental impact (reactor facilities); emergency response capability (reactor facilities); aging of nuclear energy centers; and dry cooled nuclear energy centers

  6. ZrH reactor lattice spacing (heat transfer considerations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felten, L.D.

    1970-01-01

    Temperature calculations for a 295 element ZrH reactor at fuel element spacings from 0.010'' to 0.065'' showed a very small dependence of reactor temperature on element spacing. It was found that one variation in coolant channel area (2 zones) was sufficient to satisfactorily shape the radial flow profile for the core. (U.S.)

  7. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  8. Research reactor back-end options - decommissioning: a necessary consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, M.R.; Parry, D.R.; Smith, C.

    1998-01-01

    Decommissioning is a challenge, which all radioactive site licensees eventually need to face and research reactors are no exception. BNFL has completed numerous major decommissioning projects at its own operational sites and has undertaken similar works at customers' sites including the decommissioning of the Universities Research Reactor (URR), Risley and the ICI TRIGA 1-Mk I Reactor at Billingham. Based on the execution of such projects BNFL has gained an understanding of the variety of customer requirements and the effectiveness of specific decommissioning techniques for research reactors. This paper addresses factors to be considered when reviewing the way forward following shut down and how these affect the final decisions for fuel management and the extent of decommissioning. Case studies are described from BNFL's recent experience decommissioning both the URR and ICI TRIGA reactors. (author)

  9. Design considerations for economically competitive sodium cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Hongbin; Zhao, Haihua; Mousseau, Vincent; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phenix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design. (author)

  10. General remarks on fast neutron reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, J.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The main aspects of fast reactor physics, presented in these lecture notes, are restricted to LMFBR's. The emphasis is placed on the core neutronic balance and the burn-up problems. After a brief description of the power reactor main components and of the fast reactor chronology, the fundamental parameters of the one-group neutronic balance are briefly reviewed. Then the neutronic burn-up problems related to the Pu production and to the doubling time are considered

  11. General aspects of CAREM-25 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmastro, Dario F.; Gomez, Silvia; Ishida, Viviana; Mazzi, Ruben; Santecchia, Alberto; Gomez de Soler, Susana M.

    2000-01-01

    CAREM project consists on the development and design of an advanced nuclear power plant. In order to verify its innovative features the construction of a prototype is planned. In this paper the main technical characteristics of CAREM-25 prototype reactor are presented. This is a very low power innovative reactor (100 M Wth) conceived with new generation design solutions. Based on an indirect cycle integrated light water reactor using enriched uranium, CAREM has some distinctive features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a high level of safety: -) Integrated primary system; -) Primary system cooling by natural convection; -) Self pressurization; -) and Passive safety systems. (author)

  12. General Aspects of CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmastro, Dario; Gomez, S.; Mazzi, R.; Gomez de Soler, S.; Santecchia, A.; Ishida, V.

    2000-01-01

    CAREM project consists on the development and design of an advanced Nuclear Power Plant. In order to verify its innovative features the construction of a prototype is planned. In this paper the main technical characteristics of CAREM-25 prototype reactor are presented. This is a very low power innovative reactor (100MWth) conceived with new generation design solutions. Based on an indirect cycle integrated light water reactor using enriched uranium, CAREM has some distinctive features that greatly simplify the reactor and also contribute to a high level of safety: integrated primary system, primary system cooling by natural convection, selfpressurization, and passive safety systems

  13. Nonproliferation and safeguard considerations: Pebble Bed reactor fuel cycle evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    Nuclear fuel cycles were evaluated for the Pebble Bed Gas Cooled Reactor under development in the Federal Republic of Germany. The basic fuel cycle specified for the HTR-K and PNP is well qualified and will meet the requirements of these reactors. Twenty alternate fuel cycles are described, including high-conversion cycles, net-breeding cycles, and proliferation-resistant cycles. High-conversion cycles, which have a high probability of being successfully developed, promise a significant improvement in resource utilization. Proliferation-resistant cycles, also with a high probability of successful development, conpare very favorably with those for other types of reactors. Most of the advanced cycles could be adapted to first-generation pebble bed reactors with no significant modifications

  14. Secondary cycle design considerations for reduction of reactor transients frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, L.; Leal, M.R.L.V.

    1980-01-01

    The secondary cycle systems should not be considered of secondary importance to the pressurized water reactor safety. The advanced design and analysis techniques used for components related to nuclear safety are suggested. (E.G.) [pt

  15. General consideration of effective plutonium utilization in future LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Nobuyuki; Okubo, Tsutomu

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the potential of mixed oxide fueled light water reactors (MOX-LWRs), especially focusing on the high conversion type LWRs (HC-LWRs) such as FLWR are evaluated in terms of both economic aspect and effective use of plutonium. For economics consideration, relative economics positions of MOX-LWRs are clarified comparing the cost of electricity for uranium fueled LWRs (U-LWRs), MOX-LWRs and fast breeder reactors (FBRs) assuming future natural uranium price raise and variation of parameters such as construction cost and capacity factor. Also the economic superiority of MOX utilization against the uranium use is mentioned from the view point of plutonium credit concerning to the front-end fuel cycle cost. In terms of effective use of plutonium, comparative evaluations on plutonium mass balance in the cases of HC-LWR and high moderation type LWRs (HM-LWRs) taking into account plutonium quality (ratio of fissile to total plutonium) constraint in multiple recycling are performed as representative MOX utilization cases. Through this evaluation, the advantageous features of plutonium multiple recycling by HC-LWR are clarified. From all these results, merits of the introduction of HC-LWRs are discussed. (author)

  16. Compact Reversed-Field Pinch Reactors (CRFPR): preliminary engineering considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Embrechts, M.J.; Schnurr, N.M.; Battat, M.E.; LaBauve, R.J.; Davidson, J.W.

    1984-08-01

    The unique confinement physics of the Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) projects to a compact, high-power-density fusion reactor that promises a significant reduction in the cost of electricity. The compact reactor also promises a factor-of-two reduction in the fraction of total cost devoted to the reactor plant equipment [i.e., fusion power core (FPC) plus support systems]. In addition to operational and developmental benefits, these physically smaller systems can operate economically over a range of total power output. After giving an extended background and rationale for the compact fusion approaches, key FPC subsystems for the Compact RFP Reactor (CRFPR) are developed, designed, and integrated for a minimum-cost, 1000-MWe(net) system. Both the problems and promise of the compact, high-power-density fusion reactor are quantitatively evaluated on the basis of this conceptual design. The material presented in this report both forms a framework for a broader, more expanded conceptual design as well as suggests directions and emphases for related research and development

  17. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  18. Austenitic stainless steel bulk property considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattas, R.F.

    1979-04-01

    The bulk properties of annealed 304, 316, and 20% cold-worked 316 stainless steels are evaluated for the temperature and radiation conditions expected in a near-term fusion reactor. Of interest are the thermophysical properties, void swelling produced by neutron radiaion, and the tensile, creep, and fatigue properties before and after irradiation

  19. Safety program considerations for space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cropp, L.O.

    1984-08-01

    This report discusses the necessity for in-depth safety program planning for space nuclear reactor systems. The objectives of the safety program and a proposed task structure is presented for meeting those objectives. A proposed working relationship between the design and independent safety groups is suggested. Examples of safety-related design philosophies are given

  20. Analysis of reactor cavity radiation streaming: some practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of a cost effective analysis procedure for use in the prediction of radiation environments in the cavity and containment building of a nuclear power reactor. Comments are offered on potential problems in certification of analysis procedures and the availability of benchmarkable data sets, both measurements and calculations

  1. General considerations on the oxide fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascard, R.

    1977-01-01

    Since the very first experimental irradiations in thermal reactors, performed in view of the future Rapsodie fuel general study, corrosion cladding anomalies were observed. After 10 years of Rapsodie and more than two years of Phenix, performance brought definite confirmation of the chemical reactions between the irradiated fuel and cladding. That is the reason for which the fuel designers express an urgent need for determining the corrosion rates. Semi-empirical laws and mechanisms describing corrosion processes are proposed. Erratic conditions for appearance of the oxide-cladding corrosion are stressed upon. Obviously such a problem can be fully appreciated only by a statistical approach based on a large number of observations on the true LMFBR fuel pins

  2. Reactor design considerations in mineral sequestration of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ityokumbul, M.T.; Chander, S.; O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    One of the promising approaches to lowering the anthropogenic carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere is mineral sequestration. In this approach, the carbon dioxide reacts with alkaline earth containing silicate minerals forming magnesium and/or calcium carbonates. Mineral carbonation is a multiphase reaction process involving gas, liquid and solid phases. The effective design and scale-up of the slurry reactor for mineral carbonation will require careful delineation of the rate determining step and how it changes with the scale of the reactor. The shrinking core model was used to describe the mineral carbonation reaction. Analysis of laboratory data indicates that the transformations of olivine and serpentine are controlled by chemical reaction and diffusion through an ash layer respectively. Rate parameters for olivine and serpentine carbonation are estimated from the laboratory data

  3. Consideration on risk reduction of future breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vossebrecker, H.

    1990-09-01

    An overall concept of risk minimization of future sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors is presented in this report. Since shutdown reliability is of vital importance for the breeder safety, a so-called third shutdown level is proposed in addition to the two independent fast shutdown systems. It is basically a group of passive and active measures, which are capable to bring the reactor to safe conditions in all conceivable accident-initiating events and in case of total failure of the two actual shutdown systems. Core disruptions as a result of shutdown failure are therefore beyond the scope of technical imagination. Measures are also foreseen to combat other conceivable causes of core disruption, in particular to achieve residual heat removal with essentially passive systems by making use of the good natural circulation capacity of sodium. On top of that, since absolute safety can never be claimed, damage-limiting containment measures are discussed

  4. Biomagnetic effects: a consideration in fusion reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlum, D.D.

    1976-02-01

    Fusion as a power source is receiving an increasing amount of attention. Several designs have been proposed and the feasibility of each alternative is being studied. As we move closer to a working design, attention can be paid to potential biological hazards. Large magnetic fields and the emission of tritium and lithium are unique to some fusion reactor designs. The results of a review of the current state of knowledge concerning the biological effects of magnetic fields alone and in combination with ionizing radiation are summarized in this report. The purpose of the review is to help identify areas where additional biomedical research is needed for establishing guidelines for reactor design and operation. 64 references

  5. Basic considerations for the mechanical design of heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses the principal aspects of the mechanical design of the reactor unit for a nuclear district heating plant. It is reasoned that the design must be specifically tailored to the characteristics of the applications, and that the experience gained with the design practice of big nuclear power stations must also be incorporated. Some examples of the design solutions for the SIEMENS NRH-200 are presented for illustration. (author). 7 refs, 10 figs

  6. Basic considerations for the mechanical design of heating reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, P [Siemens AG, Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The paper discusses the principal aspects of the mechanical design of the reactor unit for a nuclear district heating plant. It is reasoned that the design must be specifically tailored to the characteristics of the applications, and that the experience gained with the design practice of big nuclear power stations must also be incorporated. Some examples of the design solutions for the SIEMENS NRH-200 are presented for illustration. (author). 7 refs, 10 figs.

  7. Surface area considerations for corroding N reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Pitner, A.L.

    1996-06-01

    The N Reactor fuel is corroding at sites where the Zircaloy cladding was damaged when the fuel was discharged from the reactor. Corroding areas are clearly visible on the fuel stored in open cans in the K East Basin. There is a need to estimate the area of the corroding uranium to analyze aspects of fuel behavior as it is transitioned. from current wet storage to dry storage. In this report, the factors that contribute to open-quotes trueclose quotes surface area are analyzed in terms of what is currently known about the N Reactor fuel. Using observations from a visual examinations of the fuel in the K East wet storage facility, a value for the corroding geometric area is estimated. Based on observations of corroding uranium and surface roughness values for other metals, a surface roughness factor is also estimated and applied to the corroding K East fuel to provide an estimated open-quotes trueclose quotes surface area. While the estimated area may be modified as additional data become available from fuel characterization studies, the estimate provides a basis to assess effects of exposed uranium metal surfaces on fuel behavior in operations involved in transitioning from wet to dry storage, during shipment and staging, conditioning, and dry interim storage

  8. General description of advanced heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakodkar, A.; Sinha, R.K.; Dhawan, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor is a boiling light water cooled, heavy water moderated and vertical pressure tube type reactor with its design optimised for utilisation of thorium for power generation. The core consists of (Th-U 233 )O 2 and (Th-Pu)O 2 fuel with a discharge burn up of 20,000 MWd/Te. This reactor incorporates several features to simplify the design, which eliminate certain systems and components. AHWR design is also optimised for easy replaceability of coolant channels, facilitation of in-service inspection and maintenance and ease of erection. The AHWR design also incorporates several passive systems for performing safety-related functions in the event of an accident. In case of LOCA, emergency coolant is injected through 4 accumulators of 260 m 3 capacity directly into the core. Gravity driven water pool of capacity 6000 m 3 serves to cool the core for 3 days without operator's intervention. Core submergence, passive containment isolation and passive containment cooling are the added features in AHWR. The paper describes the various process systems, core and fuel design, primary components and safety concepts of AHWR. Plant layout and technical data are also presented. The conceptual design of the reactor has been completed, and the detailed design and development is scheduled for completion in the year 2002. (author)

  9. Considerations in the development of safety requirements for innovative reactors: Application to modular high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    Member States of the IAEA have frequently requested this organization to assess, at the conceptual stage, the safety of the design of nuclear reactors that rely on a variety of technologies and are of a high degree of innovation. However, to date, for advanced and innovative reactors and for reactors with characteristics that are different from those of existing light water reactors, widely accepted design standards and rules do not exist. This TECDOC is an outcome of the efforts deployed by the IAEA to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of advanced and innovative reactors, and of all reactors in general including research reactors, with characteristics that differ from those of light water reactors. This publication puts forward a method for safety assessment that is based on the well established and accepted principle of defence in depth. The need to develop a general approach for assessing the safety of the design of reactors that applies to all kinds of advanced reactors was emphasized by the request to the IAEA by South Africa to review the safety of the South African pebble bed modular reactor. This reactor, as other modular high temperature gas cooled reactors (MHTGRs), adopts very specific design features such as the use of coated particle fuel. The characteristics of the fuel deeply affect the design and the safety of the plant, thereby posing several challenges to traditional safety assessment methods and to the application of existing safety requirements that have been developed primarily for water reactors. In this TECDOC, the MHTGR has been selected as a case study to demonstrate the viability of the method proposed. The approach presented is based on an extended interpretation of the concept of defence in depth and its link with the general safety objectives and fundamental safety functions as set out in 'Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design', IAEA Safety Standards No. NS-R.1, issued by the IAEA in 2000. The objective

  10. Severe accident considerations in Canadian nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, A.M.; Measures, M.P.; Scott, C.K.; Lewis, M.J.

    1990-08-01

    This paper describes a current study on severe accidents being sponsored by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) and provides background on other related Canadian work. Scoping calculations are performed in Phase I of the AECB study to establish the relative consequences of several permutations resulting from six postulated initiating events, nine containment states, and a selection of meteorological conditions and health effects mitigating criteria. In Phase II of the study, selected accidents sequences would be analyzed in detail using models suitable for the design features of the Canadian nuclear power reactors

  11. Remote maintenance considerations for swimming pool tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niikura, S.; Yamada, M.; Kasai, M.

    1983-01-01

    Swimming Pool Tokamak Reactor (SPTR) is one of the candidate devices which are expected to demonstrate physical and engineering feasibility for fusion power reactors. In SPTR, water shield is adopted instead of solid shield structures. Among the advantages of SPTR are, from viewpoint of remote maintenance, small handling weight and high space availability between TF coils and a vacuum vessel. On the other hand, high dose rate during reactor repair and adverse effects on remote maintenance equipment by the shielding water might be the disadvantage of SPTR, where it is assumed that the shielding water is drained during reactor repair. Since the design of SPTR is still at the preliminary stage, for remote maintenance, much effort has been directed to clarification of design conditions such as environment and handling weight. As for the remote maintenance system concepts, studies have been focussed on those for a vacuum vessel and its internal structure (blanket, divertor and protection walls) expected to be repaired more frequently. The vacuum vessel assembly is divided into 21 sectors and number of TF coils is 14. A pair of TF coils are connected with each other by antitorque beams on the whole side surface. Vacuum vessel cassettes and associated blanket, divertor and protection walls are replaced through seven windows between TF coils pairs. Therefore each vacuum vessel cassette is required moving mechanisms in toroidal and radial directions. Options for slide mechanisms are wheels, balls, rollers and water bearings. Options for driving the cassette are self-driving by hydraulic motors and external driving by rack-pinion, wires or specific vehicles. As a result of studies, the moving mechanism with wheels and hydraulic motors has been selected for the reference design, and the system with water bearings and rack-pinion as an alternative. Furthermore typical concepts have been obtained for remote maintenance equipment such as wall-mounted manipulators, tools for

  12. Proliferation Resistance and Material Type considerations within the Collaborative Project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renda, Guido; Alim, Fatih; Cojazzi, Giacomo GM.

    2015-01-01

    The collaborative project for a European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP‑ESFR) is an international project where 25 European partners developed Research & Development solutions and concepts for a European sodium fast reactor. The project was funded by the 7. European Union Framework Programme and covered topics such as the reactor architectures and components, the fuel, the fuel element and the fuel cycle, and the safety concepts. Within sub‑project 3, dedicated to safety, a task addressed proliferation resistance considerations. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR and PP) Evaluation Methodology has been selected as the general framework for this work, complemented by punctual aspects of the IAEA‑INPRO Proliferation Resistance methodology and other literature studies - in particular for material type characterization. The activity has been carried out taking the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology and its Addendum as the general guideline for identifying potential nuclear material diversion targets. The targets proliferation attractiveness has been analyzed in terms of the suitability of the targets’ nuclear material as the basis for its use in nuclear explosives. To this aim the PR and PP Fissile Material Type measure was supplemented by other literature studies, whose related metrics have been applied to the nuclear material items present in the considered core alternatives. This paper will firstly summarize the main ESFR design aspects relevant for PR following the structure of the GIF PR and PP White Paper template. An analysis on proliferation targets is then discussed, with emphasis on their characterization from a nuclear material point of view. Finally, a high‑level ESFR PR analysis according to the four main proliferation strategies identified by the GIF PR and PP Evaluation Methodology (concealed diversion, concealed misuse, breakout, clandestine production in clandestine facilities) is

  13. Superconducting magnet radiation limit considerations for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M.E.; Walstrom, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    The radiation limits for fusion reactor magnets have a direct impact on the cost of electricity. For example, reducing the inboard shield by 1 cm saves up to $3 million in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment cost. The magnet components most sensitive to radiation damage are the superconductor, stabilizer, and insulators. Nuclear heating in the magnet affects the design and also impacts the economic performance of the reactor through increased refrigeration costs. The radiation effects in the different components of the magnet are related, as all of them are determined by the flux level in the magnet. Hence, in efforts to push radiation limits, these effects should be considered simultaneously. Furthermore, the levels of radiation effects that correspond to the optimum nuclear heating determined from economic trade-off analysis will be useful in specifying the fluence, dose, and stabilization limit goals for the magnet development program. In this paper, we review the available irradiation data and assess the need for achieving higher irradiation levels

  14. Auxiliary bearing design considerations for gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfield, S.R. Jr.; Rodwell, E.

    2001-01-01

    The need to avoid contamination of the primary system, along with other perceived advantages, has led to the selection of electromagnetic bearings (EMBs) in most ongoing commercial-scale gas cooled reactor (GCR) designs. However, one implication of magnetic bearings is the requirement to provide backup support to mitigate the effects of failures or overload conditions. The demands on these auxiliary or 'catcher' bearings have been substantially escalated by the recent development of direct Brayton cycle GCR concepts. Conversely, there has been only limited directed research in the area of auxiliary bearings, particularly for vertically oriented turbomachines. This paper explores the current state-of-the-art for auxiliary bearings and the implications for current GCR designs. (author)

  15. Physics considerations of the Reversed-Field Pinch fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagenson, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A conceptual engineering design of a fusion reactor based on plasma confinement in a toroidal Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) configuration is described. The plasma is ohmically ignited by toroidal plasma currents which also inherently provide the confining magnetic fields in a toroidal chamber having major and minor radii of 12.7 and 1.5 m, respectively. The DT plasma ignites in 2 to 3 s and undergoes a transient, unrefueled burn at 10 to 20 keV for approx. 20 s to give a DT burnup of approx. 50%. Accounting for all major energy sinks yields a cost-optimized system with a recirculating power fraction of 0.17; the power output is 750 MWe

  16. Preliminary design considerations for automatic refueling at N Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quapp, W.J.; Yount, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Refueling Enhancement Program is an effort to upgrade and improve the N Reactor refueling operation. Primary goals of this effort are to reduce personnel exposure, reduce effluents to the environment, and, where possible, increase the refueling rate. Recent advances in available commercial robotics systems have prompted a look at automating the Charge/Discharge (C/D) operations. Current efforts will culminate in a conceptual design report (CDR) and accompanying economic and risk analysis in January 1986. Based on the results in that report, DOE will review the viability of the approach as a future capital project. Implementation of automation in existing plants raises questions regarding both the programmatic (how does one implement such an effort) and technical (what equipment is available; how will it be applied) concerns. This paper addresses both aspects

  17. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The TF winding pack provides support against in-plane separating loads but offers little support against out-of-plane loads, unless shear-bonding of the conductors can be maintained. The removal of heat due to nuclear and ac loads has not been a fundamental limit to design, but certainly has non-negligible economic consequences. We present here preliminary ITER magnetic systems design parameters taken from trade studies, designs, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit. The work presented here reflects the efforts of many, but the responsibility for the opinions expressed is the authors'. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Consideration of BORAX-type reactivity accidents applied to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Meignen, Renaud; Bourgois, Thierry; Biaut, Guillaume; Mireau, Jean-Pierre; Natta, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Most of the research reactors discussed in this document are pool-type reactors in which the reactor vessel and some of the reactor coolant systems are located in a pool of water. These reactors generally use fuel in plate assemblies formed by a compact layer of uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) and aluminium particles, sandwiched between two thin layers of aluminium serving as cladding. The fuel melting process begins at 660 deg. C when the aluminium melts, while the uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) particles may remain solid. The accident that occurred in the American SL-1 reactor in 1961, together with tests carried out in the United States as of 1954 in the BORAX-1 reactor and then, in 1962, in the SPERT-1 reactor, showed that a sudden substantial addition of reactivity in this type of reactor could lead to explosive mechanisms caused by degradation, or even fast meltdown, of part of the reactor core. This is what is known as a 'BORAX-type' accident. The aim of this document is first to briefly recall the circumstances of the SL-1 reactor accident, the lessons learned, how this operational feedback has been factored into the design of various research reactors around the world and, second, to describe the approach taken by France with regard to this type of accident and how, led by IRSN, this approach has evolved in the last decade. (authors)

  19. Review of the status of low power research reactors and considerations for its development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, In Cheol; Wu, Sang Ik; Lee, Byung Chul; Ha, Jae Joo

    2012-01-01

    At present, 232 research reactors in the world are in operation and two thirds of them have a power less than 1 MW. Many countries have used research reactors as the tools for educating and training students or engineers and for scientific service such as neutron activation analysis. As the introduction of a research reactor is considered a stepping stone for a nuclear power development program, many newcomers are considering having a low power research reactor. The IAEA has continued to provide forums for the exchange of information and experiences regarding low power research reactors. Considering these, the Agency is recently working on the preparation of a guide for the preparation of technical specification possibly for a member state to use when wanting to purchase a low power research reactor. In addition, ANS has stated that special consideration should be given to the continued national support to maintain and expand research and test reactor programs and to the efforts in identifying and addressing the future needs by working toward the development and deployment of next generation nuclear research and training facilities. Thus, more interest will be given to low power research reactors and its role as a facility for education and training. Considering these, the status of low power research reactors was reviewed, and some aspects to be considered in developing a low power research reactor were studied

  20. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON REGULATIONS AND SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR QUADRICYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Pavlovic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new class of compact vehicles has been emerging and wide-spreading all around Europe: the quadricycle. These four-wheeled motor vehicles, originally derived from motorcycles, are a small and fuel-efficient mean of transportation used in rural or urban areas as an alternative to motorbikes or city cars. In some countries, they are also endorsed by local authorities and institutions which support small and environmentally-friendly vehicles. In this paper, several general considerations on quadricycles will be provided including the vehicle classification, evolution of regulations (as homologation, driver licence, emissions, etc, technical characteristics, safety requirements, most relevant investigations, and other additional useful information (e.g. references, links. It represents an important and actual topic of investigation for designers and manufacturers considering that the new EU regulation on the approval and market surveillance of quadricycles will soon enter in force providing conclusive requirements for functional safety environmental protection of these promising vehicles.

  1. Considerations for tritium protection at a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    The view on the radiological hazard associated with future fusion power stations as presented in this discussion is rarely supported by reasonably certain or reliably accurate prediction. This fact should not be taken as indicating a major programmatic deficiency. In fact, it is expected that large uncertainty would be present in health effect at the current level of technological development. The details of tritium exposure will be clarified, waiting for the operation of the Tritium System Test Assembly. Once the data base for the TSTA is established, future fusion design can be made based on economic cost/radiation exposure risk benefit. The actual execution of this cost/benefit analysis is complex because three populations are of interest: occupational work force, local population and global population. The knowledge of tritium management must be increased if D-T fusion reactors are to become compatible with the needs of utility companies. In order to exploit the differing hazard between HT and HTO, it is necessary to know much more about the mechanism of uncatalyzed conversion over a wide range of concentration and about the change caused by the variety of potential catalytic sequence in potential tritium leak. (Kako, I.)

  2. Reactor chemical considerations of the accelerator molten-salt breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Kazuo; Kato, Yoshio; Ohno, Hideo; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1982-01-01

    A single phase of the molten fluoride mixture is simultaneously functionable as a nuclear reaction medium, a heat medium and a chemical processing medium. Applying this characteristics of molten salts, the single-fluid type accelerator molten-salt breeder (AMSB) concept was proposed, in which 7 LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 was served as a target-and-blanket salt (Fig. 1 and Table 1), and the detailed discussion on the chemical aspects of AMSB are presented (Tables 2 -- 4 and Fig.2). Owing to the small total amount of radiowaste and the low concentrations of each element in target salt, AMSB would be chemically managable. The performance of the standard-type AMSB is improved by adding 0.3 -- 0.8 m/o 233 UF 4 as follows(Tables 1 and 4, and Figs. 2 and 3): (a) this ''high-gain'' type AMSB is feasible to design chemically, in which still only small amount of radiowaste is included ; (b) the fissile material production rate will be increased significantly; (c) this target salt is straightly fed as an 233 U additive to the fuel of molten-salt converter reactor (MSCR) ; (d) the dirty fuel salt suctioned from MSCR is batch-reprocessed in the safeguarded regional center, in which many AMSB are facilitated ; (e) the isolated 233 UF 4 is blended in the target salt sent to many MSCRs, and the cleaned residual fertile salt is used as a diluent of AMSB salt ; (f) this simple and rational thorium fuel breeding cycle system is also suitable for the nuclear nonproliferation and for the fabrication of smaller size power-stations. (author)

  3. Some considerations for assurance of reactor safety from experiences in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Sunao; Nishihara, Hideaki; Shibata, Toshikazu

    1981-01-01

    For the purpose of assuring reactor safety and strengthening research in the related fields, a multi-disciplinary group was formed among university researchers, including social scientists, with a special allocation of the Grant-in-Aid from the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture. An excerpt from the first year's report (1979 -- 1980) is edited here, which contains an interpretation of Murphy's reliability engineering law, a scope of reactor diagnostic studies to be pursued at universities, and safety measures already implemented or suggested to be implemented in university research reactors. (author)

  4. Engineering and Fabrication Considerations for Cost-Effective Space Reactor Shield Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Thomas A.; Disney, Richard K.

    2004-01-01

    Investment in developing nuclear power for space missions cannot be made on the basis of a single mission. Current efforts in the design and fabrication of the reactor module, including the reactor shield, must be cost-effective and take into account scalability and fabricability for planned and future missions. Engineering considerations for the shield need to accommodate passive thermal management, varying radiation levels and effects, and structural/mechanical issues. Considering these challenges, design principles and cost drivers specific to the engineering and fabrication of the reactor shield are presented that contribute to lower recurring mission costs

  5. Considerations concerning the strategy of corium retention in the reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Third-generation nuclear reactors are characterised by consideration during design of core meltdown accidents. More specifically, dedicated measures or devices must be implemented to avoid basemat melt-through in the reactor building. These devices must have a high level of confidence. The strategy of corium retention in the reactor vessel, if supported by appropriate research and development, makes it possible to achieve this objective. IRSN works alone or in partnerships to address all the issues associated with in-vessel corium retention. This document describes the in-vessel corium retention strategy and its limitations, along with the research programs conducted by IRSN in this area

  6. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  7. A Study on the demands of research reactors and considerations for an export

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol; Lee, Young Jun

    2008-11-15

    Among around 240 research reactors in operation over the world, around 80% have been operated for more than 20 years and 65% for more than 30 years. Hence the number of operable reactors is expected, between 2010 and 2020, to be reduced to 1/3 of the present situation if the lifetime of a research reactor is assumed to be 40 years. However, considering the recent re-highlighting of nuclear energy as a practical mass energy source and the contributions to the overall areas of science and technology, the demands for constructing a new research reactor and replacing the existing research reactors will be increased in the near future. On the other hand, vendors which participate in providing research reactors are not few, and AREVA in France and INVAP in Argentina are example of them in a positive position. Japan and Russia are regarded as potential competitors, but they do not actively appear in the market so far. Comparing those competitors with Korea, we have weak points regarding experiences on exports and the organizational systems as an integrated vendor. But we may have a competitiveness by grafting our experiences on the development of nuclear power technology and the construction and operation of the HANARO. In this report, the future potential demands for research reactors and the related considerations for exports have been surveyed and described, particularly, centering around the Netherlands, Vietnam and Thailand that are countries which may construct research reactors in the near future. Considerations for exporting a research reactor have been categorized into two groups of technical and nontechnical items. From a technical point of view, the issues on fuel and reactor type, design data and design ability, design codes, and technology property rights have been reviewed. For the non-technical items, an integrated project system, reasonable estimate of demands, social and economic conditions for potential demand countries, MOU status, nuclear non

  8. A Study on the demands of research reactors and considerations for an export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Cheol; Lee, Young Jun

    2008-11-01

    Among around 240 research reactors in operation over the world, around 80% have been operated for more than 20 years and 65% for more than 30 years. Hence the number of operable reactors is expected, between 2010 and 2020, to be reduced to 1/3 of the present situation if the lifetime of a research reactor is assumed to be 40 years. However, considering the recent re-highlighting of nuclear energy as a practical mass energy source and the contributions to the overall areas of science and technology, the demands for constructing a new research reactor and replacing the existing research reactors will be increased in the near future. On the other hand, vendors which participate in providing research reactors are not few, and AREVA in France and INVAP in Argentina are example of them in a positive position. Japan and Russia are regarded as potential competitors, but they do not actively appear in the market so far. Comparing those competitors with Korea, we have weak points regarding experiences on exports and the organizational systems as an integrated vendor. But we may have a competitiveness by grafting our experiences on the development of nuclear power technology and the construction and operation of the HANARO. In this report, the future potential demands for research reactors and the related considerations for exports have been surveyed and described, particularly, centering around the Netherlands, Vietnam and Thailand that are countries which may construct research reactors in the near future. Considerations for exporting a research reactor have been categorized into two groups of technical and nontechnical items. From a technical point of view, the issues on fuel and reactor type, design data and design ability, design codes, and technology property rights have been reviewed. For the non-technical items, an integrated project system, reasonable estimate of demands, social and economic conditions for potential demand countries, MOU status, nuclear non

  9. IEA-R1 research reactor: operational life extension and considerations regarding future decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajndlich, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The IEA-R1 reactor is a pool type research reactor moderated and cooled by light water and uses graphite and beryllium reflectors. The reactor is located at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. It is the oldest research reactor in the southern hemisphere and one of the oldest of this kind in the world. The first criticality of the reactor was obtained on September 16, 1957. Given the fact that Brazil does not have yet a definitive radioactive waste repository and a national policy establishing rules for the spent fuel storage, the institutions which operate the research reactors for more than 50 years in the country have searched internal solutions for continued operation. This paper describes the spent fuel assemblies and radioactive waste management process for the IEA-R1 reactor and the refurbishment and modernization program adopted to extend its lifetime. Some considerations about the future decommissioning of the reactor are also discussed which, in my opinion, might help the operating organization to make decisions about financial, legal and technical aspects of the decommissioning procedures in a time frame of 10-15 years(author)

  10. Design and safety consideration in the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Shinzo; Tanaka, Toshiuki; Sudo, Yukio; Baba, Osamu; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Okubo, Minoru

    1990-01-01

    The budget for construction of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was recently committed by the Government in Japan. The HTTR is a test reactor with thermal output of 30 MW and reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 deg. C at high temperature test operation. The HTTR plant uses a pin-in-block design core and will be used as an experience leading to high temperature applications. Several major important safety considerations are adopted in the design of the HTTR. These are as follows: 1) A coated particle fuel must not be failed during a normal reactor operation and an anticipated operational occurrence; 2) Two independent and diverse reactor shut-down systems are provided in order to shut down the reactor safely and reliably in any condition; 3) Back-up reactor cooling systems which are safety ones are provided in order to remove residual heat of reactor in any condition; 4) Multiple barriers and countermeasures are provided to contain fission products such as a containment, pressure gradient between the primary and secondary cooling circuit and so on, though coated particle fuels contain fission products with high reliability; 5) The functions of materials used in the primary cooling circuit are separated to be pressure-resisting and heat-resisting in order to resolve material problems and maintain high reliability. The detailed design of the HTTR was completed with extensive accumulation of material data and component tests. (author)

  11. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  12. Research and development of a super fast reactor (12). Considerations for the reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Shoji; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2008-01-01

    A research program aimed at developing the Super Fast Reactor (Super FR) has been entrusted by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan since December 2005. It includes the following three projects. (A) Development of the Super Fast Reactor concept. (B)Thermal-hydraulic experiments. (C) Materials development. Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) has joined this program and works on part (A) together with the University of Tokyo. From the utility's viewpoint, it is important to consider the most desirable characteristics for Super FR to have. Four issues were identified in project (A), (1) Fuel design, (2) Reactor core design, (3) Safety, and (4) Plant characteristics of Super FR. This report describes the desired characteristics of Super FR with respect to item (1) fuel design and item (2) Reactor core design, as compared with a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. The other two issues will be discussed in this project, and will also be considered in the design process of Super FR. (author)

  13. Engineering and physics considerations for a linear theta-pinch hybrid reactor (LTPHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    A fusion-fission hybrid reactor based on pulsed, high-β, linear theta-pinch magnetic confinement is considered. A preliminary design which incorporates key physics, engineering and economic considerations is presented. An extensive presentation of the system energy balance is made, and this energy balance is evaluated parametrically. The feasibility of end-loss reduction is addressed

  14. 75 FR 27368 - Aerotest Operations, Inc., Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor; Notice of Consideration of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-228, NRC-2010-0178] Aerotest Operations, Inc., Aerotest Radiography and Research Reactor; Notice of Consideration of Approval of Transfer and Conforming... approving the indirect transfer of Facility Operating License No. R-98 for the Aerotest Radiography and...

  15. Overview of Generation IV (Gen IV) Reactor Designs - Safety and Radiological Protection Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudrand, Olivier; Blanc, Daniel; Ivanov, Evgeny; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Kissane, Martin; Meignen, Renaud; Monhardt, Daniel; Nicaise, Gregory; Bourgois, Thierry; Bruna, Giovanni; Hache, Georges; Repussard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an updated overview of specific safety and radiological protection issues for all the reactor concepts adopted by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum), independent of their advantages or disadvantages in terms of resource optimization or long-lived-waste reduction. In particular, this new document attempts to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each concept in terms of safety, taking into account the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) statement concerning safety objectives for new nuclear power plants. Using an identical framework for each reactor concept (sodium-cooled fast reactors or SFR, high / very-high temperature helium-cooled reactors of V/HTR, gas-cooled fast reactors or GFR, lead-or lead / bismuth-cooled fast reactors or LFR, molten salt reactors or MSR, and supercritical-water-cooled reactors or SCWR), this summary report provides some general conclusions regarding their safety and radiological protection issues, inspired by WENRA's safety objectives and on the basis of available information. Initial lessons drawn from the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 have also been taken into account in IRSN's analysis of each reactor concept

  16. Cellular gauge symmetry and the Li organization principle: General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Peters, James F; Navarro, Jorge; Kun, Wu; Lin, Bi; Marijuán, Pedro C

    2017-12-01

    Based on novel topological considerations, we postulate a gauge symmetry for living cells and proceed to interpret it from a consistent Eastern perspective: the li organization principle. In our framework, the reference system is the living cell, equipped with general symmetries and energetic constraints standing for the intertwined biochemical, metabolic and signaling pathways that allow the global homeostasis of the system. Environmental stimuli stand for forces able to locally break the symmetry of metabolic/signaling pathways, while the species-specific DNA is the gauge field that restores the global homeostasis after external perturbations. We apply the Borsuk-Ulam Theorem (BUT) to operationalize a methodology in terms of topology/gauge fields and subsequently inquire about the evolution from inorganic to organic structures and to the prokaryotic and eukaryotic modes of organization. We converge on the strategic role that second messengers have played regarding the emergence of a unitary gauge field with profound evolutionary implications. A new avenue for a deeper investigation of biological complexity looms. Philosophically, we might be reminded of the duality between two essential concepts proposed by the great Chinese synthesizer Zhu Xi (in the XIII Century). On the one side the li organization principle, equivalent to the dynamic interplay between symmetry and information; and on the other side the qi principle, equivalent to the energy participating in the process-both always interlinked with each other. In contemporary terms, it would mean the required interconnection between information and energy, and the necessity to revise essential principles of information philosophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-05-01

    The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported [via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)] to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  18. Reactor Start-up and Control Methodologies: Consideration of the Space Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Holloway, James Paul

    2004-01-01

    The use of fission energy in space power and propulsion systems offers considerable advantages over chemical propulsion. Fission provides over six orders of magnitude higher energy density, which translates to higher vehicle specific impulse and lower specific mass. These characteristics enable the accomplishment of ambitious space exploration missions. The natural radiation environment in space provides an external source of protons and high energy, high Z particles that can result in the production of secondary neutrons through interactions in reactor structures. Initial investigation using MCNPX 2.5.b for proton transport through the SAFE-400 reactor indicates a secondary neutron net current of 1.4x107 n/s at the core-reflector interface, with an incoming current of 3.4x106 n/s due to neutrons produced in the Be reflector alone. This neutron population could provide a reliable startup source for a space reactor. Additionally, this source must be considered in developing a reliable control strategy during reactor startup, steady-state operation, and power transients. An autonomous control system is developed and analyzed for application during reactor startup, accounting for fluctuations in the radiation environment that result from changes in vehicle location (altitude, latitude, position in solar system) or due to temporal variations in the radiation field, as may occur in the case of solar flares. One proposed application of a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle is in a tour of the Jovian system, where the time required for communication to Earth is significant. Hence, it is important that a reactor control system be designed with feedback mechanisms to automatically adjust to changes in reactor temperatures, power levels, etc., maintaining nominal operation without user intervention. This paper will evaluate the potential use of secondary neutrons produced by proton interactions in the reactor vessel as a startup source for a space reactor and will present a

  19. 40 CFR 230.91 - Purpose and general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... done after taking into consideration cost, existing technology, and logistics in light of overall... national or regional level. No modifications to the basic application, meaning, or intent of this subpart...

  20. 33 CFR 332.1 - Purpose and general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... available and capable of being done after taking into consideration cost, existing technology, and logistics... and the Corps at the national or regional level. No modifications to the basic application, meaning...

  1. Design and safety considerations for the 10 MW(t) multipurpose TRIGA reactor in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razvi, J.; Bolin, J.M.; Saurwein, J.J.; Whittemore, W.L.; Proongmuang, S.

    1999-01-01

    General Atomics (GA) is constructing the Ongkharak Nuclear Research Center (ONRC) near Bangkok, Thailand for the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace. The ONRC complex includes the following: A multipurpose 10 MW(t) research reactor; An Isotope Production Facility; Centralized Radioactive Waste Processing and Storage Facilities. The Center is being built 60-km northeast of Bangkok, with a 10 MW(t) TRIGA type research reactor as the centerpiece. Facilities are included for neutron transmutation doping of silicon, neutron capture therapy neutron beam research and for production of a variety of radioisotopes. The facility will also be utilized for applied research and technology development as well as training in reactor operations, conduct of experiments and in reactor physics. The multipurpose, pool-type reactor will be fueled with high-density (45 wt%), low-enriched (19.7 wt%) uranium-erbium-zirconium-hydride (UErZrH) fuel rods, cooled and moderated by light water, and reflected by beryllium and heavy water. The general arrangement of the reactor and auxiliary pool structure allows irradiated targets to be transferred entirely under water from their irradiation locations to the hot cell, then pneumatically transferred to the adjacent Isotope Production Facility for processing. The core configuration includes 4 x 4 array standard TRIGA fuel clusters, modified clusters to serve as fast-neutron irradiation facilities, control rods and an in-core Ir-192 production facility. The active core is reflected on two sides by beryllium and on the other two sides by D 2 O. Additional irradiation facilities are also located in the beryllium reflector blocks and the D 2 O reflector blanket. The fuel provides the fundamental safety feature of the ONRC reactor, and as a result of all the well established accident-mitigating characteristics of the UErZrH fuel itself (large prompt negative temperature coefficient of reactivity, fission product retention and chemical stability), a

  2. Considerations on monitoring needs of advanced, passive safety light water reactors for severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bava, G.; Zambardi, F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with problems concerning information and related instrumentation needs for Accident Management (AM), with special emphasis on Severe Accidents (SA) in the new advanced, passive safety Light Water Reactors (PLWR), presently in a development stage. The passive safety conception adopted in the plants concerned goes parallel with a deeper consideration of SA, that reflects the need of increasing the plant resistance against conditions going beyond traditional ''design basis accidents''. Further, the role of Accident Management (AM) is still emphasized as last step of the defence in depth concept, in spite of the design efforts aimed to reduce human factor importance; as a consequence, the availability of pertinent information on actual plant conditions remains a necessary premise for performing preplanned actions. This information is essential to assess the evolution of the accident scenarios, to monitor the performances of the safety systems, to evaluate the ultimate challenge to the plant safety, and to implement the emergency operating procedures and the emergency plans. Based on these general purposes, the impact of the new conception on the monitoring structure is discussed, furthermore reference is made to the accident monitoring criteria applied in current plants to evaluate the requirements for possible solutions. (orig.)

  3. Reliability and testing considerations in the design of nuclear reactor filtration systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Nan, A.; Williams, R.P.; Goldsmith, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The high performance standards set by USAEC-DRL Regulatory Guides for nuclear reactor filtration systems pose difficult problems for on-site leakage tests. These problems are compounded by the crowded conditions inside reactor structures, and by the fact that, until recently, little consideration has been given by system designers to the needs of testing. Techniques for coping with testing problems on existing systems, and suggestions for improving the testability of future systems, are given. Test crew safety considations are discussed, and a pair of easily portable contaminant generators is described. (U.S.)

  4. Considerations concerning the reliability of reactor safety equipment; Considerations sur la fiabilite des ensembles de securite de reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furet, J; Guyot, Ch [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    A review is made of the circumstances which favor a good collection of maintenance data at the C.E.A. The large amount of data to be treated has made necessary the use of a computer for analyzing automatically the results collected. Here, only particular aspects of the reliability from the point of view of the electronics used for nuclear reactor control will be dealt with: sale and unsafe failures; probability of survival (in the case of reactor safety); availability. The general diagrams of the safety assemblies which have been drawn up for two types of reactor (power reactor and low power experimental reactor) are given. Results are presented of reliability analysis which could be applied to the use of functional modular elements, developed industrially in France. Improvement of this reliability appears to be fairly limited by an increase in the redundancy; on the other hand it is shown how it may be very markedly improved by the use of automatic tests with different frequencies for detecting unsafe failures rates of measurements for the sub-assemblies and for the logic sub-assemblies. Finally examples are given to show the incidence of the complexity and of the use of different technologies in reactor safety equipment on the reliability. (authors) [French] On rappelle les circonstances qui favorisent au C.E.A. la collecte d'une information valable des resultats de la maintenance. L'importance des donnees a traiter a rendu necessaire l'utilisation d'une calculatrice poux l'analyse automatique des resultats recueillis. On se limitera ici aux aspects particuliers de la fiabilite du point de vue de l'electronique pour le controle et la commande de reacteurs nucleaires: pannes sures et pannes non sures; probabilite de survie dans le cas de la securite des reacteurs; facteur de disponibilite. Les schemas de principe des ensembles de securite definis pour deux types de reacteurs (reacteur de puissance et reacteur experimental de faible puissance) sont indiques. On

  5. General safety orientations of the Jules Horowitz Reactor Project (JHRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tremodeux, P.; Fiorini, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    After a brief reminder of the JHR purpose, the document outlines the General Safety related Orientations/Recommendations used for the design and the safety assessment of the facility. As far as the JHR design is new, the safety philosophy adopted for this reactor will be as consistent as possible with that recommended for future (power...) reactors. The general recommendations developed in the paper are: the general nuclear safety approach for the design, operation and analysis with, in particular, the adoption of the Defence In Depth principle; the general safety objectives in terms of radiological consequences; the use of Probabilistic Safety Studies; quality assurance. The 'Defence in Depth' concept using amongst others the 'Barrier' principle remains the basis of the JHR safety. 'Defence In Depth' is applied both to design and operation. Its adequacy is checked during the safety assessment and the paper gives the technical recommendations that should allow the designer to implement this concept into the final design. Built mainly for experimental irradiation the JHR facilities will be handled according to conventional or new operation rules which could put materials under stress and entail handling errors. Specific recommendations are defined to take into account the corresponding peculiarities; they are discussed in the paper. The safety design of the JHR takes into account the experience accumulated through the CEA experimental irradiation programmes, which represents several dozen reactor years; the consultation of CEA reactor facilities operators is ongoing. The corresponding feedback is shortly described. Recommendations related to maintenance and associated operation are indicated as well as those regarding the human factor. Details are given on the JHR safety practical implementation through the CEA/DRN Safety approach. Details of the corresponding Safety Objectives are also discussed. Finally the designer position on the role of probabilistic safety

  6. Material Control and Accounting Design Considerations for High-Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjornard, Trond; Hockert, John

    2011-01-01

    The subject of this report is domestic safeguards and security by design (2SBD) for high-temperature gas reactors, focusing on material control and accountability (MC and A). The motivation for the report is to provide 2SBD support to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which was launched by Congress in 2005. This introductory section will provide some background on the NGNP project and an overview of the 2SBD concept. The remaining chapters focus specifically on design aspects of the candidate high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs) relevant to MC and A, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements, and proposed MC and A approaches for the two major HTGR reactor types: pebble bed and prismatic. Of the prismatic type, two candidates are under consideration: (1) GA's GT-MHR (Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor), and (2) the Modular High-Temperature Reactor (M-HTR), a derivative of Areva's Antares reactor. The future of the pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) for NGNP is uncertain, as the PBMR consortium partners (Westinghouse, PBMR (Pty) and The Shaw Group) were unable to agree on the path forward for NGNP during 2010. However, during the technology assessment of the conceptual design phase (Phase 1) of the NGNP project, AREVA provided design information and technology assessment of their pebble bed fueled plant design called the HTR-Module concept. AREVA does not intend to pursue this design for NGNP, preferring instead a modular reactor based on the prismatic Antares concept. Since MC and A relevant design information is available for both pebble concepts, the pebble-bed HTGRs considered in this report are: (1) Westinghouse PBMR; and (2) AREVA HTR-Module. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) sponsors the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program (FCR and D), which contains an element specifically focused on the domestic (or state) aspects of SBD. This Material Protection, Control and Accountancy Technology (MPACT) program supports the present

  7. Simulation modelling in agriculture: General considerations. | R.I. ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computer simulation model is a detailed working hypothesis about a given system. The computer does all the necessary arithmetic when the hypothesis is invoked to predict the future behaviour of the simulated system under given conditions.A general pragmatic approach to model building is discussed; techniques are ...

  8. General consideration of domestic participation in nuclear power projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1975-01-01

    No nuclear power plant can be supplied entirely by outside sources. Some degree of domestic participation is always required and this can be increased if desired. There is no general rule as to what can and should be supplied locally; different countries have different characteristics, conditions and possibilities, and these define the scope of what is to be done. (orig./FW) [de

  9. General aspects to be considered in a research reactor decommissioning plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossi, Pablo Andrade; Tello, Cledola Cassia Oliveira de

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 200 research reactors that have either not operated for a considerable period of time and may never return to operation or, are close to permanent shutdown. Many countries do not have a decommissioning policy, and like Brazil not all installations have their decommissioning plan as part of the licensing documentation. Brazil is signatory of Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, but until now there is no decommissioning policy, and specifically for research reactor there is no decommissioning guidelines in the standards. The Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN-MG) has a TRIGA Mark I Research Reactor IPR-R1 in operation for 47 years with 3.6% average fuel burn-up. The original power was 100 kW and it is being licensed for 250 kW, and it needs the decommissioning plan as part of the licensing requirements. In the paper it is presented general aspects and contents of a Research Reactors Decommissioning Plan. As the Brazilian regulatory body so far does not have a decommissioning policy established neither a regulatory framework in this issue, individual efforts are being integrated to establish a National Decommissioning Group (matrix structure) to perform the decommissioning planning and activities. The approach used for IPR-R1 is presented as suggestions to develop the national regulatory standards on this issue and applied to Brazilian Research Reactors and other nuclear facilities. (author)

  10. Radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks. I. General considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, J.L.; Chatterjee, A.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation chemistry of heavy-particle tracks in dilute aqueous solution is considered in a unified manner. Emphasis is on the physical and chemical phenomena which are involved rather than on the construction of models to be used in actual calculations although the latter problem is discussed. A differential segment of a heavy-particle track is composed of two parts which we call core and penumbra; elementary considerations show that all properties of such a differential track can be uniquely specified in terms of a two-parameter system, and we choose energy per nucleon (E) and atomic numbers (Z) as independent parameters. The nature of heavy-particle-track processes varies with the magnitude of the energy deposit (LET), and we discuss three categories of track problems, for low-, intermediate-, and high-LET cases, respectively. Scavenger reactions normally terminate radical recombination in a track, and for heavy-particle tracks we find a criterion involving the scavenger concentration for a convenient separation of core and penumbra into essentially noninteracting parts which can be treated independently. Problems of the core expansion in the three regions are considered, and it is found that a versatile model can be constructed on concepts previously introduced by Ganguly and Magee. A model for the penumbra, based on the authors' electron-track theory, is presented and discussed

  11. New to nuclear countries: considerations for adoption of Small Modular Reactors - a guide to future adopters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, A.; Ho, M.; Storr, G., E-mail: adi.paterson@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    2014-07-01

    Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) are under development in a number of countries. This class of reactors, with enhanced safety and security inherent to their design, can potentially offer advantages to countries adopting nuclear power for the first time. This includes countries considering expanding existing nuclear power capability using the benefits of Generation III+ and Generation IV technological advances. For example, public perceptions and engagement in relation to nuclear safety and security are important and need to be addressed. The regulation of nuclear power plants and the management of the nuclear fuel cycle are also important considerations. For some countries, an industrial strategy linked to participation in the nuclear fuel cycle could be a priority, associated with the development of a sophisticated workforce to support the design, construction, commissioning and operation of a fleet of reactors. Some countries will choose to be early adopters of SMRs. Others may prefer to wait until the technologies are more established. This paper will focus on the potential appeal of different SMR designs in relation to the considerations that new to nuclear countries must address and how this underpins effective decision making. (author)

  12. In-plant considerations for optimal offsite response to reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.P.; Heising, C.D.; Aldrich, D.C.

    1982-11-01

    Offsite response decision-making methods based on in-plant conditions are developed for use during severe reactor-accident situations. Dose projections are used to eliminate all LWR plant systems except the reactor core and the spent-fuel storage pool from consideration for immediate offsite emergency response during accident situations. A simple plant information-management scheme is developed for use in offsite response decision-making. Detailed consequence calculations performed with the CRAC2 model are used to determine the appropriate timing of offsite-response implementation for a range of PWR accidents involving the reactor core. In-plant decision criteria for offsite-response implementation are defined. The definition of decision criteria is based on consideration of core-accident physical processes, in-plant accident monitoring information, and results of consequence calculations performed to determine the effectiveness of various public-protective measures. The benefits and negative aspects of the proposed response-implementation criteria are detailed

  13. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON THE DISSOLUTION AND LIQUIDATION OF ROMANIAN COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cristina Baciu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available All stakeholders are interested in whether a firm has a good and stable financial situation, even though they all have different stakes in it. However, not all companies can succeed and operate profitably. The purpose of the study is to examine the peculiarities of dissolution and liquidation in Romania and the characteristics of liquidation of companies, according to their legal form. From examining the general causes of dissolution to specifics of different type of companies, all elements have a great importance in understanding how to avoid this procedure.

  14. Nuclear heat source component design considerations for HTGR process heat reactor plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Kapich, D.; King, J.H.; Venkatesh, M.C.

    1982-01-01

    Using alternate energy sources abundant in the U.S.A. to help curb foreign oil imports is vitally important from both national security and economic standpoints. Perhaps the most forwardlooking opportunity to realize national energy goals involves the integrated use of two energy sources that have an established technology base in the U.S.A., namely nuclear energy and coal. The coupling of a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) and a chemical process facility has the potential for long-term synthetic fuel production (i.e., oil, gasoline, aviation fuel, hydrogen, etc.) using coal as the carbon source. Studies are in progress to exploit the high-temperature capability of an advanced HTGR variant for nuclear process heat. The process heat plant discussed in this paper has a 1170-MW(t) reactor as the heat source and the concept is based on indirect reforming, i.e., the high-temperature nuclear thermal energy is transported (via an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX)) to the externally located process plant by a secondary helium transport loop. Emphasis is placed on design considerations for the major nuclear heat source (NHS) components, and discussions are presented for the reactor core, prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), rotating machinery, and heat exchangers

  15. Thermal hydraulic considerations in liquid-metal-cooled components of tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picologlou, B.F.; Reed, C.B.; Hua, T.Q.

    1989-01-01

    The basic considerations of MHD thermal hydraulics for liquid-metal-cooled blankets and first walls of tokamak fusion reactors are discussed. The liquid-metal MHD program of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) dedicated to analytical and experimental investigations of reactor relevant MHD flows and development of relevant thermal hydraulic design tools is presented. The status of the experimental program and examples of local velocity measurements are given. An account of the MHD codes developed to date at ANL is also presented as is an example of a 3-D thermal hydraulic analysis carried out with such codes. Finally, near term plans for experimental investigations and code development are outlined. 20 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  16. General Considerations of the Electrostatic Boundary Conditions in Oxide Heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Takuya

    2011-08-19

    -VI' for semiconductors. As we will review, interfaces between different families creates a host of electrostatic issues. They can be somewhat avoided if, as in many semiconductor heterostructures, only one family is used, with small perturbations (such as n-type or p-type doping) around them. However, for most transition metal oxides, this is greatly restrictive. For example, LaMnO{sub 3} and SrMnO{sub 3} are both insulators in part due to strong electron correlations, and only in their solid solution does 'colossal magnetoresistance' emerge in bulk. Similarly, the metallic superlattice shown in Fig. 1(c) can be considered a nanoscale deconstruction of (La,Sr)TiO{sub 3} to the insulating parent compounds. Therefore the aspiration to arbitrarily mix and match perovskite components requires a basic understanding of, and ultimately control over, these issues. In this context, here we present basic electrostatic features that arise in oxide heterostructures which vary the ionic charge stacking sequence. In close relation to the analysis of the stability of polar surfaces and semiconductor heterointerfaces, the variation of the dipole moment across a heterointerface plays a key role in determining its stability. Different self-consistent assignments of the unit cell are presented, allowing the polar discontinuity picture to be recast in terms of an equivalent local charge neutrality picture. The latter is helpful in providing a common framework with which to discuss electronic reconstructions, local-bonding considerations, crystalline defects, and lattice polarization on an equal footing, all of which are the subject of extensive current investigation.

  17. Generalized causal mediation and path analysis: Extensions and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Jeffrey M; Cho, Jang Ik; Liu, Yiying; Nelson, Suchitra

    2018-01-01

    Causal mediation analysis seeks to decompose the effect of a treatment or exposure among multiple possible paths and provide casually interpretable path-specific effect estimates. Recent advances have extended causal mediation analysis to situations with a sequence of mediators or multiple contemporaneous mediators. However, available methods still have limitations, and computational and other challenges remain. The present paper provides an extended causal mediation and path analysis methodology. The new method, implemented in the new R package, gmediation (described in a companion paper), accommodates both a sequence (two stages) of mediators and multiple mediators at each stage, and allows for multiple types of outcomes following generalized linear models. The methodology can also handle unsaturated models and clustered data. Addressing other practical issues, we provide new guidelines for the choice of a decomposition, and for the choice of a reference group multiplier for the reduction of Monte Carlo error in mediation formula computations. The new method is applied to data from a cohort study to illuminate the contribution of alternative biological and behavioral paths in the effect of socioeconomic status on dental caries in adolescence.

  18. Optimization of reactor power by taking into consideration temperature increase in a reactor pumped 3He-Xe laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetin, Fuesun

    2009-01-01

    In nuclear pumped lasers, gas parameters are optimized in a manner such that output power is increased for constructing a high power laser. Since output power increases with the increase of energy deposited in the gas, high output power requires high pumping power. However, the high energy loading results in elevated gas temperature. Temperature increase of this magnitude can detrimentally influence the laser gain and efficiency, since it negatively impacts several important laser kinetic.processes. This fact may cause laser output to abruptly terminate before the peak of the pump pulse [1-3]. A nuclear pumped laser using a volumetric energy source through the 3 He(n, p) 3 H reaction has here been considered. It is assumed that TRIGA Mark II Reactor at Istanbul Technical University is used for nuclear pumping as the neutron source. In the previous papers, the optimal parameters for improving both output power and optical homogeneity were determined [4-5]. Spatial and temporal variations of gas temperature during pumping pulse for maximum peak power (1200 MW) were determined for various operating pressures in Ref. [6]. It was seen that gas temperature reaches up to 1000 0 K near the peak of the pumping pulse for the initial pressures of 1-4 atm. This means that laser output may terminate before the peak of the pump pulse due to overheating of laser gas. Under these conditions, a question arises about a further optimisation taking into consideration gas temperature. This question has been examined in this study. Experimental results (Batyrbekov et al, 1989) showed that temperature rise up to 650 C had no influence on Xe laser characteristics [ 7]. Therefore, It has here been assumed that the lasing will terminate when gas temperature reaches 1000 0 K for a Xe-laser with 3 He buffer gas. Under these conditions optimum reactor power is investigated by taking into consideration lasing duration also. (orig.)

  19. Remote handling requirements and considerations for D-T fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the maintenance considerations for next-generation fusion reactors. It draws upon the work done at the Fusion Engineering Design Center over the past several years in the conceptual development of tokamaks and tandem mirrors. It specifically addresses the maintenance philosophy adopted for these devices, the configuration development using a modular design approach, scheduled and unscheduled maintenance operations, assembly and disassembly scenarios for component replacements, maintenance equipment requirements, and the operating availability of these devices. In addition, recent work on the development of a totally remote tokamak configuration is presented

  20. Remote handling requirements and considerations for D-T fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1984-01-01

    This paper an overview of the maintenance considerations of next-generation fusion reactors. It draws upon the work done at the Fusion Engineering Design Center over the past several years in the conceptual development of tokamaks and tandem mirrors. It specifically addresses the maintenance philosophy adopted for these devices, the configuration development using a modular design approach, scheduled and unscheduled maintenance operations, assembly and disassembly scenarios for component replacements, maintenance equipment requirements, and the operating availability of these devices. In addition, recent work on the development of a totally remote tokamak configuration is presented

  1. Remote servicing considerations for near term tokamak power reactors (TNS). Final summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1977-01-01

    Next generation Tokamaks require special consideration for remote servicing. Three major problems are highlighted: (1) movement of heavy components, (2) remote connection/disconnection of joints, and (3) remote cutting, welding, and leak detection. The first problem is assumed to be handled with existing expertise and is not considered. The remaining problems are thought to be minimized by considering two engineering departures from conventional tokamak design; locating the field shaping coils outside of the toroidal coils and enclosing the total device within an evacuated reactor cell. Five topics under this vacuum building concept are discussed: incremental cost, vacuum pumping, tritium containment, activation topology, and first year operations

  2. Design considerations for post accident monitoring system of a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Gwi Sook; Park, Je Yun; Kim, Young Ki

    2012-01-01

    The Post Accident Monitoring System (PAMS) provides primary information for operators to assess the plant conditions and perform their role in bringing the plant to a safe condition during an accident. The PAMS of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) in KOREA provides the continuous display of the PAM category 1 parameters specified in R.G 1.97, Rev. 03. Recently the PAMS of NPP has been designed according to R.G 1.97, Rev. 04. There is no PAMS at the HANARO in KOREA, but recently RRs (Research Reactors) around the world are going to have PAMS for various multi purposes. We should determine the design considerations for PAMS in a Korean RR based on the design state analysis. Thus, this paper proposes strategies on the design considerations for the PAMS of a Korean RR

  3. Design considerations and experimental observations for the TAMU air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system for the VHTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, S. A., E-mail: shamsulamri@tamu.edu; Dominguez-Ontiveros, E. E., E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu; Alhashimi, T., E-mail: jbudd123@tamu.edu; Budd, J. L., E-mail: dubaiboy@tamu.edu; Matos, M. D., E-mail: mailgoeshere@gmail.com; Hassan, Y. A., E-mail: yhasssan@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX, 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) is a promising passive decay heat removal system for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) to ensure reliability of the transfer of the core residual and decay heat to the environment under all off-normal circumstances. A small scale experimental test facility was constructed at Texas A and M University (TAMU) to study pertinent multifaceted thermal hydraulic phenomena in the air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) design based on the General Atomics (GA) concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR). The TAMU Air-Cooled Experimental Test Facility is ⅛ scale from the proposed GA-MHTGR design. Groundwork for experimental investigations focusing into the complex turbulence mixing flow behavior inside the upper plenum is currently underway. The following paper illustrates some of the chief design considerations used in construction of the experimental test facility, complete with an outline of the planned instrumentation and data acquisition methods. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were carried out to furnish some insights on the overall behavior of the air flow in the system. CFD simulations assisted the placement of the flow measurement sensors location. Preliminary experimental observations of experiments at 120oC inlet temperature suggested the presence of flow reversal for cases involving single active riser at both 5 m/s and 2.25 m/s, respectively and four active risers at 2.25 m/s. Flow reversal may lead to thermal stratification inside the upper plenum by means of steady state temperature measurements. A Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) experiment was carried out to furnish some insight on flow patterns and directions.

  4. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumpf, W.E.; Vermaak, A.P.; Ball, G.

    2000-01-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  5. Key considerations in the conversion to LEU of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor: SAFARI-1 of South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumpf, W E; Vermaak, A P; Ball, G [NECSA, PO Box 582, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2000-10-01

    Apart from the technological demands and considerations associated with the conversion of a Mo-99 commercially producing reactor to LEU, a number of commercial challenges also need to be addressed. This is particularly the case when the reactor is primarily used as a source for the production, on an uninterrupted basis, of significant quantities of Mo-99 to satisfy long term commitments to a range of global customers. This paper highlights key business considerations which are applicable in the conversion process of firstly, reactor fuel to LEU and secondly target plates for Mo-99, also to LEU, using the SAFARI-1 reactor in South Africa as a typical example of such a commercially utilized reactor. (author)

  6. Design optimization of general arrangement in Korean next generation reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Jung, D. W.; Choi, Y. B.; Cho, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    In order to optimize the general arrangement(GA) of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR), field opinions in domestic nuclear power plants have been collected, and the bench marking on UCN No.1,2 which were estimated to be the most excellent in view of operability and maintenance has been accomplished. Through this work, design optimization items for GA were reviewed. Major items to be selected for optimization are summarized as follows; 'Expanding the compound building function and the mezzanine floor concept in the auxiliary building', 'Including the diesel generator building to the auxiliary building', 'Change of the equipment removal method in the auxiliary building'. With these GA design optimization, the auxiliary building boundary will be improved as a complete rectangular type. The power block volume except the changing effect to the single containment structure will be reduced to about 10% in comparison with that of in KNGR phase II

  7. Basic considerations for the safety analysis report of the Greek Research Reactor-1 (GRR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1980-09-01

    The basic considerations upon which the new revised Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the GRR-1 will be based are presented. The format and the content the SAR will follow are given. A number of credible and less credible accidents is briefly analysed on the basis of present knowledge and experience for similar reactors, as well as the experience gained in the last 10 years of the GRR-1 operation at 5 MW. The accident caused by partial blockage of the cooling flow is considered to be the Maximum Credible Accident (MCA) for the GRR-1. The MCA is analysed and its radiological impact to the environment is estimated using conservative assumptions. (T.A.)

  8. Design considerations for micro nuclear reactors to supply power to off-grid mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gihm, B.; Cooper, G.; Morettin, D.; De Koning, P., E-mail: bgihm@hatch.ca [Hatch Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Carreau, M. [Hatch Ltd., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sarvinis, J. [Hatch Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Nuclear technology vendors have been proposing to develop small scale nuclear reactors to supply power and heat to remote industrial operations such as a mining site. Based on extensive experience in integrating different power generation technologies with captive mining power systems, Hatch examined the technical requirements of small scale nuclear reactor application in remote mine power generation. Mining power systems have unique characteristics and challenges that set them apart from utility grid connected power systems. Key examples of such unique characteristics are: A small number of large motor loads such as hoists, pumps, shovels, pumps and crushers represent a large fraction of the peak load. These equipment may cause significant load fluctuations and put the power systems under high stress; There is no organic demand growth (i.e., the load growth occurs as a step increase); and, The extreme environmental conditions and remoteness of the sites introduce a set of operational challenges and require specialized planning. This paper presents real remote mine operation data to demonstrate the load profile of remote mining sites. The operation characteristics and performance requirements of diesel reciprocating engines are discussed, which have to be matched or exceeded by a small scale nuclear power plant if it is to be a viable technical alternative to diesel power. The power quality control options from wind power integration in isolated grids are discussed as a parallel can be drawn between wind and nuclear power application in remote mine power systems. Finally the authors provided a list of technical constraints and design considerations for very small modular reactor development. (author)

  9. Design considerations for micro nuclear reactors to supply power to off-grid mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gihm, B.; Cooper, G.; Morettin, D.; De Koning, P.; Carreau, M.; Sarvinis, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear technology vendors have been proposing to develop small scale nuclear reactors to supply power and heat to remote industrial operations such as a mining site. Based on extensive experience in integrating different power generation technologies with captive mining power systems, Hatch examined the technical requirements of small scale nuclear reactor application in remote mine power generation. Mining power systems have unique characteristics and challenges that set them apart from utility grid connected power systems. Key examples of such unique characteristics are: A small number of large motor loads such as hoists, pumps, shovels, pumps and crushers represent a large fraction of the peak load. These equipment may cause significant load fluctuations and put the power systems under high stress; There is no organic demand growth (i.e., the load growth occurs as a step increase); and, The extreme environmental conditions and remoteness of the sites introduce a set of operational challenges and require specialized planning. This paper presents real remote mine operation data to demonstrate the load profile of remote mining sites. The operation characteristics and performance requirements of diesel reciprocating engines are discussed, which have to be matched or exceeded by a small scale nuclear power plant if it is to be a viable technical alternative to diesel power. The power quality control options from wind power integration in isolated grids are discussed as a parallel can be drawn between wind and nuclear power application in remote mine power systems. Finally the authors provided a list of technical constraints and design considerations for very small modular reactor development. (author)

  10. Sodium effects on mechanical performance and consideration in high temperature structural design for advanced reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, K.; Li, Meimei; Chopra, O. K.; Majumdar, S.

    2009-07-01

    Sodium environmental effects are key limiting factors in the high temperature structural design of advanced sodium-cooled reactors. A guideline is needed to incorporate environmental effects in the ASME design rules to improve the performance reliability over long operating times. This paper summarizes the influence of sodium exposure on mechanical performance of selected austenitic stainless and ferritic/martensitic steels. Focus is on Type 316SS and mod.9Cr-1Mo. The sodium effects were evaluated by comparing the mechanical properties data in air and sodium. Carburization and decarburization were found to be the key factors that determine the tensile and creep properties of the steels. A beneficial effect of sodium exposure on fatigue life was observed under fully reversed cyclic loading in both austenitic stainless steels and ferritic/martensitic steels. However, when hold time was applied during cyclic loading, the fatigue life was significantly reduced. Based on the mechanical performance of the steels in sodium, consideration of sodium effects in high temperature structural design of advanced fast reactors is discussed.

  11. Review of fast reactor operating experience gained in 1998 in Russia. General trends of future fast reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavski, V.M.; Ashurko, Y.M.; Zverev, K.V.; Sarayev, O.M.; Oshkanov, N.N.; Korol'kov, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    Review of the general state of nuclear power in Russia as for 1998 is given in brief in the paper. Results of operation of BR-10, BOR-60 and BN-600 fast reactors are presented as well as of scientific and technological escort of the BN-350 reactor. The paper outlines the current status and prospects of South-Urals and Beloyarskaya power unit projects with the BN-800 reactors. The main planned development trends on fast reactors are described concerning both new projects and R and D works. (author)

  12. Education for university students, high school teachers and the general public using the Kinki University Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, T.

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Energy Research Institute of Kinki University is equipped with a nuclear reactor which is called UTR-KINKI. UTR is the abbreviation for University Teaching and Research Reactor. The reactor is the first one installed in Japanese universities. Though the reactor is owned and operated by Kinki University, its use is widely open to scientists and students from other universities and research institutions. The reactor is made the best of teaching instrument for the training of high school teachers. In addition, the reactor is utilized for general public education concerning atomic energy. (author)

  13. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MH Lane

    2006-01-01

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations

  14. Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Experiences and Considerations With Irradiation Test Performance in an International Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MH Lane

    2006-02-15

    This letter forwards a compilation of knowledge gained regarding international interactions and issues associated with Project Prometheus. The following topics are discussed herein: (1) Assessment of international fast reactor capability and availability; (2) Japanese fast reactor (JOYO) contracting strategy; (3) NRPCT/Program Office international contract follow; (4) Completion of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) contract for manufacture of reactor test components; (5) US/Japanese Departmental interactions and required Treaties and Agreements; and (6) Non-technical details--interactions and considerations.

  15. General areas needing chemical competence to support reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proksch, E.; Bildstein, H.

    1963-01-01

    Chemical competence is needed not only for the development of new types of reactors but also for the start-up and safe operation of reactors. The activities of chemistry and chemical engineering cover a number of fields, namely chemical analysis, radiochemical analysis, corrosion research, radiolysis of water and water purification. The author reviews fields in reactor operation and maintenance in which chemical competence is needed. (author). 9 refs

  16. Overview of Generation IV (Gen IV) Reactor Designs - Safety and Radiological Protection Considerations. Published on September 24, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Bruna, Giovanni; Baudrand, Olivier; Blanc, Daniel; Ivanov, Evgeny; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Kissane, Martin; Meignen, Renaud; Monhardt, Daniel; Nicaise, Gregory; Bourgois, Thierry; Hache, Georges

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an updated overview of specific safety and radiological protection issues for all the reactor concepts adopted by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum), independent of their advantages or disadvantages in terms of resource optimization or long-lived-waste reduction. In particular, this new document attempts to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each concept in terms of safety, taking into account the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) statement concerning safety objectives for new nuclear power plants. Using an identical framework for each reactor concept (sodium-cooled fast reactors or SFR, high / very-high temperature helium-cooled reactors of V/HTR, gas-cooled fast reactors or GFR, lead-or lead / bismuth-cooled fast reactors or LFR, molten salt reactors or MSR, and supercritical-water-cooled reactors or SCWR), this summary report provides some general conclusions regarding their safety and radiological protection issues, inspired by WENRA's safety objectives and on the basis of available information. Initial lessons drawn from the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 have also been taken into account in IRSN's analysis of each reactor concept

  17. Tritium handling and vacuum considerations for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Clemmer, R.G.; Maroni, V.A.; Dillow, C.

    1979-01-01

    Tritium processing and vacuum pumping requirements were analyzed for the STARFIRE commercial fusion reactor design. It was found that vacuum pumps having a helium capture probability of 0.5 (total helium pump speed 1.2 x 10 4 m 3 /s) in combination with the proposed STARFIRE limiter-vacuum concept is sufficient to achieve plasma impurity control and, simultaneously, high fractional burnup (11%). The high fractional burnup and minimum fuel recycle time result in a very low fuel cycle tritium inventory, approx. 1300 g. A Lean-T burn method that can further reduce the fuel cycle inventory by 30 to 50% is discussed. D 2 O is proposed as a first wall coolant from considerations of plasma contamination (due to hydrogen isotope permeation through coolant tubes) and enrichment of recycled tritium from the coolant circuit. Tritium recovery from solid breeders, under realistic structural and breeder materials constraints, appears to represent a formidable task. The tritium inventory in the solid breeder is estimated to be as high as 10 kg, which would make the blanket the largest single hold-up point for tritium in the plant

  18. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalsi, S.S.; Lousteau, D.C.; Miller, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a new tokamak design project with joint participation from Europe, Japan, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and the United States. This paper describes a magnetic and mechanical design methodology for toroidal field (TF) coils that employs Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor technology. Coil winding is sized by using conductor concepts developed for the US TIBER concept. The nuclear heating generated during operation is removed from the windings by helium flowing through the conductor. The heat in the coil case is removed through a separate cooling circuit operating at approximately 20 K. Manifold concepts are presented for the complete coil cooling system. Also included are concepts for the coil structural arrangement. The effects of in-plane and out-of-plane loads are included in the design considerations for the windings and case. Concepts are presented for reacting these loads with a minimum amount of additional structural material. Concepts discussed in this paper could be considered for the ITER TF coils. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  19. Considerations on requests for euthanasia or assisted suicide; a qualitative study with Dutch general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Cate, Katja; van Tol, Donald G; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2017-11-16

    In the Netherlands, euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) is neither a right of the patient nor a duty of the physician. Beside the legal requirements, physicians can weigh their own considerations when they decide on a request for EAS. We aim at a better understanding of the considerations that play a role when physicians decide on a request for EAS. This was a qualitative study. We analysed 33 interviews held with general practitioners (GPs) from various regions in the Netherlands. The considerations found can be divided in three main types. (i) Perceived legal criteria, (ii) individual interpretations of the legal criteria and (iii) considerations unrelated to the legal criteria. Considerations of this 3rd type have not been mentioned so far in the literature and the debate on EAS. Examples are: the family should agree to EAS, the patient's attitude must reflect resignation, or conflicts must be resolved. Our study feeds the ethical discussion on the tension that can arise between a physician's own views on death and dying, and the views and preferences of his patients. When considerations like 'no unresolved conflicts' or 'enough resignation' influence the decision to grant a request for EAS this poses questions from an ethical and professional point of view. We hypothesise that these considerations reflect GPs' views on what 'good dying' entails and we advocate further research on this topic. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. 38 CFR 4.75 - General considerations for evaluating visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... for evaluating visual impairment. 4.75 Section 4.75 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... § 4.75 General considerations for evaluating visual impairment. (a) Visual impairment. The evaluation of visual impairment is based on impairment of visual acuity (excluding developmental errors of...

  1. Preliminary considerations of an intense slow positron facility based on a 78Kr loop in the high flux isotopes reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Donohue, D.L.; Peretz, F.J.; Montgomery, B.H.; Hayter, J.B.

    1990-01-01

    Suggestions have been made to the National Steering Committee for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) by Mills that provisions be made to install a high intensity slow positron facility, based on a 78 Kr loop, that would be available to the general community of scientists interested in this field. The flux of thermal neutrons calculated for the ANS is E + 15 sec -1 m -2 , which Mills has estimated will produce 5 mm beam of slow positrons having a current of about 1 E + 12 sec -1 . The intensity of such a beam will be a least 3 orders of magnitude greater than those presently available. The construction of the ANS is not anticipated to be complete until the year 2000. In order to properly plan the design of the ANS, strong considerations are being given to a proof-of-principle experiment, using the presently available High Flux Isotopes Reactor, to test the 78 Kr loop technique. The positron current from the HFIR facility is expected to be about 1 E + 10 sec -1 , which is 2 orders of magnitude greater than any other available. If the experiment succeeds, a very valuable facility will be established, and important formation will be generated on how the ANS should be designed. 3 refs., 1 fig

  2. Considerations in the design of a high power medical isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Russell M.; Nordyke, William H.; Brown, Roy

    2002-01-01

    For the low enriched aqueous homogeneous reactor to be economic in the production of medical isotopes, such as Mo-99 and Sr-89, the power level should be of the order of 100 kWth. This is double the earlier designs and this paper discusses the design changes which must be considered to meet this goal. The topics considered are: 1. Heat removal from the reactor solution; 2. Recombination of radiolytic gases; 3. Adequate radiation shielding; 4. Stability of reactor power with fluctuating reactivity; 5. Adequate cooling of the reflector; 6. Independent shutdown mechanisms; 7. Required volume of the reactor; 8. Economic implementation. (author)

  3. NEPTUNIX, a general program of simulation applied to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnemay, A.; Dansac Bon, V.

    1978-01-01

    Most simulation languages admit an incremental description and involve explicit integration algorithms. NEPTUNIX is a simulation language directly admitting algebraic differential equations under an implicit form, and it involves a very efficient implicit integration method with variable step and order. NEPTUNIX is a tool used for building large systems models in the field of nuclear reactors [fr

  4. Liquid metal reactor head designs in the USA - heat and mass transfer considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, T.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of liquid metal reactor plants in the United States over the past 30 years has resulted in an evolution of reactor head designs as reflected in the SRE, Hallam, EBR-II and FFTF plants. This evolution has probably been affected to some extent by the fact that, in contrast to most other countries, there is no single organization in the United States which has been responsible for the design of liquid metal reactor plants. The current U.S. LMR design efforts involve two innovative design consortiums (guided by the US Department of Energy) and a joint industry venture on the Large Scale Prototype Breeder. It is therefore somewhat difficult to provide a statement on the philosophy of the reactor head design in the U.S. This paper however briefly describes the existing and proposed U.S. liquid metal reactor head designs and in the process, attempt to provide some insight on the basis for those designs

  5. Considerations about decommissioning of the IEA-R1 research reactor and the future of its installations after shutdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajndlich, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor, in operation since 1957, in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), is one of the oldest research reactors in the world. However at some point in time in the future, as example of the other reactors, it will be shutdown definitively. Before that time actually arrives, the operational organization needs to plan the future of its installations and define the final destination of equipment and radioactive as well as non-radioactive material contained inside the installations. These and other questions should be addressed in the so called Preliminary decommissioning plan of the installation, which is the subject of this work. The work initially presents an over view about the theme and defines the general and specific objectives describing, in succession, the directions that the operating organization should consider for the formulation of a decommissioning plan. The present structure of the Brazilian nuclear sector emphasizing principally the norms utilized in the management of radioactive waste is also presented. A description of principle equipment of the IEA-R1 reactor which constitutes its inventory of radioactive and non-radioactive material is given. The work emphasizes the experience of the reactor technicians, acquired during several reforms and modifications of the reactor installations realized during its useful life time. This experience may be of great help for the decommissioning in the future. An experiment using the high resolution gamma spectrometric method and computer calculation using Monte Carlo theory were performed with the objective of obtaining an estimate of the radioactive waste produced from dismantling of the reactor pool walls. The cost of reactor decommissioning for different choices of strategies was determined using the CERREX code. Finally, a discussion about different strategies is presented. On the basis of these discussions it is concluded that the most advantageous

  6. Thermal and stability considerations for a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor during power-raising phase of plant startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Jiejin; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ikejiri, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes thermal analyses and linear stability analyses of the Supercritical Water-cooled Fast Reactor with 'two-path' flow scheme during the power-raising phase of plant startup. For thermal consideration, the same criterion of the maximum cladding surface temperature (MCST) as applied to the normal operating condition is used. For thermal-hydraulic stability consideration, the decay ratio of 0.5 is applied, which is taken from BWRs. Firstly, we calculated the flow rate distribution among the parallel flow paths from the reactor vessel inlet nozzles to the mixing plenum below the core using a system analysis code. The parallel flow paths consist of the seed fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow, the blanket fuel assemblies cooled by downward flow and the downcomer. Then, the MCSTs are estimated for various reactor powers and feedwater flow rates with system analyses. The decay ratios are estimated with linear stability analyses. The available range of the reactor power and feedwater flow rate to satisfy the thermal and stability criteria is obtained. (author)

  7. Neutron importance and the generalized Green function for the conventionally critical reactor with normalized neutron distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khromov, V.V.

    1978-01-01

    The notion of neutron importance when applied to nuclear reactor statics problems described by time-independent homogeneous equations of neutron transport with provision for normalization of neutron distribution is considered. An equation has been obtained for the function of neutron importance in a conditionally critical reactor with respect to an arbitrary nons linear functional determined for the normalized neutron distribution. Relation between this function and the generalized Green function of the selfconjugated operator of the reactor equation is determined and the formula of small perturbations for the functionals of a conditionally critical reactor is deduced

  8. General scheme of research reactor mainly for production of fission 99Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Feng; Liu Xingmin; Wu Xiaochun; Sun Zheng; Guo Chunqiu; Yi Dayong

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis for current circumstance and development tendency of research reactor mainly for 99 Mo production in the world, the design idea of this sort of research reactor was proposed. By the optimization and basic design, the general design parameters of the reactor were analyzed and testified. The evaluation of output activities of 99 Mo and the analysis of economics were conducted on the basically assumption. It is argued that the economics of this reactor is improved dramatically while the safety is ensured by the analysis. (authors)

  9. Generalized saddle point condition for ignition in a tokamak reactor with temperature and density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitari, O.; Hirose, A.; Skarsgard, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, the concept of a generalized ignition contour map, is extended to the realistic case of a plasma with temperature and density profiles in order to study access to ignition in a tokamak reactor. The generalized saddle point is found to lie between the Lawson and ignition conditions. If the height of the operation path with Goldston L-mode scaling is higher than the generalized saddle point, a reactor can reach ignition with this scaling for the case with no confinement degradation effect due to alpha-particle heating. In this sense, the saddle point given in a general form is a new criterion for reaching ignition. Peaking the profiles for the plasma temperature and density can lower the height of the generalized saddle point and help a reactor to reach ignition. With this in mind, the authors can judge whether next-generation tokamaks, such as Compact Ignition Tokamak, Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Reactor, Next European Torus, Fusion Experimental Reactor, International Tokamak Reactor, and AC Tokamak Reactor, can reach ignition with realistic profile parameters and an L-mode scaling law

  10. Driver options and burn cycle selection based on power reactor considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Reactor implications for noninductive current drive are presented based on a number of studies. First, the lower hybrid driver for the STARFIRE reactor is discussed and the disadvantages of this driver are reviewed. Next, the results of an extensive search for a better current driver are presented. A large number of alternatives were compared in a common context, the DEMO reactor, in order to examine their suitability on a standard basis. Finally, the methodology of a study, currently in progress, is described. The goals of this last study are to compare tokamak reactor designs optimized for operation under different burn cycles, in order to assess the actual benefits and costs of pulsed versus steady-state operation. (author)

  11. Considerations of Human Factors in the Design and Operation of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shokr, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    The feedback from the severe accidents occurred at nuclear power plants showed that safety of nuclear installations does not depend only on technical matters but also on human performance. Human errors can initiate an event or can make , by intervention, the event consequences worse. Human factors are of a particular importance for research reactors since the status of these facilities change frequently and the operators have an easy access to the reactor core and to the associated experimental facilities. This paper discusses the experience with human factors and their impact on the safety of research reactors and application of technical and administrative provisions to address these factors in the design and operation phases of research reactors for continuous improvements in safety and performance of these facilities

  12. Driver options and burn-cycle selection based on power-reactor considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1983-04-01

    Reactor implications for noninductive current drive are presented based on a number of studies. First, the lower hybrid driver for the STARFIRE reactor is discussed and the disadvantages of this driver are reviewed. Next, the results of an extensive search for a better current driver are presented. A large number of alternatives were compared in a common context, the DEMO reactor, in order to examine their suitability on a standard basis. Finally, the methodology of a study, currently in progress, is described. The goals of this last study are to compare tokamak reactor designs optimized for operation under different burn cycles, in order to assess the actual benefits and costs of pulsed versus steady-state operation

  13. Safety considerations of lithium lead alloy as a fusion reactor breeding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    Test results and conclusions are presented for lithium lead alloy interactions with various gas atmospheres, concrete and potential reactor coolants. The reactions are characterized to evaluate the potential of volatilizing and transporting radioactive species associated with the liquid breeder under postulated fusion reactor accident conditions. The safety concerns identified for lithium lead alloy reactions with the above materials are compared to those previously identified for a reference fusion breeder material, liquid lithium. Conclusions made from this comparison are also included

  14. Manufacture of heavy reactor components with particular considerations to quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreppel, H.; Clausmeyer, H.

    1980-01-01

    The use of adequate quality assurance measures is one of the most important prerequisites for the manufacture of reactor components. Nature and extent of the quality assurance system at present adopted in the Federal Republic of Germany are illustrated, using the manufacture of a reactor pressure vessel as an example. The system comprises quality organization, planning of all quality assurance measures, quality surveillance through all stages of manufacture and documentation of quality attained. (orig.)

  15. Manufacture of heavy reactor components with particular consideration to quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausmeyer, H.; Kreppel, H.

    1977-01-01

    The use of adequate quality assurance measures is one of the most important prerequisites for the manufacture of reactor components. Nature and extent of the quality assurance system at present adopted in the Federal Republic of Germany are illustrated, using the manufacture of a reactor pressure vessel as an example. The system comprises quality organization, planning of all quality assurance measures, quality surveillance through all stages of manufacture and documentation of quality attained. (orig.) [de

  16. Manufacture of heavy reactor components with particular consideration to quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreppel, H.; Clausmeyer, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of adequate quality assurance measures is one of the most important prerequisites for the manufacture of reactor components. Nature and extent of the quality assurance system at present adopted in the Federal Republic of Germany are illustrated, using the manufacture of a reactor pressure vessel as an example. The system comprises quality organization, planning of all quality assurance measures, quality surveillance through all stages of manufacture and documentation of quality attained. (orig.)

  17. Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWR/5)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottimore, R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The Standard Technical Specifications for General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (GE-STS) is a generic document prepared by the US NRC for use in the licensing process of current General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. The GE-STS sets forth the limits, operating conditions, and other requirements applicable to nuclear reactor facility operation as set forth by Section 50.36 of 10 CFR Part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public. The document is revised periodically to reflect current licensing requirements

  18. Technical regulations on the general design and safety criteria for design and construction of nuclear reactors of May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    These Technical Regulations published on 5th September 1975 were made in implementation of Section 33 of Decree No 7/9141 on the procedure for the licensing of nuclear installations. They serve as a guide to licensing authorities, project designers and operators in the nuclear field and therefore provide general criteria for safety standards, engineering codes, siting considerations, design bases for overall environmental radiation protection, and also deal with reactor core design, instrumentation, control, alarm systems, including an emergency core cooling system. Finally, the safe design of fuel elements must be ensured and fuel storage and handling techniques complied with. (NEA) [fr

  19. Evolution of general design requirements for french pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gros, G.; Jalouneix, J.; Rollinger, F.

    1988-10-01

    The design of French pressurized water reactors is based first on deterministic principles, using the well-known defense in depth concept. This safety approach, basically reflected current American practice at that time, which consisted notably in designing engineered safeguard systems capable of limiting the consequences of accidents assumed to be credible despite the preventive measures taken. Further reflections have led to complete this approach, resulting in modifications to regulatory practice, mainly related to better practical assimilation of the problems arising during plant unit operation and reactor control after an accident and to the determination to enhance the overall consistency of the safety approach. As regards system redundancy, it should be noted that common cause failures can result in the total loss of a redundant system. System redundancy aspects will be dealt with in Chapter 2. As regards study of design basis accidents, attention was focused on the human intervention stage following automatic activation of protection and safeguard systems. This resulted, for all plant units, in the revision of operating procedures, accompanied by examination of the means required for their implementation. These subjects will be discussed in Chapter 3. Finally, as regards equipment classification, the range of equipment subjected to particular requirements, formerly limited to design basis safety classified equipment, was enlarged to include important for safety equipment. This subject will be dealt with in Chapter 5

  20. Considerations relating to the presence of water in the reactor cavity during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, F.; Morales, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present some of the factors, both positive and negative, associated with the presence of water in the reactor cavity. The presence of water in the reactor cavity is one of the factors whose influence on the evolution of severe accidents must be determined since, on the one hand, it has an impact on some of the most significant severe accident phenomena and, on the other, it could be an important factor when preparing accident management strategies resulting from containment analyses. In spite of the initial intuitive impression that water in the reactor cavity must always be beneficial, certain phenomena, such as the following must also be taken into account before developing accident management strategies: - Higher production of steam - Possibility of steam explosions - Increased production of H 2 due to oxidation of steel components of the melted core ejected from the vessel - More oxidation energy released due to the presence of oxygen in the cavity (Author)

  1. Radiological considerations of the reactor cover gas processing system at the FFTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Radiological and environmental protection experience associated with the reactor cover gas processing system at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been excellent. Personnel radiation exposures received from operating and maintaining the reactor cover gas processing system have been very low, the system has remained free of radioactive particulate contamination through the first seven operating cycles (cesium contamination was detected at the end of Cycle 8A), and releases of radioactivity to the environment have been very low, well below environmental standards. This report discusses these three aspects of fast reactor cover gas purification over the first eight operating cycles of the FFTF (a duration of a little more than four years, from April 1982 through July 1986). (author)

  2. Radiological considerations of the reactor cover gas processing system at the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevo, P.R.

    1986-09-01

    Radiological and environmental protection experience associated with the reactor cover gas processing system at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been excellent. Personnel radiation exposures received from operating and maintaining the reactor cover gas processing system have been very low, the system has remained free of radioactive particulate contamination through the first seven operating cycles (cesium contamination was detected at the end of Cycle 8A), and releases of radioactivity to the environment have been very low, well below environmental standards. This report discusses these three aspects of fast reactor cover gas purification over the first eight operating cycles of the FFTF (a duration of a little more than four years, from April 1982 through July 1986)

  3. Radiation shielding considerations for the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Y.; Mori, S.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation shielding relevant to the repair and maintenance of a swimming pool-type tokamak reactor is considered. The dose rate during the reactor operation can be made low enough for personnel access into the reactor room if a 2m thick water layer is installed above the magnet cryostat. The dose rate 24 h after shutdown is such that the human access is allowed above the magnet cryostat. Sufficient water layer thickness is provided in the inboard space for the operation of automatic welder/cutter while retaining the magnet shielding capability. Some forced cooling is required for the decay heat removal in the first wall. The penetration shield thickness around the neutral beam injector port is estimated to be barely sufficient in terms of the magnet radiation damage. (orig.)

  4. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: General considerations and data needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugh, C E [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Purdy, C M [U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (United States)

    1977-07-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel. (author)

  5. Material properties requirements for LMFBR structural design: general considerations and data needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugh, C.E.; Purdy, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    A statement is given of material properties information needed in connection with the structural design technology for liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) primary circuit components. Implementation of current analysis methods and criteria is considered with an emphasis on data and data correlations for performing elastic-plastic and creep analyses, for establishing allowable stress limits, and for computing creep-fatigue damage. Further development of the technology is discussed in relation to properties information. Emphasis is placed on improved constitutive equations for representing inelastic material behavior, on procedures for treating time-dependent fatigue, and on criteria for creep rupture. The properties are generally discussed without regard to specific alloys, since most categories of information are needed for each major structural material. Some sample experimental results are given for type 304 stainless steel and 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel

  6. Physics considerations in the design of liquid metal reactors for transuranium element consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, H.; Hill, R.; Fujita, E.; Wade, D.

    1992-01-01

    The management of transuranic nuclides in liquid metal reactors (LMR's) is considered based on the use of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept. Unique features of the IFR fuel cycle with respect to transuranic management are identified. These features are exploited together with the hard spectrum of LMR's to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of a wide range of transuranic management options ranging from efficient breeding to pure consumption. Core physics aspects of the development of a low sodium void worth transuranic burner concept are described. Neutronics performance parameters and reactivity feedback characteristics estimated for this core concept are presented

  7. Non-linearity consideration when analyzing reactor noise statistical characteristics. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebadze, B V; Adamovski, L A

    1975-06-01

    Statistical characteristics of boiling water reactor noise in the vicinity of stability threshold are studied. The reactor is considered as a non-linear system affected by random perturbations. To solve a non-linear problem the principle of statistical linearization is used. It is shown that the halfwidth of resonance peak in neutron power noise spectrum density as well as the reciprocal of noise dispersion, which are used in predicting a stable operation theshold, are different from zero both within and beyond the stability boundary the determination of which was based on linear criteria.

  8. Some considerations on a plasma in the JAERI experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tone, T.; Yamato, H.; Maki, K.

    1976-01-01

    The preliminary analysis of the plasma characteristics for the JAERI tokamak experimental fusion reactor is reported. In order to make the reactor compact, the self-sustaining condition has been removed. Stationary heating by 200 keV neutral deuteron beam to maintain the power balance is applied expecting the power amplification by the TCT effect. The main parameters determined are power output of 100 MW, toroidal field on axis of 6 T, aspect ratio of 4.5 and major radius of 6.75 m. The results of the plasma power balance, fueling by means of the gas blanket scheme, power stabilization with feedback and the start-up are presented

  9. Consideration of LH2 and LD2 cold neutron sources in heavy water reactor reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, I.A.; Serebrov, A.P.

    2001-01-01

    The reactor power, the required CNS dimensions and power of the cryogenic equipment define the CNS type with maximized cold neutron production. Cold neutron fluxes from liquid hydrogen (LH 2 ) and liquid deuterium (LD 2 ) cold neutron sources (CNS) are analyzed. Different CNS volumes, presents and absence of reentrant holes inside the CNS, different adjustment of beam tube and containment are considered. (orig.)

  10. Experience in settlement analysis and related geostatic considerations for the foundation design of heavy reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, R.L.; Yen, B.C.; Bhushan, K.; Haley, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Potential settlement problems associated with new, heavier reactor structures are discussed. Methods for obtaining data for settlement analyses are summarized and analysis procedures are compared in an example. Stress history and stress distribution concepts are shown to be important for settlement estimates. (author)

  11. Considerations on the design of a helium circulator for a high temperature modular reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumm, K.; Donaldson, J.

    1988-01-01

    A modular helium cooled, high temperature reactor system with a thermal output of 200 MW per reactor has been developed by the KWU group for cogeneration of electricity and process steam. The flow of the reactor coolant - Helium at 60 bars and 250/700 deg. C is maintained by one circulator per reactor. The circulator is driven by a variable speed Siemens asynchronous motor and is submerged in the helium primary system. For operational reasons high reliability and availability of the circulator is required. The operational requirements for the circulator design are presented in this paper. The actual design has been carried out in close cooperation with the designer and manufacturer of all submerged circulators operating in AGR plants in Great Britain, James Howden Co. Renfrew, Scotland. Design solutions received so far and mainly based on sufficiently proven components - such as oil bath lubricated bearing systems - will be described. Special attention will be paid on the necessary test work; especially for the prototype to confirm the lay out. (author). 9 figs

  12. Materials considerations for UF6 gas-core reactor. Interim report for preliminary design study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, P.

    1977-04-01

    The limiting materials problem in a high-temperature UF 6 core reactor is the corrosion of the core containment vessel. The UF 6 , the lower fluorides of uranium, and the fluorine that exist at the anticipated reactor operating conditions (1000 K and about one atmosphere UF 6 ) are all corrosive. Because of this, the materials evaluation effort for this reactor design study has concentrated on the identification of a viable system for the containment vessel that meets both the materials and neutronic requirements. A study of the literature has revealed that the most promising corrosion-resistant candidates are Ni or Ni-Al alloys. One of the conclusions of this work is that the containment vessel use a nickel liner or clad since the use of Ni as a structural member is precluded by its relative blackness to thermal neutrons. Estimates of corrosion rates of Ni and Ni-Al alloys, the effects of the pressure and temperature of F 2 on the corrosion rates, calculated equilibrium gas compositions at reactor core operating conditions, suggested methods of fabrication, and recommendations for future research and development are included

  13. ORNL TNS Program: plasma engineering considerations and innovations for a medium field tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Rome, J.A.; Uckan, N.A.

    1977-12-01

    Recent plasma engineering studies have ascertained a viable concept for The Next Step (TNS) reactor based on medium toroidal fields between 4 T and 7 T at the plasma center, plasma anti β values up to 10%, and averaged densities between 0.6 x 10 14 cm -3 and 2.5 x 10 14 cm -3 . Plasma engineering innovations that can substantially reduce the size, cost, and complexity of the TNS reactor have been explored and are summarized. It is shown that the previously anticipated requirement of high pellet velocities can be substantially reduced; the toroidal field (TF) ripple requirements may be relaxed to reduce the number of TF coils and improve machine access; hybrid equilibrium field (EF) coils have been shown to require building only small interior coils and to reduce the power supply required by the exterior coils; proper approaches of microwave plasma preheating may reduce the peak loop voltage for start-up by an order of magnitude. The medium-field TNS reactor concepts and the plasma engineering innovations discussed should be applicable to other designs of tokamak reactors; some of the suggested innovations will be tested in upcoming experiments

  14. Operating point considerations for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of the continuing engineering design-point reassessment and optimization of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) are discussed. An updated interim design point which achieves a favorable energy balance and involves relaxed technological requirements, which nonetheless satisfy more rigorous physics and engineering constraints, is presented

  15. In-situ stripping of H{sub 2}S in gasoil hydrodesulphurization - reactor design considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nava, J.A.O.; Krishna, R. [Amsterdam Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-02-01

    In order to meet future diesel specifications the sulphur content of diesel would need to be reduced to below 50 ppm. This requirement would require improved reactor configurations. In this study we examine the benefits of counter-current contacting of gas oil with H{sub 2}, over conventional co-current contacting in a trickle bed hydrodesulphurization (HDS) reactor. In counter-current contacting, we achieve in-situ stripping of H{sub 2}S from the liquid phase; this is beneficial to the HDS kinetics. A comparison simulation study shows that counter-current contacting would require about 20% lower catalyst load than co-current contacting. However, counter-current contacting of gas and liquid phases in conventionally used HDS catalysts, of 1.5 mm sizes, is not possible due to flooding limitations. The catalysts need to be housed in special wire gauze envelopes as in the catalytic bales or KATAPAK-S configurations. A preliminary hardware design of a counter-current HDS reactor using catalytic bales was carried out in order to determine the technical feasibility. Using a realistic sulphur containing feedstock, the target of 50 ppm S content of desulphurized oil could be met in a reactor of reasonable dimensions. The study also underlines the need for accurate modelling of thermal effects during desulphurization. Our study also shows that interphase mass transfer is unlikely to be a limiting factor and there is a need to develop improved reactor configurations allowing for increased catalyst loading, at the expense of gas-liquid interfacial area. (Author)

  16. Operation and maintenance experience at the General Atomic Company's TRIGA reactor facility at San Diego, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, W.L.; Stout, W.A.; Shoptaugh, J.R.; Chesworth, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Since the startup of the original 250 kW TRIGA Mark I reactor in 1958, General Atomic Company has accumulated nearly 24 years of operation and maintenance experience with this type of reactor. In addition to the nearly 24 years of experience gained on the Mark I, GA has operated the 1.5 MW Advanced Prototype Test Reactor (Mark F) for 22 years and operated a 2 MW below-ground TRIGA Mark III for five years. Information obtained from normal and abnormal operation are presented. (author)

  17. Numerical solutions of the aerosol general dynamic equation for nuclear reactor safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Methods and approximations inherent in modeling of aerosol dynamics and evolution for nuclear reactor source term estimation have been investigated. Several aerosol evolution problems are considered to assess numerical methods of solving the aerosol dynamic equation. A new condensational growth model is constructed by generalizing Mason's formula to arbitrary particle sizes, and arbitrary accommodation of the condensing vapor and background gas at particle surface. Analytical solution is developed for the aerosol growth equation employing the new condensation model. The space-dependent aerosol dynamic equation is solved to assess implications of spatial homogenization of aerosol distributions. The results of our findings are as follows. The sectional method solving the aerosol dynamic equation is quite efficient in modeling of coagulation problems, but should be improved for simulation of strong condensation problems. The J-space transform method is accurate in modeling of condensation problems, but is very slow. For the situation considered, the new condensation model predicts slower aerosol growth than the corresponding isothermal model as well as Mason's model, the effect of partial accommodation is considerable on the particle evolution, and the effect of the energy accommodation coefficient is more pronounced than that of the mass accommodation coefficient. For the initial conditions considered, the space-dependent aerosol dynamics leads to results that are substantially different from those based on the spatially homogeneous aerosol dynamic equation

  18. Physical characteristics of GE [General Electric] BWR [boiling-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, R.S.; Notz, K.J.

    1989-06-01

    The physical characteristics of fuel assemblies manufactured by the General Electric Company for boiling-water reactors are classified and described. The classification into assembly types is based on the GE reactor product line, the Characteristics Data Base (CDB) assembly class, and the GE fuel design. Thirty production assembly types are identified. Detailed physical data are presented for each assembly type in an appendix. Descriptions of special (nonstandard) fuels are also reported. 52 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs

  19. Safety considerations of new critical assembly for the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umeda, Iwao; Matsuoka, Naomi; Harada, Yoshihiko; Miyamoto, Keiji; Kanazawa, Takashi

    1975-01-01

    The new critical assembly type of nuclear reactor having three cores for the first time in the world was completed successfully at the Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University in autumn of 1974. It is called KUCA (Kyoto University Critical Assembly). Safety of the critical assembly was considered sufficiently in consequence of discussions between the researchers of the institute and the design group of our company, and then many bright ideas were created through the discussions. This paper is described the new safety design of main equipments - oil pressure type center core drive mechanism, removable water overflow mechanism, core division mechanism, control rod drive mechansim, protection instrumentation system and interlock key system - for the critical assembly. (author)

  20. Consideration of emergency source terms for pebble-bed high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Liu; Jun, Zhao; Jiejuan, Tong; Jianzhu, Cao

    2009-01-01

    Being the last barrier in the nuclear power plant defense-in-depth strategy, emergency planning (EP) is an integrated project. One of the key elements in this process is emergency source terms selection. Emergency Source terms for light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plant (NPP) have been introduced in many technical documents, and advanced NPP emergency planning is attracting attention recently. Commercial practices of advanced NPP are undergoing in the world, pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant is under construction in China which is considered as a representative of advanced NPP. The paper tries to find some pieces of suggestion from our investigation. The discussion of advanced NPP EP will be summarized first, and then the characteristics of pebble-bed HTGR relating to EP will be described. Finally, PSA insights on emergency source terms selection and current pebble-bed HTGR emergency source terms suggestions are proposed

  1. IRSN preliminary considerations of the Fukushima event impact on the GENIV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanc, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    • The IRSN study aims to identify main specific safety issues for each GEN IV concept with regards to the European Nuclear Safety Regulatory Group (ENSREG) stress tests topics: → Earthquake; → Flooding; → Loss of the heat sink; →Loss of the power supply; → Combination of the two previous ones; → Severe accident management. • These main specific safety issues are identified as far as they could have a specific impact on: → Grace times; → Cliff edge effects; → Difficulties to cope with them. • The situation is different between existing reactors and for reactors not yet designed because the hazard level may be increase for the new reactors. • Nevertheless, the “hardened safety core” concept may be kept for extreme situations and will be identified on the basis of the above mentioned main specific safety issues. This analysis is a preliminary one based of the IRSN knowledge about the six GEN IV concepts issued from safety assessment already performed (in particular on the French SFRs already built) and publications

  2. Standard technical specifications for General Electric boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-08-01

    This Standard Technical Specification (STS) has been structured for the broadest possible use on General Electric plants currently being reviewed for an Operating License. Optional specifications are provided for those features and systems which may be included in individual plant designs but are not generic in their scope of application. This revision of the GE-STS does not typically include requirements which may be added or revised as a result of the NRC staff's further review of the Three Mile Island incident

  3. Radiological considerations in the design of Reprocessing Uranium Plant (RUP) of Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF), Kalpakkam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekaran, S.; Rajagopal, V.; Jose, M.T.; Venkatraman, B.

    2012-01-01

    A Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility (FRFCF) being planned at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam is an integrated facility with head end and back end of fuel cycle plants co-located in a single place, to meet the refuelling needs of the prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR). Reprocessed uranium oxide plant (RUP) is one such plant in FRFCF to built to meet annual requirements of UO 2 for fabrication of fuel sub-assemblies (FSAs) and radial blanket sub-assemblies (RSAs) for PFBR. RUP receives reprocessed uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) from fast reactor fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) of FRFCF. Unlike natural uranium oxide plant, RUP has to handle reprocessed uranium oxide which is likely to have residual fission products activity in addition to traces of plutonium. As the fuel used for PFBR is recycled within these plants, formation of higher actinides in the case of plutonium and formation of higher levels of 232 U in the uranium product would be a radiological problem to be reckoned with. The paper discussed the impact of handling of multi-recycled reprocessed uranium in RUP and the radiological considerations

  4. Some preliminary design considerations for the ANS [Advanced Neutron Source] reactor cold source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, D.L.

    1988-01-01

    Two areas concerned with the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) cold source have been investigated by simple one-dimensional calculations. The gain factors computed for a possible liquid nitrogen-15 cold source moderator are considerably below those computed for the much colder liquid deuterium moderator, as is reasonable considering the difference in moderator temperature. Nevertheless, nitrogen-15 does represent a viable option should safety related issues prohibit the use of deuterium as a moderating material. The slab geometry calculations have indicated that reflection of neutrons may be the dominant moderating mechanism and should be a consideration in the design of the cold source. 9 refs., 2 figs

  5. Safety system consideration of a supercritical-water cooled fast reactor with simplified PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.H.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    1999-01-01

    The probabilistic safety of the supercritical-water cooled fast reactor (SCFR) is evaluated with the simplified probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology. SCFR has a once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure. There are no recirculation loops in the once-through direct cycle system, which is the most important difference from the current light water reactor (LWR). The main objective of the present study is to assess the effect of this difference on the safety in the stage of conceptual design study. A safety system configuration similar to the advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) is employed. At loss of flow events, no natural recirculation occurs. Thus, emergency core flow should be quickly supplied before the completion of the feedwater pump coastdown at a loss of flow accident. The motor-driven high pressure coolant injection (MD-HPCI) system cannot be used for the quick core cooling due to the delay of the emergency diesel generator (D/G) start-up. Accordingly, an MD-HPCI system in an ABWR is substituted by a turbine-driven (TD-) HPCI system for the SCFR. The calculated core damage frequency (CDF) is a little higher than that of the Japanese ABWR and a little lower than that of the Japanese BWR when Japanese data are employed for initiating event frequencies. Four alternatives to the safety system configurations are also examined as a sensitivity analysis. This shows that the balance of the safety systems designed here is adequate. Consequently, though the SCFR has a once-through coolant system, the CDF is not high due to the diversity of feedwater systems as the direct cycle characteristics

  6. Safeguards Considerations for the Design of a Future Fast Neutron Sodium Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazalet, J.; Raymond, P.; Masson, M.; Saturnin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating safeguards at an early stage of a reactor design is a way to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards measures minimizing the possibilities of misuse of the plant or nuclear material diversion. It also reduces the impact on the construction and operation cost. At the preliminary phase, the design will integrate: confinement, containment, surveillance features and non-destructive assay equipment. Taking into account these requirements will help the operator in the approval of the plant at the design phase by national and international authorities in charge of Nuclear Material accounting and safeguards. A large amount of work has been made by the GEN IV International Forum to assess the proliferation resistance of nuclear systems. The IAEA has developed guidelines on ''Safeguards by design'' describing reference requirements for future nuclear facilities. Based on these studies, this communication details implementation of safeguards in the design of a sodium cooled fast neutron reactor (SFR) currently studied in France. Specificities are the use of MOX fuel with high concentration of plutonium and the potential capacity of breeding. A great attention should be paid to avoid diversion of nuclear material contained in fresh or irradiated fuel. Scenarios of reactor misuse are analyzed. The identification of diversion pathways and requirements for nuclear material accountancy, leads to an approach of safeguards, specific to SFR: Material Balance Areas (MBA) and some key measurement points (KMP) are characterized. Specific instrumentation assay helping in the identification and/or characterization of fuel elements and the inventory of nuclear material is described. As concerns the fuel cycle, the safeguards of the reprocessing unit will be progressively increased through the development of materials monitoring and the implementation of these measures at strategic locations of buildings, thus providing real-time information

  7. Considerations for advanced reactor design based on EBR-II experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R. W.

    1999-01-01

    The long-term success of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) provides several insights into fundamental characteristics and design features of a nuclear generating station that enhance safety, operability, and maintainability. Some of these same characteristics, together with other features, offer the potential for operational lifetimes well beyond the current licensing time frame, and improved reliability that could potentially reduce amortized capital costs as well as overall operation and maintenance costs if incorporated into advanced plant designs. These features and characteristics are described and the associated benefits are discussed

  8. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  9. Importance of thermal nonequilibrium considerations for the simulation of nuclear reactor LOCA transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.R.; Nelson, R.A.; Sullivan, L.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of considering thermal nonequilibrium effects in computer simulations of the refill and reflood portions of pressurized water reactor (PWR) loss-of-coolnat accident (LOCA) transients. Although RELAP4 assumes thermodynamic equilibrium between phases, models that account for the nonequilibrium phenomena associated with the mixing of subcooled emergency cooling water with steam and the superheating of vapor in the presence of liquid droplets have recently been incorporated into the code. Code calculated results, both with and without these new models, have been compared with experimental test data to assess the importance of including thermal nonequilibrium phenomena in computer code simulations

  10. Heat exchanger design considerations for high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Vrable, D.L.; Van Hagan, T.H.; King, J.H.; Spring, A.H.

    1980-02-01

    Various aspects of the high-temperature heat exchanger conceptual designs for the gas turbine (HTGR-GT) and process heat (HTGR-PH) plants are discussed. Topics include technology background, heat exchanger types, surface geometry, thermal sizing, performance, material selection, mechanical design, fabrication, and the systems-related impact of installation and integration of the units in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel. The impact of future technology developments, such as the utilization of nonmetallic materials and advanced heat exchanger surface geometries and methods of construction, is also discussed

  11. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements

  12. Considerations of severe accidents in the design of Korean Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Wook Jerng; Choong Sup Byun

    1998-01-01

    The severe accident is one of the key issues in the design of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) which is an evolutionary type of pressurized water reactor. As IAEA recommends in TECDOC-801, the design objective of KNGR with regard to safety is provide a sound technical basis by which an imminent off-site emergency response to any circumstance could be practically unnecessary. To implement this design objective, probabilistic safety goals were established and design requirements were developed for systems to mitigate severe accidents. The basic approach of KNGR to address severe accidents is firstly prevent severe accidents by reinforcing its capability to cope with the design basis accidents (DBA) and further with some accidents beyond DBAs caused by multiple failures, and secondly mitigate severe accidents to ensure the retention of radioactive materials in the containment by providing mean to maintain the containment integrity. For severe accident mitigation, KNGR principally takes the concept of ex-vessel corium cooling. To implement this concept, KNGR is equipped with a large cavity and cavity flooding system connected to the in-containment refueling water storage tank. Other major systems incorporated in KNGR are hydrogen igniters and safety depressurization systems. In addition, the KNGR containment is designed to withstand the pressure and temperature conditions expected during the course of severe accidents. In this paper, the design features and status of system designs related with severe accidents will be presented. Also, R and D activities related to severe accident mitigation system design will be briefly described

  13. Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: heat transfer loop and balance of plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Murray, K.A.

    1984-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance of plant design for the Pulse*Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and results are presented. The Pulse*Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar approximately 11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5 m thick plenum of droplets around an 8 m diameter inner chamber. The reactor and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17 m diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops with flow rates of 5.5 m 3 /s each are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. Power balance calculations based on an improved electrical conversion efficiency revealed a net electrical output of 1260 MWe to the bus bar and a resulting net efficiency of 39%. Suggested balance-of-plant layouts are also presented

  14. Generic risk insights for General Electric boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, R.; Taylor, J.; Chung, J.

    1991-05-01

    A methodology has been developed to extract generic risk-based information from probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) of General Electric boiling water rectors and applying the insights gained to plants that have not been subjected to a PRA. The available risk assessments (six plants) were examined to identify the most probable, i.e., dominant accident sequences at each plants. The goal was to include all sequences which represented at least 80% of core damage frequency. If the same plant specific dominant accident sequence appeared within this boundary in at least two plant PRAs, the sequence was considered to be a representative sequence. Eight sequences met this definition. From these sequences, the most important component failures and human error that contributed to each sequence have been prioritized. Guidance is provided to prioritize the representative sequences and modify selected basic events that have been shown to be sensitive to the plant specific design or operating variations of the contributing PRAs. This risk-based guidance can be used for utility and NRC activities including operator training, maintenance, design review, and inspections. 13 refs., 6 tabs

  15. Innovative technologies on fuel assemblies cleaning for sodium fast reactors: First considerations on cleaning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Lorcet, H.; Beauchamp, F.; Guigues, E.; Lovera, P.; Fleche, J. L.; Lacroix, M.; Carra, O.; Dechelette, F.; Prele, G.; Rodriguez, G.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of Sodium Fast Reactor development, innovative fuel assembly cleaning operations are investigated to meet the GEN IV goals of safety and of process development. One of the challenges is to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction currently used in these processes. The potential applications of aqueous solutions of mineral salts (including the possibility of using redox chemical reactions) to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction are considered in a first part and a new experimental bench, dedicated to this study, is described. Anhydrous alternative options based on Na/CO 2 interaction are also presented. Then, in a second part, a functional study conducted on the cleaning pit is proposed. Based on experimental feedback, some calculations are carried out to estimate the sodium inventory on the fuel elements, and physical methods like hot inert gas sweeping to reduce this inventory are also presented. Finally, the implementation of these innovative solutions in cleaning pits is studied in regard to the expected performances. (authors)

  16. Enhancing the NCSU PULSTAR reactor control room with human factors considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, B.L.; Pupons, D.E.; Perez, P.B.

    1993-01-01

    The North Carolina PULSTAR research reactor was constructed to support teaching, training, and research. The training provided is not limited to academic students but encompasses plant operators, managers, engineers, designers, and supporting organizations in the nuclear industry. Our facility is under-going design changes to maximize teaching effectiveness and continued safe operation by providing current technology in the control room. The opportunity for the enhancements is a result of the generosity of neighboring utilities and the US Department of Energy instrumentation upgrade funds. Our objective, to provide a control room environment that conforms to selected industry practices, required human factors input. A human factors course, offered jointly between the industrial engineering and the psychology departments, included the PULSTAR control room enhancement as a case study

  17. Design considerations for ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor] magnet systems: Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Miller, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is now completing a definition phase as a beginning of a three-year design effort. Preliminary parameters for the superconducting magnet system have been established to guide further and more detailed design work. Radiation tolerance of the superconductors and insulators has been of prime importance, since it sets requirements for the neutron-shield dimension and sensitively influences reactor size. The major levels of mechanical stress in the structure appear in the cases of the inboard legs of the toroidal-field (TF) coils. The cases of the poloidal-field (PF) coils must be made thin or segmented to minimize eddy current heating during inductive plasma operation. As a result, the winding packs of both the TF and PF coils includes significant fractions of steel. The TF winding pack provides support against in-plane separating loads but offers little support against out-of-plane loads, unless shear-bonding of the conductors can be maintained. The removal of heat due to nuclear and ac loads has not been a fundamental limit to design, but certainly has non-negligible economic consequences. We present here preliminary ITER magnet systems design parameters taken from trade studies, designs, and analyses performed by the Home Teams of the four ITER participants, by the ITER Magnet Design Unit in Garching, and by other participants at workshops organized by the Magnet Design Unit. The work presented here reflects the efforts of many, but the responsibility for the opinions expressed is the authors'. 4 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs

  18. Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor: Heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, M.W.; Blink, J.A.; Curlander, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    A conceptual heat transfer loop and balance-of-plant design for the Pulse Star Inertial Confinement Fusion Reactor has been investigated and the results are presented. The Pulse Star reaction vessel, a perforated steel bell jar about11 m in diameter, is immersed in Li 17 Pb 83 coolant, which flows through the perforations and forms a 1.5-m-thick plenum of droplets around a 8-m-diameter inner chamber. The bell jar and associated pumps, piping, and steam generators are contained within a 17-m-diameter pool of Li 17 Pb 83 coolant to minimize structural requirements and occupied space, resulting in reduced cost. Four parallel heat transfer loops, each with a flow rate of 5.5 m 3 /s, are necessary to transfer 3300 MWt of power. Liquid metal is pumped to the top of the pool, where it flows downward through eight vertical steam generators. Double-walled tubes are used in the steam generators to assure tritium containment without intermediate heat transfer loops. Each pump is a mixed flow type and has a required NPSH of 3.4 m, a speed of 278 rpm, and an impeller diameter of 1.2 m. The steam generator design was optimized by finding the most cost-effective combination of heat exchanger area and pumping power. The design minimizes the total cost (heat exchanger area plus pumping) for the plant lifetime. The power required for the pumps is 36 MWe. Each resulting steam generator is 12 m high and 1.6 m in diameter, with 2360 tubes. The steam generators and pumps fit easily in the pool between the reactor chamber and the pool wall

  19. The IPR-R1 TRIGA Mark I Reactor in 39 years: Operations and general improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maretti Junior, Fausto; Prado Fernandes, Marcio; Oliveira, Paulo Fernando; Alves de Amorim, Valter

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear IPR-R1 TRIGA Mark I Reactor operating in the Nuclear Technology Development Center, originally Institute for Radioactive Research in Minas Gerais, Brazil, was dedicated in November 11, 1960. Initially operating for the production of radioisotopes for different uses, it started later to be used in large scale for neutron activation analysis and training of operators for nuclear power plants. Many improvements have been made throughout these years to provide a better performance in its operation and safety conditions. A new cooling system to operate until 300 kW, a new control rod mechanism, an aluminum tank for the reactor pool, an optimization in the pneumatic system, a new reactor control console and a general remodeling of the reactor laboratory were some of the improvements added. To prevent and mitigate the ageing effects, the reactor operation personnel is starting a program to minimize future operation problems. This paper describes the improvements made, the results obtained during the past 39 years, and the precautions taken to ensure future safe operation of the reactor to give operators better conditions of safe work. (author)

  20. 10 CFR 110.26 - General license for the export of nuclear reactor components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license for the export of nuclear reactor components. 110.26 Section 110.26 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF... Denmark Finland France Germany Greece Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Latvia Lithuania Luxembourg...

  1. SACRD: a data base for fast reactor safety computer codes, general description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, N.M.; Forsberg, V.M.; Raiford, G.B.; Arwood, J.W.; Simpson, D.B.; Flanagan, G.F.

    1979-01-01

    SACRD is a data base of material properties and other handbook data needed in computer codes used for fast reactor safety studies. Data are available in the thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, structural mechanics, aerosol transport, meteorology, neutronics, and dosimetry areas. Tabular, graphical and parameterized data are provided in many cases. A general description of the SACRD system is presented in the report

  2. Innovative technologies on fuel assemblies cleaning for sodium fast reactors: First considerations on cleaning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, N.; Lorcet, H.; Beauchamp, F.; Guigues, E. [CEA, DEN, DTN Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lovera, P.; Fleche, J. L. [CEA, DEN, DPC Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lacroix, M. [CEA, DEN, DTN Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Carra, O. [AREVA / NP, 10 Rue Juliette Recamier, 69003 Lyon (France); Dechelette, F. [CEA, DEN, DTN Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Prele, G. [EDF/SEPTEN, 12-14 avenue Dutrievoz, 69628 Villeurbane Cedex (France); Rodriguez, G. [CEA, DEN, DTN Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01

    Within the framework of Sodium Fast Reactor development, innovative fuel assembly cleaning operations are investigated to meet the GEN IV goals of safety and of process development. One of the challenges is to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction currently used in these processes. The potential applications of aqueous solutions of mineral salts (including the possibility of using redox chemical reactions) to mitigate the Sodium Water Reaction are considered in a first part and a new experimental bench, dedicated to this study, is described. Anhydrous alternative options based on Na/CO{sub 2} interaction are also presented. Then, in a second part, a functional study conducted on the cleaning pit is proposed. Based on experimental feedback, some calculations are carried out to estimate the sodium inventory on the fuel elements, and physical methods like hot inert gas sweeping to reduce this inventory are also presented. Finally, the implementation of these innovative solutions in cleaning pits is studied in regard to the expected performances. (authors)

  3. Status of the German AF-programme. Considerations with respect to INFCE recommendations and criteria[AF = Anreicherungsreduzierung in Forschungsreaktoren (Enrichment reduction in research reactors)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thamm, Gerd H [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH, Research Reactor Division, Juelich (Germany)

    1983-09-01

    As is generally known, the INFCE studies carried out on a worldwide scale from 1977 to 1979 for research reactors using primarily highly enriched uranium (HEU 80% to 93% U-235) have led to the important recommendation that an effective reduction in the proliferation of weapons-usable nuclear material can be achieved by converting the fuel cycles from HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU, U-235 enrichment 20%). Further recommendations made by INFCE to the effect of restricting or markedly reducing the stockpiles of HEU materials and diminishing the production of fissile materials due to irradiation in research reactors, however, have been given secondary attention in the course of development as compared to the first recommendation mentioned above. As a result of the INFCE studies, national programmes were initiated in various countries aiming at enrichment reduction in research reactors. Essential work in this connection was commenced above all in the USA (RERTR programme), in France, Japan and in the Federal Republic of Germany (AF programme). Added to this was an IAEA support programme intended primarily for developing and threshold countries. Essential conditions in the form of criteria were elaborated by the INFCE Working Group 8C in connection with the recommendation for enrichment reduction in research reactors. These criteria are: 1. The safety margins and fuel reliability should not be reduced by a conversion from HEU to LEU cycles. 2. Losses in reactor performance (e.g. the ratio of neutron flux available for experiments) to reactor power should not be more than marginal. 3. The cost of conversion for research reactors should be kept as low as possible. 4. Any increase in operating costs after conversion should not be more than marginal. The first three criteria mentioned have been given particular attention and have a good chance of being complied with in the current worldwide development activities for a conversion of research reactors to LEU fuel cycle

  4. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs

  5. General plan for the partial dismantling of the IRT-Sofia research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolov Tihomir G.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available After the decision of the Bulgarian Government to reconstruct it, the strategy concerning the IRT-Sofia Research Reactor is to partially dismantle the old systems and equipment. The removal of the reactor core and replacement of old equipment will not pose any significant problems. For a more efficient use of existing resources, there is a need for an engineering project which has been already prepared under the title "General Plan for the Partial Dismantling of Equipment at the IRT-Sofia as a Part of the Reconstruction into a Low Power RR".

  6. On LMFBR corrosion. Part II: Consideration of the in-reactor fuel-cladding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Walker, C.T.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1976-05-01

    The scientific and technological aspects of LMFBR cladding corrosion are discussed in detail. Emphasis is placed on the influence of the irradiation environment and the effect of fuel and filler-gas impurities on the corrosion process. These studies are complemented by a concise review of out-of-pile simulation experiments that endeavour to clarify the role of the aggressive fission products cesium, tellurium and iodine. The principal models for cladding corrosion are presented and critically assessed. Areas of uncertainty are exposed and some pertinent experiments are suggested. Consideration is also given to some new observations regarding the role of stress in fuel-cladding reactions and the formation of ferrite in the corrosion zone of the cladding during irradiation. Finally, two technological solutions to the problem of cladding corrosion are proposed. These are based on the use of an oxygen buffer in the fuel and the application of a protective coating to the inner surface of the cladding

  7. Power conversion and balance of plant considerations for the STARFIRE commercial tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry, K.; Graumann, D.

    1981-01-01

    The power conversion and balance of plant facilities for this tenth-of-a-kind tokamak fusion power plant are a combination of both features common to any large power plant, and elements peculiar to the fusion technology. For example, the steam generators, turbine-generator and main condenser components of the power conversion system and the natural draft cooling towers that are used for heat rejection at sites not close to a large body of water are generic to power plants. The tritium reprocessing facilities that minimize the tritium inventory in the plant, the Electrical and RF Power Supply Building that contains the coil and rf power supplies, the cryogenic facilities that provide liquid helium coolant for the superconducting coils, and the Hot Cell in which fully remote repair and maintenance functions are performed are unique to a fusion power plant. One of the major features of the STARFIRE design is steady state operation that maximizes overall facility reliability and eliminates both thermal storage requirements and potential power fluctuations on the grid. The reference reactor power is 4000 MWt with a gross electric power generation of 1440 MW. For STARFIRE, water is the preferred coolant and is utilized in both the first wall/blanket and limiter cooling circuits. Dual parallel primary coolant loops cool the twenty-four first-wall/blanket sectors. The power deposited in the limiter, approximately 5% of the total thermal power, is removed by the separate limiter/feedwater loop and is used for feedwater heating in the steam power conversion system

  8. Simulation of the preliminary General Electric SP-100 space reactor concept using the ATHENA computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, C.D.

    1986-01-01

    The capability to perform thermal-hydraulic analyses of a space reactor using the ATHENA computer code is demonstrated. The fast reactor, liquid-lithium coolant loops, and lithium-filled heat pipes of the preliminary General electric SP-100 design were modeled with ATHENA. Two demonstration transient calculations were performed simulating accident conditions. Calculated results are available for display using the Nuclear Plant Analyzer color graphics analysis tool in addition to traditional plots. ATHENA-calculated results appear reasonable, both for steady state full power conditions, and for the two transients. This analysis represents the first known transient thermal-hydraulic simulation using an integral space reactor system model incorporating heat pipes. 6 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab

  9. Materials considerations for the coupling of thermochemical hydrogen cycles to tandem mirror reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krikorian, O.H.

    1980-01-01

    Candidate materials are discussed and initial choices made for the critical elements in a liquid Li-Na Cauldron Tandem Mirror blanket and the General Atomic Sulfur-Iodine Cycle for thermochemical hydrogen production. V and Ti alloys provide low neutron activation, good radiation damage resistance, and good chemical compatibility for the Cauldron design. Aluminide coated In-800H and siliconized SiC are materials choices for heat exchanger components in the thermochemical cycle interface

  10. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, M.G.; Freyer, P.D.; Mager, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ''precipitation-type'' and a ''damage-type'' component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs

  11. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels: Considerations for thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, M G; Freyer, P D; Mager, T R

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, an overview of the irradiation embrittlement phenomenon is presented from a structure-properties viewpoint. Effects of irradiation conditions on embrittlement are first reviewed: irradiation temperature, fluence, flux, and steel or alloy composition. Then, the techniques for identifying/characterizing the irradiation-induced microstructural features are described: TEM/STEM (electron microscopy), small angle neutron scattering, atom probe field-ion microscopy, positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Mechanisms of hardening and embrittlement generally consist of a ``precipitation-type`` and a ``damage-type`` component and the potential of annealing treatments for restoring the most of the original pressure vessel material toughness is examined; its conditions and mechanisms involved are discussed. Feasibility and economic evaluation of annealing costs is also carried out. 90 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Design considerations for a steady state fusion reactor's thermal energy dump (TED) with emphasis on SAFFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    This work examines the use of a thermal dump to handle the severe particle and energy handling requirements of a diverted plasma. We outline a general approach for evaluating the design parameters and limitations of a thermal dump, considering such things as thermomechanical and erosion effects, compatibility, availability, machinability, coolant recirculation, vacuum pumping, economics, lifetime, etc. To demonstrate how the performance requirements are reflected in design decisions, we apply a solid-walled dump to a small-sized field reversed mirror (FRM). We also examine a liquid-lithium droplet thermal dump and point out some distinct advantages of this new concept over the solid-wall design in reducing stress, erosion, and vacuum pumping problems. The chief disadvantages of this scheme include liquid-metal safe-handling problems, vapor pressure-temperature limitations, and the need for differential pumping if T/sub Li/ > 310 0 C is desired

  13. Some initial considerations on the suitability of Ferritic/ martensitic stainless steels as first wall and blanket materials in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, G.J.

    1982-01-01

    The constitution of stainless iron alloys and the characteristic properties of alloys in the main ferritic, martensitic and austenitic groups are discussed. A comparison of published data on the mechanical, thermal and irradiation properties of typical austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels shows that alloys in the latter groups have certain advantages for fusion applications. The ferromagnetism exhibited by martensitic and ferritic alloys has, however, been identified as a potentially serious obstacle to their utilisation in magnetic confinement devices. The paper describes measurements performed in other laboratories on the magnetic properties of two representative martensitic alloys 12Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2Mo. These observations show that a modest bias magnetic field of magnitude 1 - 2 tesla induces a state of magnetic saturation in these materials. They would thus behave as essentially paramagnetic materials having a relative permeability close to unity when saturated by the toroidal field of a tokamak reactor. The results of computations by the General Atomic research group to assess the implications of such magnetic behaviour on reactor design and operation are presented. The results so far indicate that the ferromagnetism of martensitic/ferritic steels would not represent a major obstacle to their utilisation as first wall or blanket materials. (author)

  14. Proposal to change General Consideration 5 and Principle 2 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Garrity, George M

    2014-01-01

    A proposal is submitted to the ICSP to change the wording of General Consideration 5 of the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes (ICNP), deleting the words Schizophycetes, Cyanophyceae and Cyanobacteria from the groups of organisms whose nomenclature is covered by the Code. It is further proposed to change the terms Zoological Code and International Code of Botanical Nomenclature in General Consideration 5 and in Principle 2 to International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants, respectively.

  15. 48 CFR 970.1504-1-5 - General considerations and techniques for determining fixed fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the opportunity to hold or expand a staff whose loyalties are primarily to the contractor; and (8) Other special considerations, including support of Government programs such as those relating to small...

  16. Review of the general atomic experimental fusion power reactor initial conceptual design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.; Sager, P.H. Jr.; Harder, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    The primary objective of the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR) is to provide the necessary interface between physics experiments and the first demonstration power plants. Since economically viable tokamak-type reactors may well have to be very high Q devices (ratio of fusion power out to power into the plasma), it will be essential for a tokamak demonstration reactor to operate at or near ignition conditions. Thus, it is believed that one of the primary objectives of the EPR must be to fully model the behavior of a D-T burning plasma required in the reactor of a demonstration plant. Therefore, a major objective of the EPR should be to achieve ignition conditions. In addition to demonstrating the ability to ignite and control a D-T plasma, it is also desirable that the EPR should produce, or at least demonstrate the ability to produce, a small amount of net electrical power. These objectives should be accomplished at a reasonable cost; this implies achieving a sufficiently high β (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic field pressure). It is believed that noncircular cross section tokamaks offer the best chance of realizing these objectives. Consequently, noncircular cross sections are a major design feature of the General Atomic EPR

  17. Design and performance of General Electric boiling water reactor main steam line isolation valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, D.A.; van Zylstra, E.H.

    1976-08-01

    An extensive test program has been completed by the General Electric Company in cooperation with the Commonwealth Edison Company on the basic design type of large main steam line isolation valves used on General Electric Boiling Water Reactors. Based on a total of 40 tests under simulated accident conditions covering a wide range of mass flows, mixture qualities, and closing times, it was concluded that the commercially available valves of this basic type will close completely and reliably as required. Analytical methods to predict transient effects in the steam line and valve after postulated breaks were refined and confirmed by the test program

  18. Experiments and models of general corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of materials in nuclear reactor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, William Gordon

    Corrosion and material degradation issues are of concern to all industries. However, the nuclear power industry must conform to more stringent construction, fabrication and operational guidelines due to the perceived additional risk of operating with radioactive components. Thus corrosion and material integrity are of considerable concern for the operators of nuclear power plants and the bodies that govern their operations. In order to keep corrosion low and maintain adequate material integrity, knowledge of the processes that govern the material's breakdown and failure in a given environment are essential. The work presented here details the current understanding of the general corrosion of stainless steel and carbon steel in nuclear reactor primary heat transport systems (PHTS) and examines the mechanisms and possible mitigation techniques for flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) in CANDU outlet feeder pipes. Mechanistic models have been developed based on first principles and a 'solution-pores' mechanism of metal corrosion. The models predict corrosion rates and material transport in the PHTS of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and the influence of electrochemistry on the corrosion and flow-assisted corrosion of carbon steel in the CANDU outlet feeders. In-situ probes, based on an electrical resistance technique, were developed to measure the real-time corrosion rate of reactor materials in high-temperature water. The probes were used to evaluate the effects of coolant pH and flow on FAC of carbon steel as well as demonstrate of the use of titanium dioxide as a coolant additive to mitigated FAC in CANDU outlet feeder pipes.

  19. Regulatory Considerations for the Long Term Cooling Safe Shutdown Requirements of the Passive Residual Heat Removal Systems in Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, S. K.; Bae, S. H.; Kim, Y. S.; Hwang, Min Jeong; Bang, Young Seok; Hwang, Taesuk

    2016-01-01

    USNRC approved safe shutdown at 215.6 .deg. C for a safe and long term cooling state for the redundant passive RHRSs by SECY-94-084. USNRC issued COLA(Combined Construction and Operating License) for the Levy County NP Unit-1/2 for the AP1000 passive RHRSs in 2014. Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power(KHNP) is developing APR+ and adopted Passive Auxiliary Feedwater System(PAFS) as a new passive RHRS design. Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety(KINS) has been developing regulatory guides for the advanced safety design features of the advanced ALWRs which has plan to construct in near future in Korea[5]. Safety and regulatory issues as well as the safe shut down requirements of the passive RHRS are discussed and considerations in developing regulatory guides for the passive RHRS are presented herein. Passive RHRSs have been introduced as new safety design features for the advanced reactors under development in Korea. These passive RHRSs have potential advantages over existing active RHRS, however, their functions are limited due to inherent ability of passive heat removal processes. It is high time to evaluate the performance of the passive PRHRs and develop regulatory guides for the safety as well as the performance analyses of the passive RHRS

  20. Considerations concering the generalization of the Dirac equations to unstable fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Sirlin, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    We discuss the generalization of the Dirac equations and spinors in momentum space to free unstable spin-1/2 fermions taking into account the fundamental requirement of Lorentz covariance. We derive the generalized adjoint Dirac equations and spinors, and explain the very simple relation that exists, in our formulation, between the unstable and stable cases. As an application of the generalized spinors, we evaluate the probability density. We also discuss the behavior of the generalized Dirac equations under time reversal.

  1. In the Beginning of the Middle: Curriculum Considerations for Middle School General Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebelhausen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Middle school general music is an experience that numerous music educators feel underprepared to teach. Because many undergraduate programs spend little time on this teaching scenario and because the challenges of middle school general music are different from those of elementary general music or middle school ensembles, teachers often lack the…

  2. Considerations on requests for euthanasia or assisted suicide; a qualitative study with Dutch general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, Katja; van Tol, Donald G.; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    Background. In the Netherlands, euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) is neither a right of the patient nor a duty of the physician. Beside the legal requirements, physicians can weigh their own considerations when they decide on a request for EAS. Objective. We aim at a better understanding of the

  3. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  4. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. Development of a general learning algorithm with applications in nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brittain, C.R.; Otaduy, P.J.; Perez, R.B.

    1989-12-01

    The objective of this study was development of a generalized learning algorithm that can learn to predict a particular feature of a process by observation of a set of representative input examples. The algorithm uses pattern matching and statistical analysis techniques to find a functional relationship between descriptive attributes of the input examples and the feature to be predicted. The algorithm was tested by applying it to a set of examples consisting of performance descriptions for 277 fuel cycles of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The program learned to predict the critical rod position for the HFIR from core configuration data prior to reactor startup. The functional relationship bases its predictions on initial core reactivity, the number of certain targets placed in the center of the reactor, and the total exposure of the control plates. Twelve characteristic fuel cycle clusters were identified. Nine fuel cycles were diagnosed as having noisy data, and one could not be predicted by the functional relationship. 13 refs., 6 figs

  6. Development of a general learning algorithm with applications in nuclear reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brittain, C.R.; Otaduy, P.J.; Perez, R.B.

    1989-12-01

    The objective of this study was development of a generalized learning algorithm that can learn to predict a particular feature of a process by observation of a set of representative input examples. The algorithm uses pattern matching and statistical analysis techniques to find a functional relationship between descriptive attributes of the input examples and the feature to be predicted. The algorithm was tested by applying it to a set of examples consisting of performance descriptions for 277 fuel cycles of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The program learned to predict the critical rod position for the HFIR from core configuration data prior to reactor startup. The functional relationship bases its predictions on initial core reactivity, the number of certain targets placed in the center of the reactor, and the total exposure of the control plates. Twelve characteristic fuel cycle clusters were identified. Nine fuel cycles were diagnosed as having noisy data, and one could not be predicted by the functional relationship. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Guide to General Atomic studies of hypothetical nuclear driven accidents for the Fort St. Vrain reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, T.; Tobias, M.

    1974-03-01

    The work of the General Atomic Company (GAC) in preparing those portions of the Final Safety Analysis Report for the Fort St. Vrain Reactor (FSV) having to do with hypothetical nuclear driven accidents has been reviewed and a guide to this literature has been prepared. The sources for this study are the Final Safety Analysis Report itself, the Quarterly and Monthly Progress Reports, Topical Reports, and Technical Specifications. The problems considered and the methods used are outlined. An appendix gives a systematic analysis which was used as a guide in organizing the references. (U.S.)

  8. A General Small-Scale Reactor To Enable Standardization and Acceleration of Photocatalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Chi Chip; Wismer, Michael K; Shi, Zhi-Cai; Zhang, Rui; Conway, Donald V; Li, Guoqing; Vachal, Petr; Davies, Ian W; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-06-28

    Photocatalysis for organic synthesis has experienced an exponential growth in the past 10 years. However, the variety of experimental procedures that have been reported to perform photon-based catalyst excitation has hampered the establishment of general protocols to convert visible light into chemical energy. To address this issue, we have designed an integrated photoreactor for enhanced photon capture and catalyst excitation. Moreover, the evaluation of this new reactor in eight photocatalytic transformations that are widely employed in medicinal chemistry settings has confirmed significant performance advantages of this optimized design while enabling a standardized protocol.

  9. Cre-loxP-Mediated Recombination: General Principles and Experimental Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Micheal A; Rosenthal, Nadia A; Pinto, Alexander R

    2017-03-02

    The cre-loxP-mediated recombination system (the "cre-loxP system") is an integral experimental tool for mammalian genetics and cell biology. Use of the system has greatly expanded our ability to precisely interrogate gene function in the mouse, providing both spatial and temporal control of gene expression. This has been largely due to the simplicity of its use and its adaptability to address diverse biological questions. While the use of the cre-loxP system is becoming increasingly widespread, in particular because of growing availability of conditional mouse mutants, many considerations need to be taken into account when utilizing the cre-loxP system. This review provides an overview of the cre-loxP system and its various permutations. It addresses the limitations of cre-loxP technology and related considerations for experimental design, and it discusses alternative strategies for site-specific genetic recombination and integration. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  10. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  11. General principles of nuclear safety management related to research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banciu, Ortenzia; Vladescu, Gabriela

    2003-01-01

    The paper contents the general principles applicable to the decommissioning of research reactors to ensure a proper nuclear safety management, during both decommissioning activities and post decommissioning period. The main objective of decommissioning is to ensure the protection of workers, population and environment against all radiological and non-radiological hazards that could result after a reactor shutdown and dismantling. In the same time, it is necessary, by some proper provisions, to limit the effect of decommissioning for the future generation, according to the new Romanian, IAEA and EU Norms and Regulations. Assurance of nuclear safety during decommissioning process involves, in the first step, to establish of some safety principles and requirements to be taken into account during whole process. In the same time, it is necessary to perform a series of analyses to ensure that the whole process is conducted in a planned and safe manner. The general principles proposed for a proper management of safety during research reactor decommissioning are as follows: - Set-up of all operations included in a Decommissioning Plan; - Set-up and qualitative evaluation of safety problems, which could appear during normal decommissioning process, both radiological and nonradiological risks for workers and public; - Set-up of accident list related to decommissioning process the events that could appear both due to some abnormal working conditions and to some on-site and off-site events like fires, explosions, flooding, earthquake, etc.); - Development and qualitative/ quantitative evaluation of scenarios for each incidents; - Development (and evaluation) of safety indicator system. The safety indicators are the most important tools used to assess the level of nuclear safety during decommissioning process, to discover the weak points and to establish safety measures. The paper contains also, a safety case evaluation (description of facility according to the decommissioning

  12. Maintainability considerations for the central cell in WITAMIR-I, a conceptual design of a tandem mirror fusion power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1980-10-01

    The concepts for maintaining the central cell reactor components for WITAMIR-I are described. WITAMIR-I is a conceptual tandem mirror fusion power reactor utilizing thermal barriers designed by the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Unique solutions to the difficult problems of routine blanket replacement and maintenance are proposed. Solutions are also proposed for maintaining the central cell coils and the shield

  13. Coherent states, quantum gravity, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. I. General considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stottmeister, Alexander; Thiemann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    This article, as the first of three, aims at establishing the (time-dependent) Born-Oppenheimer approximation, in the sense of space adiabatic perturbation theory, for quantum systems constructed by techniques of the loop quantum gravity framework, especially the canonical formulation of the latter. The analysis presented here fits into a rather general framework and offers a solution to the problem of applying the usual Born-Oppenheimer ansatz for molecular (or structurally analogous) systems to more general quantum systems (e.g., spin-orbit models) by means of space adiabatic perturbation theory. The proposed solution is applied to a simple, finite dimensional model of interacting spin systems, which serves as a non-trivial, minimal model of the aforesaid problem. Furthermore, it is explained how the content of this article and its companion affect the possible extraction of quantum field theory on curved spacetime from loop quantum gravity (including matter fields).

  14. Relationship between potency and boiling point of general anesthetics: a thermodynamic consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastmalchi, S; Barzegar-Jalali, M

    2000-07-20

    The most important group of nonspecific drugs is that of the general anesthetics. These nonspecific compounds vary greatly in structure, from noble gases such as Ar or Xe to complex steroids. Since the development of clinical anesthesia over a century ago, there has been a vast amount of research and speculation concerning the mechanism of action of general anesthetics. Despite these efforts, the exact mechanism remains unknown. Many theories of narcosis do not explain how unconsciousness is produced at a molecular level, but instead relate some physicochemical property of anesthetic agents to their anesthetic potencies. In this paper, we address some of those physicochemical properties, with more emphasis on correlating the anesthetic potency of volatile anesthetics to their boiling points based on thermodynamic principles.

  15. Forbidden Raman scattering processes. I. General considerations and E1--M1 scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harney, R.C.

    1979-01-01

    The generalized theory of forbidden Raman scattering processes is developed in terms of the multipole expansion of the electromagnetic interaction Hamiltonian. Using the general expressions, the theory of electric dipole--magnetic dipole (E1--M1) Raman scattering is derived in detail. The 1 S 0 → 3 P 1 E1--M1 Raman scattering cross section in atomic magnesium is calculated for two applicable laser wavelengths using published f-value data. Since resonantly enhanced cross sections larger than 10 -29 cm 2 /sr are predicted it should be possible to experimentally observe this scattering phenomenon. In addition, by measuring the frequency dependence of the cross section near resonance, it may be possible to directly determine the relative magnitudes of the Axp and AxA contributions to the scattering cross section. Finally, possible applications of the effect in atomic and molecular physics are discussed

  16. Steel fibre concrete, a safer material for reactor construction. A general theory for rupture prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammant, J.P.; Van Laethem, L.; Backx, E.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of steel fibre reinforcement on the mechanical behavior of concrete reactor structures is studied. It is shown that this material leads to a higher safety factor for highly stressed concrete structures like prestressed concrete pressure vessels. The reinforcement of concrete with short steel fibres results clearly in a fundamental change of the material properties. The study comprises basic experiments, the elaboration of an expression of the material laws, the development of a general computer program and the comparison of computational results with more elaborate experiments. Basic experimental work is conducted to determine the material characteristics of the fibre reinforced concrete. It is shown how the fibre reinforcement mechanism is translated into mathematical formulae by expressing the principal characteristics as matrix relationships. These relationships describe the elasto-plastic behavior and the cracked behavior. Probabilistic principles are used to express to fibre efficiency, such that a general stress-strain relationship is incorporated in a subsequent computer program. A general finite element program is developed which includes the new matrix relationships, the pull-out of fibres and the general stress-strain equations. A nonlinear calculation method gives the propagation of the distributed cracks with increasing load untill failure of the structure. Similarly, thermal cycling conditions are accounted for. For example the crack propagation in a fibre reinforced beam was measured by the photostress coating technique: the comparison with the computed crack propagation reveals an excellent agreement. Other comparative studies on simple structural parts are also reported

  17. Considerations on safety against seismic excitations in the project of reactor auxiliary building and control building in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.H.C.; Castro Monteiro, I. de

    1986-01-01

    The seismic requests to be considered in the project of main buildings of a nuclear power plant are discussed. The models for global seismic analysis of nuclear power plant structures, as well as models for global strength distribution are presented. The models for analysing reactor auxiliary building and control building, which together with the reactor building and turbine building form the main energy generation complex in a nuclear power plant, are described. (M.C.K.) [pt

  18. General Considerations Regarding the Restrictions, Exemptions and Limitations on the Right of Free Movement of Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Negrut

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a current problem, not only for the legal research, but also for the practical activity. Through this study we resume a subject that was analyzed by other authors as well, however, we highlighted, based on the analysis and observation, certain features on the free movement of persons. In the current context of globalization, the free movement of persons has new nuances. Based on the historical perspective of the approach of this principle, we examined the restrictions, exceptions and limitations on free movement of persons. From the analysis of the European legislation and jurisprudence it results that the exceptions on the free movement of persons must be interpreted strictly, the limits and the purpose of the restrictions being consistent with the general principles of European Union law (non-discrimination principle, proportionality and fundamental rights protection.

  19. Supporting and Protecting the Victims of Crime and the European Union. Some General Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana-Minodora Rusu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper there were examined, the general provisions of Directive 2012/29/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council of 25 October 2012 establishing minimum standards on the rights, support and protection of victims of crime and replacing the Framework Decision 2001/220/JHA. The paper continues other studies relating to international judicial cooperation in criminal matters, published in national or international journals or conference proceedings. Developed in a modern way that allows understanding the terms used by the European legislator and the described objectives, the paper can be useful to academics, practitioners or European legislator in terms of changing and supplementing this legislative act. The innovations consist in the brief examination, in the critical opinions and in formulating de lege ferenda, by which we propose a single act regulating the rights, supporting and protecting victims of crime by amending and completion of the examined document.

  20. Considerations regarding the general rule provided by the article 4 of the Rome II regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian PRICOPI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses certain issues related to the enforcement of the Rome II Regulation. The mentioned Regulation was adopted in order to unify, within the European Union, the rules regarding choice of law concerning non-contractual obligations. The application of the Regulation has caused some controversies in jurisprudence, regarding the implications on the national laws and international treaties or conventions. Almost two years after its prescribed date of application, a rigorous analysis of the Regulation’s impact over the case law, both on national and European level is necessary. The purpose of this study is to briefly describe, the research of the two authors regarding the practical effects of the aforementioned Regulation, as well as some judicial problems arisen from its application, mainly relating to the general rule of law, expressed in the fourth Article of the Regulation.

  1. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] staff evaluation of the General Electric Company Nuclear Reactor Study (''Reed Report'')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-07-01

    In 1975, the General Electric Company (GE) published a Nuclear Reactor Study, also referred to as ''the Reed Report,'' an internal product-improvement study. GE considered the document ''proprietary'' and thus, under the regulations of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), exempt from mandatory public disclosure. Nonetheless, members of the NRC staff reviewed the document in 1976 and determined that it did not raise any significant new safety issues. The staff also reached the same conclusion in subsequent reviews. However, in response to recent inquiries about the report, the staff reevaluated the Reed Report from a 1987 perspective. This re-evaluation, documented in this staff report, concluded that: (1) there are no issues raised in the Reed Report that support a need to curtail the operation of any GE boiling water reactor (BWR); (2) there are no new safety issues raised in the Reed Report of which the staff was unaware; and (3) although certain issues addressed by the Reed Report are still being studied by the NRC and the industry, there is no basis for suspending licensing and operation of GE BWR plants while these issues are being resolved

  2. 41 CFR 102-83.15 - Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? 102-83.15 Section 102-83... general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? Yes, Federal agencies must follow the hierarchy of consideration identified in § 102-79.55 of this chapter. ...

  3. General practitioners' management of mental disorders: A rewarding practice with considerable obstacles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleury Marie-Josée

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care improvement is the cornerstone of current reforms. Mental disorders (MDs are a leading cause of morbidity worldwide and widespread in industrialised countries. MDs are treated mainly in primary care by general practitioners (GPs, even though the latter ability to detect, diagnose, and treat patients with MDs is often considered unsatisfactory. This article examines GPs' management of MDs in an effort to acquire more information regarding means by which GPs deal with MD cases, impact of such cases on their practices, factors that enable or hinder MD management, and patient-management strategies. Methods This study employs a mixed-method approach with emphasis on qualitative investigation. Based on a previous survey of 398 GPs in Quebec, Canada, 60 GPs representing a variety of practice settings were selected for further study. A 10-minute-long questionnaire comprising 27 items was administered, and 70-minute-long interviews were conducted. Quantitative (SPSS and qualitative (NVivo analyses were performed. Results At least 20% of GP visits were MD-related. GPs were comfortable managing common MDs, but not serious MDs. GPs' based their treatment of MDs on pharmacotherapy, support therapy, and psycho-education. They used clinical intuition with few clinical tools, and closely followed their patients with MDs. Practice features (salary or hourly fees payment; psycho-social teams on-site; strong informal networks, and GPs' individual characteristics (continuing medical education; exposure and interest in MDs; traits like empathy favoured MD management. Collaboration with psychologists and psychiatrists was considered key to good MD management. Limited access to specialists, system fragmentation, and underdeveloped group practice and shared-care models were impediments. MD management was seen as burdensome because it required more time, flexibility, and emotional investment. Strategies exist to reduce the burden (one

  4. Some considerations concerning volume-modulated arc therapy: a stepping stone towards a general theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S; McQuaid, D

    2009-01-01

    In this paper it is formally shown that the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) IMRT delivery technique remains valid if the MLC is supported on a 1D moving platform. It is also shown that, in such circumstances, it is always time preferable to deliver overlapping modulating fields as a single swept field rather than as separate fields. The most general formulism is presented and then related to simpler equations in limiting cases. The paper explains in detail how a 'small-arc approximation' can be invoked to relate the 1D linear theory to the MLC-on-moving-platform-(gantry) delivery technique involving rotation therapy and known as volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is explained how volume-modulated arc therapy delivered with open unmodulated fields and which can deliver conformal dose distributions can be interpreted as an IMRT delivery. The (Elekta adopted) term VMAT will be used in a generic sense to include a similar (Varian) method known as RapidArc. Approximate expressions are derived for the 'amount of modulation' possible in a VMAT delivery. This paper does not discuss the actual VMAT planning but gives an insight at a deep level into VMAT delivery. No universal theory of VMAT is known in the sense that there is no theory that can predict precisely the performance of a VMAT delivery in terms of the free parameters available (variable gantry speed, variable fluence-delivery rate, set of MLC shapes, MLC orientation, number of arcs, coplanarity versus non-coplanarity, etc). This is in stark contrast to the situation with several other IMRT delivery techniques where such theoretical analyses are known. In this paper we do not provide such a theory; the material presented is a stepping stone on the path towards this.

  5. Sedation/general anesthesia for magnetic resonance imaging in paediatrics patients - special considerations and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzoneva, D.; Hinev, S.; Guergueltcheva, V.; Chamova, T.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study requires the patient to remain motionless for extended periods of time, which can not be achieved in children without special care or drug-induced sleep. There are various methods for sedation / general anaesthesia (GA) in children with their different advantages and disadvantages. The aim of this study was to report our experience with sedation/GA in children who require MRI/computed-tomography (CT) studies. We performed a retrospective review of the sedation/GA records in 34 children aged from 6 months to 12 years; class ASA I-III, undergoing diagnostic MR/CT study. Demographic data, information regarding diagnosis, type of sedation/GA, use of premedication, time to readiness for the procedure after premedication administration, duration of procedure, and the recovery time were obtained. Any adverse events were noted. Imaging study in most of the patients (61.8%) was performed for neurological diseases (delayed neuropsychological development, epilepsy, and cerebral palsy). Sedation/GA with Propofol was administered in 50% (n=17) of patients, in 26.5% (n=9) - Ketamine plus Midazolam; in 20.6% (n=7) - Midazolam alone, and in 9% (n=1) - Thiopental. The time to readiness for the procedure and the recovery time were statistically significantly shorter for patients receiving Propofol, and the observed adverse respiratory events were mild in severity, when compared with patients receiving sedation/GA with another hypnotic agent (p<0.05).The evaluation of the respiratory system before sedation/GA should be carefully performed, as the respiratory diseases could increase the patients' risk of adverse events occurrence. Sedation/GA with Propofol is a method of choice in children with neurological disorders with seizures, increased intracranial pressure and myopathies, undergoing MR/CT study. Crucial for patients' safety and good clinical results is the medical professionals, delivering sedation/GA, to have the knowledge and practical

  6. GENERAL CONSIDERATION REGARDING EU LAW IN THE DOMAIN OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra STĂNCIULESCU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The cultural heritage is a rich and diverse mosaic of cultural and creative expressions, our inheritance from previous generations of people and our legacy for those to come. In the terms of the Convention concerning the protection of the world cultural and natural heritage, the cultural heritage includes: monuments, such as architectural works, works of monumental sculpture and painting, elements or structures of an archaeological nature; groups of buildings and sites, such as works of man or the combined works of nature and man and areas including archaeological sites, all of these being of outstanding universal value from the point of view of history, art or science. Because of its substantial importance for the evolution of humanity, all nations in general and the European Union in particular, should have the duty of ensuring the identification, protection, conservation, presentation and transmission to future generations of the cultural and natural heritage. EU law states through the Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union at article 167 that the action of the Union shall be aimed at encouraging cooperation between Member States and, if necessary, supporting and supplementing the action in areas such as: improvement of the knowledge and dissemination of the culture and history of the European people; conservation and safeguarding of cultural heritage of European significance and others. While policy in this area is primarily the responsibility of Member States, regional and local authorities, the EU is committed to safeguarding and enhancing Europe's cultural heritage through a number of policies and programmes. Due to the lack of such policies and programmes, the lack of consistent terminology and legal definitions, especially between EU languages, the lack of information and data on the crimes that affect cultural goods, the purpose of the essay is to emphasize the need of a rigorous legal program and policy and to observe the

  7. Considerations regarding design of ion exchange columns for applications in heavy water nuclear reactors- a comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joginder Kumar; Nema, M.K.

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear reactor applications the principal role of the purification system is to maintain a satisfactory chemistry of moderator and coolant which are different at various stages of reactor operations e.g. during reactor start up, for removal of neutron poison from the moderator, the purification flows are much different compared to steady state operation of the reactor. In order to cater to varying requirements regarding purification load, optimisation in connection with ion exchange column design plays an important role and becomes very challenging in Heavy Water Nuclear Reactors mainly due to the fact that heavy water is very very expensive. In this paper a comprehensive review is made for various designs adopted so far regarding IX column in Indian PHWRs of 220 MWe size for normal operations. Design and operating experience regarding large size IX column used for occasional needs during dilute chemical decontamination of 220 MWe PHWRs is also discussed. The experience regarding development testing of the proposed design of ion exchange column for 500 MWe PHWRs is also discussed

  8. 41 CFR 102-79.55 - Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that agencies must follow in their utilization of space? 102-79.55 Section 102-79... Utilization of Space Utilization of Space § 102-79.55 Is there a general hierarchy of consideration that...

  9. Molten salt reactors. Synthesis of studies realized between 1973 and 1983. General synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hery, M.; Lecocq, A.

    1983-03-01

    After a brief recall of the MSBR project, French studies on molten salt reactors are summed up. Theoretical and experimental studies for a graphite moderated 1000 MWe reactor using molten Li, Be, Th and U fluorides cooled by salt-lead direct contact are given. These studies concern the core, molten salt chemistry, graphite, metals (molybdenum, alloy TZM), corrosion, reactor components [fr

  10. Evaluation and optimization of General Atomics' GT-MHR reactor cavity cooling system using an axiomatic design approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thielman, Jeff; Ge, Ping; Wu, Qiao; Parme, Laurence

    2005-01-01

    The development of the Generation IV (Gen-IV) nuclear reactors has presented social, technical, and economical challenges to nuclear engineering design and research. To develop a robust, reliable nuclear reactor system with minimal environmental impact and cost, modularity has been gradually accepted as a key concept in designing high-quality nuclear reactor systems. While the establishment and reliability of a nuclear power plant is largely facilitated by the installment of standardized base units, the realization of modularity at the sub-system/sub-unit level in a base unit is still highly heuristic, and lacks consistent, quantifiable measures. In this work, an axiomatic design approach is developed to evaluate and optimize the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of General Atomics' Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) nuclear reactor, for the purpose of constructing a quantitative tool that is applicable to Gen-IV systems. According to Suh's axiomatic design theory, modularity is consistently represented by functional independence through the design process. Both qualitative and quantitative measures are developed here to evaluate the modularity of the current RCCS design. Optimization techniques are also used to improve the modularity at both conceptual and parametric level. The preliminary results of this study have demonstrated that the axiomatic design approach has great potential in enhancing modular design, and generating more robust, safer, and less expensive nuclear reactor sub-units

  11. Design Safety Considerations for Water Cooled Small Modular Reactors Incorporating Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-03-01

    The global future deployment of advanced nuclear reactors for electricity generation depends primarily on the ability of nuclear industries, utilities and regulatory authorities to further enhance their reliability and economic competitiveness while satisfying stringent safety requirements. The IAEA has a project to help coordinate Member States efforts in the development and deployment of small and medium sized or small modular reactor (SMR) technology. This project aims simultaneously to facilitate SMR technology developers and potential SMR uses, particularly States embarking on a nuclear power programme, in identifying key enabling technologies and enhancing capacity building by resolving issues relevant to deployment, including nuclear reactor safety. The objective of this publication is to explore common practices for Member States, which will be an essential resource for future development and deployment of SMR technology. The accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was caused by an unprecedented combination of natural events: a strong earthquake, beyond the design basis, followed by a series of tsunamis of heights exceeding the design basis tsunami considered in the flood analysis for the site. Consequently, all the operating nuclear power plants and advanced reactors under development, including SMRs, have been incorporating lessons learned from the accident to assure and enhance the performance of the engineered safety features in coping with such external events

  12. Higher order generalized perturbation theory for boiling water reactor in-core fuel management optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B.R.; Turinsky, P.J.

    1998-01-01

    Boiling water reactor (BWR) loading pattern assessment requires solving the two-group, nodal form of the neutron diffusion equation and drift-flux form of the fluid equations simultaneously because these equation sets are strongly coupled via nonlinear feedback. To reduce the computational burden associated with the calculation of the core attributes (that is, core eigenvalue and thermal margins) of a perturbed BWR loading pattern, the analytical and numerical aspects of a higher order generalized perturbation theory (GPT) method, which correctly addresses the strong nonlinear feedbacks of two-phase flow, have been established. Inclusion of Jacobian information in the definition of the generalized flux adjoints provides for a rapidly convergent iterative method for solution of the power distribution and eigenvalue of a loading pattern perturbed from a reference state. Results show that the computational speedup of GPT compared with conventional forward solution methods demanding consistent accuracy is highly dependent on the number of spatial nodes utilized by the core simulator, varying from superior to inferior performance as the number of nodes increases

  13. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  14. General safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness.

  15. Financing - general considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Various aspects of the problems of financing a multinational regional fuel cycle centre (RFCC) are briefly discussed. Some of the points covered are: financing by participants; floating long-term loans on capital markets outside the countries of the participants; and export credits for the purchase of equipment manufactured outside the countries of the participants

  16. General safety considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness.

  17. General safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness

  18. General safety considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the full filling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 4 of the document contains some details about the priority to safety, financial and human resources, human factors, quality assurance, safety assessment and verification, radiation protection and emergency preparedness

  19. Protection set-points lines for the reactor core and considerations about power distribution and peak factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furieri, E.B.

    1981-01-01

    In order to assure the reactor core integrity during the slow operational transients (power excursion above the nominal value and the high coolant temperature), the formation of a steam film (DNB-Departure from Nucleate Boiling) in the control rods must be avoided. The protection set points lines presents the points where DNBR (relation between critical heat flux-q sub(DNB) and the local heat flux-q' sub(local) is equal to 1.30, corrected by peak factors and uncertainty in function of ΔTr and T sub(R), respectively coolant elevation and medium coolant temperature in reactor pressure vessel. The curve set-points were determined using a new version of COBRA-IIIF (CUPRO) computer code, implemented with new subroutines and linearized convergence scheme. Pratical results for Angra-1 core were obtained and its were compared with the results from the fabricator. (E.G.) [pt

  20. New techniques for cutting and decontamination for decommissioning of nuclear research reactors with consideration of cost reduction. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bach, W.; Redeker, C.F.; Versemann, R.

    2003-06-01

    In decommissioning of research reactors, specific boundary conditions, such as special materials, nuclides, geometries, spatial circumstances exist. This project aims on the development and adaptation of progressive procedures for decommissioning tasks with respect to economical aspects (cost reduction). Explored are Laser Cutting techniques, especially the cutting of aluminium in atmosphere and under water, remote- and manually controlled; decontamination and removal of concrete and ceramics by a combined diodelaser / cryogenic carbon dioxide thermal shock treatment (dry ice blasting) as well as cutting with the water-abrasive-suspension-jet and the plasma beam. The project will lead to application in the decommissioning of PTB's FRMB (research reactor of Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany). (orig.) [de

  1. TRIO a general computer code for reactor 3-D flows analysis. Application to a LMFBR hot plenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnaud, J.P.; Rouzaud, P.

    1985-09-01

    TRIO is a code developed at CEA to investigate general incompressible 2D and 3D viscous flows. Two calculations are presented: the lid driven cubic cavity at Re=400; steady state (velocity and temperature field) of a LMFBR hot plenum, carried out in order to prepare the calculation of a cold shock consecutive to a reactor scram. 8 refs., 26 figs.

  2. Decommissioning of the research nuclear reactor WWR-S Magurele - Bucharest. General presentation of the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragulescu, Emilian; Dragusin, Mitica; Popa, Victor; Boicu, Alin; Tuca, Carmen; Iorga, Ioan; Vrabie, Ionut; Mustata, Carmen

    2003-01-01

    A decommissioning project was worked out concerning the nuclear facility research reactor WWR-S Magurele-Bucharest to remove the radioactive and hazardous materials and so to exclude any risk for human health and environment. The project involves the four phases named assessment, development, operations and closeout. There are two major parts to the assesment phase: preliminary characterisation and the review and decision-making process. Characterisation is needed to develop project baseline data, which should include sufficient chemical, physical, and radiological characterisation to meet planning needs. Based on the conclusions of these studies, possible decommissioning alternative will be analyzed and: the best alternative chosen, final goal identified, risk assessments are evaluated. Also, taken into account are: regulations supporting assessment, land use considerations, financial concerns, disposal availability, public involvement, technology developments. After a decommissioning alternative was chosen, detailed engineering will begin following appropriate regulatory guidance. The plan will include characterisation information, namely: review of decommissioning alternatives; justification for the selected alternative; provision for regulatory compliance; predictions of personnel exposure, radioactive waste volume, and cost. Other activities are: scheduling, preparation for decommissioning operations; coordination, documentation, characterization report, feasibility studies, Decommissioning Plan, project daily report, radiological survey, airborne sampling records, termination survey of the site. The operations imply: identification and sequencing the operations on contaminated materials, storing on site the wastes, awaiting processing or disposal, and packaging of materials for transport to processing or disposal facilities.The key operations are: worker protection, health and safety program, review of planing work, work area assessment, work area controls

  3. General description of preliminary design of an experimental fusion reactor and the future problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sako, Kiyoshi

    1976-01-01

    Recently, the studies on plasma physics has progressed rapidly, and promising experimental data emerged successively. Especially expectation mounts high that Tokamak will develop into power reactors. In Japan, the construction of large plasma devices such as JT-60 of JAERI is going to start, and after several years, the studies on plasma physics will come to the end of first stage, then the main research and development will be directed to power reactors. The studies on the design of practical fusion reactors have been in progress since 1973 in JAERI, and the preliminary design is being carried out. The purposes of the preliminary design are the clarification of the concept of the experimental reactor and the requirements for the studies on core plasma, the examination of the problems for developing main components and systems of the reactor, and the development of design technology. The experimental reactor is the quasi-steady reactor of 100 MW fusion reaction output, and the conditions set for the design and the basis of their setting are explained. The outline of the design, namely core plasma, blankets, superconductive magnets and the shielding with them, vacuum wall, neutral particle injection heating device, core fuel supply and exhaust system, and others, is described. In case of scale-up the reactor structural material which can withstand neutron damage must be developed. (Kako, I.)

  4. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.

    2014-01-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  5. The intelligent customer: considerations around build-own-operate business and licensing models for small modular reactors in Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K., E-mail: kenneth.jones@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    An organization planning a proposal for a build-own-operate business model needs to address expanded licensee responsibilities under this model, associated regulatory impacts and how this affects their role as an 'intelligent customer'. This is particularly important for cases where builder-owner-operators plan to manufacture factory-fuelled designs and ship them to a site for installation and operation. The primary responsibility for safe conduct of licensed activities rests with the licensee. A build-own-operate model expands the scope of licensed activities to include design, manufacturing, transport, construction, and operation. The licensee must be able to demonstrate they are qualified to conduct all licensed activities including sufficient competent resources within the licensee's organization to oversee('Intelligent Customer') any work it commissions externally and the subsequent flow down through of the supply chain. This paper examines aspects that organizations need to assess the suitability of approaches that it may take to maintain in-house expertise for the control and oversight of licensed activities at all times. It considers the approach to identification of: core capabilities the licensee would need to understand its safety case under a build-own-operate model to manage licensed activities in accordance with requirements under the Nuclear Safety and Control Acta licensee's 'intelligent customer' capabilities in particular around understanding, specifying, overseeing and accepting work undertaken on its behalf by contractors. While this paper is focused on small modular reactors, being an intelligent customer applies to large commercial or research reactors equally; the size of reactor is immaterial.

  6. Nuclear safety considerations in the conceptual design of a fast reactor for space electric power and propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, T.-M.; Koenig, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Some nuclear safety aspects of a 3.2 mWt heat pipe cooled fast reactor with out-of-core thermionic converters are discussed. Safety related characteristics of the design including a thin layer of B4C surrounding the core, the use of heat pipes and BeO reflector assembly, the elimination of fuel element bowing, etc., are highlighted. Potential supercriticality hazards and countermeasures are considered. Impacts of some safety guidelines of space transportation system are also briefly discussed, since the currently developing space shuttle would be used as the primary launch vehicle for the nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft.

  7. Pin-wise Reactor Analysis Based on the Generalized Equivalence Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hwan Yeal; Heo, Woong; Kim, Yong Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, a pin-wise reactor analysis is performed based on the generalized equivalence theory. From the conventional fuel assembly lattice calculations, pin-wise 2-group cross sections and pin DFs are generated. Based on the numerical results on a small PWR benchmark, it is observed that the pin-wise core analysis provide quite accurate prediction on the effective multiplication factor and the peak pin power error is bounded by about 3% in peripheral fuel assemblies facing the baffle-reflector. Also, it was found that relatively large pin power errors occur along the interface between clearly different fuel assemblies. It is expected that the GET-based pin-by-pin core calculation can be further developed as an advanced method for reactor analysis via improving the group constants and discontinuity factors. Recently, high-fidelity multi-dimensional analysis tools are gaining more attention because of their accurate prediction of local parameters for core design and safety assessment. In terms of accuracy, direct whole-core transport is quite promising. However, it is clear that it is still very costly in terms of the computing time and memory requirements. Another possible solution is the pin-by-pin core analysis in which only small fuel pins are homogenized and the 3-D core analysis is still performed using a low-order operator such as the diffusion theory. In this paper, a pin-by-pin core analysis is performed using the hybrid CMFD (HCMFD) method. Hybrid CMFD is a new global-local iteration method that has been developed for efficient parallel calculation of pinby-pin heterogeneous core analysis. For the HCMFD method, the one-node CMFD scheme is combined with a local two-node CMFD method in a non-linear way. Since the SPH method is iterative and SPH factors are not direction dependent, it is clear that SPH method takes more computing cost and cannot take into account the different heterogeneity and transport effects at each pin interface. Unlike the SPH

  8. Activation characteristics of candidate structural materials for a near-term Indian fusion reactor and the impact of their impurities on design considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    H, L. SWAMI; C, DANANI; A, K. SHAW

    2018-06-01

    Activation analyses play a vital role in nuclear reactor design. Activation analyses, along with nuclear analyses, provide important information for nuclear safety and maintenance strategies. Activation analyses also help in the selection of materials for a nuclear reactor, by providing the radioactivity and dose rate levels after irradiation. This information is important to help define maintenance activity for different parts of the reactor, and to plan decommissioning and radioactive waste disposal strategies. The study of activation analyses of candidate structural materials for near-term fusion reactors or ITER is equally essential, due to the presence of a high-energy neutron environment which makes decisive demands on material selection. This study comprises two parts; in the first part the activation characteristics, in a fusion radiation environment, of several elements which are widely present in structural materials, are studied. It reveals that the presence of a few specific elements in a material can diminish its feasibility for use in the nuclear environment. The second part of the study concentrates on activation analyses of candidate structural materials for near-term fusion reactors and their comparison in fusion radiation conditions. The structural materials selected for this study, i.e. India-specific Reduced Activation Ferritic‑Martensitic steel (IN-RAFMS), P91-grade steel, stainless steel 316LN ITER-grade (SS-316LN-IG), stainless steel 316L and stainless steel 304, are candidates for use in ITER either in vessel components or test blanket systems. Tungsten is also included in this study because of its use for ITER plasma-facing components. The study is carried out using the reference parameters of the ITER fusion reactor. The activation characteristics of the materials are assessed considering the irradiation at an ITER equatorial port. The presence of elements like Nb, Mo, Co and Ta in a structural material enhance the activity level as well

  9. Seismic response analysis of nuclear reactor buildings under consideration of soil-structure interaction with torsional behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Iida, T.; Tsushima, Y.; Araki, T.; Nojima, O.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, the seismic response analysis is described in detail for estimating the soil-structure interaction effects with the torsional behavior. The analytical method is firstly shown for estimating the stiffness of reactor building by the bending-shear and torsion theory of the thin wall sections in regard to the behavior of structure. The three-dimensional behavior of structure can be obtained more briefly and simply by the proposed method. Secondly, the dynamical soil-foundation coefficient for estimating the dissipation of vibrational energy on the ground is derived by H. Tajimi's theory which is based on a solution of the propagation of seismic waves caused by point excitation on the surface of the elastic half-space medium. The above results give the vibrational impedances of the soil-foundation corresponding to the static soil coefficient, which is defined to the excitation force in the frequency domain. In order to analyze to the equivalues of reactor building, the authors thirdly attempt to approximate the dynamic soil-foundation coefficient as the frequency transfer function of displacement. The complex damping is used for more suitably estimating the elastic structural damping effects of structure. The regression analysis of many degrees of freedom is fourthly attempted for estimating the natural periods annd equivalent viscous damping ratios directly from the experimental results by the forced vibrational test performed in 1974. The analytical results are finally shown for simulating and comparing with the above-mentioned experimental results

  10. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Safety of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products - Part 1: General requirements and tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    This International Standard deals with safety aspects of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products such as electrical, thermal and mechanical safety. This standard covers the following types of dry-type transformers, power supplies, including switch mode power supplies, and reactors, the windings of which may be encapsulated or non-encapsulated. It has the status of a group safety publication in accordance with IEC Guide 104.

  12. Considerations concerning ''de minimis'' quantities of radioactive waste suitable for dumping at sea under a general permit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-02-01

    Following the principles proposed by the ICRP of balancing the costs and detriments of any practice involving radioactivity, there must be some level of radioactivity below which considerations other than those of the radioactivity itself are of overriding importance. For very low-level radioactive wastes, it is necessary to define a quantitative criterion which allows practical implementation of these principles within the terms of the London Dumping Convention. It will be necessary therefore to consider how these requirements can be met by defining material that can be regarded as non-radioactive for the purposes of the London Dumping Convention, defining a category of radioactivity in wastes whose content is sufficiently low (de minimis) that it can be dumped under a general permit if its other characteristics so permit. It is stressed that even if a material has been deemed to contain less than de minimis quantities of radioactive materials its suitability for dumping due to it's other constituents must still be carried out. The question of defining such a de minimis level of radioactivity was considered by an Advisory Group meeting convened at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna from 2 to 6 July 1979

  13. General outline of the operation and utilization of the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.M.; Leonard, F.; Gandolfo, J.M.; Lenders, H.

    1978-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is a high-flux material testing reactor of the thermal heterogeneous type. The fuel is 93% 235 U enriched uranium in the form of plates clad in aluminium. The moderator consists of beryllium and light water, the water being pressurized (12.5kg/cm 2 )and acting also as coolant. The pressure vessel is of aluminium, and is placed in a pool of demineralized water. One should stress the following main features of the design: the experimental channels are skew, the tube bundle presenting the form of a hyperboloid of revolution (see figure 1)-this gives easy access at the top and bottom reactor covers allowing complex instrumented devices, while maintaining a very high neutron flux at the core; great flexibilty of utilization, due to the fact that it is possible to adapt the core configuration to the experimental loading as the fissile charge can be centred on different experimental channels; although BR2 is a thermal reactor, it is possible to achieve neutron spectra very similar to those obtained in a fast reactor, either by the use of absorbing screens or by the use of fissile material within the experimental device; five 200mm diameter channels are available for loading large experimental irradiation devices, as in-pile sodium, gas or water loops. (author)

  14. A general overview of generation IV molten salt reactor (MSR) and the use of thorium as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Carlos H.; Stefani, Giovanni L.; Santos, Thiago A., E-mail: carlos.yamaguchi@usp.br, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    The molten salt reactors (MSRs) make use of fluoride salt as primary cooler, at low pressure. Although considered a generation IV reactor, your concept isn't new, since in the 1960 years the Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a little prototype of 8MWt. Over the 20{sup th} century, other countries, like UK, Japan, Russia, China and France also did research in the area, especially with the use of thorium as fuel. This goes with the fact that Brazil possess the biggest reserve of thorium in the world. In the center of nuclear engineering at IPEN is being created a study group connected to thorium reactors, which purpose is to investigate reactors using thorium to produce {sup 233}U and tailing burn, thus making the MSR using thorium as fuel, an object of study. This present work searches to do a general summary about the researches of MSR's, having as focus the utilization of thorium with the goal being to show it's efficiency and utilization is doable. (author)

  15. General meeting. Technical reunion: the numerical and experimental simulation applied to the Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-10-01

    The SFEN (French Society on Nuclear Energy), organized the 18 october 2001 at Paris, a technical day on the numerical and experimental simulation, applied to the reactor Physics. Nine aspects were discussed, giving a state of the art in the domain:the french nuclear park; the future technology; the controlled thermonuclear fusion; the new organizations and their implications on the research and development programs; Framatome-ANP markets and industrial code packages; reactor core simulation at high temperature; software architecture; SALOME; DESCARTES. (A.L.B.)

  16. Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-08-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the General Electric-Nuclear Test Reactor (GE-NTR) (Docket No. 50-73)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the General Electric Company (GE) for a renewal license number R-33 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by GE and is located in Pleasanton, California. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by GE without endangering the health and safety of the public

  18. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FORTHE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE FUEL CHANNELS IN THECANDU NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of theseinstallations has become one of the 21stcentury’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently,depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualifiedengineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is toplace a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility topublic health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility iswithin acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is todeliver a timely, cost-effective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmentalprotection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmentalradiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is notconsidered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is torecover the geographic site to its original condition.

  19. General empirical model for 60Co generation in pressurized water reactors with continuous refueling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urrutia, G.A.; Blesa, M.A.; Fernandez-Prini, R.; Maroto, A.J.G.

    1984-01-01

    A simplified model is presented that permits one to calculate the average activity on the fuel elements of a reactor that operates under continuous refueling, based on the assumption of crud interchange between fuel element surface and coolant in the form of particulate material only and using the crud specific activity as an empirical parameter determined in plant. The net activity flux from core to out-of-core components is then calculated in the form of parametric curves depending on crud specific activity and rate of particulate release from fuel surface. In pressure vessel reactors, contribution to out-ofcore radionuclide inventory arising in the release of activated materials from core components must be taken into account. The contribution from in situ activation of core components is calculated from the rates of release and the specific activities corresponding to the exposed surface of the component (calculated in a straightforward way on the basis of core geometry and neutron fluxes). The rates of release can be taken from the literature, or in the case of cobalt-rich alloys, can be calculated from experimentally determined cobalt contents of structural components and crud. For pressure vessel reactors operating under continuous refueling, activation of deposited crud and release of activated materials are compared; the latter, in certain cases, may represent a sizable (and even the largest) fraction of the total cobalt activity. It is proposed that the ratio of activities of 59 Fe to 54 Mn may be used as a diagnostic tool for in situ activation of structural materials; available data indicate ratios close to unity for pressure tube heavy water reactors (no in situ activation) and ratios around 4 to 10 for pressure vessel, heavy water reactors

  20. Training and qualification of licensed reactor operators at General Public Utilities Nuclear Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, R.L.; Coe, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Following the Three Mile Island-2 (TMI-2) accident in 1979, the utility responsible for managing the facility has looked closely at the training and qualification of its reactor operators. Performance-based operator training programmes are now in place, as required by the United States National Academy for Nuclear Training. Operators also participate directly in the development of a professional code of behaviour. (UK)

  1. Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant. License application, statement of general information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Application is made for a reactor facility consisting of a liquid metal cooled reactor and steam generator system, a steam turbine driven electric generating system, electrical switchyard, and related auxiliaries and supporting structures. The primary system is located in an inert atmosphere in shielded vaults within a containment structure. Sodium coolant is used to remove heat from the core and radial blanket. Heat from the primary sodium is transferred in heat exchangers to non radioactive sodium which is used to convert feed-water into steam which is superheated to drive a tandem-compound generator. A single shaft multi-stage turbine generator produces 380 MW(e) with steam conditions of 1450 psig at 900 0 F. Fuel is sintered ceramic pellets of mixed uranium-plutonium oxides encapsulated in stainless steel. There are 198 fuel assemblies with each assembly consisting of 217 fuel rods placed in a hexagonal channel. Plutonium enrichment ranges from 1817 to 32.0 percent by weight. Axial blanket sections contain depleted UO 2 with 99.8 percent 238 U and 0.2 percent 235 U by weight. The proposed location of the plant is within the corporate limits of the city of Oak Ridge in Roane County, Tennessee. (U.S.)

  2. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  3. Considerations of the opinions and others in the public hearing on the alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 3) in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station of the Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A public hearing was held in Hamaoka Town, Shizuoka Prefecture, on the alteration in reactor installation, i.e., the addition of Unit 3 in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., on March 19, 1981, by the Nuclear Safety Commission. The opinions and others stated by the local people were taken into consideration in the governmental examinations on the installation, etc. The considerations of such opinions principally in the examinations by NSC are explained in the form of questions (i.e. opinion, etc.) and answers (i.e. considerations) as follows: site conditions (earthquakes, ground, hydraulic features, etc.), the safety design of the reactor facilities (overall plant, aseismic design, the control of inflammable gas concentration, radioactive waste treatment, the reflection of accident experiences, etc.), radioactive waste management, radiation exposure relation, the technical capabilities of personnel (operation, etc.). (J.P.N.)

  4. Consideration of the opinions and others in the public hearing on the alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 2) in the Tsuruga Power Station of the Japan Atomic Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A public hearing was held in Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture, on the alteration in reactor installation, i.e., the addition of Unit 2 in the Tsuruga Power Station, JAPC, on November 20, 1980, by the Nuclear Safety Commission. The opinions and others stated by the local people were taken into consideration in the governmental examinations on the installation, etc. The considerations of such opinions principally in the examinations by NSC are explained in the form of questions (i.e. opinion, etc.) and answers (i.e. consideration) as follows: site conditions (site, earthquakes, ground, meteorology, siting situation, etc.), the safety design of the reactor facilities (overall plant, aseismic design, the teaching by the TMI accident in U.S., ECCS, pre-stressed concrete containment vessel, radioactive waste release, etc.), radioactive waste management, radiation exposure relation, the technical capabilities of personnel (operation, etc.). (J.P.N.)

  5. Estimation of CANDU reactor zone controller level by generalized perturbation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Heon; Kim, Jong Kyung; Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong; Yang, Won Sik

    1998-01-01

    The zone controller level change due to refueling operation has been studied using a generalized perturbation method. The generalized perturbation method provides sensitivity of zone power to individual refueling operation and incremental change of zone controller level. By constructing a system equation for each zone power, the zone controller level change was obtained. The details and a proposed model for future work are described

  6. A generalized adjoint framework for sensitivity and global error estimation in time-dependent nuclear reactor simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stripling, H.F.; Anitescu, M.; Adams, M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We develop an abstract framework for computing the adjoint to the neutron/nuclide burnup equations posed as a system of differential algebraic equations. ► We validate use of the adjoint for computing both sensitivity to uncertain inputs and for estimating global time discretization error. ► Flexibility of the framework is leveraged to add heat transfer physics and compute its adjoint without a reformulation of the adjoint system. ► Such flexibility is crucial for high performance computing applications. -- Abstract: We develop a general framework for computing the adjoint variable to nuclear engineering problems governed by a set of differential–algebraic equations (DAEs). The nuclear engineering community has a rich history of developing and applying adjoints for sensitivity calculations; many such formulations, however, are specific to a certain set of equations, variables, or solution techniques. Any change or addition to the physics model would require a reformulation of the adjoint problem and substantial difficulties in its software implementation. In this work we propose an abstract framework that allows for the modification and expansion of the governing equations, leverages the existing theory of adjoint formulation for DAEs, and results in adjoint equations that can be used to efficiently compute sensitivities for parametric uncertainty quantification. Moreover, as we justify theoretically and demonstrate numerically, the same framework can be used to estimate global time discretization error. We first motivate the framework and show that the coupled Bateman and transport equations, which govern the time-dependent neutronic behavior of a nuclear reactor, may be formulated as a DAE system with a power constraint. We then use a variational approach to develop the parameter-dependent adjoint framework and apply existing theory to give formulations for sensitivity and global time discretization error estimates using the adjoint

  7. Nuclear power reactors: reactor safety and military and civil defence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hvinden, T.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of fission products and plutonium in reactors is briefly described, followed by a short general discussion of reactor safety. The interaction of reactor safety and radioactive release considerations with military and civil defence is thereafter discussed. Reactors and other nuclear plants are factors which must be taken into account in the defence of the district around the site, and as potential targets of both conventional and guerilla attacks and sabotage, requiring special defence. The radiological hazards arising from serious damage to a power reactor by conventional weapons are briefly discussed, and the benefits of underground siting evaluated. Finally the author discusses the significance of the IAEA safeguards work as a preventive factor. (JIW)

  8. Design guide for Category III reactors: pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) in the ERDA Manual requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of DOE-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guides, and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirement of Category III reactor structures, components, and systems

  9. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  10. General practitioners' perspectives regarding competence and confidentiality in an adolescent with suspected anorexia nervosa: legal and ethical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Terence P; Paxton, Susan J

    2003-02-01

    In Victoria, Australia, the legal position regarding young people's competence to make medical treatment decisions has not been clarified in legislation, and a number of often vague common law decisions must be relied on for guidance. This situation produces a degree of uncertainty about appropriate professional practice, while also potentially impeding young people's rights claims in health care settings. With this in mind, the present research explored general practitioners' competence and confidentiality decisions regarding a 17-year-old female who presented with symptoms of an eating disorder. Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 500 Victorian general practitioners, of whom 190 responded. After reading a case vignette, general practitioners indicated whether they would find the hypothetical patient competent and if they would maintain her confidentiality. Seventy-three per cent of respondents found the patient competent and most would have maintained confidentiality, at least initially. However, subsequent analysis of the rationales supplied for these decisions revealed a wide diversity in general practitioners' understandings and implementations of extant legal authority. This research highlights the need for general practitioners to be exposed to up-to-date and clinically relevant explanations of contemporary legal positions.

  11. Reactor building with internal structure of which the movements are independent of those of the general raft and process for building these internal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hista, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    This reactor building includes a containment enclosure for the internal structures composed of a slab wedged on its periphery against the containment enclosure gusset and resting on the general raft by means of a peripheral bearing ring, a compressible layer being provided between the general raft and the slab [fr

  12. Holding or Breaking with Ptolemy's Generalization: Considerations about the Motion of the Planetary Apsidal Lines in Medieval Islamic Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, S Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    Argument In the Almagest, Ptolemy finds that the apogee of Mercury moves progressively at a speed equal to his value for the rate of precession, namely one degree per century, in the tropical reference system of the ecliptic coordinates. He generalizes this to the other planets, so that the motions of the apogees of all five planets are assumed to be equal, while the solar apsidal line is taken to be fixed. In medieval Islamic astronomy, one change in this general proposition took place because of the discovery of the motion of the solar apogee in the ninth century, which gave rise to lengthy discussions on the speed of its motion. Initially Bīrūnī and later Ibn al-Zarqālluh assigned a proper motion to it, although at different rates. Nevertheless, appealing to the Ptolemaic generalization and interpreting it as a methodological axiom, the dominant idea became to extend it in order to include the motion of the solar apogee as well. Another change occurred after correctly making a distinction between the motion of the apogees and the rate of precession. Some Western Islamic astronomers generalized Ibn al-Zarqālluh's proper motion of the solar apogee to the apogees of the planets. Analogously, Ibn al-Shāṭir maintained that the motion of the apogees is faster than precession. Nevertheless, the Ptolemaic generalization in the case of the equality of the motions of the apogees remained untouchable, despite the notable development of planetary astronomy, in both theoretical and observational aspects, in the late Islamic period.

  13. Generalized treatment of point reactor kinetics driven by random reactivity fluctuations via the Wiener-Hermite functional method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behringer, K.

    1991-02-01

    In a recent paper by Behringer et al. (1990), the Wiener-Hermite Functional (WHF) method has been applied to point reactor kinetics excited by Gaussian random reactivity noise under stationary conditions, in order to calculate the neutron steady-state value and the neutron power spectral density (PSD) in a second-order (WHF-2) approximation. For simplicity, delayed neutrons and any feedback effects have been disregarded. The present study is a straightforward continuation of the previous one, treating the problem more generally by including any number of delayed neutron groups. For the case of white reactivity noise, the accuracy of the approach is determined by comparison with the exact solution available from the Fokker-Planck method. In the numerical comparisons, the first-oder (WHF-1) approximation of the PSD is also considered. (author) 4 figs., 10 refs

  14. NJOY-97, General ENDF/B Processing System for Reactor Design Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a modular computer code used for converting evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format into libraries useful for applications calculations. Because the Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF) format is used all around the world (e.g., ENDF/B-VI in the US, JEF-2.2 in Europe, JENDL-3.2 in Japan, BROND-2.2 in Russia), NJOY gives its users access to a wide variety of the most up-to-date nuclear data. NJOY provides comprehensive capabilities for processing evaluated data, and it can serve applications ranging from continuous-energy Monte Carlo (MCNP), through deterministic transport codes (DANT, ANISN, DORT), to reactor lattice codes (WIMS, EPRI). NJOY handles a wide variety of nuclear effects, including resonances, Doppler broadening, heating (KERMA), radiation-damage, thermal scattering (even cold moderators), gas production, neutrons and charged particles, photo-atomic interactions, self shielding, probability tables, photon production, and high-energy interactions (to 150 MeV). Output can include printed listings, special library files for applications, and Postscript graphics (plus colour). More information on NJOY is available from the developer's home page at http://t2.lanl.gov. Follow the Tourbus section of the Tour area to find notes from the ICTP lectures held at Trieste in March 1998 on the ENDF format and on the NJOY code. 2 - Methods: NJOY97 consists of a set of modules, each performing a well-defined processing task. Each of these modules is essentially a separate computer program linked together by input and output files and a few common constants. The methods and instructions on how to use them are documented in the LA-12740-M report on NJOY91 and in the 'README' file. No new published document is yet available. NJOY97 is a cleaned up version of NJOY94.105 that features compatibility with a wider variety of compilers and machines, explicit double precision for 32-bit systems, a

  15. Considerations about decommissioning of the IEA-R1 research reactor and the future of its installations after shutdown; Consideracoes sobre o descomissionamento do reator de pesquisa IEA-R1 e futuro de suas instalacoes apos o seu desligamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frajndlich, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    The IEA-R1 Nuclear Research Reactor, in operation since 1957, in the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), is one of the oldest research reactors in the world. However at some point in time in the future, as example of the other reactors, it will be shutdown definitively. Before that time actually arrives, the operational organization needs to plan the future of its installations and define the final destination of equipment and radioactive as well as non-radioactive material contained inside the installations. These and other questions should be addressed in the so called Preliminary decommissioning plan of the installation, which is the subject of this work. The work initially presents an over view about the theme and defines the general and specific objectives describing, in succession, the directions that the operating organization should consider for the formulation of a decommissioning plan. The present structure of the Brazilian nuclear sector emphasizing principally the norms utilized in the management of radioactive waste is also presented. A description of principle equipment of the IEA-R1 reactor which constitutes its inventory of radioactive and non-radioactive material is given. The work emphasizes the experience of the reactor technicians, acquired during several reforms and modifications of the reactor installations realized during its useful life time. This experience may be of great help for the decommissioning in the future. An experiment using the high resolution gamma spectrometric method and computer calculation using Monte Carlo theory were performed with the objective of obtaining an estimate of the radioactive waste produced from dismantling of the reactor pool walls. The cost of reactor decommissioning for different choices of strategies was determined using the CERREX code. Finally, a discussion about different strategies is presented. On the basis of these discussions it is concluded that the most advantageous

  16. Physics of high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimo, L.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters entitled: general description of the HTR core; general considerations about reactor physics; neutron cross-sections; basic aspects of transport and diffusion theory; methods for the solution of the diffusion equation; slowing-down and thermalization in graphite; resonance absorption; spectrum calculations and cross-section averaging; burn-up; core design; fuel management and cost calculations; temperature coefficient; core dynamics and accident analysis; reactor control; peculiarities of HTR physics; analysis of calculational accuracy; sequence of reactor design calculations. (U.K.)

  17. Ultimate load analysis of prestressed concrete reactor pressure vessels considering a general material law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schimmelpfennig, K.

    1975-01-01

    A method of analysis is presented, by which progressive fracture processes in axisymmetric prestressed concrete pressure vessels during increasing internal pressure can be evaulated by means of a continuum calculation considering a general material law. Formulations used in the analysis concerning material behaviour are derived on one hand from appropriate results of testing small concrete specimens, and are on the other hand gained by parametric studies in order to solve questions still existing by recalulating fracture tests on concrete bodies with more complex states of stress. Due attention is focussed on investigating the behaviour of construction members subjected to high shear forces (end slabs.). (Auth.)

  18. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  19. Systems-design and energy-balance considerations for impact fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Areas of concern and potential problems for impact fusion are qualitatively considered within an overall systems context. A parametric and qualitative description of the general energy balance and systems considerations for an Impact Fusion Reactor (IFR) design is discussed. Reactor systems design considerations for an IFR are presented. An attempt to assess the IFR viability is made based on highly simplified but limiting projectile-target energy balances and thermonuclear burn models

  20. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltar, A.E.; Reynolds, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    This book describes the major design features of fast breeder reactors and the methods used for their design and analysis. The foremost objective of this book is to fulfill the need for a textbook on Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) technology at the graduate level or the advanced undergraduate level. It is assumed that the reader has an introductory understanding of reactor theory, heat transfer, and fluid mechanics. The book is expected to be used most widely for a one-semester general course on fast breeder reactors, with the extent of material covered to vary according to the interest of the instructor. The book could also be used effectively for a two-quarter or a two-semester course. In addition, the book could serve as a text for a course on fast reactor safety since many topics other than those appearing in the safety chapters relate to FBR safety. Methodology in fast reactor design and analysis, together with physical descriptions of systems, is emphasized in this text more than numerical results. Analytical and design results continue to change with the ongoing evolution of FBR design whereas many design methods have remained fundamentally unchanged for a considerable time

  1. Duplication of complete dentures using general-purpose handheld optical scanner and 3-dimensional printer: Introduction and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Kosuke; Matsuda, Takashi; Goto, Takaharu; Ishida, Yuichi; Ito, Teruaki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    To introduce a new clinical procedure for fabricating duplicates of complete dentures by bite pressure impression using digital technology, and to discuss its clinical significance. The denture is placed on a rotary table and the 3-dimensional form of the denture is digitized using a general-purpose handheld optical scanner. The duplicate denture is made of polylactic acid by a 3-dimensional printer using the 3-dimensional data. This procedure has the advantages of wasting less material, employing less human power, decreasing treatment time at the chair side, lowering the rates of contamination, and being readily fabricated at the time of the treatment visit. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  3. NJOY-94, General ENDF/B Processing System for Reactor Design Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The NJOY nuclear data processing system is a comprehensive computer code system for producing pointwise and multigroup cross sections and related quantities from ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data in the ENDF format, including the latest US library, ENDF/B-VI. The NJOY code works with neutrons, photons, and charged particles and produces libraries for a wide variety of particle transport and reactor analysis codes. It is capable of processing data in ENDF/B-4, ENDF/B-5, and ENDF/B-6 formats for evaluated data. Short descriptions of the different modules follow: RECONR Reconstructs pointwise cross sections from ENDF/B resonance parameters and interpolation schemes. BROADR Doppler broadens and thins pointwise cross sections. UNRESR Computes effective self-shielded pointwise cross sections in the unresolved-resonance region. HEATR Generates pointwise heat production cross sections and radiation-damage-energy production cross sections. THERMR Produces incoherent inelastic energy-to-energy matrices for free or bound scatterers, coherent elastic cross sections for hexagonal materials, and incoherent elastic cross sections. GROUPR Generates self-shielded multigroup cross sections, group- to-group neutron scattering matrices, and photon production matrices from pointwise input. GAMINR Calculates multigroup photon interaction cross sections and KERMA factors and group-to-group photon scattering matrices. ERRORR Produces multigroup covariance matrices from ENDF/B uncertainties. COVR Reads the output of ERRORR and performs covariance plotting and output-formatting operations. DTFR Formats multigroup data for transport codes such as DTF-IV and ANISN. CCCCR Formats multigroup data for the CCCC standard interface files ISOTXS, BRKOXS, and DLAYXS. MATXSR Formats multigroup data for the MATXS cross section interface file. ACER Prepares libraries for the Los Alamos continuous-energy Monte Carlo code MCNP. POWR Prepares libraries for the EPRI

  4. The mond external field effect on the dynamics of the globular clusters: general considerations and application to NGC 2419

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derakhshani, Kamran, E-mail: kderakhshani@iasbs.ac.ir [Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, P. O. Box 45195-1159 Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ{sup 2} of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  5. The mond external field effect on the dynamics of the globular clusters: general considerations and application to NGC 2419

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derakhshani, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the external field effect in the context of the MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) on the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of globular clusters (GCs). Using N-MODY, which is an N-body simulation code with a MOND potential solver, we show that the general effect of the external field for diffuse clusters, which obey MOND in most of their parts, is that it pushes the dynamics toward the Newtonian regime. On the other hand, for more compact clusters, which are essentially Newtonian in their inner parts, the external field is effective mainly in the outer parts of compact clusters. As a case study, we then choose the remote Galactic GC NGC 2419. By varying the cluster mass, half-light radius, and mass-to-light ratio, we aim to find a model that will reproduce the observational data most effectively, using N-MODY. We find that even if we take the Galactic external field into account, a Newtonian Plummer sphere represents the observational data better than MOND to an order of magnitude in terms of the total χ 2 of surface brightness and velocity dispersion.

  6. Space reactor safety, 1985--1995 lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1995-01-01

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatic, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration

  7. Space reactor safety, 1985--1995 lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, A.C.

    1995-12-31

    Space reactor safety activities and decisions have evolved over the last decade. Important safety decisions have been made in the SP-100, Space Exploration Initiative, NEPSTP, SNTP, and Bimodal Space Reactor programs. In addition, international guidance on space reactor safety has been instituted. Space reactor safety decisions and practices have developed in the areas of inadvertent criticality, reentry, radiological release, orbital operation, programmatic, and policy. In general, the lessons learned point out the importance of carefully reviewing previous safety practices for appropriateness to space nuclear programs in general and to the specific mission under consideration.

  8. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, D. [University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lang, L.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Lab., ON (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  9. A mechanistic model for predicting flow-assisted and general corrosion of carbon steel in reactor primary coolants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, D.

    2002-01-01

    Flow-assisted corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel in high-temperature lithiated water can be described with a model that invokes dissolution of the protective oxide film and erosion of oxide particles that are loosened as a result. General corrosion under coolant conditions where oxide is not dissolved is described as well. In the model, the electrochemistry of magnetite dissolution and precipitation and the effect of particle size on solubility move the dependence on film thickness of the diffusion processes (and therefore the corrosion rate) away from reciprocal. Particle erosion under dissolving conditions is treated stochastically and depends upon the fluid shear stress at the surface. The corrosion rate dependence on coolant flow under FAC conditions then becomes somewhat less than that arising purely from fluid shear (proportional to the velocity squared). Under non-dissolving conditions, particle erosion occurs infrequently and general corrosion is almost unaffected by flow For application to a CANDU primary circuit and its feeders, the model was bench-marked against the outlet feeder S08 removed from the Point Lepreau reactor, which furnished one value of film thickness and one of corrosion rate for a computed average coolant velocity. Several constants and parameters in the model had to be assumed or were optimised, since values for them were not available. These uncertainties are no doubt responsible for the rather high values of potential that evolved as steps in the computation. The model predicts film thickness development and corrosion rate for the whole range of coolant velocities in outlet feeders very well. In particular, the detailed modelling of FAC in the complex geometry of one outlet feeder (F11) is in good agreement with measurements. When the particle erosion computations are inserted in the balance equations for the circuit, realistic values of crud level are obtained. The model also predicts low corrosion rates and thick oxide films for inlet

  10. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-01

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  11. Development and Applications of a General Coupled Thermal-hydraulic/Neutronic Model for the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staalek, Mathias

    2008-03-15

    Coupled calculations are important for the simulation of nuclear power plants when there is a strong feedback between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics. A general coupled model of the Ringhals-3 Pressurized Water Reactor has been developed for this purpose. The development is outlined in the thesis with details given in the appended papers. A PARCS model was developed for the core calculations and a RELAP5 model for the thermal-hydraulic calculations. The RELAP5 model has 157 channels for modelling the flow in the fuel assemblies. This means that there is a one-one correspondence radially between the neutronic and thermal-hydraulic nodalization. This detailed mapping between the neutron kinetics and the thermal-hydraulics makes it possible to use the model for all kinds of transient. To provide realistic material data to the PARCS model, a cross-section interface was developed. With this interface one can import material data from a binary CASMO-4 library file into PARCS. Due to the one-to-one mapping, any any core loading can easily be considered. The PARCS model was benchmarked against measurements of the steady-state power distribution of Ringhals-3. The power shape was well reproduced by the model. Validational work for steady-state conditions of the thermal-hydraulic was also successfully performed. The most challenging part of the validation of a coupled model is for transients. This is much more difficult since the dynamics of the system becomes very important. Two transients that occurred at Ringhals-3 were chosen for the validational work. The first transient was a Load Rejection Transient. In general the model gave good results but some problems were experienced, e.g. the pressurizer pressure turned out to be more difficult to be correctly simulated. The second transient was a Loss of Feed Water transient. A malfunctioning feed water control valve closed, and therefore shut down the feed water supply to the steam generator in one of the

  12. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  13. Licensing considerations in converting NRC-licensed non-power reactors from high-enriched to low-enriched uranium fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R E

    1985-07-01

    During the mid-1970s, there was increasing concern with the possibility that highly enriched uranium (HEU), widely used in non-power reactors around the world, might be diverted from its intended peaceful uses. In 1982 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued a policy statement that was intended to conform with the perceived international thinking, and that addressed the two relevant areas in which NRC has statutory responsibility, namely, export of special nuclear materials for non-USA non-power reactors, and the licensing of USA-based non-power reactors not owned by the Federal government. To further address the second area, NRC issued a proposed rule for public comment that would require all NRC-licensed non-power reactors using HEU to convert to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, unless they could demonstrate a unique purpose. Currently the NRC staff is revising the proposed rule. An underlying principle guiding the staff is that as long as a change in enrichment does not lead to safety-related reactor modifications, and does not involve an unreviewed safety question, the licensee could convert the core without prior NRC approval. At the time of writing this paper, a regulatory method of achieving this principle has not been finalized. (author)

  14. Reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butz, H.P.; Heuser, F.W.; May, H.

    1985-01-01

    The paper comprises an introduction into nuclear physics bases, the safety concept generally speaking, safety devices of pwr type reactors, accident analysis, external influences, probabilistic safety assessment and risk studies. It further describes operational experience, licensing procedures under the Atomic Energy Law, research in reactor safety and the nuclear fuel cycle. (DG) [de

  15. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This chapter includes the following: General description of the RA reactor, organization of work, responsibilities of leadership and operators team, regulations concerning operation and behaviour in the reactor building, regulations for performing experiments, regulations and instructions for inserting samples into experimental channels [sr

  16. Development of a general coupling interface for the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS – Tested with the reactor dynamics code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, L.; Rohde, U.; Seidl, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Macián-Juan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A general coupling interface was developed for couplings of the TRANSURANUS code. • With this new tool simplified fuel behavior models in codes can be replaced. • Applicable e.g. for several reactor types and from normal operation up to DBA. • The general coupling interface was applied to the reactor dynamics code DYN3D. • The new coupled code system DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was successfully tested for RIA. - Abstract: A general interface is presented for coupling the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code with thermal hydraulics system, sub-channel thermal hydraulics, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) or reactor dynamics codes. As first application the reactor dynamics code DYN3D was coupled at assembly level in order to describe the fuel behavior in more detail. In the coupling, DYN3D provides process time, time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, which in case of the two-way coupling approach transfers parameters like fuel temperature and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. Results of the coupled code system are presented for the reactivity transient scenario, initiated by control rod ejection. More precisely, the two-way coupling approach systematically calculates higher maximum values for the node fuel enthalpy. These differences can be explained thanks to the greater detail in fuel behavior modeling. The numerical performance for DYN3D–TRANSURANUS was proved to be fast and stable. The coupled code system can therefore improve the assessment of safety criteria, at a reasonable computational cost

  17. General Considerations on Leisure Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurica Grigore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The leisure is a component of standard of living and quality of life, expresses the level of material and spiritual life, without it can’t beheld the multilateral development of the human, enforcing recovery functions of the organism, formative and instructive – educative, cultural andsocial. In pre-modern times, the free time was located on religious holidays and in the rest days established on the basis of religion (Sunday atChristians, Saturday at Jews, etc. The good of the individual towards trends any true democracy has in its structure, along with the materialcomponents and social and spiritual. In the economic and social framework, the reproduction of material conditions of existence is doubled by thehealth care, intelligent, creative force of the society members

  18. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ON MONEY LAUNDERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena EVA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lawyers are not immune to committing offences and the provisions of criminal law apply to them accordingly. The criminal liability of lawyers represents a natural aspect in the rule of law. Lawyers involved as defendants in criminal cases do not benefit from any special status or privileges compared to other defendants. In the international context of the fight against money laundering, the community law has submitted the profession of lawyer to two obligations concerning vigilance and denouncement. The assimilation of lawyer’s profession to financial or non-regulated professions entails the deformation of rules and principles specific to lawyers, as well as discussing the bases of any democratic society: the professional secrecy of lawyers and their independence.

  19. General Considerations on fiscal evasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pripoaie Silviu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of performance of any economy involves the measurement and correlation of three basic elements: the rate of economic growth,the rate of inflation and unemployment rate. When the rate of growth (rate of real GDP is high, the production of goods and services is growing andtherefore increasing the number of jobs, decrease unemployment and raise living standards. If the economy is in recession phase, increasing fiscalpressure to ensure the necessary budgetary funds triggers complex economic mechanisms. Rules more strictly is that those who are not able tooperate in the normal economy to slide towards the underground economy, and this not because he wants to tax evasion, but because they simplycannot cope with new regulations. It is widely accepted in economic theory and practice the idea that reliability scale macroeconomic indicators of acountry is affected by size of underground economy and the various tests made so far on this subject, focusing either on the social aspect or theeconomic or moral, or emphasizes the illegal or the edge of legality. This has led to various studies in this area do not provide comparable data orprovide data to the contrary. Worldwide were put in place, however, some calculation methods provided that applied the same country and sameperiod, the results are rarely consistent, sometimes even in fundamentally different.

  20. Numerical investigations of the fuel cycle for a 10 GW(TH)-OTTO-pebble-bed reactor with regard to high conversion ratio under special consideration of U-236 disconnexion through isotope-separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, H.

    1976-12-01

    A conversion ratio of near 1.0 can be achieved in a pebble-bed reactor using the OTTO (once through then out) loading scheme, having an economic burn-up of the fuel, an economic power density and a moderation ratio, which is considered realistically for the future. The flexibility of the reactor concept and of the fuel element design allows to recycle the fuel during full-power operation. In the present report first the criteria are shown, which are necessary to reach a high conversion ratio. Further it is presented that the conversion ratio increases considerably by closing the fuel cycle in consequence of the building-up of U-233. In this way the fuel inventory and the fuel consumption can considerably be diminished. It is demonstrated that the building-up and the accumulation of U-236 effects an important deterioration of the neutron economy. By taking the reprocessed uranium through an isotope separation (for example: ultra-gas-centrifugation) and by separation of U-236 from the other uranium isotopes it is possible to reduce the fuel consumption considerably. The expenditure and the cost which are necessary for the isotope separation are presented. (orig.) [de

  1. Determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of Photocatalytic Oxidation (PCO Purifiers for Indoor Air Pollutants Using a Closed-Loop Reactor. Part I: Theoretical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éric Dumont

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated that a laboratory-scale recirculation closed-loop reactor can be an efficient technique for the determination of the Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR of PhotoCatalytic Oxidation (PCO air purification devices. The recirculation closed-loop reactor was modeled by associating equations related to two ideal reactors: one is a perfectly mixed reservoir and the other is a plug flow system corresponding to the PCO device itself. Based on the assumption that the ratio between the residence time in the PCO device and the residence time in the reservoir τP/τR tends to 0, the model highlights that a lab closed-loop reactor can be a suitable technique for the determination of the efficiency of PCO devices. Moreover, if the single-pass removal efficiency is lower than 5% of the treated flow rate, the decrease in the pollutant concentration over time can be characterized by a first-order decay model in which the time constant is proportional to the CADR. The limits of the model are examined and reported in terms of operating conditions (experiment duration, ratio of residence times, and flow rate ranges.

  2. Power reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    This book concentrates on the different types of noise present in power reactors and how the analysis of this noise can be used as a tool for reactor monitoring and diagnostics. Noise analysis is a growing field that offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and natural multivariable interactions. A major advantage, continuous and undisturbed monitoring, supplies a means of obtaining early warnings of possible reactor malfunctions thus preventing further complications by alerting operators to a problem - and aiding in the diagnosis of that problem - before it demands major repairs. Following an introductory chapter, the theoretical basis for the various methods of noise analysis is explained, and full chapters are devoted to the fundamentals of statistics for time-domain analysis and Fourier series and related topics for frequency-domain analysis. General experimental techniques and associated theoretical considerations are reviewed, leading to discussion of practical applications in the latter half of the book. Besides chapters giving examples of neutron noise and acoustical noise, chapters are also devoted to extensive examples from pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants

  3. The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO): General description and implications for the research reactor infrastructure needed for R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, Yury A.

    2005-01-01

    The substantial growth in 21st century energy supplies needed to meet sustainable development goals has been emphasized by UNCSD, WSSD, IPCC and others. This will be driven by continuing population growth, economic development and aspiration to provide access to modern energy systems to the 1,6 billion people now without such access, the growth demand on limiting greenhouse gas emissions, and reducing the risk of climate change. A key factor to the future of nuclear power is the degree to which innovative nuclear technologies can be developed to meet challenges of economic competitiveness, safety, waste and proliferation concerns. There are two major international initiatives in the area of innovative nuclear technology: the IAEA's International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycle (INPRO) and the Generation IV International Forum. With INPRO some scenarios of future energy needs were identified and the methodology for holistic assessment of the innovative nuclear energy systems (INS), which can be developed to meet these scenarios, was developed.. The current status of the INPRO project and details of the INPRO methodology will be reported. The research needs identified due to Agency's activities on innovative nuclear system development assume the use of research reactors. The areas crucial for the development of INS which critically dependent of the RR experiments and following requirements addressed to the RR will be discussed. These areas include the development of advanced fuel and core materials for proposed innovative power reactor concepts. (author)

  4. Some general remarks concerning the experimental devices and means for flux measurements used in the research reactors of the C.E.A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossillon, F.; Chauvez, C.

    1964-01-01

    First, the authors define the operation and organisation lay-out of the research reactors. This out lay is then used as a basis for an examination of the conception, realisation and exploitation of irradiation devices. They then analyse the different operations carried out in placing an irradiation device in the reactor. They point out that the time necessary for decision of construction, conception, for material provision, for construction, out-of-pile tests and security examination is in general longer than the irradiation time. To minimize this time they advise a closer collaboration between the personnel of the experimentation laboratory and the reactor personnel for the conception of the design. They think it would be preferable to construct the prototypes in the research centre and leave the fabrication of small series to the industry. The methods used for the in-pile operation of the device are also indicated. Considering the evolution of the construction techniques they mention that the requirements for the irradiation conditions are put higher and higher (reactor stability and homogeneity). Also described are the performances of the main irradiation devices in operation in research reactor in the C.E.A. (authors) [fr

  5. General Description of the Mechanic Design of the Pressure Vessel and the Internal Mechanical Component of the CAREM Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diez, F.; Horro, R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a brief description of the CAREM reactor pressure vessel and its main internal mechanical components and summarizes the functional requirements and approaches applied for their design, together with a review of the normative applicable in each case

  6. Concept of the development of new type reactor and other nuclear technology in which nuclear-proliferation resistivity is taken into consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon I.

    2000-01-01

    As we start a new century in a new millennium, it is timely to look back at the last 50 years of nuclear energy development, and take a pause here to formulate the directions we need to take in the nuclear energy development for the next 50 years and beyond. The proliferation resistivity should be given a priority in the development of next-generation advanced reactor concepts, and there are three important principles to be considered in such efforts. The proliferation resistivity should be considered as a part of broader objectives, rather than a design goal by itself; the proliferation resistivity should be considered within the context of global institutional framework; and any technical proliferation resistivity features designed into the reactor system should be made intrinsic in nature. (author)

  7. Heat exchangers in heavy water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    Important features of some major heat exchange components of pressurized heavy water reactors and DHRUVA research reactor are presented. Design considerations and nuclear service classifications are discussed

  8. IAEA activities on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcala-Ruiz, F.

    1995-01-01

    Since its inception in 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included activities in its programme to address aspects of research reactors such as safety, utilization and fuel cycle considerations. These activities were based on statutory functions and responsibilities, and on the current situation of research reactors in operation around the world; they responded to IAEA Member States' general or specific demands. At present, the IAEA activities on research reactors cover the above aspects and respond to specific and current issues, amongst which safety-related are of major concern to Member States. The present IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP) is a response to the current situation of about 300 research reactors in operation in 59 countries around the world. (orig.)

  9. The fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: brief description of fast reactors; advantage in conserving uranium resources; experience, in UK and elsewhere, in fast reactor design, construction and operation; safety; production of plutonium, security aspects; consideration of future UK fast reactor programme. (U.K.)

  10. Mirror fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neef, W.S. Jr.; Carlson, G.A.

    1979-01-01

    Recent conceptual reactor designs based on mirror confinement are described. Four components of mirror reactors for which materials considerations and structural mechanics analysis must play an important role in successful design are discussed. The reactor components are: (a) first-wall and thermal conversion blanket, (b) superconducting magnets and their force restraining structure, (c) neutral beam injectors, and (d) plasma direct energy converters

  11. Metastatic Breast Cancer With ESR1 Mutation: Clinical Management Considerations From the Molecular and Precision Medicine (MAP) Tumor Board at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardia, Aditya; Iafrate, John A; Sundaresan, Tilak; Younger, Jerry; Nardi, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    : The last decade in oncology has witnessed impressive response rates with targeted therapies, largely because of collaborative efforts at understanding tumor biology and careful patient selection based on molecular fingerprinting of the tumor. Consequently, there has been a push toward routine molecular genotyping of tumors, and large precision medicine-based clinical trials have been launched to match therapy to the molecular alteration seen in a tumor. However, selecting the "right drug" for an individual patient in clinic is a complex decision-making process, including analytical interpretation of the report, consideration of the importance of the molecular alteration in driving growth of the tumor, tumor heterogeneity, the availability of a matched targeted therapy, efficacy and toxicity considerations of the targeted therapy (compared with standard therapy), and reimbursement issues. In this article, we review the key considerations involved in clinical decision making while reviewing a molecular genotyping report. We present the case of a 67-year-old postmenopausal female with metastatic estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer, whose tumor progressed on multiple endocrine therapies. Molecular genotyping of the metastatic lesion revealed the presence of an ESR1 mutation (encoding p.Tyr537Asn), which was absent in the primary tumor. The same ESR1 mutation was also detected in circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) extracted from her blood. The general approach for interpretation of genotyping results, the clinical significance of the specific mutation in the particular cancer, potential strategies to target the pathway, and implications for clinical practice are reviewed in this article. ER+ breast tumors are known to undergo genomic evolution during treatment with the acquisition of new mutations that confer resistance to treatment.ESR1 mutations in the ligand-binding domain of ER can lead to a ligand-independent, constitutively active form of ER and mediate

  12. Decommissioning a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The process of decommissioning a facility such as a nuclear reactor or reprocessing plant presents many waste management options and concerns. Waste minimization is a primary consideration, along with protecting a personnel and the environment. Waste management is complicated in that both radioactive and chemical hazardous wastes must be dealt with. This paper presents the general decommissioning approach of a recent project at Los Alamos. Included are the following technical objectives: site characterization work that provided a thorough physical, chemical, and radiological assessment of the contamination at the site; demonstration of the safe and cost-effective dismantlement of a highly contaminated and activated nuclear-fuelded reactor; and techniques used in minimizing radioactive and hazardous waste. 12 figs

  13. Validation of MCCI models implemented in ASTEC MEDICIS on OECD CCI-2 and CCI-3 experiments and further consideration on reactor cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agethen, K.; Koch, M.K., E-mail: agethen@lee.rub.de, E-mail: koch@lee.rub.de [Ruhr-Universitat Bochum, Energy Systems and Energy Economics, Reactor Simulation and Safety Group, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Within a severe accident in a light water reactor a loss of coolant can result in core melting and vessel failure. Afterwards, molten core material may discharge into the containment cavity and interact with the concrete basemat. Due to concrete erosion gases are released, which lead to exothermic oxidation reactions with the metals in the corium and to formation of combustible mixtures. In this work the MEDICIS module of the Accident Source Term Evaluation Code (ASTEC) is validated on experiments of the OECD CCI programme. The primary focus is set on the CCI-2 experiment with limestone common sand (LCS) concrete, in which nearly homogenous erosion appeared, and the CCI-3 experiment with siliceous concrete, in which increased lateral erosion occurred. These experiments enable the analysis of heat transfer depending on the axial and radial orientation from the interior of the melt to the surrounding surfaces and the impact of top flooding. For the simulation of both tests, two existing models in MEDICIS are used and analysed. Results of simulations show a good agreement of ablation behaviour, layer temperature and energy balance with experimental results. Furthermore the issue of a quasi-steady state in the energy balance for the long term appeared. Finally the basic data are scaled up to a generic reactor scenario, which shows that this quasi-steady state similarly occurred. (author)

  14. To the problem of regulating of software applicability for the analysis of domestic reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, V.V.; Skalozubov, V.I.

    1999-01-01

    Based on consideration and generalization of results of verification/validation researches the necessity of development of an objective evaluation criterions of software applicability (calculated codes) for separate types of domestic reactor accidents is justified. These criterions should be used in a normative position of certification or the application order of calculated codes for the analysis of reactor safety

  15. Implementation of defence in depth for next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The publication of this IAEA technical document represents the conclusion of a task, initiated in 1995, devoted to defence in depth in future reactors. It focuses mainly on the next generation of LWRs, although many general considerations may also apply to other types of reactors

  16. Serious reactor accidents reconsidered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The chance is determined for damage of the reactor core and that sequel events will cause excursion of radioactive materials into the environment. The gravity of such an accident is expressed by the source term. It appears that the chance for such an accident varies with the source term. In general it is valid that how larger the source term how smaller the chance is for it and vice versa. The chance for excursion is related to two complexes of events: serious damage (meltdown) of the reactor core, and the escape of the liberated radionuclides into the environment. The results are an order of magnitude consideration of the relation between the extent of the source term and the chance for it. From the spectrum of possible source terms three representative ones have been chosen: a large, a medium and a relative small source term. This choice is in accordance with international considerations. The hearth of this study is the estimation of the chance for occurrence of the three chosen source terms for new light-water reactors. refs.; figs.; tabs

  17. Reactor plant for Belene NPP completion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragunov, Yu. G.; Ryzhov, S. B.; Ermakov, D. N.; Repin, A. I.

    2004-01-01

    Construction of 'Belene' NPP was started at the end of 80-ties using project U-87 with V-320 reactor plant, general designer of this plant is OKB 'Gidropress'. At the beginning of 90-ties, on completing the considerable number of deliveries and performance of civil engineering work at the site the NPP construction was suspended. Nowadays, considering the state of affairs at the site and the work performed by Bulgarian Party on preservation of the equipment delivered, the most perspective is supposed to be implementation of the following versions in completing 'Belene' NPP: for completion of Unit 1 - reactor plant VVER-1000 on the basis of V-320 reactor with the maximum use of the delivered equipment (V-320M) having the extended service life and safety improvement; for Unit 2 - advanced reactor plant VVER-1000. For the upgraded reactor plant V-230M the basic solutions and characteristics are presented, as well as the calculated justification of strength and safety analyses, design of the reactor core and fuel cycle, instrumentation and control systems, application of the 'leak-before break' in the project and implementation of safety measures. For the modernised reactor plant V-392M the main characteristics and basic changes are presented, concerning reactor pressure vessel, steam generator, reactor coolant pump set. Design of NPP with the modernized reactor plant V-320M meets the up-to-date requirements and can be licensed for completion and operation. In the design of NPP with the advanced reactor plant the basic solutions and the equipment are used that are similar to those used in standard reactor plant V-320 and new one with VVER-1000 under construction and completion in Russia, and abroad. Compliance of reactor design with the up-to-date international requirements, considering the extended service life of the main equipment, shows its rather high potential for implementation during completion of 'Belene' NPP

  18. Part 8. Deployment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, K.D.; Chang, Y.I.; Daly, T.A.

    1980-01-01

    This report addresses considerations of fast breeder reactor development and deployment from a national perspective. Nations vary greatly in their expertise and interest relative to nuclear power, and hence a single set of steps to be taken by a nation in decision-making on breeder development and deployment cannot be presented. The approach taken in this report is to present discussions on key factors influencing the breeder development and deployment decisions, especially in non-breeder nations, by drawing upon historical perspectives of the Light Water Reactor for comparison

  19. Training and teaching with SILOETTE reactor and associated simulators at the Nuclear Research Centre of Grenoble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destot, M.

    1983-10-01

    Thanks to its three reactors SILOE (35 MW), MELUSINE (8 MW) and SILOETTE (100 KW), the Reactor Department of the Nuclear Research Centre of Grenoble has gained a considerable experience in the operation and utilization of research and material testing reactors. Inside of this general framework, the Reactor Department of Grenoble has built up a training and teaching centre that has been permanently active since 1975, with the aim of satisfying the considerable needs arising from the development of electro-nuclear power stations. The course is mainly intended for engineers and technicians who will be responsible for running power stations. A thorough series of practical exercices, carried out in the SILOETTE training reactor and in a PWR or in a Gas Cooled Reactor Simulator, desmonstrates the application of the theorical courses and familiarises the trainees with the behaviour of reactors and power stations

  20. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR. PART 6 - PRESENTATION OF THE DECOMMISSIONING DEVICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to present a possible solution for the designing of a device for the decommissioning of the horizontal fuel channels in the CANDU 6 nuclear reactor. The decommissioning activities are dismantling, demolition, controlled removal of equipment, components, conventional or hazardous waste (radioactive, toxic in compliance with the international basic safety standards on radiation protection. One as the most important operation in the final phase of the nuclear reactor dismantling is the decommissioning of fuel channels. For the fuel channels decommissioning should be taken into account the detailed description of the fuel channel and its components, the installation documents history, adequate radiological criteria for decommissioning guidance, safety and environmental impact assessment, including radiological and non-radiological analysis of the risks that can occur for workers, public and environment, the description of the proposed program for decommissioning the fuel channel and its components, the description of the quality assurance program and of the monitoring program, the equipments and methods used to verify the compliance with the decommissioning criteria, the planning of performing the final radiological assessment at the end of the fuel channel decommissioning. These will include also, a description of the proposed radiation protection procedures to be used during decommissioning. The dismantling of the fuel channel is performed by one device which shall provide radiation protection during the stages of decommissioning, ensuring radiation protection of the workers. The device shall be designed according to the radiation protection procedures. The decommissioning device assembly of the fuel channel components is composed of the device itself and moving platform support for coupling of the selected channel to be dismantled. The fuel channel decommissioning device is an autonomous device designed for

  1. Some general requirements for irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, H P; Skjoeldebrand, R

    1960-05-15

    This paper is limited to the interests of the EAES-symposium, namely the use of reactors for materials research and testing, for convenience we exclude consideration of chemical effects and problems of coolant technology. Its purpose is to try to define the general requirements for irradiation experiments and the reactors housing them; to see what facilities for irradiation experiments are available within the European Atomic Energy Society countries and finally, to point out possible limitations of these facilities.

  2. Processing of FRG high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel elements at General Atomic under the US/FRG cooperative agreement for spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, N.D.; Strand, J.B.; Schwarz, F.A.; Drake, R.N.

    1981-11-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and the United States (US) are cooperating on certain aspects of gas-cooled reactor technology under an umbrella agreement. Under the spent fuel treatment development section of the agreement, both FRG mixed uranium/ thorium and low-enriched uranium fuel spheres have been processed in the Department of Energy-sponsored cold pilot plant for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel processing at General Atomic Company in San Diego, California. The FRG fuel spheres were crushed and burned to recover coated fuel particles suitable for further treatment for uranium recovery. Successful completion of the tests described in this paper demonstrated certain modifications to the US HTGR fuel burining process necessary for FRG fuel treatment. Results of the tests will be used in the design of a US/FRG joint prototype headend facility for HTGR fuel

  3. Nuclear reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of different reactor types designed to exploit controlled fission reactions are explained. Reactors vary from low power research devices to high power devices especially designed to produce heat, either for direct use or to produce steam to drive turbines to generate electricity or propel ships. A general outline of basic reactors (thermal and fast) is given and then the different designs considered. The first are gas cooled, including the Magnox reactors (a list of UK Magnox stations and reactor performance is given), advanced gas cooled reactors (a list of UK AGRs is given) and the high temperature reactor. Light water cooled reactors (pressurized water [PWR] and boiling water [BWR] reactors) are considered next. Heavy water reactors are explained and listed. The pressurized heavy water reactors (including CANDU type reactors), boiling light water, steam generating heavy water reactors and gas cooled heavy water reactors all come into this category. Fast reactors (liquid metal fast breeder reactors and gas cooled fast reactors) and then water-cooled graphite-moderated reactors (RBMK) (the type at Chernobyl-4) are discussed. (U.K.)

  4. Influence of Incomplete Mixing on the OH-Isoprene Reaction in the Lower Troposphere - Measurements Above the Amazon Rain Forest and General Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörgel, M.; Dlugi, R. J. W.; Berger, M.; Mallik, C.; Tsokankunku, A.; Zelger, M.; Acevedo, O. C.; Dias, N. L.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Kesselmeier, J.; Kramm, G.; Marno, D. R.; Martinez, M.; Nölscher, A.; H G, O.; Pfannerstill, E.; Bourtsoukidis, E.; Rohrer, F.; Tauer, S.; Williams, J.; Yanez Serrano, A. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Harder, H.

    2017-12-01

    Incomplete mixing of reactants in the atmosphere (segregation) causes reduced reaction rates compared to laboratory values derived for well mixed conditions. To adequately determine the actual reaction rates in a variety of natural environments where the distribution of sources and sinks leads to inhomogeneous distribution of reactants, the intensity of segregation (IS) has to be taken into account. Although, there has been considerable progress in modeling IS in the boundary layer within the last 30 years, calculations from direct observations are still sparse as high time resolution and time synchronization are required. OH-radicals are the most important oxidizing agent in the atmosphere, and are therefore regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, reacting with the majority of atmospheric pollutants and therefore accelerating their removal from the atmosphere. Hence, to understand atmospheric self-cleansing, we need to quantify and understand the budgets (sources and sinks) of OH. As it is a fast reacting compound, for some of its reactants mixing will limit the reaction rate. The reaction of isoprene and OH radicals has gained considerable interest in recent years since large discrepancies between modeled and measured OH have been found mainly in high isoprene environments. This motivated not only laboratory studies on unknown recycling mechanisms for OH in this reaction, but also modeling work and field studies on the effect of segregation on this reaction. We measured OH radicals, isoprene and other species that are either precursors of OH or promote OH recycling (e.g. O3, NOx, HO2, H2O) with high time resolution (1-10 Hz) closely above a rain forest canopy (at 41 m above ground level) at the ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) site (02°08'38.8''S, 58°59'59.5''W). The site is characterized by high isoprene (up to 20 ppb) and low NO (50 -500 ppt). Simultaneous measurements of OH and isoprene with high time resolution so far have been sparse. To our

  5. Design guide for category II reactors light and heavy water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brynda, W.J.; Lobner, P.R.; Powell, R.W.; Straker, E.A.

    1978-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in the ERDA Manual, requires that all DOE-owned reactors be sited, designed, constructed, modified, operated, maintained, and decommissioned in a manner that gives adequate consideration to health and safety factors. Specific guidance pertinent to the safety of DOE-owned reactors is found in Chapter 0540 of the ERDA Manual. The purpose of this Design Guide is to provide additional guidance to aid the DOE facility contractor in meeting the requirement that the siting, design, construction, modification operation, maintainance, and decommissioning of DOW-owned reactors be in accordance with generally uniform standards, guide and codes which are comparable to those applied to similar reactors licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This Design Guide deals principally with the design and functional requirements of Category II reactor structure, components, and systems

  6. Guidebook to nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1976-05-01

    A general introduction to reactor physics and theory is followed by descriptions of commercial nuclear reactor types. Future directions for nuclear power are also discussed. The technical level of the material is suitable for laymen

  7. Reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawabe, Ryuhei; Yamaki, Rika.

    1990-01-01

    A water vessel is disposed and the gas phase portion of the water vessel is connected to a reactor container by a pipeline having a valve disposed at the midway thereof. A pipe in communication with external air is extended upwardly from the liquid phase portion to a considerable height so as to resist against the back pressure by a waterhead in the pipeline. Accordingly, when the pressure in the container is reduced to a negative level, air passes through the pipeline and uprises through the liquid phase portion in the water vessel in the form of bubbles and then flows into the reactor container. When the pressure inside of the reactor goes higher, since the liquid surface in the water vessel is forced down, water is pushed up into the pipeline. Since the waterhead pressure of a column of water in the pipeline and the pressure of the reactor container are well-balanced, gases in the reactor container are not leaked to the outside. Further, in a case if a great positive pressure is formed in the reactor container, the inner pressure overcomes the waterhead of the column of water, so that the gases containing radioactive aerosol uprise in the pipeline. Since water and the gases flow being in contact with each other, this can provide the effect of removing aerosol. (T.M.)

  8. Radiological protection considerations during the treatment of glioblastoma patients by boron neutron capture therapy at the high flux reactor in Petten, The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.; Rassow, J.; Finke, E.; Sauerwein, W.; Stecher-Rasmussen, F.

    2001-01-01

    A clinical trial of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma patients has been in progress at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten since October 1997. The JRC (as licence holder of the HFR) must ensure that radiological protection measures are provided. The BNCT trial is a truly European trial, whereby the treatment takes place at a facility in the Netherlands under the responsibility of clinicians from Germany and patients are treated from several European countries. Consequently, radiological protection measures satisfy both German and Dutch laws. To respect both laws, a BNCT radioprotection committee was formed under the chairmanship of an independent radioprotection expert, with members representing all disciplines in the trial. A special nuance of BNCT is that the radiation is provided by a mixed neutron/gamma beam. The radiation dose to the patient is thus a complex mix due to neutrons, gammas and neutron capture in boron, nitrogen and hydrogen, which, amongst others, need to be correctly calculated in non-commercial and validated treatment planning codes. Furthermore, due to neutron activation, measurements on the patient are taken regularly after treatment. Further investigations along these lines include dose determination using TLDs and boron distribution measurements using on-line gamma ray spectroscopy. (author)

  9. Dr Robert Aymar, Director of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), was nominated to succeed Professor Luciano Maiani as CERN's Director General, to take office on 1 January 2004.

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Dr Robert Aymar, Director of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), was nominated to succeed Professor Luciano Maiani as CERN's Director General, to take office on 1 January 2004.

  10. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  11. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System's Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a open-quotes green fieldclose quotes condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined

  12. Relationship between general safety requirements and safety culture in the improvement of safe operation of I.N.R. TRIGA reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Preda, M.; Chiritescu, M.; Dumitru, M.

    1996-01-01

    Acquiring of the basic principles of ''safety culture'' by a large number of profesionals in the nuclear field drew the attention of the decision factors in the INR managerial structure, who decided to promote certain practical actions at each level in order to improve nuclear safety. Starting from the ''Republican Standards for Nuclear Safety'' issued by CSEN in 1975, where general safety criteria are defined for nuclear reactors and NPPs, the specialists at the TRIGA reactor originated and implemented a coherent and secure system to ensure nuclear safety over all steps of nuclear activities: research, conception, execution, commissioning and operation. This system has been continuosly corrected so that now it is completely integrated in a modern safety system. The paper presents the way in which a modern system for nuclear safety at the TRIGA reactor has been implemented and developed, in accordance to specific criteria and requirements imposed by related National Regulations and with the principles of safety culture. Starting from the definition of specific responsabilities, there are presented the internal stipulations and practical actions at all levels in order to enhance nuclear safety. (orig.)

  13. Proceedings of first SWCR-KURRI academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Itsuro; Cong, Zhebao

    1986-01-01

    These are the proceedings of an academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics held at the Southwest Centre for Reactor Engineering Research and Design in Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China in September 24-26 in 1985. Included are the chairmen's addresses and 10 papers presented at the seminar in English. The titles of these papers are: (1) Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, (2) General Review of Thorium Research in Japanese Universities, (3) Comprehensive Utilization and Economic Analysis of the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor, (4) Present States of Applied Health Physics in Japan, (5) Neutron Radiography with Kyoto University Reactor, (6) Topics of Experimental Works with Kyoto University Reactor, (7) Integral Check of Nuclear Data for Reactor Structural Materials, (8) The Reactor Core, Physical Experiments and the Operation Safety Regulation of the Zero Energy Thermal Reactor for PWR Nuclear Power Plant, (9) HFETR Core Physical Parameters at Power, (10) Physical Consideration for Loads of Operated Ten Cycles in HFETR. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactors. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiron, P.

    1997-01-01

    This paper is an introduction to the 'nuclear reactors' volume of the Engineers Techniques collection. It gives a general presentation of the different articles of the volume which deal with: the physical basis (neutron physics and ionizing radiations-matter interactions, neutron moderation and diffusion), the basic concepts and functioning of nuclear reactors (possible fuel-moderator-coolant-structure combinations, research and materials testing reactors, reactors theory and neutron characteristics, neutron calculations for reactor cores, thermo-hydraulics, fluid-structure interactions and thermomechanical behaviour of fuels in PWRs and fast breeder reactors, thermal and mechanical effects on reactors structure), the industrial reactors (light water, pressurized water, boiling water, graphite moderated, fast breeder, high temperature and heavy water reactors), and the technology of PWRs (conceiving and building rules, nuclear parks and safety, reactor components and site selection). (J.S.)

  15. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 4 - FUEL CHANNEL ASSEMBLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, costeffective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  16. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 2 - FUEL CHANNEL PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, costeffective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning.The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  17. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 3 - FUEL CHANNEL REFERENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, cost-effective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  18. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DEVICE FOR THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE HORIZONTAL FUEL CHANNELS IN THE CANDU 6 NUCLEAR REACTOR PART 5 - FUEL CHANEL DECOMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi ROSCA FARTAT

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As many nuclear power plants are reaching their end of lifecycle, the decommissioning of these installations has become one of the 21st century’s great challenges. Each project may be managed differently, depending on the country, development policies, financial considerations, and the availability of qualified engineers or specialized companies to handle such projects. The principle objective of decommissioning is to place a facility into such a condition that there is no unacceptable risk from the decommissioned facility to public health and safety of the environment. In order to ensure that at the end of its life the risk from a facility is within acceptable bounds, action is normally required. The overall decommissioning strategy is to deliver a timely, cost-effective program while maintaining high standards of safety, security and environmental protection. If facilities were not decommissioned, they could degrade and potentially present an environmental radiological hazard in the future. Simply abandoning or leaving a facility after ceasing operations is not considered to be an acceptable alternative to decommissioning. The final aim of decommissioning is to recover the geographic site to its original condition.

  19. License considerations of the temporary storage in dry of the nuclear spent fuel of light water reactors; Consideraciones de licenciamiento del almacenamiento temporal en seco del combustible gastado nuclear de reactores de agua ligera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazan L, A.; Vargas A, A.; Cardenas J, J. B., E-mail: ariadna.bazan@cfe.gob.mx [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The spent fuel of the nuclear power plants of light water is usually stored in cells or frames inside steel coating pools. The water of the spent fuel pool has a double function: it serves as shielding or barrier for the radiation that emits the spent fuel and, on the other hand, to cool it in accordance with its decay in the time. The administration policies of the spent fuel vary of some countries to other, resulting common to all the cases this initial stage of cooling in the pools, after its irradiation in the reactor. When is not possible to increase more this capacity, usually, technologies of temporary storage in dry of the spent fuel in independent facilities are used. The storage in dry of the spent fuel differs of the storage in the fuel pools making use of gas instead of water as coolant and using metal or concrete instead of the water like barrier against the radiation. The storage industry in dry offers a great variety of technologies, which should be certified by the respective nuclear regulator entity before its use. (Author)

  20. Strategies of development of reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2004-01-01

    The development of nuclear energy in the coming decades will depend on the goals followed, on the available technologies and on the strategies implemented in the world in agreement with public acceptation. This article is limited to the technical aspects of the strategies of development of reactor types: 1 - objectives; 2 - common constraints to all reactor types: safety and terrorism risks, wastes, non-proliferation, economics; 3 - different reactor types: general considerations, proven technologies (PWR, BWR, Candu), non-proven technologies but having an important experience, technologies at the design stage; 4 - energy systems and 'Generation IV forum': systems based on thermal neutron reactors and low enrichment, systems for the valorization of 238 U, systems for Pu burning, systems allowing the destruction of minor actinides, thorium-based systems, the Gen IV international forum; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  1. Expert systems for the analysis of transients on nuclear reactors: crisis analysis, sextant, a general purpose physical analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbet, N.; Dumas, M.; Mihelich, G.; Souchet, Y.; Thomas, J.B.

    1987-04-01

    Two developments of expert systems intended to work on line to the analysis of nuclear reactor transients are reported. During an hypothetical crisis occurring in a nuclear facility, a staff of the Institute for Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) has to assess the risk to local population. The expert system is intended to work as an assistant to the staff. At the present time, it deals with the availability of the safety systems of the plant (e.g. ECCS), depending on the functional state of the support systems. A next step is to take into account the physical transient of the reactor (mass and energy balance, pressure, flows). In order to reach this goal as in the development of other similar expert systems, a physical analyser is required. This is the aim of SEXTANT, which combines several knowledge bases concerning measurements, models and qualitative behaviour of the plant with a mechanism of conjecture-refutation and a set of simplified models matching the current physical state. A prototype is under assessment by dealing with integral test facility transients. Both expert systems require powerful shells for their development. SPIRAL is such a toolkit for the development of expert systems devoted to the computer aided management of complex processes

  2. General design and main problems of a gas-heavy-water power reactor contained in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.; Gaudez, J.C.

    1964-01-01

    In the framework of research carried out on a CO 2 -cooled power reactor moderated by heavy water, the so-called 'pressure vessel' solution involves the total integration of the core, of the primary circuit (exchanges and blowers) and of the fuel handling machine inside a single, strong, sealed vessel made of pre-stressed concrete. A vertical design has been chosen: the handling 'attic' is placed above the core, the exchanges being underneath. This solution makes it possible to standardize the type of reactor which is moderated by heavy-water or graphite and cooled by a downward stream of carbon dioxide gas; it has certain advantages and disadvantages with respect to the pressure tube solution and these are considered in detail in this report. Extrapolation presents in particular.problems due specifically to the heavy water (for example its cooling,its purification, the balancing of the pressures of the heavy water and of the gas, the assembling of the internal structures, the height of the attic, etc. (authors) [fr

  3. Safety in decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the technical and administrative considerations relevant to the nuclear aspects of safety in the decommissioning of reactors, as they apply to the reactor and the reactor site. While the treatment, transport and disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decommissioning are important considerations, these aspects are not specifically covered in this Guide. Likewise, other possible issues in decommissioning (e.g. land use and other environmental issues, industrial safety, financial assurance) which are not directly related to radiological safety are also not considered. Generally, decommissioning will be undertaken after planned final shutdown of the reactor. In some cases a reactor may have to be decommissioned following an unplanned or unexpected event of a series or damaging nature occurring during operation. In these cases special procedures for decommissioning may need to be developed, peculiar to the particular circumstances. This Guide could be used as a basis for the development of these procedures although specific consideration of the circumstances which create the need for them is beyond its scope

  4. Observations on health outcome studies of exposure of the worker and the general population during the nuclear reactor accident at three mile island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear reactor accident at Three Mile Island in March 1979 resulted in the release of radioactivity to the environment. Radiation exposure of the workers and the general population living in the vicinity of the damaged nuclear reactor was estimated based on dose measurements, meteorological conditions, demographic characteristics, reconstruction of the source term, and a number of other factors. The projected estimates of potential delayed health effects in the worker and general population, notable cancer, developmental abnormalities of the newborn, and genetic ill-health, were carefully estimated based on then-current knowledge of radiation risks and statistical techniques of analysis. Almost a decade later, we now have epidemiological and statistical data on certain of these health outcomes in the exposed populations at risk. Discussion includes the reliability of the initial radiation risk estimates, the major illnesses of concern, the mental stress and behavioral effects at the time of and following the accident, and the current findings of the ongoing studies of the health outcomes of the vulnerable populations at risk

  5. Development of a general coupling interface for the fuel performance code transuranus tested with the reactor dynamic code DYN3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, L.; Rohde, U.; Seidl, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2013-01-01

    Several institutions plan to couple the fuel performance code TRANSURANUS developed by the European Institute for Transuranium Elements with their own codes. One of these codes is the reactor dynamic code DYN3D maintained by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden - Rossendorf. DYN3D was developed originally for VVER type reactors and was extended later to western type reactors. Usually, the fuel rod behavior is modeled in thermal hydraulics and neutronic codes in a simplified manner. The main idea of this coupling is to describe the fuel rod behavior in the frame of core safety analysis in a more detailed way, e.g. including the influence of the high burn-up structure, geometry changes and fission gas release. It allows to take benefit from the improved computational power and software achieved over the last two decades. The coupling interface was developed in a general way from the beginning. Thence it can be easily used also by other codes for a coupling with TRANSURANUS. The user can choose between a one-way as well as a two-way online coupling option. For a one-way online coupling, DYN3D provides only the time-dependent rod power and thermal hydraulics conditions to TRANSURANUS, but the fuel performance code doesn’t transfer any variable back to DYN3D. In a two-way online coupling, TRANSURANUS in addition transfers parameters like fuel temperature and cladding temperature back to DYN3D. This list of variables can be extended easily by geometric and further variables of interest. First results of the code system DYN3D-TRANSURANUS will be presented for a control rod ejection transient in a modern western type reactor. Pre-analyses show already that a detailed fuel rod behavior modeling will influence the thermal hydraulics and thence also the neutronics due to the Doppler reactivity effect of the fuel temperature. The coupled code system has therefore a potential to improve the assessment of safety criteria. The developed code system DYN3D-TRANSURANUS can be used also

  6. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, J.C.; Zaetta, A.; Johner, J.; Mathoniere, G.

    2000-01-01

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  7. Power reactor noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thie, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Noise analysis is a growing field that offers advantages such as simplicity, low cost, and natural multivariable interactions. A major advantage, continuous and undisturbed monitoring, supplies a means of obtaining early warnings of possible reactor malfunctions, thus preventing further complications by alerting opeators to a problem - and aiding in the diagnosis of that problem - before it demands major repairs. Dr. Thie hopes to further, through detailed explanations and over 70 illustrations, the acceptance of the use of noise analysis by the nuclear utility industry. Following an introductory chapter, the theoretical basis for the various methods of noise analysis is explained, and full chapters are devoted to the fundamentals of statistics for time-domain analysis and Fourier series and related topics for frequency-domain analysis. General experimental techniques and associated theoretical considerations are reviewed, leading to discussions of practical applications in the latter half of the book. Besides chapters giving examples of neutron noise and acoustical noise, chapters are also devoted to extensive examples from pressurized water reactor and boiling water reactor power plants

  8. The Preliminary Decommissioning Plan of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Pham Van; Vien, Luong Ba; Vinh, Le Vinh; Nghiem, Huynh Ton; Tuan, Nguyen Minh; Phuong, Pham Hoai [Nuclear Research Institute, Da Lat (Viet Nam)

    2013-08-15

    Recently, after 25 years of operation, a preliminary decommissioning plan for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) has been produced but as yet it has not been implemented due to the continued operations of the reactor. However, from the early phases of facility design and construction and during operation, the aspects that facilitate decommissioning process have been considered. This paper outlines the DNRR general description, the organization that manages the facility, the decommissioning strategy and associated project management, and the expected decommissioning activities. The paper also considers associated cost and funding, safety and environmental issues and waste management aspects amongst other considerations associated with decommissioning a nuclear research reactor. (author)

  9. Fusion-fission hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses the range of characteristics attainable from hybrid reactor blankets; blanket design considerations; hybrid reactor designs; alternative fuel hybrid reactors; multi-purpose hybrid reactors; and hybrid reactors and the energy economy. Hybrid reactors are driven by a fusion neutron source and include fertile and/or fissile material. The fusion component provides a copious source of fusion neutrons which interact with a subcritical fission component located adjacent to the plasma or pellet chamber. Fissile fuel and/or energy are the main products of hybrid reactors. Topics include high F/M blankets, the fissile (and tritium) breeding ratio, effects of composition on blanket properties, geometrical considerations, power density and first wall loading, variations of blanket properties with irradiation, thermal-hydraulic and mechanical design considerations, safety considerations, tokamak hybrid reactors, tandem-mirror hybrid reactors, inertial confinement hybrid reactors, fusion neutron sources, fissile-fuel and energy production ability, simultaneous production of combustible and fissile fuels, fusion reactors for waste transmutation and fissile breeding, nuclear pumped laser hybrid reactors, Hybrid Fuel Factories (HFFs), and scenarios for hybrid contribution. The appendix offers hybrid reactor fundamentals. Numerous references are provided

  10. Description of from-reactor transportation cask designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lake, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes two from-reactor cask development program contracts. They are a contract for legal weight truck cask designs, and a contract for a rail/barge cask design. The paper also presents several general considerations affecting the cask development program. Two of these which are covered in some detail are the technical topics of burnup credit and source term evaluation

  11. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  12. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  13. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

  14. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1996-07-01

    The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System's Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a open-quotes green fieldclose quotes condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined

  15. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  16. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the '978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ''green field'' condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities

  17. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  18. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.A.; Baker, M.A.W.; Hall, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    Following submission of written evidence, the Energy Committee members asked questions of three witnesses from the Central Electricity Generating Board and Nuclear Electric (which will be the government owned company running nuclear power stations after privatisation). Both questions and answers are reported verbatim. The points raised include where the responsibility for the future fast reactor programme should lie, with government only or with private enterprise or both and the viability of fast breeder reactors in the future. The case for the fast reactor was stated as essentially strategic not economic. This raised the issue of nuclear cost which has both a construction and a decommissioning element. There was considerable discussion as to the cost of building a European Fast reactor and the cost of the electricity it would generate compared with PWR type reactors. The likely demand for fast reactors will not arrive for 20-30 years and the need to build a fast reactor now is questioned. (UK)

  19. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  20. Effect of hydrazine on general corrosion of carbon and low-alloyed steels in pressurized water reactor secondary side water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvimäki, Sari [Fortum Ltd, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Saario, Timo; Sipilä, Konsta [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Nuclear Safety, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Bojinov, Martin, E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of steel in secondary side water investigated by in situ and ex situ techniques. • Oxide grown on steel in 100 ppb hydrazine shows weaker protective properties – higher corrosion rates. • Possible explanation of the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine on flow assisted corrosion offered. - Abstract: The effect of hydrazine on corrosion rate of low-alloyed steel (LAS) and carbon steel (CS) was studied by in situ and ex situ techniques under pressurized water reactor secondary side water chemistry conditions at T = 228 °C and pH{sub RT} = 9.2 (adjusted by NH{sub 3}). It is found that hydrazine injection to a maximum level of 5.06 μmol l{sup −1} onto surfaces previously oxidized in ammonia does not affect the corrosion rate of LAS or CS. This is confirmed also by plant measurements at Loviisa NPP. On the other hand, hydrazine at the level of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} decreases markedly the amount and the size of deposited oxide crystals on LAS and CS surface. In addition, the oxide grown in the presence of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} hydrazine is somewhat less protective and sustains a higher corrosion rate compared to an oxide film grown without hydrazine. These observations could explain the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine found in corrosion studies of LAS and CS.

  1. Practical considerations in developing an instrument-maintenance plan--

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guth, M.A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The author develops a general set of considerations to explain how a consistent, well-organized, prioritized, and adequate time-allowance program plan for routine maintenance can be constructed. The analysis is supplemented with experience from the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at US Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). After the preventive maintenance (PM) problem was defined, the instruments on the schedule were selected based on the manufacturer's design specifications, quality-assurance requirements, prior classifications, experiences with the incidence of breakdowns or calibration, and dependencies among instruments. The effects of repair error in PM should be also studied. The HFIR requires three full-time technicians to perform both PM and unscheduled maintenance. A review is presented of concepts from queuing theory to determine anticipated breakdown patterns. In practice, the pneumatic instruments have a much longer lifetime than the electric/electronic instruments on various reactors at ORNL. Some special considerations and risk aversion in choosing a maintenance schedule

  2. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  3. Guide to power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-07-15

    The IAEA's major first scientific publication is the Directory of Power Reactors now in operation or under construction in various parts of the world. The purpose of the directory is to present important details of various power projects in such a way as to provide a source of easy reference for anyone interested in the development of the peaceful uses of atomic energy, either at the technical or management level. Six pages have been devoted to each reactor the first of which contains general information, reactor physics data and information about the core. The second and third contain sketches of the fuel element or of the fuel element assembly, and of the horizontal and vertical sections of the reactor. On the fourth page information is grouped under the following heads: fuel element, core heat transfer, control, reactor vessel and over-all dimensions, and fluid flow. The fifth page shows a simplified flow diagram, while the sixth provides information on reflector and shielding, containment and turbo generator. Some information has also been given, when available, on cost estimates and operating staff requirements. Remarks and a bibliography constitute the last part of the description of each reactor. Reactor projects included in this directory are pressurized light water cooled power reactors. Boiling light water cooled power reactors, heavy water cooled power reactors, gas cooled power reactors, organic cooled power reactors liquid metal cooled power reactors and liquid metal cooled power reactors

  4. Neutron spectrometry for reactor applications: status, limitations, and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1975-08-01

    The ability of ''state-of-the-art'' reactor neutron spectrometry to provide definitive environmental results required for high fluence radiation damage experiments is reviewed. A formal definition of the neutron component is presented as well as general considerations which accrue from both this definition and the existence of the mixed radiation field generally encountered in reactors. A description of four selected methods of reactor neutron spectrometry is included, namely Proton Recoil (PR) methods, Time-Of-Flight (TOF) methods, the 6 Li(n,α) 3 H coincidence method, and Multiple Foil Activation (MFA) methods. These selected methods are compared. Future requirements and directions for reactor neutron spectrometry are discussed. In particular, the needs of future CTR research are stressed and the He 4 - recoil proportional counter spectroscopy method is advanced as a means of meeting these future requirements. 50 references. (auth)

  5. Concept and designs of new-generation fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses the general safety requirements and characteristics for future nuclear power plants. It examines various designs - loop, block, and integrated layouts for reactors. Specifically, the article focuses an integrated design for sodium-cooled fast reactors noting that the BN-600 reactor has operated accident-free over the past 12 years. An obvious advantage of this scheme is that the coolant of the primary loop is localized in one volume (in a vessel), there are no short connections and large-diameter pipes, which of course sharply reduces the probability in coolant leaks. With an integrated scheme the problem of embrittlement of the reactor vessel by neutron irradiation is obviated. The neutron fluence for the vessels of the AST-500 and VPBER-600 reactors, built with an integrated scheme, is less than 10 17 cm -2 . Such a fluence does not cause any appreciable change in the mechanical properties of the vessel steel. The integrated layout of the reactor makes it possible to build a containment vessel. In this case it is possible to eliminate the danger of the reactor core drying out and thus cooling of the reactor in emergency situations can be simplified substantially. In an integrated layout, however, access is more difficult to the equipment inside the reactor, thus limiting or complicating maintenance work. The integrated layout, therefore, requires the use of highly reliable equipment built according to designs that have been proven in operation and have been passed representative service-life tests under laboratory conditions. The integrated layout considerably increases the mass and size characteristics of the reactor. New solutions thus are needed for the organization of work on reactor fabrication and assembly. In the case of the BN-600 and Superphenix reactors the welding of the reactor vessels and the assembly work were done on the building site

  6. Development of a sensitivity analysis systems in nuclear reactors through generalized perturbation theory at first order in 2 D geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Juan Matias

    2005-01-01

    Perturbation Methods represent a powerful tool to do sensitivity analysis, and they found many aplications in nuclear engineering.As an introduction to this kind of analysis, we develope a program that apply the Generalized Perturbation Theory or GPT Method to bidimensional system of rectangular geometry.We first consider an homogeneous system of non-multiplying material and then an heterogeneous system with region of multiplying material, with the intention of make concret aplications of perturbation method to nuclear engineering problems.The program, that we called Pert, determines neutron fluxes and importance functions applying the Multigroup Diffusion Theory; and also solves the integrals required to calculate sensitivity coefficients.Using this perturbation methods we could verify the low computational cost required to make this kind of analysis and the simplicity of the equations systems involved, allowing us to make elaborates sensitivity analysis for the responses of our interest

  7. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

  8. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.

    1994-09-01

    On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System's WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined

  9. Breeding blankets for thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocaboy, Alain.

    1982-06-01

    Materials with structures suitable for this purpose are studied. A bibliographic review of the main solid and liquid lithiated compounds is then presented. Erosion, dimensioning and maintenance problems associated with the limiter and the first wall of the reactor are studied from the point of view of the constraints they impose on the design of the blankets. Detailed studies of the main solid and liquid blanket concepts enable the best technological compromises to be determined for the indispensable functions of the blanket to be assured under acceptable conditions. Our analysis leads to four classes of solution, which cannot at this stage be considered as final recommendations, but which indicate what sort of solutions it is worthwhile exploring and comparing in order to be in a position to suggest a realistic blanket at the time when plasma control is sufficiently good for power reactors to be envisaged. Some considerations on the general architecture of the reactor are indicated. Energy storage with pulsed reactors is discussed in the appendix, and a first approach made to minimizing the total tritium recovery [fr

  10. Development of effect assessment methodology for the deployment of fast reactor cycle system with dynamic computable general equilibrium model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiotani, Hiroki; Ono, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    The Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) is a widely used computable general equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Purdue University. Although the GTAP-E, an energy environmental version of the GTAP model, is useful for surveying the energy-economy-environment-trade linkage is economic policy analysis, it does not have the decomposed model of the electricity sector and its analyses are comparatively static. In this study, a recursive dynamic CGE model with a detailed electricity technology bundle with nuclear power generation including FR was developed based on the GTAP-E to evaluate the long-term socioeconomic effects of FR deployment. The capital stock changes caused by international investments and some dynamic constraints of the FR deployment and operation (e.g., load following capability and plutonium mass balance) were incorporated in the analyses. The long-term socioeconomic effects resulting from the deployment of economic competitive FR with innovative technologies can be assessed; the cumulative effects of the FR deployment on GDP calculated using this model costed over 40 trillion yen in Japan and 400 trillion yen worldwide, which were several times more than the cost of the effects calculated using the conventional cost-benefit analysis tool, because of ripple effects and energy substitutions among others. (author)

  11. ADAPTIVE CONTROL SYSTEM OF INDUSTRIAL REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav K. Mayevski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a mathematical model of an industrial chemical reactor for production of synthetic rubber. During reactor operation the model parameters vary considerably. To create a control algorithm performed transformation of mathematical model of the reactor in order to obtain a dependency that can be used to determine the model parameters are changing during reactor operation.

  12. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT READING COMPREHENSION IN THE SUBJECT ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES / CONSIDERACIONES SOBRE LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES

    OpenAIRE

    Graciela Feliciana Mayo Castro; Yanelis Karina Ávila Pavón

    2013-01-01

    Reading comprehension is one of the general abilities of English language in the teaching-learning process. This skill constitutes a cultural and a work device, and it is the basis that helps to acquire of a great amount of knowledge. This methodological suggestion facilitates the development of reading comprehension due to that it is a system of exercises which are organized in a hierarchical way that leads the students to better decode the message expressed in a text. Reading comprehension ...

  13. Regulations for RA reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-09-01

    Regulations for RA reactor operation are written in accordance with the legal regulations defined by the Law about radiation protection and related legal acts, as well as technical standards according to the IAEA recommendations. The contents of this book include: fundamental data about the reactor; legal regulations for reactor operation; organizational scheme for reactor operation; general and detailed instructions for operation, behaviour in the reactor building, performing experiments; operating rules for operation under steady state and accidental conditions [sr

  14. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  15. Safety considerations in the design of the fusion engineering device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Safety considerations play a significant role in the design of a near-term Fusion Engineering Device (FED). For the safety of the general public and the plant workers, the radiation environment caused by the reacting plasma and the potential release of tritium fuel are the dominant considerations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and guidelines for radiation protection have been reviewed and are being applied to the device design. Direct radiation protection is provided by the device shield and the reactor building walls. Radiation from the activated device components and the tritium fuel is to be controlled with shielding, contamination control, and ventilation. The potential release of tritium from the plant has influenced the selection of reactor building and plant designs and specifications. The safety of the plant workers is affected primarily by the radiation from the activated device components and from plasma chamber debris. The highly activated device components make it necessary to design many of the maintenance activities in the reactor building for totally remote operation. The hot cell facility has evolved as a totally remote maintenance facility due to the high radiation levels of the device components. Safety considerations have had substantial impacts on the design of FED. Several examples of safety-related design impacts are discussed in the paper. Feasible solutions have been identified for all outstanding safety-related items, and additional optimization of these solutions is anticipated in future design studies

  16. CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT READING COMPREHENSION IN THE SUBJECT ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES / CONSIDERACIONES SOBRE LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Feliciana Mayo Castro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading comprehension is one of the general abilities of English language in the teaching-learning process. This skill constitutes a cultural and a work device, and it is the basis that helps to acquire of a great amount of knowledge. This methodological suggestion facilitates the development of reading comprehension due to that it is a system of exercises which are organized in a hierarchical way that leads the students to better decode the message expressed in a text. Reading comprehension ability makes easier to decode a message not only in English language but in Spanish language as well. LA COMPRENSIÓN LECTORA EN LA ASIGNATURA INGLÉS CON FINES GENERALES AUTORAS: DIRECCIÓN PARA CORRESPONDENCIA: Departamento de Idiomas. Universidad de Las Tunas, Cuba. E-mail graciela@ult.edu.cu Fecha de recepción: 21\t-\t08\t-\t2013 Fecha de aceptación:\t30\t-\t11\t-\t2013 RESUMEN La comprensión lectora es una de las habilidades generales en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje del idioma inglés, esta constituye un instrumento de trabajo y de cultura y es la base que facilita el aprendizaje de un gran cúmulo de conocimientos. La presente alternativa metodológica facilita el desarrollo de la habilidad de comprensión lectora pues parte de un sistema de ejercicios jerárquicamente organizados, lo que conllevan al estudiante a una decodificación más acertada del mensaje expresado en los textos. El desarrollo de esta habilidad les permite la decodificación de información tanto en la lengua inglesa como en la lengua materna.

  17. Power reactors in Member States. 1978 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The computer-based reactor listing gives information on reactor core characteristics and plant systems for all power reactors in operation under construction and planned. The following two tables are included to give a general picture of the overall situation: Reactor types and net electrical power; Reactor units and net electrical power by country and cumulated by year

  18. Siting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to develop criteria for siting and the site-related design basis for research reactors. The concepts presented in this document are intended as recommendations for new reactors and are not suggested for backfitting purposes for facilities already in existence. In siting research reactors serious consideration is given to minimizing the effects of the site on the reactor and the reactor on the site and the potential impact of the reactor on the environment. In this document guidance is first provided on the evaluation of the radiological impact of the installation under normal reactor operation and accident conditions. A classification of research reactors in groups is then proposed, together with a different approach for each group, to take into account the relevant safety problems associated with facilities of different characteristics. Guidance is also provided for both extreme natural events and for man-induced external events which could affect the safe operation of the reactor. Extreme natural events include earthquakes, flooding for river or coastal sites and extreme meteorological phenomena. The feasibility of emergency planning is finally considered for each group of reactors

  19. Models and analyses for inertial-confinement fusion-reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1981-05-01

    This report describes models and analyses devised at Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the technical characteristics of different inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor elements required for component integration into a functional unit. We emphasize the generic properties of the different elements rather than specific designs. The topics discussed are general ICF reactor design considerations; reactor cavity phenomena, including the restoration of interpulse ambient conditions; first-wall temperature increases and material losses; reactor neutronics and hydrodynamic blanket response to neutron energy deposition; and analyses of loads and stresses in the reactor vessel walls, including remarks about the generation and propagation of very short wavelength stress waves. A discussion of analytic approaches useful in integrations and optimizations of ICF reactor systems concludes the report

  20. Stability of solutions of antineoplastic agents during preparation and storage for in vitro assays. General considerations, the nitrosoureas and alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosanquet, A G

    1985-01-01

    In vitro drug sensitivity of tumour biopsies is currently being determined using a variety of methods. For these chemosensitivity assays many drugs are required at short notice, and this in turn means that the drugs must generally be stored in solution. There are, however, a number of potential problems associated with dissolving and storing drugs for in vitro use, which include (a) drug adsorption; (b) effects of freezing; (c) drug stability under the normal conditions of dilution and setting up of an in vitro assay; and (d) insolubility of drugs in normal saline (NS) or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). These problems are considered in general, and some recommendations for use of solutions of drugs in in vitro assays are suggested. The nitrosoureas and alkylating agents are also investigated in greater detail in this respect. The nitrosoureas are found to be very labile in PBS at pH 7, with 5% degradation (t0.95) occurring in 10-50 min at room temperature. These values are increased about 10-fold on refrigeration and about 5- to 10-fold on reduction of the pH of the medium to pH 4-5. At pH 7 and room temperature, t0.95 is observed in under 1 h with the alkylating agents nitrogen mustard, chlorambucil, melphalan, 2,5-diaziridinyl-3,6-bis(2-hydroxyethylamino)-1,4-benzoquinone (BZQ), dibromodulcitol, dibromomannitol, treosulphan, and procarbazine. Of the other alkylating agents, 4-hydroperoxycylophosphamide (sometimes used in vitro in place of cyclophosphamide), busulphan, dianhydrogalactitol, aziridinylbenzoquinone (AZQ), and dacarbazine have a t0.95 of between 2 and 24 h, while ifosfamide and pentamethylmelamine are both stable in aqueous solution for greater than 7 days. About half the drugs studied in detail have been stored frozen in solution for in vitro use, although very little is known about their stability under these conditions.

  1. CP violation in D0- D-bar0 oscillations: general considerations and applications to the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigi, Ikaros I.; Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Recksiegel, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The observed D 0 -D-bar 0 oscillations provide a new stage in our search for New Physics in heavy flavour dynamics. The theoretical verdict on the observed values of x D and y D remains ambiguous: while they could be totally generated by Standard Model dynamics, they could also contain a sizable or even leading contribution from New Physics. Those oscillations are likely to enhance the observability of CP violation as clear manifestations of New Physics. We present general formulae for D 0 - D-bar 0 oscillations, concentrating on the case of negligible direct CP violation. In particular we derive a general formula for the time-dependent mixing-induced CP asymmetry in decays to a CP eigenstate and its correlation with the semileptonic CP asymmetry a SL (D 0 ) in D 0 (t) → lνK. We apply our formalism to the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity, using the time-dependent CP asymmetry in D 0 → K S φ as an example. We find observable effects at a level well beyond anything possible with CKM dynamics. Comparisons with CP violation in the K and B systems offer an excellent test of this scenario and reveal the specific pattern of flavour and CP violation in the D 0 -D-bar 0 system predicted by this model. We discuss a number of charm decays that could potentially offer an insight in the dynamics of CP violation in D decays. We also apply our formalism to B s -B-bar s mixing.

  2. Molten-Salt Reactors: Report for 1960 Ten-Year-Plan Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacPherson, H. G.

    1960-01-01

    For purposes of this evaluation, the molten-salt reactor is considered as an advanced concept. It is considered not to have a status of a current technology adequate to allow the construction of large-scale power plants, since no power reactor has been built or even designed in detail. As a result there can be no estimate of present cost of power, and the projection of power costs to later years is necessarily based on general arguments rather than detailed considerations.

  3. Chemical considerations in severe accident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Kress, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Study presented the first systematic attempt to include fission product physicochemical effects in the determination of expected consequences of hypothetical nuclear reactor power plant accidents. At the time, however, the data base was sparse, and the treatment of fission product behavior was not entirely consistent or accurate. Considerable research has since been performed to identify and understand chemical phenomena that can occur in the course of a nuclear reactor accident, and how these phenomena affect fission product behavior. In this report, the current status of our understanding of the chemistry of fission products in severe core damage accidents is summarized and contrasted with that of the Reactor Safety Study

  4. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  6. Equipment considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Trace or ultratrace analyses require that the HPLC equipment used, including the detector, be optimal for such determinations. HPLC detectors are discussed at length in Chapter 4; discussion here is limited to the rest of the equipment. In general, commercial equipment is adequate for trace analysis; however, as the authors approach ultratrace analysis, it becomes very important to examine the equipment thoroughly and optimize it, where possible. For this reason they will review the equipment commonly used in HPLC and discuss the optimization steps. Detectability in HPLC is influenced by two factors (1): (a) baseline noise or other interferences that lead to errors in assigning the baseline absorbance; (b) peak width. 87 refs

  7. Advanced spheromak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1996-01-01

    The spheromak has no toroidal magnetic field coils or other structure along its geometric axis, and is thus more attractive than the leading magnetic fusion reactor concept, the tokamak. As a consequence of this and other attributes, the spheromak reactor may be compact and produce a power density sufficiently high to warrant consideration of a liquid 'blanket' that breeds tritium, converts neutron kinetic energy to heat, and protects the reactor vessel from severe neutron damage. However, the physics is more complex, so that considerable research is required to learn how to achieve the reactor potential. Critical physics problems and possible ways of solving them are described. The opportunities and issues associated with a possible liquid wall are considered to direct future research

  8. Possibilities for power reactor structural material and fuel testing in reactor RA; Mogucnosti reaktora RA za testiranje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinc, R; Lazarevic, Dj; Stefanovic, D; Cupac, S; Pesic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1978-05-15

    Nuclear reactor RA at Vinca has been designed as a high flux general purpose research reactor. Among other it was intended to play a role of material testing reactor. A scope of activities of Material Laboratory and Reactor RA Department of Boris Kidric Institute is presented in this report. Reactor RA capacity for reactor structural material and fuel irradiation is also described. The increase of RA reactor irradiation capacity is based on the improvement of VISA type fuel channel for fast neutron irradiations, as well as on the general neutron flux increase, due to introduction of highly enriched uranium fuel into reactor core and the advanced in-core fuel management. The irradiation capacities described allow for the reactor material and fuel testing to the considerable extent. Istrazivacki reaktor RA u Vinci je projektovan kao visokofluksni istrazivacki reaktor opste namene. Pored ostalog, on je namenjen i za testiranje reaktorskih konstrukcionih materijala i goriva. U radu je dat pregled aktivnosti Laboratorije za materijale IBK i reaktora RA na tom podrucju, kao i opis povecanih mogucnosti reaktora RA za ozracivanje reaktorskih materijala i goriva u cilju njihovog testiranja. Povecanje mogucnosti reaktora RA zasniva se na usavrsavanju specijalnog gorivnog kanala tipa VISA (za ozracivanje materijala brzim neutronima), kao i na opstem povecanju neutronskog fluksa na osnovu uvodjenja i nacina koriscenja visokoobogacenog uranskog goriva u reaktoru RA. Opisane mogucnosti reaktora RA dozvoljavaju u znatnoj meri ispitivanje konstrukcionih materijala i goriva energetskih reaktora.

  9. Safe operation of critical assemblies and research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1960-09-15

    Some countries have accumulated considerable experience in the operation of these reactors and have in the process developed safe practices. On the other hand, other countries which have recently acquired, or will soon acquire, such reactors do not have sufficient background of experience with them to have developed full knowledge regarding their safe operation. In this situation, the International Atomic Energy Agency has considered that it would be useful to make available to all its Member States a set of recommendations on the safe operation of these reactors, based on the accumulated experience and best practices. The Director General accordingly nominated a Pane Ion Safe Operation of Critical Assemblies and Research Reactors to assist the Agency's Secretariat in drafting such recommendations

  10. Climate considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, I.P.G.; Ellison, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the conditions under which rainfall and snowmelt result in infiltration, percolation, and leachate formation, and to develop guidelines for incorporating these processes into the mine waste disposal regulations. This is important because in mine waste, and under certain circumstances, these processes can result in conditions which pose a threat to surface and ground water quality. This paper provides a general overview of infiltration, percolation, and leachate formation. It incorporates a discussion of the methods that can be used to quantify infiltration and the climatic and physical site and waste conditions under which percolation and leachate formation occur. Reference is made to case histories on infiltration, ground water recharge, and analytical procedures for calculating infiltration. An approach to infiltration prediction is outlined, and the paper concludes with a discussion on how climatic factors and prediction of infiltration could be incorporated into the regulations

  11. Gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakilian, M.

    1977-05-01

    The present study is the second part of a general survey of Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs). In this part, the course of development, overall performance and present development status of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTCRs) and advances of HTGR systems are reviewed. (author)

  12. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  13. Mirror machine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Recent mirror reactor conceptual design studies are described. Considered in detail is the design of ''standard'' Yin-Yang fusion power reactors with classical and enhanced confinement. It is shown that to be economically competitive with estimates for other future energy sources, mirror reactors require a considerable increase in Q, or major design simplifications, or preferably both. These improvements may require a departure from the ''standard'' configuration. Two attractive possibilities, both of which would use much of the same physics and technology as the ''standard'' mirror, are the field reversed mirror and the end-stoppered mirror

  14. Considerations in selecting tubing materials for CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemmings, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Corrosion resistance is the major consideration in selecting tubing material for CANDU steam generators. Corrosion, and additional considerations, lead to the following steam generator tubing material recommendations: for CANDU-BPHWR's (boiling pressurized heavy water reactors) low-cobalt Incoloy-800; for CANDU-PHWR's (pressurized, non-boiling, heavy water reactors), low-cobalt Monel-400

  15. Study on the decommissioning of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Doo Hwan; Jun, Kwan Sik; Choi, Yoon Dong; Lee, Tae Yung; Kwon, Sang Woon; Lee, Jong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-01

    Currently, KAERI operates TRIGA Mark-II and TRIGA Mark-III research reactors as a general purpose research and training facility. As these are, however, situated at Seoul office site of KAERI which is scheduled to be transferred to KEPCO as well as 30 MW HANARO research reactor which is expected to reach the first criticality in 1995 is under construction at head site of KAERI, decommissioning of TRIGA reactors has become an important topic. The objective of this study is to prepare and present TRIGA facility decontamination and decommissioning plan. Estimation of the radioactive inventory in TRIGA research reactor was carried out by the use of computational method. In addition, summarized in particular were the methodologies associated with decontamination, segmenting processes for activated metallic components, disposition of wastes. Particular consideration in this study was focused available technology applicable to decommissioning of TRIGA research reactor. State-of-the-art summaries of the available technology for decommissioning presented here will serve a useful document for preparations for decommissioning in the future. 6 figs, 41 tabs, 30 refs. (Author).

  16. Fundamentals of boiling water reactor (BWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzola, S.

    1982-01-01

    These lectures on fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are a synthesis of known and established concepts. These lectures are intended to be a comprehensive (even though descriptive in nature) presentation, which would give the basis for a fair understanding of power operation, fuel cycle and safety aspects of the boiling water reactor. The fundamentals of BWR reactor physics are oriented to design and operation. In the first lecture general description of BWR is presented, with emphasis on the reactor physics aspects. A survey of methods applied in fuel and core design and operation is presented in the second lecture in order to indicate the main features of the calculational tools. The third and fourth lectures are devoted to review of BWR design bases, reactivity requirements, reactivity and power control, fuel loading patterns. Moreover, operating limits are reviewed, as the actual limits during power operation and constraints for reactor physics analyses (design and operation). The basic elements of core management are also presented. The constraints on control rod movements during the achieving of criticality and low power operation are illustrated in the fifth lecture. Some considerations on plant transient analyses are also presented in the fifth lecture, in order to show the impact between core and fuel performance and plant/system performance. The last (sixth) lecture is devoted to the open vessel testing during the startup of a commercial BWR. A control rod calibration is also illustrated. (author)

  17. Design considerations for Mars transfer vehicles using nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) utilizing nuclear propulsion will require that careful consideration be given to the nuclear radiation environment in which it will operate. The extremely high neutron and gamma fluxes characteristic of nuclear thermal propulsion systems will cause significant heating of the fluid systems in close proximity to the reactor, especially in the lower propellant tanks. Crew radiation doses are also a concern particularly late in a mission when there is less shielding from the propellant tanks. In this study, various vehicle configuration and shielding strategies were examined and the resulting time dependent radiation fields evaluated. A common cluster of three particle bed reactor (PBR) engines were used in all configurations examined. In general, it appears that long, relatively narrow vehicles perform the best from a radiation standpoint, however, good shield optimization will be critical in maintaining a low radiation environment while minimizing the shield weight penalty.

  18. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  19. Advanced reactor concepts and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipsett, J.J.

    1988-06-01

    The need for some consistency in the terms used to describe the evolution of methods for ensuring the safety of nuclear reactors has been identified by the IAEA. This is timely since there appears to be a danger that the precision of many valuable words is being diluted and that a new jargon may appear that will confuse rather than aid the communication of important but possibly diverse philosophies and concepts. Among the difficulties faced by the nuclear industry is promoting and gaining a widespread understanding of the risks actually posed by nuclear reactors. In view of the importance of communication to both the public and to the technical community generally, the starting point for the definition of terms must be with dictionary meanings and common technical usage. The nuclear engineering community should use such words in conformance with the whole technical world. This paper addresses many of the issues suggested in the invitation to meet and also poses some additional issues for consideration. Some examples are the role of the operator in either enhancing or degrading safety and how the meaning or interpretation of the word 'safety' can be expected to change during the next few decades. It is advantageous to use criteria against which technologies and ongoing operating performance can be judged provided that the criteria are generic and not specific to particular reactor concepts. Some thoughts are offered on the need to frame the criteria carefully so that innovative solutions and concepts are fostered, not stifled

  20. TRIGA reactor main systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the main systems of low power (<2 MW) and higher power (≥2 MW) TRIGA reactors. The most significant difference between the two is that forced reactor cooling and an emergency core cooling system are generally required for the higher power TRIGA reactors. However, those TRIGA reactors that are designed to be operated above 3 MW also use a TRIGA fuel that is specifically designed for those higher power outputs (3 to 14 MW). Typical values are given for the respective systems although each TRIGA facility will have unique characteristics that may only be determined by the experienced facility operators. Due to the inherent wide scope of these research reactor facilities construction and missions, this training module covers those systems found at most operating TRIGA reactor facilities but may also discuss non-standard equipment that was found to be operationally useful although not necessarily required. (author)

  1. Research and materials irradiation reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.; Guigon, B.

    2004-01-01

    Devoted to the fundamental and applied research on materials irradiation, research reactors are nuclear installations where high neutrons flux are maintained. After a general presentation of the research reactors in the world and more specifically in France, this document presents the heavy water cooled reactors and the water cooled reactors. The third part explains the technical characteristics, thermal power, neutron flux, operating and details the Osiris, the RHF (high flux reactor), the Orphee and the Jules Horowitz reactors. The last part deals with the possible utilizations. (A.L.B.)

  2. New directions in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    New directions for tokamak research are briefly mentioned. Some of the areas for new considerations are the following: reactor size, beta ratio, current drivers, blankets, impurity control, and modular designs

  3. 32 CFR 310.15 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., or other methods). The Privacy Act Statement consists of the elements set forth in paragraph (d)(2)of... easily understood. (4) The Privacy Act statement may appear as a public notice (sign or poster...

  4. General Considerations on the Institution of Fiducia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Diana Papa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Of Roman origins, fiducia was under the form of a pact (the fiduciary pact secondary to atemporary transfer of property, by which a natural person preserved the property to the benefit of thetestator under a resolutory condition and during all the life of the testator; after the death of the testatorthe properties should be transferred either to the direct descendant, or to other person authorized by thetestator by legacy. The contemporary fiducia in the continental civil law has its origins in the Englishright in the specific institution in the common law of the trust, which designates the judicial rapportcreated by acts between the living or for a death cause from a person named founder who transfers two ormore goods under the control of an administrator to the benefit of a person or for a given purpose. TheRegulation in The New Civil Code Part III, Title IV, articles 773-791, followed the pattern of the FrenchLaw no. 2007-211 in 19th February 2007 which introduced in the French civil code, the Title XIV “Onfiducia”. The Romanian legislator took in an adapted form the provisions of the French normative actoperating some important changes or additions.

  5. 16 CFR 255.1 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... an uncooked chicken in the oven roasting bag and places the bag in one oven. He then takes a chicken roasting bag from a second oven, removes from the bag what appears to be a perfectly cooked chicken, tastes... conduct. Example 4: A well-known celebrity appears in an infomercial for an oven roasting bag that...

  6. [Algorithms, machine intelligence, big data : general considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radermacher, F J

    2015-08-01

    We are experiencing astonishing developments in the areas of big data and artificial intelligence. They follow a pattern that we have now been observing for decades: according to Moore's Law,the performance and efficiency in the area of elementary arithmetic operations increases a thousand-fold every 20 years. Although we have not achieved the status where in the singular sense machines have become as "intelligent" as people, machines are becoming increasingly better. The Internet of Things has again helped to massively increase the efficiency of machines. Big data and suitable analytics do the same. If we let these processes simply continue, our civilization may be endangerd in many instances. If the "containment" of these processes succeeds in the context of a reasonable political global governance, a worldwide eco-social market economy, andan economy of green and inclusive markets, many desirable developments that are advantageous for our future may result. Then, at some point in time, the constant need for more and faster innovation may even stop. However, this is anything but certain. We are facing huge challenges.

  7. The older orthopaedic patient: general considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Jane F

    2004-08-01

    People older than 65 years are more likely to need elective and emergent orthopaedic surgery compared with younger persons. They also experience significant benefits. Although age-related changes increase the risk of perioperative complications, understanding those changes allows prevention or at least early recognition and treatment when problems arise. Because of comorbidities, older persons take more medications that need to be managed in the perioperative period. Care could be simplified if patients were to bring their medications to the preoperative evaluation. Central nervous system sensitivity to certain pain medications (meperidine and propoxyphene) means that these drugs are best avoided as good alternatives exist (morphine and oxycodone). Adverse reactions to drugs are an important cause of acute confusion (delirium) that often complicates orthopaedic care. Early mobilization after surgery, avoiding certain drugs, avoiding restraints (including Foley catheters), attending to hydration, promoting normal sleep, compensating for sensory disorders, and stimulating daytime activities can prevent delirium. Patients with dementia are more likely to have delirium develop and, like many older people, will present special challenges in communication and decision making. Including family members in discussions may be helpful in ensuring truly informed consent.

  8. Animal experimentations: Part I: General considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T K Pal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available All materials, in the form of drugs or devices, which are intended for human use are required to be tested first in suitable animals. Many biological understandings are established on various modes of cruelties on animals. This observational notes guide us to accept or modify or even reject materials for ultimate human use. The science of experiments on animals gives us the remedial solutions to many of our human sufferings. This unique and important discipline is in need of proper understanding for selection of suitable number of animals and its proper care in captivity, and further refinements of code of conducts and ethical issues.

  9. General considerations of noise in microphone preamplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Donk, A.G.H.; van der Donk, A.G.H.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Voorthuyzen, J.A.; Bergveld, Piet

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a study of the noise performance of electret microphone systems as a part of hearing aids is presented. The signal-to-noise ratio of the microphone-preamplifier combination, containing a field-effect transistor (FET) and a high value resistive bias element in a hybrid configuration, is

  10. General considerations on the population ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Nuta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents one of the most important issues of the current context, the ageing of the population, with major consequences on the financial stability of the nation. This restructure of the population (that change the shape of the population pyramid , as a result, on the one hand, of the reducing in the fertility rate, on the other hand, increasing in life expectancy and last but not least, due to migration, unbalance national budgets, generating negative effects in economic, financial and social terms.

  11. 5 CFR 2634.401 - General considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... or control of the trust, such as investment counsel, investment advisers, accountants, or tax... and beneficiary taxes. For tax purposes, because a trust is a separate entity distinct from its beneficiaries, a trustee must file an annual fiduciary tax return for the trust (IRS Form 1041). In addition...

  12. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  13. System cost - a criterion for the economic comparison of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliffe, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    The concept of electricity cost for a single station is derived from general considerations of profitability, including the effect of inflation. This derivation leads to the further one of system cost which is especially relevant to fast reactors in that plutonium is automatically allowed for. (author)

  14. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  15. Reactor safety research. The CEC contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krischer, W.

    1990-01-01

    The involvement of the EC Commission in the reactor safety research dates back almost to the implementation of the EURATOM Treaty and has thus lasted for thirty years. The need for close collaboration and for general consensus on some crucial problems of concern to the public, has made the role of international organizations and, as far as Europe is concerned, the role of the European Community particularly important. The areas in which the CEC has been active during the last five years are widespread. This is partly due to the fact that, after TMI and Chernobyl, the effort and the interest of the different countries in reactor safety was considerable. Reactor Safety Research represents the proceedings of a seminar held by the Commission at the end of its research programme 1984-88 on reactor safety. As such it gives a comprehensive overview of the recent activities and main results achieved in the CEC Joint Research Centre and in national laboratories throughout Europe on the basis of shared cost actions. In a concluding chapter the book reports on the opinions, expressed during a panel by a group of major exponents, on the needs for future research. The main topics addressed are, with particular reference to Light Water Reactors (LWRS): reliability and risk evaluation, inspection of steel components, primary circuit components end-of-life prediction, and abnormal behaviour of reactor cooling systems. As far as LMFBRs are concerned, the topics covered are: severe accident modelling, material properties and structural behaviour studies. There are 67 pages, all of which are indexed separately. Reactor Safety Research will be of particular interest to reliability and safety engineers, nuclear engineers and technicians, and mechanical and structural engineers. (author)

  16. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12 ENFIR), 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  17. Gas fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardelli, H. da C.

    1976-03-01

    The equations of motion for both gas and particles in a gas fluidised system are stablished through general assumptions which are generally accepted on physical grounds. The resulting model is used to study the velocity fields of each phase in the case of an isolated bubble rising close to the flat distributor plate. A well posed problem results for the solution of Laplace's equation of the potential flow of the particles when consideration is given to the presence of the distributor as a boundary condition. The corresponding stream functions are also obtained which enable the drawing of the motion patterns using numerical techniques. The following two dimensional cases are analysed: S/b=1; S/b=1,5; S/b=2,5; S/b=5 and the limiting case S/b→αinfinite. The results for the interphase exchange between bubbles and particulate phases are applied to a gas fluidised bed reactor and its effect on the chemical conversion is studied for the simplest cases of piston flow and perfect mixing in the particulate phase [pt

  18. International Working Group on Fast Reactors Second Annual Meeting. Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The Agenda of the Meeting was as follows: Opening of the meeting. 2. Appraisal of the IWGFB's activity for the period from the first annual meeting of the Group. 3. Comments on national programmes on fast breeder reactors. 4. Presentation of general findings and conclusions of national and regional meetings on fast reactor problems held in represented countries and international organisations last year. 5. Comments on the programmes of international meetings on fast reactors to be held in 1969. 6. Consideration of a schedule for meetings on fast reactors in 1970. 7. Suggestions for the topics and location of specialists' meetings in 1969-1970. 8. Suggestions for reviews and studies in the field of fast reactors. 9. The time and place of the third annual meeting of the IWGFR. 10. Closing of the meeting

  19. Effect of reactor finiteness on the boundary condition at the surface of a booster section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassef, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Effect of reactor finiteness on the boundary condition at the surface of an absorbing booster embedded in the reactor core is studied and formulated. The model used in these calculations depends on the Pl-Transport coupling technique. This method takes into consideration the rigorous neutron transport behavior inside the booster medium, while the Pl-approximation in the bulk of the scattering medium surrounding the booster which can be considered infinite in most practical applications. The neutron flux gradient parallel to the surface of the booster is considered. The geometrical configuration of the reactor core cross section is circular or rectangular. Finiteness of the reactor is introduced in the general formulation through its dimensions or buckling. Extensive numerical results are given to demonstrate the dependence of the boundary condition at the surface of the booster section on the reactor finiteness and the different physical parameters

  20. Reactor as furnace and reactor as lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldanskii, V.I.

    1992-01-01

    There are presented general characteristics of the following ways of transforming of nuclear energy released in reactors into chemical : ordinary way (i.e. trough the heat, mechanical energy and electricity); chemonuclear synthesis ; use of high-temperature fuel elements (reactor as furnace); use of the mixed nγ-radiation of reactors; use of the radiation loops; radiation - photochemical synthesis (reactor as lamp). Advantage and disadvantages of all above variants are compared. The yield of the primary product of fixation of nitrogen (nitric oxide NO) in reactor with the high-temperature (above ca. 1900degC) fuel elements (reactor-furnace) can exceed W ∼ 200 kg per gram of burned uranium. For the latter variant (reactor-lamp) the yield of chemical products can reach W ∼ 60 kg. per gram of uranium. Such values of W are close to or even strongly exceed the yields of chemical products for other abovementioned variants and - what is particularly important - are not connected to the necessity of archscrupulous removal of radioactive contamination of products. (author)

  1. Decommissioning of the Nuclear Reactors R2 and R2-0 at Studsvik, Sweden. General Data as called for under Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the plans for decommissioning of the nuclear research and material test reactors R2 and R2-0, situated at the Studsvik site close to the city of Nykoeping, Sweden. The purpose of the document is to serve as information for the European Commission, and to fulfil the requirements of Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty. Studsvik is situated on the Baltic coast, about 20 km east of Nykoeping and 80 km southwest of Stockholm. The site comprises the reactors R2 and R2-0 and several facilities for material investigation and radioactive waste treatment and storage. The reactors were used for a number of different purposes from 1960 until June 2005, when they were shut down following a decision by the operator. Decommissioning of the reactor facility is planned to be completed in 2016 after dismantling and conditioning of radioactive parts and demolition of the facility. Solid and liquid radioactive wastes from the dismantling activities will be treated and stored on-site awaiting final disposal. The waste treatment facilities, which are situated in other buildings at the Studsvik site, are planned to continue operation during and after the decommissioning of the reactor facility. All nuclear fuel has been transferred to a separate storage facility and is being shipped to the US according to existing agreements. The objective of the planned dismantling activities is to achieve clearance of the facility to make it possible to either demolish the buildings or use them for other purposes. The operator has divided the planning for dismantling and demolition of the facility into three phases [1]: Dismantling 1, including primary system decontamination, dismantling of the reactors with systems in the reactor pool, draining, cleaning and temporary covering of the reactor pool. This phase has begun and is due to last till approximately December 2009. Dismantling 2, including dismantling of systems in the reactor facility, removal of equipment, radiological

  2. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  3. Reactor physics challenges in GEN-IV reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, Michael K.; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the reactor physics aspects of GENeration Four (GEN-IV) advanced reactors is presented, emphasizing how their special requirements for enhanced sustainability, safety and economics motivates consideration of features not thoroughly analyzed in the past. The resulting concept-specific requirements for better data and methods are surveyed, and some approaches and initiatives are suggested to meet the challenges faced by the international reactor physics community. No unresolvable impediments to successful development of any of the six major types of proposed reactors are identified, given appropriate and timely devotion of resources

  4. Reactor physics challenges in GEN-IV reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, Michael K.; Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA (United States)

    2005-02-15

    An overview of the reactor physics aspects of GENeration Four (GEN-IV) advanced reactors is presented, emphasizing how their special requirements for enhanced sustainability, safety and economics motivates consideration of features not thoroughly analyzed in the past. The resulting concept-specific requirements for better data and methods are surveyed, and some approaches and initiatives are suggested to meet the challenges faced by the international reactor physics community. No unresolvable impediments to successful development of any of the six major types of proposed reactors are identified, given appropriate and timely devotion of resources.

  5. Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor systems engineering. Fourth edition, Volume Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1994-01-01

    This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in the design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new materials on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: the systems concept, design decisions, and information tools; energy transport; reactor fuel management and energy cost considerations; environmental effects of nuclear power and waste management; nuclear reactor safety and regulation; power reactor systems; plant operations; and advanced plants and the future

  6. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  7. General meeting. Technical reunion: the numerical and experimental simulation applied to the Reactor Physics; Assemblee generale. Reunion technique: la simulation numerique et experimentale appliquee a la physique des reacteurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-10-01

    The SFEN (French Society on Nuclear Energy), organized the 18 october 2001 at Paris, a technical day on the numerical and experimental simulation, applied to the reactor Physics. Nine aspects were discussed, giving a state of the art in the domain:the french nuclear park; the future technology; the controlled thermonuclear fusion; the new organizations and their implications on the research and development programs; Framatome-ANP markets and industrial code packages; reactor core simulation at high temperature; software architecture; SALOME; DESCARTES. (A.L.B.)

  8. An overview of future sustainable nuclear power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poullikkas, Andreas [Electricity Authority of Cyprus, P.O. Box 24506, 1399 Nicosia (Cyprus)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper an overview of the current and future nuclear power reactor technologies is carried out. In particular, the nuclear technology is described and the classification of the current and future nuclear reactors according to their generation is provided. The analysis has shown that generation II reactors currently in operation all around the world lack significantly in safety precautions and are prone to loss of coolant accident (LOCA). In contrast, generation III reactors, which are an evolution of generation II reactors, incorporate passive or inherent safety features that require no active controls or operational intervention to avoid accidents in the event of malfunction, and may rely on gravity, natural convection or resistance to high temperatures. Today, partly due to the high capital cost of large power reactors generating electricity and partly due to the consideration of public perception, there is a shift towards the development of smaller units. These may be built independently or as modules in a larger complex, with capacity added incrementally as required. Small reactors most importantly benefit from reduced capital costs, simpler units and the ability to produce power away from main grid systems. These factors combined with the ability of a nuclear power plant to use process heat for co-generation, make the small reactors an attractive option. Generally, modern small reactors for power generation are expected to have greater simplicity of design, economy of mass production and reduced installation costs. Many are also designed for a high level of passive or inherent safety in the event of malfunction. Generation III+ designs are generally extensions of the generation III concept, which include advanced passive safety features. These designs can maintain the safe state without the use of any active control components. Generation IV reactors, which are future designs that are currently under research and development, will tend to have closed

  9. Design considerations for on-site spent-fuel transfer systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Jones, C.R.

    1989-06-01

    Studies on spent fuel shipping logistics and operation make it clear that the use of large casks, i.e., 100--125 tons, is superior to smaller casks of similar construction. This superiority manifests itself in both transportation and/or shipping economics and safety as well as reduced personnel exposure in the processing of the casks. An on-site system for the transfer of spent fuel from the storage pool to a large shipping or storage cask, as well as the transfer of spent fuel directly from a storage cask to a shipping cask, could bring the large cask benefits to those restricted reactors. Sensing the need to look more closely at this opportunity, EPRI contracted with S. Levy, Incorporated of Campbell, CA to develop a set of design considerations for such transfer systems. Rather then embark on another design study, EPRI decided to first identify the system considerations that must be factored into any design. The format for this effort presents both the Consideration and the Rationale for the consideration. The resulting work identified thirty-six General Considerations and two Special Considerations. The Considerations are in the form of mandatory requirements and desirable but nonmandatory requirements. Additionally, a brief economic study was performed to get a feel for the cost considerations of on-site transfers. The study results suggest a relatively narrow set of scenarios where on-site transfers are economically superior to alternatives. These scenarios generally involve the use of concrete casks as on-site storage devices

  10. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  11. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  12. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  13. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  14. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  15. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  16. THE EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP. GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS / EL LIDERAZGO EDUCATIVO. CONSIDERACIONES GENERALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique José Marañón Rodríguez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article treats some questions related with the leadership and the educative leadership. It is only an approach to the topic that requires of its continuity to be able to treat it more thoroughly. Given the demands of the pedagogic pattern in which the formation of professionals is sustained -at the moment, in the Cuban university in the new called universialisation - that is focused in the dimensions: instructive, educational and developmental, it confers a degree of such integrality that requires that the professor's list causes in the student a transformation process in which, through the appropriation and construction of the experience and the culture, takes place the growth and the personal development, effect that could be achieved, among other, with the development of the educative leadership.RESUMENEl presente artículo trata algunas cuestiones relacionadas con el liderazgo y el liderazgo educativo. Es sólo un acercamiento al tema que requiere de su continuidad para poder tratarlo más ampliamente. Dadas las exigencias del modelo pedagógico en que se sustenta la formación de profesionales en la universidad cubana –actualmente en nuevo estadio de universalización- que se enfoca en las dimensiones: instructiva, educativa y desarrolladora, le confieren un grado de integralidad tal, que requiere que el rol del profesor provoque en el estudiante un proceso de transformación en el que, a través de la apropiación y construcción de la experiencia y la cultura se produzca el crecimiento y el desarrollo personal, efecto que podría lograrse, entre otros, con el desarrollo del liderazgo educativo.

  17. Environmental effects on fatigue of steels for structural parts in water-steam-circuits of light water reactors. Considerations concerning the question of transferability of results from laboratory tests to real operating conditions; Der Einfluss des Mediums auf Ermuedungsvorgaenge in Staehlen fuer Strukturbauteile in Wasser-Dampf-Kreislaeufen von Leichtwasserreaktoren. Ueberlegungen zur Frage der Uebertragbarkeit von Ergebnissen aus Laborversuchen auf den realen Anlagenbetrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Armin [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Based on material science and physical chemistry it seems plausible that a corrosive medium can influence the fatigue behaviour of structural materials, i.e. steels. It has been shown decades before that high temperature water has significant effects on the fatigue behaviour of steels, decreasing the crack initiation time or increasing the growth rate of existing cracks. At the beginning of nuclear regulations this expected influence of the medium on fatigue of components of nuclear power plants was worldwide not accounted for in the relevant standards (for instance ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, section III). There was a general consideration of medium effects on the da/dN crack growth curves in the ASME Code, section XI for the assessment of the surface flaw behaviour during operation. Historically, these regulations were implemented long before the experimental observation of medium effects on crack initiation and crack growth during fatigue of steels in high-temperature water. Besides this fact there have been worldwide no generic, systematic damages of medium containing components in light-water reactors due to corrosion fatigue. Singular damages with significant medium influenced fatigue features could always be explained by not specified operational transients, like thermal stratification or local flow-induced vibrations. The contribution provides considerations that explain the discrepancy between to worldwide positive operational experience and the definitive experimental indication of a medium-enhanced fatigue. Based on these considerations the author scrutinizes critically the US NRC Regulatory Guide 1.207 with respect to the medium influence on the component's fatigue behaviour. Possibilities for experimental assessment of the discussed hypothesis are shown. [German] Es erscheint aus werkstoffkundlichen und physikalisch-chemischen Gruenden grundsaetzlich plausibel, dass ein korrosives Medium das Ermuedungsverhalten von Strukturwerkstoffen, z

  18. The effect of heavy water reactors and liquid fuel reactors on the long-term development of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, P.; Wiechers, W.K.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the rates at which various combinations of power reactor types are installed on the long-range (to the year 2040) uranium and plutonium inventory requirements are examined. Consideration is given to light water reactors, fast breeder reactors, high temperature gas-cooled reactors, heavy water reactors, and thermal breeder reactors, in various combinations, and assuming alternatively a 3% and a 5% growth in energy demand

  19. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  20. Fast breeder reactors an engineering introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, A M

    1981-01-01

    Fast Breeder Reactors: An Engineering Introduction is an introductory text to fast breeder reactors and covers topics ranging from reactor physics and design to engineering and safety considerations. Reactor fuels, coolant circuits, steam plants, and control systems are also discussed. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with a brief summary of the history of fast reactors, with emphasis on international and the prospect of making accessible enormous reserves of energy. The next chapter deals with the physics of fast reactors and considers calculation methods, flux distribution,

  1. Potential of thorium use in the HTR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann, P.; Hansen, U.; Kolb, G.; Leushacke, D.; Teuchert, E.; Werner, H.

    1979-08-01

    In this investigation, several types of reactors and fuel circulations are dealt with as they refer to the region of the Federal Republic of Germany and are compared with each other as to their need for uranium and their costs until 2100. This includes also an investigation covering the effects of a postponed application of uranium-saving reactors, a delayed reprocessing and two variants of the nuclear energy's contribution to electricity generation. After today's light water reactor (LWR) of the pressure water reactor type (DWR) and the sodium-cooled fast breeder (SBR) which is being developed, the technically rather developed helium-cooled high temperature reactor (HTR) is dealt with as another system. The high temperature reactor is, because of its high coolant temperatures, not only suitable as a nuclear power plant, but can also be used to substitute fossile energy sources on the heat market and is being developed in Germany also for use as process heat reactor for nuclear coal gasification. Here the application of nuclear energy is only considered with regard to the region of power generation. Besides the case of the LWR and HTR-operation without reprocessing and fuel recycling for all reactor systems, the calculations also take into consideration the case of the closed fuel recycling. While LWR and SBR are based on the uranium-plutonium-fuel recycling, the thorium-uranium fuel circulation is considered for the HTR with globular fuel elements. As investigations made until today are generally restricted to the system LWR/SBR and the uranium-plutonium circulation, a main concern of the investigations presented here is to show the potential of the Thorium-utilization in high-temperature reactors and to determine how this system can also be applied during the time period concerned to set up a nuclear energy strategy which is safe and profitable as far as the uranium supply is concerned. (orig./UA) 891 UA/orig.- 892 HIS [de

  2. Improved nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. A generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounds the reactor vessel and a central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and supports the bottom wall of the reactor vessel and the reactor core. The periphery of the reactor vessel bore is supported by an annular structure which allows thermal expansion but not seismic motion of the vessel, and a bed of thermally insulating material uniformly supports the vessel base whilst allowing expansion thereof. A guard ring prevents lateral seismic motion of the upper end of the reactor vessel. The periphery of the core is supported by an annular structure supported by the vessel base and keyed to the vessel wall so as to be able to expand but not undergo seismic motion. A deck is supported on the containment structure above the reactor vessel open top by annular bellows, the deck carrying the reactor control rods such that heating of the reactor vessel results in upward expansion against the control rods. (author)

  3. Numerical solution for identification of feedback coefficients in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebizuka, Yoshie; Sakai, Hideo

    1975-01-01

    Quasilinearization technique was studied to determine the Kinetic parameters of nuclear reactors. The method of solution was generalized to the determination of the parameters contained in a nonlinear system with nonlinear boundary conditions. A computer program, SNR-3, was developed to solve the resulting nonlinear two-point boundary value equations with generalized boundary conditions. In this paper, the problem formulation and the method of solution are explained for a general type of time dependent problem. A flow chart shows the procedure of numerical solution. The method was then applied to the determination of the critical factor and the reactivity feedback coefficients of reactors to investigate the accuracy and the applicability of the present method. The results showed that the present method was considerably successful, but that the random observation error effected the results of the identification. (Aoki, K.)

  4. Alternative breeder reactor technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.

    1978-01-01

    The significance of employing breeder reactors to stretch the world resources of nuclear fuels is briefly discussed, and the various types of breeder concepts are described. General descriptions, advantages, and disadvantages of the liquid metal cooled fast breeder, gas cooled fast breeder, molten salt breeder, thermal breeders, and spectral-shift control reactors are presented. Aspects of safeguarding fissile material connected with breeder operation are examined. 31 references

  5. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  6. Generalities on the dynamic behaviour of rapid reactors. Preliminary studies on Rapsodie; Generalites sur le comportement dynamique des piles rapides. Etudes preliminaires de rapsodie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campan, J L; Chaumont, J P; Clauzon, P P; Ghesquiere, G; Leduc, J; Schmitt, A P; Zaleski, C P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The study of the dynamic behaviour of fast reactors may be divided into three section: 1. Stability studies around equilibrium power only the linear case was examining. S. Transient studies in the case of usual reactor operation (shut down, scram, etc.) with thermal shocks evaluation, for instance. 3. Explosion studies, for the maximum credible accidents. This report presents the status of the studies performed at the 'Physics Research Department' at Cadarache. Methods used are detailed and illustrated with the results obtained on a preliminary metallic core of the Rapsodie Reactor. (authors) [French] Le comportement dynamique des piles rapides, se presente tout naturellement sous trois aspects: 1. Etude de stabilite autour d'un regime d'equilibre (nous nous sommes bornes ici au cas lineaire). 2. Etude de regimes transitoires lors des operations normales de pile (arret, arret d'urgence, etc.) avec evaluation des chocs thermiques par exemple. 3. Etude des regimes transitoires de caractere explosif lors des accidents les plus graves possibles. Ce rapport presente l'etat des etudes a la date du 20 decembre 1961 a la Section d'Etudes de Piles Rapides a CADARACHE. Les methodes employees ont ete detaillees et illustrees a partir des resultats obtenus sur une premiere version 'combustible metallique' de Rapsodie. (auteurs)

  7. Fourth Generation Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtek, A.

    2008-01-01

    were selected to generation IV by the GIF to further studies: Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR), Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). These six systems would each need a dedicated effort in research and development. Some consideration for the fuel and recycling technology are common and can be shared. These common areas encompass: fuel cycles, fuels and materials choice, energy products, risk and safety, economics and proliferation and physical protection concerns.(author)

  8. Mines vs reactors: comparison of radiation problems and solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation protection in uranium mines and nuclear reactors is compared, with the objective of determining if any radiation protection practices which have worked well in one area can be adapted to the other area, especially from reactors to mines since radiation protection is more highly developed in reactors. Several areas are identified where improvements can be made in radiation protection in mines, the most important being improvement in ventilation at the workplace, greater attention to special monitoring during upset conditions, and a need for a substantial increase in radiation protection staff. It is concluded that, although considerable room exists for improvement, the general approach to radiation protection presently being followed seems appropriate for the circumstances encountered in mining

  9. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  10. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  11. Radiation protection at new reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brissaud, A.

    2000-01-01

    The theoretical knowledge and the feedback of operating experience concerning radiations in reactors is now considerable. It is available to the designer in the form of predictive softwares and data bases. Thus, it is possible to include the radiation protection component throughout all the design process. In France, the existing reactors have not been designed with quantified radiation protection targets, although considerable efforts have been made to reduce sources of radiation illustrated by the decrease of the average dose rates (typically a factor 5 between the first 900 MWe and the last 1300 MWe units). The EDF ALARA PROJECT has demonstrated that good practises, radiation protection awareness, careful work organization had a strong impact on operation and maintenance work volume. A decrease of the average collective dose by a factor 2 has been achieved without noticeable modifications of the units. In the case of new nuclear facilities projects (reactor, intermediate storage facility,...), or special operations (such as steam generator replacement), quantified radiation protection targets are included in terms of collective and average individual doses within the frame of a general optimization scheme. The target values by themselves are less important than the application of an optimization process throughout the design. This is because the optimization process requires to address all the components of the dose, particularly the work volume for operation and maintenance. A careful study of this parameter contributes to the economy of the project (suppression of unecessary tasks, time-saving ergonomy of work sites). This optimization process is currently applied to the design of the EPR. General radiation protection provisions have been addressed during the basic design phase by applying general rules aiming at the reduction of sources and dose rates. The basic design optimization phase has mainly dealt with the possibility to access the containment at full

  12. Risk-assessment methodology for fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.

    1976-04-01

    The methods applied or proposed for risk assessment of nuclear reactors are reviewed, particularly with respect to their applicability for risk assessment of future commercial fast breeder reactors. All methods are based on the calculation of accident consequences for relatively few accident scenarios. The role and general impact of uncertainties in fast-reactor accident analysis are discussed. The discussion shows the need for improvement of the methodology. A generalized and improved risk-assessment methodology is outlined and proposed (accident-spectra-progression approach). The generalization consists primarily of an explicit treatment of uncertainties throughout the accident progression. The results of this method are obtained in form of consequence distributions. The width and shape of the distributions depend in part on the superposition of the uncertainties. The first moment of the consequence distribution gives an improved prediction of the ''average'' consequence. The higher-consequence moments can be used for consideration of risk aversion. The assessment of the risk of one or a certain number of nuclear reactors can only provide an ''isolated'' risk assessment. The general problem of safety risk assessment and its relation to public acceptance of certain modes of power production is a much broader problem area, which is also discussed

  13. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  14. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  15. Decommissioning of the Nuclear Reactors R2 and R2-0 at Studsvik, Sweden. General Data as called for under Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-01-15

    This document describes the plans for decommissioning of the nuclear research and material test reactors R2 and R2-0, situated at the Studsvik site close to the city of Nykoeping, Sweden. The purpose of the document is to serve as information for the European Commission, and to fulfil the requirements of Article 37 of the Euratom Treaty. Studsvik is situated on the Baltic coast, about 20 km east of Nykoeping and 80 km southwest of Stockholm. The site comprises the reactors R2 and R2-0 and several facilities for material investigation and radioactive waste treatment and storage. The reactors were used for a number of different purposes from 1960 until June 2005, when they were shut down following a decision by the operator. Decommissioning of the reactor facility is planned to be completed in 2016 after dismantling and conditioning of radioactive parts and demolition of the facility. Solid and liquid radioactive wastes from the dismantling activities will be treated and stored on-site awaiting final disposal. The waste treatment facilities, which are situated in other buildings at the Studsvik site, are planned to continue operation during and after the decommissioning of the reactor facility. All nuclear fuel has been transferred to a separate storage facility and is being shipped to the US according to existing agreements. The objective of the planned dismantling activities is to achieve clearance of the facility to make it possible to either demolish the buildings or use them for other purposes. The operator has divided the planning for dismantling and demolition of the facility into three phases [1]: Dismantling 1, including primary system decontamination, dismantling of the reactors with systems in the reactor pool, draining, cleaning and temporary covering of the reactor pool. This phase has begun and is due to last till approximately December 2009. Dismantling 2, including dismantling of systems in the reactor facility, removal of equipment, radiological

  16. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  17. TRIGA reactor as an experimental tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nahrul Khair bin Alang Mohammad Rashid (PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia))

    1981-01-01

    Article reviewed on the general features, operation and capabilities, and utilization of a research reactor, PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II. The paper also described the arrangements for the use of the PUSPATI reactor.

  18. Triga reactor as an experimental tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahrul Khair bin Alang Mohammad Rashid

    1981-01-01

    Article reviewed on the general features, operation and capabilities, and utilization of a research reactor, PUSPATI TRIGA MARK II. The paper also described the arrangements for the use of the PUSPATI reactor

  19. Nuclear future: thinking for building. Proceedings of the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications; 8. General congress on nuclear energy; 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These proceedings, for the first time, present jointly the 12. Brazilian national meeting on reactor physics and thermal hydraulics (12. ENFIR), the 8. General congress on nuclear energy (8. CGEN), and the 5. Brazilian national meeting on nuclear applications (5. ENAN). The main theme of discussion was: 'Nuclear Future: thinking for building'. The papers have analysed the progresses of peaceful utilization of nuclear technology and its forecasting for the beginning of the new millennium. The construction of Angra-3 nuclear power plant have been discussed

  20. Digital control of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crump, J.C. III.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    Research reactors provide an important service for the nuclear industry. Developments and innovations used for research reactors can be later applied to larger power reactors. Their relatively inexpensive cost allows research reactors to be an excellent testing ground for the reactors of tomorrow. One area of current interest is digital control of research reactor systems. Digital control systems offer the benefits of implementation and superior system response over their analog counterparts. At McClellan Air Force Base in Sacramento, California, the Stationary Neutron Radiography System (SNRS) uses a 1,000-kW TRIGA reactor for neutron radiography and other nuclear research missions. The neutron radiography beams generated by the reactor are used to detect corrosion in aircraft structures. While the use of the reactor to inspect intact F-111 wings is in itself noteworthy, there is another area in which the facility has applied new technology: the instrumentation and control system (ICS). The ICS developed by General Atomics (GA) contains several new and significant items: (a) the ability to servocontrol on three rods, (b) the ability to produce a square wave, and (c) the use of a software configurator to tune parameters affected by the actual reactor core dynamics. These items will probably be present in most, if not all, future research reactors. They were developed with increased control and overall usefulness of the reactor in mind

  1. Advanced reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to what the aims of advanced reactor development have to be, if a new generation of nuclear power is really to play an important role in man's energy generation activities in a fragile environment. The background given briefly covers present atmospheric evidence, the current situation in nuclear power, how reactors work and what can go wrong with them, and the present magnitudes of world energy generation. The central part of the paper describes what is currently being done in advanced reactor development and what can be expected from various systems and various elements of it. A vigorous case is made that three elements must be present in any advanced reactor development: (1) breeding; (2) passive safety; and (3) shorter-live nuclear waste. All three are possible. In the right advanced reactor systems the ways of achieving them are known. But R and D is necessary. That is the central argument made in the paper. Not advanced reactor prototype construction at this point, but R and D itself. (author)

  2. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  3. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  4. Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report: German Pebble Bed Reactor design and technology review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    This report describes and evaluates several gas-cooled reactor plant concepts under development within the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The concepts, based upon the use of a proven Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) fuel element design, include nuclear heat generation for chemical processes and electrical power generation. Processes under consideration for the nuclear process heat plant (PNP) include hydrogasification of coal, steam gasification of coal, combined process, and long-distance chemical heat transportation. The electric plant emphasized in the report is the steam turbine cycle (HTR-K), although the gas turbine cycle (HHT) is also discussed. The study is a detailed description and evaluation of the nuclear portion of the various plants. The general conclusions are that the PBR technology is sound and that the HTR-K and PNP plant concepts appear to be achievable through appropriate continuing development programs, most of which are either under way or planned

  5. 5 CFR 330.206 - Job consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Job consideration. 330.206 Section 330..., SELECTION, AND PLACEMENT (GENERAL) Reemployment Priority List (RPL) § 330.206 Job consideration. (a)(1) An eligible employee under § 330.203 is entitled to consideration for positions in the commuting area for...

  6. 46 CFR 175.550 - Special consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special consideration. 175.550 Section 175.550 Shipping...) GENERAL PROVISIONS § 175.550 Special consideration. In applying the provisions of this subchapter, the OCMI may give special consideration to authorizing departures from the specific requirements when...

  7. Irradiation of members of the general public from radioactive caesium following the Chernobyl reactor accident. Field studies in a highly contaminated area in the Bryansk region, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, C

    2000-11-01

    From 1990 to 1999, estimations of the effective dose from external as well as internal irradiation from {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs were carried out for inhabitants in rural villages in the Bryansk region, Russia, highly contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The villages were situated about 180 km from the Chernobyl power plant and the deposition of {sup 137}Cs was in the range 0.9-2.7 MBq/m{sup 2}. Yearly expeditions were conducted in autumn by members of the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmoe and Goeteborg, Institute of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg and the the first 5 years also by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The dose levels and their change in time were estimated for various groups of the general public. The body burden of {sup 134,137}Cs and hence, the effective dose, was estimated from measurements of the urinary concentration of cesium radionuclides, together with direct measurements of the body content using a portable detector. The effective dose from external irradiation was estimated from measurements with thermoluminescent dosemeters worn by the participants during one month each year. In a special case study, the changes in biokinetics of {sup 137}Cs during pregnancy was investigated in a woman with an unintended intake of {sup 137}Cs via mushrooms from a highly contaminated forest in the area. During pregnancy there is an increased excretion of cesium resulting in a biological half-time of cesium which was 54% of the half-time before pregnancy. The ratio of the {sup 137}Cs concentration in breast milk (Bq/l) to that in the mother's body (Bq/kg) was 15% one month after the child was born. The body burden of {sup 137}Cs in the Russian individuals calculated from the concentration of {sup 137}Cs in urine showed a good agreement with the body burden estimated from in vivo measurements in the same individuals. Normalisation of the cesium concentration in the urine samples by the use of potassium or

  8. Irradiation of members of the general public from radioactive caesium following the Chernobyl reactor accident. Field studies in a highly contaminated area in the Bryansk region, Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornberg, C.

    2000-11-01

    From 1990 to 1999, estimations of the effective dose from external as well as internal irradiation from 137 Cs and 134 Cs were carried out for inhabitants in rural villages in the Bryansk region, Russia, highly contaminated due to the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The villages were situated about 180 km from the Chernobyl power plant and the deposition of 137 Cs was in the range 0.9-2.7 MBq/m 2 . Yearly expeditions were conducted in autumn by members of the Departments of Radiation Physics in Malmoe and Goeteborg, Institute of Radiation Hygiene, St. Petersburg and the the first 5 years also by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. The dose levels and their change in time were estimated for various groups of the general public. The body burden of 134,137 Cs and hence, the effective dose, was estimated from measurements of the urinary concentration of cesium radionuclides, together with direct measurements of the body content using a portable detector. The effective dose from external irradiation was estimated from measurements with thermoluminescent dosemeters worn by the participants during one month each year. In a special case study, the changes in biokinetics of 137 Cs during pregnancy was investigated in a woman with an unintended intake of 137 Cs via mushrooms from a highly contaminated forest in the area. During pregnancy there is an increased excretion of cesium resulting in a biological half-time of cesium which was 54% of the half-time before pregnancy. The ratio of the 137 Cs concentration in breast milk (Bq/l) to that in the mother's body (Bq/kg) was 15% one month after the child was born. The body burden of 137 Cs in the Russian individuals calculated from the concentration of 137 Cs in urine showed a good agreement with the body burden estimated from in vivo measurements in the same individuals. Normalisation of the cesium concentration in the urine samples by the use of potassium or creatinine excretion was found to introduce systematic

  9. Reactor scram device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumasaka, Katsuyuki; Arashida, Genji; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1991-01-01

    In a control rod attaching structure in a reactor scram device of an FBR type reactor, an anti-rising mechanism proposed so far against external upward force upon occurrence of earthquakes relies on the engagement of a mechanical structure but temperature condition is not taken into consideration. Then, in the present invention, a material having curie temperature characteristics and which exhibits ferromagnetism only under low temperature condition and a magnet device are disposed to one of a movable control rod and a portion secured to the reactor. Alternatively, a bimetal member or a shape memory alloy which actuates to fix to the mating member only under low temperature condition is secured. The fixing device is adapted to operate so as to secure the control rods when the low temperature state is caused depending on the temperature condition. With such a constitution, when the control rods are separated from a driving device, they are prevented from rising even if they undergo external upward force due to earthquakes and so on, which can improve the reactor safety. (N.H.)

  10. Safety device for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquelin, Roland.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a safety device for a nuclear reactor, particularly a liquid metal (generally sodium) cooled fast reactor. This safety device includes an absorbing element with a support head connected by a disconnectable connector formed by the armature of an electromagnet at the end of an axially mobile vertical control rod. This connection is so designed that in the event of it becoming disconnected, the absorbing element gravity slides in a passage through the reactor core into an open container [fr

  11. Production reactor productivity improvement plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitz, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    The N Reactor complex, which is operated by UNC for DOE, is a unique facility and as such it is difficult to transfer technological developments and management innovations directly to the N Reactor operations. Therefore the approach to implementing an effective program was to start with the general systems philosophy and then progress into using those specific analytical and management techniques applicable to the unique situation (technologically and administratively) which existed at the N Reactor plant

  12. Review of the proposed materials of construction for the SBWR and AP600 advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.

    1994-06-01

    Two advanced light water reactor (LWR) concepts, namely the General Electric Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) and the Westinghouse Advanced Passive 600 MWe Reactor (AP600), were reviewed in detail by Argonne National Laboratory. The objectives of these reviews were to (a) evaluate proposed advanced-reactor designs and the materials of construction for the safety systems, (b) identify all aging and environmentally related degradation mechanisms for the materials of construction, and (c) evaluate from the safety viewpoint the suitability of the proposed materials for the design application. Safety-related systems selected for review for these two LWRs included (a) reactor pressure vessel, (b) control rod drive system and reactor internals, (c) coolant pressure boundary, (d) engineered safety systems, (e) steam generators (AP600 only), (f) turbines, and (g) fuel storage and handling system. In addition, the use of cobalt-based alloys in these plants was reviewed. The selected materials for both reactors were generally sound, and no major selection errors were found. It was apparent that considerable thought had been given to the materials selection process, making use of lessons learned from previous LWR experience. The review resulted in the suggestion of alternate an possibly better materials choices in a number of cases, and several potential problem areas have been cited

  13. EPR (European Pressurized Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This document presents the EPR (European Pressurized Reactor), a modernised version of PWRs which uses nuclear fission. It indicates to which category it belongs (third generation). It briefly describes its operation: recalls on nuclear fission, electricity production in a nuclear reactor. It presents and comments its characteristics: power, thermal efficiency, redundant systems for safety control, double protective enclosure, expected lifetime, use of MOX fuel, modular design. It discusses economic stakes (expected higher nuclear electricity competitiveness, but high construction costs), and safety challenges (design characteristics, critics by nuclear safety authorities about the safety data processing system). It presents the main involved actors (Areva, EDF) and competitors in the field of advanced reactors (Rosatom with its VVER 1200, General Electric with its ABWR and its ESBWR, Mitsubishi with its APWR, Westinghouse with its AP100) while outlining the importance of certifications and delays to obtain them. After having evoked key data on EPR fuel consumption, it indicates reactors under construction, evokes potential markets and perspectives

  14. Elements on reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, G.B.

    1998-01-01

    In order to achieve the two-fold goal of maximizing the energy obtained from reactor fuel and ensuring the large flexibility of plant operation in respect to safety regulations and keeping the reactor integrity the control of PWRs is generally based on real time monitoring and analysing of independent neutronic parameters: thermal power release, axial power distribution in the core and temperatures of the primary loop. Two control chains more or less coupled according to the control chosen mode are in charge of the control of these parameters. With the brief history of control in French power reactors the advanced X control mode adopted by Framatome for N4 plants is described in detail. A summary of N4 reactor control and protection system is included

  15. Small reactor operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    There is a potential need for small reactors in the future for applications such as district heating, electricity production at remote sites, and desalination. Nuclear power can provide these at low cost and with insignificant pollution. The economies required by the small scale application, and/or the remote location, require a review of the size and location of the operating staff. Current concepts range all the way from reactors which are fully automatic, and need no local attention for days or weeks, to those with reduced local staff. In general the less dependent a reactor is on local human intervention, the greater its dependence on intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low-stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. A case study of the design and licensing of the SLOWPOKE Energy System heating reactor is presented. (author)

  16. Considerations about energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lelek, V.

    2010-01-01

    As in any branch also in nuclear reactors there are attempts to forecast future as from the technology point of view so from the amount and economic effectiveness of planned capacities. It is frequently forgotten that electricity and maybe further products from nuclear energy cannot be easy stored and that there is strong feedback among overall economy and energy in its different forms and general decrease of production leads to the decrease of electricity (oil, gas) use and even to the greater decrease of its prices. This altogether is leading to the demand of deeper understanding of the energy flow, including cross-frontier trade and supply and R and D planning including very long time intervals to keep industry and life standard, which may need new technology development and bringing to the functioning new industry branches. There are described various aspects of the problem and possible conclusions for us in the situation of growing public demands and decreasing raw material base. Material is based on works and presentations from the INPRO collaborative project RMI 'Meeting energy needs in the period of raw materials insufficiency during the twenty first century' and older works. (Author)

  17. Opinion on the examination of the control-command general architecture of the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor and of its associated platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    This report first recalls the different technical and hardware elements and components discussed by the ISRN (Nuclear Radioprotection and Safety Institute) in front of the Expert Permanent Group for nuclear reactors. These elements and components are concerning the control-command architecture as a whole, and the technical ability of networks, computers, and robots. It outlines the main principles which the control-and-command must comply with: compliance of each component of the retained technological solution with the design requirements corresponding to the safety classification, robustness of the whole control-command architecture. Then, it comments and sometimes criticizes the status of the various components of the control-command platforms with respect to this compliance. Eight recommendations are given for the SPPA T2000 control-command platform and for the robustness of the control-command architecture

  18. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naruse, Yoshihiro.

    1990-01-01

    The thickness of steel shell plates in a reactor container embedded in sand cussions is monitored to recognize the corrosion of the steel shell plates. That is, the reactor pressure vessel is contained in a reactor container shell and the sand cussions are disposed on the lower outside of the reactor container shell to elastically support the shell. A pit is disposed at a position opposing to the sand cussions for measuring the thickness of the reactor container shell plates. The pit is usually closed by a closing member. In the reactor container thus constituted, the closing member can be removed upon periodical inspection to measure the thickness of the shell plates. Accordingly, the corrosion of the steel shell plates can be recognized by the change of the plate thickness. (I.S.)

  19. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garabedian, G.

    1988-01-01

    A liquid reactor is described comprising: (a) a reactor vessel having a core; (b) one or more satellite tanks; (c) pump means in the satellite tank; (d) heat exchanger means in the satellite tank; (e) an upper liquid metal conduit extending between the reactor vessel and the satellite tank; (f) a lower liquid metal duct extending between the reactor vessel and satellite tanks the upper liquid metal conduit and the lower liquid metal duct being arranged to permit free circulation of liquid metal between the reactor vessel core and the satellite tank by convective flow of liquid metal; (g) a separate sealed common containment vessel around the reactor vessel, conduits and satellite tanks; (h) the satellite tank having space for a volume of liquid metal that is sufficient to dampen temperature transients resulting from abnormal operating conditions